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Sample records for spatial filtering velocimetry

  1. Spatial filtering velocimetry of objective speckles for measuring out-of-plane motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Yura, H. T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the distance between the object and the observation plane continuously changes. With the purpose of applying optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics, in order to measure out-of-plane motion in real time......, a rotational symmetric spatial filter is designed. The spatial filter converts the speckle dynamics into a photocurrent with a quasi-sinusoidal response to the out-of-plane motion. The spatial filter is here emulated with a CCD camera, and is tested on speckles arising from a real application. The analysis...

  2. Spatial filtering velocimetry for real-time out-of-plane displacement measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Yura, H.T.; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2016-01-01

    power spectrum of the photocurrent produced by this filter. This main contribution of this paper is a model, which describe the selectivity of the sensor, applied to speckle dynamics generated by an object moving out-of-plane. To motivate our interest in these filters we also present an all optical......We probe the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the axial distance between the object and the observation plane changes. With the purpose of measuring out-of-plane motion in real time, we apply optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics. To achieve this, a rotationally...... symmetric spatial filter is designed. The spatial filter converts the speckle dynamics into a photocurrent with a quasi-sinusoidal response to the out-of-plane motion. The selectivity of the sensor relates directly to the uncertainty on sensor measurements. The selectivity most be derived from a temporal...

  3. Speckle and fringe dynamics in imagingspeckle-pattern interferometry for spatial-filtering velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Iversen, Theis F. Q.; Yura, Harold T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of laser speckles and fringes, formed in an imaging-speckle-pattern interferometer with the purpose of sensing linear three-dimensional motion and out-of-plane components of rotation in real time, using optical spatial-filtering-velocimetry techniques. The ensemble......-average definition of the cross-correlation function is applied to the intensity distributions, obtained in the observation plane at two positions of the object. The theoretical analysis provides a description for the dynamics of both the speckles and the fringes. The analysis reveals that both the magnitude...... and direction of all three linear displacement components of the object movement can be determined. Simultaneously, out-ofplane rotation of the object including the corresponding directions can be determined from the spatial gradient of the in-plane fringe motion throughout the observation plane. The theory...

  4. Spatial filtering velocimetry revisited: exact short-time detecting schemes from arbitrarily small-size reticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, S; Nara, T; Kurihara, T

    2014-01-01

    Spatial filtering velocimetry was proposed in 1963 by Ator as a velocity-sensing technique for aerial camera-control systems. The total intensity of a moving surface is observed through a set of parallel-slit reticles, resulting in a narrow-band temporal signal whose frequency is directly proportional to the image velocity. However, even despite its historical importance and inherent technical advantages, the mathematical formulation of this technique is only valid when infinite-length observation in both space and time is possible, which causes significant errors in most applications where a small receptive window and high resolution in both axes are desired. In this study, we apply a novel mathematical technique, the weighted integral method, to solve this problem, and obtain exact sensing schemes and algorithms for finite (arbitrarily small but non-zero) size reticles and short-time estimation. Practical considerations for utilizing these schemes are also explored both theoretically and experimentally. (paper)

  5. Selectivity and balance of spatial filtering velocimetry of objective speckles for measuring out-of-plane motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Yura, Hal T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2015-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the axial distance between the object and the observation plane changes. With the purpose of measuring out-of-plane motion in real time, we apply optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics. To achieve this, a rotationally sym...

  6. Zero-crossing detection algorithm for arrays of optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Pedersen, Finn; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a zero-crossing detection algorithm for arrays of compact low-cost optical sensors based on spatial filtering for measuring fluctuations in angular velocity of rotating solid structures. The algorithm is applicable for signals with moderate signal-to-noise ratios, and delivers...... repeating the same measurement error for each revolution of the target, and to gain high performance measurement of angular velocity. The traditional zero-crossing detection is extended by 1) inserting an appropriate band-pass filter before the zero-crossing detection, 2) measuring time periods between zero...

  7. Spatial filtering velocimetry for real-time measurements of speckle dynamics due to out-of-plane motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2016-01-01

    rings. Each ring divides the incoming light into two radial-wise, almost even contributions and directs them by refraction toward two half-rings of photodetectors. The corresponding two photocurrents are balanced and provide a differential photocurrent. In this paper the optical spatial filtering...

  8. Batch statistical process control of a fluid bed granulation process using in-line spatial filter velocimetry and product temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraeve, A; Van den Kerkhof, T; Hellings, M; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C; De Beer, T

    2011-04-18

    Fluid bed granulation is a batch process, which is characterized by the processing of raw materials for a predefined period of time, consisting of a fixed spraying phase and a subsequent drying period. The present study shows the multivariate statistical modeling and control of a fluid bed granulation process based on in-line particle size distribution (PSD) measurements (using spatial filter velocimetry) combined with continuous product temperature registration using a partial least squares (PLS) approach. Via the continuous in-line monitoring of the PSD and product temperature during granulation of various reference batches, a statistical batch model was developed allowing the real-time evaluation and acceptance or rejection of future batches. Continuously monitored PSD and product temperature process data of 10 reference batches (X-data) were used to develop a reference batch PLS model, regressing the X-data versus the batch process time (Y-data). Two PLS components captured 98.8% of the variation in the X-data block. Score control charts in which the average batch trajectory and upper and lower control limits are displayed were developed. Next, these control charts were used to monitor 4 new test batches in real-time and to immediately detect any deviations from the expected batch trajectory. By real-time evaluation of new batches using the developed control charts and by computation of contribution plots of deviating process behavior at a certain time point, batch losses or reprocessing can be prevented. Immediately after batch completion, all PSD and product temperature information (i.e., a batch progress fingerprint) was used to estimate some granule properties (density and flowability) at an early stage, which can improve batch release time. Individual PLS models relating the computed scores (X) of the reference PLS model (based on the 10 reference batches) and the density, respectively, flowabililty as Y-matrix, were developed. The scores of the 4 test

  9. Application of adaptive Kalman filter in vehicle laser Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhe; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Bai, Jie; Liu, Jingyun

    2018-03-01

    Due to the variation of road conditions and motor characteristics of vehicle, great root-mean-square (rms) error and outliers would be caused. Application of Kalman filter in laser Doppler velocimetry(LDV) is important to improve the velocity measurement accuracy. In this paper, the state-space model is built by using current statistical model. A strategy containing two steps is adopted to make the filter adaptive and robust. First, the acceleration variance is adaptively adjusted by using the difference of predictive observation and measured observation. Second, the outliers would be identified and the measured noise variance would be adjusted according to the orthogonal property of innovation to reduce the impaction of outliers. The laboratory rotating table experiments show that adaptive Kalman filter greatly reduces the rms error from 0.59 cm/s to 0.22 cm/s and has eliminated all the outliers. Road experiments compared with a microwave radar show that the rms error of LDV is 0.0218 m/s, and it proves that the adaptive Kalman filtering is suitable for vehicle speed signal processing.

  10. Full-field particle velocimetry with a photorefractive optical novelty filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerdemann, Mike; Holtmann, Frank; Denz, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    We utilize the finite time constant of a photorefractive optical novelty filter microscope to access full-field velocity information of fluid flows on microscopic scales. In contrast to conventional methods such as particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry, not only image acquisition of the tracer particle field but also evaluation of tracer particle velocities is done all-optically by the novelty filter. We investigate the velocity dependent parameters of two-beam coupling based optical novelty filters and demonstrate calibration and application of a photorefractive velocimetry system. Theoretical and practical limits to the range of accessible velocities are discussed

  11. Spatial filter issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.E.; Estabrook, K.G.; Milam, D.; Sell, W.D.; Van Wonterghem, R.M.; Feil, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments and calculations indicate that the threshold pressure in spatial filters for distortion of a transmitted pulse scales approximately as I O.2 and (F number-sign) 2 over the intensity range from 10 14 to 2xlO 15 W/CM 2 . We also demonstrated an interferometric diagnostic that will be used to measure the scaling relationships governing pinhole closure in spatial filters

  12. Spatial filtring and thermocouple spatial filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bing; Tong Yunxian

    1989-12-01

    The design and study on thermocouple spatial filter have been conducted for the flow measurement of integrated reactor coolant. The fundamental principle of spatial filtring, mathematical descriptions and analyses of thermocouple spatial filter are given

  13. Staging with spatial filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is known that small scale beam instabilities limit the focusable energy that can be achieved from a terawatt laser chain. Spatial filters are currently being used on CYCLOPS to ameliorate this problem. Realizing the full advantage of such a filter, however, may require certain staging modifications. A staging methodology is discussed that should be applicable to the CYCLOPS, 381, and SHIVA systems. Experiments are in progress on CYCLOPS that will address directly the utility of the proposed approach

  14. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maigyte, Lina [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Rambla Sant Nebridi 22, Terrassa 08222 (Spain); Staliunas, Kestutis [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Rambla Sant Nebridi 22, Terrassa 08222 (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Pg. Lluís Companys 23, Barcelona 08010 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  15. Laser correlation velocimetry performance in diesel applications: spatial selectivity and velocity sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespel, Camille [Universite d' Orleans, Laboratoire PRISME, Orleans (France); Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Gazon, Matthieu; Godard, Gilles [CORIA, UMR 6614, CNRS, Universite et INSA de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2012-07-15

    The characterization of diesel jets in the near field of the nozzle exit still presents challenges for experimenters. Detailed velocity measurements are needed to characterize diesel injector performance and also to establish boundary conditions for CFD codes. The present article examines the efficiency of laser correlation velocimetry (LCV) applied to diesel spray characterization. A new optical configuration based on a long-distance microscope was tested, and special care was taken to examine the spatial selectivity of the technique. Results show that the depth of the measurement volume (along the laser beam) of LCV extends beyond the depth of field of the imaging setup. The LCV results were also found to be particularly sensitive to high-speed elements of a spray. Results from high-pressure diesel jets in a back-pressure environment indicate that this technique is particularly suited to the very near field of the nozzle exit, where the flow is the narrowest and where the velocity distribution is not too large. It is also shown that the performance of the LCV technique is controlled by the filtering and windowing parameters used in the processing of the raw signals. (orig.)

  16. Laser correlation velocimetry performance in diesel applications: spatial selectivity and velocity sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespel, Camille; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Gazon, Matthieu; Godard, Gilles

    2012-07-01

    The characterization of diesel jets in the near field of the nozzle exit still presents challenges for experimenters. Detailed velocity measurements are needed to characterize diesel injector performance and also to establish boundary conditions for CFD codes. The present article examines the efficiency of laser correlation velocimetry (LCV) applied to diesel spray characterization. A new optical configuration based on a long-distance microscope was tested, and special care was taken to examine the spatial selectivity of the technique. Results show that the depth of the measurement volume (along the laser beam) of LCV extends beyond the depth of field of the imaging setup. The LCV results were also found to be particularly sensitive to high-speed elements of a spray. Results from high-pressure diesel jets in a back-pressure environment indicate that this technique is particularly suited to the very near field of the nozzle exit, where the flow is the narrowest and where the velocity distribution is not too large. It is also shown that the performance of the LCV technique is controlled by the filtering and windowing parameters used in the processing of the raw signals.

  17. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Mario E., E-mail: mario.fajardo@eglin.af.mil; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N{sub 2} gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ{sub 0} ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N{sub 2} gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N{sub 2} vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N{sub 2} collisions. The minimum necessary N{sub 2} buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a

  18. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) study of rotating cylindrical filters for animal cell perfusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo-Cardero, Alvio; Chico, Ernesto; Castilho, Leda; de Andrade Medronho, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the main fluid flow features inside a rotating cylindrical filtration (RCF) system used as external cell retention device for animal cell perfusion processes were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The motivation behind this work was to provide experimental fluid dynamic data for such turbulent flow using a high-permeability filter, given the lack of information about this system in the literature. The results shown herein gave evidence that, at the boundary between the filter mesh and the fluid, a slip velocity condition in the tangential direction does exist, which had not been reported in the literature so far. In the RCF system tested, this accounted for a fluid velocity 10% lower than that of the filter tip, which could be important for the cake formation kinetics during filtration. Evidence confirming the existence of Taylor vortices under conditions of turbulent flow and high permeability, typical of animal cell perfusion RCF systems, was obtained. Second-order turbulence statistics were successfully calculated. The radial behavior of the second-order turbulent moments revealed that turbulence in this system is highly anisotropic, which is relevant for performing numerical simulations of this system. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  19. Spatial filtering precedes motion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M J

    1992-01-23

    When we perceive motion on a television or cinema screen, there must be some process that allows us to track moving objects over time: if not, the result would be a conflicting mass of motion signals in all directions. A possible mechanism, suggested by studies of motion displacement in spatially random patterns, is that low-level motion detectors have a limited spatial range, which ensures that they tend to be stimulated over time by the same object. This model predicts that the direction of displacement of random patterns cannot be detected reliably above a critical absolute displacement value (Dmax) that is independent of the size or density of elements in the display. It has been inferred that Dmax is a measure of the size of motion detectors in the visual pathway. Other studies, however, have shown that Dmax increases with element size, in which case the most likely interpretation is that Dmax depends on the probability of false matches between pattern elements following a displacement. These conflicting accounts are reconciled here by showing that Dmax is indeed determined by the spacing between the elements in the pattern, but only after fine detail has been removed by a physiological prefiltering stage: the filter required to explain the data has a similar size to the receptive field of neurons in the primate magnocellular pathway. The model explains why Dmax can be increased by removing high spatial frequencies from random patterns, and simplifies our view of early motion detection.

  20. Smooth- and rough-wall boundary layer structure from high spatial range particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, D. T.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Schultz, M. P.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Two particle image velocimetry arrangements are used to make true spatial comparisons between smooth- and rough-wall boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers across a very wide range of streamwise scales. Together, the arrangements resolve scales ranging from motions on the order of the Kolmogorov microscale to those longer than twice the boundary layer thickness. The rough-wall experiments were obtained above a continuous sandpaper sheet, identical to that used by Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196], and cover a range of friction and equivalent sand-grain roughness Reynolds numbers (12 000 ≲δ+≲ 18000, 62 ≲ks+≲104 ). The smooth-wall experiments comprise new and previously published data spanning 6500 ≲δ+≲17 000 . Flow statistics from all experiments show similar Reynolds number trends and behaviors to recent, well-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements above the same rough surface. Comparisons, at matched δ+, between smooth- and rough-wall two-point correlation maps and two-point magnitude-squared coherence maps demonstrate that spatially the outer region of the boundary layer is the same between the two flows. This is apparently true even at wall-normal locations where the total (inner-normalized) energy differs between the smooth and rough wall. Generally, the present results provide strong support for Townsend's [The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1956), Vol. 1] wall-similarity hypothesis in high Reynolds number fully rough boundary layer flows.

  1. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    , but the approach always yields point spread functions better or equal to a traditional dynamically focused image. Finally, the process was applied to in-vivo clinical images of the liver and right kidney from a 28 years old male. The data was obtained with a single element transducer focused at 100 mm....... A new method for making spatial matched filter focusing of RF ultrasound data is proposed based on the spatial impulse response description of the imaging. The response from a scatterer at any given point in space relative to the transducer can be calculated, and this gives the spatial matched filter...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  2. Virtual experiment of optical spatial filtering in Matlab environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yunjing; Wang, Chunyong; Song, Yang; Lai, Jiancheng; Wang, Qinghua; Qi, Jing; Shen, Zhonghua

    2017-08-01

    The principle of spatial filtering experiment has been introduced, and the computer simulation platform with graphical user interface (GUI) has been made out in Matlab environment. Using it various filtering processes for different input image or different filtering purpose will be completed accurately, and filtering effect can be observed clearly with adjusting experimental parameters. The physical nature of the optical spatial filtering can be showed vividly, and so experimental teaching effect will be promoted.

  3. Spectrometer Baseline Control Via Spatial Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, M. R.; Richey, C. R.; Rinehart, S. A.; Quijada, M. A.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    An absorptive half-moon aperture mask is experimentally explored as a broad-bandwidth means of eliminating spurious spectral features arising from reprocessed radiation in an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer. In the presence of the spatial filter, an order of magnitude improvement in the fidelity of the spectrometer baseline is observed. The method is readily accommodated within the context of commonly employed instrument configurations and leads to a factor of two reduction in optical throughput. A detailed discussion of the underlying mechanism and limitations of the method are provided.

  4. Spatial filters on demand based on aperiodic Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Gadonas, Roaldas [Laser Research Center, Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University (Lithuania); Staliunas, Kestutis [DONLL, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Terrassa (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-08-15

    Photonic Crystal spatial filters, apart from stand-alone spatial filtering function, can also suppress multi-transverse-mode operation in laser resonators. Here it is shown that such photonic crystals can be designed by solving the inverse problem: for a given spatial filtering profile. Optimized Photonic Crystal filters were fabricated in photosensitive glass. Experiments have shown that such filters provide a more pronounced filtering effect for total and partial transmissivity conditions. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Correlation of Spatially Filtered Dynamic Speckles in Distance Measurement Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper statistical properties of spatially filtered dynamic speckles are considered. This phenomenon was not sufficiently studied yet while spatial filtering is an important instrument for speckles velocity measurements. In case of spatial filtering speckle velocity information is derived from the modulation frequency of filtered light power which is measured by photodetector. Typical photodetector output is represented by a narrow-band random noise signal which includes non-informative intervals. Therefore more or less precious frequency measurement requires averaging. In its turn averaging implies uncorrelated samples. However, conducting research we found that correlation is typical property not only of dynamic speckle patterns but also of spatially filtered speckles. Using spatial filtering the correlation is observed as a response of measurements provided to the same part of the object surface or in case of simultaneously using several adjacent photodetectors. Found correlations can not be explained using just properties of unfiltered dynamic speckles. As we demonstrate the subject of this paper is important not only from pure theoretical point but also from the point of applied speckle metrology. E.g. using single spatial filter and an array of photodetector can greatly improve accuracy of speckle velocity measurements

  6. Speckle-based three-dimensional velocity measurement using spatial filtering velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Theis Faber Quist; Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2011-01-01

    pattern is formed in the observation plane of the imaging system due to reflection from an area of the object illuminated by a coherent light source. The speckle pattern translates in response to in-plane translation of the object, and the presence of an angular offset reference wave coinciding...

  7. Enhancement of blurred pictures by spatial filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolton, W.P.; Redman, J.D.

    Substantial improvement in the intelligibility of defocussed pictures has been demonstrated using coherent optical processing. Correction for penumbra effects, such as arise in radiography, has been demonstrated at optical wavelengths. Compensation for a Gaussian spread function, such as might occur in radiography via a salt screen, has also been demonstrated. A simulation has shown that much greater enhancement could be expected if improved phase filters could be made

  8. implementation of spatial domain homomorphic filtering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    on a Java-enabled mobile phone and form a low cost embedded image processing enhancement system. Keywords: Spatial ... important because of the wide range of applications that can ..... Co our Image Processi g” Ph D thesis U iversity of.

  9. Gated myocardial SPECT using spatial and temporal filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatton, R.L.; Hutton, B.F.; Kyme, A.Z.; Larcos, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Standard protocols for examining myocardial perfusion and motion defects involve the use of gated SPECT images, and a composite of the gated frames. This study examines the usefulness of extracting one or a combination of frames from the gated image to assess perfusion, and whether the addition of a temporal filter to the gated image improves signal to noise. Choice of the most appropriate frame was also considered. Sixteen and eight frame gated SPECT studies were simulated using the dynamic NURBS-based cardiac torso (NCAT) phantom. Variously sized perfusion defects were included in the inferior wall to assess contrast to normal tissue. Scatter and attenuation were not included. Butterworth spatial cutoff frequencies were varied to establish the most appropriate combination of temporal/spatial filters to reduce noise and retain contrast in the images. The 16 frame data produced higher ejection fraction across all spatial filter cutoffs, and generally was unaffected by temporal filtering. Temporal filtering reduced the noise in a uniform liver region in the gated images to within 25% of the composite image noise. The lesion extent and contrast were greater in the end-diastolic frames compared to end-systolic and mid-cycle frames. In conclusion, by using a temporally filtered end-diastolic image from the gated sequence, a favourable balance between noise and contrast can be achieved. Work is progress to confirm these findings in the clinical situation. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. Estimate of energy density on CYCLOPS spatial filter pinhole structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guch, S. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The inclusion of a spatial filter between the B and C stages in CYCLOPS to reduce the effects of small-scale beam self-focusing is discussed. An estimate is made of the energy density to which the pinhole will be subjected, and the survivability of various pinhole materials and designs is discussed

  11. Spatial filtering of light by chirped photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staliunas, Kestutis; Sanchez-Morcillo, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose an efficient method for spatial filtering of light beams by propagating them through two-dimensional (also three dimensional) chirped photonic crystals, i.e., through the photonic structures with fixed transverse lattice period and with the longitudinal lattice period varying along the direction of the beam propagation. We prove the proposed idea by numerically solving the paraxial propagation equation in refraction-index-modulated media and we evaluate the efficiency of the process by harmonic-expansion analysis. The technique can be also applied for filtering (for cleaning) of the packages of atomic waves (Bose condensates), also to improve the directionality of acoustic and mechanical waves.

  12. Reversible wavelet filter banks with side informationless spatially adaptive low-pass filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhayaratne, Charith

    2011-07-01

    Wavelet transforms that have an adaptive low-pass filter are useful in applications that require the signal singularities, sharp transitions, and image edges to be left intact in the low-pass signal. In scalable image coding, the spatial resolution scalability is achieved by reconstructing the low-pass signal subband, which corresponds to the desired resolution level, and discarding other high-frequency wavelet subbands. In such applications, it is vital to have low-pass subbands that are not affected by smoothing artifacts associated with low-pass filtering. We present the mathematical framework for achieving 1-D wavelet transforms that have a spatially adaptive low-pass filter (SALP) using the prediction-first lifting scheme. The adaptivity decisions are computed using the wavelet coefficients, and no bookkeeping is required for the perfect reconstruction. Then, 2-D wavelet transforms that have a spatially adaptive low-pass filter are designed by extending the 1-D SALP framework. Because the 2-D polyphase decompositions are used in this case, the 2-D adaptivity decisions are made nonseparable as opposed to the separable 2-D realization using 1-D transforms. We present examples using the 2-D 5/3 wavelet transform and their lossless image coding and scalable decoding performances in terms of quality and resolution scalability. The proposed 2-D-SALP scheme results in better performance compared to the existing adaptive update lifting schemes.

  13. Interactions of collimation, sampling and filtering on spect spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, B.M.W.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The major factors which affect the spatial resolution of single-photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) include collimation, sampling and filtering. A theoretical formulation is presented to describe the relationship between these factors and their effects on the projection data. Numerical calculations were made using commercially available SPECT systems and imaging parameters. The results provide an important guide for proper selection of the collimator-detector design, the imaging and the reconstruction parameters to avoid unnecessary spatial resolution degradation and aliasing artifacts in the reconstructed image. In addition, the understanding will help in the fair evaluation of different SPECT systems under specific imaging conditions

  14. Spatial filtering velocimeter for vehicle navigation with extended measurement range

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-05-01

    The idea of using spatial filtering velocimeter is proposed to provide accurate velocity information for vehicle autonomous navigation system. The presented spatial filtering velocimeter is based on a CMOS linear image sensor. The limited frame rate restricts high speed measurement of the vehicle. To extend measurement range of the velocimeter, a method of frequency shifting is put forward. Theoretical analysis shows that the frequency of output signal can be reduced and the measurement range can be doubled by this method when the shifting direction is set the same with that of image velocity. The approach of fast Fourier transform (FFT) is employed to obtain the power spectra of the spatially filtered signals. Because of limited frequency resolution of FFT, a frequency spectrum correction algorithm, called energy centrobaric correction, is used to improve the frequency resolution. The correction accuracy energy centrobaric correction is analyzed. Experiments are carried out to measure the moving surface of a conveyor belt. The experimental results show that the maximum measurable velocity is about 800deg/s without frequency shifting, 1600deg/s with frequency shifting, when the frame rate of the image is about 8117 Hz. Therefore, the measurement range is doubled by the method of frequency shifting. Furthermore, experiments were carried out to measure the vehicle velocity simultaneously using both the designed SFV and a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The measurement results of the presented SFV are coincident with that of the LDV, but with bigger fluctuation. Therefore, it has the potential of application to vehicular autonomous navigation.

  15. Spatial filtering of audible sound with acoustic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Tao, Jiancheng; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces manipulate waves with specially designed structures and achieve properties that natural materials cannot offer. Similar surfaces work in audio frequency range as well and lead to marvelous acoustic phenomena that can be perceived by human ears. Being intrigued by the famous Maoshan Bugle phenomenon, we investigate large scale metasurfaces consisting of periodic steps of sizes comparable to the wavelength of audio frequency in both time and space domains. We propose a theoretical method to calculate the scattered sound field and find that periodic corrugated surfaces work as spatial filters and the frequency selective character can only be observed at the same side as the incident wave. The Maoshan Bugle phenomenon can be well explained with the method. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to design acoustical landscapes, which transform impulsive sound into famous trumpet solos or other melodious sound.

  16. Fundamental Frequency and Model Order Estimation Using Spatial Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimian-Azari, Sam; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2014-01-01

    extend this procedure to account for inharmonicity using unconstrained model order estimation. The simulations show that beamforming improves the performance of the joint estimates of fundamental frequency and the number of harmonics in low signal to interference (SIR) levels, and an experiment......In signal processing applications of harmonic-structured signals, estimates of the fundamental frequency and number of harmonics are often necessary. In real scenarios, a desired signal is contaminated by different levels of noise and interferers, which complicate the estimation of the signal...... parameters. In this paper, we present an estimation procedure for harmonic-structured signals in situations with strong interference using spatial filtering, or beamforming. We jointly estimate the fundamental frequency and the constrained model order through the output of the beamformers. Besides that, we...

  17. Evaluation Of Spatial Filters For Background Suppression In Infrared Mosaic Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, T. L.; Mazaika, P. K.

    1982-12-01

    Spaceborne infrared mosaic sensors have been proposed for future surveillance systems. Because these systems will generate a large volume of data, background suppression will require algorithms which use innovative architectures and minimal storage. This paper analyzes the implementation and performance of candidate temporal and spatial filters. Spatial filters are attractive because they require far less memory, can effectively exploit a parallel, pipelined architecture, and are relatively insensitive to target speed. However, the performance of spatial filtering is substantially worse than that of temporal filtering when the sensor has good line-of-sight stability.

  18. Adaptive spatial filtering for daytime satellite quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, Mark T.; Sickmiller, Brett A.; Flanagan, Michael B.; Black, James P.; Stoltenberg, Kurt E.; Duchane, Alexander W.

    2014-11-01

    The rate of secure key generation (SKG) in quantum key distribution (QKD) is adversely affected by optical noise and loss in the quantum channel. In a free-space atmospheric channel, the scattering of sunlight into the channel can lead to quantum bit error ratios (QBERs) sufficiently large to preclude SKG. Furthermore, atmospheric turbulence limits the degree to which spatial filtering can reduce sky noise without introducing signal losses. A system simulation quantifies the potential benefit of tracking and higher-order adaptive optics (AO) technologies to SKG rates in a daytime satellite engagement scenario. The simulations are performed assuming propagation from a low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite to a terrestrial receiver that includes an AO system comprised of a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (SHWFS) and a continuous-face-sheet deformable mirror (DM). The effects of atmospheric turbulence, tracking, and higher-order AO on the photon capture efficiency are simulated using statistical representations of turbulence and a time-domain waveoptics hardware emulator. Secure key generation rates are then calculated for the decoy state QKD protocol as a function of the receiver field of view (FOV) for various pointing angles. The results show that at FOVs smaller than previously considered, AO technologies can enhance SKG rates in daylight and even enable SKG where it would otherwise be prohibited as a consequence of either background optical noise or signal loss due to turbulence effects.

  19. A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2011-03-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

  20. SU-F-I-10: Spatially Local Statistics for Adaptive Image Filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X; Floros, D; Zhang, Y; Yin, FF; Ren, L; Pitsianis, N

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate adaptive image filtering operations, addressing spatial variations in both noise and signal. Such issues are prevalent in cone-beam projections, where physical effects such as X-ray scattering result in spatially variant noise, violating common assumptions of homogeneous noise and challenging conventional filtering approaches to signal extraction and noise suppression. Methods: We present a computational mechanism for probing into and quantifying the spatial variance of noise throughout an image. The mechanism builds a pyramid of local statistics at multiple spatial scales; local statistical information at each scale includes (weighted) mean, median, standard deviation, median absolute deviation, as well as histogram or dynamic range after local mean/median shifting. Based on inter-scale differences of local statistics, the spatial scope of distinguishable noise variation is detected in a semi- or un-supervised manner. Additionally, we propose and demonstrate the incorporation of such information in globally parametrized (i.e., non-adaptive) filters, effectively transforming the latter into spatially adaptive filters. The multi-scale mechanism is materialized by efficient algorithms and implemented in parallel CPU/GPU architectures. Results: We demonstrate the impact of local statistics for adaptive image processing and analysis using cone-beam projections of a Catphan phantom, fitted within an annulus to increase X-ray scattering. The effective spatial scope of local statistics calculations is shown to vary throughout the image domain, necessitating multi-scale noise and signal structure analysis. Filtering results with and without spatial filter adaptation are compared visually, illustrating improvements in imaging signal extraction and noise suppression, and in preserving information in low-contrast regions. Conclusion: Local image statistics can be incorporated in filtering operations to equip them with spatial adaptivity to spatial

  1. SU-F-I-10: Spatially Local Statistics for Adaptive Image Filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Floros, D [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Zhang, Y; Yin, FF; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Pitsianis, N [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To facilitate adaptive image filtering operations, addressing spatial variations in both noise and signal. Such issues are prevalent in cone-beam projections, where physical effects such as X-ray scattering result in spatially variant noise, violating common assumptions of homogeneous noise and challenging conventional filtering approaches to signal extraction and noise suppression. Methods: We present a computational mechanism for probing into and quantifying the spatial variance of noise throughout an image. The mechanism builds a pyramid of local statistics at multiple spatial scales; local statistical information at each scale includes (weighted) mean, median, standard deviation, median absolute deviation, as well as histogram or dynamic range after local mean/median shifting. Based on inter-scale differences of local statistics, the spatial scope of distinguishable noise variation is detected in a semi- or un-supervised manner. Additionally, we propose and demonstrate the incorporation of such information in globally parametrized (i.e., non-adaptive) filters, effectively transforming the latter into spatially adaptive filters. The multi-scale mechanism is materialized by efficient algorithms and implemented in parallel CPU/GPU architectures. Results: We demonstrate the impact of local statistics for adaptive image processing and analysis using cone-beam projections of a Catphan phantom, fitted within an annulus to increase X-ray scattering. The effective spatial scope of local statistics calculations is shown to vary throughout the image domain, necessitating multi-scale noise and signal structure analysis. Filtering results with and without spatial filter adaptation are compared visually, illustrating improvements in imaging signal extraction and noise suppression, and in preserving information in low-contrast regions. Conclusion: Local image statistics can be incorporated in filtering operations to equip them with spatial adaptivity to spatial

  2. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-27

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. This work tackles this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. With this setup, a single color camera is sufficient to track 3D trajectories of particles by combining 2D spatial and 1D color information. For reconstruction, this thesis derives an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. The proposed method is evaluated by both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  3. High power spatial filter considerations, with special emphasis on the cyclops geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, W.W.; Guch, S.

    1974-01-01

    This document presents considerations leading to location and first-cut design of a lens-pinhole-lens spatial filter for Cyclops laser chain. Small scale beam break-up is the driving phenomenon for spatial filtering, and design is predicated upon estimates of this effect's magnitude. The departure of the beam from diffraction limited performance (due to astigmatism and to whole beam self-focusing) is presented in terms of pinhole size limitations. All calculations are presented in terms of parameters associated with Cyclops, through the B stages, assuming that the spatial filter is located at this point in the chain, and that the focal length of the input spatial filter lens is 100 cm. The geometrical ray diagram is shown

  4. Bayesian learning for spatial filtering in an EEG-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Yang, Huijuan; Guan, Cuntai

    2013-07-01

    Spatial filtering for EEG feature extraction and classification is an important tool in brain-computer interface. However, there is generally no established theory that links spatial filtering directly to Bayes classification error. To address this issue, this paper proposes and studies a Bayesian analysis theory for spatial filtering in relation to Bayes error. Following the maximum entropy principle, we introduce a gamma probability model for describing single-trial EEG power features. We then formulate and analyze the theoretical relationship between Bayes classification error and the so-called Rayleigh quotient, which is a function of spatial filters and basically measures the ratio in power features between two classes. This paper also reports our extensive study that examines the theory and its use in classification, using three publicly available EEG data sets and state-of-the-art spatial filtering techniques and various classifiers. Specifically, we validate the positive relationship between Bayes error and Rayleigh quotient in real EEG power features. Finally, we demonstrate that the Bayes error can be practically reduced by applying a new spatial filter with lower Rayleigh quotient.

  5. Stabilizing the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by spatial filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillissen, J J J

    2016-10-01

    We propose to stabilize the thermal lattice Boltzmann method by filtering the second- and third-order moments of the collision operator. By means of the Chapman-Enskog expansion, we show that the additional numerical diffusivity diminishes in the low-wavnumber limit. To demonstrate the enhanced stability, we consider a three-dimensional thermal lattice Boltzmann system involving 33 discrete velocities. Filtering extends the linear stability of this thermal lattice Boltzmann method to 10-fold smaller transport coefficients. We further demonstrate that the filtering does not compromise the accuracy of the hydrodynamics by comparing simulation results to reference solutions for a number of standardized test cases, including natural convection in two dimensions.

  6. Eulerian Time-Domain Filtering for Spatial LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    Eulerian time-domain filtering seems to be appropriate for LES (large eddy simulation) of flows whose large coherent structures convect approximately at a common characteristic velocity; e.g., mixing layers, jets, and wakes. For these flows, we develop an approach to LES based on an explicit second-order digital Butterworth filter, which is applied in,the time domain in an Eulerian context. The approach is validated through a priori and a posteriori analyses of the simulated flow of a heated, subsonic, axisymmetric jet.

  7. Least-mean-square spatial filter for IR sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takken, E H; Friedman, D; Milton, A F; Nitzberg, R

    1979-12-15

    A new least-mean-square filter is defined for signal-detection problems. The technique is proposed for scanning IR surveillance systems operating in poorly characterized but primarily low-frequency clutter interference. Near-optimal detection of point-source targets is predicted both for continuous-time and sampled-data systems.

  8. A neural network-based optimal spatial filter design method for motor imagery classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan Yuksel

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel spatial filter design method is introduced. Spatial filtering is an important processing step for feature extraction in motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces. This paper introduces a new motor imagery signal classification method combined with spatial filter optimization. We simultaneously train the spatial filter and the classifier using a neural network approach. The proposed spatial filter network (SFN is composed of two layers: a spatial filtering layer and a classifier layer. These two layers are linked to each other with non-linear mapping functions. The proposed method addresses two shortcomings of the common spatial patterns (CSP algorithm. First, CSP aims to maximize the between-classes variance while ignoring the minimization of within-classes variances. Consequently, the features obtained using the CSP method may have large within-classes variances. Second, the maximizing optimization function of CSP increases the classification accuracy indirectly because an independent classifier is used after the CSP method. With SFN, we aimed to maximize the between-classes variance while minimizing within-classes variances and simultaneously optimizing the spatial filter and the classifier. To classify motor imagery EEG signals, we modified the well-known feed-forward structure and derived forward and backward equations that correspond to the proposed structure. We tested our algorithm on simple toy data. Then, we compared the SFN with conventional CSP and its multi-class version, called one-versus-rest CSP, on two data sets from BCI competition III. The evaluation results demonstrate that SFN is a good alternative for classifying motor imagery EEG signals with increased classification accuracy.

  9. Gas refractometry based on an all-fiber spatial optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana; Coelho, L; André, R M; Frazão, O

    2012-08-15

    A spatial optical filter based on splice misalignment between optical fibers with different diameters is proposed for gas refractometry. The sensing head is formed by a 2 mm long optical fiber with 50 μm diameter that is spliced with a strong misalignment between two single-mode fibers (SMF28) and interrogated in transmission. The misalignment causes a Fabry-Perot behavior along the reduced-size fiber and depending on the lead-out SMF28 position, it is possible to obtain different spectral responses, namely, bandpass or band-rejection filters. It is shown that the spatial filter device is highly sensitive to refractive index changes on a nitrogen environment by means of the gas pressure variation. A maximum sensitivity of -1390 nm/RIU for the bandpass filter was achieved. Both devices have shown similar temperature responses with an average sensitivity of 25.7 pm/°C.

  10. A robust spatial filtering technique for multisource localization and geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotts, S A

    2005-07-01

    Geoacoustic inversion and source localization using beamformed data from a ship of opportunity has been demonstrated with a bottom-mounted array. An alternative approach, which lies within a class referred to as spatial filtering, transforms element level data into beam data, applies a bearing filter, and transforms back to element level data prior to performing inversions. Automation of this filtering approach is facilitated for broadband applications by restricting the inverse transform to the degrees of freedom of the array, i.e., the effective number of elements, for frequencies near or below the design frequency. A procedure is described for nonuniformly spaced elements that guarantees filter stability well above the design frequency. Monitoring energy conservation with respect to filter output confirms filter stability. Filter performance with both uniformly spaced and nonuniformly spaced array elements is discussed. Vertical (range and depth) and horizontal (range and bearing) ambiguity surfaces are constructed to examine filter performance. Examples that demonstrate this filtering technique with both synthetic data and real data are presented along with comparisons to inversion results using beamformed data. Examinations of cost functions calculated within a simulated annealing algorithm reveal the efficacy of the approach.

  11. Multi-Antenna Data Collector for Smart Metering Networks with Integrated Source Separation by Spatial Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quednau, Philipp; Trommer, Ralph; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wireless transmission systems in smart metering networks share the advantage of lower installation costs due to the expandability of separate infrastructure but suffer from transmission problems. In this paper the issue of interference of wireless transmitted smart meter data with third party systems and data from other meters is investigated and an approach for solving the problem is presented. A multi-channel wireless m-bus receiver was developed to separate the desired data from unwanted interferers by spatial filtering. The according algorithms are presented and the influence of different antenna types on the spatial filtering is investigated. The performance of the spatial filtering is evaluated by extensive measurements in a realistic surrounding with several hundreds of active wireless m-bus transponders. These measurements correspond to the future environment for data-collectors as they took place in rural and urban areas with smart gas meters equipped with wireless m-bus transponders installed in almost all surrounding buildings.

  12. Beam control and diagnostic functions in the NIF transport spatial filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdener, F.R.; Ables, E.; Bliss, E.S.

    1996-10-01

    Beam control and diagnostic systems are required to align the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser prior to a shot as well as to provide diagnostics on 192 beam lines at shot time. A design that allows each beam's large spatial filter lenses to also serve as objective lenses for beam control and diagnostic sensor packages helps to accomplish the task at a reasonable cost. However, this approach also causes a high concentration of small optics near the pinhole plane of the transport spatial filter (TSF) at the output of each beam. This paper describes the optomechanical design in and near the central vacuum vessel of the TSF

  13. Altering spatial priority maps via statistical learning of target selection and distractor filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Oscar; Patacca, Alessia; Di Caro, Valeria; Della Libera, Chiara; Santandrea, Elisa; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2018-05-01

    The cognitive system has the capacity to learn and make use of environmental regularities - known as statistical learning (SL), including for the implicit guidance of attention. For instance, it is known that attentional selection is biased according to the spatial probability of targets; similarly, changes in distractor filtering can be triggered by the unequal spatial distribution of distractors. Open questions remain regarding the cognitive/neuronal mechanisms underlying SL of target selection and distractor filtering. Crucially, it is unclear whether the two processes rely on shared neuronal machinery, with unavoidable cross-talk, or they are fully independent, an issue that we directly addressed here. In a series of visual search experiments, participants had to discriminate a target stimulus, while ignoring a task-irrelevant salient distractor (when present). We systematically manipulated spatial probabilities of either one or the other stimulus, or both. We then measured performance to evaluate the direct effects of the applied contingent probability distribution (e.g., effects on target selection of the spatial imbalance in target occurrence across locations) as well as its indirect or "transfer" effects (e.g., effects of the same spatial imbalance on distractor filtering across locations). By this approach, we confirmed that SL of both target and distractor location implicitly bias attention. Most importantly, we described substantial indirect effects, with the unequal spatial probability of the target affecting filtering efficiency and, vice versa, the unequal spatial probability of the distractor affecting target selection efficiency across locations. The observed cross-talk demonstrates that SL of target selection and distractor filtering are instantiated via (at least partly) shared neuronal machinery, as further corroborated by strong correlations between direct and indirect effects at the level of individual participants. Our findings are compatible

  14. Spatially varying coefficient models in real estate: Eigenvector spatial filtering and alternative approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M; Griffith, D

    2016-01-01

    Real estate policies in urban areas require the recognition of spatial heterogeneity in housing prices to account for local settings. In response to the growing number of spatially varying coefficient models in housing applications, this study evaluated four models in terms of their spatial patterns

  15. Classification of movement intention by spatially filtered electromagnetic inverse solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congedo, M; Lotte, F; Lecuyer, A

    2006-01-01

    We couple standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography, an inverse solution for electroencephalography (EEG) and the common spatial pattern, which is here conceived as a data-driven beamformer, to classify the benchmark BCI (brain-computer interface) competition 2003, data set IV. The data set is from an experiment where a subject performed a self-paced left and right finger tapping task. Available for analysis are 314 training trials whereas 100 unlabelled test trials have to be classified. The EEG data from 28 electrodes comprise the recording of the 500 ms before the actual finger movements, hence represent uniquely the left and right finger movement intention. Despite our use of an untrained classifier, and our extraction of only one attribute per class, our method yields accuracy similar to the winners of the competition for this data set. The distinct advantages of the approach presented here are the use of an untrained classifier and the processing speed, which make the method suitable for actual BCI applications. The proposed method is favourable over existing classification methods based on an EEG inverse solution, which rely either on iterative algorithms for single-trial independent component analysis or on trained classifiers

  16. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering...

  17. Optimizing spatial patterns with sparse filter bands for motor-imagery based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Guoxu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2015-11-30

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) has been most popularly applied to motor-imagery (MI) feature extraction for classification in brain-computer interface (BCI) application. Successful application of CSP depends on the filter band selection to a large degree. However, the most proper band is typically subject-specific and can hardly be determined manually. This study proposes a sparse filter band common spatial pattern (SFBCSP) for optimizing the spatial patterns. SFBCSP estimates CSP features on multiple signals that are filtered from raw EEG data at a set of overlapping bands. The filter bands that result in significant CSP features are then selected in a supervised way by exploiting sparse regression. A support vector machine (SVM) is implemented on the selected features for MI classification. Two public EEG datasets (BCI Competition III dataset IVa and BCI Competition IV IIb) are used to validate the proposed SFBCSP method. Experimental results demonstrate that SFBCSP help improve the classification performance of MI. The optimized spatial patterns by SFBCSP give overall better MI classification accuracy in comparison with several competing methods. The proposed SFBCSP is a potential method for improving the performance of MI-based BCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Voxel-Based Spatial Filtering Method for Canopy Height Retrieval from Airborne Single-Photon Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne single-photon lidar (SPL is a new technology that holds considerable potential for forest structure and carbon monitoring at large spatial scales because it acquires 3D measurements of vegetation faster and more efficiently than conventional lidar instruments. However, SPL instruments use green wavelength (532 nm lasers, which are sensitive to background solar noise, and therefore SPL point clouds require more elaborate noise filtering than other lidar instruments to determine canopy heights, particularly in daytime acquisitions. Histogram-based aggregation is a commonly used approach for removing noise from photon counting lidar data, but it reduces the resolution of the dataset. Here we present an alternate voxel-based spatial filtering method that filters noise points efficiently while largely preserving the spatial integrity of SPL data. We develop and test our algorithms on an experimental SPL dataset acquired over Garrett County in Maryland, USA. We then compare canopy attributes retrieved using our new algorithm with those obtained from the conventional histogram binning approach. Our results show that canopy heights derived using the new algorithm have a strong agreement with field-measured heights (r2 = 0.69, bias = 0.42 m, RMSE = 4.85 m and discrete return lidar heights (r2 = 0.94, bias = 1.07 m, RMSE = 2.42 m. Results are consistently better than height accuracies from the histogram method (field data: r2 = 0.59, bias = 0.00 m, RMSE = 6.25 m; DRL: r2 = 0.78, bias = −0.06 m and RMSE = 4.88 m. Furthermore, we find that the spatial-filtering method retains fine-scale canopy structure detail and has lower errors over steep slopes. We therefore believe that automated spatial filtering algorithms such as the one presented here can support large-scale, canopy structure mapping from airborne SPL data.

  19. Multiple Vehicle Cooperative Localization with Spatial Registration Based on a Probability Hypothesis Density Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the problem of multiple vehicle cooperative localization with spatial registration in the formulation of the probability hypothesis density (PHD filter. Assuming vehicles are equipped with proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensors (with biases to cooperatively localize positions, a simultaneous solution for joint spatial registration and state estimation is proposed. For this, we rely on the sequential Monte Carlo implementation of the PHD filtering. Compared to other methods, the concept of multiple vehicle cooperative localization with spatial registration is first proposed under Random Finite Set Theory. In addition, the proposed solution also addresses the challenges for multiple vehicle cooperative localization, e.g., the communication bandwidth issue and data association uncertainty. The simulation result demonstrates its reliability and feasibility in large-scale environments.

  20. Velocimetry using scintillation of a laser beam for a laser-based gas-flux monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Naoki; Wada, Osami; Koga, Ryuji

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes a velocimetry system using scintillation of a laser-beam with spatial filters based on sensor arrays for a laser- based gas flux monitor. In the eddy correlation method, gas flux is obtained by mutual relation between the gas density and the flow velocity. The velocimetry system is developed to support the flow velocity monitor portion of the laser-based gas flux monitor with a long span for measurement. In order to sense not only the flow velocity but also the flow direction, two photo diode arrays are arranged with difference of a quarter period of the weighting function between them; the two output signals from the sensor arrays have phase difference of either (pi) /2 or -(pi) /2 depending on the sense of flow direction. In order to obtain the flow velocity and the flow direction instantly, an electronic apparatus built by the authors extracts frequency and phase from crude outputs of the pair of sensors. A feasibility of the velocimetry was confirmed indoors by measurement of the flow- velocity vector of the convection. Measured flow-velocity vector of the upward flow agreed comparatively with results of an ultrasonic anemometer.

  1. Spatial filter lens design for the main laser of the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korniski, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1ω) of 1 053microm Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) will produce 1 8 megajoules of the third harmonic light (3ω or λ=351microm) at the target The purpose of this paper is to provide the lens design community with the current lens design details of the large optics in the Main Laser This paper describes the lens design configuration and design considerations of the Main Laser The Main Laser is 123 meters long and includes two spatial filters one 13 5 meters and one 60 meters These spatial filters perform crucial beam filtering and relaying functions We shall describe the significant lens design aspects of these spatial filter lenses which allow them to successfully deliver the appropriate beam characteristic onto the target For an overview of NIF please see ''Optical system design of the National Ignition Facility,'' by R Edward English. et al also found in this volume

  2. Extending Correlation Filter-Based Visual Tracking by Tree-Structured Ensemble and Spatial Windowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Erhan; Ozkan, Huseyin; Alatan, A Aydin

    2017-11-01

    Correlation filters have been successfully used in visual tracking due to their modeling power and computational efficiency. However, the state-of-the-art correlation filter-based (CFB) tracking algorithms tend to quickly discard the previous poses of the target, since they consider only a single filter in their models. On the contrary, our approach is to register multiple CFB trackers for previous poses and exploit the registered knowledge when an appearance change occurs. To this end, we propose a novel tracking algorithm [of complexity O(D) ] based on a large ensemble of CFB trackers. The ensemble [of size O(2 D ) ] is organized over a binary tree (depth D ), and learns the target appearance subspaces such that each constituent tracker becomes an expert of a certain appearance. During tracking, the proposed algorithm combines only the appearance-aware relevant experts to produce boosted tracking decisions. Additionally, we propose a versatile spatial windowing technique to enhance the individual expert trackers. For this purpose, spatial windows are learned for target objects as well as the correlation filters and then the windowed regions are processed for more robust correlations. In our extensive experiments on benchmark datasets, we achieve a substantial performance increase by using the proposed tracking algorithm together with the spatial windowing.

  3. Particle Image Velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Vasilevskis, Sandijs; Kozlowski, Bartosz

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a non-intrusive, whole filed optical method providing instantaneous velocity information in fluids. The flow is seeded with tracer particles. The particles are illuminated in the target area with a light sheet at least twice within a short time interval....... The camera images the target area and captures each light pulse in separate image frames. The displacement of the particle between the light pulses can be used to determine the velocity vectors. This guideline introduces the principle of the PIV system and the system configuration. The measurement procedure...

  4. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet\\'s performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  5. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  6. Filter multiplexing by use of spatial Code Division Multiple Access approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jonathan; Zalevsky, Zeev; Mendlovic, David; Monreal, Javier Garcia

    2003-02-10

    The increasing popularity of optical communication has also brought a demand for a broader bandwidth. The trend, naturally, was to implement methods from traditional electronic communication. One of the most effective traditional methods is Code Division Multiple Access. In this research, we suggest the use of this approach for spatial coding applied to images. The approach is to multiplex several filters into one plane while keeping their mutual orthogonality. It is shown that if the filters are limited by their bandwidth, the output of all the filters can be sampled in the original image resolution and fully recovered through an all-optical setup. The theoretical analysis of such a setup is verified in an experimental demonstration.

  7. A wavelet and least square filter based spatial-spectral denoising approach of hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Gang; Xue, Bo; Ni, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Noise reduction is a crucial step in hyperspectral imagery pre-processing. Based on sensor characteristics, the noise of hyperspectral imagery represents in both spatial and spectral domain. However, most prevailing denosing techniques process the imagery in only one specific domain, which have not utilized multi-domain nature of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, a new spatial-spectral noise reduction algorithm is proposed, which is based on wavelet analysis and least squares filtering techniques. First, in the spatial domain, a new stationary wavelet shrinking algorithm with improved threshold function is utilized to adjust the noise level band-by-band. This new algorithm uses BayesShrink for threshold estimation, and amends the traditional soft-threshold function by adding shape tuning parameters. Comparing with soft or hard threshold function, the improved one, which is first-order derivable and has a smooth transitional region between noise and signal, could save more details of image edge and weaken Pseudo-Gibbs. Then, in the spectral domain, cubic Savitzky-Golay filter based on least squares method is used to remove spectral noise and artificial noise that may have been introduced in during the spatial denoising. Appropriately selecting the filter window width according to prior knowledge, this algorithm has effective performance in smoothing the spectral curve. The performance of the new algorithm is experimented on a set of Hyperion imageries acquired in 2007. The result shows that the new spatial-spectral denoising algorithm provides more significant signal-to-noise-ratio improvement than traditional spatial or spectral method, while saves the local spectral absorption features better.

  8. From Matched Spatial Filtering towards the Fused Statistical Descriptive Regularization Method for Enhanced Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkvarko Yuriy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a new approach to solve the ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem of high-resolution numerical reconstruction of the spatial spectrum pattern (SSP of the backscattered wavefield sources distributed over the remotely sensed scene. An array or synthesized array radar (SAR that employs digital data signal processing is considered. By exploiting the idea of combining the statistical minimum risk estimation paradigm with numerical descriptive regularization techniques, we address a new fused statistical descriptive regularization (SDR strategy for enhanced radar imaging. Pursuing such an approach, we establish a family of the SDR-related SSP estimators, that encompass a manifold of existing beamforming techniques ranging from traditional matched filter to robust and adaptive spatial filtering, and minimum variance methods.

  9. Distinct brain mechanisms support spatial vs temporal filtering of nociceptive information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Martucci, Katherine T; Granovsky, Yelena; Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Yarnitsky, David; Coghill, Robert C

    2014-12-01

    The role of endogenous analgesic mechanisms has largely been viewed in the context of gain modulation during nociceptive processing. However, these analgesic mechanisms may play critical roles in the extraction and subsequent utilization of information related to spatial and temporal features of nociceptive input. To date, it remains unknown if spatial and temporal filtering of nociceptive information is supported by similar analgesic mechanisms. To address this question, human volunteers were recruited to assess brain activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging during conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and offset analgesia (OA). CPM provides one paradigm for assessing spatial filtering of nociceptive information while OA provides a paradigm for assessing temporal filtering of nociceptive information. CPM and OA both produced statistically significant reductions in pain intensity. However, the magnitude of pain reduction elicited by CPM was not correlated with that elicited by OA across different individuals. Different patterns of brain activation were consistent with the psychophysical findings. CPM elicited widespread reductions in regions engaged in nociceptive processing such as the thalamus, insula, and secondary somatosensory cortex. OA produced reduced activity in the primary somatosensory cortex but was associated with greater activation in the anterior insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, intraparietal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule relative to CPM. In the brain stem, CPM consistently produced reductions in activity, while OA produced increases in activity. Conjunction analysis confirmed that CPM-related activity did not overlap with that of OA. Thus, dissociable mechanisms support inhibitory processes engaged during spatial vs temporal filtering of nociceptive information. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual Information Processing Based on Spatial Filters Constrained by Biological Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    was provided by Pantie and Sekuler ( 19681. They found that the detection (if gratings was affected most by adapting isee Section 6.1. 11 to square...evidence for certain eye scans being directed by spatial information in filtered images is given. Eye scan paths of a portrait of a young girl I Figure 08...multistable objects to more complex objects such as the man- girl figure of Fisher 119681, decision boundaries that are a natural concomitant to any pattern

  11. Complementary theta resonance filtering by two spatially segregated mechanisms in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Vervaeke, Koen; Graham, Lyle J; Storm, Johan F

    2009-11-18

    Synaptic input to a neuron may undergo various filtering steps, both locally and during transmission to the soma. Using simultaneous whole-cell recordings from soma and apical dendrites from rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, and biophysically detailed modeling, we found two complementary resonance (bandpass) filters of subthreshold voltage signals. Both filters favor signals in the theta (3-12 Hz) frequency range, but have opposite location, direction, and voltage dependencies: (1) dendritic H-resonance, caused by h/HCN-channels, filters signals propagating from soma to dendrite when the membrane potential is close to rest; and (2) somatic M-resonance, caused by M/Kv7/KCNQ and persistent Na(+) (NaP) channels, filters signals propagating from dendrite to soma when the membrane potential approaches spike threshold. Hippocampal pyramidal cells participate in theta network oscillations during behavior, and we suggest that that these dual, polarized theta resonance mechanisms may convey voltage-dependent tuning of theta-mediated neural coding in the entorhinal/hippocampal system during locomotion, spatial navigation, memory, and sleep.

  12. Eigenvector Spatial Filtering Regression Modeling of Ground PM2.5 Concentrations Using Remotely Sensed Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a regression model using the Eigenvector Spatial Filtering (ESF method to estimate ground PM2.5 concentrations. Covariates are derived from remotely sensed data including aerosol optical depth, normal differential vegetation index, surface temperature, air pressure, relative humidity, height of planetary boundary layer and digital elevation model. In addition, cultural variables such as factory densities and road densities are also used in the model. With the Yangtze River Delta region as the study area, we constructed ESF-based Regression (ESFR models at different time scales, using data for the period between December 2015 and November 2016. We found that the ESFR models effectively filtered spatial autocorrelation in the OLS residuals and resulted in increases in the goodness-of-fit metrics as well as reductions in residual standard errors and cross-validation errors, compared to the classic OLS models. The annual ESFR model explained 70% of the variability in PM2.5 concentrations, 16.7% more than the non-spatial OLS model. With the ESFR models, we performed detail analyses on the spatial and temporal distributions of PM2.5 concentrations in the study area. The model predictions are lower than ground observations but match the general trend. The experiment shows that ESFR provides a promising approach to PM2.5 analysis and prediction.

  13. Eigenvector Spatial Filtering Regression Modeling of Ground PM2.5 Concentrations Using Remotely Sensed Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Li, Bin; Chen, Yumin; Chen, Meijie; Fang, Tao; Liu, Yongfeng

    2018-06-11

    This paper proposes a regression model using the Eigenvector Spatial Filtering (ESF) method to estimate ground PM 2.5 concentrations. Covariates are derived from remotely sensed data including aerosol optical depth, normal differential vegetation index, surface temperature, air pressure, relative humidity, height of planetary boundary layer and digital elevation model. In addition, cultural variables such as factory densities and road densities are also used in the model. With the Yangtze River Delta region as the study area, we constructed ESF-based Regression (ESFR) models at different time scales, using data for the period between December 2015 and November 2016. We found that the ESFR models effectively filtered spatial autocorrelation in the OLS residuals and resulted in increases in the goodness-of-fit metrics as well as reductions in residual standard errors and cross-validation errors, compared to the classic OLS models. The annual ESFR model explained 70% of the variability in PM 2.5 concentrations, 16.7% more than the non-spatial OLS model. With the ESFR models, we performed detail analyses on the spatial and temporal distributions of PM 2.5 concentrations in the study area. The model predictions are lower than ground observations but match the general trend. The experiment shows that ESFR provides a promising approach to PM 2.5 analysis and prediction.

  14. Volumetric velocimetry for fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Coletti, Filippo

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, several techniques have been introduced that are capable of extracting 3D three-component velocity fields in fluid flows. Fast-paced developments in both hardware and processing algorithms have generated a diverse set of methods, with a growing range of applications in flow diagnostics. This has been further enriched by the increasingly marked trend of hybridization, in which the differences between techniques are fading. In this review, we carry out a survey of the prominent methods, including optical techniques and approaches based on medical imaging. An overview of each is given with an example of an application from the literature, while focusing on their respective strengths and challenges. A framework for the evaluation of velocimetry performance in terms of dynamic spatial range is discussed, along with technological trends and emerging strategies to exploit 3D data. While critical challenges still exist, these observations highlight how volumetric techniques are transforming experimental fluid mechanics, and that the possibilities they offer have just begun to be explored.

  15. Experimental evidence of the spatial coherence moiré and the filtering of classes of radiator pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Roman; Usuga-Castaneda, Mario; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    Evidence of the physical existence of the spatial coherence moiré is obtained by confronting numerical results with experimental results of spatially partial interference. Although it was performed for two particular cases, the results reveal a general behavior of the optical fields in any state of spatial coherence. Moreover, the study of the spatial coherence moiré deals with a new type of filtering, named filtering of classes of radiator pairs, which allows changing the power spectrum at the observation plane by modulating the complex degree of spatial coherence, without altering the power distribution at the aperture plane or introducing conventional spatial filters. This new procedure can optimize some technological applications of actual interest, as the beam shaping for instance.

  16. The spatial filtering method for solid particle velocity measurement based on an electrostatic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Chuanlong; Tang, Guanghua; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Shimin

    2009-01-01

    The spatial filtering method for particle velocity measurement has the advantages of simplicity of the measurement system and convenience of data processing. In this paper, the relationship between solid particles mean velocity in a pneumatic pipeline and the power spectrum of the output signal of an electrostatic sensor was mathematically modeled. The effects of the length of the sensor, the thickness of the dielectric pipe and its length on the spatial filtering characteristics of the sensor were also investigated using the finite element method. As for the roughness of and the difficult determination of the peak frequency f max of the power spectrum characteristics of the output signal of the sensor, a wavelet analysis based filtering method was applied to smooth the curve, which can accurately determine the peak frequency f max . Finally, experiments were performed on a pilot dense phase pneumatic conveying rig at high pressure to test the performance of the velocity measurement system. The experimental results show that the system repeatability is within ±4% over a gas superficial velocity range of 8.63–18.62 m s −1 for a particle concentration range of 0.067–0.130 m 3 m −3

  17. Crosstalk elimination in the detection of dual-beam optical tweezers by spatial filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Dino; Oddershede, Lene B.; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2014-01-01

    In dual-beam optical tweezers, the accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the two detected signals, this crosstalk leading to systematic and significant errors on the measured forces and distances. This is true both for dual-beam optical traps where the splitting of the two traps is done by polarization optics and for dual optical traps constructed by other methods, e.g., holographic tweezers. If the two traps are orthogonally polarized, most often crosstalk is minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector; however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Here we present a simple and easy-to-implement method to efficiently eliminate crosstalk. The method is based on spatial filtering by simply inserting a pinhole at the correct position and is highly compatible with standard back focal plane photodiode based detection of position and force. Our spatial filtering method reduces crosstalk up to five times better than polarization filtering alone. The effectiveness is dependent on pinhole size and distance between the traps and is here quantified experimentally and reproduced by theoretical modeling. The method here proposed will improve the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, performed by dual-beam optical traps and hence give much more scientific value for the experimental efforts

  18. Microscopy with spatial filtering for sorting particles and monitoring subcellular morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing-Yi; Qian, Zhen; Pasternack, Robert M.; Boustany, Nada N.

    2009-02-01

    Optical scatter imaging (OSI) was developed to non-invasively track real-time changes in particle morphology with submicron sensitivity in situ without exogenous labeling, cell fixing, or organelle isolation. For spherical particles, the intensity ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR, Optical Scatter Image Ratio) was shown to decrease monotonically with diameter and agree with Mie theory. In living cells, we recently reported this technique is able to detect mitochondrial morphological alterations, which were mediated by the Bcl-xL transmembrane domain, and could not be observed by fluorescence or differential interference contrast images. Here we further extend the ability of morphology assessment by adopting a digital micromirror device (DMD) for Fourier filtering. When placed in the Fourier plane the DMD can be used to select scattering intensities at desired combination of scattering angles. We designed an optical filter bank consisting of Gabor-like filters with various scales and rotations based on Gabor filters, which have been widely used for localization of spatial and frequency information in digital images and texture analysis. Using a model system consisting of mixtures of polystyrene spheres and bacteria, we show how this system can be used to sort particles on a microscopic slide based on their size, orientation and aspect ratio. We are currently applying this technique to characterize the morphology of subcellular organelles to help understand fundamental biological processes.

  19. Benefit of spatial filtering for visual perception with a subretinal implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Viola; Aryan, Naser Pour; Brendler, Christian; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Subretinal implants have proven to be capable of restoring vision to patients suffering from hereditary retinal degeneration diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. Although they already provide basic visual perception, there is still much room for improvement in this field. Effects like electric field interference limit the visual acuity and may be the cause of the perceived vision to be blurred. This influence could be reduced by means of highpass spatial filtering. In this paper, based on the available reports about the visual perception parameters from the patients using the alpha-IMS subretinal implant, a model for the blurring effect of the patients retina is proposed. On this basis, highpass filters are suggested which will compensate the obscuring effect of the stimulator device plus retina system to some extent.

  20. Two-Dimensional Planar Lightwave Circuit Integrated Spatial Filter Array and Method of Use Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jun (Inventor); Dimov, Fedor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A large coherent two-dimensional (2D) spatial filter array (SFA), 30 by 30 or larger, is produced by coupling a 2D planar lightwave circuit (PLC) array with a pair of lenslet arrays at the input and output side. The 2D PLC array is produced by stacking a plurality of chips, each chip with a plural number of straight PLC waveguides. A pupil array is coated onto the focal plane of the lenslet array. The PLC waveguides are produced by deposition of a plural number of silica layers on the silicon wafer, followed by photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) processes. A plural number of mode filters are included in the silica-on-silicon waveguide such that the PLC waveguide is transparent to the fundamental mode but higher order modes are attenuated by 40 dB or more.

  1. Improving filtering and prediction of spatially extended turbulent systems with model errors through stochastic parameter estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershgorin, B.; Harlim, J.; Majda, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filtering and predictive skill for turbulent signals is often limited by the lack of information about the true dynamics of the system and by our inability to resolve the assumed dynamics with sufficiently high resolution using the current computing power. The standard approach is to use a simple yet rich family of constant parameters to account for model errors through parameterization. This approach can have significant skill by fitting the parameters to some statistical feature of the true signal; however in the context of real-time prediction, such a strategy performs poorly when intermittent transitions to instability occur. Alternatively, we need a set of dynamic parameters. One strategy for estimating parameters on the fly is a stochastic parameter estimation through partial observations of the true signal. In this paper, we extend our newly developed stochastic parameter estimation strategy, the Stochastic Parameterization Extended Kalman Filter (SPEKF), to filtering sparsely observed spatially extended turbulent systems which exhibit abrupt stability transition from time to time despite a stable average behavior. For our primary numerical example, we consider a turbulent system of externally forced barotropic Rossby waves with instability introduced through intermittent negative damping. We find high filtering skill of SPEKF applied to this toy model even in the case of very sparse observations (with only 15 out of the 105 grid points observed) and with unspecified external forcing and damping. Additive and multiplicative bias corrections are used to learn the unknown features of the true dynamics from observations. We also present a comprehensive study of predictive skill in the one-mode context including the robustness toward variation of stochastic parameters, imperfect initial conditions and finite ensemble effect. Furthermore, the proposed stochastic parameter estimation scheme applied to the same spatially extended Rossby wave system demonstrates

  2. Damage and fracture in large aperture, fused silica, vacuum spatial filter lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; Edwards, G.J.; Marion, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Optical damage that results in large scale fracture has been observed in the large, high-fluence, fused-silica, spatial filter lenses on the Nova and Beamlet lasers. In nearly all cases damage occurs on the vacuum side of the lenses and because the vacuum side of the lens is under tensile stress this damage can lead to catastrophic crack growth if the flaw (damage) size exceeds the critical flaw size for SiO 2 . The damaged 52 cm Nova lenses fracture into two and sometimes three large pieces. Although under full vacuum load at the time they fracture, the Nova lenses do not implode. Rather the authors have observed that the pieces lock together and air slowly leaks into the vacuum spatial filter housing through the lens cracks. The Beamlet lenses have a larger aspect ratio and peak tensile stress than Nova. The peak tensile stress at the center of the output surface of the Beamlet lens is 1,490 psi versus 810 psi for Nova. During a recent Beamlet high energy shot, a damage spot on the lens grew to the critical flaw size and the lens imploded. Post shot data indicate the lens probably fractured into 5 to 7 pieces, however, unlike Nova, these pieces did not lock together. Analysis shows that the likely source of damage is contamination from pinhole blow-off or out-gassing of volatile materials within the spatial filter. Contamination degrades the antireflection properties of the sol-gel coating and reduces its damage threshold. By changing the design of the Beamlet lens it may be possible to insure that it fails safe by locking up in much that same manner as the Nova lens

  3. Semi-non-intrusive objective intelligibility measure using spatial filtering in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte; Boldt, Jesper Bünsow; Gran, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    -intrusive metrics have not been able to achieve acceptable intelligibility predictions. This paper presents a new semi-non-intrusive intelligibility measure based on an existing intrusive measure, STOI, where an estimate of the clean speech is extracted using spatial filtering in the hearing aid. The results......Reliable non-intrusive online assessment of speech intelligibility can play a key role for the functioning of hearing aids, e.g. as guidance for adjusting the hearing aid settings to the environment. While existing intrusive metrics can provide a precise and reliable measure, the current non...

  4. Adaptive spatial filtering of daytime sky noise in a satellite quantum key distribution downlink receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, Mark T.; Sickmiller, Brett A.; Flanagan, Michael B.; Black, James P.; Stoltenberg, Kurt E.; Duchane, Alexander W.

    2016-02-01

    Spatial filtering is an important technique for reducing sky background noise in a satellite quantum key distribution downlink receiver. Atmospheric turbulence limits the extent to which spatial filtering can reduce sky noise without introducing signal losses. Using atmospheric propagation and compensation simulations, the potential benefit of adaptive optics (AO) to secure key generation (SKG) is quantified. Simulations are performed assuming optical propagation from a low-Earth-orbit satellite to a terrestrial receiver that includes AO. Higher-order AO correction is modeled assuming a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a continuous-face-sheet deformable mirror. The effects of atmospheric turbulence, tracking, and higher-order AO on the photon capture efficiency are simulated using statistical representations of turbulence and a time-domain wave-optics hardware emulator. SKG rates are calculated for a decoy-state protocol as a function of the receiver field of view for various strengths of turbulence, sky radiances, and pointing angles. The results show that at fields of view smaller than those discussed by others, AO technologies can enhance SKG rates in daylight and enable SKG where it would otherwise be prohibited as a consequence of background optical noise and signal loss due to propagation and turbulence effects.

  5. Filter Bank Regularized Common Spatial Pattern Ensemble for Small Sample Motor Imagery Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Hoon; Lee, David; Lee, Sang-Goog

    2018-02-01

    For the last few years, many feature extraction methods have been proposed based on biological signals. Among these, the brain signals have the advantage that they can be obtained, even by people with peripheral nervous system damage. Motor imagery electroencephalograms (EEG) are inexpensive to measure, offer a high temporal resolution, and are intuitive. Therefore, these have received a significant amount of attention in various fields, including signal processing, cognitive science, and medicine. The common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm is a useful method for feature extraction from motor imagery EEG. However, performance degradation occurs in a small-sample setting (SSS), because the CSP depends on sample-based covariance. Since the active frequency range is different for each subject, it is also inconvenient to set the frequency range to be different every time. In this paper, we propose the feature extraction method based on a filter bank to solve these problems. The proposed method consists of five steps. First, motor imagery EEG is divided by a using filter bank. Second, the regularized CSP (R-CSP) is applied to the divided EEG. Third, we select the features according to mutual information based on the individual feature algorithm. Fourth, parameter sets are selected for the ensemble. Finally, we classify using ensemble based on features. The brain-computer interface competition III data set IVa is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The proposed method improves the mean classification accuracy by 12.34%, 11.57%, 9%, 4.95%, and 4.47% compared with CSP, SR-CSP, R-CSP, filter bank CSP (FBCSP), and SR-FBCSP. Compared with the filter bank R-CSP ( , ), which is a parameter selection version of the proposed method, the classification accuracy is improved by 3.49%. In particular, the proposed method shows a large improvement in performance in the SSS.

  6. Laboratory observations of sediment transport using combined particle image and tracking velocimetry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Donya; Calantoni, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Improved understanding of coastal hydrodynamics and morphology will lead to more effective mitigation measures that reduce fatalities and property damage caused by natural disasters such as hurricanes. We investigated sediment transport under oscillatory flow over flat and rippled beds with phase-separated stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Standard PIV techniques severely limit measurements at the fluid-sediment interface and do not allow for the observation of separate phases in multi-phase flow (e.g. sand grains in water). We have implemented phase-separated Particle Image Velocimetry by adding fluorescent tracer particles to the fluid in order to observe fluid flow and sediment transport simultaneously. While sand grains scatter 532 nm wavelength laser light, the fluorescent particles absorb 532 nm laser light and re-emit light at a wavelength of 584 nm. Optical long-pass filters with a cut-on wavelength of 550 nm were installed on two cameras configured to perform stereoscopic PIV to capture only the light emitted by the fluorescent tracer particles. A third high-speed camera was used to capture the light scattered by the sand grains allowing for sediment particle tracking via particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Together, these overlapping, simultaneously recorded images provided sediment particle and fluid velocities at high temporal and spatial resolution (100 Hz sampling with 0.8 mm vector spacing for the 2D-3C fluid velocity field). Measurements were made under a wide range of oscillatory flows over flat and rippled sand beds. The set of observations allow for the investigation of the relative importance of pressure gradients and shear stresses on sediment transport.

  7. Similar processes but different environmental filters for soil bacterial and fungal community composition turnover on a broad spatial scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré

    Full Text Available Spatial scaling of microorganisms has been demonstrated over the last decade. However, the processes and environmental filters shaping soil microbial community structure on a broad spatial scale still need to be refined and ranked. Here, we compared bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers through a biogeographical approach on the same soil sampling design at a broad spatial scale (area range: 13300 to 31000 km2: i to examine their spatial structuring; ii to investigate the relative importance of environmental selection and spatial autocorrelation in determining their community composition turnover; and iii to identify and rank the relevant environmental filters and scales involved in their spatial variations. Molecular fingerprinting of soil bacterial and fungal communities was performed on 413 soils from four French regions of contrasting environmental heterogeneity (Landesfilters was assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. This study demonstrates significant community composition turnover rates for soil bacteria and fungi, which were dependent on the region. Bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers were mainly driven by environmental selection explaining from 10% to 20% of community composition variations, but spatial variables also explained 3% to 9% of total variance. These variables highlighted significant spatial autocorrelation of both communities unexplained by the environmental variables measured and could partly be explained by dispersal limitations. Although the identified filters and their hierarchy were dependent on the region and organism, selection was systematically based on a common group of environmental variables: pH, trophic resources, texture and land use. Spatial autocorrelation was also important at

  8. Similar processes but different environmental filters for soil bacterial and fungal community composition turnover on a broad spatial scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Dequiedt, Samuel; Thioulouse, Jean; Lelièvre, Mélanie; Saby, Nicolas P A; Jolivet, Claudy; Arrouays, Dominique; Plassart, Pierre; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Spatial scaling of microorganisms has been demonstrated over the last decade. However, the processes and environmental filters shaping soil microbial community structure on a broad spatial scale still need to be refined and ranked. Here, we compared bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers through a biogeographical approach on the same soil sampling design at a broad spatial scale (area range: 13300 to 31000 km2): i) to examine their spatial structuring; ii) to investigate the relative importance of environmental selection and spatial autocorrelation in determining their community composition turnover; and iii) to identify and rank the relevant environmental filters and scales involved in their spatial variations. Molecular fingerprinting of soil bacterial and fungal communities was performed on 413 soils from four French regions of contrasting environmental heterogeneity (Landescommunities' composition turnovers. The relative importance of processes and filters was assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. This study demonstrates significant community composition turnover rates for soil bacteria and fungi, which were dependent on the region. Bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers were mainly driven by environmental selection explaining from 10% to 20% of community composition variations, but spatial variables also explained 3% to 9% of total variance. These variables highlighted significant spatial autocorrelation of both communities unexplained by the environmental variables measured and could partly be explained by dispersal limitations. Although the identified filters and their hierarchy were dependent on the region and organism, selection was systematically based on a common group of environmental variables: pH, trophic resources, texture and land use. Spatial autocorrelation was also important at coarse (80 to 120 km radius) and/or medium (40 to 65 km radius) spatial scales, suggesting dispersal limitations at these scales.

  9. Bayesian spatial filters for source signal extraction: a study in the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Wodlinger, B; Durand, D M

    2014-03-01

    The ability to extract physiological source signals to control various prosthetics offer tremendous therapeutic potential to improve the quality of life for patients suffering from motor disabilities. Regardless of the modality, recordings of physiological source signals are contaminated with noise and interference along with crosstalk between the sources. These impediments render the task of isolating potential physiological source signals for control difficult. In this paper, a novel Bayesian Source Filter for signal Extraction (BSFE) algorithm for extracting physiological source signals for control is presented. The BSFE algorithm is based on the source localization method Champagne and constructs spatial filters using Bayesian methods that simultaneously maximize the signal to noise ratio of the recovered source signal of interest while minimizing crosstalk interference between sources. When evaluated over peripheral nerve recordings obtained in vivo, the algorithm achieved the highest signal to noise interference ratio ( 7.00 ±3.45 dB) amongst the group of methodologies compared with average correlation between the extracted source signal and the original source signal R = 0.93. The results support the efficacy of the BSFE algorithm for extracting source signals from the peripheral nerve.

  10. Dim small targets detection based on self-adaptive caliber temporal-spatial filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiangsuo; Xu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianlin; Huang, Yongmei; Peng, Zhenming

    2017-09-01

    To boost the detect ability of dim small targets, this paper began by using improved anisotropy for background prediction (IABP), followed by target enhancement by improved high-order cumulates (HQS). Finally, on the basis of image pre-processing, to address the problem of missed and wrong detection caused by fixed caliber of traditional pipeline filtering, this paper used targets' multi-frame movement correlation in the time-space domain, combined with the scale-space theory, to propose a temporal-spatial filtering algorithm which allows the caliber to make self-adaptive changes according to the changes of the targets' scale, effectively solving the detection-related issues brought by unchanged caliber and decreased/increased size of the targets. Experiments showed that the improved anisotropic background predication could be loyal to the true background of the original image to the maximum extent, presenting a superior overall performance to other background prediction methods; the improved HQS significantly increased the signal-noise ratio of images; when the signal-noise ratio was lower than 2.6 dB, this detection algorithm could effectively eliminate noise and detect targets. For the algorithm, the lowest signal-to-noise ratio of the detectable target is 0.37.

  11. 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyer, Klaus; Holzner, Markus; Guala, Michele; Liberzon, Alexander; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang [Swiss Federal Institut of Technology Zurich, Institut fuer Hydromechanik und Wasserwirtschaft, Zuerich (Switzerland); Luethi, Beat [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2005-11-01

    In this article, we present an experimental setup and data processing schemes for 3D scanning particle tracking velocimetry (SPTV), which expands on the classical 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) through changes in the illumination, image acquisition and analysis. 3D PTV is a flexible flow measurement technique based on the processing of stereoscopic images of flow tracer particles. The technique allows obtaining Lagrangian flow information directly from measured 3D trajectories of individual particles. While for a classical PTV the entire region of interest is simultaneously illuminated and recorded, in SPTV the flow field is recorded by sequential tomographic high-speed imaging of the region of interest. The advantage of the presented method is a considerable increase in maximum feasible seeding density. Results are shown for an experiment in homogenous turbulence and compared with PTV. SPTV yielded an average 3,500 tracked particles per time step, which implies a significant enhancement of the spatial resolution for Lagrangian flow measurements. (orig.)

  12. Determination of spatially dependent diffusion parameters in bovine bone using Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, Abdallah; Ståhle, Per; Svensson, Ingrid

    2015-11-07

    Although many studies have been made for homogenous constant diffusion, bone is an inhomogeneous material. It has been suggested that bone porosity decreases from the inner boundaries to the outer boundaries of the long bones. The diffusivity of substances in the bone matrix is believed to increase as the bone porosity increases. In this study, an experimental set up is used where bovine bone samples, saturated with potassium chloride (KCl), were put into distilled water and the conductivity of the water was followed. Chloride ions in the bone samples escaped out in the water through diffusion and the increase of the conductivity was measured. A one-dimensional, spatially dependent mathematical model describing the diffusion process is used. The diffusion parameters in the model are determined using a Kalman filter technique. The parameters for spatially dependent at endosteal and periosteal surfaces are found to be (12.8 ± 4.7) × 10(-11) and (5 ± 3.5) × 10(-11)m(2)/s respectively. The mathematical model function using the obtained diffusion parameters fits very well with the experimental data with mean square error varies from 0.06 × 10(-6) to 0.183 × 10(-6) (μS/m)(2). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Major Depression Detection from EEG Signals Using Kernel Eigen-Filter-Bank Common Spatial Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Chien-Te; Huang, Hao-Chuan; Cheng, Wei-Teng; Liu, Yi-Hung

    2017-06-14

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has become a leading contributor to the global burden of disease; however, there are currently no reliable biological markers or physiological measurements for efficiently and effectively dissecting the heterogeneity of MDD. Here we propose a novel method based on scalp electroencephalography (EEG) signals and a robust spectral-spatial EEG feature extractor called kernel eigen-filter-bank common spatial pattern (KEFB-CSP). The KEFB-CSP first filters the multi-channel raw EEG signals into a set of frequency sub-bands covering the range from theta to gamma bands, then spatially transforms the EEG signals of each sub-band from the original sensor space to a new space where the new signals (i.e., CSPs) are optimal for the classification between MDD and healthy controls, and finally applies the kernel principal component analysis (kernel PCA) to transform the vector containing the CSPs from all frequency sub-bands to a lower-dimensional feature vector called KEFB-CSP. Twelve patients with MDD and twelve healthy controls participated in this study, and from each participant we collected 54 resting-state EEGs of 6 s length (5 min and 24 s in total). Our results show that the proposed KEFB-CSP outperforms other EEG features including the powers of EEG frequency bands, and fractal dimension, which had been widely applied in previous EEG-based depression detection studies. The results also reveal that the 8 electrodes from the temporal areas gave higher accuracies than other scalp areas. The KEFB-CSP was able to achieve an average EEG classification accuracy of 81.23% in single-trial analysis when only the 8-electrode EEGs of the temporal area and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier were used. We also designed a voting-based leave-one-participant-out procedure to test the participant-independent individual classification accuracy. The voting-based results show that the mean classification accuracy of about 80% can be achieved by the KEFP

  14. Major Depression Detection from EEG Signals Using Kernel Eigen-Filter-Bank Common Spatial Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Cheng Liao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD has become a leading contributor to the global burden of disease; however, there are currently no reliable biological markers or physiological measurements for efficiently and effectively dissecting the heterogeneity of MDD. Here we propose a novel method based on scalp electroencephalography (EEG signals and a robust spectral-spatial EEG feature extractor called kernel eigen-filter-bank common spatial pattern (KEFB-CSP. The KEFB-CSP first filters the multi-channel raw EEG signals into a set of frequency sub-bands covering the range from theta to gamma bands, then spatially transforms the EEG signals of each sub-band from the original sensor space to a new space where the new signals (i.e., CSPs are optimal for the classification between MDD and healthy controls, and finally applies the kernel principal component analysis (kernel PCA to transform the vector containing the CSPs from all frequency sub-bands to a lower-dimensional feature vector called KEFB-CSP. Twelve patients with MDD and twelve healthy controls participated in this study, and from each participant we collected 54 resting-state EEGs of 6 s length (5 min and 24 s in total. Our results show that the proposed KEFB-CSP outperforms other EEG features including the powers of EEG frequency bands, and fractal dimension, which had been widely applied in previous EEG-based depression detection studies. The results also reveal that the 8 electrodes from the temporal areas gave higher accuracies than other scalp areas. The KEFB-CSP was able to achieve an average EEG classification accuracy of 81.23% in single-trial analysis when only the 8-electrode EEGs of the temporal area and a support vector machine (SVM classifier were used. We also designed a voting-based leave-one-participant-out procedure to test the participant-independent individual classification accuracy. The voting-based results show that the mean classification accuracy of about 80% can be

  15. Coaxial volumetric velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Jux, Constantin; Sciacchitano, Andrea

    2018-06-01

    This study describes the working principles of the coaxial volumetric velocimeter (CVV) for wind tunnel measurements. The measurement system is derived from the concept of tomographic PIV in combination with recent developments of Lagrangian particle tracking. The main characteristic of the CVV is its small tomographic aperture and the coaxial arrangement between the illumination and imaging directions. The system consists of a multi-camera arrangement subtending only few degrees solid angle and a long focal depth. Contrary to established PIV practice, laser illumination is provided along the same direction as that of the camera views, reducing the optical access requirements to a single viewing direction. The laser light is expanded to illuminate the full field of view of the cameras. Such illumination and imaging conditions along a deep measurement volume dictate the use of tracer particles with a large scattering area. In the present work, helium-filled soap bubbles are used. The fundamental principles of the CVV in terms of dynamic velocity and spatial range are discussed. Maximum particle image density is shown to limit tracer particle seeding concentration and instantaneous spatial resolution. Time-averaged flow fields can be obtained at high spatial resolution by ensemble averaging. The use of the CVV for time-averaged measurements is demonstrated in two wind tunnel experiments. After comparing the CVV measurements with the potential flow in front of a sphere, the near-surface flow around a complex wind tunnel model of a cyclist is measured. The measurements yield the volumetric time-averaged velocity and vorticity field. The measurements of the streamlines in proximity of the surface give an indication of the skin-friction lines pattern, which is of use in the interpretation of the surface flow topology.

  16. A Spatial-Filtering Zero-Inflated Approach to the Estimation of the Gravity Model of Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Metulini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear estimation of the gravity model with Poisson-type regression methods has become popular for modelling international trade flows, because it permits a better accounting for zero flows and extreme values in the distribution tail. Nevertheless, as trade flows are not independent from each other due to spatial and network autocorrelation, these methods may lead to biased parameter estimates. To overcome this problem, eigenvector spatial filtering (ESF variants of the Poisson/negative binomial specifications have been proposed in the literature on gravity modelling of trade. However, no specific treatment has been developed for cases in which many zero flows are present. This paper contributes to the literature in two ways. First, by employing a stepwise selection criterion for spatial filters that is based on robust (sandwich p-values and does not require likelihood-based indicators. In this respect, we develop an ad hoc backward stepwise function in R. Second, using this function, we select a reduced set of spatial filters that properly accounts for importer-side and exporter-side specific spatial effects, as well as network effects, both at the count and the logit processes of zero-inflated methods. Applying this estimation strategy to a cross-section of bilateral trade flows between a set of 64 countries for the year 2000, we find that our specification outperforms the benchmark models in terms of model fitting, both considering the AIC and in predicting zero (and small flows.

  17. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  18. Spatial filtering self-velocimeter for vehicle application using a CMOS linear image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-03-01

    The idea of using a spatial filtering velocimeter (SFV) to measure the velocity of a vehicle for an inertial navigation system is put forward. The presented SFV is based on a CMOS linear image sensor with a high-speed data rate, large pixel size, and built-in timing generator. These advantages make the image sensor suitable to measure vehicle velocity. The power spectrum of the output signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform and is corrected by a frequency spectrum correction algorithm. This velocimeter was used to measure the velocity of a conveyor belt driven by a rotary table and the measurement uncertainty is ˜0.54%. Furthermore, it was also installed on a vehicle together with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) to measure self-velocity. The measurement result of the designed SFV is compared with that of the LDV. It is shown that the measurement result of the SFV is coincident with that of the LDV. Therefore, the designed SFV is suitable for a vehicle self-contained inertial navigation system.

  19. Control of spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors via the Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.; Lin, Y.J.

    1994-01-01

    A direct control method is developed to control the spatial xenon oscillations in pressurized water reactors. The xenon and iodine concentration difference between the top and bottom halves of the core is estimated by using the extended Kalman filter (EKF), which is a closed-loop estimation method. The measurement equation used in the observer is the axial offset measurement equation, which reflects the xenon unbalanced effect on the axial offset. Meanwhile, some of the coefficients of the observer are estimated on-line to reduce estimation error resulting from model error, i.e., simplified xenon and iodine dynamics. Therefore, the estimation can be guaranteed to be accurate, and the success of the estimation does not greatly depend on the accuracy of the observer model. The predicted one-step ahead xenon concentration, by using the EKF, was used to calculate the possible axial offset variation, and then the control rod motion was calculated to compensate for it. The simulation results show that the proposed method successfully controls the xenon oscillations

  20. Comparative analysis on some spatial-domain filters for fringe pattern denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haixia; Kemao, Qian

    2011-04-20

    Fringe patterns produced by various optical interferometric techniques encode information such as shape, deformation, and refractive index. Noise affects further processing of the fringe patterns. Denoising is often needed before fringe pattern demodulation. Filtering along the fringe orientation is an effective option. Such filters include coherence enhancing diffusion, spin filtering with curve windows, second-order oriented partial-differential equations, and the regularized quadratic cost function for oriented fringe pattern filtering. These filters are analyzed to establish the relationships among them. Theoretical analysis shows that the four filters are largely equivalent to each other. Quantitative results are given on simulated fringe patterns to validate the theoretical analysis and to compare the performance of these filters. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  1. Optical fibre laser velocimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrett, Thomas O H; James, Stephen W; Tatam, Ralph P

    2012-01-01

    The applications of optical fibre technology to laser velocimetry are diverse and often critical to their successful implementation, particularly in harsh environments. Applications range from the use of optical fibres for beam delivery and scattered light collection, aiding the miniaturization of instrument probes, to the use of imaging fibre bundles for imaging the flow field in planar velocimetry systems. Optical fibre techniques have also been used in signal processing, for example fibre frequency shifters, and optical fibre devices such as amplifiers and lasers have been exploited. This paper will review the use of optical fibres in point-wise laser velocimetry techniques such as laser Doppler velocimetry and laser transit anemometry, as well as in planar measurement techniques such as particle imaging velocimetry and planar Doppler velocimetry. (topical review)

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements of Mach 3 turbulent boundary layers at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J. M.; Gupta, A. K.; Smith, M. S.; Marineau, E. C.

    2018-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of Mach 3 turbulent boundary layers (TBL) have been performed under low Reynolds number conditions, Re_τ =200{-}1000, typical of direct numerical simulations (DNS). Three reservoir pressures and three measurement locations create an overlap in parameter space at one research facility. This allows us to assess the effects of Reynolds number, particle response and boundary layer thickness separate from facility specific experimental apparatus or methods. The Morkovin-scaled streamwise fluctuating velocity profiles agree well with published experimental and numerical data and show a small standard deviation among the nine test conditions. The wall-normal fluctuating velocity profiles show larger variations which appears to be due to particle lag. Prior to the current study, no detailed experimental study characterizing the effect of Stokes number on attenuating wall-normal fluctuating velocities has been performed. A linear variation is found between the Stokes number ( St) and the relative error in wall-normal fluctuating velocity magnitude (compared to hot wire anemometry data from Klebanoff, Characteristics of Turbulence in a Boundary Layer with Zero Pressure Gradient. Tech. Rep. NACA-TR-1247, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Springfield, Virginia, 1955). The relative error ranges from about 10% for St=0.26 to over 50% for St=1.06. Particle lag and spatial resolution are shown to act as low-pass filters on the fluctuating velocity power spectral densities which limit the measurable energy content. The wall-normal component appears more susceptible to these effects due to the flatter spectrum profile which indicates that there is additional energy at higher wave numbers not measured by PIV. The upstream inclination and spatial correlation extent of coherent turbulent structures agree well with published data including those using krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV) performed at the same facility.

  3. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Andrzej; Rodak, Aleksander; Unold, Olgierd; Klapetek, Petr

    2016-12-01

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Fixed Low-Rank Constrained EEG Spatial Filter Estimation with Application to Movie-Induced Emotion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Yano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel fixed low-rank spatial filter estimation for brain computer interface (BCI systems with an application that recognizes emotions elicited by movies. The proposed approach unifies such tasks as feature extraction, feature selection, and classification, which are often independently tackled in a “bottom-up” manner, under a regularized loss minimization problem. The loss function is explicitly derived from the conventional BCI approach and solves its minimization by optimization with a nonconvex fixed low-rank constraint. For evaluation, an experiment was conducted to induce emotions by movies for dozens of young adult subjects and estimated the emotional states using the proposed method. The advantage of the proposed method is that it combines feature selection, feature extraction, and classification into a monolithic optimization problem with a fixed low-rank regularization, which implicitly estimates optimal spatial filters. The proposed method shows competitive performance against the best CSP-based alternatives.

  5. Single-trial detection of visual evoked potentials by common spatial patterns and wavelet filtering for brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiheng; Huang, Gan; Hung, Yeung Sam; Hu, Li; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are widely used in brain-computer interface (BCI) systems as input signals conveying a subject's intention. A fast and reliable single-trial ERP detection method can be used to develop a BCI system with both high speed and high accuracy. However, most of single-trial ERP detection methods are developed for offline EEG analysis and thus have a high computational complexity and need manual operations. Therefore, they are not applicable to practical BCI systems, which require a low-complexity and automatic ERP detection method. This work presents a joint spatial-time-frequency filter that combines common spatial patterns (CSP) and wavelet filtering (WF) for improving the signal-to-noise (SNR) of visual evoked potentials (VEP), which can lead to a single-trial ERP-based BCI.

  6. Streamflow Observations From Cameras: Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry or Particle Tracking Velocimetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, F.; Piscopia, R.; Grimaldi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Image-based methodologies, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), have increased our ability to noninvasively conduct streamflow measurements by affording spatially distributed observations at high temporal resolution. However, progress in optical methodologies has not been paralleled by the implementation of image-based approaches in environmental monitoring practice. We attribute this fact to the sensitivity of LSPIV, by far the most frequently adopted algorithm, to visibility conditions and to the occurrence of visible surface features. In this work, we test both LSPIV and PTV on a data set of 12 videos captured in a natural stream wherein artificial floaters are homogeneously and continuously deployed. Further, we apply both algorithms to a video of a high flow event on the Tiber River, Rome, Italy. In our application, we propose a modified PTV approach that only takes into account realistic trajectories. Based on our findings, LSPIV largely underestimates surface velocities with respect to PTV in both favorable (12 videos in a natural stream) and adverse (high flow event in the Tiber River) conditions. On the other hand, PTV is in closer agreement than LSPIV with benchmark velocities in both experimental settings. In addition, the accuracy of PTV estimations can be directly related to the transit of physical objects in the field of view, thus providing tangible data for uncertainty evaluation.

  7. Effect of the spatial filtering and alignment error of hot-wire probes in a wall-bounded turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segalini, A; Cimarelli, A; Rüedi, J-D; De Angelis, E; Talamelli, A

    2011-01-01

    The effort to describe velocity fluctuation distributions in wall-bounded turbulent flows has raised different questions concerning the accuracy of hot-wire measurement techniques close to the wall and more specifically the effect of spatial averaging resulting from the finite size of the wire. Here, an analytical model which describes the effect of the spatial filtering and misalignment of hot-wire probes on the main statistical moments in turbulent wall-bounded flows is presented. The model, which is based on the two-point velocity correlation function, shows that the filtering is directly related to the transverse Taylor micro-scale. By means of turbulent channel flow DNS data, the capacity of the model to accurately describe the probe response is established. At the same time, the filtering effect is appraised for different wire lengths and for a range of misalignment angles which can be expected from good experimental practice. Effects of the second-order terms in the model equations are also taken into account and discussed. In order to use the model in a practical situation, the Taylor micro-scale distribution at least should be provided. A simple scaling law based on classic turbulence theory is therefore introduced and finally employed to estimate the filtering effect for different wire lengths

  8. Anticipating potential biodiversity conflicts for future biofuel crops in South Africa: incorporating spatial filters with species distribution models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Blanchard, R

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available @csir.co.za; 14 15 Keywords: Bioenergy crops, Land suitability, Biodiversity, Spatial analysis, MaxEnt, 16 Conflict, Agricultural land, Spatial filters 17 18 Primary research article 19 Page 1 of 48 GCB Bioenergy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17... habitat transformation and provides 21 an objective means of mitigating potential conflict with existing land use and biodiversity. 22 23 Page 2 of 48GCB Bioenergy 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32...

  9. Three-dimensional three-component particle velocimetry for microscale flows using volumetric scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, S A; Moran, J L; Posner, J D; Frakes, D H

    2012-01-01

    We present a diagnostic platform for measuring three-dimensional three-component (3D3C) velocity fields in microscopic volumes. The imaging system uses high-speed Nipkow spinning disk confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy provides optical sectioning using pinhole spatial filtering which rejects light originating from out-of-focus objects. The system accomplishes volumetric scanning by rapid translation of the high numerical aperture objective using a piezo objective positioner. The motion of fluorescent microspheres is quantified using 3D3C super resolution particle-imaging velocimetry with instantaneous spatial resolutions of the order of 5 µm or less in all three dimensions. We examine 3D3C flow in a PDMS microchannel with an expanding section at 3D acquisition rates of 30 Hz, and find strong agreement with a computational model. Equations from the PIV and PTV literature adapted for a scanning objective provide estimates of maximum measurable velocity. The technique allows for isosurface visualization of 3D particle motion and robust high spatial resolution velocity measurements without requiring a calibration step or reconstruction algorithms. (paper)

  10. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Andrzej, E-mail: sikora@iel.wroc.pl [Electrotechnical Institute, Division of Electrotechnology and Materials Science, M. Skłodowskiej-Curie 55/61, 50-369 Wrocław (Poland); Rodak, Aleksander [Faculty of Electronics, Wrocław University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wrocław (Poland); Unold, Olgierd [Institute of Computer Engineering, Control and Robotics, Faculty of Electronics, Wrocław University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wrocław (Poland); Klapetek, Petr [Czech Metrology Institute, Okružní 31, 638 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. - Highlights: • A novel approach to 2D wavelet-based filter for atomic force microscopy is shown. • The additional AFM measurement signal is used to adjust the filter. • Efficient removal of the local interference phenomena caused artifacts is presented.

  11. The development of the spatially correlated adjustment wavelet filter for atomic force microscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, Andrzej; Rodak, Aleksander; Unold, Olgierd; Klapetek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel approach for the practical utilization of the 2D wavelet filter in terms of the artifacts removal from atomic force microscopy measurements results is presented. The utilization of additional data such as summary photodiode signal map is implemented in terms of the identification of the areas requiring the data processing, filtering settings optimization and the verification of the process performance. Such an approach allows to perform the filtering parameters adjustment by average user, while the straightforward method requires an expertise in this field. The procedure was developed as the function of the Gwyddion software. The examples of filtering the phase imaging and Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurement result are presented. As the wavelet filtering feature may remove a local artifacts, its superior efficiency over similar approach with 2D Fast Fourier Transformate based filter (2D FFT) can be noticed. - Highlights: • A novel approach to 2D wavelet-based filter for atomic force microscopy is shown. • The additional AFM measurement signal is used to adjust the filter. • Efficient removal of the local interference phenomena caused artifacts is presented.

  12. Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF for computationally-efficient filtering of gene-gene interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Casey S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies are becoming the de facto standard in the genetic analysis of common human diseases. Given the complexity and robustness of biological networks such diseases are unlikely to be the result of single points of failure but instead likely arise from the joint failure of two or more interacting components. The hope in genome-wide screens is that these points of failure can be linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which confer disease susceptibility. Detecting interacting variants that lead to disease in the absence of single-gene effects is difficult however, and methods to exhaustively analyze sets of these variants for interactions are combinatorial in nature thus making them computationally infeasible. Efficient algorithms which can detect interacting SNPs are needed. ReliefF is one such promising algorithm, although it has low success rate for noisy datasets when the interaction effect is small. ReliefF has been paired with an iterative approach, Tuned ReliefF (TuRF, which improves the estimation of weights in noisy data but does not fundamentally change the underlying ReliefF algorithm. To improve the sensitivity of studies using these methods to detect small effects we introduce Spatially Uniform ReliefF (SURF. Results SURF's ability to detect interactions in this domain is significantly greater than that of ReliefF. Similarly SURF, in combination with the TuRF strategy significantly outperforms TuRF alone for SNP selection under an epistasis model. It is important to note that this success rate increase does not require an increase in algorithmic complexity and allows for increased success rate, even with the removal of a nuisance parameter from the algorithm. Conclusion Researchers performing genetic association studies and aiming to discover gene-gene interactions associated with increased disease susceptibility should use SURF in place of ReliefF. For instance, SURF should be

  13. A Hybrid Circuit for Spoof Surface Plasmons and Spatial Waveguide Modes to Reach Controllable Band-Pass Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Wu, Han; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-11-10

    We propose a hybrid circuit for spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and spatial waveguide modes to develop new microwave devices. The hybrid circuit includes a spoof SPP waveguide made of two anti-symmetric corrugated metallic strips and a traditional substrate integrated waveguide (SIW). From dispersion relations, we show that the electromagnetic waves only can propagate through the hybrid circuit when the operating frequency is less than the cut-off frequency of the SPP waveguide and greater than the cut-off frequency of SIW, generating efficient band-pass filters. We demonstrate that the pass band is controllable in a large range by designing the geometrical parameters of SPP waveguide and SIW. Full-wave simulations are provided to show the large adjustability of filters, including ultra wideband and narrowband filters. We fabricate a sample of the new hybrid device in the microwave frequencies, and measurement results have excellent agreements to numerical simulations, demonstrating excellent filtering characteristics such as low loss, high efficiency, and good square ratio. The proposed hybrid circuit gives important potential to accelerate the development of plasmonic integrated functional devices and circuits in both microwave and terahertz frequencies.

  14. Filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  15. Image enhancement by spatial frequency post-processing of images obtained with pupil filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Irene; Escalera, Juan C.; Stefano, Quimey Pears; Iemmi, Claudio; Ledesma, Silvia; Yzuel, María J.; Campos, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The use of apodizing or superresolving filters improves the performance of an optical system in different frequency bands. This improvement can be seen as an increase in the OTF value compared to the OTF for the clear aperture. In this paper we propose a method to enhance the contrast of an image in both its low and its high frequencies. The method is based on the generation of a synthetic Optical Transfer Function, by multiplexing the OTFs given by the use of different non-uniform transmission filters on the pupil. We propose to capture three images, one obtained with a clear pupil, one obtained with an apodizing filter that enhances the low frequencies and another one taken with a superresolving filter that improves the high frequencies. In the Fourier domain the three spectra are combined by using smoothed passband filters, and then the inverse transform is performed. We show that we can create an enhanced image better than the image obtained with the clear aperture. To evaluate the performance of the method, bar tests (sinusoidal tests) with different frequency content are used. The results show that a contrast improvement in the high and low frequencies is obtained.

  16. FLEET Velocimetry Measurements on a Transonic Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) velocimetry was used to study the flowfield around a symmetric, transonic airfoil in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT facility. A nominal Mach number of 0.85 was investigated with a total pressure of 125 kPa and total temperature of 280 K. Two-components of velocity were measured along vertical profiles at different locations above, below, and aft of the airfoil at angles of attack of 0 deg, 3.5 deg, and 7deg. Measurements were assessed for their accuracy, precision, dynamic range, spatial resolution, and overall measurement uncertainty in the context of the applied flowfield. Measurement precisions as low as 1 m/s were observed, while overall uncertainties ranged from 4 to 5 percent. Velocity profiles within the wake showed sufficient accuracy, precision, and sensitivity to resolve both the mean and fluctuating velocities and general flow physics such as shear layer growth. Evidence of flow separation is found at high angles of attack.

  17. On-Line Multi-Damage Scanning Spatial-Wavenumber Filter Based Imaging Method for Aircraft Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqiang Ren

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM of aircraft composite structure is helpful to increase reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Due to the great effectiveness in distinguishing particular guided wave modes and identifying the propagation direction, the spatial-wavenumber filter technique has emerged as an interesting SHM topic. In this paper, a new scanning spatial-wavenumber filter (SSWF based imaging method for multiple damages is proposed to conduct on-line monitoring of aircraft composite structures. Firstly, an on-line multi-damage SSWF is established, including the fundamental principle of SSWF for multiple damages based on a linear piezoelectric (PZT sensor array, and a corresponding wavenumber-time imaging mechanism by using the multi-damage scattering signal. Secondly, through combining the on-line multi-damage SSWF and a PZT 2D cross-shaped array, an image-mapping method is proposed to conduct wavenumber synthesis and convert the two wavenumber-time images obtained by the PZT 2D cross-shaped array to an angle-distance image, from which the multiple damages can be directly recognized and located. In the experimental validation, both simulated multi-damage and real multi-damage introduced by repeated impacts are performed on a composite plate structure. The maximum localization error is less than 2 cm, which shows good performance of the multi-damage imaging method. Compared with the existing spatial-wavenumber filter based damage evaluation methods, the proposed method requires no more than the multi-damage scattering signal and can be performed without depending on any wavenumber modeling or measuring. Besides, this method locates multiple damages by imaging instead of the geometric method, which helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, it can be easily applied to on-line multi-damage monitoring of aircraft composite structures.

  18. Adaptive Spatial Filter Based on Similarity Indices to Preserve the Neural Information on EEG Signals during On-Line Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Delisle-Rodriguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new on-line adaptive filter, which is based on a similarity analysis between standard electrode locations, in order to reduce artifacts and common interferences throughout electroencephalography (EEG signals, but preserving the useful information. Standard deviation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC between target electrodes and its correspondent neighbor electrodes are analyzed on sliding windows to select those neighbors that are highly correlated. Afterwards, a model based on CCC is applied to provide higher values of weight to those correlated electrodes with lower similarity to the target electrode. The approach was applied to brain computer-interfaces (BCIs based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA to recognize 40 targets of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP, providing an accuracy (ACC of 86.44 ± 2.81%. In addition, also using this approach, features of low frequency were selected in the pre-processing stage of another BCI to recognize gait planning. In this case, the recognition was significantly ( p < 0.01 improved for most of the subjects ( A C C ≥ 74.79 % , when compared with other BCIs based on Common Spatial Pattern, Filter Bank-Common Spatial Pattern, and Riemannian Geometry.

  19. Ensemble Kalman Filter Inference of Spatially-varying Manning’s n coefficients in the Coastal Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Siripatana, Adil

    2018-05-16

    Ensemble Kalman (EnKF) filtering is an established framework for large scale state estimation problems. EnKFs can also be used for state-parameter estimation, using the so-called “Joint-EnKF” approach. The idea is simply to augment the state vector with the parameters to be estimated and assign invariant dynamics for the time evolution of the parameters. In this contribution, we investigate the efficiency of the Joint-EnKF for estimating spatially-varying Manning’s n coefficients used to define the bottom roughness in the Shallow Water Equations (SWEs) of a coastal ocean model.Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) are conducted using the ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) model, which solves a modified form of the Shallow Water Equations. A deterministic EnKF, the Singular Evolutive Interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, is used to estimate a vector of Manning’s n coefficients defined at the model nodal points by assimilating synthetic water elevation data. It is found that with reasonable ensemble size (O(10)), the filter’s estimate converges to the reference Manning’s field. To enhance performance, we have further reduced the dimension of the parameter search space through a Karhunen-Loéve (KL) expansion. We have also iterated on the filter update step to better account for the nonlinearity of the parameter estimation problem. We study the sensitivity of the system to the ensemble size, localization scale, dimension of retained KL modes, and number of iterations. The performance of the proposed framework in term of estimation accuracy suggests that a well-tuned Joint-EnKF provides a promising robust approach to infer spatially varying seabed roughness parameters in the context of coastal ocean modeling.

  20. Optimal spatial filtering and transfer function for SAR ocean wave spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, R. C.; Tilley, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    The impulse response of the SAR system is not a delta function and the spectra represent the product of the underlying image spectrum with the transform of the impulse response which must be removed. A digitally computed spectrum of SEASAT imagery of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Hatteras was smoothed with a 5 x 5 convolution filter and the trend was sampled in a direction normal to the predominant wave direction. This yielded a transform of a noise-like process. The smoothed value of this trend is the transform of the impulse response. This trend is fit with either a second- or fourth-order polynomial which is then used to correct the entire spectrum. A 16 x 16 smoothing of the spectrum shows the presence of two distinct swells. Correction of the effects of speckle is effected by the subtraction of a bias from the spectrum.

  1. Modeling Change of Topographic Spatial Structures with DEM Resolution Using Semi-Variogram Analysis and Filter Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the way topographic spatial information changes with resolution was investigated using semi-variograms and an Independent Structures Model (ISM to identify the mechanisms involved in changes of topographic parameters as resolution becomes coarser or finer. A typical Loess Hilly area in the Loess Plateau of China was taken as the study area. DEMs with resolutions of 2.5 m and 25 m were derived from topographic maps with map scales of 1:10,000 using ANUDEM software. The ISM, in which the semi-variogram was modeled as the sum of component semi-variograms, was used to model the measured semi-variogram of the elevation surface. Components were modeled using an analytic ISM model and corresponding landscape components identified using Kriging and filter bank analyses. The change in the spatial components as resolution became coarser was investigated by modeling upscaling as a low pass linear filter and applying a general result to obtain an analytic model for the scaling process in terms of semi-variance. This investigation demonstrated how topographic structures could be effectively characterised over varying scales using the ISM model for the semi-variogram. The loss of information in the short range components with resolution is a major driver for the observed change in derived topographic parameters such as slope. This paper has helped to quantify how information is distributed among scale components and how it is lost in natural terrain surfaces as resolution becomes coarser. It is a basis for further applications in the field of geomorphometry.

  2. Blue light filtered white light induces depression-like responses and temporary spatial learning deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinghe; Lian, Yuzheng; Jiang, Jianjun; Wang, Wei; Hou, Xiaohong; Pan, Yao; Chu, Hongqian; Shang, Lanqin; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2018-04-18

    Ambient light has a vital impact on mood and cognitive functions. Blue light has been previously reported to play a salient role in the antidepressant effect via melanopsin. Whether blue light filtered white light (BFW) affects mood and cognitive functions remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate whether BFW led to depression-like symptoms and cognitive deficits including spatial learning and memory abilities in rats, and whether they were associated with the light-responsive function in retinal explants. Male Sprague-Dawley albino rats were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10) and treated with a white light-emitting diode (LED) light source and BFW light source, respectively, under a standard 12 : 12 h L/D condition over 30 days. The sucrose consumption test, forced swim test (FST) and the level of plasma corticosterone (CORT) were employed to evaluate depression-like symptoms in rats. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM) test. A multi-electrode array (MEA) system was utilized to measure electro-retinogram (ERG) responses induced by white or BFW flashes. The effect of BFW over 30 days on depression-like responses in rats was indicated by decreased sucrose consumption in the sucrose consumption test, an increased immobility time in the FST and an elevated level of plasma CORT. BFW led to temporary spatial learning deficits in rats, which was evidenced by prolonged escape latency and swimming distances in the spatial navigation test. However, no changes were observed in the short memory ability of rats treated with BFW. The micro-ERG results showed a delayed implicit time and reduced amplitudes evoked by BFW flashes compared to the white flash group. BFW induces depression-like symptoms and temporary spatial learning deficits in rats, which might be closely related to the impairment of light-evoked output signals in the retina.

  3. Spatial frequency domain imaging using a snap-shot filter mosaic camera with multi-wavelength sensitive pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, Tomas; Saager, Rolf B.; Kennedy, Gordon T.; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Salerud, Göran; Durkin, Anthony J.; Larsson, Marcus

    2018-02-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes a digital light processing (DLP) projector for illuminating turbid media with sinusoidal patterns. The tissue absorption (μa) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ,s) are calculated by analyzing the modulation transfer function for at least two spatial frequencies. We evaluated different illumination strategies with a red, green and blue light emitting diodes (LED) in the DLP, while imaging with a filter mosaic camera, XiSpec, with 16 different multi-wavelength sensitive pixels in the 470-630 nm wavelength range. Data were compared to SFDI by a multispectral camera setup (MSI) consisting of four cameras with bandpass filters centered at 475, 560, 580 and 650 nm. A pointwise system for comprehensive microcirculation analysis was used (EPOS) for comparison. A 5-min arterial occlusion and release protocol on the forearm of a Caucasian male with fair skin was analyzed by fitting the absorption spectra of the chromophores HbO2, Hb and melanin to the estimatedμa. The tissue fractions of red blood cells (fRBC), melanin (/mel) and the Hb oxygenation (S02 ) were calculated at baseline, end of occlusion, early after release and late after release. EPOS results showed a decrease in S02 during the occlusion and hyperemia during release (S02 = 40%, 5%, 80% and 51%). The fRBC showed an increase during occlusion and release phases. The best MSI resemblance to the EPOS was for green LED illumination (S02 = 53%, 9%, 82%, 65%). Several illumination and analysis strategies using the XiSpec gave un-physiological results (e.g. negative S02 ). XiSpec with green LED illumination gave the expected change in /RBC , while the dynamics in S02 were less than those for EPOS. These results may be explained by the calculation of modulation using an illumination and detector setup with a broad spectral transmission bandwidth, with considerable variation in μa of included chromophores. Approaches for either reducing the effective bandwidth of

  4. Development of Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging technique that relies on the photo-dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser induced fluorescence. Velocities are then obtained from time-of-flight calculations. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is relatively short (<50 µs), making it suited for high speed flows. Lifetime and radicals formation increases with temperature, which allows HTV to also probe low-velocity, high-temperature flows or reacting flows such as flames. The present work aims at extending the domain of applicability of HTV, particularly towards low-speed (<10 m/s) and moderate (<500 K) temperature flows. Results are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements recorded in identical conditions. Single shot and averaged velocity profiles are obtained in an air jet at room temperature. By modestly raising the temperature (100-200 degC) the OH production increases, resulting in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Use of nitrogen - a non-reactive gas with minimal collisional quenching - extends the OH species lifetime (to over 500 µs), which allows probing of slower flows or, alternately, increases the measurement precision at the expense of spatial resolution. Instantaneous velocity profiles are resolved in a 100degC nitrogen jet (maximum jet-center velocity of 6.5 m/s) with an uncertainty down to 0.10 m/s (1.5%) at 68% confidence level. MTV measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry and show agreement within 2%.

  5. A diagnostic imaging approach for online characterization of multi-impact in aircraft composite structures based on a scanning spatial-wavenumber filter of guided wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuanqiang; Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Su, Zhongqing

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring of impact and multi-impact in particular in aircraft composite structures has been an intensive research topic in the field of guided-wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM). Compared with the majority of existing methods such as those using signal features in the time-, frequency- or joint time-frequency domain, the approach based on spatial-wavenumber filter of guided wave shows superb advantage in effectively distinguishing particular wave modes and identifying their propagation direction relative to the sensor array. However, there exist two major issues when conducting online characterization of multi-impact event. Firstly, the spatial-wavenumber filter should be realized in the situation that the wavenumber of high spatial resolution of the complicated multi-impact signal cannot be measured or modeled. Secondly, it's difficult to identify the multiple impacts and realize multi-impact localization due to the overlapping of wavenumbers. To address these issues, a scanning spatial-wavenumber filter based diagnostic imaging method for online characterization of multi-impact event is proposed to conduct multi-impact imaging and localization in this paper. The principle of the scanning filter for multi-impact is developed first to conduct spatial-wavenumber filtering and to achieve wavenumber-time imaging of the multiple impacts. Then, a feature identification method of multi-impact based on eigenvalue decomposition and wavenumber searching is presented to estimate the number of impacts and calculate the wavenumber of the multi-impact signal, and an image mapping method is proposed as well to convert the wavenumber-time image to an angle-distance image to distinguish and locate the multiple impacts. A series of multi-impact events are applied to a carbon fiber laminate plate to validate the proposed methods. The validation results show that the localization of the multiple impacts are well achieved.

  6. Complex sparse spatial filter for decoding mixed frequency and phase coded steady-state visually evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Islam, Md Rabiul

    2018-07-01

    Mixed frequency and phase coding (FPC) can achieve the significant increase of the number of commands in steady-state visual evoked potential-based brain-computer interface (SSVEP-BCI). However, the inconsistent phases of the SSVEP over channels in a trial and the existence of non-contributing channels due to noise effects can decrease accurate detection of stimulus frequency. We propose a novel command detection method based on a complex sparse spatial filter (CSSF) by solving ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization problems for a mixed-coded SSVEP-BCI. In particular, ℓ 2,1 -regularization (aka group sparsification) can lead to the rejection of electrodes that are not contributing to the SSVEP detection. A calibration data based canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and CSSF with ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization cases were demonstrated for a 16-target stimuli with eleven subjects. The results of statistical test suggest that the proposed method with ℓ 1 - and ℓ 2,1 -regularization significantly achieved the highest ITR. The proposed approaches do not need any reference signals, automatically select prominent channels, and reduce the computational cost compared to the other mixed frequency-phase coding (FPC)-based BCIs. The experimental results suggested that the proposed method can be usable implementing BCI effectively with reduce visual fatigue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural-network-directed alignment of optical systems using the laser-beam spatial filter as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an effort at NASA Lewis Research Center to use artificial neural networks to automate the alignment and control of optical measurement systems. Specifically, it addresses the use of commercially available neural network software and hardware to direct alignments of the common laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The report presents a general approach for designing alignment records and combining these into training sets to teach optical alignment functions to neural networks and discusses the use of these training sets to train several types of neural networks. Neural network configurations used include the adaptive resonance network, the back-propagation-trained network, and the counter-propagation network. This work shows that neural networks can be used to produce robust sequencers. These sequencers can learn by example to execute the step-by-step procedures of optical alignment and also can learn adaptively to correct for environmentally induced misalignment. The long-range objective is to use neural networks to automate the alignment and operation of optical measurement systems in remote, harsh, or dangerous aerospace environments. This work also shows that when neural networks are trained by a human operator, training sets should be recorded, training should be executed, and testing should be done in a manner that does not depend on intellectual judgments of the human operator.

  8. Air-mass flux measurement system using Doppler-shifted filtered Rayleigh scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, John A.; Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An optical system has been investigated to measure mass flux distributions in the inlet of a high speed air-breathing propulsion system. Rayleigh scattered light from air is proportional to the number density of molecules and hence can be used to ascertain the gas density in a calibrated system. Velocity field measurements are achieved by spectrally filtering the elastically-scattered Doppler-shifted light with an absorbing molecular filter. A novel anamorphic optical collection system is used which allows optical rays from different scattering angles, that have different Doppler shifts, to be recorded separately. This is shown to obviate the need to tune the laser through the absorption to determine velocities, while retaining the ability to make spatially-resolved measurements along a line. By properly selecting the laser tuning and filter parameters, simultaneous density measurements can be made. These properties are discussed in the paper and experiments demonstrating the velocimetry capability are described.

  9. New adaptive sampling method in particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kaikai; Xu, Jinglei; Tang, Lan; Mo, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a new adaptive method to enable the number of interrogation windows and their positions in a particle image velocimetry (PIV) image interrogation algorithm to become self-adapted according to the seeding density. The proposed method can relax the constraint of uniform sampling rate and uniform window size commonly adopted in the traditional PIV algorithm. In addition, the positions of the sampling points are redistributed on the basis of the spring force generated by the sampling points. The advantages include control of the number of interrogation windows according to the local seeding density and smoother distribution of sampling points. The reliability of the adaptive sampling method is illustrated by processing synthetic and experimental images. The synthetic example attests to the advantages of the sampling method. Compared with that of the uniform interrogation technique in the experimental application, the spatial resolution is locally enhanced when using the proposed sampling method. (technical design note)

  10. Application of particle imaging velocimetry in windtunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kompenhans, J.; Reichmuth, J.

    1987-01-01

    Recently the instantaneous and nonintrusive measurement of the flow velocity in a large area of the flow field (two-dimensional plane) became possible by means of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Up to now PIV has mainly been used for model experiments at low flow velocities in order to test and to improve the measuring technique. The present aim is the application of PIV in large wind tunnels at high flow velocities. 7 references

  11. Velocimetry Overview for visitors from the DOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics Division; Holtkamp, David Bruce [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics Division

    2016-08-19

    We are in the midst of a transformative period in which technological advances are making fundamental changes in the measurement techniques that form the backbone of nuclear weapon certification. Optical velocimetry has replaced electrical shorting pins in “Hydrotests,” which measure the dynamic implosion process. This advance has revolutionized nuclear weapons certification during the last 5 years. We can now measure the implosion process that drives a nuclear detonation with many orders of magnitude more resolution in both space and time than was possible just 10 years ago. It has been compared to going from Morse Code to HDTV, resulting in a dozen or more improvements in models of these weapons. These Hydrotests are carried out at LANL, LLNL and the NNSS, with the later holding the important role of allowing us to test with nuclear materials, in sub-critical configurations (i.e., no yield.) Each of these institutions has largely replaced pins with hundreds of channels of optical velocimetry. Velocimetry is non-contact and is used simultaneously with the X-ray capability of these facilities. The U1-a facility at NNSS pioneered this approach in the Gemini series in 2012, and continues to lead, both in channel count and technological advances. Close cooperation among LANL, LLNL and NSTec in these advances serves the complex by leveraging capabilities across sites and accelerating the pace of technical improvements.

  12. Use of phase-locking value in sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface: zero-phase coupling and effects of spatial filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenjuan; Chen, Minyou; McFarland, Dennis J

    2017-11-01

    Phase-locking value (PLV) is a potentially useful feature in sensorimotor rhythm-based brain-computer interface (BCI). However, volume conduction may cause spurious zero-phase coupling between two EEG signals and it is not clear whether PLV effects are independent of spectral amplitude. Volume conduction might be reduced by spatial filtering, but it is uncertain what impact this might have on PLV. Therefore, the goal of this study was to explore whether zero-phase PLV is meaningful and how it is affected by spatial filtering. Both amplitude and PLV feature were extracted in the frequency band of 10-15 Hz by classical methods using archival EEG data of 18 subjects trained on a two-target BCI task. The results show that with right ear-referenced data, there is meaningful long-range zero-phase synchronization likely involving the primary motor area and the supplementary motor area that cannot be explained by volume conduction. Another novel finding is that the large Laplacian spatial filter enhances the amplitude feature but eliminates most of the phase information seen in ear-referenced data. A bipolar channel using phase-coupled areas also includes both phase and amplitude information and has a significant practical advantage since fewer channels required.

  13. Accounting for regional background and population size in the detection of spatial clusters and outliers using geostatistical filtering and spatial neutral models: the case of lung cancer in Long Island, New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goovaerts Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete Spatial Randomness (CSR is the null hypothesis employed by many statistical tests for spatial pattern, such as local cluster or boundary analysis. CSR is however not a relevant null hypothesis for highly complex and organized systems such as those encountered in the environmental and health sciences in which underlying spatial pattern is present. This paper presents a geostatistical approach to filter the noise caused by spatially varying population size and to generate spatially correlated neutral models that account for regional background obtained by geostatistical smoothing of observed mortality rates. These neutral models were used in conjunction with the local Moran statistics to identify spatial clusters and outliers in the geographical distribution of male and female lung cancer in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties, New York, USA. Results We developed a typology of neutral models that progressively relaxes the assumptions of null hypotheses, allowing for the presence of spatial autocorrelation, non-uniform risk, and incorporation of spatially heterogeneous population sizes. Incorporation of spatial autocorrelation led to fewer significant ZIP codes than found in previous studies, confirming earlier claims that CSR can lead to over-identification of the number of significant spatial clusters or outliers. Accounting for population size through geostatistical filtering increased the size of clusters while removing most of the spatial outliers. Integration of regional background into the neutral models yielded substantially different spatial clusters and outliers, leading to the identification of ZIP codes where SMR values significantly depart from their regional background. Conclusion The approach presented in this paper enables researchers to assess geographic relationships using appropriate null hypotheses that account for the background variation extant in real-world systems. In particular, this new

  14. Validation and application of Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranya, Sandor; Muste, Marian

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel methodology to estimate bedload transport in rivers based on an improved bedform tracking procedure. The measurement technique combines components and processing protocols from two contemporary nonintrusive instruments: acoustic and image-based. The bedform mapping is conducted with acoustic surveys while the estimation of the velocity of the bedforms is obtained with processing techniques pertaining to image-based velocimetry. The technique is therefore called Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The implementation of this technique produces a whole-field velocity map associated with the multi-directional bedform movement. Based on the calculated two-dimensional bedform migration velocity field, the bedload transport estimation is done using the Exner equation. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to validate the AMV based bedload estimation in a laboratory flume at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering (IIHR). The bedform migration was analysed at three different flow discharges. Repeated bed geometry mapping, using a multiple transducer array (MTA), provided acoustic maps, which were post-processed with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Bedload transport rates were calculated along longitudinal sections using the streamwise components of the bedform velocity vectors and the measured bedform heights. The bulk transport rates were compared with the results from concurrent direct physical samplings and acceptable agreement was found. As a first field implementation of the AMV an attempt was made to estimate bedload transport for a section of the Ohio river in the United States, where bed geometry maps, resulted by repeated multibeam echo sounder (MBES) surveys, served as input data. Cross-sectional distributions of bedload transport rates from the AMV based method were compared with the ones obtained from another non-intrusive technique (due to the lack of direct samplings), ISSDOTv2, developed by the US Army

  15. Particle image velocimetry a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Raffel, Marcus; Wereley, Steve T; Kompenhans, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The development of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), a measurement technique, which allows for capturing velocity information of whole ?ow ?elds in fractions of a second, has begun in the eighties of the last century. In 1998, when this book has been published ?rstly, the PIV technique emerged from laboratories to applications in fundamental and industrial research, in par- lel to the transition from photo-graphicalto video recording techniques. Thus this book, whose objective was and is to serve as a practical guide to the PIV technique, found strong interest within the increasing group of us

  16. Krypton tagging velocimetry of an underexpanded jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parziale, N J; Smith, M S; Marineau, E C

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present the excitation/emission strategy, experimental setup, and results of an implementation of krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV). KTV is performed as follows: (i) seed a base flow with krypton; (ii) photosynthesize metastable krypton atoms with a frequency-doubled dye laser to form the tagged tracer; (iii) record the translation of the tagged metastable krypton by imaging the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) that is produced with an additional dye laser. The principle strength of KTV, relative to other tagging velocimetry techniques, is the use of a chemically inert tracer. KTV results are presented for an underexpanded jet of three mixtures of varying Kr/N2 concentration. It is demonstrated that KTV can be used in gas mixtures of relatively low krypton mole fraction (0.5% Kr/99.5% N2), and the KTV data from that experiment are found to be in good agreement with an empirical fit found in the literature. We find that KTV is useful to perform instantaneous velocity measurements with metastable krypton as a chemically inert, dilute, long-lifetime tracer in gas-phase flows.

  17. Laser doppler velocimetry and confined flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Jelena T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding the mode, in which two component laser Doppler velocimetry can be applied to flows confined in cylindrical tubes or vessels, was the aim of this study. We have identified principle issues that influence the propagation of laser beams in laser Doppler velocimetry system, applied to flow confined in cylindrical tube. Among them, the most important are influences of fluid and wall refractive indices, wall thickness and internal radius ratio and beam intersection angle. In analysis of the degrees of these influences, we have applied mathematical model, based on geometrical optics. The separation of measurement volumes, that measure different velocity components, has been recognized as the main drawback. To overcome this, we propose a lens with dual focal length – primary focal length for the measurement of one velocity component and secondary focal length for the measurement of the other velocity component. We present here the procedure for calculating the optimal value of secondary focal length, depending on experimental set-up parameters. The mathematical simulation of the application of the dual focal length lens, for chosen cases presented here, confirmed the accuracy of the proposed procedure.

  18. Recognition memory for low- and high-frequency-filtered emotional faces: Low spatial frequencies drive emotional memory enhancement, whereas high spatial frequencies drive the emotion-induced recognition bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Michaela; Tröger, Johannes; Michely, Nils; Uhde, Alarith; Wentura, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    This article deals with two well-documented phenomena regarding emotional stimuli: emotional memory enhancement-that is, better long-term memory for emotional than for neutral stimuli-and the emotion-induced recognition bias-that is, a more liberal response criterion for emotional than for neutral stimuli. Studies on visual emotion perception and attention suggest that emotion-related processes can be modulated by means of spatial-frequency filtering of the presented emotional stimuli. Specifically, low spatial frequencies are assumed to play a primary role for the influence of emotion on attention and judgment. Given this theoretical background, we investigated whether spatial-frequency filtering also impacts (1) the memory advantage for emotional faces and (2) the emotion-induced recognition bias, in a series of old/new recognition experiments. Participants completed incidental-learning tasks with high- (HSF) and low- (LSF) spatial-frequency-filtered emotional and neutral faces. The results of the surprise recognition tests showed a clear memory advantage for emotional stimuli. Most importantly, the emotional memory enhancement was significantly larger for face images containing only low-frequency information (LSF faces) than for HSF faces across all experiments, suggesting that LSF information plays a critical role in this effect, whereas the emotion-induced recognition bias was found only for HSF stimuli. We discuss our findings in terms of both the traditional account of different processing pathways for HSF and LSF information and a stimulus features account. The double dissociation in the results favors the latter account-that is, an explanation in terms of differences in the characteristics of HSF and LSF stimuli.

  19. Color-filter-free spatial visible light communication using RGB-LED and mobile-phone camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2014-12-15

    A novel color-filter-free visible-light communication (VLC) system using red-green-blue (RGB) light emitting diode (LED) and mobile-phone camera is proposed and demonstrated for the first time. A feature matching method, which is based on the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm for the received grayscale image is used instead of the chromatic information decoding method. The proposed method is simple and saves the computation complexity. The signal processing is based on the grayscale image computation; hence neither color-filter nor chromatic channel information is required. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed and high performance channel recognition is achieved.

  20. Objective speckle velocimetry for autonomous vehicle odometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, D; Charrett, T O H; Waugh, L; Tatam, R P

    2012-06-01

    Speckle velocimetry is investigated as a means of determining odometry data with potential for application on autonomous robotic vehicles. The technique described here relies on the integration of translation measurements made by normalized cross-correlation of speckle patterns to determine the change in position over time. The use of objective (non-imaged) speckle offers a number of advantages over subjective (imaged) speckle, such as a reduction in the number of optical components, reduced modulation of speckles at the edges of the image, and improved light efficiency. The influence of the source/detector configuration on the speckle translation to vehicle translation scaling factor for objective speckle is investigated using a computer model and verified experimentally. Experimental measurements are presented at velocities up to 80  mm s(-1) which show accuracy better than 0.4%.

  1. Tracking speckle displacement by double Kalman filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Li; Li Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ A tracking technique using two sequentially-connected Kalman filter for tracking laser speckle displacement is presented. One Kalman filter tracks temporal speckle displacement, while another Kalman filter tracks spatial speckle displacement. The temporal Kalman filter provides a prior for the spatial Kalman filter, and the spatial Kalman filter provides measurements for the temporal Kalman filter. The contribution of a prior to estimations of the spatial Kalman filter is analyzed. An optical analysis system was set up to verify the double-Kalman-filter tracker's ability of tracking laser speckle's constant displacement.

  2. Particle image velocimetry - Principles and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, A.; Marechal, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a measurement technique elaborated towards the end of the 1970's, but which has developed considerably in recent years. The general principle of PIV is very simple and enables access to instantaneous velocity fields. It consists in recording images of tracer-particles injected into the flow and determining the distance covered by these particles. Since we know the time lapse between successive images of the same particle, we can derive the local fluid velocity. Among the many existing image acquisition and processing methods, the image inter-correlation analysis techniques, used with a pulsed laser source, is the most effective. Since we know the influence of different parameters (number of particles, beam power, time lapse between two successive images, size of query zones, etc.) on the quality of the final result, we can optimize practical adjustment of the PIV measurement scheme. The PIV was tested on the LAVITA hydraulic mockup (simulating the operation of a tangential fan). First results are, all in all, highly satisfactory. These have enabled the rapid drafting of instantaneous mean velocity field maps (20 images acquired in less than 90 seconds, with a post-processing time of about 10 minutes). Observation of the instantaneous fields has evidenced the presence of low frequency non-stationary phenomena which are not revealed by Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Quantitative comparison between LDV and PIV, concerning average fields, showed close results, with, however, local divergences which could be relatively marked. It must nevertheless be noted that the PIV measurements performed on LAVITA have not been optimized with a view to obtaining a consistently good accuracy level. Priority in the present case was given to the scope of the field explored, with a view to observing the large non-stationary structures within a flow. The PIV measurement technique is thus operational for prompt flow characterization. However

  3. Ensemble Kalman Filter Inference of Spatially-varying Manning’s n coefficients in the Coastal Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Siripatana, Adil; Mayo, Talea; Knio, Omar; Dawson, Clint; Maî tre, Olivier Le; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    size (O(10)), the filter’s estimate converges to the reference Manning’s field. To enhance performance, we have further reduced the dimension of the parameter search space through a Karhunen-Loéve (KL) expansion. We have also iterated on the filter

  4. Occurrence, profile and spatial distribution of UV-filters and musk fragrances in mussels from Portuguese coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M; Fernandes, J O; Pena, A; Cunha, S C

    2018-07-01

    The increasing production and consumption of Personal Care Products (PCPs), containing UV-filters and musk fragrances, has led to its widespread presence in the aquatic environment which can cause harmful effects to the aquatic organisms due to its intrinsic toxicity. This study aims to evaluate the degree of contamination of wild mussels along the entire Portuguese coastline, continually exposed in their habitat to different contaminants. For this purpose, approximately 1000 mussel specimens were sampled during one year in seven different locations, along the Portuguese coastline. Simultaneous quantification of five UV-filters and seven musks in mussels was achieved by a Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) extraction procedure combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Ten out of the twelve target analytes were found in the analysed samples, highlighting the presence of AHTN (tonalide), EHS (2-ethylhexylsalicylate) and EHMC (2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate) in all positive samples (93%). Overall, the results obtained indicate a widespread contamination of wild mussels along Portuguese coastline, all over the year. UV-filters were more frequently detected (90%) than musk fragrances (70%) and also quantified at higher levels, with average total concentrations reaching 1155.8 ng/g (dw) against 397.7 ng/g (dw) respectively. A high correlation was observed between the most densely populated and industrialized locations and the higher levels of musks and UV-filters found. In other hand, lower levels of PCPs were found in protected areas. As expected, an increase in UV-filters levels was observed after the summer, likely due to the intense period of recreational activities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of magnetic resonance velocimetry for steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Biancheri, C L; Pettigrew, R I; Peifer, J W; Markou, C P; Engels, H

    1990-11-01

    Whole body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has recently become an important diagnostic tool for cardiovascular diseases. The technique of magnetic resonance phase velocity encoding allows the quantitative measurement of velocity for an arbitrary component direction. A study was initiated to determine the ability and accuracy of MR velocimetry to measure a wide range of flow conditions including flow separation, three-dimensional secondary flow, high velocity gradients, and turbulence. A steady flow system pumped water doped with manganese chloride through a variety of test sections. Images were produced using gradient echo sequences on test sections including a straight tube, a curved tube, a smoothly converging-diverging nozzle, and an orifice. Magnetic resonance measurements of laminar and turbulent flows were depicted as cross-sectional velocity profiles. MR velocity measurements revealed such flow behavior as spatially varying velocity, recirculation and secondary flows over a wide range of conditions. Comparisons made with published experimental laser Doppler anemometry measurements and theoretical calculations for similar flow conditions revealed excellent accuracy and precision levels. The successful measurement of velocity profiles for a variety of flow conditions and geometries indicate that magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate, non-contacting velocimeter.

  6. Towards real-time non contact spatial resolved oxygenation monitoring using a multi spectral filter array camera in various light conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jacob R.; van Beekum, Karlijn; Klaessens, John; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Boer, Christa; Hardeberg, Jon Y.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2018-02-01

    Non contact spatial resolved oxygenation measurements remain an open challenge in the biomedical field and non contact patient monitoring. Although point measurements are the clinical standard till this day, regional differences in the oxygenation will improve the quality and safety of care. Recent developments in spectral imaging resulted in spectral filter array cameras (SFA). These provide the means to acquire spatial spectral videos in real-time and allow a spatial approach to spectroscopy. In this study, the performance of a 25 channel near infrared SFA camera was studied to obtain spatial oxygenation maps of hands during an occlusion of the left upper arm in 7 healthy volunteers. For comparison a clinical oxygenation monitoring system, INVOS, was used as a reference. In case of the NIRS SFA camera, oxygenation curves were derived from 2-3 wavelength bands with a custom made fast analysis software using a basic algorithm. Dynamic oxygenation changes were determined with the NIR SFA camera and INVOS system at different regional locations of the occluded versus non-occluded hands and showed to be in good agreement. To increase the signal to noise ratio, algorithm and image acquisition were optimised. The measurement were robust to different illumination conditions with NIR light sources. This study shows that imaging of relative oxygenation changes over larger body areas is potentially possible in real time.

  7. Neuromorphic infrared focal plane performs sensor fusion on-plane local-contrast-enhancement spatial and temporal filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Mark A.; Woolaway, James T., II; Curzan, Jon P.; McCarley, Paul L.

    1993-08-01

    An infrared focal plane has been simulated, designed and fabricated which mimics the form and function of the vertebrate retina. The `Neuromorphic' focal plane has the capability of performing pixel-based sensor fusion and real-time local contrast enhancement, much like the response of the human eye. The device makes use of an indium antimonide detector array with a 3 - 5 micrometers spectral response, and a switched capacitor resistive network to compute a real-time 2D spatial average. This device permits the summation of other sensor outputs to be combined on-chip with the infrared detections of the focal plane itself. The resulting real-time analog processed information thus represents the combined information of many sensors with the advantage that analog spatial and temporal signal processing is performed at the focal plane. A Gaussian subtraction method is used to produce the pixel output which when displayed produces an image with enhanced edges, representing spatial and temporal derivatives in the scene. The spatial and temporal responses of the device are tunable during operation, permitting the operator to `peak up' the response of the array to spatial and temporally varying signals. Such an array adapts to ambient illumination conditions without loss of detection performance. This paper reviews the Neuromorphic infrared focal plane from initial operational simulations to detailed design characteristics, and concludes with a presentation of preliminary operational data for the device as well as videotaped imagery.

  8. Peak-locking reduction for particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelis, Dirk; Wieneke, Bernhard; Neal, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    A parametric study of the factors contributing to peak-locking, a known bias error source in particle image velocimetry (PIV), is conducted using synthetic data that are processed with a state-of-the-art PIV algorithm. The investigated parameters include: particle image diameter, image interpolation techniques, the effect of asymmetric versus symmetric window deformation, number of passes and the interrogation window size. Some of these parameters are found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of the peak-locking error. The effects for specific PIV cameras are also studied experimentally using a precision turntable to generate a known rotating velocity field. Image time series recorded using this experiment show a linear range of pixel and sub-pixel shifts ranging from 0 to  ±4 pixels. Deviations in the constant vorticity field (ω z ) reveal how peak-locking can be affected systematically both by varying parameters of the detection system such as the focal distance and f -number, and also by varying the settings of the PIV analysis. A new a priori technique for reducing the bias errors associated with peak-locking in PIV is introduced using an optical diffuser to avoid undersampled particle images during the recording of the raw images. This technique is evaluated against other a priori approaches using experimental data and is shown to perform favorably. Finally, a new a posteriori anti peak-locking filter (APLF) is developed and investigated, which shows promising results for both synthetic data and real measurements for very small particle image sizes. (paper)

  9. Helioseismology in a bottle: modal acoustic velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triana, Santiago Andrés; Zimmerman, Daniel S; Lathrop, Daniel P; Nataf, Henri-Claude; Thorette, Aurélien; Lekic, Vedran

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the differential rotation of the Sun's interior is one of the great achievements of helioseismology, providing important constraints for stellar physics. The technique relies on observing and analyzing rotationally-induced splittings of p-modes in the star. Here, we demonstrate the first use of the technique in a laboratory setting. We apply it in a spherical cavity with a spinning central core (spherical-Couette flow) to determine the mean azimuthal velocity of the air filling the cavity. We excite a number of acoustic resonances (analogous to p-modes in the Sun) using a speaker and record the response with an array of small microphones on the outer sphere. Many observed acoustic modes show rotationally-induced splittings, which allow us to perform an inversion to determine the air's azimuthal velocity as a function of both radius and latitude. We validate the method by comparing the velocity field obtained through inversion against the velocity profile measured with a calibrated hot film anemometer. This modal acoustic velocimetry technique has great potential for laboratory setups involving rotating fluids in axisymmetric cavities. It will be useful especially in liquid metals where direct optical methods are unsuitable and ultrasonic techniques very challenging at best. (paper)

  10. Low-Complexity Spatial-Temporal Filtering Method via Compressive Sensing for Interference Mitigation in a GNSS Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Liang Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A compressive sensing based array processing method is proposed to lower the complexity, and computation load of array system and to maintain the robust antijam performance in global navigation satellite system (GNSS receiver. Firstly, the spatial and temporal compressed matrices are multiplied with array signal, which results in a small size array system. Secondly, the 2-dimensional (2D minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR beamformer is employed in proposed system to mitigate the narrowband and wideband interference simultaneously. The iterative process is performed to find optimal spatial and temporal gain vector by MVDR approach, which enhances the steering gain of direction of arrival (DOA of interest. Meanwhile, the null gain is set at DOA of interference. Finally, the simulated navigation signal is generated offline by the graphic user interface tool and employed in the proposed algorithm. The theoretical analysis results using the proposed algorithm are verified based on simulated results.

  11. Solutions to the cocktail party problem in insects: selective filters, spatial release from masking and gain control in tropical crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne K D Schmidt

    Full Text Available Insects often communicate by sound in mixed species choruses; like humans and many vertebrates in crowded social environments they thus have to solve cocktail-party-like problems in order to ensure successful communication with conspecifics. This is even more a problem in species-rich environments like tropical rainforests, where background noise levels of up to 60 dB SPL have been measured.Using neurophysiological methods we investigated the effect of natural background noise (masker on signal detection thresholds in two tropical cricket species Paroecanthus podagrosus and Diatrypa sp., both in the laboratory and outdoors. We identified three 'bottom-up' mechanisms which contribute to an excellent neuronal representation of conspecific signals despite the masking background. First, the sharply tuned frequency selectivity of the receiver reduces the amount of masking energy around the species-specific calling song frequency. Laboratory experiments yielded an average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of -8 dB, when masker and signal were broadcast from the same side. Secondly, displacing the masker by 180° from the signal improved SNRs by further 6 to 9 dB, a phenomenon known as spatial release from masking. Surprisingly, experiments carried out directly in the nocturnal rainforest yielded SNRs of about -23 dB compared with those in the laboratory with the same masker, where SNRs reached only -14.5 and -16 dB in both species. Finally, a neuronal gain control mechanism enhances the contrast between the responses to signals and the masker, by inhibition of neuronal activity in interstimulus intervals.Thus, conventional speaker playbacks in the lab apparently do not properly reconstruct the masking noise situation in a spatially realistic manner, since under real world conditions multiple sound sources are spatially distributed in space. Our results also indicate that without knowledge of the receiver properties and the spatial release mechanisms the

  12. 3D analysis of the morphology and spatial distribution of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Ileana; Ersen, Ovidiu; Arenal, Raul; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Messaoudi, Cédric; Chizari, Kambiz; Janowska, Izabela; Pham-Huu, Cuong

    2012-06-13

    We present here the application of the energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in the tomographic mode to determine the precise 3D distribution of nitrogen within nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). Several tilt series of energy-filtered images were acquired on the K ionization edges of carbon and nitrogen on a multiwalled N-CNT containing a high amount of nitrogen. Two tilt series of carbon and nitrogen 2D maps were then calculated from the corresponding energy-filtered images by using a proper extraction procedure of the chemical signals. Applying iterative reconstruction algorithms provided two spatially correlated C and N elemental-selective volumes, which were then simultaneously analyzed with the shape-sensitive reconstruction deduced from Zero-Loss recordings. With respect to the previous findings, crucial information obtained by analyzing the 3D chemical maps was that, among the two different kind of arches formed in these nanotubes (transversal or rounded ones depending on their morphology), the transversal arches contain more nitrogen than do the round ones. In addition, a detailed analysis of the shape-sensitive volume allowed the observation of an unexpected change in morphology along the tube axis: close to the round arches (with less N), the tube is roughly cylindrical, whereas near the transversal ones (with more N), its shape changes to a prism. This relatively new technique is very powerful in the material science because it combines the ability of the classical electron tomography to solve 3D structures and the chemical selectivity of the EFTEM imaging.

  13. Deferred slanted-edge analysis: a unified approach to spatial frequency response measurement on distorted images and color filter array subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, F

    2018-03-01

    The slanted-edge method of spatial frequency response (SFR) measurement is usually applied to grayscale images under the assumption that any distortion of the expected straight edge is negligible. By decoupling the edge orientation and position estimation step from the edge spread function construction step, it is shown in this paper that the slanted-edge method can be extended to allow it to be applied to images suffering from significant geometric distortion, such as produced by equiangular fisheye lenses. This same decoupling also allows the slanted-edge method to be applied directly to Bayer-mosaicked images so that the SFR of the color filter array subsets can be measured directly without the unwanted influence of demosaicking artifacts. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed deferred slanted-edge method in relation to existing methods.

  14. Stereo-particle image velocimetry uncertainty quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Charonko, John J

    2017-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are subject to multiple elemental error sources and thus estimating overall measurement uncertainty is challenging. Recent advances have led to a posteriori uncertainty estimation methods for planar two-component PIV. However, no complete methodology exists for uncertainty quantification in stereo PIV. In the current work, a comprehensive framework is presented to quantify the uncertainty stemming from stereo registration error and combine it with the underlying planar velocity uncertainties. The disparity in particle locations of the dewarped images is used to estimate the positional uncertainty of the world coordinate system, which is then propagated to the uncertainty in the calibration mapping function coefficients. Next, the calibration uncertainty is combined with the planar uncertainty fields of the individual cameras through an uncertainty propagation equation and uncertainty estimates are obtained for all three velocity components. The methodology was tested with synthetic stereo PIV data for different light sheet thicknesses, with and without registration error, and also validated with an experimental vortex ring case from 2014 PIV challenge. Thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relative impact of the various parameters to the overall uncertainty. The results suggest that in absence of any disparity, the stereo PIV uncertainty prediction method is more sensitive to the planar uncertainty estimates than to the angle uncertainty, although the latter is not negligible for non-zero disparity. Overall the presented uncertainty quantification framework showed excellent agreement between the error and uncertainty RMS values for both the synthetic and the experimental data and demonstrated reliable uncertainty prediction coverage. This stereo PIV uncertainty quantification framework provides the first comprehensive treatment on the subject and potentially lays foundations applicable to volumetric

  15. Identifying differences in brain activities and an accurate detection of autism spectrum disorder using resting state functional-magnetic resonance imaging : A spatial filtering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraju, Vigneshwaran; Suresh, Mahanand Belathur; Sundaram, Suresh; Narasimhan, Sundararajan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for detecting major differences in brain activities between Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patients and neurotypical subjects using the resting state fMRI. Further the method also extracts discriminative features for an accurate diagnosis of ASD. The proposed approach determines a spatial filter that projects the covariance matrices of the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) time-series signals from both the ASD patients and neurotypical subjects in orthogonal directions such that they are highly separable. The inverse of this filter also provides a spatial pattern map within the brain that highlights those regions responsible for the distinguishable activities between the ASD patients and neurotypical subjects. For a better classification, highly discriminative log-variance features providing the maximum separation between the two classes are extracted from the projected BOLD time-series data. A detailed study has been carried out using the publicly available data from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) consortium for the different gender and age-groups. The study results indicate that for all the above categories, the regional differences in resting state activities are more commonly found in the right hemisphere compared to the left hemisphere of the brain. Among males, a clear shift in activities to the prefrontal cortex is observed for ASD patients while other parts of the brain show diminished activities compared to neurotypical subjects. Among females, such a clear shift is not evident; however, several regions, especially in the posterior and medial portions of the brain show diminished activities due to ASD. Finally, the classification performance obtained using the log-variance features is found to be better when compared to earlier studies in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of particle image velocimetry measurement techniques to study turbulence characteristics of oscillatory flows around parallel-plate structures in thermoacoustic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Xiaoan; Jaworski, Artur J

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the experimental setup and measurement methodologies to study the physics of oscillatory flows in the vicinity of parallel-plate stacks by using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. Parallel-plate configurations often appear as internal structures in thermoacoustic devices and are responsible for the hydrodynamic energy transfer processes. The flow around selected stack configurations is induced by a standing acoustic wave, whose amplitude can be varied. Depending on the direction of the flow within the acoustic cycle, relative to the stack, it can be treated as an entrance flow or a wake flow. The insight into the flow behaviour, its kinematics, dynamics and scales of turbulence, is obtained using the classical Reynolds decomposition to separate the instantaneous velocity fields into ensemble-averaged mean velocity fields and fluctuations in a set of predetermined phases within an oscillation cycle. The mean velocity field and the fluctuation intensity distributions are investigated over the acoustic oscillation cycle. The velocity fluctuation is further divided into large- and small-scale fluctuations by using fast Fourier transform (FFT) spatial filtering techniques

  17. Simultaneous measurement of internal and surrounding flows of a moving droplet using multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, M; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T; Oshima, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-multiphase flow measurement technique, 'multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV), and its application to the internal and surrounding flow measurement of a droplet moving through a microchannel. The present system measures the dynamic interaction between flows in two different phases, such as solid–liquid or liquid–liquid, simultaneously and separately. Unlike conventional confocal micro-PIV, this system features a wavelength separation optical device. The optical components (e.g., filters and dichroic mirror) are designed to separate fluorescent lights of tracer particles and to eliminate unnecessary scattered light depending on the characteristic wavelengths. The system can record a sequence of images at up to 2000 frames per second. It also has an in-plane spatial resolution of 0.284 µm/pixel in a field of 227.2 µm × 170.4 µm and a confocal depth of 3.43 µm using 1.0 µm particles and a 40× objective lens. This paper examines the performance of the present system, such as its ability to separate wavelengths. Furthermore, this system is applied to liquid–liquid two-phase flow, which consists of a water droplet and surrounding oil flow, in a microchannel. We succeeded in measuring each phase movement separately and simultaneously. As a result of the estimation of the out-of-plane velocity component, a three-dimensional flow structure is obtained and the interaction between each phase is investigated

  18. Assessment of temporal and spatial evolution of bacterial communities in a biological sand filter mesocosm treating winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramond, J-B; Welz, P J; Tuffin, M I; Burton, S G; Cowan, D A

    2013-07-01

    To assess the impact of winery wastewater (WW) on biological sand filter (BSF) bacterial community structures, and to evaluate whether BSFs can constitute alternative and valuable treatment- processes to remediate WW. During 112 days, WW was used to contaminate a BSF mesocosm (length 173 cm/width 106 cm/depth 30 cm). The effect of WW on bacterial communities of four BSF microenvironments (surface/deep, inlet/outlet) was investigated using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). BSF achieved high Na (95·1%), complete Cl and almost complete chemical oxygen demand (COD) (98·0%) and phenolic (99·2%) removals. T-RFLP analysis combined with anosim revealed that WW significantly modified the surface and deep BSF bacterial communities. BSF provided high COD, phenolic and salt removals throughout the experiment. WW-selected bacterial communities were thus able to tolerate and/or degrade WW, suggesting that community composition does not alter BSF performances. However, biomass increased significantly in the WW-impacted surface sediments, which could later lead to system clogging and should thus be monitored. BSFs constitute alternatives to constructed wetlands to treat agri effluents such as WW. To our knowledge, this study is the first unravelling the responses of BSF bacterial communities to contamination and suggests that WW-selected BSF communities maintained high removal performances. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. A multi-time-step noise reduction method for measuring velocity statistics from particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicoane, Nathanaël; López-Caballero, Miguel; Bourgoin, Mickael; Aliseda, Alberto; Volk, Romain

    2017-10-01

    We present a method to improve the accuracy of velocity measurements for fluid flow or particles immersed in it, based on a multi-time-step approach that allows for cancellation of noise in the velocity measurements. Improved velocity statistics, a critical element in turbulent flow measurements, can be computed from the combination of the velocity moments computed using standard particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques for data sets that have been collected over different values of time intervals between images. This method produces Eulerian velocity fields and Lagrangian velocity statistics with much lower noise levels compared to standard PIV or PTV measurements, without the need of filtering and/or windowing. Particle displacement between two frames is computed for multiple different time-step values between frames in a canonical experiment of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The second order velocity structure function of the flow is computed with the new method and compared to results from traditional measurement techniques in the literature. Increased accuracy is also demonstrated by comparing the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy measured from this function against previously validated measurements.

  20. Capillary red blood cell velocimetry by phase-resolved optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianbo; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A

    2017-10-01

    We present a phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) method to extend Doppler OCT for the accurate measurement of the red blood cell (RBC) velocity in cerebral capillaries. OCT data were acquired with an M-mode scanning strategy (repeated A-scans) to account for the single-file passage of RBCs in a capillary, which were then high-pass filtered to remove the stationary component of the signal to ensure an accurate measurement of phase shift of flowing RBCs. The angular frequency of the signal from flowing RBCs was then quantified from the dynamic component of the signal and used to calculate the axial speed of flowing RBCs in capillaries. We validated our measurement by RBC passage velocimetry using the signal magnitude of the same OCT time series data.

  1. Spectroscopic interpretation and velocimetry analysis of fluctuations in a cylindrical plasma recorded by a fast camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenbürger, S.; Brandt, C.; Brochard, F.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.

    2010-06-01

    Fast visible imaging is used on a cylindrical magnetized argon plasma produced by thermionic discharge in the Mirabelle device. To link the information collected with the camera to a physical quantity, fast camera movies of plasma structures are compared to Langmuir probe measurements. High correlation is found between light fluctuations and plasma density fluctuations. Contributions from neutral argon and ionized argon to the overall light intensity are separated by using interference filters and a light intensifier. Light emitting transitions are shown to involve a metastable neutral argon state that can be excited by thermal plasma electrons, thus explaining the good correlation between light and density fluctuations. The propagation velocity of plasma structures is calculated by adapting velocimetry methods to the fast camera movies. The resulting estimates of instantaneous propagation velocity are in agreement with former experiments. The computation of mean velocities is discussed.

  2. Spectroscopic interpretation and velocimetry analysis of fluctuations in a cylindrical plasma recorded by a fast camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenbuerger, S.; Brandt, C.; Brochard, F.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fast visible imaging is used on a cylindrical magnetized argon plasma produced by thermionic discharge in the Mirabelle device. To link the information collected with the camera to a physical quantity, fast camera movies of plasma structures are compared to Langmuir probe measurements. High correlation is found between light fluctuations and plasma density fluctuations. Contributions from neutral argon and ionized argon to the overall light intensity are separated by using interference filters and a light intensifier. Light emitting transitions are shown to involve a metastable neutral argon state that can be excited by thermal plasma electrons, thus explaining the good correlation between light and density fluctuations. The propagation velocity of plasma structures is calculated by adapting velocimetry methods to the fast camera movies. The resulting estimates of instantaneous propagation velocity are in agreement with former experiments. The computation of mean velocities is discussed.

  3. Multi-modal MRI analysis with disease-specific spatial filtering: initial testing to predict mild cognitive impairment patients who convert to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi eOishi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alterations of the gray and white matter have been identified in Alzheimer’s disease (AD by structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. However, whether the combination of these modalities could increase the diagnostic performance is unknown.Methods: Participants included 19 AD patients, 22 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI patients, and 22 cognitively normal elderly (NC. The aMCI group was further divided into an aMCI-converter group (converted to AD dementia within three years, and an aMCI-stable group who did not convert in this time period. A T1-weighted image, a T2 map, and a DTI of each participant were normalized, and voxel-based comparisons between AD and NC groups were performed. Regions-of-interest, which defined the areas with significant differences between AD and NC, were created for each modality and named disease-specific spatial filters (DSF. Linear discriminant analysis was used to optimize the combination of multiple MRI measurements extracted by DSF to effectively differentiate AD from NC. The resultant DSF and the discriminant function were applied to the aMCI group to investigate the power to differentiate the aMCI-converters from the aMCI-stable patients. Results: The multi-modal approach with AD-specific filters led to a predictive model with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.93, in differentiating aMCI-converters from aMCI-stable patients. This AUC was better than that of a single-contrast-based approach, such as T1-based morphometry or diffusion anisotropy analysis. Conclusion: The multi-modal approach has the potential to increase the value of MRI in predicting conversion from aMCI to AD.

  4. Comparison of Simultaneous PIV and Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry in Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) technique that relies on the photo- dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser-induced fluorescence. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is about 50 micro-s. The feasibility of using HTV for probing low- speed flows (a few m/s) is investigated by using an inert, heated gas as a means to increase the OH species lifetime. Unlike particle-based techniques, MTV does not suffer from tracer settling, which is particularly problematic at low speeds. Furthermore, the flow needs to be seeded with only a small mole fraction of water vapor, making it safer for both the user and facilities than other MTV techniques based on corrosive or toxic chemical tracers. HTV is demonstrated on a steam-seeded nitrogen jet at approximately 75 C in the laminar (Umean=3.31 m/s, Re=1,540), transitional (Umean=4.48 m/s, Re=2,039), and turbulent (Umean=6.91 m/s, Re=3,016) regimes at atmospheric pressure. The measured velocity profiles are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed simultaneously with a second imager. Seeding for the PIV is achieved by introducing micron-sized water droplets into the flow with the steam; the same laser sheet is used for PIV and HTV to guarantee spatial and temporal overlap of the data. Optimizing each of these methods, however, requires conflicting operating conditions: higher temperatures benefit the HTV signals but reduce the available seed density for the PIV through evaporation. Nevertheless, data are found to agree within 10% for the instantaneous velocity profiles and within 5% for the mean profiles and demonstrate the feasibility of HTV for low-speed flows at moderate to high temperatures.

  5. MAPPING THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF DUST EXTINCTION IN NGC 959 USING BROADBAND VISIBLE AND MID-INFRARED FILTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, K.; Jansen, R. A.; Windhorst, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to estimate and map the two-dimensional distribution of dust extinction in the late-type spiral galaxy NGC 959 from the theoretical and observed flux ratio of optical V and mid-IR (MIR) 3.6 μm images. Our method is applicable to both young and old stellar populations for a range of metallicities, and is not restricted to lines of sight toward star-formation (SF) regions. We explore this method using a pixel-based analysis on images of NGC 959 obtained in the V band at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and at 3.6 μm (L band) with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera. We present the original and extinction corrected Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images, as well as optical UBVR images of NGC 959. While the dust lanes are not clearly evident at GALEX resolution, our dust map clearly traces the dust that can be seen silhouetted against the galaxy's disk in the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of NGC 959. The advantages of our method are (1) it only depends on two relatively common broadband images in the optical V band and in the MIR at 3.6 μm (but adding a near-UV band improves its fidelity); and (2) it is able to map the two-dimensional spatial distribution of dust within a galaxy. This powerful tool could be used to measure the detailed distribution of dust extinction within higher redshift galaxies to be observed with, e.g., the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 (optical near-IR) and James Webb Space Telescope (mid-IR), and to distinguish properties of dust within galaxy bulges, spiral arms, and inter-arm regions.

  6. Molecular filter-based diagnostics in high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of iodine molecular filters in nonintrusive planar velocimetry methods is examined. Detailed absorption profiles are obtained to highlight the effects that determine the profile shape. It is shown that pressure broadening induced by the presence of a nonabsorbing vapor can be utilized to significantly change the slopes bounding the absorbing region while remaining in the optically-thick regime.

  7. Modulations of eye movement patterns by spatial filtering during the learning and testing phases of an old/new face recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Chantal L; Collin, Charles A; Nelson, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    In two experiments, we examined the effects of varying the spatial frequency (SF) content of face images on eye movements during the learning and testing phases of an old/new recognition task. At both learning and testing, participants were presented with face stimuli band-pass filtered to 11 different SF bands, as well as an unfiltered baseline condition. We found that eye movements varied significantly as a function of SF. Specifically, the frequency of transitions between facial features showed a band-pass pattern, with more transitions for middle-band faces (≈5-20 cycles/face) than for low-band (≈20 cpf) ones. These findings were similar for the learning and testing phases. The distributions of transitions across facial features were similar for the middle-band, high-band, and unfiltered faces, showing a concentration on the eyes and mouth; conversely, low-band faces elicited mostly transitions involving the nose and nasion. The eye movement patterns elicited by low, middle, and high bands are similar to those previous researchers have suggested reflect holistic, configural, and featural processing, respectively. More generally, our results are compatible with the hypotheses that eye movements are functional, and that the visual system makes flexible use of visuospatial information in face processing. Finally, our finding that only middle spatial frequencies yielded the same number and distribution of fixations as unfiltered faces adds more evidence to the idea that these frequencies are especially important for face recognition, and reveals a possible mediator for the superior performance that they elicit.

  8. Evaluation to Obtain the Image According to the Spatial Domain Filtering of Various Convolution Kernels in the Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hoo Min; Yoo, Beong Gyu; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the image of spatial domain filtering as an alternative to additional image reconstruction using different kernels in MDCT. Derived from thin collimated source images were generated using water phantom and abdomen B10(very smooth), B20(smooth), B30(medium smooth), B40 (medium), B50(medium sharp), B60(sharp), B70(very sharp) and B80(ultra sharp) kernels. MTF and spatial resolution measured with various convolution kernels. Quantitative CT attenuation coefficient and noise measurements provided comparable HU(Hounsfield) units in this respect. CT attenuation coefficient(mean HU) values in the water were values in the water were 1.1∼1.8 HU, air(-998∼-1000 HU) and noise in the water(5.4∼44.8 HU), air(3.6∼31.4 HU). In the abdominal fat a CT attenuation coefficient(-2.2∼0.8 HU) and noise(10.1∼82.4 HU) was measured. In the abdominal was CT attenuation coefficient(53.3∼54.3 HU) and noise(10.4∼70.7 HU) in the muscle and in the liver parenchyma of CT attenuation coefficient(60.4∼62.2 HU) and noise (7.6∼63.8 HU) in the liver parenchyma. Image reconstructed with a convolution kernel led to an increase in noise, whereas the results for CT attenuation coefficient were comparable. Image scanned with a high convolution kernel(B80) led to an increase in noise, whereas the results for CT attenuation coefficient were comparable. Image medications of image sharpness and noise eliminate the need for reconstruction using different kernels in the future. Adjusting CT various kernels, which should be adjusted to take into account the kernels of the CT undergoing the examination, may control CT images increase the diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Flow Profile Study using miniature Laser-Doppler velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, W.E.; Booij, W.E.; de Jongh, A.; de Mul, F.F.M.

    1995-01-01

    We present a physics experiment, in which laser - Doppler velocimetry is used to make first - year university physics students realize that the idealized solutions offered by standard text books seldom are applicable without corrections, which often are numerical. This is demonstrated by carefully

  10. Broadband phase difference method for ultrasonic velocimetry in molten glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikura, Hiroshige; Ihara, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry in molten glass. Realization of such a technique has two difficulties: ultrasonic transmission into molten salt and Doppler signal processing. Buffer rod technique was developed in our research to transmit ultrasound into high temperature molten glass. This article discusses newly developed signal processing technique named broadband phase difference method. (J.P.N.)

  11. Reusable holographic velocimetry system based on polarization multiplexing in Bacteriorhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Chan, V.S.S.; Ooms, T.A.; Bhattacharya, N.; Westerweel, J.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) system using a reversible holographic material as the recording medium. In HPIV the three-dimensional flow field throughout a volume is detected by adding small tracer particles to a normally transparent medium. By recording the

  12. Performing particle image velocimetry using artificial neural networks: a proof-of-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabault, Jean; Kolaas, Jostein; Jensen, Atle

    2017-12-01

    Traditional programs based on feature engineering are underperforming on a steadily increasing number of tasks compared with artificial neural networks (ANNs), in particular for image analysis. Image analysis is widely used in fluid mechanics when performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), and therefore it is natural to test the ability of ANNs to perform such tasks. We report for the first time the use of convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and fully connected neural networks (FCNNs) for performing end-to-end PIV. Realistic synthetic images are used for training the networks and several synthetic test cases are used to assess the quality of each network’s predictions and compare them with state-of-the-art PIV software. In addition, we present tests on real-world data that prove ANNs can be used not only with synthetic images but also with more noisy, imperfect images obtained in a real experimental setup. While the ANNs we present have slightly higher root mean square error than state-of-the-art cross-correlation methods, they perform better near edges and allow for higher spatial resolution than such methods. In addition, it is likely that one could with further work develop ANNs which perform better that the proof-of-concept we offer.

  13. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  14. Retina-Inspired Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutsi, Effrosyni; Fillatre, Lionel; Antonini, Marc; Gaulmin, Julien

    2018-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel filter, which is inspired by the human retina. The human retina consists of three different layers: the Outer Plexiform Layer (OPL), the inner plexiform layer, and the ganglionic layer. Our inspiration is the linear transform which takes place in the OPL and has been mathematically described by the neuroscientific model "virtual retina." This model is the cornerstone to derive the non-separable spatio-temporal OPL retina-inspired filter, briefly renamed retina-inspired filter, studied in this paper. This filter is connected to the dynamic behavior of the retina, which enables the retina to increase the sharpness of the visual stimulus during filtering before its transmission to the brain. We establish that this retina-inspired transform forms a group of spatio-temporal Weighted Difference of Gaussian (WDoG) filters when it is applied to a still image visible for a given time. We analyze the spatial frequency bandwidth of the retina-inspired filter with respect to time. It is shown that the WDoG spectrum varies from a lowpass filter to a bandpass filter. Therefore, while time increases, the retina-inspired filter enables to extract different kinds of information from the input image. Finally, we discuss the benefits of using the retina-inspired filter in image processing applications such as edge detection and compression.

  15. Iced airfoil separation bubble measurements by particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jason J.

    Not long after the birth of aviation, pilots began to recognize the dangers posed by aircraft icing. Since that time, research has improved the awareness of this problem and the scientific understanding of the associated aerodynamic impacts, however, few studies have involved detailed, quantitative, flowfield measurements. For this reason, the current investigation was conducted in which high spatial-resolution flowfield measurements were acquired of a NACA 0012 airfoil with two- and three-dimensional, simulated, leading-edge, horn-ice accretions utilizing particle image velocimetry (PIV). These measurements complemented existing iced airfoil performance measurements, revealed previously unknown details regarding the structure and behavior of these flowfields, and could potentially facilitate the development and improvement of computational schemes used to predict largely separated flows, including that of an iced airfoil near stall. Previous iced airfoil investigations have demonstrated somewhat reduced aerodynamic penalties resulting from a three-dimensional ice simulation, compared to those of a two-dimensional ice simulation of a representative cross section. Correspondingly, the current measurements revealed accelerated transition of the separated shear layer emanating from a three-dimensional ice simulation and therefore enhanced pressure recovery and reduced mean separation bubble length, each relative to the flowfield of a representative two-dimensional ice simulation. These effects appeared to result from the quasi-steady distribution of discrete, streamwise vortices which aided the turbulent entrainment of fluid from the recirculation region of the three-dimensional ice simulation separation bubble flowfield. These vortices were generated by a streamwise-vortex instability excited by roughness along the three-dimensional ice simulation and produced spanwise-cell structures throughout this flowfield, as well as significant spanwise variation in peak

  16. Acceleration Characteristics of a Rock Slide Using the Particle Image Velocimetry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV technique with high precision and spatial resolution is a suitable sensor for flow field experiments. In this paper, the PIV technology was used to monitor the development of a displacement field, velocity field and acceleration field of a rock slide. It was found that the peak acceleration of the sliding surface appeared earlier than the peak acceleration of the sliding body. The characteristics of the rock slide including the short failure time, high velocities, and large accelerations indicate that the sliding forces and energy release rate of the slope are high. The deformation field showed that the sliding body was sliding outwards along the sliding surface while the sliding bed moved in an opposite direction. Moving upwards at the top of the sliding bed can be one of the warning signs for rock slide failure.

  17. Schlieren image velocimetry measurements in a rocket engine exhaust plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rudy; Peguero, Julio; Hargather, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) measures velocity fields by tracking the motion of naturally-occurring turbulent flow features in a compressible flow. Here the technique is applied to measuring the exhaust velocity profile of a liquid rocket engine. The SIV measurements presented include discussion of visibility of structures, image pre-processing for structure visibility, and ability to process resulting images using commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) codes. The small-scale liquid bipropellant rocket engine operates on nitrous oxide and ethanol as propellants. Predictions of the exhaust velocity are obtained through NASA CEA calculations and simple compressible flow relationships, which are compared against the measured SIV profiles. Analysis of shear layer turbulence along the exhaust plume edge is also presented.

  18. Krypton tagging velocimetry in a turbulent Mach 2.7 boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradka, D.; Parziale, N. J.; Smith, M. S.; Marineau, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    The krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV) technique is applied to the turbulent boundary layer on the wall of the "Mach 3 Calibration Tunnel" at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC) White Oak. Profiles of velocity were measured with KTV and Pitot-pressure probes in the Mach 2.7 turbulent boundary layer comprised of 99 % {N}2/1 % Kr at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers of {Re}_{\\varTheta }= 800, 1400, and 2400. Agreement between the KTV- and Pitot-derived velocity profiles is excellent. The KTV and Pitot velocity data follow the law of the wall in the logarithmic region with application of the Van Driest I transformation. The velocity data are analyzed in the outer region of the boundary layer with the law of the wake and a velocity-defect law. KTV-derived streamwise velocity fluctuation measurements are reported and are consistent with data from the literature. To enable near-wall measurement with KTV (y/δ ≈ 0.1-0.2), an 800-nm longpass filter was used to block the 760.2-nm read-laser pulse. With the longpass filter, the 819.0-nm emission from the re-excited Kr can be imaged to track the displacement of the metastable tracer without imaging the reflection and scatter from the read-laser off of solid surfaces. To operate the Mach 3 AEDC Calibration Tunnel at several discrete unit Reynolds numbers, a modification was required and is described herein.

  19. Laser speckle velocimetry applied to Rayleigh-Benard convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, M.P.; Yonte, T.; Quintanilla, M.; Saviron, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    An application of speckle velocimetry technique to Rayleigh-Benard convection is presented. A 5-mW He-Ne laser allows precise determination of the two-dimensional velocity flow field, up to several mm/sec. The digital techniques used to analyze automatically the multiexposed photographs and to generate velocity and vorticity fields are described. The obtained results are in good agreement with previously reported data. The ability of the technique to cover other experimental conditions is discussed. 14 references

  20. Large scale particle image velocimetry with helium filled soap bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosbach, Johannes; Kuehn, Matthias; Wagner, Claus [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The application of particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measurement of flows on large scales is a challenging necessity especially for the investigation of convective air flows. Combining helium filled soap bubbles as tracer particles with high power quality switched solid state lasers as light sources allows conducting PIV on scales of the order of several square meters. The technique was applied to mixed convection in a full scale double aisle aircraft cabin mock-up for validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations. (orig.)

  1. Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2015-08-01

    A flow velocimetry method, cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV), is presented as a robust, simplified, and high dynamic range implementation of the Doppler global/planar Doppler velocimetry technique. A sweep of several gigahertz of the vapor absorption spectrum is used for each velocity sample, with signals acquired from both Doppler-shifted scattered light within the flow and a non-Doppler shifted reference beam. Cross-correlation of these signals yields the Doppler shift between them, averaged over the duration of the scan. With presently available equipment, velocities from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1 can notionally be measured simultaneously, making the technique ideal for high speed flows. The processing routine is shown to be robust against large changes in the vapor pressure of the iodine cell, benefiting performance of the system in facilities where ambient conditions cannot be easily regulated. Validation of the system was performed with measurements of a model wind turbine blade boundary layer made in a 1.83 m by 1.83 m subsonic wind tunnel for which laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements were acquired alongside the CC-DGV results. CC-DGV uncertainties of ±1.30 ms-1, ±0.64 ms-1, and ±1.11 ms-1 were determined for the orthogonal stream-wise, transverse-horizontal, and transverse-vertical velocity components, and root-mean-square deviations of 2.77 ms-1 and 1.34 ms-1 from the LDV validation results were observed for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million and 2 million, respectively. Volumetric mean velocity measurements are also presented for a supersonic jet, with velocity uncertainties of ±4.48 ms-1, ±16.93 ms-1, and ±0.50 ms-1 for the orthogonal components, and self-validation done by collapsing the data with a physical scaling.

  2. Large scale particle image velocimetry with helium filled soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosbach, Johannes; Kühn, Matthias; Wagner, Claus

    2009-03-01

    The application of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measurement of flows on large scales is a challenging necessity especially for the investigation of convective air flows. Combining helium filled soap bubbles as tracer particles with high power quality switched solid state lasers as light sources allows conducting PIV on scales of the order of several square meters. The technique was applied to mixed convection in a full scale double aisle aircraft cabin mock-up for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations.

  3. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications of Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Petrosky, Brian Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Laser flare can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in a flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following thesis is formatted in a hybrid manuscript style, including a full paper presenting the applications of fluorescent Kiton R...

  4. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications Using Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosky, Brian J.; Maisto, Pietro; Lowe, K. Todd; Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Tiemsin, Patsy I.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrene latex sphere particles are widely used to seed flows for velocimetry techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These particles may be doped with fluorescent dyes such that signals spectrally shifted from the incident laser wavelength may be detected via Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An attractive application of the LIF signal is achieving velocimetry in the presence of strong interference from laser scatter, opening up new research possibilities very near solid surfaces or at liquid/gas interfaces. Additionally, LIF signals can be used to tag different fluid streams to study mixing. While fluorescence-based PIV has been performed by many researchers for particles dispersed in water flows, the current work is among the first in applying the technique to micron-scale particles dispersed in a gas. A key requirement for such an application is addressing potential health hazards from fluorescent dyes; successful doping of Kiton Red 620 (KR620) has enabled the use of this relatively safe dye for fluorescence PIV for the first time. In this paper, basic applications proving the concept of PIV using the LIF signal from KR620-doped particles are exhibited for a free jet and a twophase flow apparatus. Results indicate that while the fluorescence PIV techniques are roughly 2 orders of magnitude weaker than Mie scattering, they provide a viable method for obtaining data in flow regions previously inaccessible via standard PIV. These techniques have the potential to also complement Mie scattering signals, for example in multi-stream and/or multi-phase experiments.

  5. Iodine Tagging Velocimetry in a Mach 10 Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Robert Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A variation on molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) [1] designated iodine tagging velocimetry (ITV) is demonstrated. Molecular iodine is tagged by two-photon absorption using an Argon Fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. A single camera measures fluid displacement using atomic iodine emission at 206 nm. Two examples ofMTVfor cold-flowmeasurements areN2OMTV [2] and Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging [3]. These, like most MTV methods, are designed for atmospheric pressure applications. Neither can be implemented at the low pressures (0.1- 1 Torr) in typical hypersonic wakes. Of all the single-laser/singlecamera MTV approaches, only Nitric-Oxide Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence-based MTV [4] has been successfully demonstrated in a Mach 10 wake. Oxygen quenching limits transit times to 500 ns and accuracy to typically 30%. The present note describes the photophysics of the ITV method. Off-body velocimetry along a line is demonstrated in the aerothermodynamically important and experimentally challenging region of a hypersonic low-pressure near-wake in a Mach 10 air wind tunnel. Transit times up to 10 µs are demonstrated with conservative errors of 10%.

  6. An Idle-State Detection Algorithm for SSVEP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Using a Maximum Evoked Response Spatial Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Bisheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Siliang

    2015-11-01

    Although accurate recognition of the idle state is essential for the application of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) in real-world situations, it remains a challenging task due to the variability of the idle state. In this study, a novel algorithm was proposed for the idle state detection in a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. The proposed algorithm aims to solve the idle state detection problem by constructing a better model of the control states. For feature extraction, a maximum evoked response (MER) spatial filter was developed to extract neurophysiologically plausible SSVEP responses, by finding the combination of multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) signals that maximized the evoked responses while suppressing the unrelated background EEGs. The extracted SSVEP responses at the frequencies of both the attended and the unattended stimuli were then used to form feature vectors and a series of binary classifiers for recognition of each control state and the idle state were constructed. EEG data from nine subjects in a three-target SSVEP BCI experiment with a variety of idle state conditions were used to evaluate the proposed algorithm. Compared to the most popular canonical correlation analysis-based algorithm and the conventional power spectrum-based algorithm, the proposed algorithm outperformed them by achieving an offline control state classification accuracy of 88.0 ± 11.1% and idle state false positive rates (FPRs) ranging from 7.4 ± 5.6% to 14.2 ± 10.1%, depending on the specific idle state conditions. Moreover, the online simulation reported BCI performance close to practical use: 22.0 ± 2.9 out of the 24 control commands were correctly recognized and the FPRs achieved as low as approximately 0.5 event/min in the idle state conditions with eye open and 0.05 event/min in the idle state condition with eye closed. These results demonstrate the potential of the proposed algorithm for implementing practical SSVEP BCI systems.

  7. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels.

  8. Design, Construction, Alignment, and Calibration of a Compact Velocimetry Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris I Kaufman; Robert M Malone; Brent C Frogget; David L Esquibel; Vincent T Romero; Gregory A Lare; Bart Briggs; Adam J Iverson; Daniel K Frayer; Douglas DeVore Brian Cata

    2007-01-01

    A velocimetry experiment has been designed to measure shock properties for small cylindrical metal targets (8-mm-diameter by 2-mm thick). A target is accelerated by high explosives, caught, and retrieved for later inspection. The target is expected to move at a velocity of 0.1 to 3 km/sec. The complete experiment canister is approximately 105 mm in diameter and 380 mm long. Optical velocimetry diagnostics include the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The packaging of the velocity diagnostics is not allowed to interfere with the catchment or an X-ray imaging diagnostic. A single optical relay, using commercial lenses, collects Doppler-shifted light for both VISAR and PDV. The use of fiber optics allows measurement of point velocities on the target surface during accelerations occurring over 15 mm of travel. The VISAR operates at 532 nm and has separate illumination fibers requiring alignment. The PDV diagnostic operates at 1550 nm, but is aligned and focused at 670 nm. The VISAR and PDV diagnostics are complementary measurements and they image spots in close proximity on the target surface. Because the optical relay uses commercial glass, the axial positions of the optical fibers for PDV and VISAR are offset to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The optomechanical design requires careful attention to fiber management, mechanical assembly and disassembly, positioning of the foam catchment, and X-ray diagnostic field-of-view. Calibration and alignment data are archived at each stage of the assembly sequence

  9. Hybrid catadioptric system for advanced optical cavity velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frayer, Daniel K.

    2018-02-06

    A probe including reflector is disclosed to measure the velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the surface by the probe and then reflected back from the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface, collected into probe, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to one or more lens groups and a reflector, such as a parabolic reflector having a mirrored interior surface.

  10. Particle and speckle imaging velocimetry applied to a monostatic LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Thorsteinn; Langmeier, Andreas; Prücklmeier, Andreas; Banakh, Viktor; Falits, Andrey

    2006-11-01

    A novel backscatter-lidar imaging method of visualization of air movement in the atmosphere is discussed in the paper. The method is based on the particle image velocimetry (PIV) principle, namely: pairs of image of laser illuminated thin atmospheric layers are recorded by CCD camera and then are cross correlated to obtain velocity information from these records. Both the way of computer simulation of atmospheric version of PIV technique and the first concept proof experiments are described in the paper. It is proposed that the method can find an application for visualization of wake vortices arising behind large aircrafts.

  11. Rectifier Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Bladyko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains definition of a smoothing factor which is suitable for any rectifier filter. The formulae of complex smoothing factors have been developed for simple and complex passive filters. The paper shows conditions for application of calculation formulae and filters

  12. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  13. Systematic Error of Acoustic Particle Image Velocimetry and Its Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickiewicz Witold

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry is getting more and more often the method of choice not only for visualization of turbulent mass flows in fluid mechanics, but also in linear and non-linear acoustics for non-intrusive visualization of acoustic particle velocity. Particle Image Velocimetry with low sampling rate (about 15Hz can be applied to visualize the acoustic field using the acquisition synchronized to the excitation signal. Such phase-locked PIV technique is described and used in experiments presented in the paper. The main goal of research was to propose a model of PIV systematic error due to non-zero time interval between acquisitions of two images of the examined sound field seeded with tracer particles, what affects the measurement of complex acoustic signals. Usefulness of the presented model is confirmed experimentally. The correction procedure, based on the proposed model, applied to measurement data increases the accuracy of acoustic particle velocity field visualization and creates new possibilities in observation of sound fields excited with multi-tonal or band-limited noise signals.

  14. Noise Studies of Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Doppler Velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Muirhead, P

    2006-01-01

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. Both regular and high-frequency spectral components can be recovered from the data--the moire component carries additional information that increases the signal to noise for velocimetry and spectroscopy. Here we present simulations and theoretical studies of the photon limited Doppler velocity noise in an EDI. We used a model spectrum of a 1600K temperature star. For several rotational blurring velocities 0, 7.5, 15 and 25 km/s we calculated the dimensionless Doppler quality index (Q) versus wavenumber v. This is the normalized RMS of the derivative of the spectrum and is proportional to the photon-limited Doppler signal to noise ratio

  15. The NASA Subsonic Jet Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Many tasks in fluids engineering require prediction of turbulence of jet flows. The present document documents the single-point statistics of velocity, mean and variance, of cold and hot jet flows. The jet velocities ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 times the ambient speed of sound, and temperatures ranged from unheated to static temperature ratio 2.7. Further, the report assesses the accuracies of the data, e.g., establish uncertainties for the data. This paper covers the following five tasks: (1) Document acquisition and processing procedures used to create the particle image velocimetry (PIV) datasets. (2) Compare PIV data with hotwire and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data published in the open literature. (3) Compare different datasets acquired at the same flow conditions in multiple tests to establish uncertainties. (4) Create a consensus dataset for a range of hot jet flows, including uncertainty bands. (5) Analyze this consensus dataset for self-consistency and compare jet characteristics to those of the open literature. The final objective was fulfilled by using the potential core length and the spread rate of the half-velocity radius to collapse of the mean and turbulent velocity fields over the first 20 jet diameters.

  16. Analysis of particle kinematics in spheronization via particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Martin; Thommes, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Spheronization is a wide spread technique in pellet production for many pharmaceutical applications. Pellets produced by spheronization are characterized by a particularly spherical shape and narrow size distribution. The particle kinematic during spheronization is currently not well-understood. Therefore, particle image velocimetry (PIV) was implemented in the spheronization process to visualize the particle movement and to identify flow patterns, in order to explain the influence of various process parameters. The spheronization process of a common formulation was recorded with a high-speed camera, and the images were processed using particle image velocimetry software. A crosscorrelation approach was chosen to determine the particle velocity at the surface of the pellet bulk. Formulation and process parameters were varied systematically, and their influence on the particle velocity was investigated. The particle stream shows a torus-like shape with a twisted rope-like motion. It is remarkable that the overall particle velocity is approximately 10-fold lower than the tip speed of the friction plate. The velocity of the particle stream can be correlated to the water content of the pellets and the load of the spheronizer, while the rotation speed was not relevant. In conclusion, PIV was successfully applied to the spheronization process, and new insights into the particle velocity were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasonic particle image velocimetry for improved flow gradient imaging: algorithms, methodology and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Lili; Qian Ming; Yu Wentao; Jin Qiaofeng; Ling Tao; Zheng Hairong; Wan Kun; Gao Shen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) for improving the flow velocity measurement accuracy and efficiency in regions with high velocity gradients. The conventional Echo PIV algorithm has been modified by incorporating a multiple iterative algorithm, sub-pixel method, filter and interpolation method, and spurious vector elimination algorithm. The new algorithms' performance is assessed by analyzing simulated images with known displacements, and ultrasonic B-mode images of in vitro laminar pipe flow, rotational flow and in vivo rat carotid arterial flow. Results of the simulated images show that the new algorithm produces much smaller bias from the known displacements. For laminar flow, the new algorithm results in 1.1% deviation from the analytically derived value, and 8.8% for the conventional algorithm. The vector quality evaluation for the rotational flow imaging shows that the new algorithm produces better velocity vectors. For in vivo rat carotid arterial flow imaging, the results from the new algorithm deviate 6.6% from the Doppler-measured peak velocities averagely compared to 15% of that from the conventional algorithm. The new Echo PIV algorithm is able to effectively improve the measurement accuracy in imaging flow fields with high velocity gradients.

  18. Estimating Horizontal Displacement between DEMs by Means of Particle Image Velocimetry Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Reinoso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, digital terrain model (DTM accuracy has been studied almost exclusively by computing its height variable. However, the largely ignored horizontal component bears a great influence on the positional accuracy of certain linear features, e.g., in hydrological features. In an effort to fill this gap, we propose a means of measurement different from the geomatic approach, involving fluid mechanics (water and air flows or aerodynamics. The particle image velocimetry (PIV algorithm is proposed as an estimator of horizontal differences between digital elevation models (DEM in grid format. After applying a scale factor to the displacement estimated by the PIV algorithm, the mean error predicted is around one-seventh of the cell size of the DEM with the greatest spatial resolution, and around one-nineteenth of the cell size of the DEM with the least spatial resolution. Our methodology allows all kinds of DTMs to be compared once they are transformed into DEM format, while also allowing comparison of data from diverse capture methods, i.e., LiDAR versus photogrammetric data sources.

  19. A spatial picture of the synthetic large-scale motion from dynamic roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, David; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-11-01

    Jacobi and McKeon (2011) set up a dynamic roughness apparatus to excite a synthetic, travelling wave-like disturbance in a wind tunnel, boundary layer study. In the present work, this dynamic roughness has been adapted for a flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer experiment in a water tunnel. A key advantage of operating in water as opposed to air is the longer flow timescales. This makes accessible higher non-dimensional actuation frequencies and correspondingly shorter synthetic length scales, and is thus more amenable to particle image velocimetry. As a result, this experiment provides a novel spatial picture of the synthetic mode, the coupled small scales, and their streamwise development. It is demonstrated that varying the roughness actuation frequency allows for significant tuning of the streamwise wavelength of the synthetic mode, with a range of 3 δ-13 δ being achieved. Employing a phase-locked decomposition, spatial snapshots are constructed of the synthetic large scale and used to analyze its streamwise behavior. Direct spatial filtering is used to separate the synthetic large scale and the related small scales, and the results are compared to those obtained by temporal filtering that invokes Taylor's hypothesis. The support of AFOSR (Grant # FA9550-16-1-0361) is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  1. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Seeley, C.H.; Henderson, J.A.; Schmidl, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental flow visualization tool, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), is being used to determine the velocity field in two-dimensional fluid flows. In the past few years, the technique has been improved to allow the capture of flow fields in three dimensions. This paper describes changes which were made to two existing two-dimensional tracking algorithms to enable them to track three-dimensional PIV data. Results of the tests performed on these three-dimensional routines with synthetic data are presented. Experimental data was also used to test the tracking algorithms. The test setup which was used to acquire the three-dimensional experimental data is described, along with the results from both of the tracking routines which were used to analyze the experimental data. (author)

  2. Multiparticle imaging velocimetry measurements in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental flow visualization tool, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), is being extended to determine the velocity fields in two and three-dimensional, two-phase fluid flows. In the past few years, the technique has attracted quite a lot of interest. PIV enables fluid velocities across a region of a flow to be measured at a single instant in time in global domain. This instantaneous velocity profile of a given flow field is determined by digitally recording particle (microspheres or bubbles) images within the flow over multiple successive video frames and then conducting flow pattern identification and analysis of the data. This paper presents instantaneous velocity measurements in various two and three- dimensional, two-phase flow situations. (author)

  3. Real-time particle image velocimetry based on FPGA technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriarte Munoz, Jose Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV), based on laser sheet, is a method for image processing and calculation of distributed velocity fields.It is well established as a fluid dynamics measurement tool, being applied to liquid, gases and multiphase flows.Images of particles are processed by means of computationally demanding algorithms, what makes its real-time implementation difficult.The most probable displacements are found applying two dimensional cross-correlation function. In this work, we detail how it is possible to achieve real-time visualization of PIV method by designing an adaptive embedded architecture based on FPGA technology.We show first results of a physical field of velocity calculated by this platform system in a real-time approach. [es

  4. Particle image velocimetry new developments and recent applications

    CERN Document Server

    Willert, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a non-intrusive optical measurement technique which allows capturing several thousand velocity vectors within large flow fields instantaneously. Today, the PIV technique has spread widely and differentiated into many distinct applications, from micro flows over combustion to supersonic flows for both industrial needs and research. Over the past decade the measurement technique and the hard- and software have been improved continuously so that PIV has become a reliable and accurate method for "real life" investigations. Nevertheless there is still an ongoing process of improvements and extensions of the PIV technique towards 3D, time resolution, higher accuracy, measurements under harsh conditions and micro- and macroscales. This book gives a synopsis of the main results achieved during the EC-funded network PivNet 2 as well as a survey of the state-of-the-art of scientific research using PIV techniques in different fields of application.

  5. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry: Partial Image Error (PIE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandarajah, K; Hargrave, G K; Halliwell, N A

    2006-01-01

    This paper quantifies the errors due to partial imaging of seeding particles which occur at the edges of interrogation regions in Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). Hitherto, in the scientific literature the effect of these partial images has been assumed to be negligible. The results show that the error is significant even at a commonly used interrogation region size of 32 x 32 pixels. If correlation of interrogation region sizes of 16 x 16 pixels and smaller is attempted, the error which occurs can preclude meaningful results being obtained. In order to reduce the error normalisation of the correlation peak values is necessary. The paper introduces Normalisation by Signal Strength (NSS) as the preferred means of normalisation for optimum accuracy. In addition, it is shown that NSS increases the dynamic range of DPIV

  6. Multipoint photonic doppler velocimetry using optical lens elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogget, Brent Copely; Romero, Vincent Todd

    2014-04-29

    A probe including a fisheye lens is disclosed to measure the velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the surface and then reflected back from the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface, collected into fisheye lens, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to an index-matching lens and eventually to a fisheye lens. The fiber array flat polished and coupled to the index-matching lens using index-matching gel. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays through the fisheye lens which in turn project many measurement points at numerous different locations to establish surface coverage over a hemispherical shape with very little crosstalk.

  7. Characterization of extrusion flow using particle image velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the characterization of polymer flows within an extrusion die using particle image velocimetry (PIV in very constraining conditions (high temperature, pressure and velocity. Measurements were realized on semi-industrial equipments in order to have test conditions close to the industrial ones. Simple flows as well as disrupted ones were studied in order to determine the capabilities and the limits of the method. The analysis of the velocity profiles pointed out significant wall slip, which was confirmed by rheological measurements based on Mooney's method. Numerical simulations were used to connect the two sets of measurements and to simulate complex velocity profiles for comparison to the experimental ones. A good agreement was found between simulations and experiments providing wall slip is taken into account in the simulation.

  8. Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry and its Application in Engine Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, J M; Garner, C P; Alcock, R D; Halliwell, N A

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV) as a means to make three-component velocity measurements throughout a three-dimensional flow-field of interest. A simplified treatment of three-dimensional scalar wave propagation is outlined and subsequently used to illustrate the principles of complex correlation analysis. It is shown that this type of analysis provides the three-dimensional correlation of the propagating, monochromatic fields recorded by the hologram. A similar approach is used to analyse the Object Conjugate Reconstruction (OCR) technique to resolve directional ambiguity by introducing an artificial image shift to the reconstructed particle images. An example of how these methods are used together to measure the instantaneous flow fields within a motored Diesel engine is then described

  9. Filter apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid filters, precoated by replaceable powders, which are used in the production of ultra pure water required for steam generation of electricity. The filter elements are capable of being installed and removed by remote control so that they can be used in nuclear power reactors. (UK)

  10. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Measurements with Variable Blowing Rates Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of mean and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer with variable rates of mass injection (blowing) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. The NO2 was seeded into the flow from a slot located 29.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. The top surface of the wedge was oriented at a 20 degree angle in the Mach 10 flow, yielding an edge Mach number of approximately 4.2. The streamwise velocity profiles and streamwise fluctuating velocity component profiles were obtained using a three-laser NO2->NO photolysis molecular tagging velocimetry method. Observed trends in the mean streamwise velocity profiles and profiles of the fluctuating component of streamwise velocity as functions of the blowing rate are described. An effort is made to distinguish between the effect of blowing rate and wall temperature on the measured profiles. An analysis of the mean velocity profiles for a constant blowing rate is presented to determine the uncertainty in the measurement for different probe laser delay settings. Measurements of streamwise velocity were made to within approximately 120 gm of the model surface. The streamwise spatial resolution in this experiment ranged from 0.6 mm to 2.6 mm. An improvement in the spatial precision of the measurement technique has been made, with spatial uncertainties reduced by about a factor of 2 compared to previous measurements. For the quiescent flow calibration measurements presented, uncertainties as low as 2 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence for long delay times (25 gs). For the velocity measurements obtained with the wind tunnel operating, average single-shot uncertainties of less than 44 m/s are obtained at 95% confidence with a probe laser delay setting of 1 gs. The measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  11. Pressure from particle image velocimetry for convective flows: a Taylor’s hypothesis approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kat, R; Ganapathisubramani, B

    2013-01-01

    Taylor’s hypothesis is often applied in turbulent flow analysis to map temporal information into spatial information. Recent efforts in deriving pressure from particle image velocimetry (PIV) have proposed multiple approaches, each with its own weakness and strength. Application of Taylor’s hypothesis allows us to counter the weakness of an Eulerian approach that is described by de Kat and van Oudheusden (2012 Exp. Fluids 52 1089–106). Two different approaches of using Taylor’s hypothesis in determining planar pressure are investigated: one where pressure is determined from volumetric PIV data and one where pressure is determined from time-resolved stereoscopic PIV data. A performance assessment on synthetic data shows that application of Taylor’s hypothesis can improve determination of pressure from PIV data significantly compared with a time-resolved volumetric approach. The technique is then applied to time-resolved PIV data taken in a cross-flow plane of a turbulent jet (Ganapathisubramani et al 2007 Exp. Fluids 42 923–39). Results appear to indicate that pressure can indeed be obtained from PIV data in turbulent convective flows using the Taylor’s hypothesis approach, where there are no other methods to determine pressure. The role of convection velocity in determination of pressure is also discussed. (paper)

  12. Filter systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanin, V.R.

    1990-01-01

    The multidetector systems for high resolution gamma spectroscopy are presented. The observable parameters for identifying nuclides produced simultaneously in the reaction are analysed discussing the efficiency of filter systems. (M.C.K.)

  13. Eulerian-Lagrangian analysis for particle velocities and trajectories in a pure wave motion using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, Motohiko

    2012-04-13

    This paper investigates the velocity and the trajectory of water particles under surface waves, which propagate at a constant water depth, using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The vector fields and vertical distributions of velocities are presented at several phases in one wave cycle. The third-order Stokes wave theory was employed to express the physical quantities. The PIV technique's ability to measure both temporal and spatial variations of the velocity was proved after a series of attempts. This technique was applied to the prediction of particle trajectory in an Eulerian scheme. Furthermore, the measured particle path was compared with the positions found theoretically by integrating the Eulerian velocity to the higher order of a Taylor series expansion. The profile of average travelling distance is also presented with a solution of zero net mass flux in a closed wave flume.

  14. Development and assessment of transparent soil and particle image velocimetry in dynamic soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    This research combines Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and transparent soil to investigate the dynamic rigid block and soil interaction. In order to get a low viscosity pore fluid for the transparent soil, 12 different types of chemical solvents wer...

  15. 3D Flow Field Measurements using Aerosol Correlation Velocimetry, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroMancer Technologies proposes to develop a 3D Global Lidar Airspeed Sensor (3D-LGAS) using Aerosol Correlation Velocimetry for standoff sensing of high-resolution...

  16. Demonstration of Clean Particle Seeding for Particle Image Velocimetry in a Closed Circuit Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McNiel, Charles M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether solid carbon dioxide (CO2) particles might provide a satisfactory, and cleaner, alternative to traditional seed material for Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  17. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Zhenyu; Charonko, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we extend the original work by Charonko and Vlachos and present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. Several corrections have been applied in this work. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations by applying a subtraction of the minimum correlation value to remove the effect of the background image noise. In addition, the notion of a ‘valid’ measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct from an ‘outlier’ measurement. Finally the type and significance of the error distribution function is investigated. These advancements lead to more robust and reliable uncertainty estimation models compared with the original work by Charonko and Vlachos. The models are tested against both synthetic benchmark data as well as experimental measurements. In this work, U 68.5 uncertainties are estimated at the 68.5% confidence level while U 95 uncertainties are estimated at 95% confidence level. For all cases the resulting calculated coverage factors approximate the expected theoretical confidence intervals, thus demonstrating the applicability of these new models for estimation of uncertainty for individual PIV measurements. (paper)

  18. Particle image velocimetry correlation signal-to-noise ratio metrics and measurement uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhenyu; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2014-11-01

    In particle image velocimetry (PIV) the measurement signal is contained in the recorded intensity of the particle image pattern superimposed on a variety of noise sources. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) strength governs the resulting PIV cross correlation and ultimately the accuracy and uncertainty of the resulting PIV measurement. Hence we posit that correlation SNR metrics calculated from the correlation plane can be used to quantify the quality of the correlation and the resulting uncertainty of an individual measurement. In this paper we extend the original work by Charonko and Vlachos and present a framework for evaluating the correlation SNR using a set of different metrics, which in turn are used to develop models for uncertainty estimation. Several corrections have been applied in this work. The SNR metrics and corresponding models presented herein are expanded to be applicable to both standard and filtered correlations by applying a subtraction of the minimum correlation value to remove the effect of the background image noise. In addition, the notion of a ‘valid’ measurement is redefined with respect to the correlation peak width in order to be consistent with uncertainty quantification principles and distinct from an ‘outlier’ measurement. Finally the type and significance of the error distribution function is investigated. These advancements lead to more robust and reliable uncertainty estimation models compared with the original work by Charonko and Vlachos. The models are tested against both synthetic benchmark data as well as experimental measurements. In this work, {{U}68.5} uncertainties are estimated at the 68.5% confidence level while {{U}95} uncertainties are estimated at 95% confidence level. For all cases the resulting calculated coverage factors approximate the expected theoretical confidence intervals, thus demonstrating the applicability of these new models for estimation of uncertainty for individual PIV measurements.

  19. Displacement fields from point cloud data: Application of particle imaging velocimetry to landslide geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Arjun; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Reid, Mark E.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Pawlak, Geno

    2012-01-01

    Acquiring spatially continuous ground-surface displacement fields from Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) will allow better understanding of the physical processes governing landslide motion at detailed spatial and temporal scales. Problems arise, however, when estimating continuous displacement fields from TLS point-clouds because reflecting points from sequential scans of moving ground are not defined uniquely, thus repeat TLS surveys typically do not track individual reflectors. Here, we implemented the cross-correlation-based Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method to derive a surface deformation field using TLS point-cloud data. We estimated associated errors using the shape of the cross-correlation function and tested the method's performance with synthetic displacements applied to a TLS point cloud. We applied the method to the toe of the episodically active Cleveland Corral Landslide in northern California using TLS data acquired in June 2005–January 2007 and January–May 2010. Estimated displacements ranged from decimeters to several meters and they agreed well with independent measurements at better than 9% root mean squared (RMS) error. For each of the time periods, the method provided a smooth, nearly continuous displacement field that coincides with independently mapped boundaries of the slide and permits further kinematic and mechanical inference. For the 2010 data set, for instance, the PIV-derived displacement field identified a diffuse zone of displacement that preceded by over a month the development of a new lateral shear zone. Additionally, the upslope and downslope displacement gradients delineated by the dense PIV field elucidated the non-rigid behavior of the slide.

  20. Trip-Induced Transition Measurements in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of mean streamwise velocity, fluctuating streamwise velocity, and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A laser-induced fluorescence-based molecular tagging velocimetry technique was used to make the measurements. The nominal edge Mach number was 4.2. Velocity profiles were measured both in an untripped boundary layer and in the wake of a 4-mm diameter cylindrical tripping element centered 75.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. Three different trip heights were investigated: k = 0.53 mm, k = 1.0 mm and k = 2.0 mm. The laminar boundary layer thickness at the position of the measurements was approximately 1 mm, though the exact thickness was dependent on Reynolds number and wall temperature. All of the measurements were made starting from a streamwise location approximately 18 mm downstream of the tripping element. This measurement region continued approximately 30 mm in the streamwise direction. Additionally, measurements were made at several spanwise locations. An analysis of flow features show how the magnitude, spatial location, and spatial growth of streamwise velocity instabilities are affected by parameters such as the ratio of trip height to boundary layer thickness and roughness Reynolds number. The fluctuating component of streamwise velocity measured along the centerline of the model increased from approximately 75 m/s with no trip to +/-225 m/s with a 0.53-mm trip, and to +/-240 m/s with a 1-mm trip, while holding the freestream Reynolds number constant. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Radial basis function interpolation of unstructured, three-dimensional, volumetric particle tracking velocimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casa, L D C; Krueger, P S

    2013-01-01

    Unstructured three-dimensional fluid velocity data were interpolated using Gaussian radial basis function (RBF) interpolation. Data were generated to imitate the spatial resolution and experimental uncertainty of a typical implementation of defocusing digital particle image velocimetry. The velocity field associated with a steadily rotating infinite plate was simulated to provide a bounded, fully three-dimensional analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equations, allowing for robust analysis of the interpolation accuracy. The spatial resolution of the data (i.e. particle density) and the number of RBFs were varied in order to assess the requirements for accurate interpolation. Interpolation constraints, including boundary conditions and continuity, were included in the error metric used for the least-squares minimization that determines the interpolation parameters to explore methods for improving RBF interpolation results. Even spacing and logarithmic spacing of RBF locations were also investigated. Interpolation accuracy was assessed using the velocity field, divergence of the velocity field, and viscous torque on the rotating boundary. The results suggest that for the present implementation, RBF spacing of 0.28 times the boundary layer thickness is sufficient for accurate interpolation, though theoretical error analysis suggests that improved RBF positioning may yield more accurate results. All RBF interpolation results were compared to standard Gaussian weighting and Taylor expansion interpolation methods. Results showed that RBF interpolation improves interpolation results compared to the Taylor expansion method by 60% to 90% based on the average squared velocity error and provides comparable velocity results to Gaussian weighted interpolation in terms of velocity error. RMS accuracy of the flow field divergence was one to two orders of magnitude better for the RBF interpolation compared to the other two methods. RBF interpolation that was applied to

  2. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragni, D; Ashok, A; Van Oudheusden, B W; Scarano, F

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to evaluate pressure fields, whereas lift and drag coefficients are inferred from the evaluation of momentum contour and wake integrals. The PIV-based results are compared to those derived from conventional loads determination procedures involving surface pressure transducers and a wake rake. The method applied in this investigation is an extension to the compressible flow regime of that considered by van Oudheusden et al (2006 Non-intrusive load characterization of an airfoil using PIV Exp. Fluids 40 988–92) at low speed conditions. The application of a high-speed imaging system allows the acquisition in relatively short time of a sufficient ensemble size to compute converged velocity statistics, further translated in turbulent fluctuations included in the pressure and loads calculation, notwithstanding their verified negligible influence in the computation. Measurements are performed at varying spatial resolution to optimize the loads determination in the wake region and around the airfoil, further allowing us to assess the influence of spatial resolution in the proposed procedure. Specific interest is given to the comparisons between the PIV-based method and the conventional procedures for determining the pressure coefficient on the surface, the drag and lift coefficients at different angles of attack. Results are presented for the experiments at a free-stream Mach number M = 0.6, with the angle of attack ranging from 0° to 8°

  3. Analysis of bubbly flow using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, D.R.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.; Schmidl, W.D.; Hassan, Y.A. [Texas A and M University, Nuclear Engineering Dept., College Stagion, TX (United States); Sanchez-Silva, F. [ESIME, INP (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The local phasic velocities can be determined in two-phase flows if the phases can be separated during analysis. The continuous liquid velocity field can be captured using standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques in two-phase flows. PIV is now a well-established, standard flow measurement technique, which provides instantaneous velocity fields in a two-dimensional plane of finite thickness. PIV can be extended to three dimensions within the plane with special considerations. A three-dimensional shadow PIV (SPIV) measurement apparatus can be used to capture the dispersed phase flow parameters such as velocity and interfacial area. The SPIV images contain only the bubble images, and can be easily analyzed and the results used to separate the dispersed phase from the continuous phase in PIV data. An experimental system that combines the traditional PIV technique with SPIV will be described and sample data will be analyzed to demonstrate an advanced turbulence measurement method in a two-phase bubbly flow system. Also, a qualitative error analysis method that allows users to reduce the number of erroneous vectors obtained from the PIV measurements will be discussed. (authors)

  4. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Measurements of Suspension-Feeding Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Clos, K.; Jones, I. T.; Carrier, T. J.; Jumars, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Active suspension feeders, such as bivalves and tunicates, connect benthic and pelagic ecosystems by packaging suspended matter into larger fecal and pseudofecal particles, greatly enhancing the flux of carbon and nutrients from the water column to the benthos. The volume of water processed by a population of suspension feeders is commonly estimated by scaling up results from experiments that measure the clearance rate (the volume of water cleared of particles per time) of one or a few individual suspension feeders. Clearance rates vary, however, between species, within a species, and over time for a single individual; and the velocity fields produced by suspension feeders are likely to interact in complex ways. We measured the water velocity fields produced by two species of bivalve, Mya arenaria and Mercenaria mercenaria, and the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We used these measurements to calculate flow rates and Reynolds numbers of inhalant and exhalant siphons. We also observed strong entrainment of water by M. arenaria's exhalant siphon jet that may help to explain how the clam avoids depleting the water around it of particles and oxygen as it feeds. We are using these measurements to inform computational fluid mechanics (CFD) models of suspension feeding, allowing us to examine the interactions of flow fields produced by multiple suspension feeders and other effects not quantified by clearance-rate measurements.

  5. Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry in a supersonic flow over a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitz, Robert W.; Lahr, Michael D.; Douglas, Zachary W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Hu Shengteng; Carter, Campbell D.; Hsu, Kuang-Yu; Lum, Chee; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) measurements of velocity were made in a Mach 2 (M 2) flow with a wall cavity. In the HTV method, ArF excimer laser (193 nm) beams pass through a humid gas and dissociate H2O into H + OH to form a tagging grid of OH molecules. In this study, a 7x7 grid of hydroxyl (OH) molecules is tracked by planar laser-induced fluorescence. The grid motion over a fixed time delay yields about 50 velocity vectors of the two-dimensional flow in the plane of the laser sheets. Velocity precision is limited by the error in finding the crossing location of the OH lines written by the excimer tag laser. With a signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 for the OH lines, the determination of the crossing location is expected to be accurate within ±0.1 pixels. Velocity precision within the freestream, where the turbulence is low, is consistent with this error. Instantaneous, single-shot measurements of two-dimensional flow patterns were made in the nonreacting M 2 flow with a wall cavity under low- and high-pressure conditions. The single-shot profiles were analyzed to yield mean and rms velocity profiles in the M 2 nonreacting flow

  6. Analysis of bubbly flow using particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, D.R.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.; Schmidl, W.D.; Hassan, Y.A.; Sanchez-Silva, F.

    2001-01-01

    The local phasic velocities can be determined in two-phase flows if the phases can be separated during analysis. The continuous liquid velocity field can be captured using standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques in two-phase flows. PIV is now a well-established, standard flow measurement technique, which provides instantaneous velocity fields in a two-dimensional plane of finite thickness. PIV can be extended to three dimensions within the plane with special considerations. A three-dimensional shadow PIV (SPIV) measurement apparatus can be used to capture the dispersed phase flow parameters such as velocity and interfacial area. The SPIV images contain only the bubble images, and can be easily analyzed and the results used to separate the dispersed phase from the continuous phase in PIV data. An experimental system that combines the traditional PIV technique with SPIV will be described and sample data will be analyzed to demonstrate an advanced turbulence measurement method in a two-phase bubbly flow system. Also, a qualitative error analysis method that allows users to reduce the number of erroneous vectors obtained from the PIV measurements will be discussed. (authors)

  7. Particle image velocimetry investigation of a finite amplitude pressure wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, D.; Currie, T.; Fleck, R.; Chatfield, G.

    2006-03-01

    Particle image velocimetry is used to study the motion of gas within a duct subject to the passage of a finite amplitude pressure wave. The wave is representative of the pressure waves found in the exhaust systems of internal combustion engines. Gas particles are accelerated from stationary to 150 m/s and then back to stationary in 8 ms. It is demonstrated that gas particles at the head of the wave travel at the same velocity across the duct cross section at a given point in time. Towards the tail of the wave viscous effects are plainly evident causing the flow profile to tend towards parabolic. However, the instantaneous mean particle velocity across the section is shown to match well with the velocity calculated from a corresponding measured pressure history using 1D gas dynamic theory. The measured pressure history at a point in the duct was acquired using a high speed pressure transducer of the type typically used for engine research in intake and exhaust systems. It is demonstrated that these are unable to follow the rapid changes in pressure accurately and that they are prone to resonate under certain circumstances.

  8. Microparticle tracking velocimetry as a tool for microfluidic flow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven D.; Schmidt, James W.; Wright, John D.

    2017-07-01

    The accurate measurement of flows in microfluidic channels is important for commercial and research applications. We compare the accuracy of flow measurement techniques over a wide range flows. Flow measurements made using holographic microparticle tracking velocimetry (µPTV) and a gravimetric flow standard over the range of 0.5-100 nL/s agree within 0.25%, well within the uncertainty of the two flow systems. Two commercial thermal flow sensors were used as the intermediaries (transfer standards) between the two flow measurement systems. The gravimetric flow standard was used to calibrate the thermal flow sensors by measuring the rate of change of the mass of liquid in a beaker on a micro-balance as it fills. The holographic µPTV flow measurements were made in a rectangular channel and the flow was seeded with 1 µm diameter polystyrene spheres. The volumetric flow was calculated using the Hagen-Pouiseille solution for a rectangular channel. The uncertainty of both flow measurement systems is given. For the gravimetric standard, relative uncertainty increased for decreasing flows due to surface tension forces between the pipette carrying the flow and the free surface of the liquid in the beaker. The uncertainty of the holographic µPTV measurements did not vary significantly over the measured flow range, and thus comparatively are especially useful at low flow velocities.

  9. Channel flow structure measurements using particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norazizi Mohamed; Noraeini Mokhtar; Aziz Ibrahim; Ramli Abu Hassan

    1996-01-01

    Two different flow structures in a laboratory channel were examined using a flow visualization technique, known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The first channel flow structure was that of a steady flow over a horizontal channel bottom. Photographs of particle displacements were taken in the boundary layer in a plane parallel to the flow. These photographs were analyzed to give simultaneous measurements of two components of the velocity at hundreds of points in the plane. Averaging these photographs gave the velocity profile a few millimeters from the bottom of the channel to the water surface. The results gave good agreement with the known boundary layer theory. This technique is extended to the study of the structure under a progressive wave in the channel. A wavelength of the propagating wave is divided into sections by photographing it continously for a number of frames. Each frame is analyzed and a velocity field under this wave at various phase points were produced with their respective directions. The results show that velocity vectors in a plane under the wave could be achieved instantaneously and in good agreement with the small amplitude wave theory

  10. Zebrafish swimming in the flow: a particle image velocimetry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Mwaffo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice for the study of a number of biomechanics problems, including balance development, schooling, and neuromuscular transmission. The precise quantification of the flow physics around swimming zebrafish is critical toward a mechanistic understanding of the complex swimming style of this fresh-water species. Although previous studies have elucidated the vortical structures in the wake of zebrafish swimming in placid water, the flow physics of zebrafish swimming against a water current remains unexplored. In an effort to illuminate zebrafish swimming in a dynamic environment reminiscent of its natural habitat, we experimentally investigated the locomotion and hydrodynamics of a single zebrafish swimming in a miniature water tunnel using particle image velocimetry. Our results on zebrafish locomotion detail the role of flow speed on tail beat undulations, heading direction, and swimming speed. Our findings on zebrafish hydrodynamics offer a precise quantification of vortex shedding during zebrafish swimming and demonstrate that locomotory patterns play a central role on the flow physics. This knowledge may help clarify the evolutionary advantage of burst and cruise swimming movements in zebrafish.

  11. A new ASE filter: the 20-fold prism monochromator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Freriks, J.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    1999-01-01

    A new ASE filter is presented, consisting of 20 dispersion prisms and two spatial filters. The transmission of the filter is measured with a ring-dye laser. The 1 width of the filter is 0.23 nm. The transmission is approximately 80% for the transmitted wavelengths. The rejection is in the order of .

  12. Cryogenic flow rate measurement with a laser Doppler velocimetry standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, R.; Strzelecki, A.; Auclercq, C.; Lehot, Y.; Loubat, S.; Chevalier, J.; Ben Rayana, F.

    2018-03-01

    A very promising alternative to the state-of-the-art static volume measurements for liquefied natural gas (LNG) custody transfer processes is the dynamic principle of flow metering. As the Designated Institute (DI) of the LNE (‘Laboratoire National de métrologie et d’Essais’, being the French National Metrology Institute) for high-pressure gas flow metering, Cesame-Exadebit is involved in various research and development programs. Within the framework of the first (2010-2013) and second (2014-2017) EURAMET Joint Research Project (JRP), named ‘Metrological support for LNG custody transfer and transport fuel applications’, Cesame-Exadebit explored a novel cryogenic flow metering technology using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) as an alternative to ultrasonic and Coriolis flow metering. Cesame-Exadebit is trying to develop this technique as a primary standard for cryogenic flow meters. Currently, cryogenic flow meters are calibrated at ambient temperatures with water. Results are then extrapolated to be in the Reynolds number range of real applications. The LDV standard offers a unique capability to perform online calibration of cryogenic flow meters in real conditions (temperature, pressure, piping and real flow disturbances). The primary reference has been tested on an industrial process in a LNG terminal during truck refuelling. The reference can calibrate Coriolis flow meters being used daily with all the real environmental constraints, and its utilisation is transparent for LNG terminal operators. The standard is traceable to Standard International units and the combined extended uncertainties have been determined and estimated to be lower than 0.6% (an ongoing improvement to reducing the correlation function uncertainty, which has a major impact in the uncertainty estimation).

  13. Digital particle image thermometry/velocimetry: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, Dana [University of Washington, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Digital particle image thermometry/velocimetry (DPIT/V) is a relatively new methodology that allows for measurements of simultaneous temperature and velocity within a two-dimensional domain, using thermochromic liquid crystal tracer particles as the temperature and velocity sensors. Extensive research has been carried out over recent years that have allowed the methodology and its implementation to grow and evolve. While there have been several reviews on the topic of liquid crystal thermometry (Moffat in Exp Therm Fluid Sci 3:14-32, 1990; Baughn in Int J Heat Fluid Flow 16:365-375, 1995; Roberts and East in J Spacecr Rockets 33:761-768, 1996; Wozniak et al. in Appl Sci Res 56:145-156, 1996; Behle et al. in Appl Sci Res 56:113-143, 1996; Stasiek in Heat Mass Transf 33:27-39, 1997; Stasiek and Kowalewski in Opto Electron Rev 10:1-10, 2002; Stasiek et al. in Opt Laser Technol 38:243-256, 2006; Smith et al. in Exp Fluids 30:190-201, 2001; Kowalewski et al. in Springer handbook of experimental fluid mechanics, 1st edn. Springer, Berlin, pp 487-561, 2007), the focus of the present review is to provide a relevant discussion of liquid crystals pertinent to DPIT/V. This includes a background on liquid crystals and color theory, a discussion of experimental setup parameters, a description of the methodology's most recent advances and processing methods affecting temperature measurements, and finally an explanation of its various implementations and applications. (orig.)

  14. Generalised Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Friston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a Bayesian filtering scheme for nonlinear state-space models in continuous time. This scheme is called Generalised Filtering and furnishes posterior (conditional densities on hidden states and unknown parameters generating observed data. Crucially, the scheme operates online, assimilating data to optimize the conditional density on time-varying states and time-invariant parameters. In contrast to Kalman and Particle smoothing, Generalised Filtering does not require a backwards pass. In contrast to variational schemes, it does not assume conditional independence between the states and parameters. Generalised Filtering optimises the conditional density with respect to a free-energy bound on the model's log-evidence. This optimisation uses the generalised motion of hidden states and parameters, under the prior assumption that the motion of the parameters is small. We describe the scheme, present comparative evaluations with a fixed-form variational version, and conclude with an illustrative application to a nonlinear state-space model of brain imaging time-series.

  15. Filter This

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Barbakoff

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Library with the Lead Pipe welcomes Audrey Barbakoff, a librarian at the Milwaukee Public Library, and Ahniwa Ferrari, Virtual Experience Manager at the Pierce County Library System in Washington, for a point-counterpoint piece on filtering in libraries. The opinions expressed here are those of the authors, and are not endorsed by their employers. [...

  16. Wiener filter applied to a neutrongraphic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crispim, V.R.; Lopes, R.T.; Borges, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The randon characteristics of the image formation process influence the spatial image obtained in a neutrongraphy. Several methods can be used to optimize this image, though estimation of the noise added to the original signal. This work deals with the optimal filtering technique, using Wiener's filter. A simulation is made, where the signal (spatial resolution function) has a Lorentz's form, and ten kinds of random noise with increasing R.M.S. are generated and individually added to the original signal. Wiener's filter is applied to different noise amplitudes and the behaviour of the spatial resolution function for our system is also analysed. (Author) [pt

  17. Spatial-temporal and modal analysis of propeller induced ground vortices by particle image velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Sciacchitano, A.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.; Eitelberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    During the ground operation of aircraft, there is potentially a system of vortices generated from the ground toward the propulsor, commonly denoted as ground vortices. Although extensive research has been conducted on ground vortices induced by turbofans which were simplified by suction tubes, these

  18. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  19. Effect of non-Poisson samples on turbulence spectra from laser velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, Dave; Kjelgaard, Scott O.; Sellers, William L., III

    1994-01-01

    Spectral analysis of laser velocimetry (LV) data plays an important role in characterizing a turbulent flow and in estimating the associated turbulence scales, which can be helpful in validating theoretical and numerical turbulence models. The determination of turbulence scales is critically dependent on the accuracy of the spectral estimates. Spectral estimations from 'individual realization' laser velocimetry data are typically based on the assumption of a Poisson sampling process. What this Note has demonstrated is that the sampling distribution must be considered before spectral estimates are used to infer turbulence scales.

  20. Bag filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, M; Komeda, I; Takizaki, K

    1982-01-01

    Bag filters are widely used throughout the cement industry for recovering raw materials and products and for improving the environment. Their general mechanism, performance and advantages are shown in a classification table, and there are comparisons and explanations. The outer and inner sectional construction of the Shinto ultra-jet collector for pulverized coal is illustrated and there are detailed descriptions of dust cloud prevention, of measures used against possible sources of ignition, of oxygen supply and of other topics. Finally, explanations are given of matters that require careful and comprehensive study when selecting equipment.

  1. Digital filters

    CERN Document Server

    Hamming, Richard W

    1997-01-01

    Digital signals occur in an increasing number of applications: in telephone communications; in radio, television, and stereo sound systems; and in spacecraft transmissions, to name just a few. This introductory text examines digital filtering, the processes of smoothing, predicting, differentiating, integrating, and separating signals, as well as the removal of noise from a signal. The processes bear particular relevance to computer applications, one of the focuses of this book.Readers will find Hamming's analysis accessible and engaging, in recognition of the fact that many people with the s

  2. Design and application of finite impulse response digital filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.R.; Sampathkumaran, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    The finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter is a spatial domain filter with a frequency domain representation. The theory of the FIR filter is presented and techniques are described for designing FIR filters with known frequency response characteristics. Rational design principles are emphasized based on characterization of the imaging system using the modulation transfer function and physical properties of the imaged objects. Bandpass, Wiener, and low-pass filters were designed and applied to 201 Tl myocardial images. The bandpass filter eliminates low-frequency image components that represent background activity and high-frequency components due to noise. The Wiener, or minimum mean square error filter 'sharpens' the image while also reducing noise. The Wiener filter illustrates the power of the FIR technique to design filters with any desired frequency reponse. The low-pass filter, while of relative limited use, is presented to compare it with a popular elementary 'smoothing' filter. (orig.)

  3. Multipurpose Pressure Vessel Scanner and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Tayera

    2015-01-01

    Critical flight hardware typically undergoes a series of nondestructive evaluation methods to screen for defects before it is integrated into the flight system. Conventionally, pressure vessels have been inspected for flaws using a technique known as fluorescent dye penetrant, which is biased to inspector interpretation. An alternate method known as eddy current is automated and can detect small cracks better than dye penetrant. A new multipurpose pressure vessel scanner has been developed to perform internal and external eddy current scanning, laser profilometry, and thickness mapping on pressure vessels. Before this system can be implemented throughout industry, a probability of detection (POD) study needs to be performed to validate the system’s eddy current crack/flaw capabilities. The POD sample set will consist of 6 flight-like metal pressure vessel liners with defects of known size. Preparation for the POD includes sample set fabrication, system operation, procedure development, and eddy current settings optimization. For this, collaborating with subject matter experts was required. This technical paper details the preparation activities leading up to the POD study currently scheduled for winter 2015/2016. Once validated, this system will be a proven innovation for increasing the safety and reliability of necessary flight hardware.Additionally, testing of frangible joint requires Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) and Digital Image Correlation instrumentation. There is often noise associated with PDV data, which necessitates a frequency modulation (FM) signal-to-noise pre-test. Generally, FM radio works by varying the carrier frequency and mixing it with a fixed frequency source, creating a beat frequency which is represented by audio frequency that can be heard between about 20 to 20,000 Hz. Similarly, PDV reflects a shifted frequency (a phenomenon known as the Doppler Effect) from a moving source and mixes it with a fixed source frequency, which results in

  4. Particle Image Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Fuel Cell Manifold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Blazniak Andreasen, Marcin; Andresen, Henrik Assenholm

    2010-01-01

    The inlet effect on the manifold flow in a fuel cell stack was investigated by means of numerical methods (computational fluid dynamics) and experimental methods (particle image velocimetry). At a simulated high current density situation the flow field was mapped on a 70 cell simulated cathode...

  5. Comparative assessment of pressure field reconstructions from particle image velocimetry measurements and Lagrangian particle tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, P.L.; Michaelis, D; van Oudheusden, B.W.; Weiss, P.E.; de Kat, R.; Laskari, A.; Jeon, Y.J.; David, L; Schanz, D; Huhn, F.; Gesemann, S; Novara, M.; McPhaden, C.; Neeteson, N. J.; Rival, David E.; Schneiders, J.F.G.; Schrijer, F.F.J.

    2017-01-01

    A test case for pressure field reconstruction from particle image velocimetry (PIV) and Lagrangian particle tracking (LPT) has been developed by constructing a simulated experiment from a zonal detached eddy simulation for an axisymmetric base flow at Mach 0.7. The test case comprises sequences

  6. QUANTITATIVE FLOW-ANALYSIS AROUND AQUATIC ANIMALS USING LASER SHEET PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STAMHUIS, EJ; VIDELER, JJ

    Two alternative particle image velocimetry (PIV) methods have been developed, applying laser light sheet illumination of particle-seeded flows around marine organisms, Successive video images, recorded perpendicular to a light sheet parallel to the main stream, were digitized and processed to map

  7. Analysis of propeller-induced ground vortices by particle image velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Sciacchitano, A.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.; Eitelberg, G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The interaction between a propeller and its self-induced vortices originating on the ground is investigated in a scaled experiment. The velocity distribution in the flow field in two different planes containing the self-induced vortices is measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  8. Endovascular Device Testing with Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Priya; Ankeny, Casey J.; Ryan, Justin; Okcay, Murat; Frakes, David H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow™, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intra-aneurysmal flow…

  9. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional flow field inside a generic can-type, forward flow, experimental combustor was measured. A stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to obtain the flow field of the combustor in the non-reacting condition...

  10. Rainbow particle imaging velocimetry for dense 3D fluid velocity imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-07-21

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a

  11. Particle imaging velocimetry experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations on a single sphere settling under gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Cate, A.; Nieuwstad, C.H.; Derksen, J.J.; Van den Akker, H.E.A.

    2002-01-01

    A comparison is made between experiments and simulations on a single sphere settling in silicon oil in a box. Cross-correlation particle imaging velocimetry measurements were carried out at particle Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.5 to 31.9. The particle Stokes number varied from 0.2 to 4 and at

  12. Particle image velocimetry measurements and numerical modeling of a saline density current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle image velocimetry scalar measurements were carried out on the body of a stably stratified density current with an inlet Reynolds number of 2,300 and bulk Richardson number of 0.1. These measurements allowed the mass and momentum transport...

  13. Three-component particle image velocimetry in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available -1 Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part A: Journal of Power and Energy November 2012/ Vol. 226(7) Three-componentParticle Image Velocimetry in a Generic Can-type Gas Turbine Combustor B C Meyers 1, 2* , G C Snedden 1 , J P...

  14. Fluid Flow Characterization of High Turbulent Intensity Compressible Flow Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    completed in order to begin further experimentation. A 10 kHz Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) system and a 3 kHz Planer Laser ...9 2.3.2 Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF...35 Figure 4.4: Solenoid valve (a), proportional control valve (b) and flowmeter (c) ...................................... 36 Figure 4.5

  15. Drag coefficient accuracy improvement by means of particle image velocimetry for a transonic NACA0012 airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragni, D; Van Oudheusden, B W; Scarano, F

    2011-01-01

    A method to improve the reliability of the drag coefficient computation by means of particle image velocimetry measurements is made using experimental data acquired on a NACA0012 airfoil tested in the transonic regime, using the combination of a variable pulse separation with a new high-order Poisson spectral pressure reconstruction algorithm. (technical design note)

  16. Application of stereoscopic particle image velocimetry to studies of transport in a dusty (complex) plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Williams, Jeremiah D.; Silver, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques [E. Thomas, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2672 (1999)] have been used to obtain detailed measurements of microparticle transport in dusty plasmas. This Letter reports on an extension of these techniques to a three-dimensional velocity vector measurement approach using stereoscopic PIV. Initial measurements using the stereoscopic PIV diagnostic are presented

  17. Basics and principles of particle image velocimetry (PIV) for mapping biogenic and biologically relevant flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, Eize J.

    2006-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has proven to be a very useful technique in mapping animal-generated flows or flow patterns relevant to biota. Here, theoretical background is provided and experimental details of 2-dimensional digital PIV are explained for mapping flow produced by or relevant to

  18. The application of particle image velocimetry for the analysis of high-speed craft hydrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, G.; Thill, C.H.; Huijsmans, R.H.M.; Huijsmans, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique has become a reliable method for capturing the velocity field and its derivatives, even in complex flows and is now also widely used for validation of numerical codes. As the imaging system is sensitive to vibrations, the application in environments

  19. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic vision sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, D.; Delbruck, T.; Rösgen, T.

    2017-12-01

    A fast-flow visualization method is presented based on tracking neutrally buoyant soap bubbles with a set of neuromorphic cameras. The "dynamic vision sensors" register only the changes in brightness with very low latency, capturing fast processes at a low data rate. The data consist of a stream of asynchronous events, each encoding the corresponding pixel position, the time instant of the event and the sign of the change in logarithmic intensity. The work uses three such synchronized cameras to perform 3D particle tracking in a medium sized wind tunnel. The data analysis relies on Kalman filters to associate the asynchronous events with individual tracers and to reconstruct the three-dimensional path and velocity based on calibrated sensor information.

  20. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  1. Frequency Domain Image Filtering Using CUDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Awais Rajput

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the implementation of image filtering in frequency domain using NVIDIA?s CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture. In contrast to signal and image filtering in spatial domain which uses convolution operations and hence is more compute-intensive for filters having larger spatial extent, the frequency domain filtering uses FFT (Fast Fourier Transform which is much faster and significantly reduces the computational complexity of the filtering. We implement the frequency domain filtering on CPU and GPU respectively and analyze the speed-up obtained from the CUDA?s parallel processing paradigm. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of frequency domain filtering on CUDA, we implement three frequency domain filters, i.e., Butterworth, low-pass and Gaussian for processing different sizes of images on CPU and GPU respectively and perform the GPU vs. CPU benchmarks. The results presented in this paper show that the frequency domain filtering with CUDA achieves significant speed-up over the CPU processing in frequency domain with the same level of (output image quality on both the processing architectures

  2. Frequency domain image filtering using cuda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, M.A.; Khan, U.A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the implementation of image filtering in frequency domain using NVIDIA's CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture). In contrast to signal and image filtering in spatial domain which uses convolution operations and hence is more compute-intensive for filters having larger spatial extent, the frequency domain filtering uses FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) which is much faster and significantly reduces the computational complexity of the filtering. We implement the frequency domain filtering on CPU and GPU respectively and analyze the speed-up obtained from the CUDA's parallel processing paradigm. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of frequency domain filtering on CUDA, we implement three frequency domain filters, i.e., Butter worth, low-pass and Gaussian for processing different sizes of images on CPU and GPU respectively and perform the GPU vs. CPU benchmarks. The results presented in this paper show that the frequency domain filtering with CUDA achieves significant speed-up over the CPU processing in frequency domain with the same level of (output) image quality on both the processing architectures. (author)

  3. Investigation on filter method for smoothing spiral phase plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanhang; Wen, Shenglin; Luo, Zijian; Tang, Caixue; Yan, Hao; Yang, Chunlin; Liu, Mincai; Zhang, Qinghua; Wang, Jian

    2018-03-01

    Spiral phase plate (SPP) for generating vortex hollow beams has high efficiency in various applications. However, it is difficult to obtain an ideal spiral phase plate because of its continuous-varying helical phase and discontinued phase step. This paper describes the demonstration of continuous spiral phase plate using filter methods. The numerical simulations indicate that different filter method including spatial domain filter, frequency domain filter has unique impact on surface topography of SPP and optical vortex characteristics. The experimental results reveal that the spatial Gaussian filter method for smoothing SPP is suitable for Computer Controlled Optical Surfacing (CCOS) technique and obtains good optical properties.

  4. Convergent Filter Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We are inspired by the work of Henri Cartan [16], Bourbaki [10] (TG. I Filtres and Claude Wagschal [34]. We define the base of filter, image filter, convergent filter bases, limit filter and the filter base of tails (fr: filtre des sections.

  5. Miniaturized dielectric waveguide filters

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhu, MY; Hunter, IC

    2016-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high-permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled transverse electromagnetic filters with the same unloaded Q-factor. Designs for Chebyshev and asymmetric generalised Chebyshev filter and a diplexer are presented with experimental results for an 1800 MHz Chebyshev filter and a 1700 MHz generalised Chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  6. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  7. Combined Lorentz force and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry in a vertical convection liquid metal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Till; Vogt, Tobias; Resagk, Christian; Eckert, Sven; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental studies on turbulent vertical convection flow in the liquid metal alloy gallium-indium-tin. Flow measurements were conducted by a combined use of local Lorentz force velocimetry (LLFV) and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry (UDV). It is known that the forced convection flow in a duct generates a force on the LLFV magnet system, that grows proportional to the flow velocity. We show that for the slower flow of natural convection LLFV retains this linear dependence in the range of micronewtons. Furthermore experimental results on the scaling of heat and momentum transport with the thermal driving are presented. The results cover a range of Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under Grant No. GRK 1567.

  8. Improvement in the independence of relaxation method-based particle tracking velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, P; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    New techniques are developed to improve the independence of relaxation method-based particle tracking velocimetry (RM-PTV). Firstly, Delaunay tessellation (DT) is employed to form clusters of neighboring particles with similar motion in the same frame; and then a bidirectional calculation concept is adopted to improve the way of particle pairing. These new techniques are tested with both self-defined particle images and the particle image velocimetry standard synthetic particle images. The results indicate that the DT method performs well and efficiently in determining the particle clusters, and the particle pairing process is well optimized by the bidirectional calculation concept. With these methods, three computation parameters are eliminated, which makes RM-PTV more autonomous in applications. (paper)

  9. Pulsed operation of high-power light emitting diodes for imaging flow velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willert, C; Klinner, J; Moessner, S; Stasicki, B

    2010-01-01

    High-powered light emitting diodes (LED) are investigated for possible uses as light sources in flow diagnostics, in particular, as an alternative to laser-based illumination in particle imaging flow velocimetry in side-scatter imaging arrangements. Recent developments in solid state illumination resulted in mass-produced LEDs that provide average radiant power in excess of 10 W. By operating these LEDs with short duration, pulsed currents that are considerably beyond their continuous current damage threshold, light pulses can be generated that are sufficient to illuminate and image micron-sized particles in flow velocimetry. Time-resolved PIV measurements in water at a framing rate of 2kHz are presented. The feasibility of LED-based PIV measurements in air is also demonstrated

  10. Selection vector filter framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Rastislav; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.; Smolka, Bogdan; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.

    2003-10-01

    We provide a unified framework of nonlinear vector techniques outputting the lowest ranked vector. The proposed framework constitutes a generalized filter class for multichannel signal processing. A new class of nonlinear selection filters are based on the robust order-statistic theory and the minimization of the weighted distance function to other input samples. The proposed method can be designed to perform a variety of filtering operations including previously developed filtering techniques such as vector median, basic vector directional filter, directional distance filter, weighted vector median filters and weighted directional filters. A wide range of filtering operations is guaranteed by the filter structure with two independent weight vectors for angular and distance domains of the vector space. In order to adapt the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics, we provide also the generalized optimization algorithms taking the advantage of the weighted median filters and the relationship between standard median filter and vector median filter. Thus, we can deal with both statistical and deterministic aspects of the filter design process. It will be shown that the proposed method holds the required properties such as the capability of modelling the underlying system in the application at hand, the robustness with respect to errors in the model of underlying system, the availability of the training procedure and finally, the simplicity of filter representation, analysis, design and implementation. Simulation studies also indicate that the new filters are computationally attractive and have excellent performance in environments corrupted by bit errors and impulsive noise.

  11. Assessment of Doppler velocimetry versus nonstress test in antepartum surveillance of high risk pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi Choudhury; Barun Kumar Sharma; Bikram Kishor Kanungo; Ruby Yadav; Hafizur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Background: High risk pregnancies increase the maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality; and there is a need for appropriate investigation which can diagnose it early and predicts the morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this study were to compare the efficacy of Doppler velocimetry studies and NST in predicting fetal compromise in utero and compare their ability in predicting the perinatal outcome in cases of high risk pregnancies. Methods: It was a prospective cross-sectional ho...

  12. Abnormal Doppler flow velocimetry in the growth restricted foetus as a predictor for necrotising enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstetric decision- making for the growth restricted foetus has to take into consideration the benefits and risks of waiting for pulmonary maturity and continued exposure to hostile intra-uterine environment. Necrotising Enterocolitis (NEC results from continued exposure to hostile environment and is an important cause of poor neonatal outcome. AIMS: To evaluate the predictive value of abnormal Doppler flow velocimetry of the foetal umbilical artery for NEC and neonatal mortality. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A retrospective study carried out at a tertiary care centre for obstetric and neonatal care. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Seventy-seven neonates with birth weight less than 2000 gm, born over a period of 18 months were studied. These pregnancies were identified as having growth abnormalities of the foetus. Besides other tests of foetal well-being, they were also subjected to Doppler flow velocimetry of the foeto-placental vasculature. Obstetric outcome was evaluated with reference to period of gestation and route of delivery. The neonatal outcome was reviewed with reference to birth weight, Apgar scores and evidence of NEC. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Chi square test. RESULTS: In the group of patients with Absent or Reverse End Diastolic Frequencies (A/R EDF in the umbilical arteries, positive predictive value for NEC was 52.6%, (RR 30.2; OR 264. The mortality from NEC was 50%. When umbilical artery velocimetry did not show A/REDF, there were no cases of NEC or mortality. Abnormal umbilical or uterine artery flow increased the rate of caesarean section to 62.5% as compared to 17.6% in cases where umbilical artery flow was normal. CONCLUSION: In antenatally identified pregnancies at risk for foetal growth restriction, abnormal Doppler velocimetry in the form of A/REDF in the umbilical arteries is a useful guide to predict NEC and mortality in the early neonatal period.

  13. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Pulsed, High Power LED Volume Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Buchmann, N. A.; Willert, C.; Soria, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of high-power light emitting diode (LED) illumination in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) as an alternative to traditional laser-based illumination. The solid-state LED devices can provide averaged radiant power in excess of 10W and by operating the LEDs with short current pulses, considerably higher than in continuous operation, light pulses of sufficient energy suitable for imaging micron-sized particles can be generated. The feasibility of this LED-based ill...

  14. The magnetic-distortion probe: velocimetry in conducting fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Verhille, Gautier; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2011-09-01

    A new type of velocimeter, capable of local velocity measurements in conducting fluids, is introduced. The principle of the "magnetic-distortion probe" is based on the measurement of the induced magnetic field by the flow of a conducting fluid in the vicinity of a localized magnetic field. The new velocimeter has no moving parts, and can be enclosed in a sealed cap, easing the implementation in harsh environments, such as liquid metals. The proposed method allows one to probe both the continuous part and fluctuations of the velocity, the temporal and spatial resolution being linked to the actual geometric configuration of the probe. A prototype probe has been tested in a gallinstan pipe flow and in a fully turbulent flow of liquid gallium generated by the counter rotation of two coaxial impellers in a cylinder. The signals have been compared to a reference potential probe and show very good agreement both for time-averaged velocities and turbulent fluctuations. The prototype is shown to detect motion from a few cm s(-1) to a few m s(-1). Moreover, the use of the magnetic-distortion probe with large-scale applied magnetic field is discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  15. Development of two-dimensional velocity field measurement using particle tracking velocimetry on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Mishima, K.; Suzuki, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The structures of liquid metal two-phase flow are investigated for analyzing the core meltdown accident of fast reactor. The experiments of high-density ratio two-phase flow for lead-bismuth molten metal and nitrogen gases are conducted to understand in detail. The liquid phase velocity distributions of lead-bismuth molten metal are measured by neutron radiography using Au-Cd tracer particles. The liquid phase velocity distributions are obtained usually by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) on the neutron radiography. The PIV, however is difficult to get the velocity vector distribution quantitatively. An image of neutron radiography is divided into two images of the bubbles and the tracer particles each in particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), which distinguishes tracer contents in the bubble from them in the liquid phase. The locations of tracer particles in the liquid phase are possible to determine by particle mask correlation method, in which the bubble images are separated from the tracer images by Σ-scaling method. The particle tracking velocimetry give a full detail of the velocity vector distributions of the liquid phase in two-phase flow, in comparison with the PIV method. (M. Suetake)

  16. Recirculating electric air filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  17. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  18. Passive Power Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Künzi, R.

    2015-06-15

    Power converters require passive low-pass filters which are capable of reducing voltage ripples effectively. In contrast to signal filters, the components of power filters must carry large currents or withstand large voltages, respectively. In this paper, three different suitable filter struc tures for d.c./d.c. power converters with inductive load are introduced. The formulas needed to calculate the filter components are derived step by step and practical examples are given. The behaviour of the three discussed filters is compared by means of the examples. P ractical aspects for the realization of power filters are also discussed.

  19. Filter replacement lifetime prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Klein, Levente I.; Manzer, Dennis G.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2017-10-25

    Methods and systems for predicting a filter lifetime include building a filter effectiveness history based on contaminant sensor information associated with a filter; determining a rate of filter consumption with a processor based on the filter effectiveness history; and determining a remaining filter lifetime based on the determined rate of filter consumption. Methods and systems for increasing filter economy include measuring contaminants in an internal and an external environment; determining a cost of a corrosion rate increase if unfiltered external air intake is increased for cooling; determining a cost of increased air pressure to filter external air; and if the cost of filtering external air exceeds the cost of the corrosion rate increase, increasing an intake of unfiltered external air.

  20. Analysis of the modal behavior of an antiguide diode laser array with Talbot filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, P.D.; van Eijk, Pieter D.; Reglat, Muriel; Vassilief, Georges; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Driessen, A.; Mouthaan, A.J.

    An analysis of the filtering of the array modes in a resonant optical waveguide (ROW) array of antiguides by a diffractive spatial filter (a Talbot filter) is presented. A dispersion relation is derived for the array modes, allowing the calculation of the field distribution. The filtering is

  1. Optimization of filter loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, J.H.; Gardiner, D.E.; Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA)

    1985-01-01

    The introduction of 10 CFR Part 61 has created potential difficulties in the disposal of spent cartridge filters. When this report was prepared, Rancho Seco had no method of packaging and disposing of class B or C filters. This work examined methods to minimize the total operating cost of cartridge filters while maintaining them below the class A limit. It was found that by encapsulating filters in cement the filter operating costs could be minimized

  2. Dynamic beam filtering for miscentered patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Andrew; Shyr, William; Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster

    2018-02-01

    Accurate centering of the patient within the bore of a CT scanner takes time and is often difficult to achieve precisely. Patient miscentering can result in significant dose and image noise penalties with the use of traditional bowtie filters. This work describes a system to dynamically position an x-ray beam filter during image acquisition to enable more consistent image performance and potentially lower dose needed for CT imaging. We propose a new approach in which two orthogonal low-dose scout images are used to estimate a parametric model of the object describing its shape, size, and location within the field of view (FOV). This model is then used to compute an optimal filter motion profile by minimizing the variance of the expected detector fluence for each projection. Dynamic filtration was implemented on a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test bench using two different physical filters: 1) an aluminum bowtie and 2) a structured binary filter called a multiple aperture device (MAD). Dynamic filtration performance was compared to a static filter in studies of dose and reconstruction noise as a function of the degree of miscentering of a homogeneous water phantom. Estimated filter trajectories were found to be largely sinusoidal with an amplitude proportional to the amount of miscentering. Dynamic filtration demonstrated an improved ability to keep the spatial distribution of dose and reconstruction noise at baseline levels across varying levels of miscentering, reducing the maximum noise and dose deviation from 53% to 15% and 42% to 14% respectively for the bowtie filter, and 25% to 8% and 24% to 15% respectively for the MAD filter. Dynamic positioning of beam filters during acquisition improves dose utilization and image quality over static filters for miscentered patients. Such dynamic filters relax positioning requirements and have the potential to reduce set-up time and lower dose requirements.

  3. Improvement of image velocimetry based on a spatio-temporal correlation method; Jikukan sokan ni motozuku ryushi gazo sokudoba keisokuho no kaiseki seino kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H. [Tokuyama College of Technology, Yamaguchi (Japan); Arifuku, T. [Komatsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Koga, K. [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-05-31

    In the image velocimetry, it is generally required to detect the various velocity in each position of the flow field. But the maximum velocity which the usual velocimetry can detect has been limited in about 1 pixel per frame. Then, in order to measure the wide range of velocity vectors from the dynamic image, the improvement of performance in the image velocimetry based on a spatio-temporal correlation method would be attempted by enlarging the analytical region and by interpolating the new frame. The analytical performance of velocimetry was estimated by measuring the velocity from the flow dynamic image made artificially on the personal computer so as to simulate the flow of fluid containing a lot of small particles. As the results, the velocity range of the improved velocimetry became larger than that of the usual velocimetry. 21 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Combination of Wiener filtering and singular value decomposition filtering for volume imaging PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, L.; Lewitt, R.M.; Karp, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    Although the three-dimensional (3D) multi-slice rebinning (MSRB) algorithm in PET is fast and practical, and provides an accurate reconstruction, the MSRB image, in general, suffers from the noise amplified by its singular value decomposition (SVD) filtering operation in the axial direction. Their aim in this study is to combine the use of the Wiener filter (WF) with the SVD to decrease the noise and improve the image quality. The SVD filtering ''deconvolves'' the spatially variant axial response function while the WF suppresses the noise and reduces the blurring not modeled by the axial SVD filter but included in the system modulation transfer function. Therefore, the synthesis of these two techniques combines the advantages of both filters. The authors applied this approach to the volume imaging HEAD PENN-PET brain scanner with an axial extent of 256 mm. This combined filter was evaluated in terms of spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio with several phantoms, such as a cold sphere phantom and 3D brain phantom. Specifically, the authors studied both the SVD filter with an axial Wiener filter and the SVD filter with a 3D Wiener filter, and compared the filtered images to those from the 3D reprojection (3DRP) reconstruction algorithm. Their results indicate that the Wiener filter increases the signal-to-noise ratio and also improves the contrast. For the MSRB images of the 3D brain phantom, after 3D WF, both the Gray/White and Gray/Ventricle ratios were improved from 1.8 to 2.8 and 2.1 to 4.1, respectively. In addition, the image quality with the MSRB algorithm is close to that of the 3DRP algorithm with 3D WF applied to both image reconstructions

  5. Diode Laser Velocity Measurements by Modulated Filtered Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J. J.; Varghese, P. L.; Jagodzinski, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of solid-state lasers to be tuned in operating frequency at MHz rates by input current modulation, while maintaining a relatively narrow line-width, has made them useful for spectroscopic measurements. Their other advantages include low cost, reliability, durability, compact size, and modest power requirements, making them a good choice for a laser source in micro-gravity experiments in drop-towers and in flight. For their size, they are also very bright. In a filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiment, a diode laser can be used to scan across an atomic or molecular absorption line, generating large changes in transmission at the resonances for very small changes in frequency. The hyperfine structure components of atomic lines of alkali metal vapors are closely spaced and very strong, which makes such atomic filters excellent candidates for sensitive Doppler shift detection and therefore for high-resolution velocimetry. In the work we describe here we use a Rubidium vapor filter, and work with the strong D(sub 2) transitions at 780 nm that are conveniently accessed by near infrared diode lasers. The low power output of infrared laser diodes is their primary drawback relative to other laser systems commonly used for velocimetry. However, the capability to modulate the laser frequency rapidly and continuously helps mitigate this. Using modulation spectroscopy and a heterodyne detection scheme with a lock-in amplifier, one can extract sub-microvolt signals occurring at a specific frequency from a background that is orders of magnitude stronger. The diode laser modulation is simply achieved by adding a small current modulation to the laser bias current. It may also be swept repetitively in wavelength using an additional lower frequency current ramp.

  6. Laboratory for filter testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluch, W.

    1987-07-01

    Filters used for mine draining in brown coal surface mines are tested by the Mine Draining Department of Poltegor. Laboratory tests of new types of filters developed by Poltegor are analyzed. Two types of tests are used: tests of scale filter models and tests of experimental units of new filters. Design and operation of the test stands used for testing mechanical properties and hydraulic properties of filters for coal mines are described: dimensions, pressure fluctuations, hydraulic equipment. Examples of testing large-diameter filters for brown coal mines are discussed.

  7. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry. Final report, September 1988--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  8. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  9. Sensory Pollution from Bag Filters, Carbon Filters and Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Clausen, Geo; Weschler, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    by an upstream pre-filter (changed monthly), an EU7 filter protected by an upstream activated carbon (AC) filter, and EU7 filters with an AC filter either downstream or both upstream and downstream. In addition, two types of stand-alone combination filters were evaluated: a bag-type fiberglass filter...... that contained AC and a synthetic fiber cartridge filter that contained AC. Air that had passed through used filters was most acceptable for those sets in which an AC filter was used downstream of the particle filter. Comparable air quality was achieved with the stand-alone bag filter that contained AC...

  10. HEPA Filter Vulnerability Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    This assessment of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter vulnerability was requested by the USDOE Office of River Protection (ORP) to satisfy a DOE-HQ directive to evaluate the effect of filter degradation on the facility authorization basis assumptions. Within the scope of this assessment are ventilation system HEPA filters that are classified as Safety-Class (SC) or Safety-Significant (SS) components that perform an accident mitigation function. The objective of the assessment is to verify whether HEPA filters that perform a safety function during an accident are likely to perform as intended to limit release of hazardous or radioactive materials, considering factors that could degrade the filters. Filter degradation factors considered include aging, wetting of filters, exposure to high temperature, exposure to corrosive or reactive chemicals, and exposure to radiation. Screening and evaluation criteria were developed by a site-wide group of HVAC engineers and HEPA filter experts from published empirical data. For River Protection Project (RPP) filters, the only degradation factor that exceeded the screening threshold was for filter aging. Subsequent evaluation of the effect of filter aging on the filter strength was conducted, and the results were compared with required performance to meet the conditions assumed in the RPP Authorization Basis (AB). It was found that the reduction in filter strength due to aging does not affect the filter performance requirements as specified in the AB. A portion of the HEPA filter vulnerability assessment is being conducted by the ORP and is not part of the scope of this study. The ORP is conducting an assessment of the existing policies and programs relating to maintenance, testing, and change-out of HEPA filters used for SC/SS service. This document presents the results of a HEPA filter vulnerability assessment conducted for the River protection project as requested by the DOE Office of River Protection

  11. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews two different approaches that have been proposed to tackle the problems of model bias with the Kalman filter: the use of a colored noise model and the implementation of a separate bias filter. Both filters are implemented with and without feedback of the bias into the model state....... The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Simon-nitinol filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M.; Kim, D.; Porter, D.H.; Kleshinski, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a filter that exploits the thermal shape-memory properties of the nitinol alloy to achieve an optimized filter shape and a fine-bore introducer. Experimental methods and materials are given and results are analyzed

  13. MST Filterability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The low filter flux through the ARP has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Recent filter flux has averaged approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Salt Batch 6 has had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. In addition, at the time the testing started, SRR was assessing the impact of replacing the 0.1 micron filter with a 0.5 micron filter. This report describes testing of MST filterability to investigate the impact of filter pore size and MST particle size on filter flux and testing of filter enhancers to attempt to increase filter flux. The authors constructed a laboratory-scale crossflow filter apparatus with two crossflow filters operating in parallel. One filter was a 0.1 micron Mott sintered SS filter and the other was a 0.5 micron Mott sintered SS filter. The authors also constructed a dead-end filtration apparatus to conduct screening tests with potential filter aids and body feeds, referred to as filter enhancers. The original baseline for ARP was 5.6 M sodium salt solution with a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 1.7 M.3 ARP has been operating with a sodium concentration of approximately 6.4 M and a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 2.5 M. SRNL conducted tests varying the concentration of sodium and free hydroxide to determine whether those changes had a significant effect on filter flux. The feed slurries for the MST filterability tests were composed of simple salts (NaOH, NaNO2, and NaNO3) and MST (0.2 – 4.8 g/L). The feed slurry for the filter enhancer tests contained simulated salt batch 6 supernate, MST, and filter enhancers.

  14. A new paradigm for particle tracking velocimetry, based on graph-theory and pulsed neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derou, D.; Herault, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) technique works by recording, at different instances in time, positions of small tracers particles following a flow and illuminated by a sheet, or pseudo sheet, of light. It aims to recognize each particle trajectory, constituted of n different spots and determine thus each particle velocity vector. In this paper, we devise a new method, taking into account a global consistency of the trajectories to be extracted, in terms of visual perception and physical properties. It is based on a graph-theoretic formulation of the particle tracking problem and the use of an original neural network, called pulsed neural network. (authors). 4 figs

  15. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; OByrne, S.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a new type of flow-tagging velocimetry technique for hypersonic flows. The technique involves exciting a thin line of nitric oxide molecules with a laser beam and then, after some delay, acquiring an image of the displaced line. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National Universities T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The velocity is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 2%. Comparison with a CFD simulation of the flow shows reasonable agreement.

  16. Surge Flow in a Centrifugal Compressor Measured by Digital Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    A planar optical velocity measurement technique known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is being used to study transient events in compressors. In PIV, a pulsed laser light sheet is used to record the positions of particles entrained in a fluid at two instances in time across a planar region of the flow. Determining the recorded particle displacement between exposures yields an instantaneous velocity vector map across the illuminated plane. Detailed flow mappings obtained using PIV in high-speed rotating turbomachinery components are used to improve the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, which in turn, are used to guide advances in state-of-the-art aircraft engine hardware designs.

  17. New Developments In Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) For The Study Of Complex Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Fisher, Ross; Shaw, Joseph; Jefferson, Robert; Cianciosa, Mark; Williams, Jeremiah

    2011-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a fluid measurement technique in which the average displacement of small groups of particles is made by comparing a pair of images that are separated in time by an interval Δt. For over a decade, a several variations of the PIV technique, e.g., two-dimensional, stereoscopic, and tomographic PIV, have been used to characterize particle transport, instabilities, and the thermal properties of complex plasmas. This paper describes the basic principles involved in the PIV analysis technique and discusses potential future applications of PIV to the study of complex plasmas.

  18. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  19. Time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the 3D random Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Everest; Krivets, Vitaliy; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    The vertical shock tube at the University of Arizona is used to perform experiments on the multi-mode three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI). An interface of air and sulfur hexafluoride is formed in a counter flow configuration, and is excited using voice coils to produce faraday-like multi-modal perturbations.This interface is shock accelerated by an approximately Mach 1.2 shockwave to form the RMI. Time resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to perform analysis of the evolving instability.

  20. Nonlinear Filtering in High Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    near J (that is, the spatial accumulation of errors is mitigated). This localization comes at a price , however; the local filter stability bound holds...Appendix A to complete the proof of the variance bound. The present approach is inspired by [15]. The price we pay is that the variance bound scales...Random fields and diffusion processes. In École d’Été de Prob- abilités de Saint- Flour XV–XVII, 1985–87, volume 1362 of Lecture Notes in Math., pages

  1. Rotationally invariant correlation filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing and designing optical correlation filters that have tailored rotational invariance properties. The concept of a correlation of an image with a rotation of itself is introduced. A unified theory of rotation-invariant filtering is then formulated. The unified approach describes matched filters (with no rotation invariance) and circular-harmonic filters (with full rotation invariance) as special cases. The continuum of intermediate cases is described in terms of a cyclic convolution operation over angle. The angular filtering approach allows an exact choice for the continuous trade-off between loss of the correlation energy (or specificity regarding the image) and the amount of rotational invariance desired

  2. Measuring the 3D motion of particles in microchannel acoustophoresis using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustsson, P.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We introduce full three-dimensional tracking of particles in an acoustophoresis microchannel using Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) [1]. For the first time the interaction between acoustic streaming and the primary acoustic radiation force in microchannel acoustophoresis are exami...... relative to the influence from the acoustic radiation force. The current study opens the route to optimized acoustophoretic system design and operation to enable manipulation of small biological components such as spores, bacteria and viruses.......We introduce full three-dimensional tracking of particles in an acoustophoresis microchannel using Astigmatism Particle Tracking Velocimetry (APTV) [1]. For the first time the interaction between acoustic streaming and the primary acoustic radiation force in microchannel acoustophoresis...... are examined in three dimensions. We have quantified the velocity of particles driven by the primary acoustic radiation force and acoustic streaming, respectively, using 0.5-μm and 5-μm particles. Increased ultrasound frequency and lowered viscosity of the medium reduced the influence of acoustic streaming...

  3. Fundamental uncertainty limit of optical flow velocimetry according to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Optical flow velocity measurements are important for understanding the complex behavior of flows. Although a huge variety of methods exist, they are either based on a Doppler or a time-of-flight measurement principle. Doppler velocimetry evaluates the velocity-dependent frequency shift of light scattered at a moving particle, whereas time-of-flight velocimetry evaluates the traveled distance of a scattering particle per time interval. Regarding the aim of achieving a minimal measurement uncertainty, it is unclear if one principle allows to achieve lower uncertainties or if both principles can achieve equal uncertainties. For this reason, the natural, fundamental uncertainty limit according to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is derived for Doppler and time-of-flight measurement principles, respectively. The obtained limits of the velocity uncertainty are qualitatively identical showing, e.g., a direct proportionality for the absolute value of the velocity to the power of 32 and an indirect proportionality to the square root of the scattered light power. Hence, both measurement principles have identical potentials regarding the fundamental uncertainty limit due to the quantum mechanical behavior of photons. This fundamental limit can be attained (at least asymptotically) in reality either with Doppler or time-of-flight methods, because the respective Cramér-Rao bounds for dominating photon shot noise, which is modeled as white Poissonian noise, are identical with the conclusions from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle.

  4. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg S. O’Donovan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS technique (i records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods.

  5. High dynamic velocity range particle image velocimetry using multiple pulse separation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoons, Tim; O'Donovan, Tadhg S

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV) is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets) still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS) technique (i) records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii) processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii) yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods.

  6. A tracer liquid image velocimetry for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Bao; Liang, Jiu-Xing; Luo, Yu-Xi; Yan, Jia

    2015-02-13

    This paper presents a Tracer Liquid Image Velocimetry (TLIV) for multi-layer radial flow in bioreactors used for cells cultivation of tissue engineering. The goal of this approach is to use simple devices to get good measuring precision, specialized for the case in which the uniform level of fluid shear stress was required while fluid velocity varied smoothly. Compared to the widely used Particles Image Velocimetry (PIV), this method adopted a bit of liquid as tracer, without the need of laser source. Sub-pixel positioning algorithm was used to overcome the adverse effects of the tracer liquid deformation. In addition, a neighborhood smoothing algorithm was used to restrict the measurement perturbation caused by diffusion. Experiments were carried out in a parallel plates flow chamber. And mathematical models of the flow chamber and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation were separately employed to validate the measurement precision of TLIV. The mean relative error between the simulated and measured data can be less than 2%, while in similar validations using PIV, the error was around 8.8%. TLIV avoided the contradiction between the particles' visibility and following performance with tested fluid, which is difficult to overcome in PIV. And TLIV is easier to popularize for its simple experimental condition and low cost.

  7. Characterisation of optical filters for broadband UVA radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luciana C.; Coelho, Carla T.; Corrêa, Jaqueline S. P. M.; Menegotto, Thiago; Ferreira da Silva, Thiago; Aparecida de Souza, Muriel; Melo da Silva, Elisama; Simões de Lima, Maurício; Dornelles de Alvarenga, Ana Paula

    2016-07-01

    Optical filters were characterized in order to know its suitability for use in broadband UVA radiometer head for spectral irradiance measurements. The spectral transmittance, the angular dependence and the spatial uniformity of the spectral transmittance of the UVA optical filters were investigated. The temperature dependence of the transmittance was also studied.

  8. Study of different filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochinal, R.; Rouby, R.

    1959-01-01

    This note first contains a terminology related to filters and to their operation, and then proposes an overview of general characteristics of filters such as load loss with respect to gas rate, efficiency, and clogging with respect to filter pollution. It also indicates standard aerosols which are generally used, how they are dosed, and how efficiency is determined with a standard aerosol. Then, after a presentation of the filtration principle, this note reports the study of several filters: glass wool, filter papers provided by different companies, Teflon foam, English filters, Teflon wool, sintered Teflonite, quartz wool, polyvinyl chloride foam, synthetic filter, sintered bronze. The third part reports the study of some aerosol and dust separators

  9. Changing ventilation filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, S.

    1980-01-01

    A filter changing unit has a door which interlocks with the door of a filter chamber so as to prevent contamination of the outer surfaces of the doors by radioactive material collected on the filter element and a movable support which enables a filter chamber thereonto to be stored within the unit in such a way that the doors of the unit and the filter chamber can be replaced. The door pivots and interlocks with another door by means of a bolt, a seal around the periphery lip of the first door engages the periphery of the second door to seal the gap. A support pivots into a lower filter element storage position. Inspection windows and glove ports are provided. The unit is releasably connected to the filter chamber by bolts engaging in a flange provided around an opening. (author)

  10. Balanced microwave filters

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Jiasheng; Medina, Francisco; Martiacuten, Ferran

    2018-01-01

    This book presents and discusses strategies for the design and implementation of common-mode suppressed balanced microwave filters, including, narrowband, wideband, and ultra-wideband filters This book examines differential-mode, or balanced, microwave filters by discussing several implementations of practical realizations of these passive components. Topics covered include selective mode suppression, designs based on distributed and semi-lumped approaches, multilayer technologies, defect ground structures, coupled resonators, metamaterials, interference techniques, and substrate integrated waveguides, among others. Divided into five parts, Balanced Microwave Filters begins with an introduction that presents the fundamentals of balanced lines, circuits, and networks. Part 2 covers balanced transmission lines with common-mode noise suppression, including several types of common-mode filters and the application of such filters to enhance common-mode suppression in balanced bandpass filters. Next, Part 3 exa...

  11. SAW-Based Phononic Crystal Microfluidic Sensor-Microscale Realization of Velocimetry Approaches for Integrated Analytical Platform Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseev, Aleksandr; Lucklum, Ralf; Zubtsov, Mikhail; Schmidt, Marc-Peter; Mukhin, Nikolay V; Hirsch, Soeren

    2017-09-23

    The current work demonstrates a novel surface acoustic wave (SAW) based phononic crystal sensor approach that allows the integration of a velocimetry-based sensor concept into single chip integrated solutions, such as Lab-on-a-Chip devices. The introduced sensor platform merges advantages of ultrasonic velocimetry analytic systems and a microacoustic sensor approach. It is based on the analysis of structural resonances in a periodic composite arrangement of microfluidic channels confined within a liquid analyte. Completed theoretical and experimental investigations show the ability to utilize periodic structure localized modes for the detection of volumetric properties of liquids and prove the efficacy of the proposed sensor concept.

  12. Filter material charging apparatus for filter assembly for radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, J.M.; O'Nan, A. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A filter charging apparatus for a filter assembly is described. The filter assembly includes a housing with at least one filter bed therein and the filter charging apparatus for adding filter material to the filter assembly includes a tank with an opening therein, the tank opening being disposed in flow communication with opposed first and second conduit means, the first conduit means being in flow communication with the filter assembly housing and the second conduit means being in flow communication with a blower means. Upon activation of the blower means, the blower means pneumatically conveys the filter material from the tank to the filter housing

  13. Filter forensics: microbiota recovery from residential HVAC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Juan P; Jennings, Wiley; Wylie, Dennis; Horner, Sharon D; Siegel, Jeffrey; Kinney, Kerry A

    2018-01-30

    Establishing reliable methods for assessing the microbiome within the built environment is critical for understanding the impact of biological exposures on human health. High-throughput DNA sequencing of dust samples provides valuable insights into the microbiome present in human-occupied spaces. However, the effect that different sampling methods have on the microbial community recovered from dust samples is not well understood across sample types. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters hold promise as long-term, spatially integrated, high volume samplers to characterize the airborne microbiome in homes and other climate-controlled spaces. In this study, the effect that dust recovery method (i.e., cut and elution, swabbing, or vacuuming) has on the microbial community structure, membership, and repeatability inferred by Illumina sequencing was evaluated. The results indicate that vacuum samples captured higher quantities of total, bacterial, and fungal DNA than swab or cut samples. Repeated swab and vacuum samples collected from the same filter were less variable than cut samples with respect to both quantitative DNA recovery and bacterial community structure. Vacuum samples captured substantially greater bacterial diversity than the other methods, whereas fungal diversity was similar across all three methods. Vacuum and swab samples of HVAC filter dust were repeatable and generally superior to cut samples. Nevertheless, the contribution of environmental and human sources to the bacterial and fungal communities recovered via each sampling method was generally consistent across the methods investigated. Dust recovery methodologies have been shown to affect the recovery, repeatability, structure, and membership of microbial communities recovered from dust samples in the built environment. The results of this study are directly applicable to indoor microbiota studies utilizing the filter forensics approach. More broadly, this study provides a

  14. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  15. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  16. Backflushable filter insert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, R.C.; Vandenberg, T.; Randolph, M.C.; Lewis, T.B.; Gillis, P.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Filter elements are mounted on a tube plate beneath an accumulator chamber whose wall is extended by skirt and flange to form a closure for the top of pressure vessel. The accumulator chamber is annular around a central pipe which serves as the outlet for filtered water passing from the filter elements. The chamber contains filtered compressed air from supply. Periodically the filtration of water is stopped and vessel is drained. Then a valve is opened, allowing the accumulated air to flow from chamber up a pipe and down pipe, pushing the filtered water from pipe back through the filter elements to clean them. The accumulator chamber is so proportioned, relative to the volume of the system communicating therewith during backflushing, that the equilibrium pressure during backflushing cannot exceed the pressure rating of the vessel. However a line monitors the pressure at the top of the vessel, and if it rises too far a bleed valve is automatically opened to depressurise the system. The chamber is intended to replace the lid of an existing vessel to convert a filter using filter aid to one using permanent filter elements. (author)

  17. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wells, George; Beaton, Dorcas E; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The "Discrimination" part of the OMERACT Filter asks whether a measure discriminates between situations that are of interest. "Feasibility" in the OMERACT Filter encompasses the practical considerations of using an instrument, including its ease of use, time to complete, monetary costs......, and interpretability of the question(s) included in the instrument. Both the Discrimination and Reliability parts of the filter have been helpful but were agreed on primarily by consensus of OMERACT participants rather than through explicit evidence-based guidelines. In Filter 2.0 we wanted to improve this definition...

  18. Nanofiber Filters Eliminate Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    With support from Phase I and II SBIR funding from Johnson Space Center, Argonide Corporation of Sanford, Florida tested and developed its proprietary nanofiber water filter media. Capable of removing more than 99.99 percent of dangerous particles like bacteria, viruses, and parasites, the media was incorporated into the company's commercial NanoCeram water filter, an inductee into the Space Foundation's Space Technology Hall of Fame. In addition to its drinking water filters, Argonide now produces large-scale nanofiber filters used as part of the reverse osmosis process for industrial water purification.

  19. Filters in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, K.H.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The topics of the nine papers given include the behavior of HEPA filters during exposure to air flows of high humidity as well as of high differential pressure, the development of steel-fiber filters suitable for extreme operating conditions, and the occurrence of various radioactive iodine species in the exhaust air from boiling water reactors. In an introductory presentation the German view of the performance requirements to be met by filters in nuclear facilities as well as the present status of filter quality assurance are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Washing method of filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumidani, Masakiyo; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To enable automatic filter operation and facilitate back-washing operation by back-washing filters used in a bwr nuclear power plant utilizing an exhaust gas from a ventilator or air conditioner. Method: Exhaust gas from an exhaust pipe of an ventilator or air conditioner is pressurized in a compressor and then introduced in a back-washing gas tank. Then, the exhaust gas pressurized to a predetermined pressure is blown from the inside to the outside of a filter to thereby separate impurities collected on the filter elements and introduce them to a waste tank. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Study of flow around model of cooling tower by means of 2D Particle Image Velocimetry measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Veronika; Novotný, Jan; Šafařík, Pavel

    This paper deals with flow around a bluff body of hyperboloid shape. It combines results gathered in the course of research by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experiments were carried out by means of low-frequency 2D PIV and the Reynolds number was 43 000.

  2. Effects of Injection Timing on Fluid Flow Characteristics of Partially Premixed Combustion Based on High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Tanov, Slavey; Wang, Hua; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt; Dam, Nico

    2017-01-01

    behavior. The scope of the present study is to investigate the fluid flow characteristics of PPC at different injection timings. To this end, high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is implemented in a light-duty optical engine to measure fluid flow

  3. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming...

  4. Study of flow around model of cooling tower by means of 2D Particle Image Velocimetry measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barraclough Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with flow around a bluff body of hyperboloid shape. It combines results gathered in the course of research by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. The experiments were carried out by means of low-frequency 2D PIV and the Reynolds number was 43 000.

  5. Estimation of the measurement uncertainty in magnetic resonance velocimetry based on statistical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschewski, Martin; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Gas Turbines and Aerospace Propulsion, Darmstadt (Germany); Freudenhammer, Daniel [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Center of Smart Interfaces, Darmstadt (Germany); Buchenberg, Waltraud B. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Grundmann, Sven [University of Rostock, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Rostock (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Velocity measurements with magnetic resonance velocimetry offer outstanding possibilities for experimental fluid mechanics. The purpose of this study was to provide practical guidelines for the estimation of the measurement uncertainty in such experiments. Based on various test cases, it is shown that the uncertainty estimate can vary substantially depending on how the uncertainty is obtained. The conventional approach to estimate the uncertainty from the noise in the artifact-free background can lead to wrong results. A deviation of up to -75% is observed with the presented experiments. In addition, a similarly high deviation is demonstrated with the data from other studies. As a more accurate approach, the uncertainty is estimated directly from the image region with the flow sample. Two possible estimation methods are presented. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of the measurement uncertainty in magnetic resonance velocimetry based on statistical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschewski, Martin; Freudenhammer, Daniel; Buchenberg, Waltraud B.; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Velocity measurements with magnetic resonance velocimetry offer outstanding possibilities for experimental fluid mechanics. The purpose of this study was to provide practical guidelines for the estimation of the measurement uncertainty in such experiments. Based on various test cases, it is shown that the uncertainty estimate can vary substantially depending on how the uncertainty is obtained. The conventional approach to estimate the uncertainty from the noise in the artifact-free background can lead to wrong results. A deviation of up to -75 % is observed with the presented experiments. In addition, a similarly high deviation is demonstrated with the data from other studies. As a more accurate approach, the uncertainty is estimated directly from the image region with the flow sample. Two possible estimation methods are presented.

  7. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry investigations of the mixed convection exchange flow through a horizontal vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrall, Kevin; Pretrel, Hugues; Vaux, Samuel; Vauquelin, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    The exchange flow through a horizontal vent linking two compartments (one above the other) is studied experimentally. This exchange is here governed by both the buoyant natural effect due to the temperature difference of the fluids in both compartments, and the effect of a (forced) mechanical ventilation applied in the lower compartment. Such a configuration leads to uni- or bi-directional flows through the vent. In the experiments, buoyancy is induced in the lower compartment thanks to an electrical resistor. The forced ventilation is applied in exhaust or supply modes and three different values of the vent area. To estimate both velocity fields and flow rates at the vent, measurements are realized at thermal steady state, flush the vent in the upper compartment using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV), which is original for this kind of flow. The SPIV measurements allows the area occupied by both upward and downward flows to be determined.

  8. PIV-DCNN: cascaded deep convolutional neural networks for particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Yang, Hua; Yin, Zhouping

    2017-12-01

    Velocity estimation (extracting the displacement vector information) from the particle image pairs is of critical importance for particle image velocimetry. This problem is mostly transformed into finding the sub-pixel peak in a correlation map. To address the original displacement extraction problem, we propose a different evaluation scheme (PIV-DCNN) with four-level regression deep convolutional neural networks. At each level, the networks are trained to predict a vector from two input image patches. The low-level network is skilled at large displacement estimation and the high- level networks are devoted to improving the accuracy. Outlier replacement and symmetric window offset operation glue the well- functioning networks in a cascaded manner. Through comparison with the standard PIV methods (one-pass cross-correlation method, three-pass window deformation), the practicability of the proposed PIV-DCNN is verified by the application to a diversity of synthetic and experimental PIV images.

  9. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  10. Correcting for color crosstalk and chromatic aberration in multicolor particle shadow velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhail, M J; Fontaine, A A; Krane, M H; Goss, L; Crafton, J

    2015-01-01

    Color crosstalk and chromatic aberration can bias estimates of fluid velocity measured by color particle shadow velocimetry (CPSV), using multicolor illumination and a color camera. This article describes corrections to remove these bias errors, and their evaluation. Color crosstalk removal is demonstrated with linear unmixing. It is also shown that chromatic aberrations may be removed using either scale calibration, or by processing an image illuminated by all colors simultaneously. CPSV measurements of a fully developed turbulent pipe flow of glycerin were conducted. Corrected velocity statistics from these measurements were compared to both single-color PSV and LDV measurements and showed excellent agreement to fourth-order, to well into the viscous sublayer. Recommendations for practical assessment and correction of color aberration and color crosstalk are discussed. (paper)

  11. Investigating fundamental properties of wind turbine wake structure using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, J. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Low Reynolds number flow visualization tests are often used for showing the flow pattern changes associated with changes in lift-coefficients at a higher Reynolds number. In wind turbine studies, analysis of measured wake structures at small scale may reveal fundamental properties of the wake which will offer wake modellers a more complete understanding of rotor flows. Measurements are presented from experiments on a model wind turbine rig conducted in a water channel. The laser-optics technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to make simultaneous multi-point measurements of the wake flow behind small-scale rotors. Analysis of the PIV data shows trends in velocity and vorticity structure in the wake. Study of the flow close to the rotor plane reveals information on stalled flow and blade performance. (au)

  12. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mueller, R. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gruensch, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  13. Shock Initiation of Wedge-shaped Explosive Measured with Smear Camera and Photon Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is an important insensitive high explosive in conventional weapons due to its safety and high energy. In order to have an insight into the shock initiation performance of a TATB-based insensitive high explosive (IHE), experimental measurements of the particle velocity histories of the TATB-based Explosive using Photon Doppler Velocimetry and shock wave profile of the TATB-based explosive using High Speed Rotating Mirror Smear Camera had been performed. In this paper, we would describe the shock initiation performance of the TATB-based explosive by run-to-detonation distance and the particle velocity history at an initialization shock of about 7.9 GPa. The parameters of hugoniot of unreacted the TATB-based explosive and Pop relationship could be derived with the particle velocity history obtained in this paper.

  14. X-ray doppler velocimetry for diagnosis of fluid motion in ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J. A.; King, J. A.; Huffman, E.; Freeman, R. R.; Dutra, E. C.; Field, J. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hall, G. N.; Harding, E.; Rochau, G. A.; Porter, J. L.; Covington, A. M.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-08-01

    We are developing a novel diagnostic for measurement of bulk fluid motion in materials, that is particularly applicable to very hot, x-ray emitting plasmas in the High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) regime. The X-ray Doppler Velocimetry (XDV) technique relies on monochromatic imaging in multiple x-ray energy bands near the center of an x-ray emission line in a plasma, and utilizes bent imaging crystals. Higher energy bands are preferentially sensitive to plasma moving towards the viewer, while lower energy bands are preferentially sensitive to plasma moving away from the viewer. Combining multiple images in different energy bands allows for a reconstruction of the fluid velocity field integrated along the line of sight. We review the technique, and we discuss progress towards benchmarking the technique with proof-of-principle HEDP experiments.

  15. Two-phase velocity measurements around cylinders using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Y.A.; Philip, O.G.; Schmidl, W.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The particle Image Velocimetry flow measurement technique was used to study both single-phase flow and two-phase flow across a cylindrical rod inserted in a channel. First, a flow consisting of only a single-phase fluid was studied. The experiment consisted of running a laminar flow over four rods inserted in a channel. The water flow rate was 126 cm{sup 3}/s. Then a two-phase flow was studied. A mixture of water and small air bubbles was used. The water flow rate was 378 cm{sup 3}/s and the air flow rate was approximately 30 cm{sup 3}/s. The data are analyzed to obtain the velocity fields for both experiments. After interpretation of the velocity data, forces acting on a bubble entrained by the vortex were calculated successfully. The lift and drag coefficients were calculated using the velocity measurements and the force data.

  16. Particle image velocimetry investigation of flow over unsteady airfoil with trailing-edge strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerontakos, P.; Lee, T. [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    The flow over a flapped NACA 0012 airfoil, oscillated slightly through the static-stall angle, was investigated by using particle image velocimetry, and was supplemented by surface pressure and dynamic-load measurements. A significant increase in the dynamic lift force and nose-down pitching moment was observed. The most pronounced flow phenomenon was the formation and detachment of an energetic leading-edge vortex compared to the no-flapped airfoil. The details of the underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the various light-stall flow processes were provided via the instantaneous velocity and vorticity fields measurements. In contrast to the Gurney flap, the inverted trailing-edge strip led to an improved negative damping while a reduced lift force. The addition of an inverted strip always led to the appearance of a Karman-type vortex shedding street immediately downstream of the strip over the entire oscillation cycle. (orig.)

  17. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry for Dense 3D Fluid Velocity Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-11

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. For reconstruction, we derive an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. We evaluate our method with both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  18. Particle Data Management Software for 3DParticle Tracking Velocimetry and Related Applications – The Flowtracks Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Meller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV community employs several formats of particle information such as position and velocity as function of time, i.e. trajectory data, as a result of diverging needs unmet by existing formats, and a number of different, mostly home-grown, codes for handling the data. Flowtracks is a Python package that provides a single code base for accessing different formats as a database, i.e. storing data and programmatically manipulating them using format-agnostic data structures. Furthermore, it offers an HDF5-based format that is fast and extensible, obviating the need for other formats. The package may be obtained from https://github.com/OpenPTV/postptv and used as-is by many fluid-dynamics labs, or with minor extensions adhering to a common interface, by researchers from other fields, such as biology and population tracking.

  19. Particle image and acoustic Doppler velocimetry analysis of a cross-flow turbine wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines have advantageous properties for converting kinetic energy in wind and water currents to rotational mechanical energy and subsequently electrical power. A thorough understanding of cross-flow turbine wakes aids understanding of rotor flow physics, assists geometric array design, and informs control strategies for individual turbines in arrays. In this work, the wake physics of a scale model cross-flow turbine are investigated experimentally. Three-component velocity measurements are taken downstream of a two-bladed turbine in a recirculating water channel. Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image and acoustic Doppler velocimetry are compared for planes normal to and distributed along the turbine rotational axis. Wake features are described using proper orthogonal decomposition, dynamic mode decomposition, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponent. Consequences for downstream turbine placement are discussed in conjunction with two-turbine array experiments.

  20. Stereo particle image velocimetry set up for measurements in the wake of scaled wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanardi, Gabriele; Grassi, Donato; Zanotti, Alex; Nanos, Emmanouil M.; Campagnolo, Filippo; Croce, Alessandro; Bottasso, Carlo L.

    2017-08-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out in the boundary layer test section of Politecnico di Milano large wind tunnel to survey the wake of a scaled wind turbine model designed and developed by Technische Universität München. The stereo PIV instrumentation was set up to survey the three velocity components on cross-flow planes at different longitudinal locations. The area of investigation covered the entire extent of the wind turbines wake that was scanned by the use of two separate traversing systems for both the laser and the cameras. Such instrumentation set up enabled to gain rapidly high quality results suitable to characterise the behaviour of the flow field in the wake of the scaled wind turbine. This would be very useful for the evaluation of the performance of wind farm control methodologies based on wake redirection and for the validation of CFD tools.

  1. Functionalised alginate flow seeding microparticles for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Sylvana; Balagué, Isaac; Sancho, Irene; Ertürk, Nihal; Ferrando, Montserrat; Vernet, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Alginate microparticles as flow seeding fulfil all the requirements that are recommended for the velocity measurements in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). These spherical microparticles offer the advantage of being environmentally friendly, having excellent seeding properties and they can be produced via a very simple process. In the present study, the performances of alginate microparticles functionalised with a fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B (RhB), for PIV have been studied. The efficacy of fluorescence is appreciated in a number of PIV applications since it can boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Alginate microparticles functionalised with RhB have high emission efficiency, desirable match with fluid density and controlled size. The study of the particles behaviour in strong acid and basic solutions and ammonia is also included. This type of particles can be used for measurements with PIV and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) simultaneously, including acid-base reactions.

  2. Measurement of fluid velocity development behind a circular cylinder using particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharzadeh, Afshin; Molki, Arman

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a non-intrusive experimental approach for obtaining a two-dimensional velocity distribution around a 22 mm diameter circular cylinder mounted in a water tunnel. Measurements were performed for a constant Reynolds number of 7670 using a commercial standard particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Different flow patterns generated behind the circular cylinder are discussed. Both instantaneous and time-averaged velocity distributions with corresponding streamlines are obtained. Key concepts in fluid mechanics, such as contra-rotating vortices, von Kármán vortex street, and laminar-turbulent flow, are discussed. In addition, brief historical information pertaining to the development of flow measurement techniques—in particular, PIV—is described. (paper)

  3. High resolution measurement of the velocity profiles of channel flows using the particle image velocimetry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Azizi Mohamed

    2000-01-01

    The high resolution velocity profiles of a uniform steady channel flow and a flow beneath waves were obtained using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The velocity profiles for each flow were calculated for both components. It is shown that the profiles obtained are very precise, displaying the point velocities from a few millimeters from the bottom of the channel up to the water surface across the water depth. In the case of the wave-induced flow, the profiles are shown under the respective wave phases and given in a plane representation. High resolution measurement of point velocities in a flow is achievable using PIV and invaluable when applied to a complex flow. (Author)

  4. Application of FLEET Velocimetry in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Halls, Benjamin R.; Jiang, Naibo

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) velocimetry is demonstrated in a large-scale transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Test conditions include total pressures, total temperatures, and Mach numbers ranging from 15 to 58 psia, 200 to 295 K, and 0.2 to 0.75, respectively. Freestream velocity measurements exhibit accuracies within 1 percent and precisions better than 1 m/s. The measured velocities adhere closely to isentropic flow theory over the domain of temperatures and pressures that were tested. Additional velocity measurements are made within the tunnel boundary layer; virtual trajectories traced out by the FLEET signal are indicative of the characteristic turbulent behavior in this region of the flow, where the unsteadiness increases demonstrably as the wall is approached. Mean velocities taken within the boundary layer are in agreement with theoretical velocity profiles, though the fluctuating velocities exhibit a greater deviation from theoretical predictions.

  5. Shifted knife-edge aperture digital in-line holography for fluid velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, Virginia; Lobera, Julia; Andrés, Nieves; Arroyo, M Pilar

    2014-06-01

    We describe a digital holography technique that, with the simplicity of an in-line configuration, produces holograms where the real and virtual images are completely separated, as in an off-axis configuration. An in-line setup, in which the object is imaged near the sensor, is modified by placing a shifted knife-edge aperture that blocks half the frequency spectrum at the focal plane of the imaging lens. This simple modification of the in-line holographic configuration allows discriminating the virtual and real images. As a fluid velocimetry technique, the use of this aperture removes the minimum defocusing distance requisite and reduces the out-of-plane velocity measurement errors of classical in-line holography. Results with different test objects are shown.

  6. Particle image velocimetry measurements of 2-dimensional velocity field around twisted tape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Min Seop; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eung Soo, E-mail: kes7741@snu.ac.kr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Measurements of the flow field in a pipe with twisted tape were conducted by particle image velocimetry (PIV). • A novel matching index of refraction technique utilizing 3D printing and oil mixture was adopted to make the test section transparent. • Undistorted particle images were clearly captured in the presence of twisted tape. • 2D flow field in the pipe with twisted tape revealed the characteristic two-peak velocity profile. - Abstract: Twisted tape is a passive component used to enhance heat exchange in various devices. It induces swirl flow that increases the mixing of fluid. Thus, ITER selected the twisted tape as one of the candidates for turbulence promoting in the divertor cooling. Previous study was mainly focused on the thermohydraulic performance of the twisted tape. As detailed data on the velocity field around the twisted tape was insufficient, flow visualization study was performed to provide fundamental data on velocity field. To visualize the flow in a complex structure, novel matching index of refraction technique was used with 3-D printing and mixture of anise and mineral oil. This technique enables the camera to capture undistorted particle image for velocity field measurement. Velocity fields at Reynolds number 1370–9591 for 3 different measurement plane were obtained through particle image velocimetry. The 2-dimensional averaged velocity field data were obtained from 177 pair of instantaneous velocity fields. It reveals the characteristic two-peak flow motion in axial direction. In addition, the normalized velocity profiles were converged with increase of Reynolds numbers. Finally, the uncertainty of the result data was analyzed.

  7. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filter

    KAUST Repository

    Chernov, Alexey; Hoel, Haakon; Law, Kody; Nobile, Fabio; Tempone, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This work embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). In terms of computational cost vs. approximation error the asymptotic performance of the multilevel ensemble Kalman filter (MLEnKF) is superior to the EnKF s.

  8. Neutron Beam Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of filters is to transmit neutrons with selected energy, while remove unwanted ones from the incident neutron beam. This reduces the background, and the number of spurious. The types of commonly used now-a-day neutron filters and their properties are discussed in the present work. There are three major types of neutron filters. The first type is filter of selective thermal neutron. It transmits the main reflected neutrons from a crystal monochromate, while reject the higher order contaminations accompanying the main one. Beams coming from the moderator always contain unwanted radiation like fast neutrons and gamma-rays which contribute to experimental background and to the biological hazard potential. Such filter type is called filter of whole thermal neutron spectrum. The third filter type is it transmits neutrons with energies in the resonance energy range (En . 1 KeV). The main idea of such neutron filter technique is the use of large quantities of a certain material which have the deep interference minima in its total neutron cross-section. By transmitting reactor neutrons through bulk layer of such material, one can obtain the quasimonochromatic neutron lines instead of white reactor spectrum.

  9. Side loading filter apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, K.E.

    1981-01-01

    A side loading filter chamber for use with radioactive gases is described. The equipment incorporates an inexpensive, manually operated, mechanism for aligning filter units with a number of laterally spaced wall openings and for removing the units from the chamber. (U.K.)

  10. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filter

    KAUST Repository

    Chernov, Alexey

    2016-01-06

    This work embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). In terms of computational cost vs. approximation error the asymptotic performance of the multilevel ensemble Kalman filter (MLEnKF) is superior to the EnKF s.

  11. MEDOF - MINIMUM EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE OPTIMAL FILTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter program, MEDOF, generates filters for use in optical correlators. The algorithm implemented in MEDOF follows theory put forth by Richard D. Juday of NASA/JSC. This program analytically optimizes filters on arbitrary spatial light modulators such as coupled, binary, full complex, and fractional 2pi phase. MEDOF optimizes these modulators on a number of metrics including: correlation peak intensity at the origin for the centered appearance of the reference image in the input plane, signal to noise ratio including the correlation detector noise as well as the colored additive input noise, peak to correlation energy defined as the fraction of the signal energy passed by the filter that shows up in the correlation spot, and the peak to total energy which is a generalization of PCE that adds the passed colored input noise to the input image's passed energy. The user of MEDOF supplies the functions that describe the following quantities: 1) the reference signal, 2) the realizable complex encodings of both the input and filter SLM, 3) the noise model, possibly colored, as it adds at the reference image and at the correlation detection plane, and 4) the metric to analyze, here taken to be one of the analytical ones like SNR (signal to noise ratio) or PCE (peak to correlation energy) rather than peak to secondary ratio. MEDOF calculates filters for arbitrary modulators and a wide range of metrics as described above. MEDOF examines the statistics of the encoded input image's noise (if SNR or PCE is selected) and the filter SLM's (Spatial Light Modulator) available values. These statistics are used as the basis of a range for searching for the magnitude and phase of k, a pragmatically based complex constant for computing the filter transmittance from the electric field. The filter is produced for the mesh points in those ranges and the value of the metric that results from these points is computed. When the search is concluded, the

  12. Filtering and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Fristedt, B; Krylov, N

    2007-01-01

    Filtering and prediction is about observing moving objects when the observations are corrupted by random errors. The main focus is then on filtering out the errors and extracting from the observations the most precise information about the object, which itself may or may not be moving in a somewhat random fashion. Next comes the prediction step where, using information about the past behavior of the object, one tries to predict its future path. The first three chapters of the book deal with discrete probability spaces, random variables, conditioning, Markov chains, and filtering of discrete Markov chains. The next three chapters deal with the more sophisticated notions of conditioning in nondiscrete situations, filtering of continuous-space Markov chains, and of Wiener process. Filtering and prediction of stationary sequences is discussed in the last two chapters. The authors believe that they have succeeded in presenting necessary ideas in an elementary manner without sacrificing the rigor too much. Such rig...

  13. Filter cake breaker systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo H.F. [Poland Quimica Ltda., Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Drilling fluids filter cakes are based on a combination of properly graded dispersed particles and polysaccharide polymers. High efficiency filter cakes are formed by these combination , and their formation on wellbore walls during the drilling process has, among other roles, the task of protecting the formation from instantaneous or accumulative invasion of drilling fluid filtrate, granting stability to well and production zones. Filter cake minimizes contact between drilling fluid filtrate and water, hydrocarbons and clay existent in formations. The uniform removal of the filter cake from the entire interval is a critical factor of the completion process. The main methods used to breaking filter cake are classified into two groups, external or internal, according to their removal mechanism. The aim of this work is the presentation of these mechanisms as well their efficiency. (author)

  14. Sub-micron filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Frederick [Sanford, FL; Kaledin, Leonid [Port Orange, FL

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  15. Monolithic Integrated Ceramic Waveguide Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, IC; Sandhu, MY

    2014-01-01

    Design techniques for a new class of integrated monolithic high permittivity ceramic waveguide filters are presented. These filters enable a size reduction of 50% compared to air-filled TEM filters with the same unloaded Q-Factor. Designs for both chebyshev and asymmetric generalized chebyshev filter are presented, with experimental results for an 1800 MHz chebyshev filter showing excellent agreement with theory.

  16. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong; Wang Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  17. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wang, Yanping; Jiang, Bo; Jin, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Chunxiang; Zheng, Hairong

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  18. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  20. Circuits and filters handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    A bestseller in its first edition, The Circuits and Filters Handbook has been thoroughly updated to provide the most current, most comprehensive information available in both the classical and emerging fields of circuits and filters, both analog and digital. This edition contains 29 new chapters, with significant additions in the areas of computer-aided design, circuit simulation, VLSI circuits, design automation, and active and digital filters. It will undoubtedly take its place as the engineer's first choice in looking for solutions to problems encountered in the design, analysis, and behavi

  1. EMI filter design

    CERN Document Server

    Ozenbaugh, Richard Lee

    2011-01-01

    With today's electrical and electronics systems requiring increased levels of performance and reliability, the design of robust EMI filters plays a critical role in EMC compliance. Using a mix of practical methods and theoretical analysis, EMI Filter Design, Third Edition presents both a hands-on and academic approach to the design of EMI filters and the selection of components values. The design approaches covered include matrix methods using table data and the use of Fourier analysis, Laplace transforms, and transfer function realization of LC structures. This edition has been fully revised

  2. Randomized Filtering Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katriel, Irit; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    of AllDifferent and is generalization, the Global Cardinality Constraint. The first delayed filtering scheme is a Monte Carlo algorithm: its running time is superior, in the worst case, to that of enforcing are consistency after every domain event, while its filtering effectiveness is analyzed...... in the expected sense. The second scheme is a Las Vegas algorithm using filtering triggers: Its effectiveness is the same as enforcing are consistency after every domain event, while in the expected case it is faster by a factor of m/n, where n and m are, respectively, the number of nodes and edges...

  3. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Maria C. de; Lima, Ana L.S.; Santos, Joyra A. dos; Megueriam, Berdj A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality which employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter is strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. In this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  4. Metalcasting: Filtering Molten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauren Poole; Lee Recca

    1999-01-01

    A more efficient method has been created to filter cast molten metal for impurities. Read about the resulting energy and money savings that can accrue to many different industries from the use of this exciting new technology

  5. Perspectives on Nonlinear Filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody

    2015-01-01

    The solution to the problem of nonlinear filtering may be given either as an estimate of the signal (and ideally some measure of concentration), or as a full posterior distribution. Similarly, one may evaluate the fidelity of the filter either by its ability to track the signal or its proximity to the posterior filtering distribution. Hence, the field enjoys a lively symbiosis between probability and control theory, and there are plenty of applications which benefit from algorithmic advances, from signal processing, to econometrics, to large-scale ocean, atmosphere, and climate modeling. This talk will survey some recent theoretical results involving accurate signal tracking with noise-free (degenerate) dynamics in high-dimensions (infinite, in principle, but say d between 103 and 108 , depending on the size of your application and your computer), and high-fidelity approximations of the filtering distribution in low dimensions (say d between 1 and several 10s).

  6. HEPA air filter (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  7. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tugwell, Peter; Boers, Maarten; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides guidelines for the development and validation of outcome measures for use in clinical research. The "Truth" section of the OMERACT Filter requires that criteria be met to demonstrate that the outcome instrument meets...... the criteria for content, face, and construct validity. METHODS: Discussion groups critically reviewed a variety of ways in which case studies of current OMERACT Working Groups complied with the Truth component of the Filter and what issues remained to be resolved. RESULTS: The case studies showed...... that there is broad agreement on criteria for meeting the Truth criteria through demonstration of content, face, and construct validity; however, several issues were identified that the Filter Working Group will need to address. CONCLUSION: These issues will require resolution to reach consensus on how Truth...

  8. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, John R; Boers, Maarten; Hewlett, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides guidelines for the development and validation of outcome measures for use in clinical research. The "Truth" section of the OMERACT Filter presupposes an explicit framework for identifying the relevant core outcomes...... for defining core areas of measurement ("Filter 2.0 Core Areas of Measurement") was presented at OMERACT 11 to explore areas of consensus and to consider whether already endorsed core outcome sets fit into this newly proposed framework. METHODS: Discussion groups critically reviewed the extent to which case......, presentation, and clarity of the framework were questioned. The discussion groups and subsequent feedback highlighted 20 such issues. CONCLUSION: These issues will require resolution to reach consensus on accepting the proposed Filter 2.0 framework of Core Areas as the basis for the selection of Core Outcome...

  9. Paul Rodgersi filter Kohilas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    28. I Kohila keskkoolis kohaspetsiifiline skulptuur ja performance "Filter". Kooli 130. aastapäeva tähistava ettevõtmise eesotsas oli skulptor Paul Rodgers ja kaks viimase klassi noormeest ئ Marko Heinmäe, Hendrik Karm.

  10. Perspectives on Nonlinear Filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody

    2015-01-07

    The solution to the problem of nonlinear filtering may be given either as an estimate of the signal (and ideally some measure of concentration), or as a full posterior distribution. Similarly, one may evaluate the fidelity of the filter either by its ability to track the signal or its proximity to the posterior filtering distribution. Hence, the field enjoys a lively symbiosis between probability and control theory, and there are plenty of applications which benefit from algorithmic advances, from signal processing, to econometrics, to large-scale ocean, atmosphere, and climate modeling. This talk will survey some recent theoretical results involving accurate signal tracking with noise-free (degenerate) dynamics in high-dimensions (infinite, in principle, but say d between 103 and 108 , depending on the size of your application and your computer), and high-fidelity approximations of the filtering distribution in low dimensions (say d between 1 and several 10s).

  11. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    1 Microwave Resonators and Filters Daniel E. Oates MIT Lincoln Laboratory 244 Wood St. Lexington, MA 02478 USA Email: oates@ll.mit.edu...explained in other chapters, the surface resistance of superconductors at microwave frequencies can be as much as three orders of magnitude lower than the...resonators and filters in the first edition of this handbook (Z.-Y. Shen 2003) discussed the then state of the art of microwave frequency applications

  12. Inorganic UV filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Berbel Manaia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, concern over skin cancer has been growing more and more, especially in tropical countries where the incidence of UVA/B radiation is higher. The correct use of sunscreen is the most efficient way to prevent the development of this disease. The ingredients of sunscreen can be organic and/or inorganic sun filters. Inorganic filters present some advantages over organic filters, such as photostability, non-irritability and broad spectrum protection. Nevertheless, inorganic filters have a whitening effect in sunscreen formulations owing to the high refractive index, decreasing their esthetic appeal. Many techniques have been developed to overcome this problem and among them, the use of nanotechnology stands out. The estimated amount of nanomaterial in use must increase from 2000 tons in 2004 to a projected 58000 tons in 2020. In this context, this article aims to analyze critically both the different features of the production of inorganic filters (synthesis routes proposed in recent years and the permeability, the safety and other characteristics of the new generation of inorganic filters.

  13. Filter feeding mechanics of Hypophthalmichthys molitrix regarding porous gill rakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, David; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Cohen, Karly; Hernandez, Particia; Leftwich, Megan C.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    The silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) is a filter-feeding fish known to feed upon algal-growth in lakes, rivers, and aquacultures. The filter-feeding process centers on sponge-like membranes located in the carp's pharynx supported by fused gill rakers (GRs), which can efficiently strain suspended food particles as small as 4 µm without clogging. Guided by the anatomy of the silver carp, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of GRs, and video of the silver carp feeding, we have hypothesized that the filtration mechanism involves a pump-based biological function to capture food particles within the GRs. Dye visualization experiments were performed on a silver carp cadaver head, an excised GR sample, and on a scaled GR in vitro model - the Artificial Gill Raker (AGR). Measurements are performed for the AGR using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and penetration pressure monitoring with a biologically-inspired pumping mechanism. The role of mucus in the retention and capture of food particles has also been explored through rheological measurements, and further experimentation is planned. Our motivation stems from the potential to develop bioinspired industrial-scale filtration technologies ranging from wastewater treatment to filtration in the food industry. supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  14. A method for three-dimensional interfacial particle image velocimetry (3D-IPIV) of an air–water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, Damon E; Anderer, Angelika; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    A new stereoscopic method for collecting particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements within ∼1 mm of a wavy air–water interface with simultaneous measurements of the morphology of the interface is described. The method, termed three-dimensional interfacial particle image velocimetry (3D-IPIV), is tested in a wind wave channel with a wind speed of 5.8 m s −1 , water depth of 10 cm and a fetch of ∼9 m. Microscale breaking waves populate the interface and their flow patterns are clearly visible in the velocimetry results. The associated capillary waves and surface divergence patterns are observed. Several statistical measurements of the flow are compared with independent measurements and good agreement is found. The method shows great promise for investigating the transfer of momentum, heat and gases across an air–water interface, both in the laboratory and in field settings. Additional methods are described for manufacturing the flow tracers needed for the 3D-IPIV method. These tracers are likely to be useful for other researchers, and have the characteristics of being fluorescent, neutrally buoyant, non-toxic, monodisperse, inexpensive and easy to manufacture

  15. Computational fluid dynamics and particle image velocimetry assisted design tools for a new generation of trochoidal gear pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Garcia-Vilchez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trochoidal gear pumps produce significant flow pulsations that result in pressure pulsations, which interact with the system where they are connected, shortening the life of both the pump and circuit components. The complicated aspects of the operation of a gerotor pump make computational fluid dynamics the proper tool for modelling and simulating its flow characteristics. A three-dimensional model with deforming mesh computational fluid dynamics is presented, including the effects of the manufacturing tolerance and the leakage inside the pump. A new boundary condition is created for the simulation of the solid contact in the interteeth radial clearance. The experimental study of the pump is carried out by means of time-resolved particle image velocimetry, and results are qualitatively evaluated, thanks to the numerical simulation results. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry is developed in order to adapt it to the gerotor pump, and it is proved to be a feasible alternative to obtain the instantaneous flow of the pump in a direct mode, which would allow the determination of geometries that minimize the non-desired flow pulsations. Thus, a new methodology involving computational fluid dynamics and time-resolved particle image velocimetry is presented, which allows the obtaining of the instantaneous flow of the pump in a direct mode without altering its behaviour significantly.

  16. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  17. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan [University of Central Florida, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Orlando, FL (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangalore (India)

    2012-03-15

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise. (orig.)

  18. A tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow development over dual step cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, C., E-mail: chris.morton@ucalgary.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Yarusevych, S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Scarano, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    This experimental study focuses on the near wake development of a dual step cylinder geometry consisting of a long base cylinder of diameter d to which a larger diameter (D) cylinder of length L is attached coaxially at mid-span. The experiments cover a range of Reynolds numbers, 2000 ≤ Re{sub D} ≤ 5000, diameter ratios, 1.33 ≤ D/d ≤ 2.0 and large cylinder aspect ratios, 0.5 ≤ L/D ≤ 5 using Tomographic particle image velocimetry. Distinct changes in wake topology are observed varying the above parameters. Supporting previous experimental studies on the same geometry involving flow visualization and planar measurements, four distinct flow regimes are identified to which a distinct three-dimensional wake topology can be associated. The vortex-dominated wake dynamical behaviour is investigated with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and conditional averaging of three-dimensional velocity fields is used to exemplify the different shedding regimes. The conditionally averaged flow fields are shown to quantitatively resolve flow features equivalent to those obtained from a reduced order model consisting of the first ten to twenty POD modes, identifying the dominant vortex shedding cells and their interactions.

  19. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  20. Local velocity measurements in lead-bismuth and sodium flows using the ultrasound doppler velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.

    2003-01-01

    We will present measurements of the velocity profiles in liquid sodium and eutectic lead-bismuth by means of the Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV). A sodium flow in a rectangular duct exposed to an external, transverse magnetic field has been examined. To demonstrate the capability of UDV the transformation of the well-known turbulent, piston-like profile to an M-shaped velocity profile for growing magnetic field strength was observed. The significance of artifacts such as caused by the existence of reflecting interfaces in the measuring domain will be discussed. In the sodium case, the measurements were performed through the channel wall. An integrated ultrasonic sensor with acoustic wave-guide has been developed to overcome the limitation of ultrasonic transducers to temperatures lower than 200 .deg. C. This sensor can presently be applied at maximum temperatures up to 800 .deg. C. Stable and robust measurements have been performed in various PbBi flows in our laboratory at FZR as well as at the THESYS loop of the KALLA laboratory of the ForschungsZentrum Karlsruhe (FZK). We will also present experimental results obtained in a PbBi bubbly flow at 250...300 .deg. C. Argon bubbles were injected through a single orifice in a cylindrical container filled with stagnant PbBi. Velocity profiles were measured in the bubble plume. Mean values of the liquid as well as the bubble velocity were extracted from the data and will be presented as function of the gas flow rate

  1. Velocity profile measurement of lead-lithium flows by high-temperature ultrasonic doppler velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Y.; Kunugi, T.; Hirabayashi, Masaru; Nagai, Keiichi; Saito, Junichi; Ara, Kuniaki; Morley, N.B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a high-temperature ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (HT-UDV) technique that has been successfully applied to measure velocity profiles of the lead-lithium eutectic alloy (PbLi) flows. The impact of tracer particles is investigated to determine requirements for HT-UDV measurement of PbLi flows. The HT-UDV system is tested on a PbLi flow driven by a rotating-disk in an inert atmosphere. We find that a sufficient amount of particles contained in the molten PbLi are required to successfully measure PbLi velocity profiles by HT-UDV. An X-ray diffraction analysis is performed to identify those particles in PbLi, and indicates that those particles were made of the lead mono-oxide (PbO). Since the specific densities of PbLi and PbO are close to each other, the PbO particles are expected to be well-dispersed in the bulk of molten PbLi. We conclude that the excellent dispersion of PbO particles enables in HT-UDV to obtain reliable velocity profiles for operation times of around 12 hours. (author)

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow in the converging region of two parallel jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu; Lee, Saya, E-mail: sayalee@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The flow behaviors in the converging region were non-intrusively investigated using PIV. • The PIV results using two measuring scales and LDV data matched very well. • Significant momentum transfer was observed in the merging region right after the merging point. • Instantaneous vector field revealed characteristic interacting patterns of the jets. - Abstract: The interaction between parallel jets plays a critical role in determining the characteristics of the momentum and heat transfer in the flow. Specifically for next generation VHTR, the output temperature will be about 900 °C, and any thermal oscillations will create safety issues. The mixing variations of the coolants in the reactor core may influence these power oscillations. Numerous numerical tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been used to support the reactor design. The validation of CFD method is important to ensure the fidelity of the calculations. This requires high-fidelity, qualified benchmark data. Particle image velocimetry (PIV), a non-intrusive measuring technique, was used to provide benchmark data for resolving a simultaneous flow field in the converging region of two submerged parallel jets issued from rectangular channels. The jets studied in this work had an equal discharge velocity at room temperature. The turbulent characteristics including the distributions of mean velocities, turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses and z-component vorticity were studied. The streamwise mean velocity measured by PIV and LDV were compared, and they agreed very well.

  3. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G J M [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States); Mitchell, G [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Bailie, N [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Thornhill, D [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Watterson, J [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kimbell, J S [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  4. Study of particles clouds ejected under shock: the contributions of Photonic Doppler Velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudhomme, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    A metal plate subjected to a shock (tin, 10 GPa) undergoes a variety of damages such as spalling or the ejection of a cloud of particles. Two main mechanisms govern the formation of this cloud: the micro-jetting and the melting under shock. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV, a.k.a. LDV or het-V) is a multi-velocity time-resolved diagnostic. Developed from 2000's, the all-fibered conception makes its integration easy into shock experiments. The purpose of the thesis is to describe the contributions of PDV systems for high-velocity (several km/s) particle-cloud characterization, including micro-jetting cloud. This document presents a state of the art of shock generators, diagnostics and (numerical and experimental) studies involved in metallic micro-machined jetting. An extensive study of a PDV system is proposed. It leads to the definition of time-velocity spectrogram, evaluated in units of collected power, and a detection capability limit. Thanks to photon diffusion models, a threshold in the diameter of the measured particle is estimated. A PDV spectrogram simulation program is shown within the framework of particle clouds. Finally, several experimental campaigns are exposed. They emphasize the remarkable capacities of the system; results are compared to simulations. Diameter distributions are inferred using slowing down in air or in other gazes. Some radiometric analyses are also performed. (author) [fr

  5. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  6. Velocity Deficits in the Wake of Model Lemon Shark Dorsal Fins Measured with Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, K. N.; Turner, V.; Hackett, E.

    2017-12-01

    Aquatic animals' morphology provides inspiration for human technological developments, as their bodies have evolved and become adapted for efficient swimming. Lemon sharks exhibit a uniquely large second dorsal fin that is nearly the same size as the first fin, the hydrodynamic role of which is unknown. This experimental study looks at the drag forces on a scale model of the Lemon shark's unique two-fin configuration in comparison to drag forces on a more typical one-fin configuration. The experiments were performed in a recirculating water flume, where the wakes behind the scale models are measured using particle image velocimetry. The experiments are performed at three different flow speeds for both fin configurations. The measured instantaneous 2D distributions of the streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are ensemble averaged to generate streamwise velocity vertical profiles. In addition, velocity deficit profiles are computed from the difference between these mean streamwise velocity profiles and the free stream velocity, which is computed based on measured flow rates during the experiments. Results show that the mean velocities behind the fin and near the fin tip are smallest and increase as the streamwise distance from the fin tip increases. The magnitude of velocity deficits increases with increasing flow speed for both fin configurations, but at all flow speeds, the two-fin configurations generate larger velocity deficits than the one-fin configurations. Because the velocity deficit is directly proportional to the drag force, these results suggest that the two-fin configuration produces more drag.

  7. Flow mapping of multiphase flows using a novel single stem endoscopic particle image velocimetry instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lad, N; Adebayo, D; Aroussi, A

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a successful flow mapping technique which can optically quantify large portions of a flow regime. This enables the method to be completely non-intrusive. The ability to be non-intrusive to any flow has allowed PIV to be used in a large range of industrial sectors for many applications. However, a fundamental disadvantage of the conventional PIV technique is that it cannot easily be used with flows which have no or limited optical access. Flows which have limited optical access for PIV measurement have been addressed using endoscopic PIV techniques. This system uses two separate probes which relay a light sheet and imaging optics to a planar position within the desired flow regime. This system is effective in medical and engineering applications. The present study has been involved in the development of a new endoscopic PIV system which integrates the illumination and imaging optics into one rigid probe. This paper focuses on the validation of the images taken from the novel single stem endoscopic PIV system. The probe is used within atomized spray flow and is compared with conventional PIV measurement and also pitot-static data. The endoscopic PIV system provides images which create localized velocity maps that are comparable with the global measurement of the conventional PIV system. The velocity information for both systems clearly show similar results for the spray characterization and are also validated using the pitot-static data

  8. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  9. Experimental characterization of solid particle transport by slug flow using Particle Image Velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharzadeh, A; Rodgers, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of gas-liquid slug flow on solid particle transport inside a horizontal pipe with two types of experiments conducted. The influence of slug length on solid particle transportation is characterized using high speed photography. Using combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) with Refractive Index Matching (RIM) and fluorescent tracers (two-phase oil-air loop) the velocity distribution inside the slug body is measured. Combining these experimental analyses, an insight is provided into the physical mechanism of solid particle transportation due to slug flow. It was observed that the slug body significantly influences solid particle mobility. The physical mechanism of solid particle transportation was found to be discontinuous. The inactive region (in terms of solid particle transport) upstream of the slug nose was quantified as a function of gas-liquid composition and solid particle size. Measured velocity distributions showed a significant drop in velocity magnitude immediately upstream of the slug nose and therefore the critical velocity for solid particle lifting is reached further upstream.

  10. Ghost Particle Velocimetry implementation in millimeters devices and comparison with μPIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccomi, Marco; Alberini, Federico; Brunazzi, Elisabetta; Vigolo, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Micro/milli-fluidic devices are becoming an important reference for several disciplines and are quickly increasing their applications in scientific, as well as industrial, environment. As a consequence, the development of techniques able to analyse these kinds of systems is required to allow their progress. Here we show the implementation of the Ghost Particle Velocimetry (GPV) for the flow velocity field investigation in milli-fluidic devices. This innovative technique has been recently introduced, and has been already proven to be useful in describing rapid phenomenon at a small scale. In this work, the GPV has been used to characterize the trapping of light suspended material in a branching junction. Experiments have been performed to identify the flow velocity field close to a millimeters scale T-junction, at different Reynolds numbers. Particularly interesting are the complex structures, such as vortices and recirculation zones, induced by the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The results obtained have been deeply validated and compared with the well-established μPIV, highlighting the differences in terms of qualitative and quantitative parameters. A performance comparison has been designed to underline the strengths and weaknesses of the two experimental techniques.

  11. Visualization of air flow around soccer ball using a particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungchan; Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    A traditional soccer ball is constructed using 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. In recent years, however, the likes of the Teamgeist and Jabulani balls, constructed from 14 and 8 panels, respectively, have entered the field, marking a significant departure from conventionality in terms of shape and design. Moreover, the recently introduced Brazuca ball features a new 6-panel design and has already been adopted by many soccer leagues. However, the shapes of the constituent panels of these balls differ substantially from those of conventional balls. Therefore, this study set out to investigate the flight and aerodynamic characteristics of different orientations of the soccer ball, which is constructed from panels of different shapes. A wind tunnel test showed substantial differences in the aerodynamic forces acting on the ball, depending on its orientation. Substantial differences were also observed in the aerodynamic forces acting on the ball in different directions, corresponding to its orientation and rotation. Moreover, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (2D-PIV) measurements showed that the boundary separation varies depending on the orientation of the ball. Based on these results, we can conclude that the shape of the panels of a soccer ball substantially affects its flight trajectory.

  12. Aortic isthmus Doppler velocimetry: role in assessment of preterm fetal growth restriction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, M M

    2012-02-01

    Intrauterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR) is an important pregnancy complication associated with significant adverse clinical outcome, stillbirth, perinatal morbidity and cerebral palsy. To date, no uniformly accepted management protocol of Doppler surveillance that reduces mortality and cognitive morbidity has emerged. Aortic isthmus (AoI) evaluation has been proposed as a potential monitoring tool for IUGR fetuses. In this review, the current knowledge of the relationship between AoI Doppler velocimetry and preterm fetal growth restriction is reviewed. Relevant technical aspects and reproducibility data are reviewed as we discuss AoI Doppler and its place within the existing repertoire of Doppler assessments in placental insufficiency. The AoI is a link between the right and left ventricles which perfuse the lower and upper body, respectively. The clinical use of AoI waveforms for monitoring fetal deterioration in IUGR has been limited, but preliminary work suggests that abnormal AoI impedance indices are an intermediate step between placental insufficiency-hypoxemia and cardiac decompensation. Further prospective studies correlating AoI indices with arterial and venous Doppler indices and perinatal outcome are required before encorporating this index into clinical practice.

  13. A review on noise suppression and aberration compensation in holographic particle image velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.F. Tamrin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding three-dimensional (3D fluid flow behaviour is undeniably crucial in improving performance and efficiency in a wide range of applications in engineering and medical fields. Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV is a potential tool to probe and characterize complex flow dynamics since it is a truly three-dimensional three-component measurement technique. The technique relies on the coherent light scattered by small seeding particles that are assumed to faithfully follow the flow for subsequent reconstruction of the same the event afterward. However, extraction of useful 3D displacement data from these particle images is usually aggravated by noise and aberration which are inherent within the optical system. Noise and aberration have been considered as major hurdles in HPIV in obtaining accurate particle image identification and its corresponding 3D position. Major contributions to noise include zero-order diffraction, out-of-focus particles, virtual image and emulsion grain scattering. Noise suppression is crucial to ensure that particle image can be distinctly differentiated from background noise while aberration compensation forms particle image with high integrity. This paper reviews a number of HPIV configurations that have been proposed to address these issues, summarizes the key findings and outlines a basis for follow-on research.

  14. A blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry with silicone vascular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2011-03-01

    For accurate particle image velocimetry measurements in hemodynamics studies, it is important to use a fluid with a refractive index ( n) matching that of the vascular models (phantoms) and ideally a dynamic viscosity matching human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) composed of water, glycerol, and sodium iodide was formulated for a range of refractive indices to match most common silicone elastomers ( n = 1.40-1.43) and with corresponding dynamic viscosity within the average cited range of healthy human blood (4.4 ± 0.5 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at room temperature (22.2 ± 0.2°C), which eliminates the need for a temperature-control system. An optimally matched BMF, suitable for use in a vascular phantom ( n = 1.4140 ± 0.0008, Sylgard 184), was demonstrated with composition (by weight) of 47.38% water, 36.94% glycerol (44:56 glycerol-water ratio), and 15.68% sodium iodide salt, resulting in a dynamic viscosity of 4 .31 ± 0 .03 cP.

  15. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184.

  16. Identification of hydrodynamic forces around 3D surrogates using particle image velocimetry in a microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Sepideh; Nath, Shubhankar; Demirci, Utkan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Rizvi, Imran; Franco, Walfre

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that flow-induced shear stress induces a motile and aggressive tumor phenotype in a microfluidic model of 3D ovarian cancer. However, the magnitude and distribution of the hydrodynamic forces that influence this biological modulation on the 3D cancer nodules are not known. We have developed a series of numerical and experimental tools to identify these forces within a 3D microchannel. In this work, we used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to find the velocity profile using fluorescent micro-spheres as surrogates and nano-particles as tracers, from which hydrodynamic forces can be derived. The fluid velocity is obtained by imaging the trajectory of a range of florescence nano-particles (500-800 μm) via confocal microscopy. Imaging was done at different horizontal planes and with a 50 μm bead as the surrogate. For an inlet current rate of 2 μl/s, the maximum velocity at the center of the channel was 51 μm/s. The velocity profile around the sphere was symmetric which is expected since the flow is dominated by viscous forces as opposed to inertial forces. The confocal PIV was successfully employed in finding the velocity profile in a microchannel with a nodule surrogate; therefore, it seems feasible to use PIV to investigate the hydrodynamic forces around 3D biological models.

  17. Photonic-Doppler-Velocimetry, Paraxial-Scalar Diffraction Theory and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, W. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    In this report I describe current progress on a paraxial, scalar-field theory suitable for simulating what is measured in Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) experiments in three dimensions. I have introduced a number of approximations in this work in order to bring the total computation time for one experiment down to around 20 hours. My goals were: to develop an approximate method of calculating the peak frequency in a spectral sideband at an instant of time based on an optical diffraction theory for a moving target, to compare the ‘measured’ velocity to the ‘input’ velocity to gain insights into how and to what precision PDV measures the component of the mass velocity along the optical axis, and to investigate the effects of small amounts of roughness on the measured velocity. This report illustrates the progress I have made in describing how to perform such calculations with a full three dimensional picture including tilted target, tilted mass velocity (not necessarily in the same direction), and small amounts of surface roughness. With the method established for a calculation at one instant of time, measured velocities can be simulated for a sequence of times, similar to the process of sampling velocities in experiments. Improvements in these methods are certainly possible at hugely increased computational cost. I am hopeful that readers appreciate the insights possible at the current level of approximation.

  18. Vortex ring formation at the open end of a shock tube: A particle image velocimetry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, J. H.; Das, D.; Krothapalli, A.; Lourenco, L.

    2004-04-01

    The vortex ring generated subsequent to the diffraction of a shock wave from the open end of a shock tube is studied using particle image velocimetry. We examine the early evolution of the compressible vortex ring for three-exit shock Mach numbers, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3. For the three cases studied, the ring formation is complete at about tUb/D=2, where t is time, Ub is fluid velocity behind shock as it exits the tube and D is tube diameter. Unlike in the case of piston generated incompressible vortex rings where the piston velocity variation with time is usually trapezoidal, in the shock-generated vortex ring case the exit fluid velocity doubles from its initial value Ub before it slowly decays to zero. At the end of the ring formation, its translation speed is observed to be about 0.7 Ub. During initial formation and propagation, a jet-like flow exists behind the vortex ring. The vortex ring detachment from the tailing jet, commonly referred to as pinch-off, is briefly discussed.

  19. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  20. Microfluidic rheometry of a polymer solution by micron resolution particle image velocimetry: a model validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemaka Bandalusena, H C; Zimmerman, William B; Rees, Julia M

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to model non-Newtonian fluid flows in microgeometries. Velocity fields of dilute xanthan gum solutions in a microfluidic T-junction have been measured for pressure-driven flow using micron resolution particle image velocimetry (µ-PIV). Xanthan gum at a fixed concentration is a power-law fluid. Varying the concentration changes the rheology, effectively altering the power-law parameters reflecting the changes in the fluid's shear response since viscoelasticity and extensional viscosity are negligible for dilute solutions of this substance. As the flow is forced to turn the corner of the T-junction, a range of shear rates, and hence viscosities, is produced. If this feature could be incorporated into a viscometer, then potentially the constitutive parameters of a complex fluid could be ascertained from a single experiment. A mathematical model based on a finite element technique has been developed to simulate the fluid flow in the experimental system. Model predictions of the velocity field are found to agree well (less than 5% error) with observations, thus validating the model

  1. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, Lewis J., E-mail: ll379@cam.ac.uk; Jardine, Andrew P. [SMF Fracture and Shock Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  2. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Marshall, B. R.; Miller, E. K.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Veeser, L. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed.

  3. Development of a compact x-ray particle image velocimetry for measuring opaque flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Guk Bae; Yim, Dae Hyun; Jung, Sung Yong

    2009-03-01

    A compact x-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) system employing a medical x-ray tube as a light source was developed to measure quantitative velocity field information of opaque flows. The x-ray PIV system consists of a medical x-ray tube, an x-ray charge coupled device camera, a programmable shutter for a pulse-type x ray, and a synchronization device. Through performance tests, the feasibility of the developed x-ray PIV system as a flow measuring device was verified. To check the feasibility of the developed system, we tested a tube flow at two different mean velocities of 1 and 2 mm/s. The x-ray absorption of tracer particles must be quite different from that of working fluid to have a good contrast in x-ray images. All experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure condition. This system is unique and useful for investigating various opaque flows or flows inside opaque conduits.

  4. Investigation of the hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Lam, Kitming; Wang, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates has a significant influence on the interactions and flocculation kinetics of algae. However, characterization of the hydrodynamics of diatoms and diatom aggregates in water is rather difficult. In this laboratory study, an advanced visualization technique in particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of settling diatom aggregates. The experiments were conducted in a settling column filled with a suspension of fluorescent polymeric beads as seed tracers. A laser light sheet was generated by the PIV setup to illuminate a thin vertical planar region in the settling column, while the motions of particles were recorded by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This technique was able to capture the trajectories of the tracers when a diatom aggregate settled through the tracer suspension. The PIV results indicated directly the curvilinear feature of the streamlines around diatom aggregates. The rectilinear collision model largely overestimated the collision areas of the settling particles. Algae aggregates appeared to be highly porous and fractal, which allowed streamlines to penetrate into the aggregate interior. The diatom aggregates have a fluid collection efficiency of 10%-40%. The permeable feature of aggregates can significantly enhance the collisions and flocculation between the aggregates and other small particles including algal cells in water.

  5. Flow visualization through particle image velocimetry in realistic model of rhesus monkey's upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Woong; Phuong, Nguyen Lu; Aramaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ito, Kazuhide

    2018-05-01

    Studies concerning inhalation toxicology and respiratory drug-delivery systems require biological testing involving experiments performed on animals. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an effective in vitro technique that reveals detailed inhalation flow patterns, thereby assisting analyses of inhalation exposure to various substances. A realistic model of a rhesus-monkey upper airway was developed to investigate flow patterns in its oral and nasal cavities through PIV experiments performed under steady-state constant inhalation conditions at various flow rates-4, 10, and 20 L/min. Flow rate of the fluid passing through the inlet into the trachea was measured to obtain characteristic flow mechanisms, and flow phenomena in the model were confirmed via characterized flow fields. It was observed that increase in flow rate leads to constant velocity profiles in upper and lower trachea regions. It is expected that the results of this study would contribute to future validation of studies aimed at developing in silico models, especially those involving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a compact x-ray particle image velocimetry for measuring opaque flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Guk Bae; Yim, Dae Hyun; Jung, Sung Yong

    2009-01-01

    A compact x-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV) system employing a medical x-ray tube as a light source was developed to measure quantitative velocity field information of opaque flows. The x-ray PIV system consists of a medical x-ray tube, an x-ray charge coupled device camera, a programmable shutter for a pulse-type x ray, and a synchronization device. Through performance tests, the feasibility of the developed x-ray PIV system as a flow measuring device was verified. To check the feasibility of the developed system, we tested a tube flow at two different mean velocities of 1 and 2 mm/s. The x-ray absorption of tracer particles must be quite different from that of working fluid to have a good contrast in x-ray images. All experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure condition. This system is unique and useful for investigating various opaque flows or flows inside opaque conduits.

  7. Particle image velocimetry measurements in an anatomical vascular model fabricated using inkjet 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Kenneth I.; Hariharan, Prasanna; Craven, Brent A.

    2017-11-01

    For decades, the study of biomedical fluid dynamics using optical flow visualization and measurement techniques has been limited by the inability to fabricate transparent physical models that realistically replicate the complex morphology of biological lumens. In this study, we present an approach for producing optically transparent anatomical models that are suitable for particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a common 3D inkjet printing process (PolyJet) and stock resin (VeroClear). By matching the index of refraction of the VeroClear material using a room-temperature mixture of water, sodium iodide, and glycerol, and by printing the part in an orientation such that the flat, optical surfaces are at an approximately 45° angle to the build plane, we overcome the challenges associated with using this 3D printing technique for PIV. Here, we summarize our methodology and demonstrate the process and the resultant PIV measurements of flow in an optically transparent anatomical model of the human inferior vena cava.

  8. Investigation and visualization of internal flow through particle aggregates and microbial flocs using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Lam, Kit Ming; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-05-01

    An advanced particle-tracking and flow-visualization technology, particle image velocimetry (PIV), was utilized to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of large aggregates in water. The laser-based PIV system was used together with a settling column to capture the streamlines around two types of aggregates: latex particle aggregates and activated sludge (AS) flocs. Both types of the aggregates were highly porous and fractal with fractal dimensions of 2.13±0.31 for the latex particle aggregates (1210-2144 μm) and 1.78±0.24 for the AS flocs (1265-3737 μm). The results show that PIV is a powerful flow visualization technique capable of determining flow field details at the micrometer scale around and through settling aggregates and flocs. The PIV streamlines provided direct experimental proof of internal flow through the aggregate interiors. According to the PIV images, fluid collection efficiency ranged from 0.052 to 0.174 for the latex particle aggregates and from 0.008 to 0.126 for AS flocs. AS flocs are apparently less permeable than the particle aggregates, probably due to the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) produced by bacteria clogging the pores within the flocs. The internal permeation of fractal aggregates and bio-flocs would enhance flocculation between particles and material transport into the aggregates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Choosing and using astronomical filters

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2014-01-01

    As a casual read through any of the major amateur astronomical magazines will demonstrate, there are filters available for all aspects of optical astronomy. This book provides a ready resource on the use of the following filters, among others, for observational astronomy or for imaging: Light pollution filters Planetary filters Solar filters Neutral density filters for Moon observation Deep-sky filters, for such objects as galaxies, nebulae and more Deep-sky objects can be imaged in much greater detail than was possible many years ago. Amateur astronomers can take

  10. Anti-clogging filter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erik P.

    2015-05-19

    An anti-clogging filter system for filtering a fluid containing large particles and small particles includes an enclosure with at least one individual elongated tubular filter element in the enclosure. The individual elongated tubular filter element has an internal passage, a closed end, an open end, and a filtering material in or on the individual elongated tubular filter element. The fluid travels through the open end of the elongated tubular element and through the internal passage and through the filtering material. An anti-clogging element is positioned on or adjacent the individual elongated tubular filter element and provides a fluid curtain that preferentially directs the larger particulates to one area of the filter material allowing the remainder of the filter material to remain more efficient.

  11. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, Haakon

    2016-01-08

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a sequential filtering method that uses an ensemble of particle paths to estimate the means and covariances required by the Kalman filter by the use of sample moments, i.e., the Monte Carlo method. EnKF is often both robust and efficient, but its performance may suffer in settings where the computational cost of accurate simulations of particles is high. The multilevel Monte Carlo method (MLMC) is an extension of classical Monte Carlo methods which by sampling stochastic realizations on a hierarchy of resolutions may reduce the computational cost of moment approximations by orders of magnitude. In this work we have combined the ideas of MLMC and EnKF to construct the multilevel ensemble Kalman filter (MLEnKF) for the setting of finite dimensional state and observation spaces. The main ideas of this method is to compute particle paths on a hierarchy of resolutions and to apply multilevel estimators on the ensemble hierarchy of particles to compute Kalman filter means and covariances. Theoretical results and a numerical study of the performance gains of MLEnKF over EnKF will be presented. Some ideas on the extension of MLEnKF to settings with infinite dimensional state spaces will also be presented.

  12. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, Haakon; Chernov, Alexey; Law, Kody; Nobile, Fabio; Tempone, Raul

    2016-01-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a sequential filtering method that uses an ensemble of particle paths to estimate the means and covariances required by the Kalman filter by the use of sample moments, i.e., the Monte Carlo method. EnKF is often both robust and efficient, but its performance may suffer in settings where the computational cost of accurate simulations of particles is high. The multilevel Monte Carlo method (MLMC) is an extension of classical Monte Carlo methods which by sampling stochastic realizations on a hierarchy of resolutions may reduce the computational cost of moment approximations by orders of magnitude. In this work we have combined the ideas of MLMC and EnKF to construct the multilevel ensemble Kalman filter (MLEnKF) for the setting of finite dimensional state and observation spaces. The main ideas of this method is to compute particle paths on a hierarchy of resolutions and to apply multilevel estimators on the ensemble hierarchy of particles to compute Kalman filter means and covariances. Theoretical results and a numerical study of the performance gains of MLEnKF over EnKF will be presented. Some ideas on the extension of MLEnKF to settings with infinite dimensional state spaces will also be presented.

  13. M2 FILTER FOR SPECKLE NOISE SUPPRESSION IN BREAST ULTRASOUND IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Samundeeswari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer, commonly found in women is a serious life threatening disease due to its invasive nature. Ultrasound (US imaging method plays an effective role in screening early detection and diagnosis of Breast cancer. Speckle noise generally affects medical ultrasound images and also causes a number of difficulties in identifying the Region of Interest. Suppressing speckle noise is a challenging task as it destroys fine edge details. No specific filter is designed yet to get a noise free BUS image that is contaminated by speckle noise. In this paper M2 filter, a novel hybrid of linear and nonlinear filter is proposed and compared to other spatial filters with 3×3 kernel size. The performance of the proposed M2 filter is measured by statistical quantity parameters like MSE, PSNR and SSI. The experimental analysis clearly shows that the proposed M2 filter outperforms better than other spatial filters by 2% high PSNR values with regards to speckle suppression.

  14. Preconditioner-free Wiener filtering with a dense noise matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffenberger, Kevin M.

    2018-05-01

    This work extends the Elsner & Wandelt (2013) iterative method for efficient, preconditioner-free Wiener filtering to cases in which the noise covariance matrix is dense, but can be decomposed into a sum whose parts are sparse in convenient bases. The new method, which uses multiple messenger fields, reproduces Wiener-filter solutions for test problems, and we apply it to a case beyond the reach of the Elsner & Wandelt (2013) method. We compute the Wiener-filter solution for a simulated Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) map that contains spatially varying, uncorrelated noise, isotropic 1/f noise, and large-scale horizontal stripes (like those caused by atmospheric noise). We discuss simple extensions that can filter contaminated modes or inverse-noise-filter the data. These techniques help to address complications in the noise properties of maps from current and future generations of ground-based Microwave Background experiments, like Advanced ACTPol, Simons Observatory, and CMB-S4.

  15. Data assimilation in the early phase: Kalman filtering RIMPUFF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, P.; Turcanu, C.; Puch, R.O.

    2004-01-01

    of RODOS (Realtime Online DecisiOn Support system for nuclear emergencies) – has been developed. It is built on the Kalman filtering algorithm and it assimilates 10-minute averaged gamma dose rates measured atground level stations. Since the gamma rates are non-linear functions of the state vector...... variables, the applied Kalman filter is the so-called Extended Kalman filter. In more ways the implementation is non standard: 1) the number of state vectorvariables varies with time, and 2) the state vector variables are prediction updated with 1-minute time steps but only Kalman filtered every 10 minutes......, and this based on time averaged measurements. Given reasonable conditions, i.e. a spatially densedistribution of gamma monitors and a realistic wind field, the developed ADUM module is found to be able to enhance the prediction of the gamma dose field. Based on some of the Kalman filtering parameters, another...

  16. Adaptive digital filters

    CERN Document Server

    Kovačević, Branko; Milosavljević, Milan

    2013-01-01

    “Adaptive Digital Filters” presents an important discipline applied to the domain of speech processing. The book first makes the reader acquainted with the basic terms of filtering and adaptive filtering, before introducing the field of advanced modern algorithms, some of which are contributed by the authors themselves. Working in the field of adaptive signal processing requires the use of complex mathematical tools. The book offers a detailed presentation of the mathematical models that is clear and consistent, an approach that allows everyone with a college level of mathematics knowledge to successfully follow the mathematical derivations and descriptions of algorithms.   The algorithms are presented in flow charts, which facilitates their practical implementation. The book presents many experimental results and treats the aspects of practical application of adaptive filtering in real systems, making it a valuable resource for both undergraduate and graduate students, and for all others interested in m...

  17. Updating the OMERACT filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Boers, Maarten; Kirwan, John

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter provides a framework for the validation of outcome measures for use in rheumatology clinical research. However, imaging and biochemical measures may face additional validation challenges because of their technical nature. The Imaging...... using the original OMERACT Filter and the newly proposed structure. Breakout groups critically reviewed the extent to which the candidate biomarkers complied with the proposed stepwise approach, as a way of examining the utility of the proposed 3-dimensional structure. RESULTS: Although...... was obtained for a proposed tri-axis structure to assess validation of imaging and soluble biomarkers; nevertheless, additional work is required to better evaluate its place within the OMERACT Filter 2.0....

  18. Automated electronic filter design

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Amal

    2017-01-01

    This book describes a novel, efficient and powerful scheme for designing and evaluating the performance characteristics of any electronic filter designed with predefined specifications. The author explains techniques that enable readers to eliminate complicated manual, and thus error-prone and time-consuming, steps of traditional design techniques. The presentation includes demonstration of efficient automation, using an ANSI C language program, which accepts any filter design specification (e.g. Chebyschev low-pass filter, cut-off frequency, pass-band ripple etc.) as input and generates as output a SPICE(Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) format netlist. Readers then can use this netlist to run simulations with any version of the popular SPICE simulator, increasing accuracy of the final results, without violating any of the key principles of the traditional design scheme.

  19. Stack filter classifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  20. Quantum reality filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudder, Stan

    2010-01-01

    An anhomomorphic logic A* is the set of all possible realities for a quantum system. Our main goal is to find the 'actual reality' Φ a element of A* for the system. Reality filters are employed to eliminate unwanted potential realities until only φ a remains. In this paper, we consider three reality filters that are constructed by means of quantum integrals. A quantum measure μ can generate or actualize a Φ element of A* if μ(A) is a quantum integral with respect to φ for a density function f over events A. In this sense, μ is an 'average' of the truth values of φ with weights given by f. We mainly discuss relations between these filters and their existence and uniqueness properties. For example, we show that a quadratic reality generated by a quantum measure is unique. In this case we obtain the unique actual quadratic reality.

  1. Fusion of multispectral and panchromatic images using multirate filter banks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong; Jing Zhongliang; Li Jianxun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an image fusion method based on the filter banks is proposed for merging a high-resolution panchromatic image and a low-resolution multispectral image. Firstly, the filter banks are designed to merge different signals with minimum distortion by using cosine modulation. Then, the filter banks-based image fusion is adopted to obtain a high-resolution multispectral image that combines the spectral characteristic of low-resolution data with the spatial resolution of the panchromatic image. Finally, two different experiments and corresponding performance analysis are presented. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach outperforms the HIS transform, discrete wavelet transform and discrete wavelet frame.

  2. Experimental use of iteratively designed rotation invariant correlation filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, D.W.; Ochoa, E.; Schils, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Iteratively designed filters are incorporated into an optical correlator for position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognition of target images. The filters exhibit excellent discrimination because they are designed to contain full information about the target image. Numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate detection of targets that are corrupted with random noise (SNR≅0.5) and also partially obscured by other objects. The complex valued filters are encoded in a computer generated hologram and fabricated directly using an electron-beam system. Experimental results using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator for real-time input show excellent agreement with analytical and numerical computations

  3. Filters in topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdin, Blaise

    1999-01-01

    In this article, a modified (``filtered'') version of the minimum compliance topology optimization problem is studied. The direct dependence of the material properties on its pointwise density is replaced by a regularization of the density field using a convolution operator. In this setting...... it is possible to establish the existence of solutions. Moreover, convergence of an approximation by means of finite elements can be obtained. This is illustrated through some numerical experiments. The ``filtering'' technique is also shown to cope with two important numerical problems in topology optimization...

  4. Alarm filtering and presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses alarm filtering and presentation in the control room of nuclear and other process control plants. Alarm generation and presentation is widely recognized as a general process control problem. Alarm systems often fail to provide meaningful alarms to operators. Alarm generation and presentation is an area in which computer aiding is feasible and provides clear benefits. Therefore, researchers have developed several computerized alarm filtering and presentation approaches. This paper discusses problems associated with alarm generation and presentation. Approaches to improving the alarm situation and installation issues of alarm system improvements are discussed. The impact of artificial intelligence (AI) technology on alarm system improvements is assessed. (orig.)

  5. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to

  6. Numerical and experimental study on vorticity measurement in liquid metal using local Lorentz force velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Daniel; Marangoni, Rafael; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Local Lorentz force velocimetry (local LFV) is a contactless velocity measurement technique for liquid metals. Due to the relative movement between an electrically conductive fluid and a static applied magnetic field, eddy currents and a flow-braking Lorentz force are generated inside the metal melt. This force is proportional to the flow rate or to the local velocity, depending on the volume subset of the flow spanned by the magnetic field. By using small-size magnets, a localized magnetic field distribution is achieved allowing a local velocity assessment in the region adjacent to the wall. In the present study, we describe a numerical model of our experiments at a continuous caster model where the working fluid is GaInSn in eutectic composition. Our main goal is to demonstrate that this electromagnetic technique can be applied to measure vorticity distributions, i.e. to resolve velocity gradients as well. Our results show that by using a cross-shaped magnet system, the magnitude of the torque perpendicular to the surface of the mold significantly increases improving its measurement in a liquid metal flow. According to our numerical model, this torque correlates with the vorticity of the velocity in this direction. Before validating our numerical predictions, an electromagnetic dry calibration of the measurement system composed of a multicomponent force and torque sensor and a cross-shaped magnet was done using a rotating disk made of aluminum. The sensor is able to measure simultaneously all three components of force and torque, respectively. This calibration step cannot be avoided and it is used for an accurate definition of the center of the magnet with respect to the sensor’s coordinate system for torque measurements. Finally, we present the results of the experiments at the mini-LIMMCAST facility showing a good agreement with the numerical model.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of the effect of the induced electric potential in Lorentz force velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Daniel; Boeck, Thomas; Karcher, Christian; Wondrak, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a contactless velocity measurement technique for electrically conducting fluids. When a liquid metal or a molten glass flows through an externally applied magnetic field, eddy currents and a flow-braking force are generated inside the liquid. This force is proportional to the velocity or flow rate of the fluid and, due to Newton’s third law, a force of the same magnitude but in opposite direction acts on the source of the applied magnetic field which in our case are permanent magnets. According to Ohm’s law for moving conductors at low magnetic Reynolds numbers, an electric potential is induced which ensures charge conservation. In this paper, we analyze the contribution of the induced electric potential to the total Lorentz force by considering two different scenarios: conducting walls of finite thickness and aspect ratio variation of the cross-section of the flow. In both the cases, the force component generated by the electric potential is always in the opposite direction to the total Lorentz force. This force component is sensitive to the electric boundary conditions of the flow of which insulating and perfectly conducting walls are the two limiting cases. In the latter case, the overall electric resistance of the system is minimized, resulting in a considerable increase in the measured Lorentz force. Additionally, this force originating from the electric potential also decays when the aspect ratio of the cross-section of the flow is changed. Hence, the sensitivity of the measurement technique is enhanced by either increasing wall conductivity or optimizing the aspect ratio of the cross-section of the flow.

  8. Track benchmarking method for uncertainty quantification of particle tracking velocimetry interpolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiders, Jan F G; Sciacchitano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The track benchmarking method (TBM) is proposed for uncertainty quantification of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) data mapped onto a regular grid. The method provides statistical uncertainty for a velocity time-series and can in addition be used to obtain instantaneous uncertainty at increased computational cost. Interpolation techniques are typically used to map velocity data from scattered PTV (e.g. tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box) measurements onto a Cartesian grid. Recent examples of these techniques are the FlowFit and VIC+  methods. The TBM approach estimates the random uncertainty in dense velocity fields by performing the velocity interpolation using a subset of typically 95% of the particle tracks and by considering the remaining tracks as an independent benchmarking reference. In addition, also a bias introduced by the interpolation technique is identified. The numerical assessment shows that the approach is accurate when particle trajectories are measured over an extended number of snapshots, typically on the order of 10. When only short particle tracks are available, the TBM estimate overestimates the measurement error. A correction to TBM is proposed and assessed to compensate for this overestimation. The experimental assessment considers the case of a jet flow, processed both by tomographic PIV and by VIC+. The uncertainty obtained by TBM provides a quantitative evaluation of the measurement accuracy and precision and highlights the regions of high error by means of bias and random uncertainty maps. In this way, it is possible to quantify the uncertainty reduction achieved by advanced interpolation algorithms with respect to standard correlation-based tomographic PIV. The use of TBM for uncertainty quantification and comparison of different processing techniques is demonstrated. (paper)

  9. Simultaneous particle image velocimetry and infrared imagery of microscale breaking waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, M.H. Kamran; Loewen, Mark R.; Richardson, Christine; Asher, William E.; Jessup, Andrew T.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results from a laboratory investigation in which microscale breaking waves were detected using an infrared (IR) imager and two-dimensional (2-D) velocity fields were simultaneously measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV). In addition, the local heat transfer velocity was measured using the controlled flux technique. To the best of our knowledge these are the first measurements of the instantaneous 2-D velocity fields generated beneath microscale breaking waves. Careful measurements of the water surface profile enabled us to make accurate estimates of the near-surface velocities using PIV. Previous experiments have shown that behind the leading edge of a microscale breaker the cool skin layer is disrupted creating a thermal signature in the IR image [Jessup et al., J. Geophys. Res. 102, 23145 (1997)]. The simultaneously sampled IR images and PIV data enabled us to show that these disruptions or wakes are typically produced by a series of vortices that form behind the leading edge of the breaker. When the vortices are first formed they are very strong and coherent but as time passes, and they move from the crest region to the back face of the wave, they become weaker and less coherent. The near-surface vorticity was correlated with both the fractional area coverage of microscale breaking waves and the local heat transfer velocity. The strong correlations provide convincing evidence that the wakes produced by microscale breaking waves are regions of high near-surface vorticity that are in turn responsible for enhancing air-water heat transfer rates

  10. Turbulent Structure of a Simplified Urban Fluid Flow Studied Through Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Bruno; Goudarzi, Sepehr A.; Vinuesa, Ricardo; Wark, Candace

    2018-02-01

    Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was used to provide a three-dimensional characterization of the flow around a simplified urban model defined by a 5 by 7 array of blocks, forming four parallel streets, perpendicular to the incoming wind direction corresponding to a zero angle of incidence. Channeling of the flow through the array under consideration was observed, and its effect increased as the incoming wind direction, or angle of incidence ( AOI), was changed from 0° to 15°, 30°, and 45°. The flow between blocks can be divided into two regions: a region of low turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) levels close to the leeward side of the upstream block, and a high TKE area close to the downstream block. The centre of the arch vortex is located in the low TKE area, and two regions of large streamwise velocity fluctuation bound the vortex in the spanwise direction. Moreover, a region of large spanwise velocity fluctuation on the downstream block is found between the vortex legs. Our results indicate that the reorientation of the arch vortex at increasing AOI is produced by the displacement of the different TKE regions and their interaction with the shear layers on the sides and top of the upstream and downstream blocks, respectively. There is also a close connection between the turbulent structure between the blocks and the wind gusts. The correlations among gust components were also studied, and it was found that in the near-wall region of the street the correlations between the streamwise and spanwise gusts R_{uv} were dominant for all four AOI cases. At higher wall-normal positions in the array, the R_{uw} correlation decreased with increasing AOI, whereas the R_{uv} coefficient increased as AOI increased, and at {it{AOI}}=45° all three correlations exhibited relatively high values of around 0.4.

  11. Irrigant flow during photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jon D; Jaramillo, David E; DiVito, Enrico; Peters, Ove A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to compare fluid movements generated from photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) and passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI). Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was performed using 6-μm melamine spheres in water. Measurement areas were 3-mm-long sections of the canal in the coronal, midroot and apical regions for PIPS (erbium/yttrium-aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser set at 15 Hz with 20 mJ), or passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, non-cutting insert at 30% unit power) was performed in simulated root canals prepared to an apical size #30/0.04 taper. Fluid movement was analysed directly subjacent to the apical ends of ultrasonic insert or fiber optic tips as well as at midroot and apically. During PUI, measured average velocities were around 0.03 m/s in the immediate vicinity of the sides and tip of the ultrasonic file. Speeds decayed to non-measureable values at a distance of about 2 mm from the sides and tip. During PIPS, typical average speeds were about ten times higher than those measured for PUI, and they were measured throughout the length of the canal, at distances up to 20 mm away. PIPS caused higher average fluid speeds when compared to PUI, both close and distant from the instrument. The findings of this study could be relevant to the debriding and disinfecting stage of endodontic therapy. Irrigation enhancement beyond needle irrigation is relevant to more effectively eradicate microorganisms from root canal systems. PIPS may be an alternative approach due to its ability to create high streaming velocities further away from the activation source compared to ultrasonic activation.

  12. In vitro characterization of bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yap, Choon-Hwai; Milligan, Nicole C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-08-01

    The congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with increased leaflet calcification, ascending aortic dilatation, aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR). Although underlying genetic factors have been primarily implicated for these complications, the altered mechanical environment of BAVs could potentially accelerate these pathologies. The objective of the current study is to characterize BAV hemodynamics in an in vitro system. Two BAV models of varying stenosis and jet eccentricity and a trileaflet AV (TAV) were constructed from excised porcine AVs. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments were conducted at physiological flow and pressure conditions to characterize fluid velocity fields in the aorta and sinus regions, and ensemble averaged Reynolds shear stress and 2D turbulent kinetic energy were calculated for all models. The dynamics of the BAV and TAV models matched the characteristics of these valves which are observed clinically. The eccentric and stenotic BAV showed the strongest systolic jet (V = 4.2 m/s), which impinged on the aortic wall on the non-fused leaflet side, causing a strong vortex in the non-fused leaflet sinus. The magnitudes of TKE and Reynolds stresses in both BAV models were almost twice as large as comparable values for TAV, and these maximum values were primarily concentrated around the central jet through the valve orifice. The in vitro model described here enables detailed characterization of BAV flow characteristics, which is currently challenging in clinical practice. This model can prove to be useful in studying the effects of altered BAV geometry on fluid dynamics in the valve and ascending aorta. These altered flows can be potentially linked to increased calcific responses from the valve endothelium in stenotic and eccentric BAVs, independent of concomitant genetic factors.

  13. Estimation of uncertainty bounds for individual particle image velocimetry measurements from cross-correlation peak ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charonko, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have established firmly that particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a robust method for non-invasive, quantitative measurements of fluid velocity, and that when carefully conducted, typical measurements can accurately detect displacements in digital images with a resolution well below a single pixel (in some cases well below a hundredth of a pixel). However, to date, these estimates have only been able to provide guidance on the expected error for an average measurement under specific image quality and flow conditions. This paper demonstrates a new method for estimating the uncertainty bounds to within a given confidence interval for a specific, individual measurement. Here, cross-correlation peak ratio, the ratio of primary to secondary peak height, is shown to correlate strongly with the range of observed error values for a given measurement, regardless of flow condition or image quality. This relationship is significantly stronger for phase-only generalized cross-correlation PIV processing, while the standard correlation approach showed weaker performance. Using an analytical model of the relationship derived from synthetic data sets, the uncertainty bounds at a 95% confidence interval are then computed for several artificial and experimental flow fields, and the resulting errors are shown to match closely to the predicted uncertainties. While this method stops short of being able to predict the true error for a given measurement, knowledge of the uncertainty level for a PIV experiment should provide great benefits when applying the results of PIV analysis to engineering design studies and computational fluid dynamics validation efforts. Moreover, this approach is exceptionally simple to implement and requires negligible additional computational cost. (paper)

  14. A three-dimensional strain measurement method in elastic transparent materials using tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuma Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanical interaction between blood vessels and medical devices can induce strains in these vessels. Measuring and understanding these strains is necessary to identify the causes of vascular complications. This study develops a method to measure the three-dimensional (3D distribution of strain using tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV and compares the measurement accuracy with the gauge strain in tensile tests.The test system for measuring 3D strain distribution consists of two cameras, a laser, a universal testing machine, an acrylic chamber with a glycerol water solution for adjusting the refractive index with the silicone, and dumbbell-shaped specimens mixed with fluorescent tracer particles. 3D images of the particles were reconstructed from 2D images using a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART and motion tracking enhancement. Distributions of the 3D displacements were calculated using a digital volume correlation. To evaluate the accuracy of the measurement method in terms of particle density and interrogation voxel size, the gauge strain and one of the two cameras for Tomo-PIV were used as a video-extensometer in the tensile test. The results show that the optimal particle density and interrogation voxel size are 0.014 particles per pixel and 40 × 40 × 40 voxels with a 75% overlap. The maximum measurement error was maintained at less than 2.5% in the 4-mm-wide region of the specimen.We successfully developed a method to experimentally measure 3D strain distribution in an elastic silicone material using Tomo-PIV and fluorescent particles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that applies Tomo-PIV to investigate 3D strain measurements in elastic materials with large deformation and validates the measurement accuracy.

  15. Statistically-Efficient Filtering in Impulsive Environments: Weighted Myriad Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan G. Gonzalez

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear filtering theory has been largely motivated by the characteristics of Gaussian signals. In the same manner, the proposed Myriad Filtering methods are motivated by the need for a flexible filter class with high statistical efficiency in non-Gaussian impulsive environments that can appear in practice. Myriad filters have a solid theoretical basis, are inherently more powerful than median filters, and are very general, subsuming traditional linear FIR filters. The foundation of the proposed filtering algorithms lies in the definition of the myriad as a tunable estimator of location derived from the theory of robust statistics. We prove several fundamental properties of this estimator and show its optimality in practical impulsive models such as the α-stable and generalized-t. We then extend the myriad estimation framework to allow the use of weights. In the same way as linear FIR filters become a powerful generalization of the mean filter, filters based on running myriads reach all of their potential when a weighting scheme is utilized. We derive the “normal” equations for the optimal myriad filter, and introduce a suboptimal methodology for filter tuning and design. The strong potential of myriad filtering and estimation in impulsive environments is illustrated with several examples.

  16. Filter and slice thickness selection in SPECT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A.; Wilson, G.A.; O'Mara, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of filter and slice thickness in SPECT image reconstruction as function of activity and linear and angular sampling were investigated in phantom and patient imaging studies. Reconstructed transverse and longitudinal spatial resolution of the system were measured using a line source in a water filled phantom. Phantom studies included measurements of the Data Spectrum phantom; clinical studies included tomographic procedures in 40 patients undergoing imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Slices of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial resolution, noise, and image quality. Major findings include; spatial resolution and image quality improve with increasing linear sampling frequencies over the range of 4-8 mm/p in the phantom images, best spatial resolution and image quality in clinical images were observed at a linear sampling frequency of 6mm/p, Shepp and Logan filter gives the best spatial resolution for phantom studies at the lowest linear sampling frequency; smoothed Shepp and Logan filter provides best quality images without loss of resolution at higher frequencies and, spatial resolution and image quality improve with increased angular sampling frequency in the phantom at 40 c/p but appear to be independent of angular sampling frequency at 400 c/p

  17. The ATLAS event filter

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, H P; Boissat, C; Davis, R; Duval, P Y; Etienne, F; Fede, E; Francis, D; Green, P; Hemmer, F; Jones, R; MacKinnon, J; Mapelli, Livio P; Meessen, C; Mommsen, R K; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Nacasch, R; Negri, A; Pinfold, James L; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rafflin, C; Scannicchio, D A; Stanescu, C; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the studies for the ATLAS Event Filter is given. The architecture and the high level design of the DAQ-1 prototype is presented. The current status if the prototypes is briefly given. Finally, future plans and milestones are given. (11 refs).

  18. Spectral Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandel, Jan; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin; Fuglík, Viktor; Turčičová, Marie; Eben, Kryštof; Resler, Jaroslav; Juruš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2014), EMS2014-446 [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ & European Conference on Applied Climatology (ECAC) /10./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF DMS-1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * spectral filter Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  19. Ghost suppression in image restoration filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum image restoration filter is described in which provision is made to constrain the spatial extent of the restoration function, the noise level of the filter output and the rate of falloff of the composite system point-spread away from the origin. Experimental results show that sidelobes on the composite system point-spread function produce ghosts in the restored image near discontinuities in intensity level. By redetermining the filter using a penalty function that is zero over the main lobe of the composite point-spread function of the optimum filter and nonzero where the point-spread function departs from a smoothly decaying function in the sidelobe region, a great reduction in sidelobe level is obtained. Almost no loss in resolving power of the composite system results from this procedure. By iteratively carrying out the same procedure even further reductions in sidelobe level are obtained. Examples of original and iterated restoration functions are shown along with their effects on a test image.

  20. Median Filter Noise Reduction of Image and Backpropagation Neural Network Model for Cervical Cancer Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wutsqa, D. U.; Marwah, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider spatial operation median filter to reduce the noise in the cervical images yielded by colposcopy tool. The backpropagation neural network (BPNN) model is applied to the colposcopy images to classify cervical cancer. The classification process requires an image extraction by using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method to obtain image features that are used as inputs of BPNN model. The advantage of noise reduction is evaluated by comparing the performances of BPNN models with and without spatial operation median filter. The experimental result shows that the spatial operation median filter can improve the accuracy of the BPNN model for cervical cancer classification.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  2. Filter assembly for metallic and intermetallic tube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Lippert, Thomas E.; Bruck, Gerald J.; Smeltzer, Eugene E.

    2001-01-01

    A filter assembly (60) for holding a filter element (28) within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel is provided, containing: a filter housing (62), said filter housing having a certain axial length and having a peripheral sidewall, said sidewall defining an interior chamber (66); a one piece, all metal, fail-safe/regenerator device (68) within the interior chamber (66) of the filter housing (62) and/or extending beyond the axial length of the filter housing, said device containing an outward extending radial flange (71) within the filter housing for seating an essential seal (70), the device also having heat transfer media (72) disposed inside and screens (80) for particulate removal; one compliant gasket (70) positioned next to and above the outward extending radial flange of the fail-safe/regenerator device; and a porous metallic corrosion resistant superalloy type filter element body welded at the bottom of the metal fail-safe/regenerator device.

  3. Digital Simulation of a Hybrid Active Filter - An Active Filter in Series with a Shunt Passive Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Sitaram, Mahesh I; Padiyar, KR; Ramanarayanan, V

    1998-01-01

    Active filters have long been in use for the filtering of power system load harmonics. In this paper, the digital simulation results of a hybrid active power filter system for a rectifier load are presented. The active filter is used for filtering higher order harmonics as the dominant harmonics are filtered by the passive filter. This reduces the rating of the active filter significantly. The DC capacitor voltage of the active filter is controlled using a PI controller.

  4. Wiener discrete cosine transform-based image filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrebnyak, Oleksiy; Lukin, Vladimir V.

    2012-10-01

    A classical problem of additive white (spatially uncorrelated) Gaussian noise suppression in grayscale images is considered. The main attention is paid to discrete cosine transform (DCT)-based denoising, in particular, to image processing in blocks of a limited size. The efficiency of DCT-based image filtering with hard thresholding is studied for different sizes of overlapped blocks. A multiscale approach that aggregates the outputs of DCT filters having different overlapped block sizes is proposed. Later, a two-stage denoising procedure that presumes the use of the multiscale DCT-based filtering with hard thresholding at the first stage and a multiscale Wiener DCT-based filtering at the second stage is proposed and tested. The efficiency of the proposed multiscale DCT-based filtering is compared to the state-of-the-art block-matching and three-dimensional filter. Next, the potentially reachable multiscale filtering efficiency in terms of output mean square error (MSE) is studied. The obtained results are of the same order as those obtained by Chatterjee's approach based on nonlocal patch processing. It is shown that the ideal Wiener DCT-based filter potential is usually higher when noise variance is high.

  5. Experimental study of filter cake formation on different filter media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.

    2009-01-01

    Removal of particulate matter from gases generated in the process industry is important for product recovery as well as emission control. Dynamics of filtration plant depend on operating conditions. The models, that predict filter plant behaviour, involve empirical resistance parameters which are usually derived from limited experimental data and are characteristics of the filter media and filter cake (dust deposited on filter medium). Filter cake characteristics are affected by the nature of filter media, process parameters and mode of filter regeneration. Removal of dust particles from air is studied in a pilot scale jet pulsed bag filter facility resembling closely to the industrial filters. Limestone dust and ambient air are used in this study with two widely different filter media. All important parameters like pressure drop, gas flow rate, dust settling, are recorded continuously at 1s interval. The data is processed for estimation of the resistance parameters. The pressure drop rise on test filter media is compared. Results reveal that the surface of filter media has an influence on pressure drop rise (concave pressure drop rise). Similar effect is produced by partially jet pulsed filter surface. Filter behaviour is also simulated using estimated parameters and a simplified model and compared with the experimental results. Distribution of cake area load is therefore an important aspect of jet pulse cleaned bag filter modeling. Mean specific cake resistance remains nearly constant on thoroughly jet pulse cleaned membrane coated filter bags. However, the trend can not be confirmed without independent cake height and density measurements. Thus the results reveal the importance of independent measurements of cake resistance. (author)

  6. Numerical study of canister filters with alternatives filter cap configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A. N.; Daud, A. R.; Abdullah, K.; Seri, S. M.; Razali, M. A.; Hushim, M. F.; Khalid, A.

    2017-09-01

    Air filtration system and filter play an important role in getting a good quality air into turbo machinery such as gas turbine. The filtration system and filter has improved the quality of air and protect the gas turbine part from contaminants which could bring damage. During separation of contaminants from the air, pressure drop cannot be avoided but it can be minimized thus helps to reduce the intake losses of the engine [1]. This study is focused on the configuration of the filter in order to obtain the minimal pressure drop along the filter. The configuration used is the basic filter geometry provided by Salutary Avenue Manufacturing Sdn Bhd. and two modified canister filter cap which is designed based on the basic filter model. The geometries of the filter are generated by using SOLIDWORKS software and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software is used to analyse and simulates the flow through the filter. In this study, the parameters of the inlet velocity are 0.032 m/s, 0.063 m/s, 0.094 m/s and 0.126 m/s. The total pressure drop produce by basic, modified filter 1 and 2 is 292.3 Pa, 251.11 Pa and 274.7 Pa. The pressure drop reduction for the modified filter 1 is 41.19 Pa and 14.1% lower compared to basic filter and the pressure drop reduction for modified filter 2 is 17.6 Pa and 6.02% lower compared to the basic filter. The pressure drops for the basic filter are slightly different with the Salutary Avenue filter due to limited data and experiment details. CFD software are very reliable in running a simulation rather than produces the prototypes and conduct the experiment thus reducing overall time and cost in this study.

  7. Proper orthogonal decomposition-based estimations of the flow field from particle image velocimetry wall-gradient measurements in the backward-facing step flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John Craig; Mokhasi, Paritosh; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, particle image velocimetry (PIV) results from the recirculation zone of a backward-facing step flow, of which the Reynolds number is 2800 based on bulk velocity upstream of the step and step height (h = 16.5 mm), are used to demonstrate the capability of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-based measurement models. Three-component PIV velocity fields are decomposed by POD into a set of spatial basis functions and a set of temporal coefficients. The measurement models are built to relate the low-order POD coefficients, determined from an ensemble of 1050 PIV fields by the 'snapshot' method, to the time-resolved wall gradients, measured by a near-wall measurement technique called stereo interfacial PIV. These models are evaluated in terms of reconstruction and prediction of the low-order temporal POD coefficients of the velocity fields. In order to determine the estimation coefficients of the measurement models, linear stochastic estimation (LSE), quadratic stochastic estimation (QSE), principal component regression (PCR) and kernel ridge regression (KRR) are applied. We denote such approaches as LSE-POD, QSE-POD, PCR-POD and KRR-POD. In addition to comparing the accuracy of measurement models, we introduce multi-time POD-based estimations in which past and future information of the wall-gradient events is used separately or combined. The results show that the multi-time estimation approaches can improve the prediction process. Among these approaches, the proposed multi-time KRR-POD estimation with an optimized window of past wall-gradient information yields the best prediction. Such a multi-time KRR-POD approach offers a useful tool for real-time flow estimation of the velocity field based on wall-gradient data

  8. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Lukac

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03 in Grado, Italy.

  9. A Differential Geometric Approach to Nonlinear Filtering: The Projection Filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, D.; Hanzon, B.; LeGland, F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a new and systematic method of approximating exact nonlinear filters with finite dimensional filters, using the differential geometric approach to statistics. The projection filter is defined rigorously in the case of exponential families. A convenient exponential family is

  10. Dual Adaptive Filtering by Optimal Projection Applied to Filter Muscle Artifacts on EEG and Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Boudet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle artifacts constitute one of the major problems in electroencephalogram (EEG examinations, particularly for the diagnosis of epilepsy, where pathological rhythms occur within the same frequency bands as those of artifacts. This paper proposes to use the method dual adaptive filtering by optimal projection (DAFOP to automatically remove artifacts while preserving true cerebral signals. DAFOP is a two-step method. The first step consists in applying the common spatial pattern (CSP method to two frequency windows to identify the slowest components which will be considered as cerebral sources. The two frequency windows are defined by optimizing convolutional filters. The second step consists in using a regression method to reconstruct the signal independently within various frequency windows. This method was evaluated by two neurologists on a selection of 114 pages with muscle artifacts, from 20 clinical recordings of awake and sleeping adults, subject to pathological signals and epileptic seizures. A blind comparison was then conducted with the canonical correlation analysis (CCA method and conventional low-pass filtering at 30 Hz. The filtering rate was 84.3% for muscle artifacts with a 6.4% reduction of cerebral signals even for the fastest waves. DAFOP was found to be significantly more efficient than CCA and 30 Hz filters. The DAFOP method is fast and automatic and can be easily used in clinical EEG recordings.

  11. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

  12. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  13. Shifted-modified Chebyshev filters

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENGÜL, Metin

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of filter approximation method that utilizes shifted-modified Chebyshev filters. Construction of the new filters involves the use of shifted-modified Chebyshev polynomials that are formed using the roots of conventional Chebyshev polynomials. The study also includes 2 tables containing the shifted-modified Chebyshev polynomials and the normalized element values for the low-pass prototype filters up to degree 6. The transducer power gain, group dela...

  14. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  15. The magnetic centrifugal mass filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages.

  16. Stochastic stacking without filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.P.; Marriner, J.

    1982-12-01

    The rate of accumulation of antiprotons is a critical factor in the design of p anti p colliders. A design of a system to accumulate higher anti p fluxes is presented here which is an alternative to the schemes used at the CERN AA and in the Fermilab Tevatron I design. Contrary to these stacking schemes, which use a system of notch filters to protect the dense core of antiprotons from the high power of the stack tail stochastic cooling, an eddy current shutter is used to protect the core in the region of the stack tail cooling kicker. Without filters one can have larger cooling bandwidths, better mixing for stochastic cooling, and easier operational criteria for the power amplifiers. In the case considered here a flux of 1.4 x 10 8 per sec is achieved with a 4 to 8 GHz bandwidth

  17. Multilevel particle filter

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody

    2016-01-06

    This talk will pertain to the filtering of partially observed diffusions, with discrete-time observations. It is assumed that only biased approximations of the diffusion can be obtained, for choice of an accuracy parameter indexed by l. A multilevel estimator is proposed, consisting of a telescopic sum of increment estimators associated to the successive levels. The work associated to O( 2) mean-square error between the multilevel estimator and average with respect to the filtering distribution is shown to scale optimally, for example as O( 2) for optimal rates of convergence of the underlying diffusion approximation. The method is illustrated on some toy examples as well as estimation of interest rate based on real S&P 500 stock price data.

  18. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  19. The Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter: A Filter Bank Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Rickard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For computational efficiency, it is important to utilize model structure in particle filtering. One of the most important cases occurs when there exists a linear Gaussian substructure, which can be efficiently handled by Kalman filters. This is the standard formulation of the Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF. This contribution suggests an alternative formulation of this well-known result that facilitates reuse of standard filtering components and which is also suitable for object-oriented programming. Our RBPF formulation can be seen as a Kalman filter bank with stochastic branching and pruning.

  20. Spatial Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda VELICANU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a brief description of the most important operations that can be performed on spatial data such as spatial queries, create, update, insert, delete operations, conversions, operations on the map or analysis on grid cells. Each operation has a graphical example and some of them have code examples in Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  1. Spatializing Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations.......The article analyses some of artist Søren Lose's photographic installations in which time, history and narration is reflected in the creation of allegoric, spatial relations....

  2. Spatial Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Computation and today’s microprocessors with the approach to operating system architecture, and the controversy between microkernels and monolithic kernels...Both Spatial Computation and microkernels break away a relatively monolithic architecture into in- dividual lightweight pieces, well specialized...for their particular functionality. Spatial Computation removes global signals and control, in the same way microkernels remove the global address

  3. Manipulation Robustness of Collaborative Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Van Roy; Xiang Yan

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative filtering system recommends to users products that similar users like. Collaborative filtering systems influence purchase decisions and hence have become targets of manipulation by unscrupulous vendors. We demonstrate that nearest neighbors algorithms, which are widely used in commercial systems, are highly susceptible to manipulation and introduce new collaborative filtering algorithms that are relatively robust.

  4. Quick-change filter cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  5. Filter Effectiveness Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK), as well as Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) treated with mono-olein to simulate the effects of biodiesel . Results...fuel. Sufficient analysis and qualification of filter products is becoming increasingly crucial in ground transportation vehicles to promote the...well as a simulated biodiesel composed of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and mono-olein. As written in the scope of work, the alternative aviation

  6. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Luyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-17

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This dissertation presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly

  7. Near-ground tornado-like vortex structure resolved by particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [Iowa State University, Aerospace Engineering Department, Ames, IA (United States); University of Minnesota, Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sarkar, Partha P. [Iowa State University, Aerospace Engineering Department, Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    The near-ground flow structure of tornadoes is of utmost interest because it determines how and to what extent civil structures could get damaged in tornado events. We simulated tornado-like vortex flow at the swirl ratios of S = 0.03-0.3 (vane angle {theta}{sub v} = 15 -60 ), using a laboratory tornado simulator and investigated the near-ground-vortex structure by particle imaging velocimetry. Complicated near-ground flow was measured in two orthogonal views: horizontal planes at various elevations (z = 11, 26 and 53 mm above the ground) and the meridian plane. We observed two distinct vortex structures: a single-celled vortex at the lowest swirl ratio (S = 0.03, {theta}{sub v} = 15 ) and multiple suction vortices rotating around the primary vortex (two-celled vortex) at higher swirl ratios (S = 0.1-0.3, {theta}{sub v} = 30 -60 ). We quantified the effects of vortex wandering on the mean flow and found that vortex wandering was important and should be taken into account in the low swirl ratio case. The tangential velocity, as the dominant velocity component, has the peak value about three times that of the maximum radial velocity regardless of the swirl ratio. The maximum velocity variance is about twice at the high swirl ratio ({theta}{sub v} = 45 ) that at the low swirl ratio ({theta}{sub v} = 15 ), which is contributed significantly by the multiple small-scale secondary vortices. Here, the results show that not only the intensified mean flow but greatly enhanced turbulence occurs near the surface in the tornado-like vortex flow. The intensified mean flow and enhanced turbulence at the ground level, correlated with the ground-vortex interaction, may cause dramatic damage of the civil structures in tornadoes. This work provides detailed characterization of the tornado-like vortex structure, which has not been fully revealed in previous field studies and laboratory simulations. It would be helpful in improving the understanding of the interaction between the

  8. An innovative experimental setup for Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Olivieri, Giorgio; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a powerful methodology to nonintrusively monitor surface flows. Its use has been beneficial to the development of rating curves in riverine environments and to map geomorphic features in natural waterways. Typical LSPIV experimental setups rely on the use of mast-mounted cameras for the acquisition of natural stream reaches. Such cameras are installed on stream banks and are angled with respect to the water surface to capture large scale fields of view. Despite its promise and the simplicity of the setup, the practical implementation of LSPIV is affected by several challenges, including the acquisition of ground reference points for image calibration and time-consuming and highly user-assisted procedures to orthorectify images. In this work, we perform LSPIV studies on stream sections in the Aniene and Tiber basins, Italy. To alleviate the limitations of traditional LSPIV implementations, we propose an improved video acquisition setup comprising a telescopic, an inexpensive GoPro Hero 3 video camera, and a system of two lasers. The setup allows for maintaining the camera axis perpendicular to the water surface, thus mitigating uncertainties related to image orthorectification. Further, the mast encases a laser system for remote image calibration, thus allowing for nonintrusively calibrating videos without acquiring ground reference points. We conduct measurements on two different water bodies to outline the performance of the methodology in case of varying flow regimes, illumination conditions, and distribution of surface tracers. Specifically, the Aniene river is characterized by high surface flow velocity, the presence of abundant, homogeneously distributed ripples and water reflections, and a meagre number of buoyant tracers. On the other hand, the Tiber river presents lower surface flows, isolated reflections, and several floating objects. Videos are processed through image-based analyses to correct for lens

  9. Matched-Filter Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Tabatabaei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional infrared thermography techniques, including pulsed and lock-in thermography, have shown great potential for non-destructive evaluation of broad spectrum of materials, spanning from metals to polymers to biological tissues. However, performance of these techniques is often limited due to the diffuse nature of thermal wave fields, resulting in an inherent compromise between inspection depth and depth resolution. Recently, matched-filter thermography has been introduced as a means for overcoming this classic limitation to enable depth-resolved subsurface thermal imaging and improving axial/depth resolution. This paper reviews the basic principles and experimental results of matched-filter thermography: first, mathematical and signal processing concepts related to matched-fileting and pulse compression are discussed. Next, theoretical modeling of thermal-wave responses to matched-filter thermography using two categories of pulse compression techniques (linear frequency modulation and binary phase coding are reviewed. Key experimental results from literature demonstrating the maintenance of axial resolution while inspecting deep into opaque and turbid media are also presented and discussed. Finally, the concept of thermal coherence tomography for deconvolution of thermal responses of axially superposed sources and creation of depth-selective images in a diffusion-wave field is reviewed.

  10. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  11. Further development of microparticle image velocimetry analysis for characterisation of gas streams as a novel method of fuel cell development. Final report; Weiterentwicklung des Mikro-Particle Image Velocimetry Analyseverfahrens zur Charakterisierung von Gasstroemungen als neuartige Entwicklungsmethodik fuer Brennstoffzellen. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The project aimed at a better understanding of the complex fluid-mechanical processes in the small ducts of bipolar plates. So far, an appropriate technology for in-situ measurement was lacking. The project therefore focused on the further development of microparticle image velocimetry in order to enable analyses of the local velocity distribution of a gas stream in a microduct. Further, measurements were carried out in the microducts of a fuel cell in the more difficult conditions of actual operation. (orig./AKB) [German] Anlass des Forschungsvorhabens war die komplizierten stroemungsmechanischen Zusammenhaenge in den kleinen Kanaelen der Bipolarplatten zu verstehen. Bisher stand keine Messtechnik zur Verfuegung, dies es erlaubt, die stroemungsmechanischen Prozesse in den Mikrokanaelen unter Realbedingungen in situ zu vermessen und mit der instantanen Zellleistung zu korrelieren, Ziel des Projektes war es daher, die Methode der Mikro-Partikel-Image-Velocimetry in der Art weiterzuentwickeln, dass eine Analyse der lokalen Geschwindigkeitsverteilung einer Gasstroemung in einem Mikrokanal ermoeglicht wird. Darueber hinaus wird als zweites Ziel des Projekts eine solche Messung unter den erschwerten Bedingungen einer betriebenen Brennstoffzelle in Mikrokanaelen einer Zelle durchgefuehrt.

  12. Rectification of Image Velocity Results (RIVeR): A simple and user-friendly toolbox for large scale water surface Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, Antoine; García, Carlos Marcelo; Rodríguez, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    LSPIV (Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry) and LSPTV (Large Scale Particle Tracking Velocimetry) are used as relatively low-cost and non-intrusive techniques for water-surface velocity analysis and flow discharge measurements in rivers or large-scale hydraulic models. This paper describes a methodology based on state-of-the-art tools (for example, that apply classical PIV/PTV analysis) resulting in large-scale surface-flow characterization according to the first operational version of the RIVeR (Rectification of Image Velocity Results). RIVeR is developed in Matlab and is designed to be user-friendly. RIVeR processes large-scale water-surface characterization such as velocity fields or individual trajectories of floating tracers. This work describes the wide range of application of the techniques for comparing measured surface flows in hydraulic physical models to flow discharge estimates for a wide range of flow events in rivers (for example, low and high flows).

  13. Controlling flow conditions of test filters in iodine filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, R.; Laine, J.

    1979-03-01

    Several different iodine filter and test filter designs and experience gained from their operation are presented. For the flow experiments, an iodine filter system equipped with flow regulating and measuring devices was built. In the experiments the influence of the packing method of the iodine sorption material and the influence of the flow regulating and measuring divices upon the flow conditions in the test filters was studied. On the basis of the experiments it has been shown that the flows through the test filters always can be adjusted to a correct value if there only is a high enough pressure difference available across the test filter ducting. As a result of the research, several different methods are presented with which the flows through the test filters in both operating and future iodine sorption system can easily be measured and adjusted to their correct values. (author)

  14. Full-Volume, Three-Dimensional, Transient Measurements of Bubbly Flows Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Shadow Image Velocimetry Coupled with Pattern Recognition Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassin Hassan

    2001-01-01

    Develop a state-of-the-art non-intrusive diagnostic tool to perform simultaneous measurements of both the temporal and three-dimensional spatial velocity of the two phases of a bubbly flow. These measurements are required to provide a foundation for studying the constitutive closure relations needed in computational fluid dynamics and best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes employed in nuclear reactor safety analysis and severe accident simulation. Such kinds of full-field measurements are not achievable through the commonly used point-measurement techniques, such as hot wire, conductance probe, laser Doppler anemometry, etc. The results can also be used in several other applications, such as the dynamic transport of pollutants in water or studies of the dispersion of hazardous waste

  15. Image restoration by Wiener filtering in the presence of signal-dependent noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Ichioka, Y; Suzuki, T

    1977-09-01

    An optimum filter to restore the degraded image due to blurring and the signal-dependent noise is obtained on the basis of the theory of Wiener filtering. Computer simulations of image restoration using signal-dependent noise models are carried out. It becomes clear that the optimum filter, which makes use of a priori information on the signal-dependent nature of the noise and the spectral density of the signal and the noise showing significant spatial correlation, is potentially advantageous.

  16. Nutrient removal by prairie filter strips in agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Zhou; M.J. Helmers; H. Asbjornsen; R. Kolka; M.D. Tomer; R.M. Cruse

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from agricultural landscapes have been identified as primary sources of excess nutrients in aquatic systems. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of prairie filter strips (PFS) in removing nutrients from cropland runoff in 12 small watersheds in central Iowa. Four treatments with PFS of different spatial...

  17. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Stereo Imaging Velocimetry of Mixing Driven by Buoyancy Induced Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Jacqmin, D.; Bomani, B. M.; Alexander, I. J.; Kassemi, M.; Batur, C.; Tryggvason, B. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixing of two fluids generated by steady and particularly g-jitter acceleration is fundamental towards the understanding of transport phenomena in a microgravity environment. We propose to carry out flight and ground-based experiments to quantify flow fields due to g-jitter type of accelerations using Stereo Imaging Velocimetry (SIV), and measure the concentration field using laser fluorescence. The understanding of the effects of g-jitter on transport phenomena is of great practical interest to the microgravity community and impacts the design of experiments for the Space Shuttle as well as the International Space Station. The aim of our proposed research is to provide quantitative data to the community on the effects of g-jitter on flow fields due to mixing induced by buoyancy forces. The fundamental phenomenon of mixing occurs in a broad range of materials processing encompassing the growth of opto-electronic materials and semiconductors, (by directional freezing and physical vapor transport), to solution and protein crystal growth. In materials processing of these systems, crystal homogeneity, which is affected by the solutal field distribution, is one of the major issues. The understanding of fluid mixing driven by buoyancy forces, besides its importance as a topic in fundamental science, can contribute towards the understanding of how solutal fields behave under various body forces. The body forces of interest are steady acceleration and g-jitter acceleration as in a Space Shuttle environment or the International Space Station. Since control of the body force is important, the flight experiment will be carried out on a tunable microgravity vibration isolation mount, which will permit us to precisely input the desired forcing function to simulate a range of body forces. To that end, we propose to design a flight experiment that can only be carried out under microgravity conditions to fully exploit the effects of various body forces on fluid mixing. Recent

  19. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  20. Selection of unstable patterns and control of optical turbulence by Fourier plane filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report on selection and stabilization of transverse optical patterns in a feedback mirror experiment. Amplitude filtering in the Fourier plane is used to select otherwise unstable spatial patterns. Optical turbulence observed for nonlinearities far above the pattern formation threshold...

  1. Moiré volume Bragg grating filter with tunable bandwidth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhov, Sergiy; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Zeldovich, Boris; Glebov, Leonid

    2014-08-25

    We propose a monolithic large-aperture narrowband optical filter based on a moiré volume Bragg grating formed by two sequentially recorded gratings with slightly different resonant wavelengths. Such recording creates a spatial modulation of refractive index with a slowly varying sinusoidal envelope. By cutting a specimen at a small angle, to a thickness of one-period of this envelope, the longitudinal envelope profile will shift from a sine profile to a cosine profile across the face of the device. The transmission peak of the filter has a tunable bandwidth while remaining at a fixed resonant wavelength by a transversal shift of incidence position. Analytical expressions for the tunable bandwidth of such a filter are calculated and experimental data from a filter operating at 1064 nm with bandwidth range 30-90 pm is demonstrated.

  2. A CLT on the SNR of Diagonally Loaded MVDR Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Francisco; Mestre, Xavier; Hachem, Walid

    2012-08-01

    This paper studies the fluctuations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of minimum variance distorsionless response (MVDR) filters implementing diagonal loading in the estimation of the covariance matrix. Previous results in the signal processing literature are generalized and extended by considering both spatially as well as temporarily correlated samples. Specifically, a central limit theorem (CLT) is established for the fluctuations of the SNR of the diagonally loaded MVDR filter, under both supervised and unsupervised training settings in adaptive filtering applications. Our second-order analysis is based on the Nash-Poincar\\'e inequality and the integration by parts formula for Gaussian functionals, as well as classical tools from statistical asymptotic theory. Numerical evaluations validating the accuracy of the CLT confirm the asymptotic Gaussianity of the fluctuations of the SNR of the MVDR filter.

  3. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry measurements of the flow field on the rear window of a generic car model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tounsi Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric 3-component Velocimetry measurements are carried out in the flow field around the rear window of a generic car model, the so-called Ahmed body. This particular flow field is known to be highly unsteady, three dimensional and characterized by strong vortices. The volumetric velocity measurements from the present experiments provide the most comprehensive data for this flow field to date. The present study focuses on the wake flow modifications which result from using a simple flow control device, such as the one recently employed by Fourrié et al. [1]. The mean data clearly show the structure of this complex flow and confirm the drag reduction mechanism suggested by Fourrié et al. The results show that strengthening the separated flow leads to weakening the longitudinal vortices and vice versa. The present paper shows that the Volumetric 3-component Velocimetry technique is a powerful tool used for a better understanding of a threedimensional unsteady complex flow such that developing around a bluffbody.

  4. Particle image velocimetry measurement of complex flow structures in the diffuser and spherical casing of a reactor coolant pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchao Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of turbulent flow in the reactor coolant pump (RCP is a premise of the optimal design of the RCP. Flow structures in the RCP, in view of the specially devised spherical casing, are more complicated than those associated with conventional pumps. Hitherto, knowledge of the flow characteristics of the RCP has been far from sufficient. Research into the nonintrusive measurement of the internal flow of the RCP has rarely been reported. In the present study, flow measurement using particle image velocimetry is implemented to reveal flow features of the RCP model. Velocity and vorticity distributions in the diffuser and spherical casing are obtained. The results illuminate the complexity of the flows in the RCP. Near the lower end of the discharge nozzle, three-dimensional swirling flows and flow separation are evident. In the diffuser, the imparity of the velocity profile with respect to different axial cross sections is verified, and the velocity increases gradually from the shroud to the hub. In the casing, velocity distribution is nonuniform over the circumferential direction. Vortices shed consistently from the diffuser blade trailing edge. The experimental results lend sound support for the optimal design of the RCP and provide validation of relevant numerical algorithms. Keywords: Diffuser, Flow Structures, Particle Image Velocimetry, Reactor Coolant Pump, Spherical Casing, Velocity Distribution

  5. Aeroacoustic analysis of an airfoil with Gurney flap based on time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueqing; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Pröbsting, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry for the experimental assessment of trailing edge noise sources has become focus of research in recent years. The present study investigates the feasibility of the noise prediction for high-lift devices based on time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). The model under investigation is a NACA 0015 airfoil with a Gurney flap with a height of 6% of the chord length. The velocity fields around and downstream of the Gurney flap were measured by PIV and used to compute the corresponding pressure fields by solving the Poisson equation for incompressible flows. The reconstructed pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface constitute the source term for Curle's aeroacoustic analogy, which was employed in both the distributed and compact formulation to estimate the noise emission from PIV. The results of the two formulations are compared with the simultaneous far-field microphone measurements in the temporal and spectral domains. Both formulations of Curle's analogy yield acoustic sound pressure levels in good agreement with the simultaneous microphone measurements for the tonal component. The estimated far-field sound power spectra (SPL) from the PIV measurements reproduce the peak at the vortex shedding frequency, which also agrees well with the acoustic measurements.

  6. Hybrid micro-/nano-particle image velocimetry for 3D3C multi-scale velocity field measurement in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Young Uk; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2011-01-01

    The conventional two-dimensional (2D) micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique has inherent bias error due to the depth of focus along the optical axis to measure the velocity field near the wall of a microfluidics device. However, the far-field measurement of velocity vectors yields good accuracy for micro-scale flows. Nano-PIV using the evanescent wave of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy can measure near-field velocity vectors within a distance of around 200 nm from the solid surface. A micro-/nano-hybrid PIV system is proposed to measure both near- and far-field velocity vectors simultaneously in microfluidics. A near-field particle image can be obtained by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy using nanoparticles, and the far-field velocity vectors are measured by three-hole defocusing micro-particle tracking velocimetry (micro-PTV) using micro-particles. In order to identify near- and far-field particle images, lasers of different wavelengths are adopted and tested in a straight microchannel for acquiring the three-dimensional three-component velocity field. We found that the new technique gives superior accuracy for the velocity profile near the wall compared to that of conventional nano-PIV. This method has been successfully applied to precisely measure wall shear stress in 2D microscale Poiseulle flows

  7. Experimental Assessment of Flow Fields Associated with Heart Valve Prostheses Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV): Recommendations for Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Sastry, Sudeep; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan

    2018-03-12

    Experimental flow field characterization is a critical component of the assessment of the hemolytic and thrombogenic potential of heart valve substitutes, thus it is important to identify best practices for these experimental techniques. This paper presents a brief review of commonly used flow assessment techniques such as Particle image velocimetry (PIV), Laser doppler velocimetry, and Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging and a comparison of these methodologies. In particular, recommendations for setting up planar PIV experiments such as recommended imaging instrumentation, acquisition and data processing are discussed in the context of heart valve flows. Multiple metrics such as residence time, local velocity and shear stress that have been identified in the literature as being relevant to hemolysis and thrombosis in heart valves are discussed. Additionally, a framework for uncertainty analysis and data reporting for PIV studies of heart valves is presented in this paper. It is anticipated that this paper will provide useful information for heart valve device manufacturers and researchers to assess heart valve flow fields for the potential for hemolysis and thrombosis.

  8. Optimization of in-line phase contrast particle image velocimetry using a laboratory x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, I.; Fouras, A.; Paganin, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase contrast particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a laboratory x-ray microfocus source is investigated using a numerical model. Phase contrast images of 75 μm air bubbles, embedded within water exhibiting steady-state vortical flow, are generated under the paraxial approximation using a tungsten x-ray spectrum at 30 kVp. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast speckle images at a range of source-object and object-detector distances are generated, and used as input into a simulated PIV measurement. The effects of source-size-induced penumbral blurring, together with the finite dynamic range of the detector, are accounted for in the simulation. The PIV measurement procedure involves using the cross-correlation between temporally sequential speckle images to estimate the transverse displacement field for the fluid. The global error in the PIV reconstruction, for the set of simulations that was performed, suggests that geometric magnification is the key parameter for designing a laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast PIV system. For the modeled system, x-ray phase-contrast PIV data measurement can be optimized to obtain low error ( 15 μm) of the detector, high geometric magnification (>2.5) is desired, while for large source size system (FWHM > 30 μm), low magnification (<1.5) would be suggested instead. The methods developed in this paper can be applied to optimizing phase-contrast velocimetry using a variety of laboratory x-ray sources.

  9. Iodine Tagging Velocimetry and Mechanism in the Hypersonic Near Wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates a new molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) method for velocity measurements of high speed flow. It demonstrates offbody Iodine Tagging Velocimetry (ITV) in the hypersonic near wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) model. Experiments are performed in the NASA-Langley 31-inch Mach 10 air wind tunnel. A 0.5% I2 / N2 mixture is seeded on the leeward backshell of the model using a pressure tap. I2 laser-induced fluorescence is excited along a 5.5 mm line using an ArF excimer laser near 193 nm. Results indicate I2 absorbs at least 2 photons to produce iodine ions and electrons. These recombine as the tagged region is displaced downstream to produce I (2P3/2) whose emission is monitored at 206 nm. Results at P0 = 2.41 MPa (350 psi), T0 = 990K, and 10 micro-sec transit times produce velocities from 630-820 m/sec across the I2 seeded jet at a distance of 38.2 mm (25.5 jet diameters) downstream from the jet orifice. Maximum wake jet velocities near the shear layer are 59% of freestream velocity.

  10. Kaon Filtering For CLAS Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNabb, J.

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of data from CLAS is a multi-step process. After the detectors for a given running period have been calibrated, the data is processed in the so called pass-1 cooking. During the pass-1 cooking each event is reconstructed by the program a1c which finds particle tracks and computes momenta from the raw data. The results are then passed on to several data monitoring and filtering utilities. In CLAS software, a filter is a parameterless function which returns an integer indicating whether an event should be kept by that filter or not. There is a main filter program called g1-filter which controls several specific filters and outputs several files, one for each filter. These files may then be analyzed separately, allowing individuals interested in one reaction channel to work from smaller files than using the whole data set would require. There are several constraints on what the filter functions should do. Obviously, the filtered files should be as small as possible, however the filter should also not reject any events that might be used in the later analysis for which the filter was intended

  11. Measuring plate thickness using spatial local wavenumber filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo; Park, Jin Ho; Lee, Jeong Han; Park, Gyu Hae; Jeon, Jun Young

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion on the surface of a structure can generate cracks or cause walls to thin. This can lead to fracturing, which can eventually lead to fatalities and property loss. In an effort to prevent this, laser imaging technology has been used over the last ten years to detect thin-plate structure, or relatively thin piping. The most common laser imaging was used to develop a new technology for inspecting and imaging a desired area in order to scan various structures for thin-plate structure and thin piping. However, this method builds images by measuring waves reflected from defects, and subsequently has a considerable time delay of a few milliseconds at each scanning point. In addition, the complexity of the system is high, due to additional required components, such as laser-focusing parts. This paper proposes a laser imaging method with an increased scanning speed, based on excitation and the measurement of standing waves in structures. The wavenumber of standing waves changes at sections with a geometrical discontinuity, such as thickness. Therefore, it is possible to detect defects in a structure by generating standing waves with a single frequency and scanning the waves at each point by with the laser scanning system. The proposed technique is demonstrated on a wall-thinned plate with a linear thickness variation

  12. Zernike phase spatial filter for measuring the aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana N. Khonina; Victor V. Kotlyar; Dmitriy V. Kirsh

    2015-01-01

    To measure directly the wavefront aberration coefficients, we propose to use the multi8order diffractive element fitted with the set of Zernike polynomials. Polynomials of lowest degree describe defocusing (ametropy) and astigmatism. Coefficients of highest degree correspond to the spherical aberration of oblique rays that occurs as a consequence of misalignment of the crystalline lens and foveola, as well as deflection at the periphery of the crystalline lens. Mul^order elements allow severa...

  13. Geometrical superresolved imaging using nonperiodic spatial masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Amikam; Zalevsky, Zeev; Javidi, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of every imaging system is limited either by the F-number of its optics or by the geometry of its detection array. The geometrical limitation is caused by lack of spatial sampling points as well as by the shape of every sampling pixel that generates spectral low-pass filtering. We present a novel approach to overcome the low-pass filtering that is due to the shape of the sampling pixels. The approach combines special algorithms together with spatial masking placed in the intermediate image plane and eventually allows geometrical superresolved imaging without relation to the actual shape of the pixels.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF ADVANCED FILTER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Newby; G.J. Bruck; M.A. Alvin; T.E. Lippert

    1998-04-30

    Reliable, maintainable and cost effective hot gas particulate filter technology is critical to the successful commercialization of advanced, coal-fired power generation technologies, such as IGCC and PFBC. In pilot plant testing, the operating reliability of hot gas particulate filters have been periodically compromised by process issues, such as process upsets and difficult ash cake behavior (ash bridging and sintering), and by design issues, such as cantilevered filter elements damaged by ash bridging, or excessively close packing of filtering surfaces resulting in unacceptable pressure drop or filtering surface plugging. This test experience has focused the issues and has helped to define advanced hot gas filter design concepts that offer higher reliability. Westinghouse has identified two advanced ceramic barrier filter concepts that are configured to minimize the possibility of ash bridge formation and to be robust against ash bridges should they occur. The ''inverted candle filter system'' uses arrays of thin-walled, ceramic candle-type filter elements with inside-surface filtering, and contains the filter elements in metal enclosures for complete separation from ash bridges. The ''sheet filter system'' uses ceramic, flat plate filter elements supported from vertical pipe-header arrays that provide geometry that avoids the buildup of ash bridges and allows free fall of the back-pulse released filter cake. The Optimization of Advanced Filter Systems program is being conducted to evaluate these two advanced designs and to ultimately demonstrate one of the concepts in pilot scale. In the Base Contract program, the subject of this report, Westinghouse has developed conceptual designs of the two advanced ceramic barrier filter systems to assess their performance, availability and cost potential, and to identify technical issues that may hinder the commercialization of the technologies. A plan for the Option I, bench

  15. Spatial Theography

    OpenAIRE

    van Noppen, Jean Pierre

    1995-01-01

    Descriptive theology («theography») frequently resorts to metaphorical modes of meaning. Among these metaphors, the spatial language of localization and orientation plays an important role to delineate tentative insights into the relationship between the human and the divine. These spatial metaphors are presumably based on the universal human experience of interaction between the body and its environment. It is dangerous, however, to postulate universal agreement on meanings associated with s...

  16. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  17. Adaptive projective filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikusar, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    The new approach to solving of the finding problem is proposed. The method is based on Discrete Projective Transformations (DPT), the List Square Fitting (LSF) and uses the information feedback in tracing for linear or quadratic track segments (TS). The fast and stable with respect to measurement errors and background points recurrent algorithm is suggested. The algorithm realizes the family of digital adaptive projective filters (APF) with known nonlinear weight functions-projective invariants. APF can be used in adequate control systems for collection, processing and compression of data, including tracking problems for the wide class of detectors. 10 refs.; 9 figs

  18. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, Hakon

    2016-06-14

    This work embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the setting of finite dimensional signal evolution and noisy discrete-time observations. The signal dynamics is assumed to be governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE), and a hierarchy of time grids is introduced for multilevel numerical integration of that SDE. The resulting multilevel EnKF is proved to asymptotically outperform EnKF in terms of computational cost versus approximation accuracy. The theoretical results are illustrated numerically.

  19. Interdigital filter design

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, WP

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available to the general inverter-coupled resonator bandpass filter structure in Figure 2 [6] by using the inverter shown in Figure 3. The admittance of the inverter in Figure 3 is 4 J= Y mn sin(βl) (1) where β is the propagation factor and l is the length... of the resonators (a quarter wavelength in this case). While the series quarter-wave line alone can approximate an inverter, the structure shown in Figure 3 is more accurate over wide bandwidths. At this point the circuits in Figures 1 and 2 still differ because...

  20. Multilevel ensemble Kalman filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, Hakon; Law, Kody J. H.; Tempone, Raul

    2016-01-01

    This work embeds a multilevel Monte Carlo sampling strategy into the Monte Carlo step of the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) in the setting of finite dimensional signal evolution and noisy discrete-time observations. The signal dynamics is assumed to be governed by a stochastic differential equation (SDE), and a hierarchy of time grids is introduced for multilevel numerical integration of that SDE. The resulting multilevel EnKF is proved to asymptotically outperform EnKF in terms of computational cost versus approximation accuracy. The theoretical results are illustrated numerically.