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Sample records for spacelab user implementation

  1. Spacelab user implementation assessment study. (Software requirements analysis). Volume 2: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The engineering analyses and evaluation studies conducted for the Software Requirements Analysis are discussed. Included are the development of the study data base, synthesis of implementation approaches for software required by both mandatory onboard computer services and command/control functions, and identification and implementation of software for ground processing activities.

  2. Spacelab Mission Implementation Cost Assessment (SMICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynes, B. V.

    1984-01-01

    A total savings of approximately 20 percent is attainable if: (1) mission management and ground processing schedules are compressed; (2) the equipping, staffing, and operating of the Payload Operations Control Center is revised, and (3) methods of working with experiment developers are changed. The development of a new mission implementation technique, which includes mission definition, experiment development, and mission integration/operations, is examined. The Payload Operations Control Center is to relocate and utilize new computer equipment to produce cost savings. Methods of reducing costs by minimizing the Spacelab and payload processing time during pre- and post-mission operation at KSC are analyzed. The changes required to reduce costs in the analytical integration process are studied. The influence of time, requirements accountability, and risk on costs is discussed. Recommendation for cost reductions developed by the Spacelab Mission Implementation Cost Assessment study are listed.

  3. Spacelab Users Guide: A Short Introduction to Spacelab and Its Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Spacelab is an orbital facility that provides a pressurized, 'shirt-sleeve' laboratory (the module) and an unpressurized platform (the pallet), together with certain standard services. It is a reusable system, which is transported to and from orbit in the cargo bay of the space shuttle orbiter and remains there throughout the flight. Spacelab extends the shuttle capability, and the Orbiter/Spacelab combination can be regarded as a short-stay space station which can remain in orbit for up to 30 days (the nominal mission duration is 7 days). In orbit, the experiments carried by Spacelab are operated by a team of up to four payload specialists who normally work in the laboratory, but spend their off-duty time in the orbiter cabin. The purpose of Spacelab is to provide a ready access to space for a broad spectrum of experimenters in many fields and from many nations. Low-cost techniques are envisaged for experiment development, integration and operation. The aim of this document is to provide a brief summary of Spacelab design characteristics and its use potential for experimenters wishing to take advantage of the unique opportunities offered for space experimentation.

  4. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  5. Spacelab Level 4 Programmatic Implementation Assessment Study. Volume 2: Ground Processing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Alternate ground processing options are summarized, including installation and test requirements for payloads, space processing, combined astronomy, and life sciences. The level 4 integration resource requirements are also reviewed for: personnel, temporary relocation, transportation, ground support equipment, and Spacelab flight hardware.

  6. User Participation in Pilot Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot...... implementation as a method for participatory design. We find that to foster participation and learning about user needs a pilot implementation must create a space for reflecting on use, in addition to the space for using the pilot system. The space for reflection must also exist during the activities preparing...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  7. Scientific management and implementation of the geophysical fluid flow cell for Spacelab missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J.; Toomre, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scientific support for the spherical convection experiment to be flown on Spacelab 3 was developed. This experiment takes advantage of the zero gravity environment of the orbiting space laboratory to conduct fundamental fluid flow studies concerned with thermally driven motions inside a rotating spherical shell with radial gravity. Such a system is a laboratory analog of large scale atmospheric and solar circulations. The radial body force necessary to model gravity correctly is obtained by using dielectric polarization forces in a radially varying electric field to produce radial accelerations proportional to temperature. This experiment will answer fundamental questions concerned with establishing the preferred modes of large scale motion in planetary and stellar atmospheres.

  8. Spacelab 3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1990-01-01

    Spacelab-3 (SL-3) was the first microgravity mission of extended duration involving crew interaction with animal experiments. This interaction involved sharing the Spacelab environmental system, changing animal food, and changing animal waste trays by the crew. Extensive microbial testing was conducted on the animal specimens and crew and on their ground and flight facilities during all phases of the mission to determine the potential for cross contamination. Macroparticulate sampling was attempted but was unsuccessful due to the unforseen particulate contamination occurring during the flight. Particulate debris of varying size (250 micron to several inches) and composition was recovered post flight from the Spacelab floor, end cones, overhead areas, avionics fan filter, cabin fan filters, tunnel adaptor, and from the crew module. These data are discussed along with solutions, which were implemented, for particulate and microbial containment for future flight facilities.

  9. User resistance to information system implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Robert H.; Grimshaw, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Users often resist information system implementations and it has been established that this can cause an implementation to fail. In this paper, the user attitudes that can cause resistance are examined using an established attitude change theory from social and cognitive psychology: the Elaboration......-ranging study are presented that, in addition to supporting this argument, identifies and classifies 19 new heuristics and peripheral influences (in addition to the nine already known) that commonly, and adversely, affect user attitudes and responses to new information system implementations....

  10. A review of Spacelab mission management approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, H. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Spacelab development program is a joint undertaking of the NASA and ESA. The paper addresses the initial concept of Spacelab payload mission management, the lessons learned, and modifications made as a result of the actual implementation of Spacelab Mission 1. The discussion covers mission management responsibilities, program control, science management, payload definition and interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload and launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. After 3.5 years the outlined overall mission manager approach has proven to be most successful. The approach does allow the mission manager to maintain the lowest overall mission cost.

  11. Spacelab Life Sciences-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Jahns, Gary; Meylor, John; Hawes, Nikki; Fast, Tom N.; Zarow, Greg

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an historical overview of the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) mission along with the resultant biomaintenance data and investigators' findings. Only the nonhuman elements, developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) researchers, are addressed herein. The STS-40 flight of SLS-1, in June 1991, was the first spacelab flown after 'return to orbit', it was also the first spacelab mission specifically designated as a Life Sciences Spacelab. The experiments performed provided baseline data for both hardware and rodents used in succeeding missions.

  12. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  13. Development of user guidelines for ECAS display design. Volume 2: Tasks 9 and 10. [educating the public to the benefits of spacelab and the space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathurst, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Lay-oriented speakers aids, articles, a booklet, and a press kit were developed to inform the press and the general public with background information on the space transportation system, Spacelab, and Spacelab 1 experiments. Educational materials relating to solar-terrestrial physics and its potential benefits to mankind were also written. A basic network for distributing audiovisual and printed materials to regional secondary schools and universities was developed. Suggested scripts to be used with visual aids describing materials science and technology and astronomy and solar physics are presented.

  14. Spacelab ready for transport to Washington, DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Spacelab is wrapped and ready for transport to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. Spacelab was designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the Space Shuttle program and first flew on STS-9 in November 1983. Its final flight was the STS-90 Neurolab mission in April 1998. A sister module will travel home and be placed on display in Europe. The Spacelab concept of modular experiment racks in a pressurized shirt-sleeve environment made it highly user-friendly and accessible. Numerous experiments conceived by hundreds of scientists on the ground were conducted by flight crews in orbit. Spacelab modules served as on-orbit homes for everything from squirrel monkeys to plant seeds. They supported astronomical as well as Earth observations, for servicing the Hubble Space Telescope and for research preparatory to the International Space Station. One of the greatest benefits afforded by the Spacelab missions was the opportunity to fly a mission more than once, with the second or third flight building on the experiences and data gathered from its predecessors.

  15. Spacelab Life Sciences Research Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, Frank; Young, Laurence R.; Seddon, Rhea; Ross, Muriel; Baldwin, Kenneth; Frey, Mary Anne; Hughes, Rod

    2000-01-01

    This document describes some of the life sciences research that was conducted on Spacelab missions. Dr. Larry Young, Director of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, provides an overview of the Life Sciences Spacelabs.

  16. Mobile User Objective Systems (MUOS) Reference Implementation Laboratory (MRIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mobile User Objective Systems (MUOS) Reference Implementation Laboratory (MRIL) performs verification and validation testing of various MUOS terminals. MRIL also...

  17. Spacelab shaping space operations planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, F. R.; Reinhold, C.

    1976-01-01

    An up-to-date picture is presented of the organizational structure, the key management personnel, and management relationships of the Spacelab program. Attention is also given to Spacelab's development status and plans for its operations. A number of charts are provided to illustrate the organizational relations. It is pointed out that the parties involved in Spacelab activities must yet resolve questions about ownership of transportation-system elements, payloads, ground support facilities, and data obtained from space missions.

  18. Implementation of enterprise resource planning systems: a user perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, E.; Hilletofth, P.; Mukhtar, U.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three Pakistani companies that recently have implemented a new ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF’s level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users believe that management should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment.

  19. Spacelab Science Results Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  20. Design and implementation of Skype USB user gateway software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang

    2017-08-01

    With the widespread application of VoIP, the client with private protocol becomes more and more popular. Skype is one of the representatives. How to connect Skype with PSTN just by Skype client has gradually become hot. This paper design and implement the software based on a kind of USB User Gateway. With the software Skype user can freely communicate with PSTN phone. FSM is designed as the core of the software, and Skype control is separated by the USB Gateway control. In this way, the communication becomes more flexible and efficient. In the actual user testing, the software obtains good results.

  1. Implementation of a user defined mine blast model in LSDYNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler-Street, M.; Leerdam, P.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A user defined mine blast model has been developed and implemented into the explicit finite element code LS-DYNA to provide a numerically efficient method for simulating an antivehicular mine blast. The objective is to provide a simple and robust numerical method which is able to represent both the

  2. EV Charging Algorithm Implementation with User Price Preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin; Hu, Boyang; Qiu, Charlie; Chu, Peter; Gadh, Rajit

    2015-02-17

    in this paper, we propose and implement a smart Electric Vehicle (EV) charging algorithm to control the EV charging infrastructures according to users’ price preferences. EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), equipped with bidirectional communication devices and smart meters, can be remotely monitored by the proposed charging algorithm applied to EV control center and mobile app. On the server side, ARIMA model is utilized to fit historical charging load data and perform day-ahead prediction. A pricing strategy with energy bidding policy is proposed and implemented to generate a charging price list to be broadcasted to EV users through mobile app. On the user side, EV drivers can submit their price preferences and daily travel schedules to negotiate with Control Center to consume the expected energy and minimize charging cost simultaneously. The proposed algorithm is tested and validated through the experimental implementations in UCLA parking lots.

  3. Enterprise Systems Implementations: Organizational Influence Processes for Corporate User Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Axel; Nordheim, Stig

    2008-01-01

    -depth, interpretive study from the oil industry, where we analyze a case of innovative integration of an ECM system with collaboration technologies. The data collection has been longitudinal. The data analysis has been performed through the perspective of organizational influence processes. The main finding concerns...... an organizational role as corporate user representative to deal with the scale and complexities of implementation. A single person was particularly influential in the role. At the outset a user representative had to perform upward influence processes from a lower formal position. This is impeding...

  4. Implementation of graphical user interfaces in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmsnes, K.A.; Johnsen, T.; Sundling, C.-V.

    1997-01-01

    During recent years a demand has formed for systems that support design and implementation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. Picasso-3 is a user interface management system supporting object oriented definition of GUIs in a distributed computing environment. The system is currently being used in a number of different application areas within the nuclear industry, such as retrofitting of display systems in simulators and control rooms, education and training applications, etc. Some examples are given of nuclear applications where the Picasso-3 system has been used

  5. User apprehensions and expectations in healthcare IS implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt; Ejnefjäll, Thomas

    We report on the initial findings from a qualitative user expectations study of a Patient Data Management System implementation in an Intensive Care Unit in a Swedish hospital. By drawing on grounded theory we take an open focus on the concepts of fears and beliefs and find that specifically...... the users’ stories of their expectations towards the implementation project seem to influence their apprehensions on similar terms as their existing experiences. The main theoretical contribution here is a framework showing that apprehensions are derived from not only past experience but also new...... expectations. We also contribute with the finding that uncertain aspects of users’ existing work practices lead to positively valued expectations. Practically, we argue that users’ certainties toward the IS implementation may actually lead to uncertainty in other areas and propose that further research should...

  6. Autonomous Flight Rules Concept: User Implementation Costs and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, William B.; Hilb, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The costs to implement Autonomous Flight Rules (AFR) were examined for estimates in acquisition, installation, training and operations. The user categories were airlines, fractional operators, general aviation and unmanned aircraft systems. Transition strategies to minimize costs while maximizing operational benefits were also analyzed. The primary cost category was found to be the avionics acquisition. Cost ranges for AFR equipment were given to reflect the uncertainty of the certification level for the equipment and the extent of existing compatible avionics in the aircraft to be modified.

  7. Approach to Spacelab Payload mission management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, H. G.; Lester, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleus of the approach to Spacelab Payload mission management is the establishment of a single point of authority for the entire payload on a given mission. This single point mission manager will serve as a 'broker' between the individual experiments and the STS, negotiating agreements by two-part interaction. The payload mission manager, along with a small support team, will represent the users in negotiating use of STS accommodations. He will provide the support needed by each individual experimenter to meet the scientific, technological, and applications objectives of the mission with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. The investigator will assume complete responsibility for his experiment hardware definition and development and will take an active role in the integration and operation of his experiment.

  8. Spacelab - Ten years of international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignier, M.; Harrington, J. C.; Sander, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of the Spacelab program are reviewed, with a focus on the cooperative relationship between ESA and NASA. The initial decision to undertake the program and the three agreements signed to begin its implementation are examined, and the division of responsibilities and financial contributions is discussed insofar as it affected the management structure. Consideration is given to the major facilities, the 50-mission operational cycle, communications, the currently scheduled activities (through 1985), the prospective later uses, and the ten dedicated discipline laboratories. The importance of continuous mutual support during the planning and development phases is stressed. The program so far is considered a success, in terms of the goals set by the participants and in terms of the resolution of the problems inherent in international technological endeavors.

  9. Discovering the process of user expectating in a pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus Rotvit Perlt

    feedback on their usage experience. The theoretical implications are that researchers should be wary of attempting to assess and measure users expectations in an ISD project using prior prevalent theories on user expectations since they do not fully seem to explain the phenomenon in an ISD context......This Ph.D.-dissertation addresses the call for more research on “how” and “why” users change their expectations in Information Systems Development (ISD). Contrary to many previous studies on user expectations in the IS literature, the study takes an interpretative, qualitative approach to address...... the research question of: "How do users change their expectations in an Information Systems Development (ISD) project?" The findings of the study are that users in the case studied characterised their expectations in different ways and did not define an expectation, as previously assumed, as belonging...

  10. Implementing Recommendations From Web Accessibility Guidelines: A Comparative Study of Nondisabled Users and Users With Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutz, Sven; Sonderegger, Andreas; Sauer, Juergen

    2017-09-01

    The present study examined whether implementing recommendations of Web accessibility guidelines would have different effects on nondisabled users than on users with visual impairments. The predominant approach for making Web sites accessible for users with disabilities is to apply accessibility guidelines. However, it has been hardly examined whether this approach has side effects for nondisabled users. A comparison of the effects on both user groups would contribute to a better understanding of possible advantages and drawbacks of applying accessibility guidelines. Participants from two matched samples, comprising 55 participants with visual impairments and 55 without impairments, took part in a synchronous remote testing of a Web site. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of three Web sites, which differed in the level of accessibility (very low, low, and high) according to recommendations of the well-established Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 (WCAG 2.0). Performance (i.e., task completion rate and task completion time) and a range of subjective variables (i.e., perceived usability, positive affect, negative affect, perceived aesthetics, perceived workload, and user experience) were measured. Higher conformance to Web accessibility guidelines resulted in increased performance and more positive user ratings (e.g., perceived usability or aesthetics) for both user groups. There was no interaction between user group and accessibility level. Higher conformance to WCAG 2.0 may result in benefits for nondisabled users and users with visual impairments alike. Practitioners may use the present findings as a basis for deciding on whether and how to implement accessibility best.

  11. More Life-Science Experiments For Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Dalton, B.; Hogan, R.; Leon, H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments done as part of Spacelab Life Sciences 2 mission (SLS-2). Research planned on cardiovascular, vestibular, metabolic, and thermal responses of animals in weightlessness. Expected to shed light on effects of prolonged weightlessness on humans.

  12. Responsive Graphical User Interface (ReGUI) and its Implementation in MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulszky, Matej; Pocsova, Jana; Mojzisova, Andrea; Podlubny, Igor

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the responsive graphical user interface (ReGUI) approach to creating applications, and demonstrate how this approach can be implemented in MATLAB. The same general technique can be used in other programming languages.

  13. Anything but engaged: user involvement in the context of a national electronic health record implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Cresswell

    2011-07-01

    Conclusions This work has allowed us to further develop an existing model of user engagement from the commercial sector and adapt it to inform user engagement in the context of large-scale eHealth implementations. By identifying key points of possible engagement, disengagement and re-engagement, this model will we hope both help those planning similar large-scale EHR implementation efforts and act as a much needed catalyst to further research in this neglected field of enquiry.

  14. Animal studies on Spacelab-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R.; Callahan, P.; Berry, W.; Funk, G.; Lencki, W.

    1987-01-01

    The flight of two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats on Spacelab-3 was the first mission to provide hands-on maintenance on animals in a laboratory environment. With few exceptions, the animals grew and behaved normally, were free of chronic stress, and differed from ground controls only for gravity dependent parameters. One of the monkeys exhibited symptoms of space sickness similar to those observed in humans, which suggests squirrel monkeys may be good models for studying the space adaptation syndrome. Among the wide variety of parameters measured in the rats, most notable was the dramatic loss of muscle mass and increased fragility of long bones. Other interesting rat findings were those of suppressed interferom production by spleen cells, defective release of growth hormone by somatrophs, possible dissociation of circadian pacemakers, changes in hepatic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypersensitivity of marrow cells to erythropoietin. These results portend a strong role for animals in identifying and elucidating the physiological and anatomical responses of mammals to microgravity.

  15. The Spacelab IPS Star Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Francis C., III

    The cost of doing business in space is very high. If errors occur while in orbit the costs grow and desired scientific data may be corrupted or even lost. The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) Star Simulator is a unique test bed that allows star trackers to interface with simulated stars in a laboratory before going into orbit. This hardware-in-the loop testing of equipment on earth increases the probability of success while in space. The IPS Star Simulator provides three fields of view 2.55 x 2.55 degrees each for input into star trackers. The fields of view are produced on three separate monitors. Each monitor has 4096 x 4096 addressable points and can display 50 stars (pixels) maximum at a given time. The pixel refresh rate is 1000 Hz. The spectral output is approximately 550 nm. The available relative visual magnitude range is 2 to 8 visual magnitudes. The star size is less than 100 arc seconds. The minimum star movement is less than 5 arc seconds and the relative position accuracy is approximately 40 arc seconds. The purpose of this paper is to describe the LPS Star Simulator design and to provide an operational scenario so others may gain from the approach and possible use of the system.

  16. Communication network for decentralized remote tele-science during the Spacelab mission IML-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Uwe; Schulz, Klaus-Juergen; Incollingo, Marco

    1994-01-01

    The ESA communication network for decentralized remote telescience during the Spacelab mission IML-2, called Interconnection Ground Subnetwork (IGS), provided data, voice conferencing, video distribution/conferencing and high rate data services to 5 remote user centers in Europe. The combination of services allowed the experimenters to interact with their experiments as they would normally do from the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at MSFC. In addition, to enhance their science results, they were able to make use of reference facilities and computing resources in their home laboratory, which typically are not available in the POCC. Characteristics of the IML-2 communications implementation were the adaptation to the different user needs based on modular service capabilities of IGS and the cost optimization for the connectivity. This was achieved by using a combination of traditional leased lines, satellite based VSAT connectivity and N-ISDN according to the simulation and mission schedule for each remote site. The central management system of IGS allows minimization of staffing and the involvement of communications personnel at the remote sites. The successful operation of IGS for IML-2 as a precursor network for the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF) has proven the concept for communications to support the operation of the COF decentralized scenario.

  17. A process for selection and training of super-users for ERP implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Peter; Sandfeld Hansen, Kenneth; Helt, Mads

    2017-01-01

    The concept of super-users as a means to facilitate ERP implementation projects has recently taken a foothold in practice, but is still largely overlooked in research. In particular, little is known about the selection and training processes required to successfully develop skilled super-users in......The concept of super-users as a means to facilitate ERP implementation projects has recently taken a foothold in practice, but is still largely overlooked in research. In particular, little is known about the selection and training processes required to successfully develop skilled super...

  18. The first Spacelab payload - A joint NASA/ESA venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R.; Pace, R.; Collet, J.; Sanfourche, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Planning for the 1980 qualification flight of Spacelab, which will involve a long module and one pallet, is discussed. The mission will employ two payload specialists, one sponsored by NASA and the other by ESA. Management of the Spacelab mission functions, including definition and execution of the on-board experiments, development of the experimental hardware and training of the payload specialists, is considered; studies proposed in the areas of atmospheric physics, space plasma physics, solar physics, earth observations, astronomy, astrophysics, life sciences and material sciences are reviewed. Analyses of the Spacelab environment and the Spacelab-to-orbiter and Spacelab-to-experiment interactions are also planned.

  19. User acceptability--a critical success factor for picture archiving and communication system implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivianu-Gaita, D; Babyn, P; Gilday, D; O'Brien, B; Charkot, E

    2000-05-01

    The Department of Diagnostic Imaging at the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC), Toronto, implemented a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) during the last year. This report describes our experience from the point of view of user acceptability. Based on objective data, the following key success factors were identified: user involvement in PACS planning, training, technical support, and rollout of pilot projects. Although technical factors are critical and must be addressed, the main conclusion of our study is that other nontechnical factors need to be recognized and resolved. Recognition of the importance of these factors to user acceptance and clear communication and consultation will help reduce negative user attitudes and increase the chance of a successful PACS implementation.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic prescription: a systematic review of user groups' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Nsangou, Édith-Romy; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Grenier, Sonya; Sicotte, Claude

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review identifying users groups' perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic prescription (e-prescribing) in primary care. We included studies following these criteria: presence of an empirical design, focus on the users' experience of e-prescribing implementation, conducted in primary care, and providing data on barriers and facilitators to e-prescribing implementation. We used the Donabedian logical model of healthcare quality (adapted by Barber et al) to analyze our findings. We found 34 publications (related to 28 individual studies) eligible to be included in this review. These studies identified a total of 594 elements as barriers or facilitators to e-prescribing implementation. Most user groups perceived that e-prescribing was facilitated by design and technical concerns, interoperability, content appropriate for the users, attitude towards e-prescribing, productivity, and available resources. This review highlights the importance of technical and organizational support for the successful implementation of e-prescribing systems. It also shows that the same factor can be seen as a barrier or a facilitator depending on the project's own circumstances. Moreover, a factor can change in nature, from a barrier to a facilitator and vice versa, in the process of e-prescribing implementation. This review summarizes current knowledge on factors related to e-prescribing implementation in primary care that could support decision makers in their design of effective implementation strategies. Finally, future studies should emphasize on the perceptions of other user groups, such as pharmacists, managers, vendors, and patients, who remain neglected in the literature.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of LMS mobile application: scele mobile based on user-centered design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banimahendra, R. D.; Santoso, H. B.

    2018-03-01

    The development of mobile technology is now increasing rapidly, demanding all activities including learning should be done on mobile devices. It shows that the implementation of mobile application as a learning medium needs to be done. This study describes the process of developing and evaluating the Moodle-based mobile Learning Management System (LMS) application called Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCeLE). This study discusses the process of defining features, implementing features into the application, and evaluating the application. We define the features using user research and literature study, then we implement the application with user-centered design basis, at the last phase we evaluated the application using usability testing and system usability score (SUS). The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which this application can help the users doing their tasks and provide recommendation for the next research and development.

  2. Developing a Framework and Implementing User-Driven Innovation in Supply and Value Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Alexia; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Wandahl, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This paper serves to create a framework for and, subsequently, implementing user-driven innovation in a construction material industry network. The research has its outset in Project InnoDoors that consists of a Danish university and a construction material network. The framework and the implemen......This paper serves to create a framework for and, subsequently, implementing user-driven innovation in a construction material industry network. The research has its outset in Project InnoDoors that consists of a Danish university and a construction material network. The framework...

  3. User Participation in Pilot Implementation: Porters and Nurses Coordinating Patient Transports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør Martinsdóttir á; Hertzum, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Pilot implementations provide users with real-work experiences of how a system will affect their daily work before the design of the system is finalized. On the basis of a pilot implementation of a system for coordinating the transport of patients by hospital porters, we investigate pilot impleme...... the use of the pilot system because the porters and nurses learned about their needs throughout the pilot implementation, not just during use. Finally, we discuss how the scope and duration of a pilot implementation influence the conditions for participation....

  4. Anything but engaged: user involvement in the context of a national electronic health record implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Morrison, Zoe; Crowe, Sarah; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    The absence of meaningful end user engagement has repeatedly been highlighted as a key factor contributing to 'failed' implementations of electronic health records (EHRs), but achieving this is particularly challenging in the context of national scale initiatives. In 2002, the National Health Service (NHS) embarked on a so-called 'top-down' national implementation strategy aimed at introducing commercial, centrally procured, EHRs into hospitals throughout England. We aimed to examine approaches to, and experiences of, user engagement in the context of a large-scale EHR implementation across purposefully selected hospital care providers implementing early versions of nationally procured software. We conducted a qualitative, case-study based, socio-technically informed, longitudinal investigation, purposefully sampling and collecting data from four hospitals. Our data comprised a total of 123 semi-structured interviews with users and managers, 15 interviews with additional stakeholders, 43 hours of non-participant observations of meetings and system use, and relevant organisation-specific documents from each case study site. Analysis was thematic, building on an existing model of user engagement that was originally developed in the context of studying the implementation of relatively simple technologies in commercial settings. NVivo8 software was used to facilitate coding. Despite an enduring commitment to the vision of shared EHRs and an appreciation of their potential benefits, meaningful end user engagement was never achieved. Hospital staff were not consulted in systems choice, leading to frustration; they were then further alienated by the implementation of systems that they perceived as inadequately customised. Various efforts to achieve local engagement were attempted, but these were in effect risk mitigation strategies. We found the role of clinical champions to be important in these engagement efforts, but progress was hampered by the hierarchical structures

  5. Models of user involvement in the mental health context: intentions and implementation challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Marianne; Edwards, Adrian

    2013-09-01

    Patient-centered care, shared decision-making, patient participation and the recovery model are models of care which incorporate user involvement and patients' perspectives on their treatment and care. The aims of this paper are to examine these different care models and their association with user involvement in the mental health context and discuss some of the challenges associated with their implementation. The sources used are health policy documents and published literature and research on patient-centered care, shared decision-making, patient participation and recovery. The policy documents advocate that mental health services should be oriented towards patients' or users' needs, participation and involvement. These policies also emphasize recovery and integration of people with mental disorders in the community. However, these collaborative care models have generally been subject to limited empirical research about effectiveness. There are also challenges to implementation of the models in inpatient care. What evidence there is indicates tensions between patients' and providers' perspectives on treatment and care. There are issues related to risk and the person's capacity for user involvement, and concerns about what role patients themselves wish to play in decision-making. Lack of competence and awareness among providers are further issues. Further work on training, evaluation and implementation is needed to ensure that inpatient mental health services are adapting user oriented care models at all levels of services.

  6. Understanding national culture effects on user behavior in integrative IS implementations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnse Locker, Niels; Vos, Janita F.J.; Boonstra, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how national culture manifests itself in integrative IS implementations and how it influences user behavior. Adopting a case survey approach, a sample of 70 cases encompassing 18 countries/regions, 18 industries and over 25 different integrative IT systems resulted in 481

  7. Spacelab-3 (STS-51B) Onboard Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Spacelab-3 mission was to conduct materials science experiments in a stable low-gravity environment. In addition, the crew performed research in life sciences, fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, and astronomy. Spacelab-3 was equipped with several new minilabs, special facilities that would be used repeatedly on future flights. Two elaborate crystal growth furnaces, a life support and housing facility for small animals, and two types of apparatus for the study of fluids were evaluated on their inaugural flight. In this photograph, astronaut Don Lind observes the mercuric iodide growth experiment through a microscope at the vapor crystal growth furnace. The goals of this investigation were to grow near-perfect single crystals of mercuric iodide and to gain improved understanding of crystal growth by a vapor process. Mercuric iodide crystals have practical use as sensitive x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and in portable detector devices for nuclear power plant monitoring, natural resource prospecting, biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, and in astronomical instruments. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, Spacelab-3 (STS-51B) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Challenger on April 29, 1985.

  8. User's perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing quality colonoscopy services in Canada: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Gilles; Gagnon, Marie Pierre; Candas, Bernard; Dubé, Catherine; Ben Abdeljelil, Anis; Grenier, Sonya

    2010-11-02

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents a serious and growing health problem in Canada. Colonoscopy is used for screening and diagnosis of symptomatic or high CRC risk individuals. Although a number of countries are now implementing quality colonoscopy services, knowledge synthesis of barriers and facilitators perceived by healthcare professionals and patients during implementation has not been carried out. In addition, the perspectives of various stakeholders towards the implementation of quality colonoscopy services and the need of an efficient organisation of such services have been reported in the literature but have not been synthesised yet. The present study aims to produce a comprehensive synthesis of actual knowledge on the barriers and facilitators perceived by all stakeholders to the implementation of quality colonoscopy services in Canada. First, we will conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and other published documentation on the barriers and facilitators to implementing quality colonoscopy services. Standardised literature searches and data extraction methods will be used. The quality of the studies and their relevance to informing decisions on colonoscopy services implementation will be assessed. For each group of users identified, barriers and facilitators will be categorised and compiled using narrative synthesis and meta-analytical techniques. The principle factors identified for each group of users will then be validated for its applicability to various Canadian contexts using the Delphi study method. Following this study, a set of strategies will be identified to inform decision makers involved in the implementation of quality colonoscopy services across Canadian jurisdictions. This study will be the first to systematically summarise the barriers and facilitators to implementation of quality colonoscopy services perceived by different groups and to consider the local contexts in order to ensure the applicability of this

  9. What makes end-user training successful? : a mixed method study of a business process management system implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benny de Waal; Ronald Batenburg

    2012-01-01

    Under what conditions is end-user training (EUT) as part of the implementation of a business process management (BPM) system successful? This question is addressed in this paper. Based on the literature on EUT and implementation success, we first argue that user involvement with, and attitude

  10. What makes end-user training successful? A mixed method study of a business process management system implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, B.M.E. de; Batenburg, R.

    2012-01-01

    Under what conditions is end-user training (EUT) as part of the implementation of a business process management (BPM) system successful? This question is addressed in this paper. Based on the literature on EUT and implementation success, we first argue that user involvement with, and attitude

  11. A framework for implementation of user-centric identity management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Joseph K.; Olesen, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Users increasingly become part of electronic transactions, which take place instantaneously without direct user involvement. This leads to the risk of data manipulation, identity theft and privacy violation, and it has become a major concern for individuals and businesses around the world. Gov......-ernments in many countries are implementing identity man-agement systems (IdMS) to curtail these incidences and to offer citizens the power to exercise informational self-determination. Using concepts from technology adoption and fit-viability theo-ries as well as the laws of identity, this paper analyzes...... the crite-ria for successful implementation and defines a framework for a citizen-centric national IdMS. Results from a survey con-ducted in Ghana are also included....

  12. Exploring the Nature and Implementation Process of User-Centric Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hienerth, Christoph; Keinz, Peter; Lettl, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Recent ICT advances have allowed companies to interact with external stakeholders, especially users, in more efficient and effective ways, with the result that more and more companies are striving to take advantage of these new opportunities and harness their users’ creative potential by integrat......Recent ICT advances have allowed companies to interact with external stakeholders, especially users, in more efficient and effective ways, with the result that more and more companies are striving to take advantage of these new opportunities and harness their users’ creative potential...... by integrating them into core business processes. Successful companies like Threadless or Dell - which were designed to allow user innovation and co-creation from the outset - have clearly demonstrated the potential value of such approaches. However, introducing user-centric value creation processes...... at established companies is a complex task, requiring major adaptations to traditional manufacturer-centered business models. At present, little is known about how such companies can successfully implement user-centric business models: this article explores (1) the success factors for attracting and engaging...

  13. Spacelab life sciences 2 post mission report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckey, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Jay C. Buckey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas served as an alternate payload specialist astronaut for the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Space Shuttle Mission from January 1992 through December 1993. This report summarizes his opinions on the mission and offers suggestions in the areas of selection, training, simulations, baseline data collection and mission operations. The report recognizes the contributions of the commander, payload commander and mission management team to the success of the mission. Dr. Buckey's main accomplishments during the mission are listed.

  14. Holography on the Spacelab 3 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robert B.; Kroes, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab 3's Fluid Experiment System, in which triglycine sulfate crystals were produced by a low temperature solution-growth technique, employs holography as its primary data-gathering system. This use of holography allows optical techniques which would be difficult to apply in orbit to be used after the holographic data is returned to ground laboratories, using an analysis of the reconstructed holographic image. The system used allows both single- and double-exposure holograms to be obtained in two separate orthogonal configurations.

  15. Implementing a user-driven online quality improvement toolkit for cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; York, Laura S; Bowman, Candice; Gale, Randall C; Smith, Nina; Asch, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    Peer-to-peer collaboration within integrated health systems requires a mechanism for sharing quality improvement lessons. The Veterans Health Administration (VA) developed online compendia of tools linked to specific cancer quality indicators. We evaluated awareness and use of the toolkits, variation across facilities, impact of social marketing, and factors influencing toolkit use. A diffusion of innovations conceptual framework guided the collection of user activity data from the Toolkit Series SharePoint site and an online survey of potential Lung Cancer Care Toolkit users. The VA Toolkit Series site had 5,088 unique visitors in its first 22 months; 5% of users accounted for 40% of page views. Social marketing communications were correlated with site usage. Of survey respondents (n = 355), 54% had visited the site, of whom 24% downloaded at least one tool. Respondents' awareness of the lung cancer quality performance of their facility, and facility participation in quality improvement collaboratives, were positively associated with Toolkit Series site use. Facility-level lung cancer tool implementation varied widely across tool types. The VA Toolkit Series achieved widespread use and a high degree of user engagement, although use varied widely across facilities. The most active users were aware of and active in cancer care quality improvement. Toolkit use seemed to be reinforced by other quality improvement activities. A combination of user-driven tool creation and centralized toolkit development seemed to be effective for leveraging health information technology to spread disease-specific quality improvement tools within an integrated health care system. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Operation management system evaluation in the central Finland health care district - end users' view of system implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetty, Kaisa; Häyrinen, Eija

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the implementation of the operation management system in the Central Finland Health Care District. The implementation of the operation management system changed the practice of operation management for the surgical clinic and concerned 500 personnel in total. A survey was carried out to investigate the end users' views on the system's usefulness, usability and the training and user support provided. The users' possibilities to accomplish their tasks and the kind of obstacles they face in operation management were explored. The assessment revealed that more end support is needed after the system implementation, even though a generally positive attitude towards the system was manifested among the staff.

  17. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-05

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Development of Point Kernel Shielding Analysis Computer Program Implementing Recent Nuclear Data and Graphic User Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Ho; Lee, Seung Gi; Chung, Chan Young; Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Jai Ki

    2001-01-01

    In order to comply with revised national regulationson radiological protection and to implement recent nuclear data and dose conversion factors, KOPEC developed a new point kernel gamma and beta ray shielding analysis computer program. This new code, named VisualShield, adopted mass attenuation coefficient and buildup factors from recent ANSI/ANS standards and flux-to-dose conversion factors from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 74 for estimation of effective/equivalent dose recommended in ICRP 60. VisualShield utilizes graphical user interfaces and 3-D visualization of the geometric configuration for preparing input data sets and analyzing results, which leads users to error free processing with visual effects. Code validation and data analysis were performed by comparing the results of various calculations to the data outputs of previous programs such as MCNP 4B, ISOSHLD-II, QAD-CGGP, etc

  19. Spacelab Life Science-1 Mission Onboard Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Spacelab Life Science -1 (SLS-1) was the first Spacelab mission dedicated solely to life sciences. The main purpose of the SLS-1 mission was to study the mechanisms, magnitudes, and time courses of certain physiological changes that occur during space flight, to investigate the consequences of the body's adaptation to microgravity and readjustment to Earth's gravity, and bring the benefits back home to Earth. The mission was designed to explore the responses of the heart, lungs, blood vessels, kidneys, and hormone-secreting glands to microgravity and related body fluid shifts; examine the causes of space motion sickness; and study changes in the muscles, bones, and cells. This photograph shows astronaut Rhea Seddon conducting an inflight study of the Cardiovascular Deconditioning experiment by breathing into the cardiovascular rebreathing unit. This experiment focused on the deconditioning of the heart and lungs and changes in cardiopulmonary function that occur upon return to Earth. By using noninvasive techniques of prolonged expiration and rebreathing, investigators can determine the amount of blood pumped out of the heart (cardiac output), the ease with which blood flows through all the vessels (total peripheral resistance), oxygen used and carbon dioxide released by the body, and lung function and volume changes. SLS-1 was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (STS-40) on June 5, 1995.

  20. Effectiveness of Using a Change Management Approach to Convey the Benefits of an Information Security Implementation to Technology Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeannine B.

    2012-01-01

    This study addressed the problems associated with users' understanding, accepting, and complying with requirements of security-oriented solutions. The goal of the research was not to dispute existing theory on IT project implementations, but rather to further the knowledge on the topic of technology user acceptance of security-oriented IT…

  1. Effectiveness of Agile Implementation Methods in Business Intelligence Projects from an End-user Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Misiak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The global Business Intelligence (BI market grew by 10% in 2013 according to the Gartner Report. Today organizations require better use of data and analytics to support their business decisions. Internet power and business trend changes have provided a broad term for data analytics – Big Data. To be able to handle it and leverage a value of having access to Big Data, organizations have no other choice than to get proper systems implemented and working. However traditional methods are not efficient for changing business needs. The long time between project start and go-live causes a gap between initial solution blueprint and actual user requirements in the end of the project. This article presents the latest market trends in BI systems implementation by comparing Agile with traditional methods. It presents a case study provided in a large telecommunications company (20K employees and the results of a pilot research provided in the three large companies: telecommunications, digital, and insurance. Both studies prove that Agile methods might be more effective in BI projects from an end-user perspective and give first results and added value in a much shorter time compared to a traditional approach.

  2. Spacelab experiment computer study. Volume 1: Executive summary (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L.; Hodges, B. C.; Christy, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative cost for various Spacelab flight hardware configurations is provided along with varied software development options. A cost analysis of Spacelab computer hardware and software is presented. The cost study is discussed based on utilization of a central experiment computer with optional auxillary equipment. Groundrules and assumptions used in deriving the costing methods for all options in the Spacelab experiment study are presented. The groundrules and assumptions, are analysed and the options along with their cost considerations, are discussed. It is concluded that Spacelab program cost for software development and maintenance is independent of experimental hardware and software options, that distributed standard computer concept simplifies software integration without a significant increase in cost, and that decisions on flight computer hardware configurations should not be made until payload selection for a given mission and a detailed analysis of the mission requirements are completed.

  3. Spacelab operations planning. [ground handling, launch, flight and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA planning in the fields of ground, launch and flight operations and experiment integration to effectively operate Spacelab. Payload mission planning is discussed taking consideration of orbital analysis and the mission of a multiuser payload which may be either single or multidiscipline. Payload analytical integration - as active process of analyses to ensure that the experiment payload is compatible to the mission objectives and profile ground and flight operations and that the resource demands upon Spacelab can be satisfied - is considered. Software integration is touched upon and the major integration levels in ground operational processing of Spacelab and its experimental payloads are examined. Flight operations, encompassing the operation of the Space Transportation System and the payload, are discussed as are the initial Spacelab missions. Charts and diagrams are presented illustrating the various planning areas.

  4. Protection Spacelab from Meteoroid and Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shigui; Yan, Jun; Han, Zengyao

    2013-08-01

    As the first long-term on-orbit spacelab of China, TianGong-1 will stay aloft for 2 years. Its failure risk subjected to Meteoroid and Orbital Debris(M/OD) is hundreds of times higher than the risk of Shenzhou-5, Shenzhou-6 or Shenzhou-7, so the special M/OD protection designs have been applied. In order to reduce the penetration risk of radiator tube, the design of radiator has been modified by placing the tube at the side of radiator plate, and the new design does not affect the thermal control system without adding the mass. Secondly, Whipple structure is adopted in the two sides and front of spacecraft against M/OD impact.

  5. Evaluation of biological models using Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollinger, D.; Williams, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Biological models of hypogravity effects are described, including the cardiovascular-fluid shift, musculoskeletal, embryological and space sickness models. These models predict such effects as loss of extracellular fluid and electrolytes, decrease in red blood cell mass, and the loss of muscle and bone mass in weight-bearing portions of the body. Experimentation in Spacelab by the use of implanted electromagnetic flow probes, by fertilizing frog eggs in hypogravity and fixing the eggs at various stages of early development and by assessing the role of the vestibulocular reflex arc in space sickness is suggested. It is concluded that the use of small animals eliminates the uncertainties caused by corrective or preventive measures employed with human subjects.

  6. Comparison of user groups' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic health records: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leduc Yvan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic health record (EHR implementation is currently underway in Canada, as in many other countries. These ambitious projects involve many stakeholders with unique perceptions of the implementation process. EHR users have an important role to play as they must integrate the EHR system into their work environments and use it in their everyday activities. Users hold valuable, first-hand knowledge of what can limit or contribute to the success of EHR implementation projects. A comprehensive synthesis of EHR users' perceptions is key to successful future implementation. This systematic literature review was aimed to synthesize current knowledge of the barriers and facilitators influencing shared EHR implementation among its various users. Methods Covering a period from 1999 to 2009, a literature search was conducted on nine electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on users' perceived barriers and facilitators to shared EHR implementation, in healthcare settings comparable to Canada. Studies in all languages with an empirical study design were included. Quality and relevance of the studies were assessed. Four EHR user groups were targeted: physicians, other health care professionals, managers, and patients/public. Content analysis was performed independently by two authors using a validated extraction grid with pre-established categorization of barriers and facilitators for each group of EHR users. Results Of a total of 5,695 potentially relevant publications identified, 117 full text publications were obtained after screening titles and abstracts. After review of the full articles, 60 publications, corresponding to 52 studies, met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent adoption factors common to all user groups were design and technical concerns, ease of use, interoperability, privacy and security, costs, productivity, familiarity and ability with EHR, motivation to use EHR, patient and health

  7. A user needs assessment to inform health information exchange design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Martinez, Diego A; Garcia-Arce, Andres; Taylor, Stephanie; Mateja, Candice; Fabri, Peter J; Zayas-Castro, Jose L

    2015-10-12

    Important barriers for widespread use of health information exchange (HIE) are usability and interface issues. However, most HIEs are implemented without performing a needs assessment with the end users, healthcare providers. We performed a user needs assessment for the process of obtaining clinical information from other health care organizations about a hospitalized patient and identified the types of information most valued for medical decision-making. Quantitative and qualitative analysis were used to evaluate the process to obtain and use outside clinical information (OI) using semi-structured interviews (16 internists), direct observation (750 h), and operational data from the electronic medical records (30,461 hospitalizations) of an internal medicine department in a public, teaching hospital in Tampa, Florida. 13.7 % of hospitalizations generate at least one request for OI. On average, the process comprised 13 steps, 6 decisions points, and 4 different participants. Physicians estimate that the average time to receive OI is 18 h. Physicians perceived that OI received is not useful 33-66 % of the time because information received is irrelevant or not timely. Technical barriers to OI use included poor accessibility and ineffective information visualization. Common problems with the process were receiving extraneous notes and the need to re-request the information. Drivers for OI use were to trend lab or imaging abnormalities, understand medical history of critically ill or hospital-to-hospital transferred patients, and assess previous echocardiograms and bacterial cultures. About 85 % of the physicians believe HIE would have a positive effect on improving healthcare delivery. Although hospitalists are challenged by a complex process to obtain OI, they recognize the value of specific information for enhancing medical decision-making. HIE systems are likely to have increased utilization and effectiveness if specific patient-level clinical information is

  8. Implementation of a graphical user interface for the virtual multifrequency spectrometer: The VMS-Draw tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Daniele; Baiardi, Alberto; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Egidi, Franco; Latouche, Camille; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-02-15

    This article presents the setup and implementation of a graphical user interface (VMS-Draw) for a virtual multifrequency spectrometer. Special attention is paid to ease of use, generality and robustness for a panel of spectroscopic techniques and quantum mechanical approaches. Depending on the kind of data to be analyzed, VMS-Draw produces different types of graphical representations, including two-dimensional or three-dimesional (3D) plots, bar charts, or heat maps. Among other integrated features, one may quote the convolution of stick spectra to obtain realistic line-shapes. It is also possible to analyze and visualize, together with the structure, the molecular orbitals and/or the vibrational motions of molecular systems thanks to 3D interactive tools. On these grounds, VMS-Draw could represent a useful additional tool for spectroscopic studies integrating measurements and computer simulations. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Pilot implementation and user preferences of a Bariatric After-care application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    the feature with regards to the ability to re-schedule their appointments. The vast majority also found the additional resources to be helpful. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the potential use of smartphone innovations in Bariatric After-care self-management. The current study has shown that users are generally receptive towards such an innovative implementation and has also highlighted some of their preferences with regards to such a self-management application for self-management of their health condition post bariatric surgery. In addition, the authors have also managed to demonstrate how clinicians could be involved in the formulation of a bariatric care application, which has an evidence base.

  10. The Use of Balanced Scorecard in Implementation of the User-Driven Innovation Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena KRAWCZYK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Customers play a crucial role in innovation processes. Their importance is proved by numerous theories and innovation models which put users and clients in the heart of innovation processes. One of the newest concept, popular in Scandinavian countries, picking up this thread is the User–Driven Innovation (UDI. To increase probability of innovation success consumers must be involved in the firm’s business model / innovation strategy, becoming a part of the innovation processes and all other stakeholders should be aware of the significance and character of the linkage between customer and company. As a result, building, implementing and monitoring of the customer–oriented innovation strategy should take place. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC may turn out to be very helpful in achieving the above. The aim of this paper is to show that BSC may be a device of implementing the User–Driven Innovation concept, helping to understand UDI assumptions and the role of customers in creating value. Examples of strategic goals and performance indicators presented in this paper may be used by enterprises, which intend to build UDI-based BSC.

  11. Implementation of patient charges at primary care facilities in Kenya: implications of low adherence to user fee policy for users and facility revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opwora, Antony; Waweru, Evelyn; Toda, Mitsuru; Noor, Abdisalan; Edwards, Tansy; Fegan, Greg; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    With user fees now seen as a major hindrance to universal health coverage, many countries have introduced fee reduction or elimination policies, but there is growing evidence that adherence to reduced fees is often highly imperfect. In 2004, Kenya adopted a reduced and uniform user fee policy providing fee exemptions to many groups. We present data on user fee implementation, revenue and expenditure from a nationally representative survey of Kenyan primary health facilities. Data were collected from 248 randomly selected public health centres and dispensaries in 2010, comprising an interview with the health worker in charge, exit interviews with curative outpatients, and a financial record review. Adherence to user fee policy was assessed for eight tracer conditions based on health worker reports, and patients were asked about actual amounts paid. No facilities adhered fully to the user fee policy across all eight tracers, with adherence ranging from 62.2% for an adult with tuberculosis to 4.2% for an adult with malaria. Three quarters of exit interviewees had paid some fees, with a median payment of US dollars (USD) 0.39, and a quarter of interviewees were required to purchase additional medical supplies at a later stage from a private drug retailer. No consistent pattern of association was identified between facility characteristics and policy adherence. User fee revenues accounted for almost all facility cash income, with average revenue of USD 683 per facility per year. Fee revenue was mainly used to cover support staff, non-drug supplies and travel allowances. Adherence to user fee policy was very low, leading to concerns about the impact on access and the financial burden on households. However, the potential to ensure adherence was constrained by the facilities' need for revenue to cover basic operating costs, highlighting the need for alternative funding strategies for peripheral health facilities. Published by Oxford University Press in association with

  12. Data Management for Flexible Access - Implementation and Lessons Learned from work with Multiple User Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, K. K.; Scott, S.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    There is no shortage of community-specific and generic data discovery and download platforms and protocols (e.g. CUAHSI HIS, DataONE, GeoNetwork Open Source, GeoPortal, OGC CSW, OAI PMH), documentation standards (e.g. FGDC, ISO 19115, EML, Dublin Core), data access and visualization standards and models (e.g. OGC WxS, OpenDAP), and general-purpose web service models (i.e. REST & SOAP) upon which Geo-informatics cyberinfrastructure (CI) may be built. When attempting to develop a robust platform that may service a wide variety of users and use cases the challenge is one of identifying which existing platform (if any) may support those current needs while also allowing for future expansion for additional capabilities. In the case of the implementation of a data storage, discovery and delivery platform to support the multiple projects at the Earth Data Analysis Center at UNM, no single platform or protocol met the joint requirements of two initial applications (the New Mexico Resource Geographic Information System [http://rgis.unm.edu] and the New Mexico EPSCoR Data Portal [http://nmepscor.org/dataportal]) and furthermore none met anticipated additional requirements as new applications of the platform emerged. As a result of this assessment three years ago EDAC embarked on the development of the Geographic Storage, Transformation, and Retrieval Engine (GSToRE) platform as a general purpose platform upon which n-tiered geospatially enabled data intensive applications could be built. When initially released in 2010 the focus was on the publication of dynamically generated Open Geospatial Consortium services based upon a PostgreSQL/PostGIS backend database. The identification of additional service interface requirements (implementation of the DataONE API and CUAHSI WaterML services), use cases provided by the NM EPSCoR education working group, and expanded metadata publication needs have led to a significant update to the underlying data management tier for GSToRE - the

  13. Tiangong-1, the First Manned Spacelab of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coue, P.

    This paper presents an overview of Tiangong-1, the first Chinese space station officially dubbed Spacelab by Beijing authorities. Tiangong programme also demonstrates the actual progress level of China in the field of manned space activities. This new spacecraft will allow China to practice many tasks, to help prepare for the next step: the permanently occupied space station. Open sources have been only used to write this paper. For example, Chinese media revealed numerous information describing the Spacelab during the first docking operation between Tiangong-1 and Shenzhou-8. All aspects of this programme will be listed comprising the old stories and the new one: major technical characteristics, accommodation, mission, future prospects, etc.

  14. The astronomy spacelab payloads study: executive volume. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The progress of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is reported. Astronomical research in space, using the Spacelab in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, is described. The various fields of solar astronomy or solar physics, ultraviolet and optical astronomy, and high energy astrophysics are among the topics discussed. These fields include scientific studies of the Sun and its dynamical processes, of the stars in wavelength regions not accessible to ground based observations, and the exciting new fields of X-ray, gamma ray, and particle astronomy

  15. Integrating care for frequent users of emergency departments: implementation evaluation of a brief multi-organizational intensive case management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Deborah; Leszcz, Molyn; O'Campo, Patricia; Hwang, Stephen W; Wasylenki, Donald A; Kurdyak, Paul; Wise Harris, Deborah; Gozdzik, Agnes; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2016-04-27

    Addressing the needs of frequent users of emergency departments (EDs) is a health system priority in many jurisdictions. This study describes stakeholder perspectives on the implementation of a multi-organizational brief intervention designed to support integration and continuity of care for frequent ED users with mental health and addictions problems, focusing on perceived barriers and facilitators to early implementation in a large urban centre. Coordinating Access to Care from Hospital Emergency Departments (CATCH-ED) is a brief case management intervention bridging hospital, primary and community care for frequent ED users experiencing mental illness and addictions. To examine barriers and facilitators to early implementation of this multi-organizational intervention, between July and October 2012, 47 stakeholders, including direct service providers, managers and administrators participated in 32 semi-structured qualitative interviews and one focus group exploring their experience with the intervention and factors that helped or hindered successful early implementation. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders valued the intervention and its potential to support continuity of care for this population. Service delivery system factors, including organizational capacity and a history of collaborative relationships across the healthcare continuum, and support system factors, such as training and supervision, emerged as key facilitators of program implementation. Operational challenges included early low program referral rates, management of a multi-organizational initiative, variable adherence to the model among participating organizations, and scant access to specialty psychiatric resources. Factors contributing to these challenges included lack of dedicated staff in the ED and limited local system capacity to support this population, and insufficient training and technical assistance available to participating organizations. A multi

  16. THE USE OF MARKETING INDICATORS TO MEASURE AND MONITOR THE EFFECTS OF IMPLEMENTING THE CONCEPT OF USER-DRIVEN INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Krawczyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of users as a source of information for company innovation activity was raised in the 1980s by von Hippel. Today, a concept of a similar basis is known and developed in Europe under the name of User-Driven Innovation (UDI. The UDI is based on the belief that enterprises which are able to create, often in close cooperation with customers, products and services with features desired by users will survive in the market. In order to achieve the above, companies are trying to identify the hidden, often unconscious, needs of users, in order to try to meet these needs (UDI - Consumer Voice or implement ready-made innovative solutions attributed to consumers (UDI - Consumer Leadership (Warzybok, et al., 2008; NORDEN, 2006. Due to the growing significance of users as a source of information for innovation activities it is important to find measures which could assess the impact of this source on company innovativeness (Krawczyk, 2013b. The aim of this paper is to show that marketing indicators focused on measuring the relationship with customers can be used to measure the effects of implementation of UDI in innovative companies.

  17. Lessons learned from the design and implementation of distributed post-WIMP user interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Seifried, Thomas; Jetter, Hans-Christian; Haller, Michael; Reiterer, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Creating novel user interfaces that are “natural” and distributed is challenging for designers and developers. “Natural” interaction techniques are barely standardized and in combination with distributed UIs additional technical difficulties arise. In this paper we present the lessons we have learned in developing several natural and distributed user interfaces and propose design patterns to support development of such applications.

  18. Proposal for Implementing Multi-User Database (MUD) Technology in an Academic Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filby, A. M. Iliana

    1996-01-01

    Explores the use of MOO (multi-user object oriented) virtual environments in academic libraries to enhance reference services. Highlights include the development of multi-user database (MUD) technology from gaming to non-recreational settings; programming issues; collaborative MOOs; MOOs as distinguished from other types of virtual reality; audio…

  19. A coded mask telescope for the Spacelab 2 mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmore, A.P.; Skinner, G.K.; Eyles, C.J.; Ramsey, B.

    1984-01-01

    A dual coded mask telescope for the Spacelab 2 mission is now in the final stages of preparation at Birmingham University. It is due for launch in late 1984/early 1985 and will be by far the largest and most sophisticated such instrument to be flown in this time-frame. The design and capabilities of the telescope will be described. (orig.)

  20. International aerospace engineering: NASA shuttle and European Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilstein, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASA negotiations and contractual arrangements involving European space research organizations' participation in manned space operations and efforts in building Spacelab for the U.S. Reusable Space Shuttle are discussed. Some of the diplomatic and technical collaboration involved in the international effort is reviewed.

  1. NASIS data base management system: IBM 360 TSS implementation. Volume 8: Data base administrator user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Data Base Administrator User's Guide for the NASA Aerospace Safety Information System is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) multi-terminal tasking, (2) data base executive, (3) utilities, (4) maintenance, (5) terminal support, and (6) retrieval subsystem.

  2. Implementation of the chemicals regulation REACH : Exploring the impact on occupational health and safety management among Swedish downstream users

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Linda; Antonsson, Ann-Beth

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have examined how the European chemicals regulation Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) has influenced occupational risk management of chemicals at Swedish downstream user companies. The data were collected through interviews with occupational health and safety professionals, safety representatives and authority employees. The results show that most of the informants had scarce knowledge about REACH and that REACH implementation...

  3. Alteration and Implementation of the CP/M-86 Operating System for a Multi-User Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    THE CP/M-86 OPERATING SYSTEM FOR A MULTI-USER ENVIRONMENT by Thomas V. Almquist and David S. Stevens C-, December 1982 ,LU Thesis Advisor : U. R. Kodres...tool$ 044, robo O0eA 6^900091 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Alteration and Implementation of the CP/M-86 Operating System for a...SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 1982 Authors: Approved by: ..... .. . . . . . . . . Thesis Advisor Second

  4. End User and Implementer Experiences of mHealth Technologies for Noncommunicable Chronic Disease Management in Young Adults: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Helen; Campbell, Jared M; Stinson, Jennifer N; Burley, Megan M; Briggs, Andrew M

    2017-12-12

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as asthma, diabetes, cancer, and persistent musculoskeletal pain impose an escalating and unsustainable burden on young people, their families, and society. Exploring how mobile health (mHealth) technologies can support management for young people with NCDs is imperative. The aim of this study was to identify, appraise, and synthesize available qualitative evidence on users' experiences of mHealth technologies for NCD management in young people. We explored the perspectives of both end users (young people) and implementers (health policy makers, clinicians, and researchers). A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. Eligibility criteria included full reports published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2007 to December 2016, searched across databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, and PsycINFO. All qualitative studies that evaluated the use of mHealth technologies to support young people (in the age range of 15-24 years) in managing their chronic NCDs were considered. Two independent reviewers identified eligible reports and conducted critical appraisal (based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument: JBI-QARI). Three reviewers independently, then collaboratively, synthesized and interpreted data through an inductive and iterative process to derive emergent themes across the included data. External validity checking was undertaken by an expert clinical researcher and for relevant content, a health policy expert. Themes were subsequently subjected to a meta-synthesis, with findings compared and contrasted between user groups and policy and practice recommendations derived. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Among studies of end users (N=7), mHealth technologies supported the management of young people with diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Implementer studies (N=5) covered the management of cognitive and communicative disabilities, asthma

  5. Incorporating the user perspective into a proposed model for assessing success of SHS implementations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Holtorf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern energy can contribute to development in multiple ways while approximately 20% of world's populations do not yet have access to electricity. Solar Home Systems (SHSs consists of a PV module, a charge controller and a battery supply in the range of 100 Wh/d in Sunbelt countries. The question addressed in this paper is how SHS users approach success of their systems and how these user's views can be integrated in to an existing model of success. Information was obtained on the user's approach to their SHSs by participatory observation, interviews with users and by self-observation undertaken by the lead author while residing under SHS electricity supply conditions. It was found that success of SHSs from the users' point of view is related to the ability of these systems to reduce the burdens of supplying energy services to homesteads. SHSs can alleviate some energy supply burdens, and they can improve living conditions by enabling communication on multiple levels and by addressing convenience and safety concerns. However, SHSs do not contribute to the energy services which are indispensable for survival, nor to the thermal energy services required and desired in dwellings of Sunbelt countries. The elements of three of the four components of our previously proposed model of success have been verified and found to be appropriate, namely the user's self-set goals, their importance and SHSs' success factors. The locally appropriate, and scientifically satisfactory, measurement of the level of achievement of self-set goals, the fourth component of our model of success, remains an interesting area for future research.

  6. Designing for multi-user interaction in the home environment : Implementing social translucence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, K.; Broekhuijsen, M.J.; van Essen, H.A.; Eggen, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces of interactive systems for domestic use are usually designed for individual interactions although these interactions influence multiple users. In order to prevent conflicts and unforeseen influences on others we propose to leverage the human ability to take each other into consideration

  7. Supporting User Involvement in Child Welfare Work: A Way of Implementing Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Karin; Hyvönen, Ulf; Karlsson, Per-Åke; Larsson, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The article describes and analyses some preliminary working methods for user involvement in child welfare. The models are based on the results of a national project in Sweden where children and young people have been involved as informants. How experiences and viewpoints from children and young people can be a source of knowledge in child welfare…

  8. User experience with a health insurance coverage and benefit-package access: implications for policy implementation towards expansion in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shafiu; Aji, Budi; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Souares, Aurelia; Dong, Hengjin; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Developing countries are devising strategies and mechanisms to expand coverage and benefit-package access for their citizens through national health insurance schemes (NHIS). In Nigeria, the scheme aims to provide affordable healthcare services to insured-persons and their dependants. However, inclusion of dependants is restricted to four biological children and a spouse per user. This study assesses the progress of implementation of the NHIS in Nigeria, relating to coverage and benefit-package access, and examines individual factors associated with the implementation, according to users' perspectives. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was done between October 2010 and March 2011 in Kaduna state and 796 users were randomly interviewed. Questions regarding coverage of immediate-family members and access to benefit-package for treatment were analysed. Indicators of coverage and benefit-package access were each further aggregated and assessed by unit-weighted composite. The additive-ordinary least square regression model was used to identify user factors that may influence coverage and benefit-package access. With respect to coverage, immediate-dependants were included for 62.3% of the users, and 49.6 rated this inclusion 'good' (49.6%). In contrast, 60.2% supported the abolishment of the policy restriction for non-inclusion of enrolees' additional children and spouses. With respect to benefit-package access, 82.7% of users had received full treatments, and 77.6% of them rated this as 'good'. Also, 14.4% of users had been refused treatments because they could not afford them. The coverage of immediate-dependants was associated with age, sex, educational status, children and enrolment duration. The benefit-package access was associated with types of providers, marital status and duration of enrolment. This study revealed that coverage of family members was relatively poor, while benefit-package access was more adequate. Non-inclusion of family members could

  9. Implementation of internet training on posture reform of computer users in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keykhaie, Zohreh; Zareban, Iraj; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz; Hormozi, Maryam; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Masoudi, Gholamreza; Rahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-12-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are of common problems among computer (PC) users. Training of posture reform plays a significant role in the prevention of the emergence, progression and complications of these diseases. The present research was performed to study the effect of the Internet training on the posture reform of the Internet users working in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan in 2014. This study was a quasi-experimental intervention with control group and conducted in two Iranian universities including Sistan and Baluchestan University and Islamic Azad University of Zahedan. The study was done on 160 PC users in the two groups of intervention (80 people) and control (80 people). Training PowerPoint was sent to the intervention group through the Internet and a post test was given to them after 45 days. Statistical software of SPSS 19 and statistical tests of Kolmogrov, t-test, Fisher Exact test, and correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. After the training, the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, performance and self-efficacy in the intervention group were 24.21 ± 1.34, 38.36 ± 2.89, 7.59 ± 1.16, and 45.06 ± 4.11, respectively (P Internet had a significant impact on the posture reform of the PC users. According to the findings observed, there was a significant relationship between the scores of self-efficacy-performance after training. Therefore, based on the findings of the study, it is suggested that Internet training to increase self-efficacy approach in the successive periods can be effective to reform the postures of PC users.

  10. Dedicated data recording video system for Spacelab experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shoji; Fujiwara, Shinji; Onozuka, Kuniharu

    1984-04-01

    A feasibility study of video tape recorder (VTR) modification to add the capability of data recording etc. was conducted. This system is an on-broad system to support Spacelab experiments as a dedicated video system and a dedicated data recording system to operate independently of the normal operation of the Orbiter, Spacelab and the other experiments. It continuously records the video image signals with the acquired data, status and operator's voice at the same time on one cassette video tape. Such things, the crews' actions, animals' behavior, microscopic views and melting materials in furnace, etc. are recorded. So, it is expected that experimenters can make a very easy and convenient analysis of the synchronized video, voice and data signals in their post flight analysis.

  11. Space platforms - A cost effective evolution of Spacelab operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The capabilities added to the Shuttle/Spacelab configuration by the addition of the Power Extension Package (PEP), the Power System (PS), and the Science and Applications Space Platforms (SASP) are reviewed with an emphasis on SASP. SASP are intended for placement in orbit by the Shuttle to test new instruments and systems, for clustering of instrumentation, and for servicing, refurbishment, repair, or augmentation by the Shuttle. The PEP permits extended stays in orbit (30 days), and the PS is an orbital solar array and energy storage system acting as a free flying spacecraft. The Shuttle can deliver payloads to the PS or attach to it for extension of the Spacelab operations. Applications of SASP for long term space-based biological experiments are outlined, and the fact that SASP do not increase the required Shuttle in-orbit time is stressed.

  12. Low power CAMAC and NIM modular systems for spaceflight use on Shuttle and Spacelab missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainor, J.H.; Kaminski, T.J.; Ehrmann, C.H.

    1977-02-01

    The advent of the Shuttle launch vehicle and Spacelab have resulted in adequate weight and volume such that experiment electronics can be implemented at relatively low cost using spaceflight versions of CAMAC and NIM modules. Studies of 10 modules by manufacturers have shown that power reduction overall by a factor of approximately 3 can be accomplished. This is adequate both from the point of view of consumption and temperature rise in vacuum. Our studies have shown that a stock of approximately 45 module types is required and a listing is given. The changes required in these modules in order to produce spaceflight versions are described. And finally, the further studies, prototyping and testing leading to eventual flight qualification are described.

  13. Quick Link Selection Method by Using Pricing Strategy Based on User Equilibrium for Implementing an Effective Urban Travel Demand Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Afandizadeh Zargari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-stage model of optimization as a quick method to choose the best potential links for implementing urban travel demand management (UTDM strategy like road pricing. The model is optimized by minimizing the hidden cost of congestion based on user equilibrium (MHCCUE. It forecasts the exact amount of flows and tolls for links in user equilibrium condition to determine the hidden cost for each link to optimize the link selection based on the network congestion priority. The results show that not only the amount of total cost is decreased, but also the number of selected links for pricing is reduced as compared with the previous toll minimization methods. Moreover, as this model just uses the traffic assignment data for calculation, it could be considered as a quick and optimum solution for choosing the potential links.

  14. Design and Implementation of User-Created Information Systems with Mobile RFID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kwoen; Chin, Sungho; Kim, Hee Cheon; Chung, Kwang Sik

    RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) has been usually applied at physical distribution field. The Mobile RFID can be the only technology that we can lead the market. In our country, ETRI standardizes MOBION (MOBile Identification ON), and the mobile-telecommunication companies provide the trial-mobile RFID service from 2006. In the trial-mobile RFID services, the Broker model is used to decode the mobile RFID code. However, the Broker model has some problems, such as communication overhead caused by the frequent ODS query, service performance, and various services for users. In this paper, we developed device application that is capable for filtering unrelated code from RFID service to improve the decoding performance. We also improve the performance through simplifying connection process between device application and the broker. Finally, we propose and develop the user-created information system to widely distribute the Mobile RFID service.

  15. Implementation of Hierarchical Task Analysis for User Interface Design in Drawing Application for Early Childhood Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kania Sabariah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Draw learning in early childhood is an important lesson and full of stimulation of the process of growth and development of children which could help to train the fine motor skills. We have had a lot of applications that can be used to perform learning, including interactive learning applications. Referring to the observations that have been conducted showed that the experiences given by the applications that exist today are very diverse and have not been able to represent the model of learning and characteristics of early childhood (4-6 years. Based on the results, Hierarchical Task Analysis method generated a list of tasks that must be done in designing an user interface that represents the user experience in draw learning. Then by using the Heuristic Evaluation method the usability of the model has fulfilled a very good level of understanding and also it can be enhanced and produce a better model.

  16. Ubiquitous User Localization in LBS - The Need for Implementing Ethical Thinking in Our Research Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retscher, Guenther; Obex, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Location-based Services (LBS) influence nowadays every individual's life due to the emerging market penetration of smartphones and other mobile devices. For smartphone Apps localization technologies are developed ranging from GNSS beyond to other alternative ubiquitous positioning methods as well as the use of the in-built inertial sensors, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometer, barometer, etc. Moreover, signals-of-opportunity which are not intended for positioning at the first sight but are receivable in many environments such as in buildings and public spaces are more and more utilized for positioning and navigation. The use of Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) is a typical example. These technologies, however, have become very powerful tools as the enable to track an individual or even a group of users. Most technical researchers imply that it is mainly about further enhancing technologies and algorithms including the development of new advanced Apps to improve personal navigation and to deliver location oriented information just in time to a single LBS user or group of users. The authors claim that there is a need that ethical and political issues have to be addressed within our research community from the very beginning. Although there is a lot of research going on in developing algorithms to keep ones data and LBS search request in private, researchers can no longer keep their credibility without cooperating with ethical experts or an ethical committee. In a study called InKoPoMoVer (Cooperative Positioning for Real-time User Assistance and Guidance at Multi-modal Public Transit Junctions) a cooperation with social scientists was initiated for the first time at the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, in this context. The major aims of this study in relation to ethical questions are addressed in this paper.

  17. User Interface on the World Wide Web: How to Implement a Multi-Level Program Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Jonathan W.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) research project was to write a user interface that utilizes current World Wide Web (WWW) technologies for an existing computer program written in C, entitled LaRCRisk. The project entailed researching data presentation and script execution on the WWW and than writing input/output procedures for the database management portion of LaRCRisk.

  18. Systems engineering perspective on eHealth implementations: case study of users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanta, GB

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The expected outputs and outcomes for healthcare services delivery were not realized by the implemented eHealth systems in South Africa. This paper investigates the impact of system engineering management (SEM) practices on the efficiency...

  19. INFLUENCE OF THE IMPLEMENTATION FACTORS IN THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS QUALITY FOR THE USER SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel de la Garza Ramos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the influence range of the organizational, planning and technical factors within the information quality, system quality and information systems services quality, in the user satisfaction, based on the designed model research for this purpose. The empirical study takes place in six Higher Education Institutes (94 questionnaires by the Partial Least Square statistic tool. The results has shown that Organizational Factor (information needs, management support, institutional objectives satisfaction is which has the most impact because its high correlation value (R=0.624; R=0.435 yR=0.428 and significance (p<0.001, p<0.01 and p<0.01 in the three raised hypotheses, taking into consideration an explained variance of 78.8% in the User Satisfaction. In the same way, with the quality in general, the users think that the information systems help to satisfy their information needs and increase their productivity into making decisions in their jobs.

  20. The prevalence of mental health problems among users of NHS stop smoking services: effects of implementing a routine screening procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratschen Elena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco dependence among people with mental health problems is an issue that deserves attention both from a clinical and from a public health perspective. Research suggests that Stop Smoking Services often fail to ask clients about underlying mental health problems and thus fail to put in place the treatment adaptations and liaison procedures often required to meet the needs of clients with a mental health condition who want to stop smoking. This study assesses the recording of mental health problems in a large NHS stop smoking service in England and examines the effect of implementing a short screening procedure on recording mental health conditions. Methods Treatment records from the Stop Smoking Service covering a period of 13 months were audited. The prevalence of reported mental health problems in the six month period before the implementation of the mental health screening procedure was compared with that of the six month period following implementation. The screening procedure was only implemented in the support services directly provided by the Stop Smoking Service. Comparisons were also made with third-party sections of the service where no such screening procedure was introduced. Results The prevalence of reported mental health problems among a total of n = 4999 clients rose from less than 1% before implementation of the screening procedure to nearly 12% in the period following implementation, with the change being statistically significant. No significant rise was observed over the same period in the sections of the service where no screening procedure was implemented. Conclusions The absence of standard procedures to record mental health problems among service users in many stop smoking services is currently likely to prevent the detection of co morbidity. Implementing a simple screening procedure appears suitable to increase the routine recording of mental health problems in a stop smoking service, which is an

  1. Design features of selected mechanisms developed for use in Spacelab. [mechanical ground support equipment and environmental control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inden, W.

    1979-01-01

    Selected mechanisms developed for the Spacelab program are discussed. These include: (1) the roller rail used to install/remove the Spacelab floor loaded with racks carrying experiments; (2) the foot restraint; and (3) the lithium hydroxide used for decontamination.

  2. User-driven Cloud Implementation of environmental models and data for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, R. J.; Percy, B. J.; Elkhatib, Y.; Blair, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental data and models come from disparate sources over a variety of geographical and temporal scales with different resolutions and data standards, often including terabytes of data and model simulations. Unfortunately, these data and models tend to remain solely within the custody of the private and public organisations which create the data, and the scientists who build models and generate results. Although many models and datasets are theoretically available to others, the lack of ease of access tends to keep them out of reach of many. We have developed an intuitive web-based tool that utilises environmental models and datasets located in a cloud to produce results that are appropriate to the user. Storyboards showing the interfaces and visualisations have been created for each of several exemplars. A library of virtual machine images has been prepared to serve these exemplars. Each virtual machine image has been tailored to run computer models appropriate to the end user. Two approaches have been used; first as RESTful web services conforming to the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Processing Service (WPS) interface standard using the Python-based PyWPS; second, a MySQL database interrogated using PHP code. In all cases, the web client sends the server an HTTP GET request to execute the process with a number of parameter values and, once execution terminates, an XML or JSON response is sent back and parsed at the client side to extract the results. All web services are stateless, i.e. application state is not maintained by the server, reducing its operational overheads and simplifying infrastructure management tasks such as load balancing and failure recovery. A hybrid cloud solution has been used with models and data sited on both private and public clouds. The storyboards have been transformed into intuitive web interfaces at the client side using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, utilising plug-ins such as jQuery and Flot (for graphics), and Google Maps

  3. Understanding the End User Perspective: A Multiple-Case Study of Successful Health Information Technology Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, Bardia

    2010-01-01

    The United States continues to lag behind other countries in its adoption of health information technology. A failure to increase adoption will jeopardize the nation's ability to reduce medical errors, address the rapid growth of healthcare costs, and enact effective healthcare reform. Health information technology (HIT) implementation success…

  4. The TESSA OER Experience: Building Sustainable Models of Production and User Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Freda

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a review of the origins, design strategy and implementation plans of the Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa (TESSA) research and development programme. The programme is working to develop new models of teacher education, particularly school based training, including the creation of a programme webspace and an extensive bank…

  5. The implementation of computerized cognitive behavioural therapies in a service user-led, third sector self help clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Kate; Seccombe, Nick; Lidbetter, Nicky

    2011-07-01

    The efficacy and effectiveness of a computerized cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) package, Beating the Blues, has been demonstrated in a large randomized controlled trial and several pragmatic studies in the National Health Service (NHS). The current study tests the generalizability of this finding to the implementation of CCBT in a service user-led, third sector Self Help Clinic. 510 referrals for the Beating the Blues program were received over a 16 month period in routine care. The Patient Health Questionnaire Depression (PHQ-9) and Anxiety (GAD-7) Scales were administered pre-treatment and during each treatment session. The 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), Work and Social Adjustment Scale and Patient Experience Questionnaire were also administered pre-treatment and immediately on completing treatment. More than two-thirds of referrals were suitable for treatment and completed a baseline assessment; 84% of these started the Beating the Blues program. Two-hundred and twenty-six people meeting caseness criteria at baseline completed at least two sessions of CCBT. Of these, 50% met recovery criteria at their final point of measurement. Completer and intention-to-treat analysis also demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvements on key outcome measures. CCBT can be effectively implemented in a service user-led, third sector Self Help Clinic, increasing access to psychological therapies to meet local needs for tier two interventions for depression and anxiety.

  6. Implementation of a panel of service users for the evaluation of mental health outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Michel; Renaud, Jeff; Bourassa, Francine; Beauchesne, Louise; Mpiana, André; Bernier, Sylvain; Milton, Diana

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the experience of a standing panel of psychiatric outpatients over a period of five years. The procedure is used as a complementary method to assess client satisfaction regarding services provided by a Montreal psychiatric institute. During this period, 13 meetings were held, involving a total of 22 patients as active members of the panel. These sessions allowed 11 decision makers of the institute to consult the panel regarding various topics such as service organization, quality of services, and client information. In a context of internal evaluation, by giving direct and rapid access to service users' perspectives on key issues regarding service provision, the panel appeared to be a practical procedure for use in complement with other satisfaction assessment methods. Unplanned effects included the recruitment of participants as patient representatives on different hospital committees and associations, and as presenters in conferences and congresses.

  7. Implementing a bar-code assisted medication administration system: effects on the dispensing process and user perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, N R; Cheung, S T D; Cheng, K; Lai, K; Chui, W C M; Cheung, B M Y

    2014-06-01

    We assessed the effects of a bar-code assisted medication administration system used without the support of computerised prescribing (stand-alone BCMA), on the dispensing process and its users. The stand-alone BCMA system was implemented in one ward of a teaching hospital. The number of dispensing steps, dispensing time and potential dispensing errors (PDEs) were directly observed one month before and eight months after the intervention. Attitudes of pharmacy and nursing staff were assessed using a questionnaire (Likert scale) and interviews. Among 1291 and 471 drug items observed before and after the introduction of the technology respectively, the number of dispensing steps increased from five to eight and time (standard deviation) to dispense one drug item by one staff personnel increased from 0.8 (0.09) to 1.5 (0.12) min. Among 2828 and 471 drug items observed before and after the intervention respectively, the number of PDEs increased significantly (Psystem offered less benefit to the dispensing process (9/16). Nursing staff perceived the system as useful in improving the accuracy of drug administration (7/10). Implementing a stand-alone BCMA system may slow down and complicate the dispensing process. Nursing staff believe the stand-alone BCMA system could improve the drug administration process but pharmacy staff believes the technology would be more helpful if supported by computerised prescribing. However, periodical assessments are needed to identify weaknesses in the process after implementation, and all users should be educated on the benefits of using this technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veer, Anke J E; Fleuren, Margot A H; Bekkema, Nienke; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-10-27

    A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of determinants influencing the success of the introduction of new technologies as perceived by nursing staff. The study population is a nationally representative research sample of nursing staff (further referred to as the Nursing Staff Panel), of whom 685 (67%) completed a survey questionnaire about their experiences with recently introduced technologies. Participants were working in Dutch hospitals, psychiatric organizations, care organizations for mentally disabled people, home care organizations, nursing homes or homes for the elderly. Half of the respondents were confronted with the introduction of a new technology in the last three years. Only half of these rated the introduction of the technology as positive.The factors most frequently mentioned as impeding actual use were related to the (kind of) technology itself, such as malfunctioning, ease of use, relevance for patients, and risks to patients. Furthermore nursing staff stress the importance of an adequate innovation strategy. A prerequisite for the successful introduction of new technologies is to analyse determinants that may impede or enhance the introduction among potential users. For technological innovations special attention has to be paid to the (perceived) characteristics of the technology itself.

  9. Software complex AS (automation of spectrometry). User interface of experiment automation system implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astakhova, N.V.; Beskrovnyj, A.I.; Bogdzel', A.A.; Butorin, P.E.; Vasilovskij, S.G.; Gundorin, N.A.; Zlokazov, V.B.; Kutuzov, S.A.; Salamatin, I.M.; Shvetsov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental software complex for automation of spectrometry (AS) that enables prompt realization of experiment automation systems for spectrometers, which use data buferisation, has been developed. In the development new methods of programming and building of automation systems together with novel net technologies were employed. It is suggested that programs to schedule and conduct experiments should be based on the parametric model of the spectrometer, the approach that will make it possible to write programs suitable for any FLNP (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics) spectrometer and experimental technique applied and use different hardware interfaces for introducing the spectrometric data into the data acquisition system. The article describes the possibilities provided to the user in the field of scheduling and control of the experiment, data viewing, and control of the spectrometer parameters. The possibility of presenting the current spectrometer state, programs and the experimental data in the Internet in the form of dynamically formed protocols and graphs, as well as of the experiment control via the Internet is realized. To use the means of the Internet on the side of the client, applied programs are not needed. It suffices to know how to use the two programs to carry out experiments in the automated mode. The package is designed for experiments in condensed matter and nuclear physics and is ready for using. (author)

  10. European X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry payload for Spacelab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, R D; Whitcomb, G [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Brinkman, A C [Space Research Laboratory, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Beuermann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik; Culhane, J L [University Coll., London (UK). Mullard Space Science Lab.; Griffiths, R [Leicester Univ. (UK); Manno, V [ESA Headquarters, Paris, France; Rocchia, R [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1976-08-01

    A group of instruments for X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry studies of a number of cosmic X-ray sources is being designed for possible use on Spacelab. Large area Bragg spectrometers and polarimeters for photon energies above 2 keV are described. For the energy range below 2 keV, both dispersive and non-dispersive spectrometers are employed at the common focus of a nested array of paraboloids. Following a brief outline of the scientific background to the mission, the properties of the individual instruments are discussed.

  11. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  12. Preliminary results of the Spacelab 2 superfluid helium experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, P.V.; Collins, D.J.; Elleman, D.D.; Jackson, H.W.; Wang, T.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the properties of superfluid helium in a microgravity environment flew on the Shuttle on the Spacelab 2 mission in July and August of 1985. This paper summarizes the flight experiment and describes some preliminary results. The experiment comprised an investigation of long-wavelength third-sound waves in micron-thick films, a study of the motions of superfluid helium under milli-g and micro-g accelerations, and measurements of the fluctuations in temperature associated with the small motions of the bulk helium. An additional objective was to qualify and characterize a reflyable, space-compatible cryostat

  13. TU-C-201-01: Clinical Implementation of HDR: A New User’s Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hallaq, H. [The University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  14. Abstract ID: 103 GAMOS: Implementation of a graphical user interface for dosimetry calculation in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalaoui Slimani, Faical Alaoui; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2018-01-01

    There are several computer programs or combination of programs for radiation tracking and other information in tissues by using Monte Carlo simulation [1]. Among these are GEANT4 [2] programs provided as classes that can be incorporated in C++ codes to achieve different tasks in radiation interactions with matter. GEANT4 made the physics easier but requires often a long learning-curve that implies a good knowledge of C++ and the Geant4 architecture. GAMOS [3], the Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations, facilitates the use of Geant4 by providing a script language that covers almost all the needs of a radiotherapy simulation but it is obviously out of reach of biological researchers. The aim of the present work was to report the design and development of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) for absorbed dose calculation and for particle tracking in humans, small animals and phantoms. The GUI is based on the open source GEANT4 for the physics of particle interactions, on the QT cross-platform application for combining programming commands and for display. The calculation of the absorbed dose can be performed based on 3D CT images in DICOM format, from images of phantoms or from solid volumes that can be made from any pure or composite material to be specified by its molecular formulas. The GUI has several menus relative to the emitting source which can have different shapes, positions, energy as mono- or poly-energy such as X-ray spectra; the types of particles and particle interactions; energy deposition and absorbed dose; and the output results as histograms. In conclusion, the GUI we developed can be easily used by any researcher without the need to be familiar with computer programming, and it will be freely proposed as an open source. Copyright © 2017.

  15. Direct facility funding as a response to user fee reduction: implementation and perceived impact among Kenyan health centres and dispensaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy; Goodman, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    There is increasing pressure for reduction of user fees, but this can have adverse effects by decreasing facility-level funds. To address this, direct facility funding (DFF) was piloted in Coast Province, Kenya, with health facility committees (HFCs) responsible for managing the funds. We evaluated the implementation and perceived impact 2.5 years after DFF introduction. Quantitative data collection at 30 public health centres and dispensaries included a structured interview with the in-charge, record reviews and exit interviews. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with the in-charge and HFC members at 12 facilities, and with district staff and other stakeholders. DFF procedures were well established: HFCs met regularly and accounting procedures were broadly followed. DFF made an important contribution to facility cash income, accounting for 47% in health centres and 62% in dispensaries. The main items of expenditure were wages for support staff (32%), travel (21%), and construction and maintenance (18%). DFF was perceived to have a highly positive impact through funding support staff such as cleaners and patient attendants, outreach activities, renovations, patient referrals and increasing HFC activity. This was perceived to have improved health worker motivation, utilization and quality of care. A number of problems were identified. HFC training was reportedly inadequate, and no DFF documentation was available at facility level, leading to confusion. Charging user fees above those specified in the national policy remained common, and understanding of DFF among the broader community was very limited. Finally, relationships between HFCs and health workers were sometimes characterized by mistrust and resentment. Relatively small increases in funding may significantly affect facility performance when the funds are managed at the periphery. Kenya plans to scale up DFF nationwide. Our findings indicate this is warranted, but should include improved training

  16. User fee exemptions and excessive household spending for normal delivery in Burkina Faso: the need for careful implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameur Amal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Parliament of Burkina Faso passed a policy to reduce the direct costs of obstetric services and neonatal care in the country’s health centres, aiming to lower the country’s high national maternal mortality and morbidity rates. Implementation was via a “partial exemption” covering 80% of the costs. In 2008 the German NGO HELP launched a pilot project in two health districts to eliminate the remaining 20% of user fees. Regardless of any exemptions, women giving birth in Burkina Faso’s health centres face additional expenses that often represent an additional barrier to accessing health services. We compared the total cost of giving birth in health centres offering partial exemption versus those with full exemption to assess the impact on additional out-of-pocket fees. Methods A case–control study was performed to compare medical expenses. Case subjects were women who gave birth in 12 health centres located in the Dori and Sebba districts, where HELP provided full fee exemption for obstetric services and neonatal care. Controls were from six health centres in the neighbouring Djibo district where a partial fee exemption was in place. A random sample of approximately 50 women per health centre was selected for a total of 870 women. Results There was an implementation gap regarding the full exemption for obstetric services and neonatal care. Only 1.1% of the sample from Sebba but 17.5% of the group from Dori had excessive spending on birth related costs, indicating that women who delivered in Sebba were much less exposed to excessive medical expenses than women from Dori. Additional out-of-pocket fees in the full exemption health districts took into account household ability to pay, with poorer women generally paying less. Conclusions We found that the elimination of fees for facility-based births benefits especially the poorest households. The existence of excessive spending related to direct costs of

  17. Integrating pro-environmental behavior with transportation network modeling: User and system level strategies, implementation, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, H. M. Abdul

    Personal transport is a leading contributor to fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse (GHG) emissions in the U.S. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that light-duty vehicles (LDV) are responsible for 61% of all transportation related energy consumption in 2012, which is equivalent to 8.4 million barrels of oil (fossil fuel) per day. The carbon content in fossil fuels is the primary source of GHG emissions that links to the challenge associated with climate change. Evidently, it is high time to develop actionable and innovative strategies to reduce fuel consumption and GHG emissions from the road transportation networks. This dissertation integrates the broader goal of minimizing energy and emissions into the transportation planning process using novel systems modeling approaches. This research aims to find, investigate, and evaluate strategies that minimize carbon-based fuel consumption and emissions for a transportation network. We propose user and system level strategies that can influence travel decisions and can reinforce pro-environmental attitudes of road users. Further, we develop strategies that system operators can implement to optimize traffic operations with emissions minimization goal. To complete the framework we develop an integrated traffic-emissions (EPA-MOVES) simulation framework that can assess the effectiveness of the strategies with computational efficiency and reasonable accuracy. The dissertation begins with exploring the trade-off between emissions and travel time in context of daily travel decisions and its heterogeneous nature. Data are collected from a web-based survey and the trade-off values indicating the average additional travel minutes a person is willing to consider for reducing a lb. of GHG emissions are estimated from random parameter models. Results indicate that different trade-off values for male and female groups. Further, participants from high-income households are found to have higher trade-off values

  18. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to predict implementation of harm reduction strategies among MDMA/ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan K; Rosenberg, Harold

    2016-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to test whether the variables proposed by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) were associated with baseline intention to implement and subsequent use of 2 MDMA/ecstasy-specific harm reduction interventions: preloading/postloading and pill testing/pill checking. Using targeted Facebook advertisements, an international sample of 391 recreational ecstasy users were recruited to complete questionnaires assessing their ecstasy consumption history, and their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, habit strength (past strategy use), and intention to use these two strategies. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control were significantly associated with baseline intention to preload/postload and pill test/pill check. Out of the 391 baseline participants, 100 completed the two-month follow-up assessment. Baseline habit strength and frequency of ecstasy consumption during the three months prior to baseline were the only significant predictors of how often participants used the preloading/postloading strategy during the follow-up. Baseline intention to pill test/pill check was the only significant predictor of how often participants used this strategy during the follow-up. These findings provide partial support for TPB variables as both correlates of baseline intention to implement and predictors of subsequent use of these two strategies. Future investigations could assess whether factors related to ecstasy consumption (e.g., subjective level of intoxication, craving, negative consequences following consumption), and environmental factors (e.g., accessibility and availability of harm reduction resources) improve the prediction of how often ecstasy users employ these and other harm reduction strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. DNAseq Workflow in a Diagnostic Context and an Example of a User Friendly Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years next generation sequencing (NGS technologies evolved from costly tools used by very few, to a much more accessible and economically viable technology. Through this recently gained popularity, its use-cases expanded from research environments into clinical settings. But the technical know-how and infrastructure required to analyze the data remain an obstacle for a wider adoption of this technology, especially in smaller laboratories. We present GensearchNGS, a commercial DNAseq software suite distributed by Phenosystems SA. The focus of GensearchNGS is the optimal usage of already existing infrastructure, while keeping its use simple. This is achieved through the integration of existing tools in a comprehensive software environment, as well as custom algorithms developed with the restrictions of limited infrastructures in mind. This includes the possibility to connect multiple computers to speed up computing intensive parts of the analysis such as sequence alignments. We present a typical DNAseq workflow for NGS data analysis and the approach GensearchNGS takes to implement it. The presented workflow goes from raw data quality control to the final variant report. This includes features such as gene panels and the integration of online databases, like Ensembl for annotations or Cafe Variome for variant sharing.

  20. [Views of health system administrators, professionals, and users concerning the electronic health record and facilitators and obstacles to its implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jose Felipe Riani; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo

    2018-02-05

    The design and deployment of complex technologies like the electronic health record (EHR) involve technical, personal, social, and organizational issues. The Brazilian public and private scenario includes different local and regional initiatives for implementation of the electronic health record. The Brazilian Ministry of Health also has a proposal to develop a national EHR. The current study aimed to provide a comprehensive view of perceptions by health system administrators, professionals, and users concerning their experiences with the electronic health record and their opinions of the possibility of developing a national EHR. This qualitative study involved 28 semi-structured interviews. The results revealed both the diversity of factors that can influence the implementation of an electronic health record and the existence of convergences and aspects that tend to be valued differently according to the different points of view. Key aspects include discussions on the electronic health record's attributes and it impact on healthcare, especially in the case of local electronic health records, concerns over costs and confidentiality and privacy pertaining to electronic health records in general, and the possible implications of centralized versus decentralized data storage in the case of a national EHR. The interviews clearly showed the need to establish more effective communication among the various stakeholders, and that the different perspectives should be considered when drafting and deploying an EHR at the local, regional, and national levels.

  1. Integration for coexistence? Implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana from the perspective of service users and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi, Razak Mohammed; Poku, Adjoa Afriyie; Boateng, Simon; Amoah, Padmore Adusei; Mumin, Alhassan Abdul; Obodai, Jacob; Agyemang-Duah, Williams

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendations over the past decades, Ghana features pluralistic rather than truly integrated medical system. Policies about the integration of complementary medicine into the national health care delivery system need to account for individual-level involvement and cultural acceptability of care rendered by health care providers. Studies in Ghana, however, have glossed over the standpoint of the persons of the illness episode about the intercultural health care policy framework. This paper explores the health care users, and providers' experiences and attitudes towards the implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana. In-depth interviews, augmented with informal conversations, were conducted with 16 health service users, 7 traditional healers and 6 health professionals in the Sekyere South District and Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Data were thematically analysed and presented based on the a posteriori inductive reduction approach. Findings reveal a widespread positive attitude to, and support for integrative medical care in Ghana. However, inter-provider communication in a form of cross-referrals and collaborative mechanisms between healers and health professionals seldom occurs and remains unofficially sanctioned. Traditional healers and health care professionals are skeptical about intercultural health care policy mainly due to inadequate political commitment for provider education. The medical practitioners have limited opportunity to undergo training for integrative medical practice. We also find a serious mistrust between the practitioners due to the "diversity of healing approaches and techniques." Weak institutional support, lack of training to meet standards of practice, poor registration and regulatory measures as well as negative perception of the integrative medical policy inhibit its implementation in Ghana. In order to advance any useful intercultural health care policy in

  2. Hematology and biochemical findings of Spacelab 1 flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Chen, J. P.; Crosby, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Larkin, E.; Tavassoli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The changes in erythropoiesis in astronauts caused by weightlessness was experimentally studied during the Spacelab 1 flight. Immediately after landing showed a mean decrease of 9,3 percent in the four astronauts. Neither hyperoxia nor an increase in blood phosphate caused the decrease. Red cell survival time and iron incorporation postflight were not significantly different from their preflight levels. Serum haptoglobin did not decrease, indicating that intravascular hemolysis was not a major cause of red cell mass change. An increase in serum ferritin after the second day of flight may have been caused by red cell breakdown early in flight. The space flight-induced decrease in red cell mass may result from a failure of erythropoesis to replace cells destroyed by the spleen soon after weightlessness is attained.

  3. Hematological measurements in rats flown on Spacelab shuttle SL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, R.D.; Andrews, R.B.; Gibson, L.A.; Congdon, C.C.; Wright, P.; Dunn, C.D.R.; Jones, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a decrease in red cell mass occurs in astronauts, and some studies indicate a leukocytosis occurs. A life science module housing young and mature rats was flown on shuttle mission Spacelab 3 (SL-3), and the results of hematology studies of flight and control rats are presented. Statistically significant increases in the hematocrit, red blood cell counts, and hemoglobin determinations, together with a mild neutrophilia and lymphopenia, were found in flight animals. No significant changes were found in bone marrow and spleen cell differentials or erythropoietin determinations. Clonal assays demonstrated an increased erythroid colony formation of flight animal bone marrow cells at erythropoietin doses of 0.02 and 1.0 U/ml but not 0.20 U/ml. These results agree with some but vary from other previously published studies. Erythropoietin assays performed by radioimmunoassay and clonal studies were performed for the first time

  4. Animal experimentation in Spacelab - Present and future U.S. plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W. E.; Dant, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Current development of life-sciences hardware and experiments for the fourth Spacelab mission in the Life Sciences Flight Experiments Program at NASA Ames is reviewed. The research-animal holding facility, the general-purpose work station, and the life sciences laboratory equipment are characterized, and the 14 Ames projects accepted for the mission are listed and discussed. Several hardware systems and experimental procedures will be verified on the Spacelab-3 mission scheduled for late 1984.

  5. Definition of Life Sciences laboratories for shuttle/Spacelab. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Research requirements and the laboratories needed to support a Life Sciences research program during the shuttle/Spacelab era were investigated. A common operational research equipment inventory was developed to support a comprehensive but flexible Life Sciences program. Candidate laboratories and operational schedules were defined and evaluated in terms of accomodation with the Spacelab and overall program planning. Results provide a firm foundation for the initiation of a life science program for the shuttle era.

  6. The implementation of the Care Programme Approach for service users with a learning disability. Building Bridges to the same Old Horizons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: People with mental health problems and learning disabilities often do not receive the care they require. The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is meant to help with this. However, there have been many problems in the past with the introduction of the CPA into mental health services. There is no literature which explores what factors help or hinder the introduction of the CPA for service users with a mental health and learning disability, especially from the perspective of those responsible for overseeing this process. WHAT DOES THIS ARTICLE ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The implementation of the CPA for this service user group is fragmented, and services are not working together in partnership. The CPA is being effectively implemented for people who are deemed to present with a risk to themselves or others. If a service user does not present with a high risk, they are not provided care through the CPA. Service users were not involved in the development or introduction of the policy in practice. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Services need to work better at engaging service users when they are developing and introducing new policies. Rather than applying the CPA for all service users, across all services, it should only be considered for those deemed to present with a high risk. It is effectively implemented for these people. For those not deemed to present with a high risk, services should consider using alternative service user led care planning frameworks. Introduction The Care Programme Approach was introduced in England to ensure services met the needs of people with mental health problems and a concurrent learning disability (dual diagnosis). The CPA implementation was patchy and services failed to work in partnership. Aim This study aimed to explore the factors shaping the recent implementation of the CPA for service users with a dual diagnosis. Method A single case study approach was undertaken. Data were collected through

  7. The Identification, Implementation, and Evaluation of Critical User Interface Design Features of Computer-Assisted Instruction Programs in Mathematics for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, You-Jin; Woo, Honguk

    2010-01-01

    Critical user interface design features of computer-assisted instruction programs in mathematics for students with learning disabilities and corresponding implementation guidelines were identified in this study. Based on the identified features and guidelines, a multimedia computer-assisted instruction program, "Math Explorer", which delivers…

  8. Identification and implementation of end-user needs during development of a state-of-the-art modeling tool-set - 59069

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Roger; Williamson, Mark; Gerdes, Kurt; Freshley, Mark; Dixon, Paul; Collazo, Yvette T.; Hubbard, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development is supporting a multi-National Laboratory effort to develop the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is an emerging state-of-the-art scientific approach and software infrastructure for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. These modular and open-source high performance computing tools and user interfaces will facilitate integrated approaches that enable standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure decisions. The ASCEM team recognized that engaging end-users in the ASCEM development process would lead to enhanced development and implementation of the ASCEM tool-sets in the user community. End-user involvement in ASCEM covers a broad spectrum of perspectives, including: performance assessment (PA) and risk assessment practitioners, research scientists, decision-makers, oversight personnel, and regulators engaged in the US DOE cleanup mission. End-users are primarily engaged in ASCEM via the ASCEM User Steering Committee (USC) and the 'user needs interface' task. Future plans also include user involvement in demonstrations of the ASCEM tools. This paper will describe the details of how end users have been engaged in the ASCEM program and will demonstrate how this involvement has strengthened both the tool development and community confidence. ASCEM tools requested by end-users specifically target modeling challenges associated with US DOE cleanup activities. The demonstration activities involve application of ASCEM tools and capabilities to representative problems at DOE sites. Selected results from the ASCEM Phase 1 demonstrations are discussed to illustrate how capabilities requested by end-users were implemented in prototype versions of the ASCEM tool. The ASCEM team engaged a variety of interested parties early in the development

  9. Use of a FORTH-based PROLOG for real-time expert systems. 1: Spacelab life sciences experiment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H.; Odette, Louis L.; Krever, Alfred J.; West, Allison K.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time expert system is being developed to serve as the astronaut interface for a series of Spacelab vestibular experiments. This expert system is written in a version of Prolog that is itself written in Forth. The Prolog contains a predicate that can be used to execute Forth definitions; thus, the Forth becomes an embedded real-time operating system within the Prolog programming environment. The expert system consists of a data base containing detailed operational instructions for each experiment, a rule base containing Prolog clauses used to determine the next step in an experiment sequence, and a procedure base containing Prolog goals formed from real-time routines coded in Forth. In this paper, we demonstrate and describe the techniques and considerations used to develop this real-time expert system, and we conclude that Forth-based Prolog provides a viable implementation vehicle for this and similar applications.

  10. Research on lettuce growth technology onboard Chinese Tiangong II Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yunze; Guo, Shuangsheng; Zhao, Pisheng; Wang, Longji; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jian; Bian, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    Lettuce was grown in a space vegetable cultivation facility onboard the Tiangong Ⅱ Spacelab during October 18 to November 15, 2016, in order to testify the key cultivating technology in CELSS under spaceflight microgravity condition. Potable water was used for irrigation of rooting substrate and the SRF (slowly released fertilizer) offered mineral nutrition for plant growth. Water content and electric conductivity in rooting substrate were measured based on FDR(frequency domain reflectometry) principle applied first in spaceflight. Lettuce germinated with comparative growth vigor as the ground control, showing that the plants appeared to be not stressed by the spaceflight environment. Under microgravity, lettuce grew taller and showed deeper green color than the ground control. In addition, the phototropism of the on-orbit plants was more remarkable. The nearly 30-d spaceflight test verified the seed fixation technology and water& nutrition management technology, which manifests the feasibility of FDR being used for measuring moisture content and electric conductivity in rooting zone under microgravity. Furthermore, the edibility of the space-grown vegetable was proved, providing theoretical support for astronaut to consume the space vegetable in future manned spaceflight.

  11. NASIS data base management system - IBM 360/370 OS MVT implementation. 7: Data base administrator user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Data Base Administrator User's Guide for the NASA Aerospace Safety information system is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) multi-terminal tasking, (2) data base executive, (3) utilities, (4) maintenance, and (5) update mode functions.

  12. Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) team in the SL POCC) during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  13. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  14. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  15. Mechanical and thermal design of an experiment aboard the space shuttle: the Spacelab spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrometer designed by ONERA and IASB (Belgium Space Aeronomy Institute) to measure atmospheric trace constituents was flown aboard Spacelab 1 during the 9 th mission of the American Space Shuttle from November 28 to December 8, 1983. After a brief summary of the history of the project related to Spacelab, the mechanical and thermal design of the spectrometer is described. Some methods, calculations and characteristic tests are detailed as examples. The behaviour of the experiment during the mission and the results of the post-flight tests are shortly analyzed in order to prepare the qualification for a reflight [fr

  16. STS-40 Spacelab Life Science 1 (SLS-1) module in OV-102's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Spacelab Life Science 1 (SLS-1) module is documented in the payload bay (PLB) of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Included in the view are: the spacelab (SL) transfer tunnel joggle section and support struts; SLS-1 module forward end cone with the European Space Agency (ESA) SL insignia, SLS-1 payload insignia, and the upper feed through plate (center); the orbiter maneuvering system (OMS) pods; and the vertical stabilizer with the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 901 Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensing (SILTS) at the top 24 inches. The vertical stabilizer points to the Earth's limb and the cloud-covered surface of the Earth below.

  17. The design and development of an oil-free compressor for Spacelab Refrigerator/Freezer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hye, A.

    1984-01-01

    Design features and test results of an oil-free compressor developed for Spacelab Mission-4 Refrigerator/Freezer are detailed. The compressor has four identical pistons activated by a common eccentric shaft, operated by a brushless dc motor at 1300 rpm. The stroke of each piston is 0.28 cm, with the piston ends connected to the shaft by means of sealed needle bearings, eliminating the ned for oil. The mass flow rates produced by the compressor are by over 100 percent higher compared to the original Amfridge unit. Test results show that the compressor can meet the Spacelab refrigerator/freezer requirements.

  18. The gravitational plant physiology facility-Description of equipment developed for biological research in spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, D. G.; Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.; Lewis, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    In January 1992, the NASA Suttle mission STS 42 carried a facility designed to perform experiments on plant gravi- and photo-tropic responses. This equipment, the Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) was made up of a number of interconnected units mounted within a Spacelab double rack. The details of these units and the plant growth containers designed for use in GPPF are described. The equipment functioned well during the mission and returned a substantial body of time-lapse video data on plant responses to tropistic stimuli under conditions of orbital microgravity. GPPF is maintained by NASA Ames Research Center, and is flight qualifiable for future spacelab missions.

  19. The Spacelab-Mir-1 "Greenhouse-2" experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, G. E.; Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V. N.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Podolsky, I. G.

    1996-01-01

    The Spacelab-Mir-1 (SLM-1) mission is the first docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-71) with the Orbital Station Mir in June 1995. The SLM-1 "Greenhouse-2" experiment will utilize the Russian-Bulgarian-developed plant growth unit (Svet). "Greenhouse-2" will include two plantings (1) designed to test the capability of Svet to grow a crop of Superdwarf wheat from seed to seed, and (2) to provide green plant material for post-flight analysis. Protocols, procedures, and equipment for the experiment have been developed by the US-Russian science team. "Greenhouse-2" will also provide the first orbital test of a new Svet Instrumentation System (SIS) developed by Utah State University to provide near real time data on plant environmental parameters and gas-exchange rates. SIS supplements the Svet control and monitoring system with additional sensors for substrate moisture, air temperature, IR leaf temperature, light, oxygen, pressure, humidity, and carbon-dioxide. SIS provides the capability to monitor canopy transpiration and net assimilation of the plants growing in each vegetation unit (root zone) by enclosing the canopy in separate, retractable, ventilated leaf chambers. Six times during the seed-to-seed experiment, plant samples will be collected, leaf area measured, and plant parts fixed and/or dried for ground analysis. A second planting initiated 30 days before the arrival of a U.S. Shuttle [originally planned to be STS-71] is designed to provide green material at the vegetative development stage for ground analysis. [As this paper is being edited, the experiment has been delayed until after the arrival of STS-71.].

  20. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section, part A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, l985, through June 30, l988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The scientific analyses during the performance period consisted of follow-up studies of shuttle orbiter environment and orbiter/ionosphere interactions and various plasma particle and wave studies which dealt with data taken when the PDP was on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and when the PDP was in free flight. Of particular interest during the RMS operations and free flight were the orbiter wake studies and joint studies of beam/plasma interactions with the SL-2 Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) of the Vehicle Charging and Potential Investigation (VCAP). Internal reports, published papers and presentations which involve PDP/SL-2 data are listed in Sections 3 and 4. A PDP/SL-2 scientific results meeting was held at the University of Iowa on June 10, l986. This meeting was attended by most of the PDP and VCAP investigators and provided a forum for discussing and comparing the various results, particularly with regard to the PDP free flight.

  1. The Reliability and User-Feasibility of Materials and Procedures for Monitoring the Implementation Integrity of a Reading Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeny, John C.; Easton, Julia E.; Upright, James J.; Tunstall, Kali R.; Ehrenbock, Cassia A.

    2014-01-01

    Within the realm of school-based interventions, implementation integrity is important for practical, legal, and ethical purposes. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that proper monitoring of implementation integrity is often absent from both research and practice. School psychology practitioners and researchers have reported that a major barrier to…

  2. An internet tool for creation of cancer survivorship care plans for survivors and health care providers: design, implementation, use and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E; Vachani, Carolyn; Hampshire, Margaret K; Jacobs, Linda A; Metz, James M

    2009-09-04

    Survivorship care plans have been recommended by the Institute of Medicine for all cancer survivors. We implemented an Internet-based tool for creation of individualized survivorship care plans. To our knowledge, this is the first tool of this type to be designed and made publicly accessible. To investigate patterns of use and satisfaction with an Internet-based tool for creation of survivorship care plans. OncoLife, an Internet-based program for creation of survivorship care plans, was designed by a team of dedicated oncology nurses and physicians at the University of Pennsylvania. The program was designed to provide individualized, comprehensive health care recommendations to users responding to queries regarding demographics, diagnosis, and cancer treatments. After being piloted to test populations, OncoLife was made publicly accessible via Oncolink, a cancer information website based at the University of Pennsylvania which averages 3.9 million page views and over 385,000 unique visits per month. Data entered by anonymous public users was maintained and analyzed. From May 2007 to November 2008, 3343 individuals utilized this tool. Most (63%) identified themselves as survivors, but also health care providers (25%) and friends/family of survivors (12%). Median age at diagnosis was 48 years (18-100+), and median current age 51 (19-100+). Most users were Caucasian (87%), female (71%), and college-educated (82%). Breast cancer was the most common diagnosis (46%), followed by hematologic (12%), gastrointestinal (11%), gynecologic (9%), and genitourinary (8%). Of all users, 84% had undergone surgery, 80% chemotherapy, and 60% radiotherapy. Half of users (53%) reported receiving follow-up care from only an oncologist, 13% only a primary care provider (PCP), and 32% both; 12% reported having received survivorship information previously. Over 90% of users, both survivors and health care providers, reported satisfaction levels of "good" to "excellent" using this tool

  3. Design and implementation of a secure and user-friendly broker platform supporting the end-to-end provisioning of e-homecare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoecke, Sofie; Steurbaut, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; De Turck, Filip; Dhoedt, Bart

    2010-01-01

    We designed a broker platform for e-homecare services using web service technology. The broker allows efficient data communication and guarantees quality requirements such as security, availability and cost-efficiency by dynamic selection of services, minimizing user interactions and simplifying authentication through a single user sign-on. A prototype was implemented, with several e-homecare services (alarm, telemonitoring, audio diary and video-chat). It was evaluated by patients with diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The patients found that the start-up time and overhead imposed by the platform was satisfactory. Having all e-homecare services integrated into a single application, which required only one login, resulted in a high quality of experience for the patients.

  4. Implementation and preliminary evaluation of 'C-tone': A novel algorithm to improve lexical tone recognition in Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Lichuan; Wang, Ningyuan; Tang, Guofang; Lu, Thomas; Yin, Li; Tu, Wenhe; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2017-09-01

    Because of limited spectral resolution, Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant (CI) users have difficulty perceiving fundamental frequency (F0) cues that are important to lexical tone recognition. To improve Mandarin tone recognition in CI users, we implemented and evaluated a novel real-time algorithm (C-tone) to enhance the amplitude contour, which is strongly correlated with the F0 contour. The C-tone algorithm was implemented in clinical processors and evaluated in eight users of the Nurotron NSP-60 CI system. Subjects were given 2 weeks of experience with C-tone. Recognition of Chinese tones, monosyllables, and disyllables in quiet was measured with and without the C-tone algorithm. Subjective quality ratings were also obtained for C-tone. After 2 weeks of experience with C-tone, there were small but significant improvements in recognition of lexical tones, monosyllables, and disyllables (P C-tone were greater for disyllables than for monosyllables. Subjective quality ratings showed no strong preference for or against C-tone, except for perception of own voice, where C-tone was preferred. The real-time C-tone algorithm provided small but significant improvements for speech performance in quiet with no change in sound quality. Pre-processing algorithms to reduce noise and better real-time F0 extraction would improve the benefits of C-tone in complex listening environments. Chinese CI users' speech recognition in quiet can be significantly improved by modifying the amplitude contour to better resemble the F0 contour.

  5. Contemporary achievements in astronautics: Salyut-7, the Vega Project and Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasov, V. N.; Balebanov, V. M.; Goldovskiy, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The latest achievements in Soviet aeronautics are described; the new stage in the space program to study Venus using Soviet automated space probes, and the next space mission by cosmonauts to the Salyut-7 station. Information is also presented on the flight of the Spacelab orbiting laboratory created by Western European specialists.

  6. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume II. Program implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A discussion is presented of the use of the RELAP4/MOD5 computer program in simulating the thermal-hydraulic behavior of light-water reactor systems when subjected to postulated transients such as a LOCA, pump failure, or nuclear excursion. The volume is divided into main sections which cover: (1) program description, (2) input data, (3) problem initialization, (4) user guidelines, (5) output discussion, (6) source program description, (7) implementation requirements, (8) data files, (9) description of PLOTR4M, (10) description of STH20, (11) summary flowchart, (12) sample problems, (13) problem definition, and (14) problem input

  7. For Earth into space: The German Spacelab Mission D-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahm, P. R.; Keller, M. H.; Schiewe, B.

    The Spacelab Mission D-2 successfully lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on April 26, 1993. With 88 experiments on board covering eleven different research disciplines it was a very ambitious mission. Besides materials and life science subjects, the mission also encompassed astronomy, earth observation, radiation physics and biology, telecommunication, automation and robotics. Notable results were obtained in almost all cases. To give some examples of the scientific output, building upon results obtained in previous missions (FSLP, D1) diffusion in melts was broadly represented delivering most precise data on the atomic mobility within various liquids, and crystal growth experiments (the largest gallium arsenide crystal grown by the floating zone technique, so far obtained anywhere, was one of the results), biological cell growth experiments were continued (for example, beer yeast cultures, continuing their growth on earth, delivered a qualitatively superior brewery result), the human physiology miniclinic configuration ANTHRORACK gave novel insights concerning cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal (fluid volume determining) factors. Astronomical experiments yielded insights into our own galaxy within the ultra violet spectrum, earth observation experiments delivered the most precise resolution data superimposed by thematic mapping of many areas of the Earth, and the robotics experiment brought a remarkable feature in that a flying object was caught by the space robot, which was only achieved through several innovative advances during the time of experiment preparation. The eight years of preparation were also beneficial in another sense. Several discoveries have been made, and various technology transfers into ground-based processes were verified. To name the outstanding ones, in the materials science a novel bearing materials production process was developped, a patent granted for an improved high temperature heating chamber; with life sciences a new hormone

  8. User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wiley, R A

    1977-01-01

    User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

  9. Development of point Kernel radiation shielding analysis computer program implementing recent nuclear data and graphic user interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for safe and efficient use of radiation and radioactive work activity along with shielding analysis as a result the number of nuclear and conventional facilities using radiation or radioisotope rises. Most Korean industries and research institutes including Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) have been using foreign computer programs for radiation shielding analysis. Korean nuclear regulations have introduced new laws regarding the dose limits and radiological guides as prescribed in the ICRP 60. Thus, the radiation facilities should be designed and operated to comply with these new regulations. In addition, the previous point kernel shielding computer code utilizes antiquated nuclear data (mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc) which were developed in 1950∼1960. Subsequently, the various nuclear data such mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc. have been updated during the past few decades. KOPEC's strategic directive is to become a self-sufficient and independent nuclear design technology company, thus KOPEC decided to develop a new radiation shielding computer program that included the latest regulatory requirements and updated nuclear data. This new code was designed by KOPEC with developmental cooperation with Hanyang University, Department of Nuclear Engineering. VisualShield is designed with a graphical user interface to allow even users unfamiliar to radiation shielding theory to proficiently prepare input data sets and analyzing output results

  10. Assessing User Engagement of an mHealth Intervention: Development and Implementation of the Growing Healthy App Engagement Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymer, Sharyn; Russell, Catherine Georgina; Campbell, Karen; Laws, Rachel; Ong, Kok-Leong; Elliott, Rosalind; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is an ongoing problem in developed countries that needs targeted prevention in the youngest age groups. Children in socioeconomically disadvantaged families are most at risk. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions offer a potential route to target these families because of its relatively low cost and high reach. The Growing healthy program was developed to provide evidence-based information on infant feeding from birth to 9 months via app or website. Understanding user engagement with these media is vital to developing successful interventions. Engagement is a complex, multifactorial concept that needs to move beyond simple metrics. Objective The aim of our study was to describe the development of an engagement index (EI) to monitor participant interaction with the Growing healthy app. The index included a number of subindices and cut-points to categorize engagement. Methods The Growing program was a feasibility study in which 300 mother-infant dyads were provided with an app which included 3 push notifications that was sent each week. Growing healthy participants completed surveys at 3 time points: baseline (T1) (infant age ≤3 months), infant aged 6 months (T2), and infant aged 9 months (T3). In addition, app usage data were captured from the app. The EI was adapted from the Web Analytics Demystified visitor EI. Our EI included 5 subindices: (1) click depth, (2) loyalty, (3) interaction, (4) recency, and (5) feedback. The overall EI summarized the subindices from date of registration through to 39 weeks (9 months) from the infant’s date of birth. Basic descriptive data analysis was performed on the metrics and components of the EI as well as the final EI score. Group comparisons used t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and Spearman correlation tests as appropriate. Consideration of independent variables associated with the EI score were modeled using linear regression models. Results The overall EI

  11. Exploring Visualisation of Channel Activity, Levels and EQ for User Interfaces Implementing the Stage Metaphor for Music Mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Uhrenholt, Anders Kirk

    2016-01-01

    This short précis outlines a collection of different strategies for visualising simple audio features for a GUI- based audio mixing interface that uses the stage metaphor control scheme. Audio features such as activity, loudness and spectral centroid are extracted in real-time and mapped...... to different visual cues that can be adapted to the circular widgets most often found in implementations of the stage metaphor. An initial evaluation suggests that while the visualisations are generally intuitive and provide information about activity of audio channels, they are not used directly. When...... implementing these kinds of dynamic graphical visualisations it is thus important to consider how intrusive they are compared to their usefulness in a real mixing context....

  12. "CAN Stop"--implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts--study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Christiane; Miranda, Alejandra; Weymann, Nina; Reis, Olaf; Moré, Kerstin; Thomasius, Rainer

    2011-04-18

    Current research shows that overall numbers for cannabis use among adolescents and young adults dropped in recent years. However, this trend is much less pronounced in continuous cannabis use. With regard to the heightened risk for detrimental health- and development-related outcomes, adolescents and young adults with continuous cannabis use need special attention. The health services structure for adolescents and young adults with substance related problems in Germany, is multifaceted, because different communal, medical and judicial agencies are involved. This results in a rather decentralized organizational structure of the help system. This and further system-inherent characteristics make the threshold for young cannabis users rather high. Because of this, there is a need to establish evidence-based low-threshold help options for young cannabis users, which can be easily disseminated. Therefore, a training programme for young cannabis users (age 14-21) was developed in the "CAN Stop" project. Within the project, we seek to implement and evaluate the training programme within different institutions of the help system. The evaluation is sensitive to the different help systems and their specific prerequisites. Moreover, within this study, we also test the practicability of a training provision through laypersons. The CAN Stop study is a four-armed randomized wait-list controlled trial. The four arms are needed for the different help system settings, in which the CAN Stop training programme is evaluated: (a) the drug addiction aid and youth welfare system, (b) the out-patient medical system, (c) the in-patient medical system and (d) prisons for juvenile offenders. Data are collected at three points, before and after the training or a treatment as usual, and six months after the end of either intervention. The CAN Stop study is expected to provide an evidence-based programme for young cannabis users seeking to reduce or quit their cannabis use. Moreover, we seek to

  13. "CAN Stop" - Implementation and evaluation of a secondary group prevention for adolescent and young adult cannabis users in various contexts - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moré Kerstin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current research shows that overall numbers for cannabis use among adolescents and young adults dropped in recent years. However, this trend is much less pronounced in continuous cannabis use. With regard to the heightened risk for detrimental health- and development-related outcomes, adolescents and young adults with continuous cannabis use need special attention. The health services structure for adolescents and young adults with substance related problems in Germany, is multifaceted, because different communal, medical and judicial agencies are involved. This results in a rather decentralized organizational structure of the help system. This and further system-inherent characteristics make the threshold for young cannabis users rather high. Because of this, there is a need to establish evidence-based low-threshold help options for young cannabis users, which can be easily disseminated. Therefore, a training programme for young cannabis users (age 14-21 was developed in the "CAN Stop" project. Within the project, we seek to implement and evaluate the training programme within different institutions of the help system. The evaluation is sensitive to the different help systems and their specific prerequisites. Moreover, within this study, we also test the practicability of a training provision through laypersons. Methods/Design The CAN Stop study is a four-armed randomized wait-list controlled trial. The four arms are needed for the different help system settings, in which the CAN Stop training programme is evaluated: (a the drug addiction aid and youth welfare system, (b the out-patient medical system, (c the in-patient medical system and (d prisons for juvenile offenders. Data are collected at three points, before and after the training or a treatment as usual, and six months after the end of either intervention. Discussion The CAN Stop study is expected to provide an evidence-based programme for young cannabis users

  14. The design, fabrication and installation of cable routing mockups in support of Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    From flight and mockup drawings of Spacelab 2 (SL 2) experiments and hardware, shop ready mockup drawings were produced. Floor panels were the first items considered for fabrication. Cold plate and orthogrid mockups were designed and fabricated. Experiment and other hardware mockups were fabricated of aluminum or plywood, depending on size and configuration. Eighty-three cable routing bracket mockups were fabricated of aluminum and delivered for painting.

  15. Medical emergency aid through telematics: design, implementation guidelines and analysis of user requirements for the MERMAID project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anogianakis, G; Maglavera, S; Pomportsis, A; Bountzioukas, S; Beltrame, F; Orsi, G

    1998-01-01

    MERMAID is an EU financed telemedicine project with global reach and 24-h, multilingual capability. It aspires to provide a model for the provision of health care services based on the electronic transmission of medical information, via ISDN based videoconferencing. This model will not be limited to medical diagnostics but it will encompass all cases where the actual delivery of health care services involves a patient who is not located where the provider is. Its implementation requires the commissioning of an expensive telecommunications infrastructure and the exploration of a number of solutions. In fact, all categories of telemedical applications (audio and video conferencing, multimedia communications, flat file and image transfer with low, medium and high bandwidth data requirements) are considered while the full range of network choices (digital land lines, cellular/wireless, satellite and broadband) are being tested in terms of cost/performance tradeoffs that are inherent to them and the developmental stage each of these options occupies in their in its life cycle. Finally, out that MERMAID utilises advanced land based line transmission technologies to aid the remote patient by making available the specialist care that is best suited in the particular case.

  16. Fire Monitoring - The use of medium resolution satellites (AVHRR, MODIS, TET) for long time series processing and the implementation in User Driven Applications and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, E.-M.; Stein, E.; Strunz, G.; Strobl, C.; Frey, C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces fire monitoring works of two different projects, namely TIMELINE (TIMe Series Processing of Medium Resolution Earth Observation Data assessing Long -Term Dynamics In our Natural Environment) and PHAROS (Project on a Multi-Hazard Open Platform for Satellite Based Downstream Services). It describes the evolution from algorithm development from in applied research to the implementation in user driven applications and systems. Concerning TIMELINE, the focus of the work lies on hot spot detection. A detailed description of the choice of a suitable algorithm (round robin approach) will be given. Moreover, strengths and weaknesses of the AVHRR sensor for hot spot detection, a literature review, the study areas and the selected approach will be highlighted. The evaluation showed that the contextual algorithm performed best, and will therefore be used for final implementation. Concerning the PHAROS project, the key aspect is on the use of satellite-based information to provide valuable support to all phases of disaster management. The project focuses on developing a pre-operational sustainable service platform that integrates space-based EO (Earth Observation), terrestrial sensors and communication and navigation assets to enhance the availability of services and products following a multi-hazard approach.

  17. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 1: Executive summary. [carry-on laboratory for Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The definition and integration tasks involved in the development of design concepts for a carry-on laboratory (COL), to be compatible with Spacelab operations, were divided into the following study areas: (1) identification of research and equipment requirements of the COL; (2) development of a number of conceptual layouts for COL based on the defined research of final conceptual designs; and (4) development of COL planning information for definition of COL/Spacelab interface data, cost data, and program cost schedules, including design drawings of a selected COL to permit fabrication of a functional breadboard.

  18. Research and technology, 1993. Salute to Skylab and Spacelab: Two decades of discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A summary description of Skylab and Spacelab is presented. The section on Advanced Studies includes projects in space science, space systems, commercial use of space, and transportation systems. Within the Research Programs area, programs are listed under earth systems science, space physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Technology Programs include avionics, materials and manufacturing processes, mission operations, propellant and fluid management, structures and dynamics, and systems analysis and integration. Technology transfer opportunities and success are briefly described. A glossary of abbreviations and acronyms is appended as is a list of contract personnel within the program areas.

  19. AMPS sciences objectives and philosophy. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas-in-Space project on Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will open a new era in the exploration of earth's near-space environment, where the weight and power capabilities of Spacelab and the ability to use man in real time add important new features. The Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas-in-Space project (AMPS) is conceived of as a facility where flexible core instruments can be flown repeatedly to perform different observations and experiments. The twin thrusts of remote sensing of the atmosphere below 120 km and active experiments on the space plasma are the major themes. They have broader implications in increasing our understanding of plasma physics and of energy conversion processes elsewhere in the universe.

  20. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.; Ferguson, S.; Finch, M.; Frank, Z.; Kelly, G.; Lindgren, R.; Morrill, M.; Pope, T.; Reeves, R.; Rehse, R.; Shine, R.; Simon, G.; Harvey, J.; Leibacher, J.; Livingston, W.; November, L.; Zirker, J.

    The time sequences of diffraction limited granulation images obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter on Spacelab 2 are presented. The uncorrection autocorrelation limetime in magnetic regions is dominated by the 5-min oscillation. The removal of this oscillation causes the autocorrelation lifetime to increase by more than a factor of 2. The results suggest that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Horizontal displacements and transverse velocities in the intensity field are measured. Lower limits to the lifetime in the quiet and magnetic sun are set at 440 s and 950 s, respectively.

  1. Life science payloads planning study. [for space shuttle orbiters and spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Preferred approaches and procedures were defined for integrating the space shuttle life sciences payload from experiment solicitation through final data dissemination at mission completion. The payloads operations plan was refined and expended to include current information. The NASA-JSC facility accommodations were assessed, and modifications recommended to improve payload processing capability. Standard format worksheets were developed to permit rapid location of experiment requirements and a Spacelab mission handbook was developed to assist potential life sciences investigators at academic, industrial, health research, and NASA centers. Practical, cost effective methods were determined for accommodating various categories of live specimens during all mission phases.

  2. A Spacelab Expert System for Remote Engineering and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Nick; Colombano, Silvano; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's space science program is based on strictly pre-planned activities. This approach does not always result in the best science. We describe an existing computer system that enables space science to be conducted in a more reactive manner through advanced automation techniques that have recently been used in SLS-2 October 1993 space shuttle flight. Advanced computing techniques, usually developed in the field of Artificial Intelligence, allow large portions of the scientific investigator's knowledge to be "packaged" in a portable computer to present advice to the astronaut operator. We strongly believe that this technology has wide applicability to other forms of remote science/engineering. In this brief article, we present the technology of remote science/engineering assistance as implemented for the SLS-2 space shuttle flight. We begin with a logical overview of the system (paying particular attention to the implementation details relevant to the use of the embedded knowledge for system reasoning), then describe its use and success in space, and conclude with ideas about possible earth uses of the technology in the life and medical sciences.

  3. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a spacelab mission payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) task flow is shown. Current progress is identified. The requirements generated in task 1 have been used to formulate an initial ACPL baseline design concept. ACPL design/functional features are illustrated. A timetable is presented of the routines for ACPL integration with the spacelab system.

  4. Web-users identification

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, Ilja

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to determine what parameters (of a browser fingerprint) are necessary in order to identify a user in a specific interval (number of users). The secondary goal is to try to assign fingerprints to users. The final goal is to find out the weight of each parameter (usefulness). The thesis consists of two main parts: data collection (up to 10000 users) and analysis of the data. As a result, with help of an implemented JavaScript plugin, a database, which consists of...

  5. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of exposure to microgravity on pituitary gland was investigated by examining cells isolated from anterior pituitaries of rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission and, subsequently, cultured for 6 days. Compared with ground controls, flight cells contained more intracellular growth hormone (GH); however, the flight cells released less GH over the 6-day culture period and after implantation into hypophysectomized rats than did the control cells. Compared with control rats, glands from large rats (400 g) contained more somatotrophs (44 percent compared with 37 percent in control rats); small rats (200 g) showed no difference. No major differences were found in the somatotroph ultrastructure (by TEM) or in the pattern of the immunoactive GH variants. However, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that flight cells released much less of a biologically active high-molecular weight GH variant, suggesting that space flight may lead to secretory dysfunction.

  6. Image motion compensation on the Spacelab 2 Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter /SL2 SOUP/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, T. D.; Duncan, D. W.; Finch, M. L.; Spence, G.

    1981-01-01

    The SOUP experiment on Spacelab 2 includes a 30 cm visible light telescope and focal plane package mounted on the Instrument Pointing System (IPS). Scientific goals of the experiment dictate pointing stability requirements of less than 0.05 arcsecond jitter over periods of 5-20 seconds. Quantitative derivations of these requirements from two different aspects are presented: (1) avoidance of motion blurring of diffraction-limited images; (2) precise coalignment of consecutive frames to allow measurement of small image differences. To achieve this stability, a fine guider system capable of removing residual jitter of the IPS and image motions generated on the IPS cruciform instrument support structure has been constructed. This system uses solar limb detectors in the prime focal plane to derive an error signal. Image motion due to pointing errors is compensated by the agile secondary mirror mounted on piezoelectric transducers, controlled by a closed-loop servo system.

  7. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section. Part B: Thesis projects. Final science report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, J.S.; Frank, L.A.; Kurth, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, 1985, through June 30, 1988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). Three Master's and three Ph.D. theses were written using PDP instrumentation data. These theses are listed in Volume 2, Part B

  8. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section. Part B: Thesis projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, 1985, through June 30, 1988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). Three Master's and three Ph.D. theses were written using PDP instrumentation data. These theses are listed in Volume 2, Part B.

  9. Man in space - A time for perspective. [crew performance on Space Shuttle-Spacelab program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Factors affecting crew performances in long-term space flights are examined with emphasis on the Space Shuttle-Spacelab program. Biomedical investigations carried out during four Skylab missions indicate that initially rapid changes in certain physiological parameters, notably in cardiovascular response and red-blood-cell levels, lead to an adapted condition. Calcium loss remains a potential problem. Space Shuttle environmental control and life-support systems are described together with technology facilitating performance of mission objectives in a weightless environment. It is concluded that crew requirements are within the physical and psychological capability of astronauts, but the extent to which nonastronaut personnel will be able to participate without extensive training and pre-conditioning remains to be determined.

  10. Importance of temperature control for HEFLEX, a biological experiment for Spacelab 1. [plant gravitational physiology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of temperature control to HEFLEX, a Spacelab experiment designed to measure kinetic properties of Helianthis nutation in a low-g environment, is discussed. It is argued that the development of the HEFLEX experiment has been severely hampered by the inadequate control of ambient air temperature provided by the spacecraft module design. A worst case calculation shows that delivery of only 69% of the maximum yield of useful data from the HEFLEX system is guaranteed; significant data losses from inadequate temperature control are expected. The magnitude of the expected data losses indicates that the cost reductions associated with imprecise temperature controls may prove to be a false economy in the long term.

  11. Interim Report of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Study. Volume 2; Ultraviolet and Optical Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will comprise NASA's primary transportation system into near-earth orbit during the 1980s. The Shuttle will provide the astronomical community with a major new capability to send a wide variety of instrumentation into orbit, to utilize it there under manned or automatic control for periods from seven to thirty days, and to return it to the ground. To this end the European Space Research Organization (ESRO) is developing Spacelab, an array of interchangeable components -pressurized manned modules, unpressurized pallets and related support systems - to be mounted in the Shuttle payload bay. Spacelab will offer important opportunities to carry out astronomical research with instruments optimized for specific objectives. With a high flight frequency and with the ability to modify or interchange telescopes and instruments between flights, one will not need to make rigid long-term commitments to specific and compromised telescope/instrument/ detector combinations as is the case for automated satellites. Observational techniques demanding the physical return of data and equipment - in particular the use of photographic film, instruments requiring tight calibration controls, cryogens, high-risk detectors and degradeable optical coatings -will open research areas not readily addressed by automated satellites. Although Shuttle flight duration will be limited to periods from seven to thirty days, substantial data can be obtained with a single instrument on short missions, if targets are carefully selected and prioritized, and a large number of instruments can be accommodated on a single flight. Important astronomical data are regularly obtained on sounding rocket flights of five minutes duration. Spacelab will provide far longer observing periods for large and small telescopes, with resources greatly exceeding those of sounding rockets, while retaining much of the sounding rocket philosophy in terms of instrument flexibility, simplicity, reliability

  12. Man/terminal interaction evaluation of computer operating system command and control service concepts. [in Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, D. W.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Experiment Computer Operating System (ECOS) of the Spacelab will allow the onboard Payload Specialist to command experiment devices and display information relative to the performance of experiments. Three candidate ECOS command and control service concepts were reviewed and laboratory data on operator performance was taken for each concept. The command and control service concepts evaluated included a dedicated operator's menu display from which all command inputs were issued, a dedicated command key concept with which command inputs could be issued from any display, and a multi-display concept in which command inputs were issued from several dedicated function displays. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed in terms of training, operational errors, task performance time, and subjective comments of system operators.

  13. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume II. Program implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This portion of the RELAP4/MOD5 User's Manual presents the details of setting up and entering the reactor model to be evaluated. The input card format and arrangement is presented in depth, including not only cards for data but also those for editing and restarting. Problem initalization including pressure distribution and energy balance is discussed. A section entitled ''User Guidelines'' is included to provide modeling recommendations, analysis and verification techniques, and computational difficulty resolution. The section is concluded with a discussion of the computer output form and format

  14. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    by conducting a literature review. The concept of pilot implementation, although commonly used in practice, is rather disregarded in research. In the literature, pilot implementations are mainly treated as secondary to the learning outcomes and are presented as merely a means to acquire knowledge about a given...... objective. The prevalent understanding is that pilot implementations are an ISD technique that extends prototyping from the lab and into test during real use. Another perception is that pilot implementations are a project multiple of co-existing enactments of the pilot implementation. From this perspective......This PhD dissertation engages in the study of pilot (system) implementation. In the field of information systems, pilot implementations are commissioned as a way to learn from real use of a pilot system with real data, by real users during an information systems development (ISD) project and before...

  15. Towards Improving Overview and Metering through Visualisation and Dynamic Query Filters for User Interfaces Implementing the Stage Metaphor for Music Mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Uhrenholt, Anders Kirk

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with challenges involved with implementing the stage metaphor control scheme for mixing music. Recent studies suggest that the stage metaphor outperforms the traditional channel-strip metaphor in several different ways. However, the implementation of the stage metaphor poses issu...

  16. An interactive computer approach to performing resource analysis for a multi-resource/multi-project problem. [Spacelab inventory procurement planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    New planning techniques and supporting computer tools are needed for the optimization of resources and costs for space transportation and payload systems. Heavy emphasis on cost effective utilization of resources has caused NASA program planners to look at the impact of various independent variables that affect procurement buying. A description is presented of a category of resource planning which deals with Spacelab inventory procurement analysis. Spacelab is a joint payload project between NASA and the European Space Agency and will be flown aboard the Space Shuttle starting in 1980. In order to respond rapidly to the various procurement planning exercises, a system was built that could perform resource analysis in a quick and efficient manner. This system is known as the Interactive Resource Utilization Program (IRUP). Attention is given to aspects of problem definition, an IRUP system description, questions of data base entry, the approach used for project scheduling, and problems of resource allocation.

  17. A critical review of the life sciences project management at Ames Research Center for the Spacelab Mission development test 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. M.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A management study was initiated by ARC (Ames Research Center) to specify Spacelab Mission Development Test 3 activities and problems. This report documents the problems encountered and provides conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future ARC life sciences projects. An executive summary of the conclusions and recommendations is provided. The report also addresses broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the space environment.

  18. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  19. A critical analysis of the implementation of service user involvement in primary care research and health service development using normalization process theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Edel; McEvoy, Rachel; O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary; de Brún, Tomas; Okonkwo, Ekaterina; Rooney, Michelle; Dowrick, Chris; Rogers, Anne; MacFarlane, Anne

    2016-06-01

    There have been recent important advances in conceptualizing and operationalizing involvement in health research and health-care service development. However, problems persist in the field that impact on the scope for meaningful involvement to become a routine - normalized - way of working in primary care. In this review, we focus on current practice to critically interrogate factors known to be relevant for normalization - definition, enrolment, enactment and appraisal. Ours was a multidisciplinary, interagency team, with community representation. We searched EBSCO host for papers from 2007 to 2011 and engaged in an iterative, reflexive approach to sampling, appraising and analysing the literature following the principles of a critical interpretive synthesis approach and using Normalization Process Theory. Twenty-six papers were chosen from 289 papers, as a purposeful sample of work that is reported as service user involvement in the field. Few papers provided a clear working definition of service user involvement. The dominant identified rationale for enrolling service users in primary care projects was linked with policy imperatives for co-governance and emancipatory ideals. The majority of methodologies employed were standard health services research methods that do not qualify as research with service users. This indicates a lack of congruence between the stated aims and methods. Most studies only reported positive outcomes, raising questions about the balance or completeness of the published appraisals. To improve normalization of meaningful involvement in primary care, it is necessary to encourage explicit reporting of definitions, methodological innovation to enhance co-governance and dissemination of research processes and findings. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Eliciting end-user expectations to guide the implementation process of a new electronic health record: A case study using concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukes, Erik; Cornet, Ronald; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the usability of concept mapping to elicit the expectations of healthcare professionals regarding the implementation of a new electronic health record (EHR). These expectations need to be taken into account during the implementation process to maximize the chance of success of the EHR. Two university hospitals in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in the preparation phase of jointly implementing a new EHR. During this study the hospitals had different methods of documenting patient information (legacy EHR vs. paper-based records). Concept mapping was used to determine and classify the expectations of healthcare professionals regarding the implementation of a new EHR. A multidisciplinary group of 46 healthcare professionals from both university hospitals participated in this study. Expectations were elicited in focus groups, their relevance and feasibility were assessed through a web-questionnaire. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling and clustering methods were used to identify clusters of expectations. We found nine clusters of expectations, each covering an important topic to enable the healthcare professionals to work properly with the new EHR once implemented: usability, data use and reuse, facility conditions, data registration, support, training, internal communication, patients, and collaboration. Average importance and feasibility of each of the clusters was high. Concept mapping is an effective method to find topics that, according to healthcare professionals, are important to consider during the implementation of a new EHR. The method helps to combine the input of a large group of stakeholders at limited efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Demonstration of two-user, 10-Gbits/s optical code-division multiple-access system implemented by using cascaded longperiod fiber gratings formed in dispersion-compensating fiber with inner-cladding structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Sun-Jong; Eom, T.J.; Kim, T.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A two-user, 10-Gbits/s optical code-division multiple-access system implemented by using cascaded long-period fiber gratings formed in a dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF) is demonstrated. Our results show that the sensitivity of cladding modes to the refractive index change on the cladding...... surface is greatly reduced by utilizing the inner-cladding mode of the DCF. Two pairs of encoder/decoder are constructed and the performance is evaluated by measuring bit error rate (BER). With an interferer, a BER of 1.5 X 10(-12) is measured at a received optical power of -6 dBm....

  2. Demonstration of two-user, 10-Gbits/s optical code-division multiple-access system implemented by using cascaded long-period fiber gratings formed in dispersion-compensating fiber with inner-cladding structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jong; Eom, Tae-Jung; Kim, Tae-Young; Lee, Byeong Ha; Park, Chang-Soo

    2005-09-01

    A two-user, 10-Gbits/s optical code-division multiple-access system implemented by using cascaded long-period fiber gratings formed in a dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF) is demonstrated. Our results show that the sensitivity of cladding modes to the refractive index change on the cladding surface is greatly reduced by utilizing the inner-cladding mode of the DCF. Two pairs of encoder/decoder are constructed and the performance is evaluated by measuring bit error rate (BER). With an interferer, a BER of 1.5×10-12 is measured at a received optical power of -6 dBm.

  3. User interface support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton; Wilde, Nick

    1989-01-01

    Space construction will require heavy investment in the development of a wide variety of user interfaces for the computer-based tools that will be involved at every stage of construction operations. Using today's technology, user interface development is very expensive for two reasons: (1) specialized and scarce programming skills are required to implement the necessary graphical representations and complex control regimes for high-quality interfaces; (2) iteration on prototypes is required to meet user and task requirements, since these are difficult to anticipate with current (and foreseeable) design knowledge. We are attacking this problem by building a user interface development tool based on extensions to the spreadsheet model of computation. The tool provides high-level support for graphical user interfaces and permits dynamic modification of interfaces, without requiring conventional programming concepts and skills.

  4. The PANTHER User Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coram, Jamie L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morrow, James D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  5. Spacelab 1 hematology experiment (INS103): Influence of space flight on erythrokinetics in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, C. S.; Chen, J. P.; Crosby, W.; Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Larkin, E.; Tavassoli, M.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment conducted on the 10-day Spacelab 1 mission aboard the ninth Space Shuttle flight in November to December 1983 was designed to measure factors involved in the control of erythrocyte turnover that might be altered during weightlessness. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the flight. Immediately after landing, red cell mass showed a mean decrease of 9.3 percent in the four astronauts. Neither hyperoxia nor an increase in blood phosphate was a cause of the decrease. Red cell survival time and iron incorporation postflight were not significantly different from their preflight levels. Serum haptoglobin did not decrease, indicating that intravascular hemolysis was not a major cause of red cell mass change. An increase in serum ferritin after the second day of flight may have been caused by red cell breakdown early in flight. Erythropoietin levels decreased during and after flight, but preflight levels were high and the decrease was not significant. The space flight-induced decrease in red cell mass may result from a failure of erythropoiesis to replace cells destroyed by the spleen soon after weightlessness is attained.

  6. Gaseous environment of the Shuttle early in the Spacelab 2 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Jolene S.; Murphy, Gerald B.; Kurth, William S.

    1988-01-01

    A cold-cathode ionization gage was flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-5IF as part of the Spacelab 2 payload. Neutral pressure data that were taken in the payload bay during the first few hours on orbit are presented. These data show that when the payload bay is oriented such that the atmospheric gases are ramming into it, the pressure rises to a peak of 4 x 10 to the -6th Torr. Pressure is also slightly higher during the sunlit portion of each orbit. Outgassing of the payload bay causes the pressure to be elevated to a few times 10 to the -6th Torr early in the mission. In addition, several effects on pressure have been identified that are due to chemical releases. Substantial increases (50-150 percent) are seen during another experiment's gas purge. Orbiter chemical-release effects include: pressure increases of 200 percent up to 7 x 10 to the -6th Torr due to Orbital Maneuvering System burns, minor perturbations in pressure due to vernier thruster firings and little or no increase in pressure due to water dumps. In the case of vernier thruster firings, effects are seen only from down-firing thrusters in the back of the Orbiter, which are probably due to reflection of thruster gases off Orbiter surfaces.

  7. Salivary gland ultrastructure and cyclic AMP-dependent reactions in Spacelab 3 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mednieks, M.I.; Hand, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Environmental stimuli influencing catecholamine levels induce changes in cyclic AMP-dependent reactions and cell morphology in the rat parotid. Responses of salivary glands to spaceflight were determined by measurement of cyclic AMP-mediated reactions in fresh-frozen salivary glands and by microscopic evaluation of ultrastructure in fixed parotid glands. Decreased cell-free protein phosphorylation, determined by autoradiography, occurred in parotid glands in three of five flight animals. Protein kinase activity ratios were decreased in the soluble and increased in the particulate fractions of Spacelab 3 (SL-3) rat sublingual glands, compared with ground controls. Biochemical analyses show that effects of space flight on salivary glands are similar to those induced experimentally by physiological manipulation or alteration of catecholamine levels. Morphological evaluation of three SL-3 rat parotid glands showed increased numbers of lysosomes, autophagic vacuoles containing degenerating secretory product, and accumulation of lipid droplets. Since these animals lost weight, consistent with disruption of food and water consumption, morphological changes may in part be due to decreased masticatory stimulation, as occurs with reduced food intake or a liquid diet. The observed changes may reflect physiological responses of the gastrointestinal and autonomic systems to effects of spaceflight

  8. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution

  9. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-11-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution.

  10. Implementation of Fee-Free Maternal Health-Care Policy in Ghana: Perspectives of Users of Antenatal and Delivery Care Services From Public Health-Care Facilities in Accra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anafi, Patricia; Mprah, Wisdom K; Jackson, Allen M; Jacobson, Janelle J; Torres, Christopher M; Crow, Brent M; O'Rourke, Kathleen M

    2018-01-01

    In 2008, the government of Ghana implemented a national user fee maternal care exemption policy through the National Health Insurance Scheme to improve financial access to maternal health services and reduce maternal as well as perinatal deaths. Although evidence shows that there has been some success with this initiative, there are still issues relating to cost of care to beneficiaries of the initiative. A qualitative study, comprising 12 focus group discussions and 6 interviews, was conducted with 90 women in six selected urban neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana, to examine users' perspectives regarding the implementation of this policy initiative. Findings showed that direct cost of delivery care services was entirely free, but costs related to antenatal care services and indirect costs related to delivery care still limit the use of hospital-based midwifery and obstetric care. There was also misunderstanding about the initiative due to misinformation created by the government through the media.We recommend that issues related to both direct and indirect costs of antenatal and delivery care provided in public health-care facilities must be addressed to eliminate some of the lingering barriers relating to cost hindering the smooth operation and sustainability of the maternal care fee exemption policy.

  11. [Evaluation of the implementation of the FAPACAN programme to prevent cancer behavioral risk in primary care users in the North of Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, M Luisa; Fernández Carreira, Jose Manuel; López González, Santiago; del Olivo del Valle Gómez, M; García Casas, Juan Bautista; Cueto Espinar, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of the process is an essential condition to correctly measure the impact of educational interventions on behaviour, its psychosocial determinants and the state of change, in the context of health promotion. The aim was to evaluate the quality of the implementation of the FAPACAN Programme, designed to prevent behavioural risk of cancer in Primary Care, and to improve its psychosocial determinants in the A.S.E. Model and the state of change according to Prochaska and DiClemente Theory. The quality of implementation was measured by means of a visit to the health centre, by filling in a checklist 'in situ', and a phone survey with the patient. Centralisation and association measures were found (Pearson and Spearman's coefficient). A multiple regression model was obtained with the score made by the patient (range of 0 to 8) and the covariables: gender, age, level of education, locality and family history of cancer. The quality scores obtained oscillate between 72% and 81% of optimum quality. Significant differences were found owing to the administrator (better with fewer years of exercise) and the patient (better with higher level of study). In general, the quality of implementation was more than sufficient, in spite of the poor provision by the health system.

  12. Design and implementation of a wireless (Bluetooth) four channel bio-instrumentation amplifier and digital data acquisition device with user-selectable gain, frequency, and driven reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmanescu, Alin; Miller, Benjamin; Magno, Terence; Ahmed, Assad; Kremenic, Ian

    2006-01-01

    A portable, multi-purpose Bio-instrumentation Amplifier and Data AcQuisition device (BADAQ) capable of measuring and transmitting EMG and EKG signals wirelessly via Bluetooth is designed and implemented. Common topologies for instrumentation amplifiers and filters are used and realized with commercially available, low-voltage, high precision operational amplifiers. An 8-bit PIC microcontroller performs 10-bit analog-to-digital conversion of the amplified and filtered signals and controls a Bluetooth transceiver capable of wirelessly transmitting the data to any Bluetooth enabled device. Electrical isolation between patient/subject, circuitry, and ancillary equipment is achieved by optocoupling components. The design focuses on simplicity, portability, and affordability.

  13. Monitoring Of The Middle Atmosphere: Grille Spectrometer Experiment Results On Board SPACELAB 1 And Scientific Program Of ATLAS 1 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papineau, N.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Ackerman, Marcel E.

    1989-10-01

    Measurements of atmospheric trace gases have been performed during the first Spacelab mission on board the Space Shuttle. The principle of the observations is infrared absorption spectroscopy using the solar occultation technique. Infrared absorption spectra of NO, CO, CO2, NO2, N20, CH4 and H2O have been recorded using the Grille spectrometer developped by ONERA and IASB. From the observed spectra, vertical profiles for these molecules have been derived. The present paper summarizes the main results and compares them with computed vertical profiles from a zonally averaged model of the middle atmosphere. The scientific objectives of the second mission, Atlas 1, planned for 1990 are also presented.

  14. Critical review of Ames Life Science participation in Spacelab Mission Development Test 3: The SMD 3 management study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R.; Wilhelm, J.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S.

    1978-01-01

    A management study was conducted to specify activities and problems encountered during the development of procedures for documentation and crew training on experiments, as well as during the design, integration, and delivery of a life sciences experiment payload to Johnson Space Center for a 7 day simulation of a Spacelab mission. Conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future Ames' life sciences projects are included. Broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the environment of space are also addressed.

  15. A Decade of Life Sciences Experiment Unique Equipment Development for Spacelab and Space Station, 1990-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul D.; Connolly, J. P.; Navarro, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ames Research Center's Life Sciences Division has developed and flown an extensive array of spaceflight experiment unique equipment (EUE) during the last decade of the twentieth century. Over this ten year span, the EUE developed at ARC supported a vital gravitational biology flight research program executed on several different platforms, including the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and Space Station Mir. This paper highlights some of the key EUE elements developed at ARC and flown during the period 1990-1999. Resulting lessons learned will be presented that can be applied to the development of similar equipment for the International Space Station.

  16. Signature-based User Authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Hámorník, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    This work aims on missing handwritten signature authentication in Windows. Result of this work is standalone software that allow users to log into Windows by writing signature. We focus on security of signature authentification and best overall user experience. We implemented signature authentification service that accept signature and return user access token if signature is genuine. Signature authentification is done by comparing given signature to signature patterns by their similarity. Si...

  17. Understanding users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of users can help libraries in the process of understanding user similarities and differences. Segmentation can also form the basis for selecting segments of target users and for developing tailored services for specific target segments. Several approaches and techniques have been...... tested in library contexts and the aim of this article is to identify the main approaches and to discuss their perspectives, including their strenghts and weaknesses in, especially, public library contexts. The purpose is also to prsent and discuss the results of a recent - 2014 - Danish library user...... segmentation project using computer-generated clusters. Compared to traditional marketing texts, this article also tries to identify user segments or images or metaphors by the library profession itself....

  18. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  19. School-based diagnosis and treatment of malaria by teachers using rapid diagnostic tests and artemisinin-based combination therapy: experiences and perceptions of users and implementers of the Learner Treatment Kit, southern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphwatiwa, Treza; Witek-McManus, Stefan; Mtali, Austin; Okello, George; Nguluwe, Paul; Chatsika, Hard; Roschnik, Natalie; Halliday, Katherine E; Brooker, Simon J; Mathanga, Don P

    2017-08-07

    Training teachers to diagnose uncomplicated malaria using malaria rapid diagnostic tests and treat with artemisinin-based combination therapy has the potential to improve the access of primary school children (6-14 years) to prompt and efficient treatment for malaria, but little is known about the acceptability of such an intervention. This qualitative study explored experiences and perceptions of users and implementers of a programme of school-based malaria case management via a first-aid kit-the Learner Treatment Kit (LTK)-implemented as part of a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Zomba district, Malawi. From 29 primary schools where teachers were trained to test and treat school children for malaria using the LTK, six schools were purposively selected on the basis of relative intervention usage (low, medium or high); school size and geographical location. In total eight focus group discussions were held with school children, parents and guardians, and teachers; and 20 in-depth interviews were conducted with key stakeholders at the school, district and national levels. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic analysis approach. The LTK was widely perceived by respondents to be a worthwhile intervention, with the opinion that trained teachers were trusted providers of malaria testing and treatment to school children. Benefits of the programme included a perception of improved access to malaria treatment for school children; decreased school absenteeism; and that the programme supported broader national health and education policies. Potential barriers to successful implementation expressed included increased teacher workloads, a feeling of inadequate supervision from health workers, lack of incentives and concerns for the sustainability of the programme regarding the supply of drugs and commodities. Training teachers to test for and treat uncomplicated malaria in schools was well received by both users and implementers alike, and

  20. User-centred design and experience prototyping: Design and implementation of pre-handwriting intervention to children with coordination difficulties/dyspraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Muhammad Fakri; Senan, Norhalina; Suparjoh, Suriawati; Keay-Bright, Wendy

    2017-10-01

    We have proposed a method to assist children with coordination difficulties or dyspraxia to improve their pre-handwriting skills. We have chosen an animation technique called `Rotoscopy', a method that normally been used in animation and film production and adapted it to Rotoscopy Pre-handwriting Interface (RPI) prototypes using the interactive whiteboard (IWB) as interaction device. The motivation of this research is to discover how efficient if Rotoscopy is used beyond its normal purposes; and how it gives benefits in terms of behavioural and motivational aspects rather than commercial and profit point of view. Implementation of RPI prototypes has taken place through series of workshops with a teacher and a group of children with handwriting difficulties at a special education school in Caerphilly, Cardiff, United Kingdom. In the workshops children were given pre-handwriting activities in two different environments. They have been trained to use RPI prototypes and IWB, as well as pen and paper tasks. Their activities and action have been observed and recorded using video camera. Evaluation method is based-on video analysis of children's pre-handwriting result and their reaction and motivation during the workshop. It was learnt that majority of children who used RPI prototypes and IWB have produced better results in terms of accuracy of the drawing as compared to results of pen and paper activities. Furthermore the children were more motivated to use the prototypes and IWB rather than using pen and paper. The study's contribution to knowledge includes offering a new way to improve children's pre-handwriting skills using computer animation technique and touch-based devices.

  1. Phase B: Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL): A spacelab mission payload. Final review (DR-MA-03)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, O. W.

    1976-01-01

    Systems design for an initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory to study microphysical processes in zero gravity is presented. Included are descriptions of the fluid, thermal, mechanical, control and data, and electrical distribution interfaces with Spacelab. Schedule and cost analysis are discussed.

  2. The Evolution of Spacelab Ultraviolet Astronomy Missions from OSS-3 through -7 to Astro-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s, NASA was building towards a robust program in space astronomy. An evolutionary step from ground-based astronomy to space astronomy was human operation of space telescopes as astronomy in general evolved from astronomers directly at the telescope to application of computers and long distance communications to control to operate remote telescopes. Today ground-based telescopes and space observatories from cubesats to the Hubble Space Telescope and soon the James Webb Space Telescope are routinely operated remotely.In response to the Spacelab Announcement of Opportunity in the early 1980s, three ultraviolet experiments – the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and the Wisconsin Ultraviolet PhotoPolarimetry Experiment -- all instruments derived from multiple sounding rocket flights--were selected to fly as an integrated payload attached to a space shuttle. The justification for professional astronomers, both as Mission Specialists from the astronaut cadre and Payload Specialists from the instrument teams, was built to ensure key technical skills both of the science and the instruments. Bundled together as OSS-3 through -7 flights focused on Comet Halley, the experiments went through many changes and delays as a pathfinder for an anticipated series of attached astronomy payloads.By 1986, the five-flight mission had evolved into two missions, Astro-1 dedicated primarily to observe Halley’s Comet in early March 1986 and Astro-2 to fly about one year later. Due to the Challenger disaster 35 days before scheduled launch of Astro-1, the mission went through an initial cancellation and then re-scheduling once the instrument complement of Astro-1 was expanded to include Broad Band X-ray Telescope with emphasis on studying SN1987A. Ultimately Astro-1 flew in December 1990 partnered with an X-ray experiment focused on SN1987A.The nine-day mission was mostly successful despite multiple technical issues overcome by the NASA

  3. Brain-Based Indices for User System Symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Veltman, J.A.; Grootjen, M.

    2010-01-01

    The future generation user system interfaces need to be user-centric which goes beyond user-friendly and includes understanding and anticipating user intentions. We introduce the concept of operator models, their role in implementing user-system symbiosis, and the usefulness of brain-based indices

  4. Metadata: A user`s view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretherton, F.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Singley, P.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    An analysis is presented of the uses of metadata from four aspects of database operations: (1) search, query, retrieval, (2) ingest, quality control, processing, (3) application to application transfer; (4) storage, archive. Typical degrees of database functionality ranging from simple file retrieval to interdisciplinary global query with metadatabase-user dialog and involving many distributed autonomous databases, are ranked in approximate order of increasing sophistication of the required knowledge representation. An architecture is outlined for implementing such functionality in many different disciplinary domains utilizing a variety of off the shelf database management subsystems and processor software, each specialized to a different abstract data model.

  5. IAC user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Gregg, J.

    1984-01-01

    The User Manual for the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) Level 1 system is presented. The IAC system currently supports the thermal, structures, controls and system dynamics technologies, and its development is influenced by the requirements for design/analysis of large space systems. The system has many features which make it applicable to general problems in engineering, and to management of data and software. Information includes basic IAC operation, executive commands, modules, solution paths, data organization and storage, IAC utilities, and module implementation.

  6. ASTRA Plus User Manual

    OpenAIRE

    MATUZAS Vaidas; CONTINI SERGIO

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the user interface and the main commands to perform system dependability analysis by means of ASTRA Plus. This package implements the analysis methods developed at the Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen from mid-2008. ASTRA Plus is composed of the Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) module and of the Concurrent Importance and Sensitivity Analysis (CISA) module. The FTA module contains three different methods for solving a fault tree; all are based on the...

  7. Implementation of new concepts for space HVAC systems in domestic buildings in consideration of cost, consumption and user comfort. Final report; Umsetzung neuer Konzepte der technischen Gebaeudeausruestung im Wohnungsbau unter Beruecksichtigung von Kosten, Verbraeuchen und Nutzerkomfort. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F.; Sucic, D.; Wendler, M.

    1998-03-01

    The goal of this project was the development of a set of tools for the selection of optimal concepts for HVAC-systems in housing buildings. Several factors are considered. They include technical feasibility, costs for investment, maintenance and operation, energy concumption, environmental impacts and user comfort. It is intended with the help of these tools to identify the most important factors which influence energy consumption and to suggest simple and cost effective measures to reduce energy consumption. Measures include improvements of the envelope, changes in the HVAC-system and its operation according to the needs to the inhabitants of the building. This report describes these components of this tool set which were developed in the frame of the project WohnKomfort. It lists data and rules chosen. In addition we report experiences which we gained with an prototypical implementation. This implementation allows load calculations for more than 60.000 different buildings applying EN 802 (only one zone model) as calculation method. It also supports selection of heating systems for such buildings by offering an evaluation according to user specified criteria including cost, environment and comfort. (orig./MM) [Deutsch] Ziel des Vorhabens war die Entwicklung eines Instrumentariums zur Auswahl optimaler Konzepte fuer technische Anlagen in Wohngebaeuden unter Beruecksichtigung der Faktoren technische Machbarkeit, Erstellungs-, Betriebskosten, Energieverbrauch, Umweltbelastung und Nutzerkomfort. Mit Hilfe dieses Instrumentariums soll es moeglich werden, die Haupteinflussfaktoren fuer den Energieverbrauch anzugeben und Vorschlaege fuer einfache und kostenguenstige Massnahmen zu seiner Reduzierung auf der Seite des Gebaeudes (bauliche Massnahmen) und der Anlage (technische Massnahmen, Nutzerverhalten) anzugeben. In diesem Bericht beschreiben wir die im Vorhaben entwickelten Komponenten des Instrumentariums, die zugrundeliegenden Daten und Regeln sowie Erfahrungen, die

  8. User 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porras, Jari; Heikkinen, Kari; Kinnula, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    an effect on their future needs. Human needs have been studied much longer than user generations per se. Psychologist Maslow presented a characterization of human needs as early as 1943. This basic characterization was later studied with an evolving environment in mind. Although the basic needs have...

  9. Chat Bots Implementation and User Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Sajjad

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the concept of Chat Bots, and to analyse its importance and place in today’s communication platforms. The goal of the project was to build a Chat Bot prototypically for Metropolia University of Applied Sciences helpdesk on a messaging platform, which would replace the traditional way of reserv- ing old devices for purchase sold at Metropolia’s helpdesk in different times throughout the year. The chat bot was developed using a high-level implementat...

  10. On User Interface Architectures and Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    KUKOLA, TERO

    2008-01-01

    The definition of MVC model has become distorted. Many MVC adaptations use a mediating controller between model and view layers, which is not part of the original MVC/80 model. While the separation of model and view has benefits, the mediating controller leads to excessive redundancy in code and should be avoided. Removing the mediating controller simplifies UI architectures. This simplification can be continued further by adopting dynamic features and ultimately by adopting dynamic languages...

  11. Effects of rectilinear acceleration, caloric and optokinetic stimulation of human subjects in the Spacelab D-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzig, J.; von Baumgarten, R.

    A set of vestibular experiments was performed during the course of the German Spacelab D-1 mission from 30 October to 6 November 1985 by a consortium of experimenters from various european countries. Similar to the Spacelab SL-1 mission all of the scientific crew members were theoretically and practically trained for the experiments. Baseline measurements for all tests were collected 113, 86, 44, 30 and 18 days prior to the mission and compared with data taken inflight, on the landing day and the consecutive 7 to 14 days. The hardware comprised mainly a motordriven accelerating platform, the SPACE SLED, and the vestibular helmet, a multi-purpose instrument in support of a variety of vestibular experiments including air-calorisation of the ears, optokinetic stimulation pattern presentation and optical and nystagmographic recording of eye movements. Measurements of the threshold for the perception of detection of whole body movement did not reveal any dramatic changes in the 2 measured axes inflight when compared to preflight values. Early postflight values show a significantly elevated threshold for all axes in 3 out of 4 subjects. The caloric nystagmus, already found during the SL-1 mission, was confirmed on all three tested subjects during the D-1 mission. It's amplitude and in some instances it's direction were influenced by horizontal acceleration on the SLED. The amplitude of optokinetic nystagmus increased when subjects were allowed to free-float over that seen when subjects were fixed. Stimulation of the neck receptors by roll movements of the body against the fixated head resulted in illusory object motion to the contralateral side. Torsional movements of the eyes during such neck receptor stimulation was present inflight and postflight, while it had not been observed preflight. Most results point to a reduction of otolithic effects in favour of visual and proprioceptive influences for spatial orientation.

  12. Implementing a routine outcome assessment procedure to evaluate the quality of assistive technology service delivery for children with physical or multiple disabilities: Perceived effectiveness, social cost, and user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, Lorenzo; Bizzarri, Martina; Bitelli, Claudio; Roentgen, Uta; Gelderblom, Gert-Jan; de Witte, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence on the effects and quality of assistive technology service delivery (ATSD). This study presents a quasi-experimental 3-months follow-up using a pre-test/post-test design aimed at evaluating outcomes of assistive technology (AT) interventions targeting children with physical and multiple disabilities. A secondary aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the follow-up assessment adopted in this study with a view to implement the procedure in routine clinical practice. Forty-five children aged 3-17 years were included. Parents were asked to complete the Individual Prioritised Problem Assessment (IPPA) for AT effectiveness; KWAZO (Kwaliteit van Zorg [Quality of Care]) and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0 for satisfaction with ATSD; Siva Cost Analysis Instrument (SCAI) for estimating the social cost of AT interventions. At follow-up, 25 children used the AT recommended. IPPA effect sizes ranged from 1.4 to 0.7, showing a large effect of AT interventions. Overall, parents were satisfied with ATSD, but Maintenance, Professional Services, and AT Delivery were rated not satisfactory. SCAI showed more resources spent for AT intervention compared to human assistance without technological supports. AT may be an effective intervention for children with disabilities. Issues concerning responsiveness and feasibility of the IPPA and the SCAI instruments are discussed with a view to inform routine clinical practice.

  13. Designing Privacy for You : A User Centric Approach For Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Senarath, Awanthika; Arachchilage, Nalin A. G.; Slay, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Privacy directly concerns the user as the data owner (data- subject) and hence privacy in systems should be implemented in a manner which concerns the user (user-centered). There are many concepts and guidelines that support development of privacy and embedding privacy into systems. However, none of them approaches privacy in a user- centered manner. Through this research we propose a framework that would enable developers and designers to grasp privacy in a user-centered manner and implement...

  14. Time, Attitude, and User Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Assimilation of a standard ERP system to an organization is difficult. User involvement seems to be the crux of the matter. However, even the best intentions for user involvement may come to nothing. A case study of a five-year ERP implementation process reveals that a main reason may be that the...... research regarding new approaches and/or new techniques and tools for user participation in the context of ERP implementations is needed. Udgivelsesdato: 2008......Assimilation of a standard ERP system to an organization is difficult. User involvement seems to be the crux of the matter. However, even the best intentions for user involvement may come to nothing. A case study of a five-year ERP implementation process reveals that a main reason may...... be that the perception of usefulness of the system in any given phase of the implementation is heavily dependent on preceding events—the process. A process model analysis identifies eight episodes and nine encounters in the case showing that the user’s attitude towards the ERP system changes between acceptance...

  15. How users matter : The co-construction of users and technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, Nelly E.J.; Pinch, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    Users have become an integral part of technology studies. The essays in this volume look at the creative capacity of users to shape technology in all phases, from design to implementation. Using a variety of theoretical approaches, including a feminist focus on users and use (in place of the

  16. CAPTCHA: Impact on User Experience of Users with Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Gafni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CAPTCHA is one of the most common solutions to check if the user trying to enter a Website is a real person or an automated piece of software. This challenge-response test, implemented in many Internet Websites, emphasizes the gaps between accessibility and security on the Internet, as it poses an obstacle for the learning-impaired in the reading and comprehension of what is presented in the test. Various types of CAPTCHA tests have been developed in order to address accessibility and security issues. The objective of this study is to investigate how the differences between various CAPTCHA tests affect user experience among populations with and without learning disabilities. A questionnaire accompanied by experiencing five different tests was administered to 212 users, 60 of them with learning disabilities. Response rates for each test and levels of success were collected automatically. Findings suggest that users with learning disabilities have more difficulties in solving the tests, especially those with distorted texts, have more negative attitudes towards the CAPTCHA tests, but the response time has no statistical difference from users without learning disabilities. These insights can help to develop and implement solutions suitable for many users and especially for population with learning disabilities.

  17. User Preferences in Image Map Using

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráková, A.; Vozenilek, V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of map making, the attention is given to the resulting image map (to be accurate, readable, and suit the primary purpose) and its user aspects. Current cartography understands the user issues as all matters relating to user perception, map use and also user preferences. Most commercial cartographic production is strongly connected to economic circumstances. Companies are discovering user's interests and market demands. However, is it sufficient to focus just on the user's preferences? Recent research on user aspects at Palacký University Olomouc addresses a much wider scope of user aspects. The user's preferences are very often distorting - the users think that the particular image map is kind, beautiful, and useful and they wants to buy it (or use it - it depends on the form of the map production). But when the same user gets the task to use practically this particular map (such as finding the shortest way), so the user concludes that initially preferred map is useless, and uses a map, that was worse evaluated according to his preferences. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate not only the correctness of image maps and their aesthetics but also to assess the user perception and other user issues. For the accomplishment of such testing, eye-tracking technology is a useful tool. The research analysed how users read image maps, or if they prefer image maps over traditional maps. The eye tracking experiment on the comparison of the conventional and image map reading was conducted. The map readers were asked to solve few simple tasks with either conventional or image map. The readers' choice of the map to solve the task was one of investigated aspect of user preferences. Results demonstrate that the user preferences and user needs are often quite different issues. The research outcomes show that it is crucial to implement map user testing into the cartographic production process.

  18. CAPTCHA: Impact on User Experience of Users with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ruti; Nagar, Idan

    2016-01-01

    CAPTCHA is one of the most common solutions to check if the user trying to enter a Website is a real person or an automated piece of software. This challenge-response test, implemented in many Internet Websites, emphasizes the gaps between accessibility and security on the Internet, as it poses an obstacle for the learning-impaired in the reading…

  19. Multi-user data acquisition environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The typical data acquisition environment involves data collection and monitoring by a single user. However, in order to support experiments on the Mars facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have had to create a multi-user data acquisition environment where any user can control the data acquisition and several users can monitor and analyze data being collected in real time. This paper describes how we accomplished this on an HP A600 computer. It focuses on the overall system description and user communication with the tasks within the system. Our current implementation is one phase of a long-term software development project

  20. Justine user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    Justine is the graphical user interface to the Los Alamos Radiation Modeling Interactive Environment (LARAMIE). It provides LARAMIE customers with a powerful, robust, easy-to-use, WYSIWYG interface that facilitates geometry construction and problem specification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with LARAMIE, and the transport codes available, i.e., MCNPTM and DANTSYSTM. No attempt is made in this manual to describe these codes in detail. Information about LARAMIE, DANTSYS, and MCNP are available elsewhere. It i also assumed that the reader is familiar with the Unix operating system and with Motif widgets and their look and feel. However, a brief description of Motif and how one interacts with it can be found in Appendix A.

  1. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter - POLAR onboard the China’s Spacelab “Tiangong-2”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianchao; BAO, T. W.; BATSCH, T.; BRITVITCH, I.; CADOUX, F.; DONG, Y. W.; GAUVIN, N.; HAJDAS, W.; KOLE, M.; LECHANOINE-LELUC, C.; LI, L.; MARCINKOWSKI, R.; ORSI, S.; POHL, M.; PRODUIT, N.; RAPIN, D.; RUTCZYNSKA, A.; RYBKA, D.; SZABELSKI, J.; WANG, R. J.; WU, B. B.; XIAO, H. L.; ZHANG, S. N.; ZHANG, Y. J.; ZWOLINSKA, A.

    2015-08-01

    POLAR is a novel compact space-borne Compton polarimeter conceived for a precise measurement of hard X-ray/Gamma-ray polarization and optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in the energy range 50 - 500 keV. The future detailed measurement of the polarization of GRB will lead to a better understanding of its radiation region geometry and emission mechanisms. Thanks to its remarkable properties on large effective area, field of view (4.14 sr or 1/3 of the visible sky) and obvious modulation factor, POLAR will be able to reach a minimum detectable polarization (1-σ level) of about 3% for several GRB measurements per year. POLAR consists of 25 detector modular units (DMU). Each DMU is composed of 64 low-Z plastic scintillator bars, read out by a flat-panel multi-anode photomultipliers and ASIC front-end electronics. The incoming photons undergo Compton scattering in the bars and produce a modulation pattern. Simulations and hard X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments have shown that the polarization degree and angle can be retrieved from this pattern with the accuracy necessary for pinning down the GRB mechanisms. A full flight model of POLAR has been constructed, in view of a flight on the Chinese spacelab TG-2 expected in 2016. The design of POLAR, Monte-Carlo simulation analysis as well as the performance test results will be all addressed in details in this talk.

  2. Distributed user interfaces usability and collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, María D; Tesoriero, Ricardo; Penichet, Victor MR

    2013-01-01

    Written by international researchers in the field of Distributed User Interfaces (DUIs), this book brings together important contributions regarding collaboration and usability in Distributed User Interface settings. Throughout the thirteen chapters authors address key questions concerning how collaboration can be improved by using DUIs, including: in which situations a DUI is suitable to ease the collaboration among users; how usability standards can be used to evaluate the usability of systems based on DUIs; and accurately describe case studies and prototypes implementing these concerns

  3. CSSP implementation plan for space plasma physics programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Williams, D.J.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD)

    1985-01-01

    The Committee on Solar and Space Physics (CSSP) has provided NASA with guidance in the areas of solar, heliospheric, magnetospheric, and upper atmospheric research. The budgetary sitation confronted by NASA has called for a prioritized plane for the implementation of solar and space plasma physics programs. CSSP has developed the following recommendations: (1) continue implementation of both the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and Solar Optical Telescope programs; (2) initiate the International Solar Terrestrial Physics program; (3) plan for later major free-flying missions and carry out the technology development they require; (4) launch an average of one solar and space physics Explorer per yr beginning in 1990; (5) enhance current Shuttle/Spacelab programs; (6) develop facility-class instrumentation; (7) augment the solar terrestrial theory program by FY 1990; (8) support a compute modeling program; (9) strengthen the research and analysis program; and (10) maintain a stable suborbital program for flexible science objectives in upper atmosphere and space plasma physics

  4. EPICS system: system structure and user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, R.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Lahey, T.E.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.

    1984-02-01

    This paper present the user's view of and the general organization of the EPICS control system at Fermilab. Various subsystems of the EPICS control system are discussed. These include the user command language, software protection, the device database, remote computer interfaces, and several application utilities. This paper is related to two other papers on EPICS: an overview paper and a detailed implementation paper

  5. 微博营销系统用户分析功能的设计和实现%Design and implementation of user analysis function of microblog marketing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁金鹏; 王晓宇

    2011-01-01

    为了构建一个基于微博开放平台的在线营销系统,给营销人员提供更加全面、准确的用户信息,系统通过各微博平台开放API获取用户消息和相关信息,重点研究了如何通过融合来自不同开放平台的用户数据源,形成统一的用户数据模型的问题,最终实现了各平台用户数据的整合.实验结果表明,该系统功能能够更加准确、全面地反映用户真实信息.%: To build an online marketing system that was based on microblog open platform and provide marketing specialists with more comprehensive and accurate information, users' status and relative information was acquired through open platform API. The authors focused on how to merge user data from several different open platforms and to form one unified user data model, finally achieved the amalgamation of user data from different platforms. The experimental results show that this function can reflect the user's information more comprehensively and accurately.

  6. Sustained User Engagement in Health Information Technology: The Long Road from Implementation to System Optimization of Computerized Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support Systems for Prescribing in Hospitals in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Lee, Lisa; Mozaffar, Hajar; Williams, Robin; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-10-01

    To explore and understand approaches to user engagement through investigating the range of ways in which health care workers and organizations accommodated the introduction of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and computerized decision support (CDS) for hospital prescribing. Six hospitals in England, United Kingdom. Qualitative case study. We undertook qualitative semi-structured interviews, non-participant observations of meetings and system use, and collected organizational documents over three time periods from six hospitals. Thematic analysis was initially undertaken within individual cases, followed by cross-case comparisons. We conducted 173 interviews, conducted 24 observations, and collected 17 documents between 2011 and 2015. We found that perceived individual and safety benefits among different user groups tended to facilitate engagement in some, while other less engaged groups developed resistance and unsanctioned workarounds if systems were perceived to be inadequate. We identified both the opportunity and need for sustained engagement across user groups around system enhancement (e.g., through customizing software) and the development of user competencies and effective use. There is an urgent need to move away from an episodic view of engagement focused on the preimplementation phase, to more continuous holistic attempts to engage with and respond to end-users. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. User Requirements for Wireless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in the elicitation process. Cases and user requirement elements discussed in the book include: User requirements elicitation processes for children, construction workers, and farmers User requirements for personalized services of a broadcast company Variations in user involvement Practical elements of user...

  8. Lessons Learned in Designing User-configurable Modular Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2013-01-01

    User-configurable robotics allows users to easily configure robotic systems to perform task-fulfilling behaviors as desired by the users. With a user configurable robotic system, the user can easily modify the physical and func-tional aspect in terms of hardware and software components of a robotic...... with the semi-autonomous com-ponents of the user-configurable robotic system in interaction with the given environment. Components constituting such a user-configurable robotic system can be characterized as modules in a modular robotic system. Several factors in the definition and implementation...

  9. Use of force feedback to enhance graphical user interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Louis B.; Brave, Scott

    1996-04-01

    This project focuses on the use of force feedback sensations to enhance user interaction with standard graphical user interface paradigms. While typical joystick and mouse devices are input-only, force feedback controllers allow physical sensations to be reflected to a user. Tasks that require users to position a cursor on a given target can be enhanced by applying physical forces to the user that aid in targeting. For example, an attractive force field implemented at the location of a graphical icon can greatly facilitate target acquisition and selection of the icon. It has been shown that force feedback can enhance a users ability to perform basic functions within graphical user interfaces.

  10. Adaptive User Profiles in Pervasive Advertising Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Florian; Balz, Moritz; Kristes, Stefanie; Shirazi, Alireza Sahami; Mennenöh, Julian; Schmidt, Albrecht; Schröder, Hendrik; Goedicke, Michael

    Nowadays modern advertising environments try to provide more efficient ads by targeting costumers based on their interests. Various approaches exist today as to how information about the users' interests can be gathered. Users can deliberately and explicitly provide this information or user's shopping behaviors can be analyzed implicitly. We implemented an advertising platform to simulate an advertising environment and present adaptive profiles, which let users setup profiles based on a self-assessment, and enhance those profiles with information about their real shopping behavior as well as about their activity intensity. Additionally, we explain how pervasive technologies such as Bluetooth can be used to create a profile anonymously and unobtrusively.

  11. Wilmar Planning Tool, user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Helge V.

    2006-01-15

    This is a short user guide to the Wilmar Planning Tool developed in the project Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets (WILMAR) supported by EU (Contract No. ENK5-CT-2002-00663). A User Shell implemented in an Excel workbook controls the Wilmar Planning Tool. All data are contained in Access databases that communicate with various sub-models through text files that are exported from or imported to the databases. In the User Shell various scenario variables and control parameters are set, and export of model data from the input database, activation of the models, as well as import of model results to the output database are triggered from the shell. (au)

  12. Wilmar Planning Tool, user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Helge V.

    2006-01-01

    This is a short user guide to the Wilmar Planning Tool developed in the project Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets (WILMAR) supported by EU (Contract No. ENK5-CT-2002-00663). A User Shell implemented in an Excel workbook controls the Wilmar Planning Tool. All data are contained in Access databases that communicate with various sub-models through text files that are exported from or imported to the databases. In the User Shell various scenario variables and control parameters are set, and export of model data from the input database, activation of the models, as well as import of model results to the output database are triggered from the shell. (au)

  13. Selecting users for participation in IT projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Christensen, Anders S.; Fjeldsted, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The selection of users for participation in IT projects involves trade-offs between multiple criteria, one of which is selecting a representative cross-section of users. This criterion is basic because trading it for other criteria means basing designs on information biased toward some user groups...... at the expense of others. Based on interviews in development and customer organizations we find that their criteria for user selection favour persons who can contribute to the progress of the IT project over persons who are representative of the full range of users. A highly valued contribution from...... participating users is the ability to advocate a vision for the system and champion its organizational implementation. A survey in one customer organization shows that respondents’ personal traits explain up to 31% of the variation in their experience of aspects of the usability of a recently introduced system...

  14. User Design: A Case Study on Corporate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Raymond S.; Carr-Chellman, Alison A.; Lohmann, Neal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of implementing user design strategies within the corporate culture. Using a case study design approach, this article explores the change process within a "Fortune" 100 company in which users were given significant decision-making powers. The main focus is on the unique nature of user design in…

  15. Graphical User Interface Programming in Introductory Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, Michael M.; Spooner, David L.

    Modern computing systems exploit graphical user interfaces for interaction with users; as a result, introductory computer science courses must begin to teach the principles underlying such interfaces. This paper presents an approach to graphical user interface (GUI) implementation that is simple enough for beginning students to understand, yet…

  16. Tactical Wireless Networking in Coalition Environments: Implementing an IEEE 802.20 Wireless End-User Network Utilizing FLASH-OFDM to Provide a Secure Mobile Extension to Existing WAN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrish, William J; Tovar, Daniel R

    2005-01-01

    This thesis will focus on the area of 802.20 wireless networking as a feasible "last mile" solution to wireless access in a tactical coalition environment and will be implemented into a series of experiments...

  17. User Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bertelsen, Pernille

    User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude.......User Innovation Management (UIM) is a method for fo-opereation with users in innovation projects. The UIM method emphasizes the practice of a participatorty attitude....

  18. User Behavior Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Juston Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    User Behaviour Analytics is the tracking, collecting and assessing of user data and activities. The goal is to detect misuse of user credentials by developing models for the normal behaviour of user credentials within a computer network and detect outliers with respect to their baseline.

  19. Lazy User Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Collan, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    In this position paper we suggest that a user will most often choose the solution (device) that will fulfill her (information) needs with the least effort. We call this “lazy user behavior”. We suggest that the principle components responsible for solution selection are the user need and the user state. User need is the user’s detailed (information) need (urgency, type, depth, etc.) and user state is the situation, in which the user is at the moment of the need (location, time, etc.); the use...

  20. Assessing users' experience of shared sanitation facilities: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the academic literature, users' feedback and experiences of technologies in the post-implementation phase have received scarce attention. The purpose of this study is to investigate users' experience of sanitation technologies in the early post-implementation phase, when opportunities for remedial intervention are still ...

  1. Graphical user interfaces and visually disabled users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, L.H.D.; Waterham, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    From February 1992 until the end of 1993, the authors ((IPO) Institute for Perception Research) participated in a European ((TIDE) Technology Initiative for Disabled and Elderly) project which addressed the problem arising for visually disabled computer-users from the growing use of Graphical User

  2. Accelerator facilities users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, H.C.; Adrion, L.; Frosch, R.; Salzmann, M.

    1994-07-01

    In 1981 the ''Green Book'' of SIN was distributed, a User Handbook serving the needs of people already working at SIN as well as informing new users about our installations. An update of the Green Book is necessary because many beams have disappeared, been modified or added, and the installation has been upgraded in intensity and versatility quite considerably. The spectrum of users has shifted away from nuclear and particle physics; applications in medicine, solid state physics and materials science have gained in importance. This Users' Guide is intended to inform our users about the changes, and to interest potential new users in coming to PSI. (author) figs., tabs

  3. Understanding your users a practical guide to user requirements methods, tools, and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Today many companies are employing a user-centered design (UCD) process, but for most companies, usability begins and ends with the usability test. Although usability testing is a critical part of an effective user-centered life cycle, it is only one component of the UCD process. This book is focused on the requirements gathering stage, which often receives less attention than usability testing, but is equally as important. Understanding user requirements is critical to the development of a successful product. Understanding Your Users is an easy to read, easy to implement, how-to guide on

  4. Nurses perceptions of a user friendly interface

    OpenAIRE

    Alshafai, Fatimah

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The successful implementation of clinical information systems depends to a large extent on its usability. Usability can be achieved by a strong focus on interface quality. With a focus on improving the quality of patient care, growing numbers of clinical information systems have been advertised as being "user-friendly". However, the term "user-friendly" may not be quite accurate and in some circumstances could be misleading. Within a clinical setting, an interface designed as ea...

  5. End-User Driven Business Process Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Stoitsev, Todor

    2009-01-01

    Business Process Management (BPM) solutions enable enterprises to consolidate and optimize their business operations and to gain competitive advantage in the fast evolving global market. Often, the only ones to understand the matter and complexity of business processes are the end users of enterprise software, who execute them on a daily basis. The need to involve end users in business process composition during the implementation of BPM solutions in enterprises is clearly perceived. However,...

  6. User interface user's guide for HYPGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ing-Tsau

    1992-01-01

    The user interface (UI) of HYPGEN is developed using Panel Library to shorten the learning curve for new users and provide easier ways to run HYPGEN for casual users as well as for advanced users. Menus, buttons, sliders, and type-in fields are used extensively in UI to allow users to point and click with a mouse to choose various available options or to change values of parameters. On-line help is provided to give users information on using UI without consulting the manual. Default values are set for most parameters and boundary conditions are determined by UI to further reduce the effort needed to run HYPGEN; however, users are free to make any changes and save it in a file for later use. A hook to PLOT3D is built in to allow graphics manipulation. The viewpoint and min/max box for PLOT3D windows are computed by UI and saved in a PLOT3D journal file. For large grids which take a long time to generate on workstations, the grid generator (HYPGEN) can be run on faster computers such as Crays, while UI stays at the workstation.

  7. IDRC Connect User Guide

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Kristina Kamichaitis

    IDRC Extranet home page, which is an umbrella for a number of applications available to IDRC external users. ... IDRC Connect is not formatted for mobile users. ..... Thesis. • Training Material. • Website. • Working Paper. • Workshop Report.

  8. Implicit User Interest Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, K

    2002-01-01

    User interest profile presents items that the users are interested in. Typically those items can be listed or grouped. Listing is good but it does not possess interests at different abstraction levels - the higher-level interests are more general, while the lower-level ones are more specific. Furthermore, more general interests, in some sense, correspond to longer-term interests, while more specific interests correspond to shorter-term interests. This hierarchical user interest profile has obvious advantages: specifying user's specific interests and general interests and representing their relationships. Current user interest profile structures mostly do not use implicit method, nor use an appropriate clustering algorithm especially for conceptually hierarchical structures. This research studies building a hierarchical user interest profile (HUIP) and the hierarchical divisive algorithm (HDC). Several users visit hundreds of web pages and each page is recorded in each users profile. These web pages are used t...

  9. Demand access communications for TDRSS users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillig, David; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) has long been used to provide reliable low and high-data rate relay services between user spacecraft in Earth orbit and the ground. To date, these TDRSS services have been implemented via prior scheduling based upon estimates of user needs and mission event timelines. While this approach may be necessary for large users that require greater amounts of TDRSS resources, TDRSS can potentially offer the planned community of smaller science missions (e.g., the small explorer missions), and other emerging users, the unique opportunity for services on demand. In particular, innovative application of the existing TDRSS Multiple Access (MA) subsystem, with its phased array antenna, could be used to implement true demand access services without modification to either the TDRSS satellites or the user transponder, thereby introducing operational and performance benefits to both the user community and the Space Network. In this paper, candidate implementations of demand access service via the TDRSS MA subsystem are examined in detail. Both forward and return link services are addressed and a combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments are provided. The paper also identifies further areas for investigation in this ongoing activity that is being conducted by GSFC/Code 531 under the NASA Code O Advanced Systems Program.

  10. Waste treatability guidance program. User`s guide. Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, C.

    1995-12-21

    DOE sites across the country generate and manage radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and sanitary wastes. It is necessary for each site to find the technologies and associated capacities required to manage its waste. One role of DOE HQ Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is to facilitate the integration of the site- specific plans into coherent national plans. DOE has developed a standard methodology for defining and categorizing waste streams into treatability groups based on characteristic parameters that influence waste management technology needs. This Waste Treatability Guidance Program automates the Guidance Document for the categorization of waste information into treatability groups; this application provides a consistent implementation of the methodology across the National TRU Program. This User`s Guide provides instructions on how to use the program, including installations instructions and program operation. This document satisfies the requirements of the Software Quality Assurance Plan.

  11. Framework for Enabling User-Generated Content

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Karin H

    2012-01-01

    User-generated content, UGC, is a modern topic today and refers to media and creative works created by Internet users and posted on the Internet. More and more application developers wants to offer sharing functionalities in their applications and on their websites. The alternatives of doing so today are to use UGC platforms API, like Facebook and Twitter, to upload the content to that specific platform or to implement the framework ShareKit that enables the user to share their content on mul...

  12. NPAS Users Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This NPAS Users Guide is primarily intended as a source of information about policies, procedures, and facilities appropriate for users in the program of Nuclear Physics at SLAC (NPAS). General policies and practices are described, the preparation of proposals is discussed, and the services for users is outlined. SLAC experimental facilities are described, and contacts are listed

  13. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 2: Requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratories. [for Spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The task phase concerned with the requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratory (COL) began with a definition of biomedical research areas and candidate research equipment, and then went on to develop conceptual layouts for COL which were each evaluated in order to arrive at a final conceptual design. Each step in this design/evaluation process concerned itself with man/systems integration research and hardware, and life support and protective systems research and equipment selection. COL integration studies were also conducted and include attention to electrical power and data management requirements, operational considerations, and shuttle/Spacelab interface specifications. A COL program schedule was compiled, and a cost analysis was finalized which takes into account work breakdown, annual funding, and cost reduction guidelines.

  14. Spacelab Life Sciences flight experiments: an integrated approach to the study of cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight produces rapid cardiovascular changes which are adaptive and appropriate in that setting, but are associated with significant deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension on return to Earth's gravity. The rapidity with which these space flight induced changes appear and disappear provides an ideal model for studying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension, regardless of etiology. Since significant deconditioning is seen after flights of very short duration, muscle atrophy due to inactivity plays, at most, a small role. These changes in circulatory control associated with cephalad fluid shifts, rather than inactivity per se, are probably more important factors. In order to test this hypothesis in a systematic way, a multidisciplinary approach which defines and integrates inputs and responses from a wide variety of circulatory sub-systems is required. The cardiovascular experiments selected for Spacelab Life Sciences flights 1 and 2 provide such an approach. Both human and animal models will be utilized. Pre- and post-flight characterization of the payload crew includes determination of maximal exercise capacity (bicycle ergometry), orthostatic tolerance (lower body negative pressure), alpha and beta adrenergic sensitivity (isoproterenol and phenylephrine infusions), baroreflex sensitivity (ECG-gated, stepwise changes in carotid artery transmural pressure with a pneumatic neck collar), and responses to a 24 h period of 5 deg head-down tilt. Measurements of cardiac output (CO2 and C2H2 rebreathing), cardiac chamber dimensions (phased-array 2-dimensional echocardiography), direct central venous pressure, leg volume (Thornton sock), limb blood flow and venous compliance (occlusion plethysmography), blood and plasma volumes, renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rates, and various hormonal levels including catecholamines and atrial natriuretic factor will also be obtained

  15. DOSFAC2 user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.L.; Chanin, D.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the DOSFAC2 code, which is used for generating dose-to-source conversion factors for the MACCS2 code. DOSFAC2 is a revised and updated version of the DOSFAC code that was distributed with version 1.5.11 of the MACCS code. included are (1) an overview and background of DOSFAC2, (2) a summary of two new functional capabilities, and (3) a user`s guide. 20 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding......When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...

  17. User interface for a partially incompatible system software environment with non-ADP users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loffman, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    Good user interfaces to computer systems and software applications are the result of combining an analysis of user needs with knowledge of interface design principles and techniques. This thesis reports on an interface for an environment: (a) that consists of users who are not computer science or data processing professionals; and (b) which is bound by predetermined software and hardware. The interface was designed which combined these considerations with user interface design principles. Current literature was investigated to establish a baseline of knowledge about user interface design. There are many techniques which can be used to implement a user interface, but all should have the same basic goal, which is to assist the user in the performance of a task. This can be accomplished by providing the user with consistent, well-structured interfaces which also provide flexibility to adapt to differences among users. The interface produced used menu selection and command language techniques to make two different operating system environments appear similar. Additional included features helped to address the needs of different users. The original goal was also to make the transition between the two systems transparent. This was not fully accomplished due to software and hardware limitations.

  18. User Interface Technology for Formal Specification Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Philpot, Andrew; Pressburger, Thomas; Underwood, Ian; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Formal specification development and modification are an essential component of the knowledge-based software life cycle. User interface technology is needed to empower end-users to create their own formal specifications. This paper describes the advanced user interface for AMPHION1 a knowledge-based software engineering system that targets scientific subroutine libraries. AMPHION is a generic, domain-independent architecture that is specialized to an application domain through a declarative domain theory. Formal specification development and reuse is made accessible to end-users through an intuitive graphical interface that provides semantic guidance in creating diagrams denoting formal specifications in an application domain. The diagrams also serve to document the specifications. Automatic deductive program synthesis ensures that end-user specifications are correctly implemented. The tables that drive AMPHION's user interface are automatically compiled from a domain theory; portions of the interface can be customized by the end-user. The user interface facilitates formal specification development by hiding syntactic details, such as logical notation. It also turns some of the barriers for end-user specification development associated with strongly typed formal languages into active sources of guidance, without restricting advanced users. The interface is especially suited for specification modification. AMPHION has been applied to the domain of solar system kinematics through the development of a declarative domain theory. Testing over six months with planetary scientists indicates that AMPHION's interactive specification acquisition paradigm enables users to develop, modify, and reuse specifications at least an order of magnitude more rapidly than manual program development.

  19. Implementation of Summon at KAUST

    KAUST Repository

    Buck, Stephen

    2017-03-09

    Web discovery services has evolved tremendously from the time of its introduction to present day. Their technology has enabled library users to obtain a variety of materials in different format and type faster and farther. Coupled with a myriad of features, users are ‘pampered’ with the options to email, download citations, full text articles, book chapters on different devices such as laptops, desktops and mobile devices (among others). In this session, the speaker will highlight KAUST library’s new discovery service (KORAL powered by Summon) launched in June 2016. Topics include the implementation project, its challenges and lessons learnt and the after-implementation initiatives.

  20. Implementation of Summon at KAUST

    KAUST Repository

    Buck, Stephen; Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-01-01

    Web discovery services has evolved tremendously from the time of its introduction to present day. Their technology has enabled library users to obtain a variety of materials in different format and type faster and farther. Coupled with a myriad of features, users are ‘pampered’ with the options to email, download citations, full text articles, book chapters on different devices such as laptops, desktops and mobile devices (among others). In this session, the speaker will highlight KAUST library’s new discovery service (KORAL powered by Summon) launched in June 2016. Topics include the implementation project, its challenges and lessons learnt and the after-implementation initiatives.

  1. Spectrometer user interface to computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Davies, M.; Fry, F.A.; Venn, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A computer system for use in radiation spectrometry should be designed around the needs and comprehension of the user and his operating environment. To this end, the functions of the system should be built in a modular and independent fashion such that they can be joined to the back end of an appropriate user interface. The point that this interface should be designed rather than just allowed to evolve is illustrated by reference to four related computer systems of differing complexity and function. The physical user interfaces in all cases are keyboard terminals, and the virtues and otherwise of these devices are discussed and compared with others. The language interface needs to satisfy a number of requirements, often conflicting. Among these, simplicity and speed of operation compete with flexibility and scope. Both experienced and novice users need to be considered, and any individual's needs may vary from naive to complex. To be efficient and resilient, the implementation must use an operating system, but the user needs to be protected from its complex and unfamiliar syntax. At the same time the interface must allow the user access to all services appropriate to his needs. The user must also receive an image of privacy in a multi-user system. The interface itself must be stable and exhibit continuity between implementations. Some of these conflicting needs have been overcome by the SABRE interface with languages operating at several levels. The foundation is a simple semimnemonic command language that activates indididual and independent functions. The commands can be used with positional parameters or in an interactive dialogue the precise nature of which depends upon the operating environment and the user's experience. A command procedure or macrolanguage allows combinations of commands with conditional branching and arithmetic features. Thus complex but repetitive operations are easily performed

  2. TAILSIM Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltner, Dale W.

    2000-01-01

    The TAILSIM program uses a 4th order Runge-Kutta method to integrate the standard aircraft equations-of-motion (EOM). The EOM determine three translational and three rotational accelerations about the aircraft's body axis reference system. The forces and moments that drive the EOM are determined from aerodynamic coefficients, dynamic derivatives, and control inputs. Values for these terms are determined from linear interpolation of tables that are a function of parameters such as angle-of-attack and surface deflections. Buildup equations combine these terms and dimensionalize them to generate the driving total forces and moments. Features that make TAILSIM applicable to studies of tailplane stall include modeling of the reversible control System, modeling of the pilot performing a load factor and/or airspeed command task, and modeling of vertical gusts. The reversible control system dynamics can be described as two hinged masses connected by a spring. resulting in a fifth order system. The pilot model is a standard form of lead-lag with a time delay applied to an integrated pitch rate and/or airspeed error feedback. The time delay is implemented by a Pade approximation, while the commanded pitch rate is determined by a commanded load factor. Vertical gust inputs include a single 1-cosine gust and a continuous NASA Dryden gust model. These dynamic models. coupled with the use of a nonlinear database, allow the tailplane stall characteristics, elevator response, and resulting aircraft response, to be modeled. A useful output capability of the TAILSIM program is the ability to display multiple post-run plot pages to allow a quick assessment of the time history response. There are 16 plot pages currently available to the user. Each plot page displays 9 parameters. Each parameter can also be displayed individually. on a one plot-per-page format. For a more refined display of the results the program can also create files of tabulated data. which can then be used by other

  3. Slycat™ User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossno, Patricia J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gittinger, Jaxon [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hunt, Warren L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Letter, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Shawn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sielicki, Milosz Aleksander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Slycat™ is a web-based system for performing data analysis and visualization of potentially large quantities of remote, high-dimensional data. Slycat™ specializes in working with ensemble data. An ensemble is a group of related data sets, which typically consists of a set of simulation runs exploring the same problem space. An ensemble can be thought of as a set of samples within a multi-variate domain, where each sample is a vector whose value defines a point in high-dimensional space. To understand and describe the underlying problem being modeled in the simulations, ensemble analysis looks for shared behaviors and common features across the group of runs. Additionally, ensemble analysis tries to quantify differences found in any members that deviate from the rest of the group. The Slycat™ system integrates data management, scalable analysis, and visualization. Results are viewed remotely on a user’s desktop via commodity web clients using a multi-tiered hierarchy of computation and data storage, as shown in Figure 1. Our goal is to operate on data as close to the source as possible, thereby reducing time and storage costs associated with data movement. Consequently, we are working to develop parallel analysis capabilities that operate on High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms, to explore approaches for reducing data size, and to implement strategies for staging computation across the Slycat™ hierarchy. Within Slycat™, data and visual analysis are organized around projects, which are shared by a project team. Project members are explicitly added, each with a designated set of permissions. Although users sign-in to access Slycat™, individual accounts are not maintained. Instead, authentication is used to determine project access. Within projects, Slycat™ models capture analysis results and enable data exploration through various visual representations. Although for scientists each simulation run is a model of real-world phenomena given certain

  4. User Satisfaction Issues in ERP Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin Dezdar

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, companies in developing countries have implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Regardless of the various benefits of the ERP system, its adoption and implementation have not been without problems. Many companies have assigned considerable organizational resources to their ERP projects, but have encountered unexpected challenges. Neglecting a number of important factors in ERP projects might lead to failure instead of success. User ...

  5. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Heon

    2008-01-01

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  6. Intervention Now to Eliminate Repeat Unintended Pregnancy in Teenagers (INTERUPT): a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and qualitative and realist synthesis of implementation factors and user engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Rhiannon; Hendry, Maggie; Aslam, Rabeea'h; Booth, Andrew; Carter, Ben; Charles, Joanna M; Craine, Noel; Tudor Edwards, Rhiannon; Noyes, Jane; Ives Ntambwe, Lupetu; Pasterfield, Diana; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Williams, Nefyn

    2016-02-01

    The UK has one of the highest rates of teenage pregnancies in Western Europe. One-fifth of these are repeat pregnancies. Unintended conceptions can cause substantial emotional, psychological and educational harm to teenagers, often with enduring implications for life chances. Babies of teenage mothers have increased mortality and are at a significantly increased risk of poverty, educational underachievement and unemployment later in life, with associated costs to society. It is important to identify effective, cost-effective and acceptable interventions. To identify who is at the greatest risk of repeat unintended pregnancies; which interventions are effective and cost-effective; and what the barriers to and facilitators of the uptake of these interventions are. We conducted a multistreamed, mixed-methods systematic review informed by service user and provider consultation to examine worldwide peer-reviewed evidence and UK-generated grey literature to find and evaluate interventions to reduce repeat unintended teenage pregnancies. We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and the Health Technology Assessment Database), EMBASE (Excerpta Medica database), British Nursing Index, Educational Resources Information Center, Sociological Abstracts, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, BiblioMap (the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre register of health promotion and public health research), Social Sciences Citation Index (supported by Web of Knowledge), Research Papers in Economics, EconLit (American Economic Association's electronic bibliography), OpenGrey, Scopus, Scirus, Social Care Online, National Research Register, National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network

  7. Protocol Implementation Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho Quaresma, Jose Nuno; Probst, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Users expect communication systems to guarantee, amongst others, privacy and integrity of their data. These can be ensured by using well-established protocols; the best protocol, however, is useless if not all parties involved in a communication have a correct implementation of the protocol and a...... Generator framework based on the LySatool and a translator from the LySa language into C or Java....... necessary tools. In this paper, we present the Protocol Implementation Generator (PiG), a framework that can be used to add protocol generation to protocol negotiation, or to easily share and implement new protocols throughout a network. PiG enables the sharing, verification, and translation...

  8. International user studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Madsen, Sabine; Jensen, Iben

    In this report, we present the results of a research project about international user studies. The project has been carried out by researchers from the Center for Persona Research and –Application, The IT University in Copenhagen and the Department of Learning and Philosophy, Aalborg University...... in Sydhavnen, and it is funded by InfinIT. Based on a qualitative interview study with 15 user researchers from 11 different companies, we have investigated how companies collect and present data about users on international markets. Key findings are: Companies do not collect data about end users in all...... the countries/regions they operate in. Instead, they focus on a few strategic markets. International user studies tend to be large-scale studies that involve the effort of many both internal and external/local human resources. The studies typically cover 2-4 countries/regions and many end users in each country...

  9. Dependence and resistance in community mental health care-Negotiations of user participation between staff and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femdal, I; Knutsen, I R

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Implementation of user participation is described as a change from a paternalistic healthcare system to ideals of democratization where users' voices are heard in relational interplays with health professionals. The ideological shift involves a transition from welfare dependency and professional control towards more active service-user roles with associated rights and responsibilities. A collaborative relationship between users and professionals in mental health services is seen as important by both parties. Nevertheless, the health professionals find it challenging in practice to reorient their roles and to find productive ways to cooperate. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study illuminates how user participation is negotiated and involves multiple and shifting subject positions in the collaboration between users and professionals in community mental health care. By taking different positions, the relationship between users and professionals develops through dynamic interaction. This study challenges understandings of equality and implicit "truths" in user participation by illuminating subtle forms of power and dilemmas that arise in user-professional negotiations. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Instead of denying the appearance of power, it is important to question the execution of power in the interplay between users and professionals. Focusing on the negotiation processes between users and professionals is important for increasing reflection on and improving understanding of the dynamic in collaboration and speech. By focusing on negotiations, power can be used in productive ways in user-professional relationships. Introduction Implementation of user participation is considered important in today's mental health care. Research shows, however, that user participation lacks clarity and provokes uncertainty regarding shifting roles. Aim To investigate negotiation of user participation in a microstudy of

  10. MADS Users' Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    MADS (Minimization Assistant for Dynamical Systems) is a trajectory optimization code in which a user-specified performance measure is directly minimized, subject to constraints placed on a low-order discretization of user-supplied plant ordinary differential equations. This document describes the mathematical formulation of the set of trajectory optimization problems for which MADS is suitable, and describes the user interface. Usage examples are provided.

  11. Intervention Now to Eliminate Repeat Unintended Pregnancy in Teenagers (INTERUPT): a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and qualitative and realist synthesis of implementation factors and user engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Rabeea'h W; Hendry, Maggie; Booth, Andrew; Carter, Ben; Charles, Joanna M; Craine, Noel; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Noyes, Jane; Ntambwe, Lupetu Ives; Pasterfield, Diana; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Williams, Nefyn; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2017-08-15

    Unintended repeat conceptions can result in emotional, psychological and educational harm to young women, often with enduring implications for their life chances. This study aimed to identify which young women are at the greatest risk of repeat unintended pregnancies; which interventions are effective and cost-effective; and what are the barriers to and facilitators for the uptake of these interventions. We conducted a mixed-methods systematic review which included meta-analysis, framework synthesis and application of realist principles, with stakeholder input and service user feedback to address this. We searched 20 electronic databases, including MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica database, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts and Research Papers in Economics, to cover a broad range of health, social science, health economics and grey literature sources. Searches were conducted between May 2013 and June 2014 and updated in August 2015. Twelve randomised controlled trials (RCTs), two quasi-RCTs, 10 qualitative studies and 53 other quantitative studies were identified. The RCTs evaluated psychosocial interventions and an emergency contraception programme. The primary outcome was repeat conception rate: the event rate was 132 of 308 (43%) in the intervention group versus 140 of 289 (48%) for the control group, with a non-significant risk ratio (RR) of 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.08]. Four studies reported subsequent birth rates: 29 of 237 (12%) events for the intervention arm versus 46 out of 224 (21%) for the control arm, with an RR of 0.60 (95% CI 0.39-0.93). Many repeat conceptions occurred in the context of poverty, low expectations and aspirations and negligible opportunities. Qualitative and realist evidence highlighted the importance of context, motivation, future planning and giving young women a central and active role in the development of new interventions. Little or no evidence for the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of any of the

  12. Airport Information Retrieval System (AIRS) User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-01

    The handbook is a user's guide for a prototype air traffic flow control automation system developed for the FAA's System Command Center. The system is implemented on a time-sharing computer and is designed to provide airport traffic load predictions ...

  13. Measuring user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Lalmas, Mounia; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2014-01-01

    User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online

  14. MLF user program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Takashi; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2008-01-01

    The user program of J-PARC/MLF is overviewed. Since MLF will be one of the major neutron facilities in the world, an international standard system for the user program is expected. It is also expected to establish a system to promote users from industries. The MLF user program is based on the IUPAP recommendation on the selection of proposals. Both open and closed accesses, biannual, regular, rapid accesses, etc. will be provided. All the features in the system are being introduced to maximize both scientific and engineering outputs from MLF. (author)

  15. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikkert, Wim; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user's perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations, we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface, intuitively. First, we evaluated numerous gesture possibilities for a set of commands that can be issued to the interface. These gestures were selected from literature, science fiction movies, and a previous exploratory study. Second, we implemented a working prototype with which the users could interact with both hands and the preferred hand gestures with 2D and 3D visualizations of biochemical structures. We found that the gestures are influenced to significant extent by the fast paced developments in multimedia interfaces such as the Apple iPhone and the Nintendo Wii and to no lesser degree by decades of experience with the more traditional WIMP-based interfaces.

  16. Demonstrator 1: User Interface and User Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Describes the user interface and its functionality in a prototype system used for a virtual seminar session. The functionality is restricted to what is needed for a distributed seminar discussion among not too many people. The system is designed to work with the participants distributed at several...

  17. Information Filtering Based on Users' Negative Opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2013-05-01

    The process of heat conduction (HC) has recently found application in the information filtering [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.99, 154301 (2007)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. The classical HC model predicts users' potential interested objects based on their interesting objects regardless to the negative opinions. In terms of the users' rating scores, we present an improved user-based HC (UHC) information model by taking into account users' positive and negative opinions. Firstly, the objects rated by users are divided into positive and negative categories, then the predicted interesting and dislike object lists are generated by the UHC model. Finally, the recommendation lists are constructed by filtering out the dislike objects from the interesting lists. By implementing the new model based on nine similarity measures, the experimental results for MovieLens and Netflix datasets show that the new model considering negative opinions could greatly enhance the accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, from 0.049 to 0.036 for Netflix and from 0.1025 to 0.0570 for Movielens dataset, reduced by 26.53% and 44.39%, respectively. Since users prefer to give positive ratings rather than negative ones, the negative opinions contain much more information than the positive ones, the negative opinions, therefore, are very important for understanding users' online collective behaviors and improving the performance of HC model.

  18. Avaliação da implantação de programa voltado para melhoria da acessibilidade e humanização do acolhimento aos usuários na rede básica: Salvador, 2005-2008 Evaluation of the implementation of a program aiming to improve accessibility and humanization for primary health care users: Salvador, Brazil, 2005-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Vieira-da-Silva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar e monitorar a implantação de um projeto voltado para a ampliação do acesso e a humanização do acolhimento aos usuários da rede básica de Salvador, entre novembro de 2005 e maio de 2008. MÉTODOS: foi realizada uma avaliação da implantação do projeto em três momentos, tanto de uma perspectiva externa, por equipe de consultores, quanto resultado de uma autoavaliação por parte dos Gerentes de Unidades. Com esse objetivo, foi elaborado um modelo lógico da intervenção, do qual foi derivada uma matriz com critérios para a avaliação. RESULTADOS: ao final do primeiro ano, a implantação dos componentes do programa variou entre 45% e 82% das unidades. Seis meses após, verificou-se uma ampliação da implantação. No terceiro e último ano, em 2008, avaliação feita em amostra de 24 Unidades revelou persistência da implantação do projeto, porém com importantes retrocessos. CONCLUSÕES: o elevado grau de implantação verificado, com a redução das filas evitáveis e melhoria da acessibilidade às unidades de saúde, no primeiro ano, pode estar relacionado à estratégia de implantação, bem como a algumas características da gestão municipal. Os autores discutem ainda as possíveis razões dos obstáculos encontrados no contexto da gestão municipal do Sistema Único de Saúde.OBJECTIVES: to evaluate and monitor the implementation of a project aiming to broaden access and humanization of user embracement for users of the primary health care in Salvador, Brazil, between November 2005 and May 2008. METHODS: the implementation of the project was evaluated at three points in time, both externally, by a team of consultants, and internally as part of a self-evaluation by Unit Managers. An intervention logic model was designed for this purpose and a set of evaluation criteria derived from this. RESULTS: at the end of the first year, the implementation of program components varied from 45% to 82% of units. Six

  19. Parallel community climate model: Description and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, J.B.; Flanery, R.E.; Semeraro, B.D.; Worley, P.H. [and others

    1996-07-15

    This report gives an overview of a parallel version of the NCAR Community Climate Model, CCM2, implemented for MIMD massively parallel computers using a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallel implementation was developed on an Intel iPSC/860 with 128 processors and on the Intel Delta with 512 processors, and the initial target platform for the production version of the code is the Intel Paragon with 2048 processors. Because the implementation uses a standard, portable message-passing libraries, the code has been easily ported to other multiprocessors supporting a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallelization strategy used is to decompose the problem domain into geographical patches and assign each processor the computation associated with a distinct subset of the patches. With this decomposition, the physics calculations involve only grid points and data local to a processor and are performed in parallel. Using parallel algorithms developed for the semi-Lagrangian transport, the fast Fourier transform and the Legendre transform, both physics and dynamics are computed in parallel with minimal data movement and modest change to the original CCM2 source code. Sequential or parallel history tapes are written and input files (in history tape format) are read sequentially by the parallel code to promote compatibility with production use of the model on other computer systems. A validation exercise has been performed with the parallel code and is detailed along with some performance numbers on the Intel Paragon and the IBM SP2. A discussion of reproducibility of results is included. A user`s guide for the PCCM2 version 2.1 on the various parallel machines completes the report. Procedures for compilation, setup and execution are given. A discussion of code internals is included for those who may wish to modify and use the program in their own research.

  20. EMI New User Communities

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, M

    2013-01-01

    This document provides pieces of information about new user communities that directly or indirectly take advantage of EMI Products. Each user community is described via one specific EMI product use case to understand and communicate the current usage of EMI Products in practice.

  1. Additional user needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorschach, H.E.; Hayter, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of a discussion group on users' needs held at the Workshop on an Advanced Steady-State Neutron Facility. The discussion was devoted to reactor characteristics, special facilities and siting considerations suggested by user needs. (orig.)

  2. Users in Persistant Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta; Varnes, Claus J.

    2012-01-01

    of the hybrid collective to include the press and distribution channels to want it back. All actors in collective actions can become lead users when supported by establishing alliances. This perspective is different from Von Hippel (1986) who is claiming that the trend needs to be defined before the lead users...

  3. User Interface History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface e...

  4. Users are problem solvers!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer-Janse, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Most formal problem-solving studies use verbal protocol and observational data of problem solvers working on a task. In user-centred product-design projects, observational studies of users are frequently used too. In the latter case, however, systematic control of conditions, indepth analysis and

  5. GOCE User Toolbox and Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Per; Benveniste, Jerome

    2017-04-01

    The GOCE User Toolbox GUT is a compilation of tools for the utilisation and analysis of GOCE Level 2 products.
GUT support applications in Geodesy, Oceanography and Solid Earth Physics. The GUT Tutorial provides information
and guidance in how to use the toolbox for a variety of applications. GUT consists of a series of advanced
computer routines that carry out the required computations. It may be used on Windows PCs, UNIX/Linux Workstations,
and Mac. The toolbox is supported by The GUT Algorithm Description and User Guide and The GUT
Install Guide. A set of a-priori data and models are made available as well. Without any doubt the development
of the GOCE user toolbox have played a major role in paving the way to successful use of the GOCE data for
oceanography. The GUT version 2.2 was released in April 2014 and beside some bug-fixes it adds the capability for the computation of Simple Bouguer Anomaly (Solid-Earth). During this fall a new GUT version 3 has been released. GUTv3 was further developed through a collaborative effort where the scientific communities participate aiming
on an implementation of remaining functionalities facilitating a wider span of research in the fields of Geodesy,
Oceanography and Solid earth studies.
Accordingly, the GUT version 3 has:
 - An attractive and easy to use Graphic User Interface (GUI) for the toolbox,
 - Enhance the toolbox with some further software functionalities such as to facilitate the use of gradients,
anisotropic diffusive filtering and computation of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies.
 - An associated GUT VCM tool for analyzing the GOCE variance covariance matrices.

  6. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  7. User's manual for the CORTES GRAPHICS PACKAGE GRFPAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report provides necessary user information to implement and use a graphics package for the CORTES finite-element computer programs. Complete input instructions are provided. Sample input and output are given

  8. User Frustrations as Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weiss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available User frustrations are an excellent source of new product ideas. Starting with this observation, this article describes an approach that entrepreneurs can use to discover business opportunities. Opportunity discovery starts with a problem that the user has, but may not be able to articulate. User-centered design techniques can help elicit those latent needs. The entrepreneur should then try to understand how users are solving their problem today, before proposing a solution that draws on the unique skills and technical capabilities available to the entrepreneur. Finally, an in-depth understanding of the user allows the entrepreneur to hone in on the points of difference and resonance that are the foundation of a strong customer value proposition.

  9. TRAC User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.; Stumpf, H.; Lime, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    This guide has been prepared to assist users in applying the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). TRAC is an advanced best-estimate systems code for analyzing transients in thermal-hydraulic systems. The code is very general. Because it is general, efforts to model specific nuclear power plants or experimental facilities often present a challenge to the TRAC user. This guide has been written to assist first-time or intermediate users. It is specifically written for the TRAC version designated TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The TRAC User's Guide should be considered a companion document to the TRAC Code Manual; the user will need both documents to use TRAC effectively. 18 refs., 45 figs., 19 tabs

  10. RADTRAN 4: User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer's Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ''RADTRAN III'' by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code

  11. Managing the Risks Associated with End-User Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Maryam; Weiss, Ira R.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies organizational risks of end-user computing (EUC) associated with different stages of the end-user applications life cycle (analysis, design, implementation). Generic controls are identified that address each of the risks enumerated in a manner that allows EUC management to select those most appropriate to their EUC environment. (5…

  12. Support for Quality Assurance in End-User Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Robert; McKenna, Edward G.

    1989-01-01

    Suggests an approach that organizations can take to provide centralized support services for quality assurance in end-user information systems, based on the experiences of a support group at Citicorp Mortgage, Inc. The functions of the support group include user education, software selection, and assistance in testing, implementation, and support…

  13. A foundation for translating user interaction designs into OSF/Motif-based software

    OpenAIRE

    Hinson, Kenneth Paul

    1994-01-01

    The user interface development process occurs in a behavioral domain and in a constructional domain. The development process in the behavioral domain focuses on the "look and feel" of the user interface and its behavior in response to user actions. The development process in the constructional domain focuses on developing software to implement the user interface. Although one may attempt to design a user interface from a constructional view, it is important to concentrate desig...

  14. Satellite communication from user to user

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gern, Manfred

    Satellite communication systems which allow a multitude of user-to-user, point-to-point, and multipoint connections, are presented. The bit rates are 64 kbit/sec and multiples, up to 1.92 Mbit/sec. If required, the ground-stations are installed at the customer's site or at suitable locations in order to serve several customers. However, technical requirements for station location have also to be fulfulled, in order to avoid interference with terrestrial radio services. The increasing number of participants to Satellite Multi Service and INTELSAT Business Services imposes the solution of the problem of communication using cheap techniques. The changes of the German Federal Post Office also permit the economic use of satellite radio techniques for short distances.

  15. Game user experience evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhaupt, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating interactive systems for their user experience (UX) is a standard approach in industry and research today. This book explores the areas of game design and development and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as ways to understand the various contributing aspects of the overall gaming experience. Fully updated, extended and revised this book is based upon the original publication Evaluating User Experience in Games, and provides updated methods and approaches ranging from user- orientated methods to game specific approaches. New and emerging methods and areas explored include physiologi

  16. Safety for Users

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    CERN welcomes more than 8000 Users every year. The PH Department as host to these scientific associates requires the highest safety standards. The PH Safety Office has published a Safety Flyer for Users. Important safety topics and procedures are presented. Although the Flyer is intended primarily to provide safety information for Users, the PH Safety Office invites all those on the CERN sites to keep a copy of the flyer as it gives guidance in matters of safety and explains what to do in the event of an emergency. Link: http://ph-dep.web.cern.ch/ph-dep/Safety/SafetyOffice.html PH-Safety Office PH Department

  17. Safety for Users

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    CERN welcomes more than 8000 Users every year. The PH Department as host to these scientific associates requires the highest safety standards. The PH Safety Office has published a safety flyer for Users. Important safety topics and procedures are presented. Although the flyer is intended primarily to provide safety information for Users, the PH Safety Office invites all those on the CERN sites to keep a copy of the flyer as it gives guidance in matters of safety and explains what to do in the event of an emergency. The flyer is available at: http://ph-dep.web.cern.ch/ph-dep/Safety/SafetyOffice.html PH-Safety Office PH Department

  18. Designing for user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles is concerned with making user experience engaging. The cascade of social web applications we are now familiar with - blogs, consumer reviews, wikis, and social networking - are all engaging experiences. But engagement is an increasingly common goal in business and productivity environments as well. This book provides a foundation for all those seeking to design engaging user experiences rich in communication and interaction. Combining a handbook on basic principles with case studies, it provides readers with a ric

  19. Treaty implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper touches on three aspects of the relationship between intelligence and treaty implementation, a two-way association. First the author discusses the role of intelligence as a basis for compliance monitoring and treaty verification. Second the authors discusses payoffs of intelligence gathering and the intelligence process of treaty implementation, in particular on-site inspection. Third, the author goes in another direction and discusses some of the tensions between the intelligence gathering and treaty-implementation processes, especially with regard to extensive use of on-site inspection, such as we are likely to see in monitoring compliance of future arms control treaties

  20. Implementation of virtual LANs over ATM WANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Torsten; Maehler, Martin

    1998-09-01

    Virtual LANs (VLANs) allow to interconnect users over campus or wide area networks and gives the users the impression as they would be connected to the same local area network (LAN). The implementation of VLANs is based on ATM Forum's LAN Emulation and LAN/ATM switches providing interconnection of emulated LANs over ATM and the LAN ports to which the user's end systems are attached to. The paper discusses possible implementation architectures and describes advanced features such as ATM short-cuts, QoS, and redundancy concepts.

  1. Popularity framework for monitoring user workload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molfetas, Angelos; Dimitrov, Gancho; Lassnig, Mario; Garonne, Vincent; Stewart, Graeme; Barisits, Martin; Beermann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a monitoring framework for large scale data management systems with frequent data access. This framework allows large data management systems to generate meaningful information from collected tracing data and to be queried on demand for specific user usage patterns in respect to source and destination locations, period intervals, and other searchable parameters. The feasibility of such a system at the petabyte scale is demonstrated by describing the implementation and operational experience of a real world management information system for the ATLAS experiment employing the proposed framework. Our observations suggest that the proposed user monitoring framework is capable of scaling to meet the needs of very large data management systems.

  2. Programming Graphical User Interfaces in R

    CERN Document Server

    Verzani, John

    2012-01-01

    Programming Graphical User Interfaces with R introduces each of the major R packages for GUI programming: RGtk2, qtbase, Tcl/Tk, and gWidgets. With examples woven through the text as well as stand-alone demonstrations of simple yet reasonably complete applications, the book features topics especially relevant to statisticians who aim to provide a practical interface to functionality implemented in R. The book offers: A how-to guide for developing GUIs within R The fundamentals for users with limited knowledge of programming within R and other languages GUI design for specific functions or as l

  3. COSIS User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Koo, B. S.; Lee, W. K.; Lee, C. C.; Zee, S. Q.

    2006-02-01

    COSIS (COre State Indication System) which implemented in the SMART research reactor plays a role to supply the core state parameters or graphs for the operator to recognize the core state effectively. The followings are the main functions of COSIS. Validity Check for the Process Signals and Determination of the COSIS Inputs (SIGVAL), Coolant Flow Rate Calculation (FLOW), Core Thermal Power Calculation (COREPOW), In-core 3-Dimensional Power Distribution Calculation and Peaking Parameters Generation (POWER3D), Azimuthal Tilt Calculation (AZITILT). This report describes the structures of the I/O files that are essential for the users to run COSIS. COSIS handles the following 4 input files. DATABASE: The base input file, COSIS.INP: The signal input file, CCS.DAT: File required for the in-core detector signal processing and the 3-D power distribution calculation, TPFH2O: Steam table for the water properties The DATABASE file contains the base information for a nuclear power plant and is read at the first COSIS calculation. The COSIS.INP file contains the process input and detector signals, and is read by COSIS at every second. CCS.DAT file, that is produced by the COSISMAS code, contains the information for the in-core detector signal processing and the 3-D power distribution calculation. TPFH2O file is a steam table and is written in binary format. COSIS produces the following 4 output files. DATABASE.OUT: The output file for the DATABASE input file, COSIS.OUT: The normal output file produced after the COSIS calculation, COSIS.SUM: File for the operator to recognize the core state effectively, MAS S IG: File to run the COSISMAS code The DATABASE.OUT file is produced right after finishing DATABASE processing. The COSIS.OUT file is produced after finishing the input signal processing and the main COSIS calculation. The COSIS.SUM file is the summary file of the COSIS results for the operator to recognize the core state effectively. The MAS S IG file is the COSISMAS input

  4. Development of experimental concepts for investigating the strength behavior of fine-grained cohesive soil in the Spacelab/space shuttle zero-g environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaparte, R.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Three different sets of tests are proposed for the NASA Spacelab experimental program. The first of tests, designed to measure the true cohesion of several different soils, would be carried out in space through use of a specially prepared direct shear apparatus. As part of this first series of tests, it is recommended that a set of drained unconfined compression tests be performed terrestrially on the same soils as tested in space. A form of the direct tension test is planned to measure the true tensile strength of the same types of soils used in the first series of tests. The direct tension tests could be performed terrestrially. The combined results of the direct shear tests, direct tension tests, and unconfined compression tests can be used to construct approximate failure envelopes for the soils tested in the region of the stress origin. Relationships between true cohesion and true tensile strength can also be investigated. In addition, the role of physio-chemical variables should be studied. The third set of tests involves using a multiaxial cubical or true triaxial test apparatus to investigate the influence of gravity induced fabric anisotropy and stress nonhomogeneities on the stress strain behavior of cohesive soils at low effective stress levels. These tests would involve both in space and terrestrial laboratory testing.

  5. User interface development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggrawal, Bharat

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the development of user interfaces for OS/2 versions of computer codes for the analysis of seals. Current status, new features, work in progress, and future plans are discussed.

  6. SEVERO code - user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacramento, A.M. do.

    1989-01-01

    This user's manual contains all the necessary information concerning the use of SEVERO code. This computer code is related to the statistics of extremes = extreme winds, extreme precipitation and flooding hazard risk analysis. (A.C.A.S.)

  7. EPA User Personas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how EPA's three web user personas (Information Consumer, Information Intermediary, and Information Interpreter) can help you identify appropriate top audiences and top tasks for a topic or web area.

  8. Bevalac user's handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment

  9. VIERS- User Preference Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Preferences service provides a means to store, retrieve, and manage user preferences. The service supports definition of enterprise wide preferences, as well as...

  10. AVERT User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    AVERT is a flexible modeling framework with a simple user interface designed specifically to meet the needs of state air quality planners and other interested stakeholders. Use this guide to get started.

  11. EMAP Users Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Arnold; Redondo, Rory

    Presented is the user's manual for the Educational Manpower Information Sources Project (EMAP), an information file containing approximately 325 document abstracts related to the field of educational planning. (The EMAP file is described in document SP 006 747.) (JB)

  12. MINTEQ user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Hostetler, C.J.; Deutsch, W.J.; Cowan, C.E.

    1987-02-01

    This manual will aid the user in applying the MINTEQ geochemical computer code to model aqueous solutions and the interactions of aqueous solutions with hypothesized assemblages of solid phases. The manual will provide a basic understanding of how the MINTEQ computer code operates and the important principles that are incorporated into the code and instruct a user of the MINTEQ code on how to create input files to simulate a variety of geochemical problems. Chapters 2 through 8 are for the user who has some experience with or wishes to review the principles important to geochemical computer codes. These chapters include information on the methodology MINTEQ uses to incorporate these principles into the code. Chapters 9 through 11 are for the user who wants to know how to create input data files to model various types of problems. 35 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  13. FEL diagnostics and user control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1998-01-01

    The most recent upgrades and improvements to the free-electron laser (FEL) facility FELIX are presented. Special attention is paid to the improved beam-handling and diagnostic station. In this evacuated beam station a device is implemented that is capable of selecting single micropulses with measured efficiencies of more than 50% over the whole wavelength range of FELIX (5-110 μm). Furthermore, the broadband autocorrelator for micropulse length measurements and the planned continuous polarization rotator based on reflective optics are discussed. Recent additions to the ancillary equipment available to FEL users are presented briefly. The most important ones are the mirror-dispersion-controlled 10-fs Ti:sapphire laser and the 40-T magnet. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. The manned space-laboratories control centre - MSCC. Operational functions and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogl, H.; Kehr, J.; Wlaka, M.

    This paper describes the functions of the MSCC during the operations of the Columbus Attached Laboratory and the Free Flying Laboratory as part of the In-Orbit-Infrastructure Ground Segment. For the Attached Laboratory, MSCC payload operations coordination for European experiments within the Attached Laboratory and elsewhere on the Space Station Freedom will be explained. The Free Flying Laboratory will be operated and maintained exclusively from the MSCC during its 30 years lifetime. Several operational scenarios will demonstrate the role of the MSCC during routine - and servicing operations: of main importance are the servicing activities of the Attached Laboratory and the Free Flyer at the Space Station as well as servicing of the Free Flyer by the European Space Plane Hermes. The MSCC will have complex operational-, communications-and management interfaces with the IOI Ground Segment, the Space Station User community and with the international partners. Columbus User Support Centres will be established in many European member states, which have to be coordinated by the MSCC to ensure the proper reception of the scientific data and to provide them with quick access to their experiments in space. For operations planning and execution of experiments in the Attached Laboratory, a close cooperation with the Space Station control authorities in the USA will be established. The paper will show the development of the MSCC being initially used for the upcoming Spacelab Mission D-2 (MSCC Phase-1) and later upgraded to a Columbus dedicated control centre (MSCC Phase-2). For the initial construction phase the establishing of MSCC requirements, the philosophie used for the definition of the 'basic infrastructure' and key features of the installed facilities will be addressed. Resulting from Columbus and D-2 requirements, the sizing of the building with respect to controlrooms, conference rooms, office spare and simulation high-bay areas will be discussed. The defined 'basic

  15. Elusive Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heering Holt, Ditte; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    2018-01-01

    in health. However, despite growing support for intersectoral policymaking, implementation remains a challenge. Critics argue that public health has remained naïve about the policy process and a better understanding is needed. Based on ethnographic data, this paper conducts an in-depth analysis of a local......: On the basis of an explorative study among ten Danish municipalities, we conducted an ethnographic study of the development of a municipal-wide implementation strategy for the intersectoral health policy of a medium-sized municipality. The main data sources consist of ethnographic field notes from participant...

  16. End User Development Toolkit for Developing Physical User Interface Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Daniel T; Palfi, Anders; Svendsen, Haakon Sønsteby

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tangible user interfaces and end user development are two increasingresearch areas in software technology. Physical representation promoteopportunities to ease the use of technology and reinforce personality traits ascreativeness, collaboration and intuitive actions. However, designing tangibleuser interfaces are both cumbersome and require several layers of architecture.End user development allows users with no programming experience to createor customize their own applications. ...

  17. Evaluating User Participation and User Influence in an Enterprise System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Does user influence have an impact on the data quality of an information systems development project? What decision making should users have? How can users effectively be engaged in the process? What is success? User participation is considered to be a critical success factor for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects, yet there is little…

  18. ERP ASSIMILATION: AN END-USER APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurbean Luminita

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the ERP adoption based on the IT assimilation theory. The ERP lifecycle is associated with the IT assimilation steps. We propose a distribution of these steps along the lifecycle. Derived from the findings in the reviewed literature we will focus the cultural factors, in particular those related to the end-users (determined as a major impact factor in our previous study: Negovan et al., 2011. Our empirical study is centred on the end-users perspective and it tries to determine if and how their behaviour affects the achievement of the ERP assimilation steps. The paper reasons that organizations that understand the IT assimilation steps correlated to the ERP implementation critical factors are more likely to implement and use ERP successfully.

  19. VisTool: A user interface and visualization development system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shangjin

    system – to simplify user interface development. VisTool allows user interface development without real programming. With VisTool a designer assembles visual objects (e.g. textboxes, ellipse, etc.) to visualize database contents. In VisTool, visual properties (e.g. color, position, etc.) can be formulas...... programming. However, in Software Engineering, software engineers who develop user interfaces do not follow it. In many cases, it is desirable to use graphical presentations, because a graphical presentation gives a better overview than text forms, and can improve task efficiency and user satisfaction....... However, it is more difficult to follow the classical usability approach for graphical presentation development. These difficulties result from the fact that designers cannot implement user interface with interactions and real data. We developed VisTool – a user interface and visualization development...

  20. STAIRS User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadjokov, V; Dragulev, V; Gove, N; Schmid, H

    1976-10-15

    The STorage And Information Retrieval System (STAIRS) of IBM is described from the user's point of view. The description is based on the experimental use of STAIRS at the IAEA computer, with INIS and AGRIS data bases, from June 1975 to May 1976. Special attention is paid to what may be termed the hierarchical approach to retrieval in STAIRS. Such an approach allows for better use of the intrinsic data-base structure and, hence, contributes to higher recall and/or relevance ratios in retrieval. The functions carried out by STAIRS are explained and the communication language between the user and the system outlined. Details are given of the specific structure of the INIS and AGRIS data bases for STAIRS. The manual should enable an inexperienced user to start his first on-line dialogues by means of a CRT or teletype terminal. (author)

  1. STAIRS User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadjokov, V.; Dragulev, V.; Gove, N.; Schmid, H.

    1976-10-01

    The STorage And Information Retrieval System (STAIRS) of IBM is described from the user's point of view. The description is based on the experimental use of STAIRS at the IAEA computer, with INIS and AGRIS data bases, from June 1975 to May 1976. Special attention is paid to what may be termed the hierarchical approach to retrieval in STAIRS. Such an approach allows for better use of the intrinsic data-base structure and, hence, contributes to higher recall and/or relevance ratios in retrieval. The functions carried out by STAIRS are explained and the communication language between the user and the system outlined. Details are given of the specific structure of the INIS and AGRIS data bases for STAIRS. The manual should enable an inexperienced user to start his first on-line dialogues by means of a CRT or teletype terminal. (author)

  2. End User Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Caroline; Lunn, Darren; Michailidou, Eleni

    As new technologies emerge, and Web sites become increasingly sophisticated, ensuring they remain accessible to disabled and small-screen users is a major challenge. While guidelines and automated evaluation tools are useful for informing some aspects of Web site design, numerous studies have demonstrated that they provide no guarantee that the site is genuinely accessible. The only reliable way to evaluate the accessibility of a site is to study the intended users interacting with it. This chapter outlines the processes that can be used throughout the design life cycle to ensure Web accessibility, describing their strengths and weaknesses, and discussing the practical and ethical considerations that they entail. The chapter also considers an important emerging trend in user evaluations: combining data from studies of “standard” Web use with data describing existing accessibility issues, to drive accessibility solutions forward.

  3. GRSAC Users Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model

  4. GRSAC Users Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model.

  5. Implementation Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegland, Troels Jacob; Raakjær, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    level are supplemented or even replaced by national priorities. The chapter concludes that in order to capture the domestic politics associated with CFP implementation in Denmark, it is important to understand the policy process as a synergistic interaction between dominant interests, policy alliances...

  6. HANARO user support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Soo; Kim, Y. J.; Seong B.S. [and others

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to support external user for the promotion of HANARO common utilization effectively. To do this, external manpower was recruited and trained. Also, in order to find out and cultivate HANARO user, practice-oriented education was done. The total number of project selected as the promotion of HANARO common utilization was 31 in this year. These composed of four fields such as neutron beam utilization, materials/nuclear materials irradiation test, neutron activation analysis and radioisotope production. In each field, the numbers of project were 17, 7, 4 and 3 respectively. At first, from a selected project of view, supporting ratio by external manpower was reached to the 58%, that is, 18 out of 31 project was supported. In each field, it was 82% for neutron beam utilization and 100% for neutron activation analysis. Also, from the utilization time point of view, supporting ratio of external manpower was reached to 30% for neutron beam utilization and 59% for neutron activation analysis. Otherwise, supporting ratio by manpower in KAERI was reached to 97%, that is, 30 out of 31 project was supported. Also, from the utilization time point of view, total supporting ratio was reached to 15%. In each field, it was 20% for neutron beam utilization, 18% for materials/nuclear materials irradiation test, 20% for neutron activation analysis and 6% for radioisotope production. In order to contribute finding and cultivating of HANARO potential user and increase utilization ratio of HANARO experimental facility, practice-oriented HANARO user education has been done. At first, 32 participants from industries, universities, institutes were educated and practiced on HRPD/SANS instrument in the field of neutron beam utilization. Otherwise, in order to support external user effectively, external manpower were trained. Also, more effective support for external user could be possible through the grasping difficulty and problem on the performance of project

  7. HANARO user support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Soo; Kim, Y. J.; Seong B.S.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to support external user for the promotion of HANARO common utilization effectively. To do this, external manpower was recruited and trained. Also, in order to find out and cultivate HANARO user, practice-oriented education was done. The total number of project selected as the promotion of HANARO common utilization was 31 in this year. These composed of four fields such as neutron beam utilization, materials/nuclear materials irradiation test, neutron activation analysis and radioisotope production. In each field, the numbers of project were 17, 7, 4 and 3 respectively. At first, from a selected project of view, supporting ratio by external manpower was reached to the 58%, that is, 18 out of 31 project was supported. In each field, it was 82% for neutron beam utilization and 100% for neutron activation analysis. Also, from the utilization time point of view, supporting ratio of external manpower was reached to 30% for neutron beam utilization and 59% for neutron activation analysis. Otherwise, supporting ratio by manpower in KAERI was reached to 97%, that is, 30 out of 31 project was supported. Also, from the utilization time point of view, total supporting ratio was reached to 15%. In each field, it was 20% for neutron beam utilization, 18% for materials/nuclear materials irradiation test, 20% for neutron activation analysis and 6% for radioisotope production. In order to contribute finding and cultivating of HANARO potential user and increase utilization ratio of HANARO experimental facility, practice-oriented HANARO user education has been done. At first, 32 participants from industries, universities, institutes were educated and practiced on HRPD/SANS instrument in the field of neutron beam utilization. Otherwise, in order to support external user effectively, external manpower were trained. Also, more effective support for external user could be possible through the grasping difficulty and problem on the performance of project

  8. Course Ontology-Based User's Knowledge Requirement Acquisition from Behaviors within E-Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qingtian; Zhao, Zhongying; Liang, Yongquan

    2009-01-01

    User's knowledge requirement acquisition and analysis are very important for a personalized or user-adaptive learning system. Two approaches to capture user's knowledge requirement about course content within an e-learning system are proposed and implemented in this paper. The first approach is based on the historical data accumulated by an…

  9. Natural User Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Câmara , António

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Engenharia Informática apresentada à Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra This project’s main subject are Natural User Interfaces. These interfaces’ main purpose is to allow the user to interact with computer systems in a more direct and natural way. The popularization of touch and gesture devices in the last few years has allowed for them to become increasingly common and today we are experiencing a transition of interface p...

  10. User friendly packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Most consumers have experienced occasional problems with opening packaging. Tomato sauce from the tinned mackerel splattered all over the kitchen counter, the unrelenting pickle jar lid, and the package of sliced ham that cannot be opened without a knife or a pair of scissors. The research project...... “User-friendly Packaging” aims to create a platform for developing more user-friendly packaging. One intended outcome of the project is a guideline that industry can use in development efforts. The project also points the way for more extended collaboration between companies and design researchers. How...... can design research help industry in packaging innovation?...

  11. IMAGE User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehfest, E; De Waal, L; Oostenrijk, R.

    2010-09-15

    This user manual contains the basic information for running the simulation model IMAGE ('Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment') of PBL. The motivation for this report was a substantial restructuring of the source code for IMAGE version 2.5. The document gives concise content information about the submodels, tells the user how to install the program, describes the directory structure of the run environment, shows how scenarios have to be prepared and run, and gives insight in the restart functionality.

  12. Who are your users?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Salminen, joni; Jung, Soon-Gyo

    2017-01-01

    One of the reasons for using personas is to align user understandings across project teams and sites. As part of a larger persona study, at Al Jazeera English (AJE), we conducted 16 qualitative interviews with media producers, the end users of persona descriptions. We asked the participants about...... their understanding of a typical AJE media consumer, and the variety of answers shows that the understandings are not aligned and are built on a mix of own experiences, own self, assumptions, and data given by the company. The answers are sometimes aligned with the data-driven personas and sometimes not. The end...

  13. EPRINT ARCHIVE USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    University of Southampton invites the CERN community to participate in a survey Professor Stevan Harnad is conducting on current users and non-users of Eprint Archives. http://www.eprints.org/survey/ The findings will be used to suggest potential enhancements of the services as well as to get a deeper understanding of the very rapid developments in the on-line dissemination and use of scientific and scholarly research. (The survey is anonymous. Revealing your identity is optional and it will be kept confidential.)

  14. MERBoard User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Jay; Shab, Ted; Vera, Alonso; Gaswiller, Rich; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important goal of MERBoard is to allow users to quickly and easily share information. The front-end interface is physically a large plasma computer display with a touch screen, allowing multiple people to interact shoulder-to-shoulder or in a small meeting area. The software system allows people to interactively create digital whiteboards, browse the web, give presentations and connect to personal computers (for example, to run applications not on the MERBoard computer itself). There are four major integrated applications: a browser; a remote connection to another computer (VNC); a digital whiteboard; and a digital space (MERSpace), which is a digital repository for each individual user.

  15. MBN Explorer Users' Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Sushko, Gennady; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    The MBN Explorer Users' Guide describes how to install and to run MBN Explorer, the software package for advanced multiscale simulations of complex molecular structure and dynamics. This guide includes the description of the main features and the algorithms of the program, the manual how to use...... simulations of structure and dynamics of a broad range of systems with the sizes from the atomic up to the mesoscopic scales. MBN Explorer is being developed and distributed by MBN Research Center, www.mbnresearch.com, which organises hands-on tutorials for the software, user's workshops and conferences....

  16. Biodigester User Survey 2012 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Mansvelt, R.; Sras, Phanny; Pino, Mariela

    2012-03-15

    Based on a feasibility study executed in November 2004, The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Cambodia (MAFF) and The Netherlands Development Organisation (SNVCambodia) agreed to cooperate in the set-up and implementation of a National Biodigester Programme (NBP). The terms of this cooperation are laid down in a Memorandum of Understanding that was concluded in May 2005 and extended in January 2010 till December 2012. An implementation document for the programme period was compiled in early 2006 and agreed upon by MAFF and SNV during an official ceremony in March 2006. The duration of the first phase of the NBP is 7.5 years, of which the last 6 months of 2005 and the first 3 months of 2006 were used for preparation, and the years 2006-12 for implementation. The overall objective of the first phase of the NBP is 'The dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. The programme is currently (February 2012) operational in 14 provinces, of which 8 are to be surveyed, after being started in 3 provinces in April 2006. The programme supported the construction of 16,000 domestic biodigester plants at the time of report writing. In order to identify the level of satisfaction of the biodigester owners and the effects that the technology brings to the household, the NBP has undertaken a Biodigester User Survey (BUS) with three main objectives: (1) To evaluate the effect of domestic biodigester installations, as perceived by the user, by conducting a representative quantitative random survey of 150 households using biodigesters constructed under the NBP in 8 provinces in Cambodia; (2) To evaluate how the users have experienced the programme activities such as promotion, construction, quality assurance, training and after-sales service; (3) To evaluate the impact of the programme and how it

  17. E-book recommender system design and implementation based on data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongjiang

    2011-12-01

    In the knowledge explosion, rapid development of information age, how quickly the user or users interested in useful information for feedback to the user problem to be solved in this article. This paper based on data mining, association rules to the model and classification model a combination of electronic books on the recommendation of the user's neighboring users interested in e-books to target users. Introduced the e-book recommendation and the key technologies, system implementation algorithms, and implementation process, was proved through experiments that this system can help users quickly find the required e-books.

  18. Perspectives on User Satisfaction Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena

    2001-01-01

    Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and user satisfaction, and user surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and user satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between user expectations and managers' perceptions of user…

  19. CAPTCHA – Security affecting User Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Gafni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CAPTCHA - Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart - is a test with the aim to distinguish between malicious automatic software and real users in the era of Cyber security threats. Various types of CAPTCHA tests were developed, in order to address accessibility while implementing security. This research focuses on the users’ attitudes and experiences related to use of the different kinds of tests. A questionnaire accompanied by experiencing five different CAPTCHA tests was performed among 212 users. Response times for each test and rate of success were collected automatically. The findings demonstrate that none of the existing tests are ideal. Although the participants were familiar with the Text-based test, they found it the most frustrating and non-enjoyable. Half of the participants failed in the Arithmetic-based test. While most of the participants found the picture and game based test enjoyable, their response time for those tests was the largest. The age factor was encountered as influencing both the attitude of the user and the performance, while younger users are more tolerant, have a better success rate, and are faster, the elder users found the tests annoying and time-consuming.

  20. User localization during human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, F; Gorostiza, Javi F; Malfaz, María; Salichs, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a user localization system based on the fusion of visual information and sound source localization, implemented on a social robot called Maggie. One of the main requisites to obtain a natural interaction between human-human and human-robot is an adequate spatial situation between the interlocutors, that is, to be orientated and situated at the right distance during the conversation in order to have a satisfactory communicative process. Our social robot uses a complete multimodal dialog system which manages the user-robot interaction during the communicative process. One of its main components is the presented user localization system. To determine the most suitable allocation of the robot in relation to the user, a proxemic study of the human-robot interaction is required, which is described in this paper. The study has been made with two groups of users: children, aged between 8 and 17, and adults. Finally, at the end of the paper, experimental results with the proposed multimodal dialog system are presented.

  1. Personal lifelong user model clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Kay, Judy; Kummerfeld, Bob

    This paper explores an architecture for very long term user modelling, based upon personal user model clouds. These ensure that the individual's applications can access their model whenever it is needed. At the same time, the user can control the use of their user model. So, they can ensure...... which combines both. Finally we discuss implications of our approach for consistency and freshness of the user model information....... it is accessed only when and where they wish, by applications that they wish. We consider the challenges of representing user models so that they can be reused by multiple applications. We indicate potential synergies between distributed and centralised user modelling architectures, proposing an architecture...

  2. Users, Bystanders and Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    Human-agent interaction (HAI), especially in the field of embodied conversational agents (ECA), is mainly construed as dyadic communication between a human user and a virtual agent. This is despite the fact that many application scenarios for future ECAs involve the presence of others. This paper...

  3. User's guide for ICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraley, S.K.

    1976-07-01

    ICE is a cross-section mixing code which will accept cross sections from an AMPX working library and produce mixed cross sections in the AMPX working library format, ANISN format, and the group-independent ANISN format. User input is in the free-form or fixed-form FIDO structure. The code is operable as a module in the AMPX system

  4. SALOME. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastrow, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    A user's guide for a least squares fit analysis program is presented, which has been developed for VUV and visible plasma spectroscopy on the Extrap-T1 experiment. The program can be used for line and multiplet identification, multiplet intensity and line width measurements. Atomic data are used extensively to aid the interpretation of the spectra. 7 figs

  5. Power User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  6. 16. ESRF users meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coraux, J.; Renevier, H.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Daudin, B.; Proietti, M.G.; Renaud, G.; Fowler, B.; Mercer, D.L.; Omar, A.H.; Thompson, P.; Markovic, N.M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Lucas, C.A.; Andrejczuk, A.; Kwiatkowska, J.; Dobrzynski, L.; Zukowski, E.; Bellin, Ch.; Loupias, G.; Shukla, A.; Buslaps, Th.; Stankov, S.; Sladecek, M.; Slezak, T.; Korecki, J.; Spiridis, N.; Sepiol, B.; Vogl, G.; Chumakov, A.; Ruffer, R.; Hermann, R.P.; Grandjean, F.; Schweika, W.; Long, G.J.; Leupold, O.; Belrhall, H.; Caserotto, H.; Dauvergne, F.; Geoffroy, L.; Guljarro, M.; Launer, L.; Levault, B.; Walsh, M.; Beckers, M.; Schell, N.; Martins, R.M.S.; Mucklich, A.; Moller, W.; Silva, R.J.C.; Mahesh, K.K.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Tejas, Parikh; Neil, Fellows; Durodola, J.; Slawinski, W.; Przenioslo, R.; Sosnowska, I.; Suard, E.

    2006-01-01

    This document gathers the posters that were presented during the poster session of this workshop. These posters highlight the results obtained by ESRF'users in different fields such as surface structure, Compton scattering studies, localized vibrational modes in thermoelectric materials, Ni-Ti thin films, residual stresses in superconducting wires, and changes in crystal and magnetic structure of NdFeO 3

  7. Lead User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Larsen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    covers the opposite view, where a company actively searches and involves lead users, however, with limited success also. Based on both cases, we analyze how, in these emerging processes of relating, meaning is co-created in a way that narrows the shared conceptual space for imagination and collaboration...

  8. Engaging with users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Bang, Anne Louise

    with the biggest sense organ – our skin. Thus, the aim of our research is to develop new dialogue tools for teaching fashion and textile students in order to stimulate new ways of thinking and engaging with users. By developing and employing participatory design methods in the field of fashion and textiles, we...

  9. Governing the water user

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rap, Edwin; Wester, Flip

    2017-01-01

    This article traces a policy shift that makes the ‘water user’ the main subject of water governance. From a Foucauldian perspective on governmentality these new subjectivities accompany neo-liberal governmental technologies to devolve autonomy from state institutions to an active user base, whilst

  10. User Centric Policy Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  11. CONSUME: users guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.D. Ottmar; M.F. Burns; J.N. Hall; A.D. Hanson

    1993-01-01

    CONSUME is a user-friendly computer program designed for resource managers with some working knowledge of IBM-PC applications. The software predicts the amount of fuel consumption on logged units based on weather data, the amount and fuel moisture of fuels, and a number of other factors. Using these predictions, the resource manager can accurately determine when and...

  12. TO STORES USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    SPL Division

    2001-01-01

    Stores users are informed that the Stores (Central, Emergency window, Raw materials, Chemical products and Prévessin Self service stores) will be closed on Friday, 7 December owing to migration of the Stores computers to Windows 2000. Thank you for your understanding.

  13. TRANS-USERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to redesign production and business processes to accommodate for users' requirements (Maisons MACCHI), and the client as driver of innovation on the construction and renovation of the low budget hotel brand Formule 1 of ACCOR Hotels. In the third part, the discussion and conclusion addresses three interlinked...

  14. Users Office - Removal

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    As of 8 December 2010 and until the end of February 2011, the Users Office will move from Bldg. 60. New Location : Bldg. 510-R-033 Opening Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday : 08.30 – 12.30 Monday to Friday: 14.00 – 16.00 Closed Wednesday mornings.

  15. Adaptive user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    This book describes techniques for designing and building adaptive user interfaces developed in the large AID project undertaken by the contributors.Key Features* Describes one of the few large-scale adaptive interface projects in the world* Outlines the principles of adaptivity in human-computer interaction

  16. Editorial Library: User Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surace, Cecily J.

    This report presents the findings of a survey conducted by the editorial library of the Los Angeles Times to measure usage and satisfaction with library service, provide background information on library user characteristics, collect information on patterns of use of the Times' clipping files, relate data on usage and satisfaction parameters to…

  17. TOTAL user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1994-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all of the states and transitions in the model of a complex system can be devastatingly tedious and error-prone. Even with tools such as the Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST), the user must describe a system by specifying the rules governing the behavior of the system in order to generate the model. With the Table Oriented Translator to the ASSIST Language (TOTAL), the user can specify the components of a typical system and their attributes in the form of a table. The conditions that lead to system failure are also listed in a tabular form. The user can also abstractly specify dependencies with causes and effects. The level of information required is appropriate for system designers with little or no background in the details of reliability calculations. A menu-driven interface guides the user through the system description process, and the program updates the tables as new information is entered. The TOTAL program automatically generates an ASSIST input description to match the system description.

  18. CANAL user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, A.; Wolf, L.; Todreas, N.

    1979-11-01

    CANAL is a subchannel computer program for the steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analysis of BWR fuel rod bundles. The purpose of this manual is to introduce the user into the mechanism of running the code by providing information about the input data and options

  19. GERTS GQ User's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Y.; And Others

    This user's manual for the simulation program Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (GERT) GQ contains sections on nodes, branches, program input description and format, and program output, as well as examples. Also included is a programmer's manual which contains information on scheduling, subroutine descriptions, COMMON Variables, and…

  20. Incident users of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...

  1. AELIB user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.E.; Klawitter, G.L.

    1981-05-01

    This report is an updatable manual for users of AELIB, the AECL Library of FORTRAN-callable routines for the CRNL CDC 6600/CYBER 170 system. It provides general advice on the use of this library and detailed information on the selection and usage of particular library routines

  2. Our Deming Users' Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinklocker, Christina

    1992-01-01

    After training in the Total Quality Management concept, a suburban Ohio school district created a Deming Users' Group to link agencies, individuals, and ideas. The group has facilitated ongoing school/business collaboration, networking among individuals from diverse school systems, mentoring and cooperative learning activities, and resource…

  3. OASIS User Manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bojtar, L

    2009-01-01

    The OASIS system has been operational for years now. After a long development the project has reached a state where the number of features it provides exceeds largely what most of its users knows about. The author felt it was time to write a user manual explaining all the functionality of the viewer application. This document is a user manual, concentrating on the functionality of the viewer from the user’s point of view. There are already documents available on the project’s web site about the technical aspects at http://project-oasis.web.cern.ch/project-oasis/presentations.htm . There was an attempt to produce a tutorial on the viewer, but it didn’t get much further than the table of contents, that however is well thought. The structure of this user manual follows the same principle, the basic and most often used features are grouped together. Advanced or less often used features are described in a separate chapter. There is a second organizational principle, features belong to different levels: chann...

  4. Educating the Music User

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    To better serve students' evolving needs in music, music educators must connect classroom learning with how students use and interact with music in their daily lives. One way to accomplish this is by approaching classrooms with the music user in mind, which can open new possibilities for meaningful music making and remove students from the…

  5. Implementation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Meeting the identified needs of Earth science requires approaching EOS as an information system and not simply as one or more satellites with instruments. Six elements of strategy are outlined as follows: implementation of the individual discipline missions as currently planned; use of sustained observational capabilities offered by operational satellites without waiting for the launch of new mission; put first priority on the data system; deploy an Advanced Data Collection and Location System; put a substantial new observing capability in a low Earth orbit in such a way as to provide for sustained measurements; and group instruments to exploit their capabilities for synergism; maximize the scientific utility of the mission; and minimize the costs of implementation where possible.

  6. Implementing Pseudonymity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Mowbray

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available I will give an overview of some technologies that enable pseudonymity - allowing individuals to reveal or prove information about themselves to others without revealing their full identity. I will describe some functionalities relating to pseudonymity that can be implemented, and some that cannot. My intention is to present enough of the mathematics that underlies technology for pseudonymity to show that it is indeed possible to implement some functionalities that at first glance may appear impossible. In particular, I will show that several of the intended functions of the UK national ID could be provided in a pseudonymous fashion, allowing greater privacy. I will also outline some technology developed at HP Labs which ensures that users’ personal data is released only to software that has been checked to conform to their preferred privacy policies.

  7. Implementing Summon: an unexpected journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Elwell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, the user interface to library content has developed from the classic OPAC, through federated search, and has culminated in the selection of discovery tools currently on the market. At The University of Wolverhampton, we selected Summon as our discovery tool back in late 2010. We chose to implement Summon as our sole library catalogue interface instead of as a secondary service alongside an existing OPAC, a decision that was unique amongst Summon customers at the time. This article looks at our experiences during the first two years of using Summon, from the initial implementation, through various stages of user feedback and developments that followed. We hope that sharing these experiences may help those looking to follow a similar path.

  8. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  9. SHARP User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Thomas, J. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mahadevan, Vijay S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rahaman, Ronald O. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Solberg, Jerome [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    SHARP is an advanced modeling and simulation toolkit for the analysis of nuclear reactors. It is comprised of several components including physical modeling tools, tools to integrate the physics codes for multi-physics analyses, and a set of tools to couple the codes within the MOAB framework. Physics modules currently include the neutronics code PROTEUS, the thermal-hydraulics code Nek5000, and the structural mechanics code Diablo. This manual focuses on performing multi-physics calculations with the SHARP ToolKit. Manuals for the three individual physics modules are available with the SHARP distribution to help the user to either carry out the primary multi-physics calculation with basic knowledge or perform further advanced development with in-depth knowledge of these codes. This manual provides step-by-step instructions on employing SHARP, including how to download and install the code, how to build the drivers for a test case, how to perform a calculation and how to visualize the results. Since SHARP has some specific library and environment dependencies, it is highly recommended that the user read this manual prior to installing SHARP. Verification tests cases are included to check proper installation of each module. It is suggested that the new user should first follow the step-by-step instructions provided for a test problem in this manual to understand the basic procedure of using SHARP before using SHARP for his/her own analysis. Both reference output and scripts are provided along with the test cases in order to verify correct installation and execution of the SHARP package. At the end of this manual, detailed instructions are provided on how to create a new test case so that user can perform novel multi-physics calculations with SHARP. Frequently asked questions are listed at the end of this manual to help the user to troubleshoot issues.

  10. SHARP User Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Y. Q.; Shemon, E. R.; Thomas, J. W.; Mahadevan, Vijay S.; Rahaman, Ronald O.; Solberg, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    SHARP is an advanced modeling and simulation toolkit for the analysis of nuclear reactors. It is comprised of several components including physical modeling tools, tools to integrate the physics codes for multi-physics analyses, and a set of tools to couple the codes within the MOAB framework. Physics modules currently include the neutronics code PROTEUS, the thermal-hydraulics code Nek5000, and the structural mechanics code Diablo. This manual focuses on performing multi-physics calculations with the SHARP ToolKit. Manuals for the three individual physics modules are available with the SHARP distribution to help the user to either carry out the primary multi-physics calculation with basic knowledge or perform further advanced development with in-depth knowledge of these codes. This manual provides step-by-step instructions on employing SHARP, including how to download and install the code, how to build the drivers for a test case, how to perform a calculation and how to visualize the results. Since SHARP has some specific library and environment dependencies, it is highly recommended that the user read this manual prior to installing SHARP. Verification tests cases are included to check proper installation of each module. It is suggested that the new user should first follow the step-by-step instructions provided for a test problem in this manual to understand the basic procedure of using SHARP before using SHARP for his/her own analysis. Both reference output and scripts are provided along with the test cases in order to verify correct installation and execution of the SHARP package. At the end of this manual, detailed instructions are provided on how to create a new test case so that user can perform novel multi-physics calculations with SHARP. Frequently asked questions are listed at the end of this manual to help the user to troubleshoot issues.

  11. Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Andrew Scott

    2015-01-01

    This Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of Building M7-505 of institutional controls that have been implemented at the site. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with Building M7-505, institutional land use controls (LUCs) are necessary to prohibit the use of groundwater from the site. LUCs are also necessary to prevent access to soil under electrical equipment in the northwest portion of the site. Controls necessary to prevent human exposure will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  12. Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Yudin, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step guide for planning and carrying out your Microsoft Dynamics GP 2013 implementation. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of setup screens and practical examples and advice are included for the Dynamics GP system and core modules.If you are a new or existing Microsoft Dynamics GP consultant or an end user who wants to implement, install, and set up core modules of Dynamics GP 2013, then this book is for you. A basic understanding of business management systems and either Dynamics GP or a similar application is recommended.

  13. Observing the user experience a practitioner's guide to user research

    CERN Document Server

    Kuniavsky, Mike; Goodman, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The gap between who designers and developers imagine their users are, and who those users really are can be the biggest problem with product development. Observing the User Experience will help you bridge that gap to understand what your users want and need from your product, and whether they'll be able to use what you've created. Filled with real-world experience and a wealth of practical information, this book presents a complete toolbox of techniques to help designers and developers see through the eyes of their users. It provides in-depth coverage of 13 user experience research techniques

  14. Implementing Target Value Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Thais da C L; Lichtig, Will; Rybkowski, Zofia K

    2017-04-01

    An alternative to the traditional way of designing projects is the process of target value design (TVD), which takes different departure points to start the design process. The TVD process starts with the client defining an allowable cost that needs to be met by the design and construction teams. An expected cost in the TVD process is defined through multiple interactions between multiple stakeholders who define wishes and others who define ways of achieving these wishes. Finally, a target cost is defined based on the expected profit the design and construction teams are expecting to make. TVD follows a series of continuous improvement efforts aimed at reaching the desired goals for the project and its associated target value cost. The process takes advantage of rapid cycles of suggestions, analyses, and implementation that starts with the definition of value for the client. In the traditional design process, the goal is to identify user preferences and find solutions that meet the needs of the client's expressed preferences. In the lean design process, the goal is to educate users about their values and advocate for a better facility over the long run; this way owners can help contractors and designers to identify better solutions. This article aims to inform the healthcare community about tools and techniques commonly used during the TVD process and how they can be used to educate and support project participants in developing better solutions to meet their needs now as well as in the future.

  15. New Users | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Users Becoming a Core Facilities User The following steps are applicable to anyone who would like to become a user of the CCR SAXS Core facilities. All users are required to follow the Core Facilty User Polices.

  16. Identifying online user reputation in terms of user preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Identifying online user reputation is significant for online social systems. In this paper, taking into account the preference physics of online user collective behaviors, we present an improved group-based rating method for ranking online user reputation based on the user preference (PGR). All the ratings given by each specific user are mapped to the same rating criteria. By grouping users according to their mapped ratings, the online user reputation is calculated based on the corresponding group sizes. Results for MovieLens and Netflix data sets show that the AUC values of the PGR method can reach 0.9842 (0.9493) and 0.9995 (0.9987) for malicious (random) spammers, respectively, outperforming the results generated by the traditional group-based method, which indicates that the online preference plays an important role for measuring user reputation.

  17. Extended Delivery Time Analysis for Secondary Packet Transmission With Adaptive Modulation Under Interweave Cognitive Implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Usman, Muneer; Yang, Hong-Chuan; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive radio communication can opportunistically access underutilized spectrum for emerging wireless applications. With interweave cognitive implementation, a secondary user (SU) transmits only if primary user does not occupy the channel

  18. GANDALF: users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strout, R.E. II; Beach, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The GANDALF computer code was written to calculate neutron dose equivalent given the pulse-height data obtained by using a Linear Energy Transfer (LET) proportional counter. The code also uses pre- and/or post-calibration spectra, from an alpha source, to determine a calibration factor in keV/μ/channel. Output from the code consists of the effective radius of the detection chamber in microns, a calibration factor in keV/μ/channel, and the total dose and dose equivalent in rad or rem between any two LET energies by using the equations by Attix and Roesch [Radiation Dosimetry, 1, 71 (1968)]. This report is a user's manual and is not intended as anything else, and assumes that the user has a basic knowledge of the LLL Octopus timesharing system. However, a very brief description of how the code operates is included

  19. TEBASCO user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, L.D.; Kaiser, T.B.; LoDestro, L.; Maron, N.; Nevins, W.M.; Willmann, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    TEBASCO is a Tandem mirror Equilibrium and BAllooning Stability COde. TEBASCO allows you to compute tandem-mirror MHD equilibria and to analyze both the flute-averaged and ballooning-mode stability of these equilibria. This stability analysis is directed toward the computation of marginal stability boundaries. Users of TEBASCO require a binary output file from the EFFI code which describes the vacuum magnetic field. In making this EFFI file the user will have defined a system of units for lengths (e.g., meters) and magnetic field (e.g., Tesla). In TEBASCO, all magnetic field strengths are normalized to the vacuum center-cell midplane value, and times are defined in units of the time for an Alfven wave in this field to transit one EFFI unit of length

  20. IT User Community Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Peter Jones (IT-CDA-WF)

    2016-01-01

    IT-CDA is gathering information to more accurately form a snapshot of the CERN IT user community and we would appreciate you taking time to complete the following survey.   We want to use this survey to better understand how the user community uses their devices and our services, and how the delivery of those services could be improved. You will need to authenticate to complete the survey. However please note that your responses are confidential and will be compiled together and analysed as a group. You can also volunteer to offer additional information if you so wish. This survey should take no longer than 5 minutes. Thanks in advance for your collaboration.

  1. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    Logistics Group - FI Department

    2005-01-01

    The Farnell catalogue can now be accessed from the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue. Users can order Farnell equipment as well as standard Stores equipment at the same time using a single document, the EDH Materials Request form. The Materials Request form offers users items from both the internal 'Stores' catalogue and the external 'Farnell' catalogue, all of which may be ordered on the same form. The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Farnell equipment to Farnell. The delivery time is 48 hours in both cases. Requests for materials are routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  2. COLETTE users' guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heenan, R.W.; King, S.M.; Osborn, R.; Stanley, H.B.

    1989-12-01

    This guide describes the computer program COLETTE. It has been purposely designed to reduce the small-angle data collected on the ISIS small-angle neutron camera LOQ in an interactive and user-friendly manner. This not only gives the LOQ user an opportunity to inspect data rapidly and comprehensively during the course of an experiment but also provides the instrument scientists with a flexible diagnostic tool with which they can monitor the performance of the instrument. After the experiment is completed, COLETTE may be used to provide the final I(Q) versus Q following subtraction of a sample background run and normalisation to a scattering standard. By limiting the range of azimuthal angles included in the analysis the program may take sections through an anisotropic scattering pattern from an ordered system. A completely two dimensional I(Q x ,Q y ) map may also be generated. (author)

  3. Users' requirements for IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Jitsukawa, S.; Ehrlich, K.; Moeslang, A.

    1998-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a high energy neutron irradiation facility which generates an intense neutron flux with D-Li stripping reactions for fusion materials testing. The role of IFMIF is (1) development of various fusion reactor materials, (2) determination of design-relevant engineering databases for the DEMO fusion reactor, (3) calibration and validation of data generated from fission reactor irradiations and the other simulation experiments, etc. The conceptual design activity (CDA) of IFMIF was initiated in February 1995 as an IEA collaborative activity to complete a reference conceptual design of IFMIF in December 1996. Users' requirements for the conceptual design of IFMIF were developed for materials to be tested, types of experiments, small specimen test technology and irradiation conditions. Furthermore, the neutron irradiation field characteristics (spectrum, flux/volume, etc.) of IFMIF were evaluated for the conceptual design parameters and were shown to meet the essential requirements of the users. (orig.)

  4. CSTEM User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, M.; McKnight, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    This manual is a combination of a user manual, theory manual, and programmer manual. The reader is assumed to have some previous exposure to the finite element method. This manual is written with the idea that the CSTEM (Coupled Structural Thermal Electromagnetic-Computer Code) user needs to have a basic understanding of what the code is actually doing in order to properly use the code. For that reason, the underlying theory and methods used in the code are described to a basic level of detail. The manual gives an overview of the CSTEM code: how the code came into existence, a basic description of what the code does, and the order in which it happens (a flowchart). Appendices provide a listing and very brief description of every file used by the CSTEM code, including the type of file it is, what routine regularly accesses the file, and what routine opens the file, as well as special features included in CSTEM.

  5. ASSIST user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all the states and transitions in a complex system model can be devastatingly tedious and error prone. The Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST) computer program allows the user to describe the semi-Markov model in a high-level language. Instead of listing the individual model states, the user specifies the rules governing the behavior of the system, and these are used to generate the model automatically. A few statements in the abstract language can describe a very large, complex model. Because no assumptions are made about the system being modeled, ASSIST can be used to generate models describing the behavior of any system. The ASSIST program and its input language are described and illustrated by examples.

  6. Internet user behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radbâță, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet is a useful tool for everybody in a technologically advanced world. As Internet appears and develops, it creates a totally new network environment. The development of commerce on the Internet based on virtual communities has become one of the most successful business models in the world. After analyzing the concept of internet, the e-commerce market and its marketing mix and the benefits and limitations of the Internet, we have presented a few studies on Internet user behaviour. Furthermore, the paper looks at a representative sample of Romanian internet users. The results reveal that the Romanians are using the Internet especially for information gathering, e-mail, entertainment and social networking.

  7. MAGIC user's group software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, G.; Ludeking, L.; McDonald, J.; Nguyen, K.; Goplen, B.

    1990-01-01

    The MAGIC User's Group has been established to facilitate the use of electromagnetic particle-in-cell software by universities, government agencies, and industrial firms. The software consists of a series of independent executables that are capable of inter-communication. MAGIC, SOS, μ SOS are used to perform electromagnetic simulations while POSTER is used to provide post-processing capabilities. Each is described in the paper. Use of the codes for Klystrode simulation is discussed

  8. Single user systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, I.

    1985-01-01

    The first part of the talk is devoted to establishing concepts and trends in interactive computing technology and is intended to provide a framework. I then discuss personal computing architectures of today and planned architectures of the 1990s. I present current personal computer environments for the programmer and for the user. Scenarios for future computing environments are developed. Finally, I open a discussion on the social implications of personal computers. (orig./HSI)

  9. 16. ESRF users meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coraux, J.; Renevier, H.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Daudin, B.; Proietti, M.G.; Renaud, G.; Fowler, B.; Mercer, D.L.; Omar, A.H.; Thompson, P.; Markovic, N.M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Lucas, C.A.; Andrejczuk, A.; Kwiatkowska, J.; Dobrzynski, L.; Zukowski, E.; Bellin, Ch.; Loupias, G.; Shukla, A.; Buslaps, Th.; Stankov, S.; Sladecek, M.; Slezak, T.; Korecki, J.; Spiridis, N.; Sepiol, B.; Vogl, G.; Chumakov, A.; Ruffer, R.; Hermann, R.P.; Grandjean, F.; Schweika, W.; Long, G.J.; Leupold, O.; Belrhall, H.; Caserotto, H.; Dauvergne, F.; Geoffroy, L.; Guljarro, M.; Launer, L.; Levault, B.; Walsh, M.; Beckers, M.; Schell, N.; Martins, R.M.S.; Mucklich, A.; Moller, W.; Silva, R.J.C.; Mahesh, K.K.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Tejas, Parikh; Neil, Fellows; Durodola, J.; Slawinski, W.; Przenioslo, R.; Sosnowska, I.; Suard, E

    2006-07-01

    This document gathers the posters that were presented during the poster session of this workshop. These posters highlight the results obtained by ESRF'users in different fields such as surface structure, Compton scattering studies, localized vibrational modes in thermoelectric materials, Ni-Ti thin films, residual stresses in superconducting wires, and changes in crystal and magnetic structure of NdFeO{sub 3}.

  10. User interface inspection methods a user-centered design method

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Chauncey

    2014-01-01

    User Interface Inspection Methods succinctly covers five inspection methods: heuristic evaluation, perspective-based user interface inspection, cognitive walkthrough, pluralistic walkthrough, and formal usability inspections. Heuristic evaluation is perhaps the best-known inspection method, requiring a group of evaluators to review a product against a set of general principles. The perspective-based user interface inspection is based on the principle that different perspectives will find different problems in a user interface. In the related persona-based inspection, colleagues assume the

  11. From European Standard to User Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobi, Ole Illum; Lind, Morten

    1997-01-01

    Today’s public administration and planning need access to proper spatial information. The tremendous growth in the area of maps and other geographically referenced databases increases the needs of the user as well as the supplier of information for an overview of the jungle of spatial data....... The answer to this need is a metadata service that gives relevant and up-to-date, at-your-fingertips information on available geographical datasets.As a result of the work in the standardization organizations, we are now, luckily, able to take the first steps towards an implementation of metadata services...... in the design of the next generation of metadata services.On the basis of recent Danish experiences with implementation of the CEN/TC 287 standard into a WWW Geographical Information metadata service, we will present and discuss some general issues: The conceptual strategy, the implementation of dataset...

  12. PARFUME User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamman, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    PARFUME, a fuel performance analysis and modeling code, is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for evaluating gas reactor coated particle fuel assemblies for prismatic, pebble bed, and plate type fuel geometries. The code is an integrated mechanistic analysis tool that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of coated fuel particles (TRISO) and the probability for fuel failure given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise during the fuel fabrication process. Using a robust finite difference numerical scheme, PARFUME is capable of performing steady state and transient heat transfer and fission product diffusion analyses for the fuel. Written in FORTRAN 90, PARFUME is easy to read, maintain, and modify. Currently, PARFUME is supported only on MS Windows platforms. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME User Guide, a supplement to the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report which describes the theoretical aspects of the code. User information is provided including: (1) code development, (2) capabilities and limitations, (3) installation and execution, (4) user input and output, (5) sample problems, and (6) error messages. In the near future, the INL plans to release a fully benchmarked and validated beta version of PARFUME.

  13. "Playing" with our users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    was from the amazing Dr Anthony Lewis Brooks (aka Tony) who has conceived the concepts GameAbilitation, ArtAbilitation, and Ludic Engagement Designs for All. While presenting some of his work on GameAbilitation and ArtAbilitation he brought up the subject of conducting research with users with disabilities...... to be positive for the users. Well this might be how research works and we do try to be ethical, explain terms and conditions to our users and then say thank you, we sometimes return to present the results, give more “thank you”s and promise that “if it becomes available/when they acquire such an expensive...... device/when such smartphones become cheaper/when we’ll have funds” they can have such an experience again and that we make sure to upload everything online for free and so on and so forth. And sometimes we do actually try to leave devices, guidelines and software behind, though we never return to check...

  14. Measuring the User Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry B. Santoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to develop an adapted version of User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ and evaluate a learning management system. Although there is a growing interest on User Experience, there are still limited resources (i.e. measurement tools or questionnaires available to measure user experience of any products, especially learning management systems. Two hundreds and thirteen computer science students participated and completed the adapted version of UEQ. In the study, the researchers used a learning management system named Student Centered e-Learning Environment (SCELE. Several types of learning materials are posted in SCELE such as audio files, simulations, PowerPoint slides, multimedia contents, and webpage links. Most of the lecturers use discussion forums in their courses to encourage students to participate in active learning setting. Staff and lecturers sometimes post academic-related announcements on the SCELE homepage. Two hundred thirteen students enrolled in Computer Science program were invited to evaluate the SCELE. This study will benefit UX practitioners, HCI educators, program and center of learning resources administrators, and learning management system developers. Findings of the present study may also be valuable for universities and high schools which are using computer-based learning environments.

  15. AVRAM user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrady, P.W.

    1988-02-01

    This document details the use of the reliability code for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project. This code was designed by Tom Anklam and John Harris. In late 1984 Patrick McGrady and Elena Koontz of C and TD/TA were assigned the task of improving the code and converting it for use on the DEC-10 system. In early 1986, Patric McGrady converted it to the CRAY. The AVRAM code is divided into distinct parts (often referred to as programs in this document). There is a COSMOS file that controls the execution of the FORTRAN code and controls the naming of output datasets and the deletion of temporary datasets created by the code. The FORTRAN code consists of a main program as a driver and of three main subroutines: EDIT, PARAM, and AVRAM. The EDIT program allows the user to create a new user defined system or add to an existing system or to change certain parameters. The PARAM program allows the user to alter system parameters and to select options such as economics run, criticality analysis or sensitivity studies. The AVRAM program does a reliability analysis of the system

  16. Private Sharing of User Location over Online Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Freudiger, Julien; Neu, Raoul; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Online social networks increasingly allow mobile users to share their location with their friends. Much to the detriment of users’ privacy, this also means that social network operators collect users’ lo- cation. Similarly, third parties can learn users’ location from localization and location visualization services. Ideally, third-parties should not be given complete access to users’ location. To protect location privacy, we design and implement a platform-independent solution for users to s...

  17. User Requirements Model for University Timetable Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Althunibat; Mohammad I. Muhairat

    2016-01-01

    Automated timetables are used to schedule courses, lectures and rooms in universities by considering some constraints. Inconvenient and ineffective timetables often waste time and money. Therefore, it is important to investigate the requirements and potential needs of users. Thus, eliciting user requirements of University Timetable Management System (TMS) and their implication becomes an important process for the implementation of TMS. On this note, this paper seeks to propose a m...

  18. Electronic referrals: what matters to the users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jim; Gu, Yulong; Day, Karen; White, Sue; Pollock, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Between September 2010 and May 2011 we evaluated three implementations of electronic referral (eReferral) systems at Hutt Valley, Northland and Canterbury District Health Boards in New Zealand. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered through project documentation, database records and stakeholder interviews. This paper reports on the user perspectives based on interviews with 78 clinical, management and operational stakeholders in the three regions. Themes that emerge across the regions are compared and synthesised. Interviews focused on pre-planned domains including quality of referral, ease of use and patient safety, but agendas were adapted progressively to elaborate and triangulate on themes emerging from earlier interviews and to clarify indications from analysis of database records. The eReferral users, including general practitioners, specialists and administrative staff, report benefits in the areas of: (1) availability and transparency of referral-related data; (2) work transformation; (3) improved data quality and (4) the convenience of auto-population from the practice management system into the referral forms. eReferral provides enhanced visibility of referral data and status within the limits of the implementation (which only goes to the hospital door in some cases). Users in all projects indicated the desire to further exploit IT to enhance two-way communication between community and hospital. Reduced administrative handling is a clear work transformation benefit with mixed feedback regarding clinical workload impact. Innovations such as GP eReferral triaging teams illustrate the further potential for workflow transformation. Consistent structure in eReferrals, as well as simple legibility, enhances data quality. Efficiency and completeness is provided by auto-population of forms from system data, but opens issues around data accuracy. All three projects highlight the importance of user involvement in design, implementation and refinement. In

  19. Reasoning about Users' Actions in a Graphical User Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virvou, Maria; Kabassi, Katerina

    2002-01-01

    Describes a graphical user interface called IFM (Intelligent File Manipulator) that provides intelligent help to users. Explains two underlying reasoning mechanisms, one an adaptation of human plausible reasoning and one that performs goal recognition based on the effects of users' commands; and presents results of an empirical study that…

  20. Implementing Sentinels in the TARGIT BI Suite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelfart, Morten; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of socalled sentinels in the TARGIT BI Suite. Sentinels are a novel type of rules that can warn a user if one or more measure changes in a multi-dimensional data cube are expected to cause a change to another measure critical to the user. Sentinels notify u...... pattern mining or correlation techniques. We demonstrate, through extensive experiments, that mining and usage of sentinels is feasible with good performance for the typical users on a real, operational data warehouse....

  1. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  2. Reducing Risky Security Behaviours: Utilising Affective Feedback to Educate Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay A. Shepherd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the number of tools created to help end-users reduce risky security behaviours, users are still falling victim to online attacks. This paper proposes a browser extension utilising affective feedback to provide warnings on detection of risky behaviour. The paper provides an overview of behaviour considered to be risky, explaining potential threats users may face online. Existing tools developed to reduce risky security behaviours in end-users have been compared, discussing the success rates of various methodologies. Ongoing research is described which attempts to educate users regarding the risks and consequences of poor security behaviour by providing the appropriate feedback on the automatic recognition of risky behaviour. The paper concludes that a solution utilising a browser extension is a suitable method of monitoring potentially risky security behaviour. Ultimately, future work seeks to implement an affective feedback mechanism within the browser extension with the aim of improving security awareness.

  3. A User Centered Approach to Developing Emergent Technology Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo; McAloone, Timothy Charles; Schlegel, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    be used too early in the design process, given that users respond best to issues they know or can relate to. This paper presents a case study where a user-centred approach was used to determine when and how to involve users in the design of a TV-enabled mobile telephone. The aim of the study......Current participatory design methods do not allow designers to gain the insight required to develop products with emerging technologies, that is, products that do not have any precedents in the users’ knowledge base and experience. This poses challenges to the designers, as input from users cannot...... methodological issues related to user involvement in the implementation of emerging technologies in the consumer electronics industry....

  4. Success Factors of Large Scale ERP Implementation in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Rotchanakitumnuai; Siriluck

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to examine the determinants of ERP implementation success factors of ERP implementation. The result indicates that large scale ERP implementation success consist of eight factors: project management competence, knowledge sharing, ERP system quality , understanding, user involvement, business process re-engineering, top management support, organization readiness.

  5. Planning and User Interface Affordances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Amant, Robert

    1999-01-01

    .... We identify a number of similarities between executing plans and interacting with a graphical user interface, and argue that affordances for planning environments apply equally well to user interface environments...

  6. User interface to administrative DRMS within a distributed environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L. D.; Kirk, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The implementation of a data base management system (DBMS) into a communications office to control and report on communication leased service contracts is discussed. The system user executes online programs to update five files residing on a UNIVAC 1100/82, through the forms mode features of the Tektronix 4025 terminal and IMSAI 8080 microcomputer. This user can select the appropriate form to the Tektronix 4025 screen, and enter new data, update existing data, or discontinue service. Selective online printing of 40 reports is accomplished by the system user to satisfy management, budget, and bill payment reporting requirements.

  7. Relaxing rdf queries based on user and domain preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Stueckenschmidt, Heiner; Wache, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Research in cooperative query answering is triggered by the observation that users are often not able to correctly formulate queries to databases such that they return the intended result. Due to lacking knowledge about the contents and the structure of a database, users will often only be able t...... application in the context of e-learning systems....... knowledge and user preferences. We describe a framework for information access that combines query refinement and relaxation in order to provide robust, personalized access to heterogeneous resource description framework data as well as an implementation in terms of rewriting rules and explain its...

  8. Concepts and implementations of natural language query systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Liu, I-Hsiung

    1984-01-01

    The currently developed user language interfaces of information systems are generally intended for serious users. These interfaces commonly ignore potentially the largest user group, i.e., casual users. This project discusses the concepts and implementations of a natural query language system which satisfy the nature and information needs of casual users by allowing them to communicate with the system in the form of their native (natural) language. In addition, a framework for the development of such an interface is also introduced for the MADAM (Multics Approach to Data Access and Management) system at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.

  9. User interfaces of information retrieval systems and user friendliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Vilar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the characteristics of user interfaces of information retrieval systems with the emphasis on design and evaluation. It presents users’ information retrieval tasks and the functions which are offered through interfaces. Design rules, guidelines and standards are presented, as well as criteria and methods for evaluation. Special emphasis is placed on the concept of user friendliness as one of the most important characteristic of the user interfaces. Various definitions of user friendliness are presented and their elements are also discussed. In the end, the paper shows how user interfaces should be designed, taken into consideration all these criteria.

  10. What drives Users' Website Registration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Li (Ting); P.A. Pavlou (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUser registration is an important prerequisite for the success of many websites by enabling users to gain access to domain information and personalized content. It is not always desirable for users, however, because they need to disclose personal information. This paper examines what

  11. Lead user projects in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Gutstein, Adele

    2018-01-01

    Earlier research on the lead user method is focused on individual case studies and how the method was applied in a specific context. In this paper, we take a broader approach, analyzing a sample of 24 lead user projects, which included working with 188 lead users. These projects were analyzed...

  12. Disk Operating System User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-01

    This document serves the purpose of bringing together in one place most of the information a user needs to use the DDP-516 Disk Operating System, (DOS). DOS is a core resident, one user, console-oriented operating system which allows the user to cont...

  13. Test and User Facilities | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities Our test and user facilities are available to | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z B Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant C Controllable Grid Interface Test System D Dynamometer Test Facilities

  14. Safeguarding the User - Developing a Multimodal Design for Surveying and Raising Internet Safety and Security Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa; Sharp, Robin; Andersen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    Internet safety and security for the user is an issue of great importance for the successful implementation of ICT, but since it is a complex field, with a specialist vocabulary that cannot immediately be understood by the common user, it is difficult to survey the field. The user may not underst......Internet safety and security for the user is an issue of great importance for the successful implementation of ICT, but since it is a complex field, with a specialist vocabulary that cannot immediately be understood by the common user, it is difficult to survey the field. The user may...... describes an ICT-based research method that combines a verbal mode of inquiry with a visual mode employing illustrations, animations and simulations to provide the user with a multimodal media experience. The rationale for this is that we are working in a complex technical field with a specialist vocabulary...

  15. Raspberry Pi user guide

    CERN Document Server

    Upton, Eben

    2013-01-01

    The essential guide to getting started with the Raspberry Pi ® The Raspberry Pi has been a success beyond the dream of its creators. Their goal, to encourage a new generation of computer programmers who understand how computers work, is well under way. Raspberry Pi User Guide 2e is the newest edition of the runaway bestseller written by the Pi's co-creator, Eben Upton, and tech writer Gareth Halfacree. It contains everything you need to know to get the Pi up and running, including how to: Connect a keyboard, mouse, monitor and other peripheralsInstall software and configure your Raspberry

  16. XTV users guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.; Johns, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    XTV is an X-Windows based Graphical User Interface for viewing results of Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) calculations. It provides static and animated color mapped visualizations of both thermal-hydraulic and heat conduction components in a TRAC model of a nuclear power plant, as well as both on-screen and hard copy two-dimensional plot capabilities. XTV is the successor to TRAP, the former TRAC postprocessor using the proprietary DISSPLA graphics library. This manual describes Version 2.0, which requires TRAC version 5.4.20 or later for full visualization capabilities

  17. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From next week, the SFS UNIMARKET (tooling) catalogue will be accessible using the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and those of existing suppliers. Users will now be able to place orders from the SFS catalogue using the Material Request form on EDH. Note: The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment and those for SFS equipment, placed using the same Material Request form, to the CERN Stores and SFS respectively. In both cases, the maximum delivery time will be 48 hours. Requests for equipment will be routed for approval in accordance with standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  18. INFORMATION FOR STORES USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From next week, the SFS UNIMARKET (tooling) catalogue will be accessible using the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and those of existing suppliers. Users will now be able to place orders from the SFS catalogue using the Material Request form on EDH. Note: The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment and those for SFS equipment, placed using the same Material Request form, to the CERN Stores and SFS respectively. In both cases, the maximum delivery time will be 48 hours. Requests for equipment will be routed for approval in accordance with standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  19. User Interface Technology Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    Menu entries may be grouped and orgered Into menu hierarchies. AN levels of a hirarchy may be visible at once, or they may have to be navigated with...s t Xerox aw systemflla3. Ti ft"s lb m"k t system leble , ba it ls effective tis of1 iy some User 9101" SWsuc kaybosrdoeute usersome ssteMIS ( Apple Ma...r~stMiTemidndanodApple we tadaml no d Muaioh Isa tadsm macesd to Apple - ,pfr ftc ParSomPT In a beadue-nu of Adobe System lnooporstsd. Scdlbs Is a

  20. ASSERT-4 user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, R.A.; Tahir, A.; Carver, M.B.; Stewart, D.G.; Thibeault, P.R.; Rowe, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    ASSERT-4 is an advanced subchannel code being developed primarily to model single- and two-phase flow and heat transfer in horizontal rod bundles. This manual is intended to facilitate the application of this code to the analysis of flow in reactor fuel channels. It contains a brief description of the thermalhydraulic model and ASSERT-4 solution scheme, and other information required by users. This other information includes a detailed discussion of input data requirements, a sample problem and solution, and information describing how to access and run ASSERT-4 on the Chalk River computers

  1. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radiospares Catalogue is now accessible from the Material Request page on EDH in the same way as the CERN Stores Catalogue. This means that users can order Radiospares equipment by completing an EDH Materials Request form. N.B.: The system will automatically forward orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Radiospares equipment to Radiospares. In both cases the delivery time will be a maximum of 48 hours. Requests for materials will be routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  2. XMGR5 users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Fisher, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    ACE/gr is XY plotting tool for workstations or X-terminals using X. A few of its features are: User defined scaling, tick marks, labels, symbols, line styles, colors. Batch mode for unattended plotting. Read and write parameters used during a session. Polynomial regression, splines, running averages, DFT/FFT, cross/auto-correlation. Hardcopy support for PostScript, HP-GL, and FrameMaker.mif format. While ACE/gr has a convenient point-and-click interface, most parameter settings and operations are available through a command line interface (found in Files/Commands).

  3. The borderless online user

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Thomas; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally copyright has been exploited in separate geographical markets. This practice restricts the ability of users to access online services, music, movies and sports events on their electronic devices wherever they are in Europe and regardless of borders, viz. so called ‘portability...... of amending the current legal regime. This contribution argues, however, that existing EU rules and principles, in particular the rules of competition law, may deal with the challenges of the existing restrictions on the cross-border access to online services to such an extent that those challenges...

  4. Information for Stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    The DISTRELEC catalogue (IT) is now available in EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and the catalogues of existing suppliers. Using an EDH materials request form, users can now order DISTRELEC equipment from amongst the following product groups: peripherals, multimedia, PC components, data media, communication and data cables and adapters. Non-authorised materials will be clearly indicated. As a reminder, the system automatically manages the distribution of standard Stores equipment and punch out equipment ordered on the same request form. In both cases, delivery will take a maximum of 48 hours. The approval of the EDH document will follow the usual EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  5. CDS User survey

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Document Service

    2011-01-01

      The CERN Document Server is launching a user survey in order to collect information relative to its search engine, submission interfaces, collaborative features and content organisation. With the view of re-shaping its collections and interfaces and to better integrate with the new INSPIRE platform that serves all HEP literature, CERN Document Server team invites you to take part in the survey. Your input is essential to provide us with useful information before setting up the new service and improve your interactions with CDS. Thanks for participating !  

  6. Parks and their users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Goličnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with urban parks and their use(rs. It focuses on usage-spatial relationships from two different angles. Firstly, it discusses the actual uses mapped in places, using repeated observation on different days, times and weather conditions. Secondly, it addresses designers’ views and beliefs about usage and design of urban parks. However, the paper shows that designers’ beliefs and awareness about uses in places, in some aspects, differ from actual use. It stresses the use of empirical knowledge about usage-spatial relationships, which can be gained by using observation and behavioural mapping, in decision-making processes for parks design.

  7. 15. ESRF users meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotis C, Kafatos; Ulrich, K.U.; Weib, S.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.; Foerstendorf, H.; Zanker, H.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Kirschner, J.; Robach, O.; Ferrer, S.; Lyman, P.F.; Shneerson, V.L.; Fung, R.; Harder, R.J.; Parihar, S.S.; Johnson-Steigelman, H.T.; Lu, E.D.; Saldin, D.K.; Eastwood, D.S.; Atkinson, D.; Tanner, B.K.; Hase, T.P.A.; Van Kampen, M.; Hjorvarsson, B.; Brown, S.; Thompson, P.; Konovalov, O.; Saint-Martin, E.; Daillant, J.; Luzet, D.; Szlachetko, J.; Barrett, R.; Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, M.; Monaco, A.; Chumakov, A.; Crichton, W.; Van Buerck, I.; Wortmann, G.; Meyer, A.; Ponkratz, U.; Ruffer, R.; Sakurai, Y.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Buslaps, T.; Honkimki, V.; Maeno, Y.; Collart, E.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.P.; Leininger, Ph.; Ishii, H.; Cai, Y.; Cheong, S.W.; Martins, R.M.S.; Schell, N.; Beckers, M.; Silva, R.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Acapito, F.; Seta, M. de; Capelini, G.; Giorgi, M.; Schorr, G.; Geandier, G.; Alves Marques, M.; Barros Marquesa, M.I. de; Cabaco, M.I.; Gaspara, A.M.; Marques, M.P.M.; Amado, A.M.; Amorim da Costa, A.M.; Bruneseaux, F.; Weisbecker, P.; Brandao, M.J.; Aeby-Gautier, E.; Simmonds, H.; Lei, C.; Das, A.; Trolley, D.; Thomas, H.E.; Macdonald, J.E.; Wiegart, L.; Tolan, M.; Struth, B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Hart, D.C.; Imhof, A.; Van Blaaderen, A.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Snigirev, A.; Mossaid, A.; Snigireva, I.; Reconditi, M.; Brunello, E

    2005-07-01

    This document gathers the posters presented on the one day and a half long plenary meeting workshop. This meeting workshop is a privileged forum where ESRF users can exchange their views on the latest scientific and technical development involving synchrotron radiation. One poster deals with the investigation of colloid composition and uranium bond structure to see whether the migration of contaminants from abandoned mines could be stimulated or attenuated by colloids. Another poster is dedicated to the investigation of the uranium speciation in covered mine tailings by a combination of micro-spectroscopic and wet chemical approaches. 2 posters deal with the contribution of synchrotron radiation to radiotherapy.

  8. 15. ESRF users meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotis C, Kafatos; Ulrich, K.U.; Weib, S.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.; Foerstendorf, H.; Zanker, H.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Kirschner, J.; Robach, O.; Ferrer, S.; Lyman, P.F.; Shneerson, V.L.; Fung, R.; Harder, R.J.; Parihar, S.S.; Johnson-Steigelman, H.T.; Lu, E.D.; Saldin, D.K.; Eastwood, D.S.; Atkinson, D.; Tanner, B.K.; Hase, T.P.A.; Van Kampen, M.; Hjorvarsson, B.; Brown, S.; Thompson, P.; Konovalov, O.; Saint-Martin, E.; Daillant, J.; Luzet, D.; Szlachetko, J.; Barrett, R.; Berset, M.; Dousse, J.C.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Kubala-Kukus, A.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, M.; Monaco, A.; Chumakov, A.; Crichton, W.; Van Buerck, I.; Wortmann, G.; Meyer, A.; Ponkratz, U.; Ruffer, R.; Sakurai, Y.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Buslaps, T.; Honkimki, V.; Maeno, Y.; Collart, E.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.P.; Leininger, Ph.; Ishii, H.; Cai, Y.; Cheong, S.W.; Martins, R.M.S.; Schell, N.; Beckers, M.; Silva, R.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.; Acapito, F.; Seta, M. de; Capelini, G.; Giorgi, M.; Schorr, G.; Geandier, G.; Alves Marques, M.; Barros Marquesa, M.I. de; Cabaco, M.I.; Gaspara, A.M.; Marques, M.P.M.; Amado, A.M.; Amorim da Costa, A.M.; Bruneseaux, F.; Weisbecker, P.; Brandao, M.J.; Aeby-Gautier, E.; Simmonds, H.; Lei, C.; Das, A.; Trolley, D.; Thomas, H.E.; Macdonald, J.E.; Wiegart, L.; Tolan, M.; Struth, B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Hart, D.C.; Imhof, A.; Van Blaaderen, A.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Snigirev, A.; Mossaid, A.; Snigireva, I.; Reconditi, M.; Brunello, E.

    2005-01-01

    This document gathers the posters presented on the one day and a half long plenary meeting workshop. This meeting workshop is a privileged forum where ESRF users can exchange their views on the latest scientific and technical development involving synchrotron radiation. One poster deals with the investigation of colloid composition and uranium bond structure to see whether the migration of contaminants from abandoned mines could be stimulated or attenuated by colloids. Another poster is dedicated to the investigation of the uranium speciation in covered mine tailings by a combination of micro-spectroscopic and wet chemical approaches. 2 posters deal with the contribution of synchrotron radiation to radiotherapy

  9. FISPACT 97: user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.A.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    1997-05-01

    FISPACT is the inventory code included in the European Activation System (EASY). A new version of FISPACT: FISPACT-97 has been developed and this report is the User manual for the code. It explains the use of all the code words used in the input file to specify a FISPACT run and describes how all the data files are connected. A series of appendices cover the working of the code and the physical and mathematical details. Background information on the data files and extensive examples of input files suitable for various applications are included. (Author)

  10. Percept User Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, Brian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kennon, Stephen Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document is the main user guide for the Sierra/Percept capabilities including the mesh_adapt and mesh_transfer tools. Basic capabilities for uniform mesh refinement (UMR) and mesh transfers are discussed. Examples are used to provide illustration. Future versions of this manual will include more advanced features such as geometry and mesh smoothing. Additionally, all the options for the mesh_adapt code will be described in detail. Capabilities for local adaptivity in the context of offline adaptivity will also be included. This page intentionally left blank.

  11. Raspberry Pi user guide

    CERN Document Server

    Halfacree, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Make the most out of the world’s first truly compact computer It's the size of a credit card, it can be charged like a smartphone, it runs on open-source Linux, and it holds the promise of bringing programming and playing to millions at low cost. And now you can learn how to use this amazing computer from its co-creator, Eben Upton, in Raspberry Pi User Guide. Cowritten with Gareth Halfacree, this guide gets you up and running on Raspberry Pi, whether you're an educator, hacker, hobbyist, or kid. Learn how to connect your Pi to other hardware, install software, write basic programs, an

  12. User-centered Technologies For Blind Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review, summarize, and illustrate research work involving four audio-based games created within a user-centered design methodology through successive usability tasks and evaluations. These games were designed by considering the mental model of blind children and their styles of interaction to perceive and process data and information. The goal of these games was to enhance the cognitive development of spatial structures, memory, haptic perception, mathematical skills, navigation and orientation, and problem solving of blind children. Findings indicate significant improvements in learning and cognition from using audio-based tools specially tailored for the blind. That is, technologies for blind children, carefully tailored through user-centered design approaches, can make a significant contribution to cognitive development of these children. This paper contributes new insight into the design and implementation of audio-based virtual environments to facilitate learning and cognition in blind children.

  13. Bridging Flows: Microfluidic End‐User Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabourin, David

    Microfluidic applications hold promise for many different end‐users both within and outside, and across many different research communities. Despite the benefits of microfluidic approaches, adoption and implementation thereof is often hindered by practical issues. Microfluidic components which......‐integrated interconnection and miniaturized peristaltic pump solutions were then combined into modular microfluidic systems. One system provides high interconnection numbers/density and allows many possible configurations. Additionally, and apart from many other accounts of modular microfluidic solutions, methods...... for control and actuation of microfluidic networks built from the modular components is described. Prototypes of the microfluidic system have begun to be distributed to external collaborators and researcher parties. These end‐users will assist in the validation of the approach and ultimately fulfil the key...

  14. User's guide to the 'DISPOSALS' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, M.S.; James, A.R.; Laundy, R.S.

    1984-03-01

    This report provides a User's Guide to the 'DISPOSALS' computer model and includes instructions on how to set up and run a specific problem together with details of the scope, theoretical basis, data requirements and capabilities of the model. The function of the 'DISPOSALS' model is to make assignments of nuclear waste material in an optimum manner to a number of disposal sites each subject to a number of constraints such as limits on the volume and activity. The user is able to vary the number of disposal sites, the range and limits of the constraints to be applied to each disposal site and the objective function for optimisation. The model is based on the Linear Programming technique and uses CAP Scientific's LAMPS and MAGIC packages. Currently the model has been implemented on CAP Scientific's VAX 11/750 minicomputer. (author)

  15. Revised user's guide to the 'DISPOSALS' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laundy, R.S.; James, A.R.; Groom, M.S.; LeJeune, S.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides a User's Guide to the 'DISPOSALS' computer model and includes instructions on how to set up and run a specific problem together with details of the scope, theoretical basis, data requirements and capabilities of the model. The function of the 'DISPOSALS' model is to make assignments of nuclear waste material in an optimum manner to a number of disposal sites each subject to a number of constraints such as limits on the volume and activity. The user is able to vary the number of disposal sites, the range and limits of the constraints to be applied to each disposal site and the objective function for optimisation. The model is based on the Linear Programming technique and uses CAP Scientific's LAMPS and MAGIC packages. Currently the model has been implemented on CAP Scientific's VAX 11/750 minicomputer. (author)

  16. Mini-mast CSI testbed user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Pappa, Richard S.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Miserentino, Robert; Bailey, James P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Williams, Boyd L., Jr.; Bruner, Anne M.

    1992-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed is a 20 m generic truss highly representative of future deployable trusses for space applications. It is fully instrumented for system identification and active vibrations control experiments and is used as a ground testbed at NASA-Langley. The facility has actuators and feedback sensors linked via fiber optic cables to the Advanced Real Time Simulation (ARTS) system, where user defined control laws are incorporated into generic controls software. The object of the facility is to conduct comprehensive active vibration control experiments on a dynamically realistic large space structure. A primary goal is to understand the practical effects of simplifying theoretical assumptions. This User's Guide describes the hardware and its primary components, the dynamic characteristics of the test article, the control law implementation process, and the necessary safeguards employed to protect the test article. Suggestions for a strawman controls experiment are also included.

  17. User Driven Innovation in the Building Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per; Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Rødtness, Mette

    2008-01-01

    During the late years there has been an ever-increasing focus on the possibilities to change the building process to raise quality on the final building products as well as the activities of actors involved in the building process. One reason for this interest is the new opportunities evolving du...... building design. A general methodological framework and meta ontology for Virtual Innovation in Construction is presented as well as findings from implementation of the method....... to introduction of advanced information and communication technology (ICT). The paper focuses on creative changes of the building process powered by user driven innovation activities. An overview of existing user driven innovation methodologies is given as well experiences from the ongoing Virtual Innovation...

  18. CULTURAL FEATURES SHARED BY INFORMATION SYSTEMS USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Maldonado

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems may arise when organizational culture is not considered in the development of information systems, such as difficulties in system implementation, since users do not accept changes in their work cultures. However, current methodology designs do not contemplate cultural factors. The objective of this investigation was to identify the main cultural features shared by the users of information systems in an Argentinean university. As result of this work it was possible to identify the memes shared by the members of the community selected, and to categorize such memes according to their incidence grade. This work seeks to be an initial step towards the construction of systems that evolve along with the organizational culture they are an integral part of.

  19. User Types in Online Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Online applications are presented in the context of information society. Online applications characteristics are analyzed. Quality characteristics are presented in relation to online applications users. Types of users for AVIO application are presented. Use cases for AVIO application are identified. The limitations of AVIO application are defined. Types of users in online applications are identified. The threedimensional matrix of access to the online application resources is built. The user type-oriented database is structured. Access management of the fields related to the database tables is analyzed. The classification of online applications users is done.

  20. A User-Centric View of Intelligent Environments: User Expectations, User Experience and User Role in Building Intelligent Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija Kaasinen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our everyday environments are gradually becoming intelligent, facilitated both by technological development and user activities. Although large-scale intelligent environments are still rare in actual everyday use, they have been studied for quite a long time, and several user studies have been carried out. In this paper, we present a user-centric view of intelligent environments based on published research results and our own experiences from user studies with concepts and prototypes. We analyze user acceptance and users’ expectations that affect users’ willingness to start using intelligent environments and to continue using them. We discuss user experience of interacting with intelligent environments where physical and virtual elements are intertwined. Finally, we touch on the role of users in shaping their own intelligent environments instead of just using ready-made environments. People are not merely “using” the intelligent environments but they live in them, and they experience the environments via embedded services and new interaction tools as well as the physical and social environment. Intelligent environments should provide emotional as well as instrumental value to the people who live in them, and the environments should be trustworthy and controllable both by regular users and occasional visitors. Understanding user expectations and user experience in intelligent environments, and providing users with tools to influence the environments can help to shape the vision of intelligent environments into meaningful, acceptable and appealing service entities for all those who live and act in them.

  1. Photovoltaics information user study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  2. ARDS User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Personal computers (PCs) are now used extensively for engineering analysis. their capability exceeds that of mainframe computers of only a few years ago. Programs originally written for mainframes have been ported to PCs to make their use easier. One of these programs is ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) which was developed at Arizona State University (ASU) by Nelson et al. to quickly and accurately analyze rotor steady state and transient response using the method of component mode synthesis. The original ARDS program was ported to the PC in 1995. Several extensions were made at ASU to increase the capability of mainframe ARDS. These extensions have also been incorporated into the PC version of ARDS. Each mainframe extension had its own user manual generally covering only that extension. Thus to exploit the full capability of ARDS required a large set of user manuals. Moreover, necessary changes and enhancements for PC ARDS were undocumented. The present document is intended to remedy those problems by combining all pertinent information needed for the use of PC ARDS into one volume.

  3. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD`s Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases & Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  4. Electronic Commerce user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD's Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  5. Involving Lead Users in Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Bilgram, Volker; Gutstein, Adele

    2018-01-01

    Research on the lead user method has been conducted for more than thirty years and has shown that the method is more likely to generate breakthrough innovation than traditional market research tools. Based on a systematic literature review, this paper shows a detailed view on the broad variety...... of research on lead user characteristics, lead user processes, lead user identification and application, and success factors. The main challenge of the lead user method as identified in literature is the resource issue regarding time, manpower, and costs. Also, internal acceptance and the processing...... of the method have been spotted in literature, as well as the intellectual property protection issue. From the starting point of the initial lead user method process introduced by Lüthje and Herstatt (2004), results are integrated into a revisited view on the lead user method process. In addition, concrete...

  6. Abolition of user fees: the Uganda paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Mugisha, Frederick; Kirunga, Christine; Macq, Jean; Criel, Bart

    2011-11-01

    Inadequate health financing is one of the major challenges health systems in low-income countries currently face. Health financing reforms are being implemented with an increasing interest in policies that abolish user fees. Data from three nationally representative surveys conducted in Uganda in 1999/2000, 2002/03 and 2005/06 were used to investigate the impact of user fee abolition on the attainment of universal coverage objectives. An increase in illness reporting was noted over the three surveys, especially among the poorer quintiles. An increase in utilization was registered in the period immediately following the abolition of user fees and was most pronounced in the poorest quintile. Overall, there was an increase in utilization in both public and private health care delivery sectors, but only at clinic and health centre level, not at hospitals. Our study shows important changes in health-care-seeking behaviour. In 2002/03, the poorest population quintile started using government health centres more often than private clinics whereas in 1999/2000 private clinics were the main source of health care. The richest quintile has increasingly used private clinics. Overall, it appears that the private sector remains a significant source of health care. Following abolition of user fees, we note an increase in the use of lower levels of care with subsequent reductions in use of hospitals. Total annual average expenditures on health per household remained fairly stable between the 1999/2000 and 2002/03 surveys. There was, however, an increase of US$21 in expenditure between the 2002/03 and 2005/06 surveys. Abolition of user fees improved access to health services and efficiency in utilization. On the negative side is the fact that financial protection is yet to be achieved. Out-of-pocket expenditure remains high and mainly affects the poorer population quintiles. A dual system seems to have emerged where wealthier population groups are switching to the private sector.

  7. Grid Service for User-Centric Job

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauret, Jerome

    2009-07-31

    The User Centric Monitoring (UCM) project was aimed at developing a toolkit that provides the Virtual Organization (VO) with tools to build systems that serve a rich set of intuitive job and application monitoring information to the VO’s scientists so that they can be more productive. The tools help collect and serve the status and error information through a Web interface. The proposed UCM toolkit is composed of a set of library functions, a database schema, and a Web portal that will collect and filter available job monitoring information from various resources and present it to users in a user-centric view rather than and administrative-centric point of view. The goal is to create a set of tools that can be used to augment grid job scheduling systems, meta-schedulers, applications, and script sets in order to provide the UCM information. The system provides various levels of an application programming interface that is useful through out the Grid environment and at the application level for logging messages, which are combined with the other user-centric monitoring information in a abstracted “data store”. A planned monitoring portal will also dynamically present the information to users in their web browser in a secure manor, which is also easily integrated into any JSR-compliant portal deployment that a VO might employ. The UCM is meant to be flexible and modular in the ways that it can be adopted to give the VO many choices to build a solution that works for them with special attention to the smaller VOs that do not have the resources to implement home-grown solutions.

  8. Development and Implementation of Location Based Native Mobile Application

    OpenAIRE

    Čović, Zlatko; Babić, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development and implementation of a location based native mobile application for smart phones with the Android operating system. It can be used in promotion of some product or brand in the way of mobile games. The application has the administration interface (back-end) for data manipulation of users, administrators, clients and items. The system distinguishes between three levels of users: the main administrator, administrators-customers and users. The paper also descr...

  9. Development and user guide for GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Jeong Taek; Hwang, In Ku; Ham, Chang Sik; Kwon, Ki Chun.

    1997-05-01

    ADIOS(Alarm Diagnosis and Integrated Operator Support) is designed to improve the operation performance of the man-machine interface system by giving dynamic alarm priority according to plant situation, and implemented with G2 real-time expert shell. It processes alarm priority in G2 using the plant data which is received from simulator, and sends the processed alarm signals to the alarm tile through TCP/IP communication link. This report includes some experiences about the GSI(G2 Standard Interface) configuration and user programming, and describes about how to build on-line ADIOS system. (author)

  10. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  11. Evaluation of complete streets policy implementation by metropolitan planning organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Over the last ten years, communities around the country have begun to implement comprehensive reforms : designed to ensure that roadway users of all ages and abilities can safely utilize the transportation system. : This complete streets policy frame...

  12. Guidelines for user interactions in mobile augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Ortman, Erik; Swedlund, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Over the last couple of years the field of Augmented Reality has transformed from something mainly seen in academic researchinto several examples of big commercially successful products, and the widespread use of highly capable mobile devices has greatly helped accelerate this trend. The powerful sensors in modern handsets enable designers to bring Augmented Reality implementations to the hands ofthe users.This thesis examines how Augmented Reality can be implemented onmobile platforms, mainl...

  13. User interfaces of information retrieval systems and user friendliness

    OpenAIRE

    Polona Vilar; Maja Žumer

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the characteristics of user interfaces of information retrieval systems with the emphasis on design and evaluation. It presents users’ information retrieval tasks and the functions which are offered through interfaces. Design rules, guidelines and standards are presented, as well as criteria and methods for evaluation. Special emphasis is placed on the concept of user friendliness as one of the most important characteristic of the user interfaces. Various definitions of u...

  14. The Relevance of Learning Processes for IT Implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Khosrow-Pour, M.

    2007-01-01

    The starting point of this paper is the belief that it is neither the quality of the technology, nor that of the individual users, but the interactions among people in groups of users concerning a new system that determines the success or failure of IT implementation. Aiming at conceptualization of

  15. EURALERT-89 user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.; Friedland, W.; Proehl, G.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1990-09-01

    EURALERT-89 is a dose assessment program system including countermeasures which has been developed in the framework of the C.E.C. research programme 'Radiological aspects of nuclear accident scenarios'. For this purpose the ECOSYS model for calculating the transfer of radionuclides through the environment, the contamination of foodstuffs and potential doses has been adapted to real-time use in the different European countries. In this user's guide the file names are given in the form SUBD/FNAM; this means that the data file with name FNAM is in the subdirectory SUBD. Remember that writing the path of a file depends on the computer used. With EURALERT-89 it is relatively simple to get an estimate of the most important informations (deposition, maximum specific activities in foodstuffs, most important dose values) for all locations which are included in the input file. This goal can be achieved with only a few commands. (orig./HP)

  16. CALENDF-2010: user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublet, Jean-Christophe; Ribon, Pierre; Coste-Delclaux, Mireille

    2011-09-01

    CALENDF-2010 represents a Fortran-95 update of the 1994, 2001 then 2005 code distribution with emphasise on programming quality and standards, physics and usage improvements. Devised to process multigroup cross-sections it relies on Gauss quadrature mathematical principle and strength. The followings processes can be handled by the code: moment probability table and effective cross-section calculation; pointwise cross section, probability table and effective cross-section regrouping; probability table condensation; probability table mix for several isotopes; probability table interpolation; effective cross section based probability table calculations; probability table calculations from effective cross-sections; cross-section comparison, complete energy pointwise cross-section processing and thickness dependent averaged transmission sample calculation. The CALENDF user manual, after having listed all principal code functions, describes sequentially each of them and gives comments on their associated output streams. Installation procedures, test cases and running time platform comparisons are given in the appendix. (authors)

  17. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Bossard catalogue is now accessible alongside the CERN Stores catalogue from the Material Request form on EDH. Users will thus be able to order Bossard equipment using the EDH Materials Request form. As a reminder, the system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Bossard equipment to Bossard. In both cases the delivery time will be a maximum of 48 hours. Requests for materials will be routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Some items will remain available from the emergency desk in the event of urgent requests. These items will be visible in the Stores catalogue even if they cannot be purchased via the EDH material request form. Logistics Group FI Department

  18. Truck shovel users group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J. [Surface Mining Association for Research and Technology, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The Truck Shovel Users Group (TSUG) was developed as part of the Surface Mining Association for Research and Technology (SMART), an association of companies that meet to coordinate technology developments for the mining industry. The TSUG meet regularly to discuss equipment upgrades, maintenance planning systems, and repair techniques. The group strives to maximize the value of its assets through increased safety, equipment performance and productivity. This presentation provided administrative details about the TSUG including contact details and admission costs. It was concluded that members of the group must be employed by companies that use heavy mining equipment, and must also be willing to host meetings, make presentations, and support the common goals of the group. tabs., figs.

  19. INFORMATION FOR GAS USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Logistics Group

    2001-01-01

    The contractor for the supply and distribution of pressurised gases has drawn our attention to the large number of gas bottles and banks being stored on the site for increasingly long periods. Users are reminded that the rental charges for gas bottles and banks are based on a progressive rate depending on their period of use. To assist CERN in its efforts to optimise its operations in this field, you are kindly requested : to return empty or unused containers to the official gas distribution points as soon as possible, to try to limit reserve stocks, bearing in mind that standardised gases can be delivered within 36 hours. This will result in a higher turnover rate and in increased safety and will improve the availability of the gases. For all further enquiries, please contact Gas.Store@cern.ch by e-mail or call 72265. Thank you for your co-operation.

  20. Information for gas users

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The contractor for the supply and distribution of pressurised gases has drawn our attention to the large number of gas bottles and banks being stored on the site for increasingly long periods. Users are reminded that the rental charges for gas bottles and banks are based on a progressive rate depending on their period of use. To assist CERN in its efforts to optimise its operations in this field, you are kindly requested: - to return empty or unused containers to the official gas distribution points as soon as possible - to try to limit reserve stocks, bearing in mind that standardised gases can be delivered within 36 hours. This will result in a higher turnover rate and in increased safety and will improve the availability of the gases. For all further enquiries, please contact "Gas store" by e-mail. Thank you for your co-operation. Logistics Group SPL Division

  1. Communication to Linux users

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    We would like to inform you that the aging “phone” Linux command will stop working: On lxplus on 30 November 2009, On lxbatch on 4 January 2010, and is replaced by the new “phonebook” command, currently available on SLC4 and SLC5 Linux. As the new “phonebook” command has different syntax and output formats from the “phone” command, please update and test all scripts currently using “phone” before the above dates. You can refer to the article published on the IT Service Status Board, under the Service Changes section. Please send any comments to it-dep-phonebook-feedback@cern.ch Best regards, IT-UDS User Support Section

  2. Openphone user engagement and requirements solicitation in low literacy users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndwe, J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available stimulus of being singled out and made to feel important” (Franke and Kaul 1978). User engagement is particularly important for this targeted user group because of a cultural aspect, “where a questioner invariably gets positive answers as a matter... and specification is complex even when designing a ‘simple’ single user system because users often cannot properly articulate their needs (Pekkola et al. 2006). This complexity is amplified when designing applications that are to be used by a group of people...

  3. PST user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Cebull, M.J.; Gilbert, B.G.

    1996-10-01

    The Parametric Source Term (PST) software allows estimation of radioactivity release fractions for Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). PST was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program. PST contains a framework of equations that model activity transport between volumes in the release pathway from the core, through the vessel, through the containment, and to the environment. PST quickly obtains exact solutions to differential equations for activity transport in each volume for each time interval. PST provides a superior method for source term estimation because it: ensures conservation of activity transported across various volumes in the release pathway; provides limited consideration of the time-dependent behavior of input parameter uncertainty distributions; allows input to be quantified using state-of-the-art severe accident analysis code results; increases modeling flexibility because linkage between volumes is specified by user input; and allows other types of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plant designs to be evaluated with minimal modifications. PST is a microcomputer-based system that allows the analyst more flexibility than a mainframe system. PST has been developed to run with both MS DOS and MS Windows 95/NT operating systems. PST has the capability to load ASP Source Term Vector (STV) information, import pre-specified default input for the 6 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) initially analyzed in the NRC ASP program, allow input value modifications for release fraction sensitivity studies, export user-specified default input for the LWR being modeled, report results of radioactivity release calculations at each time interval, and generate formatted results that can interface with other risk assessment codes. This report describes the PST model and provides guidelines for using PST

  4. How to Apply the User Profile Usability Technique in the User Modelling Activity for an Adaptive Food Recommendation System for People on Special Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrecia Llerena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest among software professionals in the possibility of adapting software to user requirements has grown as a result of the evolution of software analysis, design and implementation thinking and the growth in the number of software systems users. Moving away from the traditional approach where the user has to settle for the options offered by software systems, different factors (e.g. user needs, aspirations, preferences, knowledge level, goals have to be taken into account for this purpose. Technically, this possibility is referred to as adaptiveness, and it requires user data. It is these data (user model that determine the adaptiveness conditions. Our aim is to build a user model for adaptive systems applied to nutritional requirements, modelling user characteristics that affect their diets and help to improve their health. To build the user model, we apply the user profile usability technique. In order to validate our proposal, we analyse and design a preliminary prototype of an adaptive system capable of making food recommendations to satisfy specific user needs. This study revealed that diet is a propitious field for the development of adaptive systems and that user modelling is a good choice for design of this type of systems.

  5. Design requirements for SRB production control system. Volume 4: Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The implementation plan which is presented was developed to provide the means for the successful implementation of the automated production control system. There are three factors which the implementation plan encompasses: detailed planning; phased implementation; and user involvement. The plan is detailed to the task level in terms of necessary activities as the system is developed, refined, installed, and tested. These tasks are scheduled, on a preliminary basis, over a two-and-one-half-year time frame.

  6. mHealth implementation in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available to incorporate a wide range of Mhealth applications to service the Health System information needs and end user needs. This paper aims to describe the current state of mHealth applications and implementation in South Africa by a review of reported MHealth...

  7. Explaining IT Implementation Through Group Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Sikkel, Nicolaas

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of an IT system in an organization takes a certain amount of time. System usage becomes stable when users have appropriated the system and new work practices have been established. We propose a concept of group learning as a framework to highlight relevant aspects of such a process. A

  8. Designing and Implementing Performance Technology for Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joi L. Moore

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthesizes research findings from a performance analysis of teacher tasks and the implementation of performance technology. These findings are aligned with design and implementation theories to provide understanding of the complex factors and events that occur during the implementation process. The article describes the necessary elements and conditions for designing and implementing performance tools in school environments that will encourage usage, efficient performance, and positive attitudes. Two models provide a visual representation of causal relationships between the implementation factors and the technology user. Although the implementation process can become complex because of the simultaneous events and phases, it can be properly managed through good communication and strategic involvement of teachers during the design and development process. The models may be able to assist technology designers and advocates with presenting innovations to teachers who are frequently asked to try technical solutions for performance support or improvement.

  9. Towards local implementation of Dutch health policy guidelines: a concept-mapping approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuunders, T.J.M.; Bon-Martens, M.J.H. van; Goor, I.A.M. van de; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.; Oers, H.A.M. van

    2017-01-01

    To develop a targeted implementation strategy for a municipal health policy guideline, implementation targets of two guideline users [Regional Health Services (RHSs)] and guideline developers of leading national health institutes were made explicit. Therefore, characteristics of successful

  10. Towards local implementation of Dutch health policy guidelines : A concept-mapping approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuunders, T.J.M.; Van Bon-martens, M.J.H.; Van De Goor, L.A.M.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.; Van Oers, J.A.M.

    To develop a targeted implementation strategy for a municipal health policy guideline, implementation targets of two guideline users [Regional Health Services (RHSs)] and guideline developers of leading national health institutes were made explicit. Therefore, characteristics of successful

  11. Concentrations of ethane (C2H6) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and acetylene (C2H2) in the upper troposphere deduced from Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy/Spacelab 3 spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Zander, R.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the spectroscopic analysis of C2H6 and C2H2 absorption spectra obtained by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument flown on the Shuttle as part of the Spacelab 3 mission. The spectra were recorded during sunset occultations occurring between 25 deg N and 31 deg N latitudes, yielding volume-mixing ratio profiles of C2H6 in the lower stratosphere and the upper troposphere, and an upper tropospheric profile of C2H2. These results compare well with previous in situ and remote sounding data obtained at similar latitudes and with model calculations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the ATMOS instrument to sound the lower atmosphere from space.

  12. Flippable User Interfaces for Internationalization

    OpenAIRE

    Khaddam, Iyad; Vanderdonckt, Jean; 3rd ACM Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems EICS’2011

    2011-01-01

    The language reading direction is probably one of the most determinant factors influencing the successful internationalization of graphical user interfaces, beyond their mere translation. Western languages are read from left to right and top to bottom, while Arabic languages and Hebrew are read from right to left and top to bottom, and Oriental languages are read from top to bottom. In order to address this challenge, we introduce flippable user interfaces that enable the end user to change t...

  13. Survey of user authentication mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Magno, Marianna B.

    1996-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The use of a password as the only traditional user authentication mechanism has been criticized for its weakness in computer security. One problem is for the user to select short, easy to remember passwords. Another problem is the selection of a password that is too long which the user tends to forget. Long passwords tend to be written down carelessly somewhere in the work space. Such practices can create serious security loopholes. Co...

  14. Radioactivity: ''small users, big problems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, C.

    1993-01-01

    In the United Kingdom there are at least one thousand small users of radioactivity in industry, in medicine, in higher education establishments and even schools. These users of small amounts of radioactivity, covering a wide variety of forms and applications, have difficulty in disposing of their wastes. Disposal provisions for users outside the nuclear industry, the practical problems they encounter and the future developments likely are discussed. (UK)

  15. Verbal learning and memory in adolescent cannabis users, alcohol users and non-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowij, Nadia; Jones, Katy A; Rozman, Megan E; Davis, Sasha M; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Heaven, Patrick C L; Lubman, Dan I; Yücel, Murat

    2011-07-01

    Long-term heavy cannabis use can result in memory impairment. Adolescent users may be especially vulnerable to the adverse neurocognitive effects of cannabis. In a cross-sectional and prospective neuropsychological study of 181 adolescents aged 16-20 (mean 18.3 years), we compared performance indices from one of the most widely used measures of learning and memory--the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test--between cannabis users (n=52; mean 2.4 years of use, 14 days/month, median abstinence 20.3 h), alcohol users (n=67) and non-user controls (n=62) matched for age, education and premorbid intellectual ability (assessed prospectively), and alcohol consumption for cannabis and alcohol users. Cannabis users performed significantly worse than alcohol users and non-users on all performance indices. They recalled significantly fewer words overall (pmemory performance after controlling for extent of exposure to cannabis. Despite relatively brief exposure, adolescent cannabis users relative to their age-matched counterparts demonstrated similar memory deficits to those reported in adult long-term heavy users. The results indicate that cannabis adversely affects the developing brain and reinforce concerns regarding the impact of early exposure.

  16. HIV prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spread of HIV among drug and alcohol users, as a high-risk group, is a significant problem in Africa, as in other parts of the world. Few programs have been implemented in Africa to deal specifically with this issue. Since November 2006, the AED Capable Partners Program in Kenya project has provided technical ...

  17. A User's Guide to CGNS. 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Poirier, Diane M. A.; Bush, Robert H.; Towne, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    The CFD General Notation System (CGNS) was developed to be a self-descriptive, machine-independent standard for storing CFD aerodynamic data. This guide aids users in the implementation of CGNS. It is intended as a tutorial on the usage of the CGNS mid-level library routines for reading and writing grid and flow solution datasets for both structured and unstructured methodologies.

  18. Lead user projects in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Gutstein, Adele

    2018-01-01

    Earlier research on the lead user method is focused on individual case studies and how the method was applied in a specific context. In this paper, we take a broader approach, analyzing a sample of 24 lead user projects, which included working with 188 lead users. These projects were analyzed....... Moreover, crowdsourcing contests and netnography proved to be of significant value for the need, trend, and lead user identification phases. This paper concludes by discussing theoretical and practical implications, the limitations of this study, and recommendations for future studies....

  19. User acquaintance with mobile interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Walesa, Magali; Sarrey, Evelyne; Wipfli, Rolf; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Handheld technology finds slowly its place in the healthcare world. Some clinicians already use intensively dedicated mobile applications to consult clinical references. However, handheld technology hasn't still broadly embraced to the core of the healthcare business, the hospitals. The weak penetration of handheld technology in the hospitals can be partly explained by the caution of stakeholders that must be convinced about the efficiency of these tools before going forward. In a domain where temporal constraints are increasingly strong, caregivers cannot loose time on playing with gadgets. All users are not comfortable with tactile manipulations and the lack of dedicated peripheral complicates entering data for novices. Stakeholders must be convinced that caregivers will be able to master handheld devices. In this paper, we make the assumption that the proper design of an interface may influence users' performances to record information. We are also interested to find out whether users increase their efficiency when using handheld tools repeatedly. To answer these questions, we have set up a field study to compare users' performances on three different user interfaces while recording vital signs. Some user interfaces were familiar to users, and others were totally innovative. Results showed that users' familiarity with smartphone influences their performances and that users improve their performances by repeating a task.

  20. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casajus Ramo, A; Sapunov, M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  1. Implementation of the monitor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenberger, M.

    1982-01-01

    Sequential and parallel computer programs are contrasted, and the problems of implementing compilers are stated, with special reference to the Pascal language. Process and monitor data types in computer programming are described, various procedures are listed and the monitor concept is applied to a generator-user problem. A Pascal initiator program is listed. It is claimed that the monitor approach can yield lower fault levels than assembler or semaphore approaches. It is pointed out that monitors for program synchronisation are only applicable for common, and not for distributed, storage systems. 9 references.

  2. Bluetooth API Implementation into Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bluetooth is a popular method of communication between devices. Many smartphones today have the capability to communicate using Bluetooth. Android developers sometimes need to use Bluetooth in their projects. Android OS provides a powerful API for Bluetooth that allows to simplify scanning the environment for devices, pairing and connecting, data transfer between devices and more. However, utilizing the Bluetooth API can be difficult for first-time users. The objective of this article is to demonstrate the key points of implementing Bluetooth API in the Android application.

  3. EPICS system: RSX implementation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, T.E.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Kramper, B.J.; MacKinnon, B.A.; West, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents implementation details of the Experimental Physics Interactive Control System (EPICS). EPICS is used to control accelerated particle beams for high-energy physics experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The topics discussed are: interprocessor communication, support of beamline terminals and devices, resource management, mapping, various problems, some solutions to the problems, performance measurement, and modifications and extensions to RSX-11M. This paper is the third of three related papers on the EPICS system. The other two cover (1) the system overview and (2) the system structure and user interface

  4. Graphical User Interfaces and Library Systems: End-User Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Margaret; Marshall, Lucy

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study by Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Library to determine user satisfaction with the graphical user interface-based (GUI) Dynix Marquis compared with the text-based Dynix Classic Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC). Results show that the GUI-based OPAC was preferred by endusers over the text-based OPAC. (eight references) (DGM)

  5. User interaction with user-adaptive information filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, H.S.M.; Evers, V.; Someren, van M.W.; Wielinga, B.J.; Besselink, S.; Rutledge, L.W.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Aykin, N.M.

    2007-01-01

    User-adaptive information filters can be a tool to achieve timely delivery of the right information to the right person, a feat critical in crisis management. This paper explores interaction issues that need to be taken into account when designing a user-adaptive information filter. Two case studies

  6. User Interaction with User-Adaptive Information Filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Cramer; V. Evers; M. van Someren; B. Wielinga; S. Besselink; L. Rutledge (Lloyd); N. Stash; L. Aroyo (Lora)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractUser-adaptive information filters can be a tool to achieve timely delivery of the right information to the right person, a feat critical in crisis management. This paper explores interaction issues that need to be taken into account when designing a user-adaptive information filter. Two

  7. User constraints for reliable user-defined smart home scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guilly, Thibaut; Nielsen, Michael Kvist; Pedersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Defining control scenarios in a smart home is a difficult task for end users. In particular, one concern is that user-defined scenarios could lead to unsafe or undesired state of the system. To help them explore scenario specifications, we propose in this paper a system that enables specification...

  8. Research of user access control for networked manufacturing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiao-lin; LEI Yu; CHEN De-ren

    2006-01-01

    An integrated user access control method was proposed to address the issues of security and management in networked manufacturing systems (NMS).Based on the analysis of the security issues in networked manufacturing system,an integrated user access control method composed of role-based access control (RBAC),task-based access control (TBAC),relationship-driven access control (RDAC)and coalition-based access control (CBAC) was proposed,including the hierarchical user relationship model,the reference model and the process model.The elements and their relationships were defined,and the expressions of constraints authorization were given.The extensible access control markup language (XACML) was used to implement this method.This method was used in the networked manufacturing system in the Shaoxing spinning region of China.The results show that the integrated user access control method can reduce the costs of system security maintenance and management.

  9. Research on potential user identification model for electric energy substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Huaijian; Chen, Meiling; Lin, Haiying; Yang, Shuo; Miao, Bo; Zhu, Xinzhi

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of energy substitution plays an important role in promoting the development of energy conservation and emission reduction in china. Energy service management platform of alternative energy users based on the data in the enterprise production value, product output, coal and other energy consumption as a potential evaluation index, using principal component analysis model to simplify the formation of characteristic index, comprehensive index contains the original variables, and using fuzzy clustering model for the same industry user’s flexible classification. The comprehensive index number and user clustering classification based on constructed particle optimization neural network classification model based on the user, user can replace electric potential prediction. The results of an example show that the model can effectively predict the potential of users’ energy potential.

  10. TMAP7 User Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, Glen R.

    2008-01-01

    The TMAP Code was written at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory by Brad Merrill and James Jones in the late 1980s as a tool for safety analysis of systems involving tritium. Since then it was upgraded to TMAP4 and has been used in numerous applications including experiments supporting fusion safety, predictions for advanced systems such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and estimates involving tritium production technologies. Its further upgrade to TMAP2000 and now to TMAP7 was accomplished in response to several needs. TMAP and TMAP4 had the capacity to deal with only a single trap for diffusing gaseous species in solid structures. TMAP7 includes up to three separate traps and up to 10 diffusing species. The original code had difficulty dealing with heteronuclear molecule formation such as HD and DT under solution-law dependent diffusion boundary conditions. That difficulty has been overcome. TMAP7 automatically generates heteronuclear molecular partial pressures when solubilities and partial pressures of the homonuclear molecular species are provided for law-dependent diffusion boundary conditions. A further sophistication is the addition of non-diffusing surface species. Atoms such as oxygen or nitrogen or formation and decay or combination of hydroxyl radicals on metal surfaces are sometimes important in reactions with diffusing hydrogen isotopes but do not themselves diffuse appreciably in the material. TMAP7 will accommodate up to 30 such surface species, allowing the user to specify relationships between those surface concentrations and partial pressures of gaseous species above the surfaces or to form them dynamically by combining diffusion species or other surface species. Additionally, TMAP7 allows the user to include a surface binding energy and an adsorption barrier energy. The code includes asymmetrical diffusion between the surface sites and regular diffusion sites in the bulk. All of the

  11. VERAView User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Andrew T.; Lee, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    VERAView has been developed as an interactive graphical interface for the visualization and engineering analyses of output data from VERA. The python-based software is easy to install and intuitive to use, and provides instantaneous 2D and 3D images, 1D plots, and alpha-numeric data from VERA multi-physics simulations. This document provides a brief overview of the software and some description of the major features of the application, including examples of each of the encapsulated ''widgets'' that have been implemented thus far. VERAView is still under major development and large changes in the software and this document are still anticipated.

  12. TRUBA User Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, M. A.; Castejon, F.; Cappa, A.

    2008-04-25

    The TRUBA (pipeline in Russian) code is a computational tool for studying the propagation of Gaussian-shaped microwave beams in a prescribed equilibrium plasma. This manual covers the basic material handed to use the implementation of TRUBA (version 3,4) interfaced with the numerical library of the TJ-II stellarator. The manual provides a concise theoretical background of the problem, specifications for setting up the input files and interpreting the output of the code, and some information useful in modifying TRUBA. (Author) 13 refs.

  13. TRUBA User Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshchenko, M. A.; Castejon, F.; Cappa, A.

    2008-01-01

    The TRUBA (pipeline in Russian) code is a computational tool for studying the propagation of Gaussian-shaped microwave beams in a prescribed equilibrium plasma. This manual covers the basic material handed to use the implementation of TRUBA (version 3,4) interfaced with the numerical library of the TJ-II stellarator. The manual provides a concise theoretical background of the problem, specifications for setting up the input files and interpreting the output of the code, and some information useful in modifying TRUBA. (Author) 13 refs

  14. AMUC: Associated Motion capture User Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sally Jane; Lawson, Sian E M; Olivier, Patrick; Watson, Paul; Chan, Anita M-A; Dade-Robertson, Martyn; Dunphy, Paul; Green, Dave; Hiden, Hugo; Hook, Jonathan; Jackson, Daniel G

    2009-07-13

    The AMUC (Associated Motion capture User Categories) project consisted of building a prototype sketch retrieval client for exploring motion capture archives. High-dimensional datasets reflect the dynamic process of motion capture and comprise high-rate sampled data of a performer's joint angles; in response to multiple query criteria, these data can potentially yield different kinds of information. The AMUC prototype harnesses graphic input via an electronic tablet as a query mechanism, time and position signals obtained from the sketch being mapped to the properties of data streams stored in the motion capture repository. As well as proposing a pragmatic solution for exploring motion capture datasets, the project demonstrates the conceptual value of iterative prototyping in innovative interdisciplinary design. The AMUC team was composed of live performance practitioners and theorists conversant with a variety of movement techniques, bioengineers who recorded and processed motion data for integration into the retrieval tool, and computer scientists who designed and implemented the retrieval system and server architecture, scoped for Grid-based applications. Creative input on information system design and navigation, and digital image processing, underpinned implementation of the prototype, which has undergone preliminary trials with diverse users, allowing identification of rich potential development areas.

  15. Cyber Physical Systems for User Reliability Measurements in a Sharing Economy Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Aria; Jeong, Junho; Kim, Yeichang

    2017-08-13

    As the sharing economic market grows, the number of users is also increasing but many problems arise in terms of reliability between providers and users in the processing of services. The existing methods provide shared economic systems that judge the reliability of the provider from the viewpoint of the user. In this paper, we have developed a system for establishing mutual trust between providers and users in a shared economic environment to solve existing problems. In order to implement a system that can measure and control users' situation in a shared economic environment, we analyzed the necessary factors in a cyber physical system (CPS). In addition, a user measurement system based on a CPS structure in a sharing economic environment is implemented through analysis of the factors to consider when constructing a CPS.

  16. Joint optimization of CQI calculation and interference mitigation for user scheduling in MIMO-OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sadek, Mirette; Aï ssa, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    In MIMO-OFDM multiuser systems, user scheduling is employed as a means of multiple access. In a downlink scenario, users that share the same subcarriers of an OFDM symbol are separated through precoding in order to achieve space division multiple access (SDMA). User scheduling techniques rely on channel knowledge at the transmitter, namely, the so-called channel quality indicator (CQI). In this paper, we implement a leakage-based precoding algorithm whose purpose is twofold. First, it is used to compute a reliable CQI based on a group of precoding vectors that are adapted to the channel. Then, it implements user scheduling through using the optimum vectors for precoding, thus minimizing interference among users. We also introduce the concept of resource block size adaptivity. The resource block (RB) is defined as the least unit in an OFDM symbol that a user can be assigned to. We propose a variable RB size that adapts to the channel conditions. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Joint optimization of CQI calculation and interference mitigation for user scheduling in MIMO-OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sadek, Mirette

    2011-05-01

    In MIMO-OFDM multiuser systems, user scheduling is employed as a means of multiple access. In a downlink scenario, users that share the same subcarriers of an OFDM symbol are separated through precoding in order to achieve space division multiple access (SDMA). User scheduling techniques rely on channel knowledge at the transmitter, namely, the so-called channel quality indicator (CQI). In this paper, we implement a leakage-based precoding algorithm whose purpose is twofold. First, it is used to compute a reliable CQI based on a group of precoding vectors that are adapted to the channel. Then, it implements user scheduling through using the optimum vectors for precoding, thus minimizing interference among users. We also introduce the concept of resource block size adaptivity. The resource block (RB) is defined as the least unit in an OFDM symbol that a user can be assigned to. We propose a variable RB size that adapts to the channel conditions. © 2011 IEEE.

  18. Enabling web users and developers to script accessibility with Accessmonkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jeffrey P; Brudvik, Jeremy T; Leung, Jessica O; Ladner, Richard E

    2009-07-01

    Efficient web access remains elusive for blind computer users. Previous efforts to improve web accessibility have focused on developer awareness, automated improvement, and legislation, but these approaches have left remaining concerns. First, while many tools can help produce accessible content, most are difficult to integrate into existing developer workflows and rarely offer specific suggestions that developers can implement. Second, tools that automatically improve web content for users generally solve specific problems and are difficult to combine and use on a diversity of existing assistive technology. Finally, although blind web users have proven adept at overcoming the shortcomings of the web and existing tools, they have been only marginally involved in improving the accessibility of their own web experience. In a step toward addressing these concerns, we have developed Accessmonkey, a common scripting framework that web users, web developers and web researchers can use to collaboratively improve accessibility. This framework advances the idea that Javascript and dynamic web content can be used to improve inaccessible content instead of being a cause of it. Using Accessmonkey, web users and developers on different platforms and with potentially different goals can collaboratively make the web more accessible. In this article, we first present the design of the Accessmonkey framework and offer several example scripts that demonstrate the utility of our approach. We conclude by discussing possible future extensions that will provide easy access to scripts as users browse the web and enable non-technical blind users to independently create and share improvements.

  19. Characteristics and determinants of music appreciation in adult CI users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Birgit; Vinck, Bart; De Vel, Eddy; Maes, Leen; D'Haenens, Wendy; Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the associations between self-reported listening habits and perception of music and speech perception outcomes in quiet and noise for both unilateral cochlear implant (CI) users and bimodal (CI in one ear, hearing aid in contra-lateral ear) users. Information concerning music appreciation was gathered by means of a newly developed questionnaire. Moreover, audiological data (pure-tone audiometry, speech tests in noise and quiet) were gathered and the relationship between speech perception and music appreciation is studied. Bimodal users enjoy listening to music more in comparison with unilateral CI users. Also, music training within rehabilitation is still uncommon, while CI recipients believe that music training might be helpful to maximize their potential with current CI technology. Music training should not be exclusively reserved for the good speech performers. Therefore, a music training program (MTP) that consists of different difficulty levels should be developed. Hopefully, early implementation of MTP in rehabilitation programs can enable adult CI users to enjoy and appreciate music and to maximize their potential with commercially available technology. Furthermore, because bimodal users consider the bimodal stimulation to be the most enjoyable way to listen to music, CI users with residual hearing in the contra-lateral ear should be encouraged to continue wearing their hearing aid in that ear.

  20. ETAP user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Higuchi, Suminori.

    1990-11-01

    The event tree analysis technique has been used in Probabilistic Safety Assessment for LWRs to delineate various accident scenarios leading to core melt or containment failure and to evaluate their frequencies. This technique often requires manual preparation of event trees with iterative process and time-consuming work in data handling. For the purpose of reducing manual efforts in event tree analysis, we developed a new software package named ETAP (Event Tree Analysis Supporting Program) for event tree analysis. ETAP is an interactive PC-based program which has the ability to construct, update, document, and quantify event trees. Because of its fast running capability to quantify event trees, use of the EATP program can make it easy to perform the sensitivity studies on a variety of system/containment performance issues. This report provides a user's manual for ETAP, which describes the structure, installation, and use of EATP. This software runs on NEC/PC-9800 or compatible PCs that have a 640 KB memory and MS-DOS 2.11 or higher. (author)