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Sample records for spacelab experiment interface

  1. More Life-Science Experiments For Spacelab

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Dalton, B.; Hogan, R.; Leon, H.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes experiments done as part of Spacelab Life Sciences 2 mission (SLS-2). Research planned on cardiovascular, vestibular, metabolic, and thermal responses of animals in weightlessness. Expected to shed light on effects of prolonged weightlessness on humans.

  2. Spacelab experiment computer study. Volume 1: Executive summary (presentation)

    Lewis, J. L.; Hodges, B. C.; Christy, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative cost for various Spacelab flight hardware configurations is provided along with varied software development options. A cost analysis of Spacelab computer hardware and software is presented. The cost study is discussed based on utilization of a central experiment computer with optional auxillary equipment. Groundrules and assumptions used in deriving the costing methods for all options in the Spacelab experiment study are presented. The groundrules and assumptions, are analysed and the options along with their cost considerations, are discussed. It is concluded that Spacelab program cost for software development and maintenance is independent of experimental hardware and software options, that distributed standard computer concept simplifies software integration without a significant increase in cost, and that decisions on flight computer hardware configurations should not be made until payload selection for a given mission and a detailed analysis of the mission requirements are completed.

  3. Spacelab operations planning. [ground handling, launch, flight and experiments

    Lee, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA planning in the fields of ground, launch and flight operations and experiment integration to effectively operate Spacelab. Payload mission planning is discussed taking consideration of orbital analysis and the mission of a multiuser payload which may be either single or multidiscipline. Payload analytical integration - as active process of analyses to ensure that the experiment payload is compatible to the mission objectives and profile ground and flight operations and that the resource demands upon Spacelab can be satisfied - is considered. Software integration is touched upon and the major integration levels in ground operational processing of Spacelab and its experimental payloads are examined. Flight operations, encompassing the operation of the Space Transportation System and the payload, are discussed as are the initial Spacelab missions. Charts and diagrams are presented illustrating the various planning areas.

  4. Dedicated data recording video system for Spacelab experiments

    Fukuda, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shoji; Fujiwara, Shinji; Onozuka, Kuniharu

    1984-04-01

    A feasibility study of video tape recorder (VTR) modification to add the capability of data recording etc. was conducted. This system is an on-broad system to support Spacelab experiments as a dedicated video system and a dedicated data recording system to operate independently of the normal operation of the Orbiter, Spacelab and the other experiments. It continuously records the video image signals with the acquired data, status and operator's voice at the same time on one cassette video tape. Such things, the crews' actions, animals' behavior, microscopic views and melting materials in furnace, etc. are recorded. So, it is expected that experimenters can make a very easy and convenient analysis of the synchronized video, voice and data signals in their post flight analysis.

  5. Preliminary results of the Spacelab 2 superfluid helium experiment

    Mason, P.V.; Collins, D.J.; Elleman, D.D.; Jackson, H.W.; Wang, T.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the properties of superfluid helium in a microgravity environment flew on the Shuttle on the Spacelab 2 mission in July and August of 1985. This paper summarizes the flight experiment and describes some preliminary results. The experiment comprised an investigation of long-wavelength third-sound waves in micron-thick films, a study of the motions of superfluid helium under milli-g and micro-g accelerations, and measurements of the fluctuations in temperature associated with the small motions of the bulk helium. An additional objective was to qualify and characterize a reflyable, space-compatible cryostat

  6. The Spacelab-Mir-1 "Greenhouse-2" experiment

    Bingham, G. E.; Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V. N.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Podolsky, I. G.

    1996-01-01

    The Spacelab-Mir-1 (SLM-1) mission is the first docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-71) with the Orbital Station Mir in June 1995. The SLM-1 "Greenhouse-2" experiment will utilize the Russian-Bulgarian-developed plant growth unit (Svet). "Greenhouse-2" will include two plantings (1) designed to test the capability of Svet to grow a crop of Superdwarf wheat from seed to seed, and (2) to provide green plant material for post-flight analysis. Protocols, procedures, and equipment for the experiment have been developed by the US-Russian science team. "Greenhouse-2" will also provide the first orbital test of a new Svet Instrumentation System (SIS) developed by Utah State University to provide near real time data on plant environmental parameters and gas-exchange rates. SIS supplements the Svet control and monitoring system with additional sensors for substrate moisture, air temperature, IR leaf temperature, light, oxygen, pressure, humidity, and carbon-dioxide. SIS provides the capability to monitor canopy transpiration and net assimilation of the plants growing in each vegetation unit (root zone) by enclosing the canopy in separate, retractable, ventilated leaf chambers. Six times during the seed-to-seed experiment, plant samples will be collected, leaf area measured, and plant parts fixed and/or dried for ground analysis. A second planting initiated 30 days before the arrival of a U.S. Shuttle [originally planned to be STS-71] is designed to provide green material at the vegetative development stage for ground analysis. [As this paper is being edited, the experiment has been delayed until after the arrival of STS-71.].

  7. Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) team in the SL POCC) during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  8. Mechanical and thermal design of an experiment aboard the space shuttle: the Spacelab spectrometer

    Besson, J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrometer designed by ONERA and IASB (Belgium Space Aeronomy Institute) to measure atmospheric trace constituents was flown aboard Spacelab 1 during the 9 th mission of the American Space Shuttle from November 28 to December 8, 1983. After a brief summary of the history of the project related to Spacelab, the mechanical and thermal design of the spectrometer is described. Some methods, calculations and characteristic tests are detailed as examples. The behaviour of the experiment during the mission and the results of the post-flight tests are shortly analyzed in order to prepare the qualification for a reflight [fr

  9. Use of a FORTH-based PROLOG for real-time expert systems. 1: Spacelab life sciences experiment application

    Paloski, William H.; Odette, Louis L.; Krever, Alfred J.; West, Allison K.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time expert system is being developed to serve as the astronaut interface for a series of Spacelab vestibular experiments. This expert system is written in a version of Prolog that is itself written in Forth. The Prolog contains a predicate that can be used to execute Forth definitions; thus, the Forth becomes an embedded real-time operating system within the Prolog programming environment. The expert system consists of a data base containing detailed operational instructions for each experiment, a rule base containing Prolog clauses used to determine the next step in an experiment sequence, and a procedure base containing Prolog goals formed from real-time routines coded in Forth. In this paper, we demonstrate and describe the techniques and considerations used to develop this real-time expert system, and we conclude that Forth-based Prolog provides a viable implementation vehicle for this and similar applications.

  10. Spacelab Life Sciences-1

    Dalton, Bonnie P.; Jahns, Gary; Meylor, John; Hawes, Nikki; Fast, Tom N.; Zarow, Greg

    1995-01-01

    This report provides an historical overview of the Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) mission along with the resultant biomaintenance data and investigators' findings. Only the nonhuman elements, developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) researchers, are addressed herein. The STS-40 flight of SLS-1, in June 1991, was the first spacelab flown after 'return to orbit', it was also the first spacelab mission specifically designated as a Life Sciences Spacelab. The experiments performed provided baseline data for both hardware and rodents used in succeeding missions.

  11. Irradiance Observations of SMM, Spacelab 1, UARS, and ATLAS Experiments

    Willson, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Detection of intrinsic solar variability on the total flux level was made using results from the first active Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) experiment, launched on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)in early 1980.

  12. Importance of temperature control for HEFLEX, a biological experiment for Spacelab 1. [plant gravitational physiology study

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of temperature control to HEFLEX, a Spacelab experiment designed to measure kinetic properties of Helianthis nutation in a low-g environment, is discussed. It is argued that the development of the HEFLEX experiment has been severely hampered by the inadequate control of ambient air temperature provided by the spacecraft module design. A worst case calculation shows that delivery of only 69% of the maximum yield of useful data from the HEFLEX system is guaranteed; significant data losses from inadequate temperature control are expected. The magnitude of the expected data losses indicates that the cost reductions associated with imprecise temperature controls may prove to be a false economy in the long term.

  13. Spacelab 1 hematology experiment (INS103): Influence of space flight on erythrokinetics in man

    Leach, C. S.; Chen, J. P.; Crosby, W.; Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Larkin, E.; Tavassoli, M.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment conducted on the 10-day Spacelab 1 mission aboard the ninth Space Shuttle flight in November to December 1983 was designed to measure factors involved in the control of erythrocyte turnover that might be altered during weightlessness. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the flight. Immediately after landing, red cell mass showed a mean decrease of 9.3 percent in the four astronauts. Neither hyperoxia nor an increase in blood phosphate was a cause of the decrease. Red cell survival time and iron incorporation postflight were not significantly different from their preflight levels. Serum haptoglobin did not decrease, indicating that intravascular hemolysis was not a major cause of red cell mass change. An increase in serum ferritin after the second day of flight may have been caused by red cell breakdown early in flight. Erythropoietin levels decreased during and after flight, but preflight levels were high and the decrease was not significant. The space flight-induced decrease in red cell mass may result from a failure of erythropoiesis to replace cells destroyed by the spleen soon after weightlessness is attained.

  14. Spacelab 3 mission

    Dalton, Bonnie P.

    1990-01-01

    Spacelab-3 (SL-3) was the first microgravity mission of extended duration involving crew interaction with animal experiments. This interaction involved sharing the Spacelab environmental system, changing animal food, and changing animal waste trays by the crew. Extensive microbial testing was conducted on the animal specimens and crew and on their ground and flight facilities during all phases of the mission to determine the potential for cross contamination. Macroparticulate sampling was attempted but was unsuccessful due to the unforseen particulate contamination occurring during the flight. Particulate debris of varying size (250 micron to several inches) and composition was recovered post flight from the Spacelab floor, end cones, overhead areas, avionics fan filter, cabin fan filters, tunnel adaptor, and from the crew module. These data are discussed along with solutions, which were implemented, for particulate and microbial containment for future flight facilities.

  15. A Decade of Life Sciences Experiment Unique Equipment Development for Spacelab and Space Station, 1990-1999

    Savage, Paul D.; Connolly, J. P.; Navarro, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ames Research Center's Life Sciences Division has developed and flown an extensive array of spaceflight experiment unique equipment (EUE) during the last decade of the twentieth century. Over this ten year span, the EUE developed at ARC supported a vital gravitational biology flight research program executed on several different platforms, including the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and Space Station Mir. This paper highlights some of the key EUE elements developed at ARC and flown during the period 1990-1999. Resulting lessons learned will be presented that can be applied to the development of similar equipment for the International Space Station.

  16. Spacelab Science Results Study

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  17. A review of Spacelab mission management approach

    Craft, H. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Spacelab development program is a joint undertaking of the NASA and ESA. The paper addresses the initial concept of Spacelab payload mission management, the lessons learned, and modifications made as a result of the actual implementation of Spacelab Mission 1. The discussion covers mission management responsibilities, program control, science management, payload definition and interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload and launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. After 3.5 years the outlined overall mission manager approach has proven to be most successful. The approach does allow the mission manager to maintain the lowest overall mission cost.

  18. The first Spacelab payload - A joint NASA/ESA venture

    Kennedy, R.; Pace, R.; Collet, J.; Sanfourche, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Planning for the 1980 qualification flight of Spacelab, which will involve a long module and one pallet, is discussed. The mission will employ two payload specialists, one sponsored by NASA and the other by ESA. Management of the Spacelab mission functions, including definition and execution of the on-board experiments, development of the experimental hardware and training of the payload specialists, is considered; studies proposed in the areas of atmospheric physics, space plasma physics, solar physics, earth observations, astronomy, astrophysics, life sciences and material sciences are reviewed. Analyses of the Spacelab environment and the Spacelab-to-orbiter and Spacelab-to-experiment interactions are also planned.

  19. KSC technician installs rows of experiment racks in IML-1 spacelab module

    1991-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) technician installs rows of experiment racks in the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) in the KSC Operations and Checkout (O and C) Bldg. The IML-1 is scheduled to fly on STS-42 in early 1992, and will turn the shuttle into a laboratory dedicated to investigating the effects of microgravity on materials and life processes. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91P-169.

  20. A Smart Material Interfaces Learning Experience

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience held with a class of primary school children who were introduced to a novel class of resources, named smart materials, and the interfaces built with them (Smart Material Interfaces). The pupils were guided along a multidisciplinary educational path in which

  1. Monitoring Of The Middle Atmosphere: Grille Spectrometer Experiment Results On Board SPACELAB 1 And Scientific Program Of ATLAS 1 Mission

    Papineau, N.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Ackerman, Marcel E.

    1989-10-01

    Measurements of atmospheric trace gases have been performed during the first Spacelab mission on board the Space Shuttle. The principle of the observations is infrared absorption spectroscopy using the solar occultation technique. Infrared absorption spectra of NO, CO, CO2, NO2, N20, CH4 and H2O have been recorded using the Grille spectrometer developped by ONERA and IASB. From the observed spectra, vertical profiles for these molecules have been derived. The present paper summarizes the main results and compares them with computed vertical profiles from a zonally averaged model of the middle atmosphere. The scientific objectives of the second mission, Atlas 1, planned for 1990 are also presented.

  2. Spacelab Life Sciences flight experiments: an integrated approach to the study of cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension

    Gaffney, F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight produces rapid cardiovascular changes which are adaptive and appropriate in that setting, but are associated with significant deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension on return to Earth's gravity. The rapidity with which these space flight induced changes appear and disappear provides an ideal model for studying the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of deconditioning and orthostatic hypotension, regardless of etiology. Since significant deconditioning is seen after flights of very short duration, muscle atrophy due to inactivity plays, at most, a small role. These changes in circulatory control associated with cephalad fluid shifts, rather than inactivity per se, are probably more important factors. In order to test this hypothesis in a systematic way, a multidisciplinary approach which defines and integrates inputs and responses from a wide variety of circulatory sub-systems is required. The cardiovascular experiments selected for Spacelab Life Sciences flights 1 and 2 provide such an approach. Both human and animal models will be utilized. Pre- and post-flight characterization of the payload crew includes determination of maximal exercise capacity (bicycle ergometry), orthostatic tolerance (lower body negative pressure), alpha and beta adrenergic sensitivity (isoproterenol and phenylephrine infusions), baroreflex sensitivity (ECG-gated, stepwise changes in carotid artery transmural pressure with a pneumatic neck collar), and responses to a 24 h period of 5 deg head-down tilt. Measurements of cardiac output (CO2 and C2H2 rebreathing), cardiac chamber dimensions (phased-array 2-dimensional echocardiography), direct central venous pressure, leg volume (Thornton sock), limb blood flow and venous compliance (occlusion plethysmography), blood and plasma volumes, renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rates, and various hormonal levels including catecholamines and atrial natriuretic factor will also be obtained

  3. Spacelab ready for transport to Washington, DC

    1998-01-01

    Spacelab is wrapped and ready for transport to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. Spacelab was designed by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the Space Shuttle program and first flew on STS-9 in November 1983. Its final flight was the STS-90 Neurolab mission in April 1998. A sister module will travel home and be placed on display in Europe. The Spacelab concept of modular experiment racks in a pressurized shirt-sleeve environment made it highly user-friendly and accessible. Numerous experiments conceived by hundreds of scientists on the ground were conducted by flight crews in orbit. Spacelab modules served as on-orbit homes for everything from squirrel monkeys to plant seeds. They supported astronomical as well as Earth observations, for servicing the Hubble Space Telescope and for research preparatory to the International Space Station. One of the greatest benefits afforded by the Spacelab missions was the opportunity to fly a mission more than once, with the second or third flight building on the experiences and data gathered from its predecessors.

  4. Spacelab Users Guide: A Short Introduction to Spacelab and Its Use

    1976-01-01

    Spacelab is an orbital facility that provides a pressurized, 'shirt-sleeve' laboratory (the module) and an unpressurized platform (the pallet), together with certain standard services. It is a reusable system, which is transported to and from orbit in the cargo bay of the space shuttle orbiter and remains there throughout the flight. Spacelab extends the shuttle capability, and the Orbiter/Spacelab combination can be regarded as a short-stay space station which can remain in orbit for up to 30 days (the nominal mission duration is 7 days). In orbit, the experiments carried by Spacelab are operated by a team of up to four payload specialists who normally work in the laboratory, but spend their off-duty time in the orbiter cabin. The purpose of Spacelab is to provide a ready access to space for a broad spectrum of experimenters in many fields and from many nations. Low-cost techniques are envisaged for experiment development, integration and operation. The aim of this document is to provide a brief summary of Spacelab design characteristics and its use potential for experimenters wishing to take advantage of the unique opportunities offered for space experimentation.

  5. Spacelab Life Sciences Research Panel

    Sulzman, Frank; Young, Laurence R.; Seddon, Rhea; Ross, Muriel; Baldwin, Kenneth; Frey, Mary Anne; Hughes, Rod

    2000-01-01

    This document describes some of the life sciences research that was conducted on Spacelab missions. Dr. Larry Young, Director of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, provides an overview of the Life Sciences Spacelabs.

  6. Design features of selected mechanisms developed for use in Spacelab. [mechanical ground support equipment and environmental control

    Inden, W.

    1979-01-01

    Selected mechanisms developed for the Spacelab program are discussed. These include: (1) the roller rail used to install/remove the Spacelab floor loaded with racks carrying experiments; (2) the foot restraint; and (3) the lithium hydroxide used for decontamination.

  7. RC Circuits: Some Computer-Interfaced Experiments.

    Jolly, Pratibha; Verma, Mallika

    1994-01-01

    Describes a simple computer-interface experiment for recording the response of an RC network to an arbitrary input excitation. The setup is used to pose a variety of open-ended investigations in network modeling by varying the initial conditions, input signal waveform, and the circuit topology. (DDR)

  8. Spacelab shaping space operations planning

    Steven, F. R.; Reinhold, C.

    1976-01-01

    An up-to-date picture is presented of the organizational structure, the key management personnel, and management relationships of the Spacelab program. Attention is also given to Spacelab's development status and plans for its operations. A number of charts are provided to illustrate the organizational relations. It is pointed out that the parties involved in Spacelab activities must yet resolve questions about ownership of transportation-system elements, payloads, ground support facilities, and data obtained from space missions.

  9. The LHC machine-experiment interface

    CERN. Geneva; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Brüning, Oliver Sim

    2002-01-01

    This series of three lectures will provide an overview of issues arising at the interface between the LHC machine and the experiments, which are required for guiding the interaction between the collider and the experiments when operation of the LHC commences. A basic description of the LHC Collider and its operating parameters, such as its energy, currents, bunch structure and luminosity, as well as variations on these parameters, will be given. Furthermore, the optics foreseen for the experimental insertions, the sources and intensities of beam losses and the running-in scenarios for the various phases of operation will be discussed. A second module will cover the specific requirements and expectations of each experiment in terms of the layout of experimental areas, the matters related to radiation monitoring and shielding, the design of the beam pipe and the vacuum system, alignment issues and the measurement of the total cross-section and absolute luminosity by the experiments. Finally an analysis of infor...

  10. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  11. Spacelab Mission Implementation Cost Assessment (SMICA)

    Guynes, B. V.

    1984-01-01

    A total savings of approximately 20 percent is attainable if: (1) mission management and ground processing schedules are compressed; (2) the equipping, staffing, and operating of the Payload Operations Control Center is revised, and (3) methods of working with experiment developers are changed. The development of a new mission implementation technique, which includes mission definition, experiment development, and mission integration/operations, is examined. The Payload Operations Control Center is to relocate and utilize new computer equipment to produce cost savings. Methods of reducing costs by minimizing the Spacelab and payload processing time during pre- and post-mission operation at KSC are analyzed. The changes required to reduce costs in the analytical integration process are studied. The influence of time, requirements accountability, and risk on costs is discussed. Recommendation for cost reductions developed by the Spacelab Mission Implementation Cost Assessment study are listed.

  12. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and discu...

  13. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and disc...

  14. Spacelab-3 (STS-51B) Onboard Photograph

    1985-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Spacelab-3 mission was to conduct materials science experiments in a stable low-gravity environment. In addition, the crew performed research in life sciences, fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, and astronomy. Spacelab-3 was equipped with several new minilabs, special facilities that would be used repeatedly on future flights. Two elaborate crystal growth furnaces, a life support and housing facility for small animals, and two types of apparatus for the study of fluids were evaluated on their inaugural flight. In this photograph, astronaut Don Lind observes the mercuric iodide growth experiment through a microscope at the vapor crystal growth furnace. The goals of this investigation were to grow near-perfect single crystals of mercuric iodide and to gain improved understanding of crystal growth by a vapor process. Mercuric iodide crystals have practical use as sensitive x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and in portable detector devices for nuclear power plant monitoring, natural resource prospecting, biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, and in astronomical instruments. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, Spacelab-3 (STS-51B) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Challenger on April 29, 1985.

  15. The Spacelab IPS Star Simulator

    Wessling, Francis C., III

    The cost of doing business in space is very high. If errors occur while in orbit the costs grow and desired scientific data may be corrupted or even lost. The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) Star Simulator is a unique test bed that allows star trackers to interface with simulated stars in a laboratory before going into orbit. This hardware-in-the loop testing of equipment on earth increases the probability of success while in space. The IPS Star Simulator provides three fields of view 2.55 x 2.55 degrees each for input into star trackers. The fields of view are produced on three separate monitors. Each monitor has 4096 x 4096 addressable points and can display 50 stars (pixels) maximum at a given time. The pixel refresh rate is 1000 Hz. The spectral output is approximately 550 nm. The available relative visual magnitude range is 2 to 8 visual magnitudes. The star size is less than 100 arc seconds. The minimum star movement is less than 5 arc seconds and the relative position accuracy is approximately 40 arc seconds. The purpose of this paper is to describe the LPS Star Simulator design and to provide an operational scenario so others may gain from the approach and possible use of the system.

  16. An Architectural Experience for Interface Design

    Gong, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of human-computer interface design was brought to the foreground with the emergence of the personal computer, the increasing complexity of electronic systems, and the need to accommodate the human operator in these systems. With each new technological generation discovering the interface design problems of its own technologies, initial…

  17. Spacelab 3 flight experiment No. 3AFT23: Autogenic-feedback training as a preventive method for space adaptation syndrome

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Sharp, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    Space adaptation syndrome is a motion sickness-like disorder which affects up to 50 percent of all people exposed to microgravity in space. This experiment tested a physiological conditioning procedure (Autogenic-Feedback Training, AFT) as an alternative to pharmacological management. Four astronauts participated as subjects in this experiment. Crewmembers A and B served as treatment subjects. Both received preflight training for control of heart rate, respiration rate, peripheral blood volume, and skin conductance. Crewmembers C and D served as controls (i.e., did not receive training). Crewmember A showed reliable control of his own physiological responses, and a significant increase in motion sickness tolerance after training. Crewmember B, however, demonstrated much less control and only a moderate increase in motion sickness tolerance was observed after training. The inflight symptom reports and physiological data recordings revealed that Crewmember A did not experience any severe symptom episodes during the mission, while Crewmember B reported one severe symptom episode. Both control group subjects, C and D (who took antimotion sickness medication), reported multiple symptom episodes on mission day 0. Both inflight data and crew reports indicate that AFT may be an effective countermeasure. Additional data must be obtained inflight (a total of eight treatment and eight control subjects) before final evaluation of this treatment can be made.

  18. Holography on the Spacelab 3 mission

    Owen, Robert B.; Kroes, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Spacelab 3's Fluid Experiment System, in which triglycine sulfate crystals were produced by a low temperature solution-growth technique, employs holography as its primary data-gathering system. This use of holography allows optical techniques which would be difficult to apply in orbit to be used after the holographic data is returned to ground laboratories, using an analysis of the reconstructed holographic image. The system used allows both single- and double-exposure holograms to be obtained in two separate orthogonal configurations.

  19. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  20. Spacelab Life Science-1 Mission Onboard Photograph

    1995-01-01

    Spacelab Life Science -1 (SLS-1) was the first Spacelab mission dedicated solely to life sciences. The main purpose of the SLS-1 mission was to study the mechanisms, magnitudes, and time courses of certain physiological changes that occur during space flight, to investigate the consequences of the body's adaptation to microgravity and readjustment to Earth's gravity, and bring the benefits back home to Earth. The mission was designed to explore the responses of the heart, lungs, blood vessels, kidneys, and hormone-secreting glands to microgravity and related body fluid shifts; examine the causes of space motion sickness; and study changes in the muscles, bones, and cells. This photograph shows astronaut Rhea Seddon conducting an inflight study of the Cardiovascular Deconditioning experiment by breathing into the cardiovascular rebreathing unit. This experiment focused on the deconditioning of the heart and lungs and changes in cardiopulmonary function that occur upon return to Earth. By using noninvasive techniques of prolonged expiration and rebreathing, investigators can determine the amount of blood pumped out of the heart (cardiac output), the ease with which blood flows through all the vessels (total peripheral resistance), oxygen used and carbon dioxide released by the body, and lung function and volume changes. SLS-1 was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia (STS-40) on June 5, 1995.

  1. Animal experimentation in Spacelab - Present and future U.S. plans

    Berry, W. E.; Dant, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Current development of life-sciences hardware and experiments for the fourth Spacelab mission in the Life Sciences Flight Experiments Program at NASA Ames is reviewed. The research-animal holding facility, the general-purpose work station, and the life sciences laboratory equipment are characterized, and the 14 Ames projects accepted for the mission are listed and discussed. Several hardware systems and experimental procedures will be verified on the Spacelab-3 mission scheduled for late 1984.

  2. Approach to Spacelab Payload mission management

    Craft, H. G.; Lester, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleus of the approach to Spacelab Payload mission management is the establishment of a single point of authority for the entire payload on a given mission. This single point mission manager will serve as a 'broker' between the individual experiments and the STS, negotiating agreements by two-part interaction. The payload mission manager, along with a small support team, will represent the users in negotiating use of STS accommodations. He will provide the support needed by each individual experimenter to meet the scientific, technological, and applications objectives of the mission with minimum cost and maximum efficiency. The investigator will assume complete responsibility for his experiment hardware definition and development and will take an active role in the integration and operation of his experiment.

  3. Internal interface for RFC muon trigger electronics at CMS experiment

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Pietrusinski, Michall

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes design and practical realization of an internal communication layer referred to as the Internal Interface (II). The system was realized for the RFC Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. Fully automatic implementation of the communication layer is realized in the FPGA chips and in the control software. The methodology of implementation was presented in the description form of the interface structure from the sides of hardware and software. The examples of the communication layer realizations were given for the RFC Muon Trigger.

  4. The phenomenological experience of dementia and user interface development

    Peterson, Carrie Beth; Mitseva, Anelia; Mihovska, Albena D.

    2009-01-01

    This study follows the project ISISEMD through a phenomenological approach of investigating the experience of the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) for someone with dementia. The aim is to accentuate the Assistive Technology (AT) from the end user perspective. It proposes that older adults and those...... with dementia should no longer be an overlooked population, and how the HCI community can learn from their experiences to develop methods and design interfaces which truly benefit these individuals. Guidelines from previous research are incorporated along with eclectic, user-centered strategies as the interface...... designers for ISISEMD develop an appropriate and effective modality. The paper outlines the interconnected difficulties associated with the characteristics of older adults with mild dementia, which are important to be considered when introducing AT to that group of end users. It further presents clear...

  5. Space platforms - A cost effective evolution of Spacelab operation

    Stofan, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The capabilities added to the Shuttle/Spacelab configuration by the addition of the Power Extension Package (PEP), the Power System (PS), and the Science and Applications Space Platforms (SASP) are reviewed with an emphasis on SASP. SASP are intended for placement in orbit by the Shuttle to test new instruments and systems, for clustering of instrumentation, and for servicing, refurbishment, repair, or augmentation by the Shuttle. The PEP permits extended stays in orbit (30 days), and the PS is an orbital solar array and energy storage system acting as a free flying spacecraft. The Shuttle can deliver payloads to the PS or attach to it for extension of the Spacelab operations. Applications of SASP for long term space-based biological experiments are outlined, and the fact that SASP do not increase the required Shuttle in-orbit time is stressed.

  6. Experiences in Interagency and International Interfaces for Mission Support

    Dell, G. T.; Mitchell, W. J.; Thompson, T. W.; Cappellari, J. O., Jr.; Flores-Amaya, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GFSC) provides extensive support and products for Space Shuttle missions, expendable launch vehicle launches, and routine on-orbit operations for a variety of spacecraft. A major challenge in providing support for these missions is defining and generating the products required for mission support and developing the method by which these products are exchanged between supporting agencies. As interagency and international cooperation has increased in the space community, the FDD customer base has grown and with it the number and variety of external interfaces and product definitions. Currently, the FDD has working interfaces with the NASA Space and Ground Networks, the Johnson Space Center, the White Sands Complex, the Jet propulsion Laboratory (including the Deep Space Network), the United States Air Force, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, the German Spaceflight Operations Center, the European Space Agency, and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. With the increasing spectrum of possible data product definitions and delivery methods, the FDD is using its extensive interagency experience to improve its support of established customers and to provide leadership in adapting/developing new interfaces. This paper describes the evolution of the interfaces between the FDD and its customers, discusses many of the joint activities ith these customers, and summarizes key lessons learned that can be applied to current and future support.

  7. Interfacing system isolation experience review. Final report, August 1991

    1991-08-01

    A light water reactor power plant has auxiliary systems interconnected with the reactor coolant system that are not designed for reactor operating pressure. These principally include the shutdown heat removal systems and various emergency core cooling injection systems. There are multiple isolation valves that prevent rector vessel pressure from causing overpressurization in low pressure interfacing systems. Combinations of hardware failures or operational errors are necessary to expose these systems to overpressurization. This experience review provides insights regarding the risk that an auxiliary system might become over pressurized from the reactor system. While analyses show that for the pressures involved the probability of auxiliary system failure is low, the auxiliary system conceivably might fail outside of containment while the plant is at power. Such a potential event has come to be called an interfacing system loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA). This report provides a compilation of occurrences where valve leakage, valve failure, or valve mispositioning played a role in the ability to maintain interfacing system isolation. Seventeen U.S. BWR events, twenty three U.S. PWR events and one foreign event are discussed in the report. Eleven of the U.S. BWR events and ten U.S. PWR events are judged to relate directly to the so-called ISLOCA event in that they fulfilled one or more of the failures necessary to cause an ISLOCA. (author)

  8. Animal studies on Spacelab-3

    Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R.; Callahan, P.; Berry, W.; Funk, G.; Lencki, W.

    1987-01-01

    The flight of two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats on Spacelab-3 was the first mission to provide hands-on maintenance on animals in a laboratory environment. With few exceptions, the animals grew and behaved normally, were free of chronic stress, and differed from ground controls only for gravity dependent parameters. One of the monkeys exhibited symptoms of space sickness similar to those observed in humans, which suggests squirrel monkeys may be good models for studying the space adaptation syndrome. Among the wide variety of parameters measured in the rats, most notable was the dramatic loss of muscle mass and increased fragility of long bones. Other interesting rat findings were those of suppressed interferom production by spleen cells, defective release of growth hormone by somatrophs, possible dissociation of circadian pacemakers, changes in hepatic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypersensitivity of marrow cells to erythropoietin. These results portend a strong role for animals in identifying and elucidating the physiological and anatomical responses of mammals to microgravity.

  9. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  10. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  11. The gravitational plant physiology facility-Description of equipment developed for biological research in spacelab

    Heathcote, D. G.; Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.; Lewis, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    In January 1992, the NASA Suttle mission STS 42 carried a facility designed to perform experiments on plant gravi- and photo-tropic responses. This equipment, the Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) was made up of a number of interconnected units mounted within a Spacelab double rack. The details of these units and the plant growth containers designed for use in GPPF are described. The equipment functioned well during the mission and returned a substantial body of time-lapse video data on plant responses to tropistic stimuli under conditions of orbital microgravity. GPPF is maintained by NASA Ames Research Center, and is flight qualifiable for future spacelab missions.

  12. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 1: Executive summary. [carry-on laboratory for Spacelab

    1974-01-01

    The definition and integration tasks involved in the development of design concepts for a carry-on laboratory (COL), to be compatible with Spacelab operations, were divided into the following study areas: (1) identification of research and equipment requirements of the COL; (2) development of a number of conceptual layouts for COL based on the defined research of final conceptual designs; and (4) development of COL planning information for definition of COL/Spacelab interface data, cost data, and program cost schedules, including design drawings of a selected COL to permit fabrication of a functional breadboard.

  13. FELIX: the new detector interface for the ATLAS experiment

    Wu, Weihao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    During the next major shutdown (2019-2020), the ATLAS experiment at the LHC at CERN will adopt the Front-End Link eXchange (FELIX) system as the interface between the data acquisition, detector control and TTC (Timing, Trigger and Control) systems and new or updated trigger and detector front-end electronics. FELIX will function as a router between custom serial links from front-end ASICs and FPGAs to data collection and processing components via a commodity switched network. Links may aggregate many slower links or be a single high bandwidth link. FELIX will also forward the LHC bunch-crossing clock, fixed latency trigger accepts and resets received from the TTC system to front-end electronics. The FELIX system uses commodity server technology in combination with FPGA-based PCIe I/O cards. The FELIX servers will run a software routing platform serving data to network clients. Commodity servers connected to FELIX systems via the same network will run the new Software Readout Driver (SW ROD) infrastructure for...

  14. FELIX: the New Detector Interface for the ATLAS Experiment

    Aggarwal, Anamika; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    During the next major shutdown (2019-2020), the ATLAS experiment at the LHC will adopt the Front-End Link eXchange (FELIX) system as the interface between the data acquisition, detector control and TTC (Timing, Trigger and Control) systems and new or updated trigger and detector front-end electronics. FELIX will function as a router between custom serial links from front-end ASICs and FPGAs to data collection and processing components via a commodity switched network. Links may aggregate many slower links or be a single high bandwidth link. FELIX will also forward the LHC bunch-crossing clock, fixed latency trigger accepts and resets received from the TTC system to front-end electronics. The FELIX system uses commodity server technology in combination with FPGA-based PCIe I/O cards. The FELIX servers will run a software routing platform serving data to network clients. Commodity servers connected to FELIX systems via the same network will run the new Software Readout Driver (SW ROD) infrastructure for event f...

  15. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface.

  16. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  17. Fast ADC interface with data reduction facilities for multi-parameter experiments in nuclear physics

    Liebl, W; Franz, N; Ziegler, G [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet Physik; Hegewisch, S; Kunz, D; Maier, D; Lutter, R; Schoeffel, K; Stanzel, B [Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Sektion Physik; Drescher, B [Hahn-Meitner-Institut fuer Kernforschung Berlin G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)

    1982-03-01

    A modular ADC interface system for multi-parameter experiments with single NIM ADCs is described. 16 fast ADCs are handled by CAMAC modules and data buses in order to build up a sophisticated hardware system which is able to take coincidence data and singles spectra in parallel. The coincidence logic is handled by one of the interface modules; the interface allows online data reduction. The further expansion of the system will be discussed.

  18. A fast ADC interface with data reduction facilities for multi-parameter experiments in nuclear physics

    Liebl, W.; Franz, N.; Ziegler, G.

    1982-01-01

    A modular ADC interface system for multi-parameter experiments with single NIM ADCs is described. 16 fast ADCs are handled by CAMAC modules and data buses in order to build up a sophisticated hardware system which is able to take coincidence data and singles spectra in parallel. The coincidence logic is handled by one of the interface modules; the interface allows online data reduction. The further expansion of the system will be discussed. (orig.)

  19. The design, fabrication and installation of cable routing mockups in support of Spacelab 2

    1981-01-01

    From flight and mockup drawings of Spacelab 2 (SL 2) experiments and hardware, shop ready mockup drawings were produced. Floor panels were the first items considered for fabrication. Cold plate and orthogrid mockups were designed and fabricated. Experiment and other hardware mockups were fabricated of aluminum or plywood, depending on size and configuration. Eighty-three cable routing bracket mockups were fabricated of aluminum and delivered for painting.

  20. Phase B: Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL): A spacelab mission payload. Final review (DR-MA-03)

    Clausen, O. W.

    1976-01-01

    Systems design for an initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory to study microphysical processes in zero gravity is presented. Included are descriptions of the fluid, thermal, mechanical, control and data, and electrical distribution interfaces with Spacelab. Schedule and cost analysis are discussed.

  1. Spacelab life sciences 2 post mission report

    Buckey, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    Jay C. Buckey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas served as an alternate payload specialist astronaut for the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Space Shuttle Mission from January 1992 through December 1993. This report summarizes his opinions on the mission and offers suggestions in the areas of selection, training, simulations, baseline data collection and mission operations. The report recognizes the contributions of the commander, payload commander and mission management team to the success of the mission. Dr. Buckey's main accomplishments during the mission are listed.

  2. Experiments on the Richtmyer--Meshkov instability: Small-scale perturbations on a plane interface

    Brouillette, M.; Sturtevant, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the results of measurements of the ''visual thickness,'' obtained from flow visualization experiments by the schlieren method, of initially plane interfaces between two gases under impulsive accelerations. It is found that when such interfaces are processed by just one incident shock wave of strength of order M s =1.5, their thickness increases slowly and they require observation over extended times; their growth rates are found to slow down with time, in agreement with simple theoretical arguments. The observed growth rates of thin interfaces formed by plastic membranes have been found to be substantially smaller than that reported by previous investigators. Also, thick, diffusively smoothed interfaces initially grow much more slowly than the discontinuous ones do. In these experiments, it is found that wall vortices formed by shock wave/boundary-layer interaction at the interface grow much more rapidly than the shock-processed interfaces in the bulk of the fluid. These wall structures can reduce the apparent growth of interfaces by vorticity-induced strain and impair the observation of the relevant interface phenomena

  3. [Brain-Computer Interface: the First Clinical Experience in Russia].

    Mokienko, O A; Lyukmanov, R Kh; Chernikova, L A; Suponeva, N A; Piradov, M A; Frolov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is suggested to stimulate the same plastic mechanisms in the brain as a real movement. The brain-computer interface (BCI) controls motor imagery by converting EEG during this process into the commands for an external device. This article presents the results of two-stage study of the clinical use of non-invasive BCI in the rehabilitation of patients with severe hemiparesis caused by focal brain damage. It was found that the ability to control BCI did not depend on the duration of a disease, brain lesion localization and the degree of neurological deficit. The first step of the study involved 36 patients; it showed that the efficacy of rehabilitation was higher in the group with the use of BCI (the score on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) improved from 1 [0; 2] to 5 [0; 16] points, p = 0.012; no significant improvement was observed in control group). The second step of the study involved 19 patients; the complex BCI-exoskeleton (i.e. with the kinesthetic feedback) was used for motor imagery trainings. The improvement of the motor function of hands was proved by ARAT (the score improved from 2 [0; 37] to 4 [1; 45:5] points, p = 0.005) and Fugl-Meyer scale (from 72 [63; 110 ] to 79 [68; 115] points, p = 0.005).

  4. Interface enabling the management of the magnetic gradients for a N.M.R. experiment

    Frutoso, J.; Mallet, J.J.; Bonmartin, A.; Minchella, P.

    1983-01-01

    The object of this work was to realize a versatile electronic system which is able to manage the three magnetic gradients necessary to a NMR experiment. The cheapest mean used is based on a microcomputer VIC 20 Commodore, connected through an interface to three ''pilotage'' power-supplies. In this paper the interface between the VIC 20 and the three power-supplies, is particularly described [fr

  5. Emulsion sheet doublets as interface trackers for the OPERA experiment

    Anokhina, A.; Ariga, A.; Arrabito, L.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bay, F.; Greggio, F.Bersani; Bertolin, A.; Besnier, M.; Bick, D.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Carrara, E.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chon-Sen, N.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; Cuha, V.; Dal Corso, F.; D'Amato, G.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Declais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Giovanni, A.; Di Marco, N.; Di Troia, C.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dominjon, A.; Dracos, Marcos; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Ebert, J.; Egorov, O.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, Antonio; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Felici, G.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Galkin, V.I.; Galkin, V.A.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Goellnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guler, M.; Gusev, G.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, Caren; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hiramatsu, S.; Hoshino, Kaoru; Ieva, M.; Jakovcic, K.; Janicsko Csathy, J.; Janutta, B.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kawai, T.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S.H.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laktineh, I.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, Andrea; Lutter, G.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matsuoka, H.; Mauri, N.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Messina, M.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, Piero; Morishima, Kunihiro; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, Maria Teresa; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Osedlo, V.; Ossetski, D.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pretzl, Klaus P.; Publichenko, P.; Pupilli, F.; Roganova, T.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Ryzhikov, D.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Saveliev, V.; Sazhina, G.; Schembri, A.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Shibuya, H.; Simone, S.; Sioli, Max; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, Paolo Emilio; Sugonyaev, V.; Taira, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Tsarev, V.; Tufanli, S.; Ushida, N.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Wurtz, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, Amina; Zimmermann, R.

    2008-01-01

    New methods for efficient and unambiguous interconnection between electronic counters and target units based on nuclear photographic emulsion films have been developed. The application to the OPERA experiment, that aims at detecting oscillations between mu neutrino and tau neutrino in the CNGS neutrino beam, is reported in this paper. In order to reduce background due to latent tracks collected before installation in the detector, on-site large-scale treatments of the emulsions ("refreshing") have been applied. Changeable Sheet (CSd) packages, each made of a doublet of emulsion films, have been designed, assembled and coupled to the OPERA target units ("ECC bricks"). A device has been built to print X-ray spots for accurate interconnection both within the CSd and between the CSd and the related ECC brick. Sample emulsion films have been extensively scanned with state-of-the-art automated optical microscopes. Efficient track-matching and powerful background rejection have been achieved in tests with electronic...

  6. World-wide online monitoring interface of the ATLAS experiment

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Mineev, M; Hauser, R; Salnikov, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration accounts for more than 3000 members located all over the world. The efficiency of the experiment can be improved allowing system experts not present on site to follow the ATLAS operations in real-time, spotting potential problems which otherwise may remain unattended for a non-negligible time. Taking into account the wide geographical spread of the ATLAS collaboration, the solution of this problem is to have all monitoring information with minimal access latency available world-wide. We have implemented a framework which defines a standard approach for retrieving arbitrary monitoring information from the ATLAS private network via HTTP. An information request is made by specifying one of the predefined URLs with some optional parameters refining data which has to be shipped back in XML format. The framework takes care of receiving, parsing and forwarding such requests to the appropriate plugins. The plugins retrieve the requested data and convert it to XML (or optionally to JSON) format...

  7. Emulsion sheet doublets as interface trackers for the OPERA experiment

    Anokhina, A; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Arrabito, L; Autiero, D; Brugiere, T; Chaussard, L; Badertscher, A; Bay, F; Greggio, F Bersani; Bertolin, A; Besnier, M; Bick, D; Bozza, C; Brugnera, R; Carrara, E; Brunetti, G; Buontempo, S; Cazes, A; Chernyavsky, M

    2008-01-01

    New methods for efficient and unambiguous interconnection between electronic position sensitive detectors and target units based on nuclear photographic emulsion films have been developed. The application to the OPERA experiment, that aims at detecting ν μ ν τ oscillations in the CNGS neutrino beam, is reported in this paper. In order to reduce background due to latent tracks collected before installation in the detector, on-site large-scale treatments of the emulsions (''refreshing'') have been applied. Changeable Sheet (CSd) packages, each made of a doublet of emulsion films, have been designed, assembled and coupled to the OPERA target units (''ECC bricks''). A device has been built to print X-ray spots for accurate interconnection both within the CSd and between the CSd and the related ECC brick. Sample emulsion films have been extensively scanned with state-of-the-art automated optical microscopes. Efficient track-matching and powerful background rejection have been achieved in tests with electronically tagged penetrating muons. Further improvement of in-doublet film alignment was obtained by matching the pattern of low-energy electron tracks. The commissioning of the overall OPERA alignment procedure is in progress

  8. Protection Spacelab from Meteoroid and Orbital Debris

    Zheng, Shigui; Yan, Jun; Han, Zengyao

    2013-08-01

    As the first long-term on-orbit spacelab of China, TianGong-1 will stay aloft for 2 years. Its failure risk subjected to Meteoroid and Orbital Debris(M/OD) is hundreds of times higher than the risk of Shenzhou-5, Shenzhou-6 or Shenzhou-7, so the special M/OD protection designs have been applied. In order to reduce the penetration risk of radiator tube, the design of radiator has been modified by placing the tube at the side of radiator plate, and the new design does not affect the thermal control system without adding the mass. Secondly, Whipple structure is adopted in the two sides and front of spacecraft against M/OD impact.

  9. Evaluation of biological models using Spacelab

    Tollinger, D.; Williams, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Biological models of hypogravity effects are described, including the cardiovascular-fluid shift, musculoskeletal, embryological and space sickness models. These models predict such effects as loss of extracellular fluid and electrolytes, decrease in red blood cell mass, and the loss of muscle and bone mass in weight-bearing portions of the body. Experimentation in Spacelab by the use of implanted electromagnetic flow probes, by fertilizing frog eggs in hypogravity and fixing the eggs at various stages of early development and by assessing the role of the vestibulocular reflex arc in space sickness is suggested. It is concluded that the use of small animals eliminates the uncertainties caused by corrective or preventive measures employed with human subjects.

  10. Spacelab - Ten years of international cooperation

    Bignier, M.; Harrington, J. C.; Sander, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of the Spacelab program are reviewed, with a focus on the cooperative relationship between ESA and NASA. The initial decision to undertake the program and the three agreements signed to begin its implementation are examined, and the division of responsibilities and financial contributions is discussed insofar as it affected the management structure. Consideration is given to the major facilities, the 50-mission operational cycle, communications, the currently scheduled activities (through 1985), the prospective later uses, and the ten dedicated discipline laboratories. The importance of continuous mutual support during the planning and development phases is stressed. The program so far is considered a success, in terms of the goals set by the participants and in terms of the resolution of the problems inherent in international technological endeavors.

  11. Scientific management and implementation of the geophysical fluid flow cell for Spacelab missions

    Hart, J.; Toomre, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scientific support for the spherical convection experiment to be flown on Spacelab 3 was developed. This experiment takes advantage of the zero gravity environment of the orbiting space laboratory to conduct fundamental fluid flow studies concerned with thermally driven motions inside a rotating spherical shell with radial gravity. Such a system is a laboratory analog of large scale atmospheric and solar circulations. The radial body force necessary to model gravity correctly is obtained by using dielectric polarization forces in a radially varying electric field to produce radial accelerations proportional to temperature. This experiment will answer fundamental questions concerned with establishing the preferred modes of large scale motion in planetary and stellar atmospheres.

  12. Evaluating a multi-player brain-computer interface game: challenge versus co-experience

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Volpe, G; Reidsma, Dennis; Poel, Mannes; Camurri, A.; Obbink, Michel; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) have started to be considered as game controllers. The low level of control they provide prevents them from providing perfect control but allows the design of challenging games which can be enjoyed by players. Evaluation of enjoyment, or user experience (UX), is

  13. AMPS sciences objectives and philosophy. [Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas-in-Space project on Spacelab

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will open a new era in the exploration of earth's near-space environment, where the weight and power capabilities of Spacelab and the ability to use man in real time add important new features. The Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas-in-Space project (AMPS) is conceived of as a facility where flexible core instruments can be flown repeatedly to perform different observations and experiments. The twin thrusts of remote sensing of the atmosphere below 120 km and active experiments on the space plasma are the major themes. They have broader implications in increasing our understanding of plasma physics and of energy conversion processes elsewhere in the universe.

  14. Life science payloads planning study. [for space shuttle orbiters and spacelab

    Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Preferred approaches and procedures were defined for integrating the space shuttle life sciences payload from experiment solicitation through final data dissemination at mission completion. The payloads operations plan was refined and expended to include current information. The NASA-JSC facility accommodations were assessed, and modifications recommended to improve payload processing capability. Standard format worksheets were developed to permit rapid location of experiment requirements and a Spacelab mission handbook was developed to assist potential life sciences investigators at academic, industrial, health research, and NASA centers. Practical, cost effective methods were determined for accommodating various categories of live specimens during all mission phases.

  15. Enhancing the Gaming Experience Using 3D Spatial User Interface Technologies.

    Kulshreshth, Arun; Pfeil, Kevin; LaViola, Joseph J

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spatial user interface technologies have the potential to make games more immersive and engaging and thus provide a better user experience. Although technologies such as stereoscopic 3D display, head tracking, and gesture-based control are available for games, it is still unclear how their use affects gameplay and if there are any user performance benefits. The authors have conducted several experiments on these technologies in game environments to understand how they affect gameplay and how we can use them to optimize the gameplay experience.

  16. Definition of common support equipment and space station interface requirements for IOC model technology experiments

    Russell, Richard A.; Waiss, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the common support equipment and Space Station interface requirements for the IOC (initial operating capabilities) model technology experiments. In particular, each principal investigator for the proposed model technology experiment was contacted and visited for technical understanding and support for the generation of the detailed technical backup data required for completion of this study. Based on the data generated, a strong case can be made for a dedicated technology experiment command and control work station consisting of a command keyboard, cathode ray tube, data processing and storage, and an alert/annunciator panel located in the pressurized laboratory.

  17. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments.

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  18. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  19. Development of user guidelines for ECAS display design. Volume 2: Tasks 9 and 10. [educating the public to the benefits of spacelab and the space transportation system

    Bathurst, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Lay-oriented speakers aids, articles, a booklet, and a press kit were developed to inform the press and the general public with background information on the space transportation system, Spacelab, and Spacelab 1 experiments. Educational materials relating to solar-terrestrial physics and its potential benefits to mankind were also written. A basic network for distributing audiovisual and printed materials to regional secondary schools and universities was developed. Suggested scripts to be used with visual aids describing materials science and technology and astronomy and solar physics are presented.

  20. Rheological Properties of Natural Subduction Zone Interface: Insights from "Digital" Griggs Experiments

    Ioannidi, P. I.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Moreno, M.; Agard, P.; Oncken, O.; Angiboust, S.

    2017-12-01

    The physical nature of plate locking and its relation to surface deformation patterns at different time scales (e.g. GPS displacements during the seismic cycle) can be better understood by determining the rheological parameters of the subduction interface. However, since direct rheological measurements are not possible, finite element modelling helps to determine the effective rheological parameters of the subduction interface. We used the open source finite element code pTatin to create 2D models, starting with a homogeneous medium representing shearing at the subduction interface. We tested several boundary conditions that mimic simple shear and opted for the one that best describes the Grigg's type simple shear experiments. After examining different parameters, such as shearing velocity, temperature and viscosity, we added complexity to the geometry by including a second phase. This arises from field observations, where shear zone outcrops are often composites of multiple phases: stronger crustal blocks embedded within a sedimentary and/or serpentinized matrix have been reported for several exhumed subduction zones. We implemented a simplified model to simulate simple shearing of a two-phase medium in order to quantify the effect of heterogeneous rheology on stress and strain localization. Preliminary results show different strength in the models depending on the block-to-matrix ratio. We applied our method to outcrop scale block-in-matrix geometries and by sampling at different depths along exhumed former subduction interfaces, we expect to be able to provide effective friction and viscosity of a natural interface. In a next step, these effective parameters will be used as input into seismic cycle deformation models in an attempt to assess the possible signature of field geometries on the slip behaviour of the plate interface.

  1. Asphaltene-laden interfaces form soft glassy layers in contraction experiments: a mechanism for coalescence blocking.

    Pauchard, Vincent; Rane, Jayant P; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-11-04

    In previous studies, the adsorption kinetics of asphaltenes at the water-oil interface were interpreted utilizing a Langmuir equation of state (EOS) based on droplet expansion experiments.1-3 Long-term adsorption kinetics followed random sequential adsorption (RSA) theory predictions, asymptotically reaching ∼85% limiting surface coverage, which is similar to limiting random 2D close packing of disks. To extend this work beyond this slow adsorption process, we performed rapid contractions and contraction-expansions of asphaltene-laden interfaces using the pendant drop experiment to emulate a Langmuir trough. This simulates the rapid increase in interfacial asphaltene concentration that occurs during coalescence events. For the contraction of droplets aged in asphaltene solutions, deviation from the EOS consistently occurs at a surface pressure value ∼21 mN/m corresponding to a surface coverage ∼80%. At this point droplets lose the shape required for validity of the Laplace-Young equation, indicating solidlike surface behavior. On further contraction wrinkles appear, which disappear when the droplet is held at constant volume. Surface pressure also decreases down to an equilibrium value near that measured for slow adsorption experiments. This behavior appears to be due to a transition to a glassy interface on contraction past the packing limit, followed by relaxation toward equilibrium by desorption at constant volume. This hypothesis is supported by cycling experiments around the close-packed limit where the transition to and from a solidlike state appears to be both fast and reversible, with little hysteresis. Also, the soft glass rheology model of Sollich is shown to capture previously reported shear behavior during adsorption. The results suggest that the mechanism by which asphaltenes stabilize water-in-oil emulsions is by blocking coalescence due to rapid formation of a glassy interface, in turn caused by interfacial asphaltenes rapidly increasing in

  2. Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Critical Interface Features of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Freudenberg, Kevin D.; Litherland, P. Steve; Cole, Michael J.; Williamson, David E.; Goranson, Paul L.; Nelson, Brad E.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Myatt, R.

    2009-01-01

    The (18) modular coils for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) are joined at assembly by interfaces to form a toroidal shell which serves as the structural backbone of the device. There are six each of three coil types (A, B, and C); consequently, there are 4 distinct interface designs (A-A, A-B, B-C, C-C). This paper describes the performance evaluations and analyses used in the development of these critical interfaces. Initial analyses indicated that the baseline interface designs did not provide adequate shear capability along the inner (unbolted) legs between the modular coils and did not adequately address assembly tolerance requirements. Consequently a design effort was undertaken to develop interfaces with adequate shear capability and which would facilitate the achievement of assembly tolerances. Analyses indicated that a friction coefficient of 0.3 is necessary for 'no-slip' joints with a preload value of ∼320 kN in the outboard regions. Two types of compatible segmented friction shims were developed to meet the friction requirement. One type uses alumina coated stainless steel shims and the other uses G-10/ stainless steel/ G-10 'sandwich shims.' Analyses indicated that the time constant requirements for induced currents in the shell could still be achieved with welds along all the inner (unbolted) legs except at the C-C interface. Consequently, welded interfaces utilizing alternating MIG fillet welds on each end of shims between coil castings were developed to react the shear loads. This configuration minimizes distortion since it avoids direct weld shrinkage stress across the interfaces. Analyses indicates that a 12.7 mm fillet weld has adequate shear capability, with average stress through the welds of 90-125 MPa, compared to a static limit of 217 MPa. Custom sized compression pucks located in the middle of the welded shims react the compressive loads and have average stresses less than 137 MPa. Fatigue acceptability of the welded

  3. Semiconductor-Electrocatalyst Interfaces: Theory, Experiment, and Applications in Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Nellist, Michael R; Laskowski, Forrest A L; Lin, Fuding; Mills, Thomas J; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-04-19

    Light-absorbing semiconductor electrodes coated with electrocatalysts are key components of photoelectrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. Efforts to optimize these systems have been slowed by an inadequate understanding of the semiconductor-electrocatalyst (sem|cat) interface. The sem|cat interface is important because it separates and collects photoexcited charge carriers from the semiconductor. The photovoltage generated by the interface drives "uphill" photochemical reactions, such as water splitting to form hydrogen fuel. Here we describe efforts to understand the microscopic processes and materials parameters governing interfacial electron transfer between light-absorbing semiconductors, electrocatalysts, and solution. We highlight the properties of transition-metal oxyhydroxide electrocatalysts, such as Ni(Fe)OOH, because they are the fastest oxygen-evolution catalysts known in alkaline media and are (typically) permeable to electrolyte. We describe the physics that govern the charge-transfer kinetics for different interface types, and show how numerical simulations can explain the response of composite systems. Emphasis is placed on "limiting" behavior. Electrocatalysts that are permeable to electrolyte form "adaptive" junctions where the interface energetics change during operation as charge accumulates in the catalyst, but is screened locally by electrolyte ions. Electrocatalysts that are dense, and thus impermeable to electrolyte, form buried junctions where the interface physics are unchanged during operation. Experiments to directly measure the interface behavior and test the theory/simulations are challenging because conventional photoelectrochemical techniques do not measure the electrocatalyst potential during operation. We developed dual-working-electrode (DWE) photoelectrochemistry to address this limitation. A second electrode is attached to the catalyst layer to sense or control current/voltage independent from that of the

  4. Tiangong-1, the First Manned Spacelab of China

    Coue, P.

    This paper presents an overview of Tiangong-1, the first Chinese space station officially dubbed Spacelab by Beijing authorities. Tiangong programme also demonstrates the actual progress level of China in the field of manned space activities. This new spacecraft will allow China to practice many tasks, to help prepare for the next step: the permanently occupied space station. Open sources have been only used to write this paper. For example, Chinese media revealed numerous information describing the Spacelab during the first docking operation between Tiangong-1 and Shenzhou-8. All aspects of this programme will be listed comprising the old stories and the new one: major technical characteristics, accommodation, mission, future prospects, etc.

  5. The astronomy spacelab payloads study: executive volume. Interim report

    1975-07-01

    The progress of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is reported. Astronomical research in space, using the Spacelab in conjunction with the Space Shuttle, is described. The various fields of solar astronomy or solar physics, ultraviolet and optical astronomy, and high energy astrophysics are among the topics discussed. These fields include scientific studies of the Sun and its dynamical processes, of the stars in wavelength regions not accessible to ground based observations, and the exciting new fields of X-ray, gamma ray, and particle astronomy

  6. Epigenetic control of mobile DNA as an interface between experience and genome change

    James A. Shapiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile DNA in the genome is subject to RNA-targeted epigenetic control. This control regulates the activity of transposons, retrotransposons and genomic proviruses. Many different life history experiences alter the activities of mobile DNA and the expression of genetic loci regulated by nearby insertions. The same experiences induce alterations in epigenetic formatting and lead to trans-generational modifications of genome expression and stability. These observations lead to the hypothesis that epigenetic formatting directed by non-coding RNA provides a molecular interface between life history events and genome alteration.

  7. For Earth into space: The German Spacelab Mission D-2

    Sahm, P. R.; Keller, M. H.; Schiewe, B.

    The Spacelab Mission D-2 successfully lifted off from Kennedy Space Center on April 26, 1993. With 88 experiments on board covering eleven different research disciplines it was a very ambitious mission. Besides materials and life science subjects, the mission also encompassed astronomy, earth observation, radiation physics and biology, telecommunication, automation and robotics. Notable results were obtained in almost all cases. To give some examples of the scientific output, building upon results obtained in previous missions (FSLP, D1) diffusion in melts was broadly represented delivering most precise data on the atomic mobility within various liquids, and crystal growth experiments (the largest gallium arsenide crystal grown by the floating zone technique, so far obtained anywhere, was one of the results), biological cell growth experiments were continued (for example, beer yeast cultures, continuing their growth on earth, delivered a qualitatively superior brewery result), the human physiology miniclinic configuration ANTHRORACK gave novel insights concerning cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal (fluid volume determining) factors. Astronomical experiments yielded insights into our own galaxy within the ultra violet spectrum, earth observation experiments delivered the most precise resolution data superimposed by thematic mapping of many areas of the Earth, and the robotics experiment brought a remarkable feature in that a flying object was caught by the space robot, which was only achieved through several innovative advances during the time of experiment preparation. The eight years of preparation were also beneficial in another sense. Several discoveries have been made, and various technology transfers into ground-based processes were verified. To name the outstanding ones, in the materials science a novel bearing materials production process was developped, a patent granted for an improved high temperature heating chamber; with life sciences a new hormone

  8. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    Lange Ramos, Bruno; The ATLAS collaboration; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani Neto, Varlen; Vieira Arosa, Breno

    2015-01-01

    In order to manage a heterogeneous and worldwide collaboration, the ATLAS experiment develops web systems that range from supporting the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring equipment radiation levels. These systems are vastly supported by Glance, a technology that was set forward in 2004 to create an abstraction layer on top of varied databases that automatically recognizes their modeling and generate web search interfaces. Fence (Front ENd ENgine for glaNCE) assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of configuration files. It produces templates of the core JSON files on top of which it is possible to create Glance-compliant search interfaces. Once the database, its schemas and tables are defined using Glance, its records can be incorporated into the templates by escaping the returned values with a reference to the column identifier wrapped around double enclosing brackets. The developer may also expand on available configuration files to create HTML forms and securely ...

  9. A coded mask telescope for the Spacelab 2 mission

    Willmore, A.P.; Skinner, G.K.; Eyles, C.J.; Ramsey, B.

    1984-01-01

    A dual coded mask telescope for the Spacelab 2 mission is now in the final stages of preparation at Birmingham University. It is due for launch in late 1984/early 1985 and will be by far the largest and most sophisticated such instrument to be flown in this time-frame. The design and capabilities of the telescope will be described. (orig.)

  10. International aerospace engineering: NASA shuttle and European Spacelab

    Bilstein, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASA negotiations and contractual arrangements involving European space research organizations' participation in manned space operations and efforts in building Spacelab for the U.S. Reusable Space Shuttle are discussed. Some of the diplomatic and technical collaboration involved in the international effort is reviewed.

  11. Interface entre cidade e tecnologia: a experiência do espaço tecnológico Interface between city and technology: technological space experience

    Polise Moreira de Marchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A experiência do espaço urbano tem sofrido alterações operadas por extensões, expansões e simulaçõesem virtude da incorporação do desenvolvimento tecnológico à própria constituição física e à linguagemda cidade. Entre cidade e experiência, a interface tecnológica se apresenta como possibilidade de reconhecimento,conhecimento e produção das relações espaciais reais e potenciais das cidades contemporâneas.Desde a concepção do mundo urbano, que, segundo Henri Lefebvre (1991, esteve relacionada diretamentecom o período industrial, a tecnologia tem delimitado e pontuado as diversas fases e consequentes camadasque formam a cidade, tanto em relação à dinâmica física do espaço, como em relação à sua representação.Se de fato a tecnologia sempre esteve vinculada diretamente à própria construção das cidades, por meio deiniciativas dos governos e de grandes empresas, é na sua condição atual que se potencializa como mediaçãoentre o indivíduo e o espaço urbano, este cada vez mais tecnologicamente hibridizado. Destarte, este artigotem por objetivo discutir de que modo a tecnologia tem estabelecido novas mediações e respectivas configuraçõesno espaço urbano das cidades contemporâneas, de modo a não ser mais possível dissociá-la destecontexto. Para tal propósito, tomam-se como referência projetos ou iniciativas de pesquisa que buscam nastecnologias de informação e comunicação (TICs novos meios de extensão da cidade, em interface com ambientesurbanos geolocalizados ou virtuais.

  12. Interfaces of nuclear structure studies-decay vs. in-beam experiments

    Grawe, H.; Gorska, M.; Hu, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Fahlander, C.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1999-05-01

    The common interface of β-decay and particle-decay experiments and in-beam studies following fusion, relativistic fission and projectile fragmentation is defined by the search for the best way to extract nuclear structure information. For a few examples selected from the exotic regions of nuclei around 100 Sn and between 68 Ni and 78 Ni it is demonstrated, that complementary spectroscopic data extracted by various methods lead to an understanding of the shell structure at these keypoints of the nuclidic chart. (orig.)

  13. Experiments and Analyses for Determining Fibre/Matrix Interface Parameters – Understanding Debonding Problems

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Gupta, Mohit; Lilholt, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A new experimental technique is developed to monitor the initiation and propagation of adebond crack during a fibre pull-out experiment. The advanced experimental setup consists of a high resolution video camera and a laser extensometer mounted at a tensile test machine. The test setup enables...... strain ΔεT, accounting for initial residual stresses. Specimens of a single steel fibre embedded centrally in a polyester matrix are tested using the experimental setup and the model. A practical experimental procedure for establishing the interface parameters is suggested, and an example demonstrates...

  14. Spatial Planning Experiences for Vulnerability Reduction in the Wildland-Urban Interface in Mediterranean European Countries

    Galiana-Martín Luis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of the wildland-urban interface in countries in the European Mediterranean basin is increasing vulnerability to forest fires. Despite more effective extinction systems, this is still a growing problem. This article defends the importance of spatial planning (land-use and urban planning and the need for systematic intervention to mitigate this wildfire risk. A critical review of the current situation, noting intervention focused on buildings and plots and insufficient action on intermediate spatial scales, is followed by the presentation of significant and relevant experiences in the European context.

  15. Concrete - Opalinus clay interaction: in-situ experiment and technique for coring undisturbed interfaces

    Maeder, U.; Dolder, F.; Jenni, A.; Schwyn, B.; Frieg, B.; Eul, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Interactions near interfaces are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and resultant diffusive transport, and are predicted to lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influences properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Reactive transport modelling predictions and laboratory and in situ studies revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. An increase in porosity in the cement close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone adjacent to the interface is commonly predicted and observed. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at demonstrating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected at a realistic spatial scale and under saturated conditions. A duration of 20 years is foreseen during which reaction progress should become measurable and thus comparable to laboratory experiments and modelling predictions. Companion studies address cement hydration, and develop new high-resolution techniques for phase identification using μ-X-ray diffraction at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The field experiment at Mont Terri comprises two vertical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 9 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on three different binders: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted by silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica). The characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after 2 years of alteration are presented in a companion contribution (Jenni et al.). A key issue is the repeat recovery of

  16. Software complex AS (automation of spectrometry). User interface of experiment automation system implementation

    Astakhova, N.V.; Beskrovnyj, A.I.; Bogdzel', A.A.; Butorin, P.E.; Vasilovskij, S.G.; Gundorin, N.A.; Zlokazov, V.B.; Kutuzov, S.A.; Salamatin, I.M.; Shvetsov, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental software complex for automation of spectrometry (AS) that enables prompt realization of experiment automation systems for spectrometers, which use data buferisation, has been developed. In the development new methods of programming and building of automation systems together with novel net technologies were employed. It is suggested that programs to schedule and conduct experiments should be based on the parametric model of the spectrometer, the approach that will make it possible to write programs suitable for any FLNP (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics) spectrometer and experimental technique applied and use different hardware interfaces for introducing the spectrometric data into the data acquisition system. The article describes the possibilities provided to the user in the field of scheduling and control of the experiment, data viewing, and control of the spectrometer parameters. The possibility of presenting the current spectrometer state, programs and the experimental data in the Internet in the form of dynamically formed protocols and graphs, as well as of the experiment control via the Internet is realized. To use the means of the Internet on the side of the client, applied programs are not needed. It suffices to know how to use the two programs to carry out experiments in the automated mode. The package is designed for experiments in condensed matter and nuclear physics and is ready for using. (author)

  17. MHD modeling of ATLAS experiments to study transverse shear interface interactions

    Faehl, R J; Keinigs, R K; Lindemuth, I R

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. The transverse shear established at the interface of two solids moving at differential velocities on the order of the sound speed is being studied in experiments on the ATLAS capacitor bank at Los Alamos, beginning in August 2001. The ATLAS bank has finished certification tests and has demonstrated peak currents of 27.5 MA with a 5 microsecond risetime into an inductive load. One- and two-dimensional MHD calculations have been performed in support of these "friction-like" ATLAS experiments. Current flowing along the outer surface of a thick aluminum liner, roughly 8 mm thick, accelerates the solid liner to velocities ~1 km/s. This cylindrically imploding liner then impacts a target assembly, composed of alternating regions of high and low density materials. The different shock speeds in the two materials leads to a differential velocity along the interface. Shock heating, elastic- plastic flow, and stress transport are included in the calculations. Material strength properties are tre...

  18. Man-machine interface in a submarine command and weapon control system: features and design experience

    Johan H. Aas

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Important man-machine interface (MMI issues concerning a submarine command and weapon control system (CWCS such as crew organization, automation level and decision support are discussed in this paper. Generic submarine CWCS functions and operating conditions are outlined. Detailed, dynamic and real-time prototypes were used to support the MMI design. The prototypes are described and experience with detailed prototyping is discussed. Some of the main interaction principles are summarized and a restricted example of the resulting design is given. Our design experience and current work have been used to outline future perspectives of MMI design in naval CWCSs. The need for both formal and experimental approaches is emphasized.

  19. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Illobre, Luis Fernandez; Ortega Pascual, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user. (authors)

  20. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  1. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  2. Man/terminal interaction evaluation of computer operating system command and control service concepts. [in Spacelab

    Dodson, D. W.; Shields, N. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The Experiment Computer Operating System (ECOS) of the Spacelab will allow the onboard Payload Specialist to command experiment devices and display information relative to the performance of experiments. Three candidate ECOS command and control service concepts were reviewed and laboratory data on operator performance was taken for each concept. The command and control service concepts evaluated included a dedicated operator's menu display from which all command inputs were issued, a dedicated command key concept with which command inputs could be issued from any display, and a multi-display concept in which command inputs were issued from several dedicated function displays. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed in terms of training, operational errors, task performance time, and subjective comments of system operators.

  3. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    Miriam eZacksenhouse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  4. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces.

    Benyamini, Miri; Zacksenhouse, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus, we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  5. Experiment on a novel user input for computer interface utilizing tongue input for the severely disabled.

    Kencana, Andy Prima; Heng, John

    2008-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel passive tongue control and tracking device. The device is intended to be used by the severely disabled or quadriplegic person. The main focus of this device when compared to the other existing tongue tracking devices is that the sensor employed is passive which means it requires no powered electrical sensor to be inserted into the user's mouth and hence no trailing wires. This haptic interface device employs the use of inductive sensors to track the position of the user's tongue. The device is able perform two main PC functions that of the keyboard and mouse function. The results show that this device allows the severely disabled person to have some control in his environment, such as to turn on and off or control daily electrical devices or appliances; or to be used as a viable PC Human Computer Interface (HCI) by tongue control. The operating principle and set-up of such a novel passive tongue HCI has been established with successful laboratory trials and experiments. Further clinical trials will be required to test out the device on disabled persons before it is ready for future commercial development.

  6. Crack path predictions and experiments in plane structures considering anisotropic properties and material interfaces

    P.O. Judt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications special requirements are directed to a material's fracture behavior and the prediction of crack paths. Especially if the material exhibits anisotropic elastic properties or fracture toughnesses, e.g. in textured or composite materials, the simulation of crack paths is challenging. Here, the application of path independent interaction integrals (I-integrals, J-, L- and M-integrals is beneficial for an accurate crack tip loading analysis. Numerical tools for the calculation of loading quantities using these path-invariant integrals are implemented into the commercial finite element (FE-code ABAQUS. Global approaches of the integrals are convenient considering crack tips approaching other crack faces, internal boundaries or material interfaces. Curved crack faces require special treatment with respect to integration contours. Numerical crack paths are predicted based on FE calculations of the boundary value problem in connection with an intelligent adaptive re-meshing algorithm. Considering fracture toughness anisotropy and accounting for inelastic effects due to small plastic zones in the crack tip region, the numerically predicted crack paths of different types of specimens with material interfaces and internal boundaries are compared to subcritically grown paths obtained from experiments.

  7. Particle Engulfment and Pushing by Solidifying Interfaces. Pt. 2; Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Analysis

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Juretzko, Frank R.; Dhindaw, Brij K.; Catalina, Adrian; Sen, Subhayu; Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the directional solidification experiments on Particle Engulfment and Pushing by Solidifying Interfaces (PEP) conducted on the space shuttle Columbia during the Life and Microgravity Science Mission are reported. Two pure aluminum (99.999%) 9 mm cylindrical rods, loaded with about 2 vol.% 500 micrometers diameter zirconia particles were melted and resolidified in the microgravity (microg) environment of the shuttle. One sample was processed at step-wise increased solidification velocity, while the other at step-wise decreased velocity. It was found that a pushing-to-engulfment transition (PET) occurred in the velocity range of 0.5 to 1 micrometers. This is smaller than the ground PET velocity of 1.9 to 2.4 micrometers. This demonstrates that natural convection increases the critical velocity. A previously proposed analytical model for PEP was further developed. A major effort to identify and produce data for the surface energy of various interfaces required for calculation was undertaken. The predicted critical velocity for PET was of 0.775 micrometers/s.

  8. Experience of Time by People on the Go: A Theory of the Locomotion-Temporality Interface.

    Kruglanski, Arie W; Pierro, Antonio; Higgins, E Tory

    2016-05-01

    We explore the psychological interface of time and motion.Locomotion, the proclivity toward movement and change, constitutes a significant determinant of persons' orientation toward time, both as a valuable resource and as a flow advancing from past to future. High locomotors act quickly, multitask and refrain from procrastination, thus conserving time as are source Their preoccupation with movement, moreover, affects their relation to the flow of time High locomotors are future oriented and eschew preoccupation with the past. They are optimistic, experience little regret, generate few counterfactuals, feel little guilt about past wrongdoings, and leave behind past friends. Evidence accumulates that locomotors' "fast forward" orientation pervades diverse aspects of their behavior and has significant consequences for individuals and societies. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  9. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    Lange Ramos, Bruno; The ATLAS collaboration; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani Neto, Varlen; Vieira Arosa, Breno; Abreu Da Silva, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from supporting the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment at the cave, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. Fence assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies vastly on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that vi...

  10. Simple Harmonics Motion experiment based on LabVIEW interface for Arduino

    Tong-on, Anusorn; Saphet, Parinya; Thepnurat, Meechai

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we developed an affordable modern innovative physics lab apparatus. The ultrasonic sensor is used to measure the position of a mass attached on a spring as a function of time. The data acquisition system and control device were developed based on LabVIEW interface for Arduino UNO R3. The experiment was designed to explain wave propagation which is modeled by simple harmonic motion. The simple harmonic system (mass and spring) was observed and the motion can be realized using curve fitting to the wave equation in Mathematica. We found that the spring constants provided by Hooke’s law and the wave equation fit are 9.9402 and 9.1706 N/m, respectively.

  11. Image motion compensation on the Spacelab 2 Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter /SL2 SOUP/

    Tarbell, T. D.; Duncan, D. W.; Finch, M. L.; Spence, G.

    1981-01-01

    The SOUP experiment on Spacelab 2 includes a 30 cm visible light telescope and focal plane package mounted on the Instrument Pointing System (IPS). Scientific goals of the experiment dictate pointing stability requirements of less than 0.05 arcsecond jitter over periods of 5-20 seconds. Quantitative derivations of these requirements from two different aspects are presented: (1) avoidance of motion blurring of diffraction-limited images; (2) precise coalignment of consecutive frames to allow measurement of small image differences. To achieve this stability, a fine guider system capable of removing residual jitter of the IPS and image motions generated on the IPS cruciform instrument support structure has been constructed. This system uses solar limb detectors in the prime focal plane to derive an error signal. Image motion due to pointing errors is compensated by the agile secondary mirror mounted on piezoelectric transducers, controlled by a closed-loop servo system.

  12. User-friendly interfaces for control of crystallographic experiments at CHESS

    Szebenyi, D. M. E.; Deacon, A.; Ealick, S. E.; LaIuppa, J. M.; Thiel, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    In designing a system to collect high quality diffraction data in an efficient manner, both hardware and software must be considered. This work focuses on the data collection software used at CHESS, the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron source, with emphasis on the interface between the user and the experimental components. For each type of detector used at CHESS, there is a graphical user interface (GUI) enabling the user to easily set up and run an experiment. For the CCD detector from Area Detector Systems Corp., this is a commercial product from ADSC, customized for CHESS. For the Princeton CCD detectors, a GUI has recently been developed to streamline communication between the user and the TV6 program which controls the detector. For Fuji imaging plates, a new GUI controls operation of the oscillation camera, including the imaging plate carousel; scanning of plates is done using the software provided by Fuji. Although these GUI's are not identical, they have numerous similarities, making it easier for users to learn operation of a new detector. They also incorporate error-checking to avoid problems such as overwriting data files or collecting data with no x-rays. Common to experiments with all detectors is a GUI used for operations such as alignment of the optical table on which the oscillation camera is mounted. Integral to a good data collection system is the capability to process diffraction images, for evaluation of crystal quality, determination of data collection strategy, screening of potential derivatives, and so forth. The mccview graphical front-end has been developed to conveniently initiate processing programs, including preliminary routines (correct, getbeam), main analysis routines (xdisp, denzo, scalepack), and the strategy routine m.simulate

  13. A study on the application of voice interaction in automotive human machine interface experience design

    Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Xiemin

    2018-04-01

    This paper, firstly, introduces the application trend of the integration of multi-channel interactions in automotive HMI ((Human Machine Interface) from complex information models faced by existing automotive HMI and describes various interaction modes. By comparing voice interaction and touch screen, gestures and other interaction modes, the potential and feasibility of voice interaction in automotive HMI experience design are concluded. Then, the related theories of voice interaction, identification technologies, human beings' cognitive models of voices and voice design methods are further explored. And the research priority of this paper is proposed, i.e. how to design voice interaction to create more humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios to enhance interactive experiences of automotive HMI. The specific scenarios in driving behaviors suitable for the use of voice interaction are studied and classified, and the usability principles and key elements for automotive HMI voice design are proposed according to the scenario features. Then, through the user participatory usability testing experiment, the dialogue processes of voice interaction in automotive HMI are defined. The logics and grammars in voice interaction are classified according to the experimental results, and the mental models in the interaction processes are analyzed. At last, the voice interaction design method to create the humane task-oriented dialogue scenarios in the driving environment is proposed.

  14. Critical review of Ames Life Science participation in Spacelab Mission Development Test 3: The SMD 3 management study

    Helmreich, R.; Wilhelm, J.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S.

    1978-01-01

    A management study was conducted to specify activities and problems encountered during the development of procedures for documentation and crew training on experiments, as well as during the design, integration, and delivery of a life sciences experiment payload to Johnson Space Center for a 7 day simulation of a Spacelab mission. Conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future Ames' life sciences projects are included. Broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the environment of space are also addressed.

  15. A FPGA-based Network Interface Card with GPUDirect enabling realtime GPU computing in HEP experiments

    Lonardo, Alessandro; Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Lo Cicero, Francesca; Martinelli, Michele; Neri, Ilaria; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pastorelli, Elena; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simeone, Francesco; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Tosoratto, Laura; Vicini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The capability of processing high bandwidth data streams in real-time is a computational requirement common to many High Energy Physics experiments. Keeping the latency of the data transport tasks under control is essential in order to meet this requirement. We present NaNet, a FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card design featuring Remote Direct Memory Access towards CPU and GPU memories plus a transport protocol offload module characterized by cycle-accurate upper-bound handling. The combination of these two features allows to relieve almost entirely the OS and the application from data tranfer management, minimizing the unavoidable jitter effects associated to OS process scheduling. The design currently supports one GbE (1000Base-T) and three custom 34 Gbps APElink I/O channels, but four-channels 10GbE (10Base-R) and 2.5 Gbps deterministic latency KM3link versions are being implemented. Two use cases of NaNet will be discussed: the GPU-based low level trigger for the RICH detector in the NA62 experiment an...

  16. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    Lange, Bruno; Maidantchik, Carmen; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani, Varlen; Arosa, Breno; Abreu, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from managing the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment in the experimental cavern, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. FENCE assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies heavily on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that view/edit privileges are granted to eligible users only. The framework also provides tools for securely writing into a database. Fully HTML5-compliant multi-step forms can be generated from their JSON description to assure that the submitted data comply with a series of constraints. Input validation is carried out primarily on the server- side but, following progressive enhancement guidelines, verification might also be performed on the client-side by enabling specific markup data attributes which are then handed over to the jQuery validation plug-in. User monitoring is accomplished by thoroughly logging user requests along with any POST data. Documentation is built from the source code using the phpDocumentor tool and made readily available for developers online. Fence, therefore, speeds up the implementation of Web interfaces and reduces the response time to requirement changes by minimizing maintenance overhead.

  17. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    Lange, Bruno; Maidantchik, Carmen; Pavani, Varlen; Arosa, Breno; Abreu, Igor; Pommes, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from managing the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment in the experimental cavern, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. FENCE assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies heavily on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that view/edit privileges are granted to eligible users only. The framework also provides tools for securely writing into a database. Fully HTML5-compliant multi-step forms can be generated from their JSON description to assure that the submitted data comply with a series of constraints. Input validation is carried out primarily on the server- side but, following progressive enhancement guidelines, verification might also be performed on the client-side by enabling specific markup data attributes which are then handed over to the jQuery validation plug-in. User monitoring is accomplished by thoroughly logging user requests along with any POST data. Documentation is built from the source code using the phpDocumentor tool and made readily available for developers online. Fence, therefore, speeds up the implementation of Web interfaces and reduces the response time to requirement changes by minimizing maintenance overhead. (paper)

  18. Low power CAMAC and NIM modular systems for spaceflight use on Shuttle and Spacelab missions

    Trainor, J.H.; Kaminski, T.J.; Ehrmann, C.H.

    1977-02-01

    The advent of the Shuttle launch vehicle and Spacelab have resulted in adequate weight and volume such that experiment electronics can be implemented at relatively low cost using spaceflight versions of CAMAC and NIM modules. Studies of 10 modules by manufacturers have shown that power reduction overall by a factor of approximately 3 can be accomplished. This is adequate both from the point of view of consumption and temperature rise in vacuum. Our studies have shown that a stock of approximately 45 module types is required and a listing is given. The changes required in these modules in order to produce spaceflight versions are described. And finally, the further studies, prototyping and testing leading to eventual flight qualification are described.

  19. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Correlation technique was used to locate the crack tip and monitor the crack growth. For the specimens with H45 core, unstable crack growth took place initially. Following the unstable propagation, the crack propagated in the core underneath the resin-rich cell layer approaching the interface. However......, the crack did not kink into the interface. For the specimens with H100 core, the crack propagated initially in the core and then returned into the interface and continued to propagate in the interface. For the specimens with H250 core, the crack initially propagated in the core and then kinked...

  20. USER FRUSTRATION IN HIT INTERFACES: EXPLORING PAST HCI RESEARCH FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CLINICIANS' EXPERIENCES.

    Opoku-Boateng, Gloria A

    2015-01-01

    User frustration research has been one way of looking into clinicians' experience with health information technology use and interaction. In order to understand how clinician frustration with Health Information Technology (HIT) use occurs, there is the need to explore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) literature that addresses both frustration and HIT use. In the past three decades, HCI frustration research has increased and expanded. Researchers have done a lot of work to understand emotions, end-user frustration and affect. This paper uses a historical literature review approach to review the origins of emotion and frustration research and explore the research question; Does HCI research on frustration provide insights on clinicians' frustration with HIT interfaces? From the literature review HCI research on emotion and frustration provides additional insights that can indeed help explain user frustration in HIT. Different approaches and HCI perspectives also help frame HIT user frustration research as well as inform HIT system design. The paper concludes with a suggested directions on how future design and research may take.

  1. FELIX: the New Detector Interface for the ATLAS Experiment arXiv

    Wu, Weihao

    During the next major shutdown (2019-2020), the ATLAS experiment at the LHC will adopt the Front-End Link eXchange (FELIX) system as the interface between the data acquisition, detector control and TTC (Timing, Trigger and Control) systems and new or updated trigger and detector front-end electronics. FELIX will function as a router between custom serial links from front-end ASICs and FPGAs to data collection and processing components via a commodity switched network. Links may aggregate many slower links or be a single high bandwidth link. FELIX will also forward the LHC bunch-crossing clock, fixed latency trigger accepts and resets received from the TTC system to front-end electronics. The FELIX system uses commodity server technology in combination with FPGA-based PCIe I/O cards. The FELIX servers will run a software routing platform serving data to network clients. Commodity servers connected to FELIX systems via the same network will run the new Software Readout Driver (SW ROD) infrastructure for event f...

  2. Development of a software interface for optical disk archival storage for a new life sciences flight experiments computer

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1989-01-01

    The current Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment (LSLE) microcomputer for life sciences experiment data acquisition is now obsolete. Among the weaknesses of the current microcomputer are small memory size, relatively slow analog data sampling rates, and the lack of a bulk data storage device. While life science investigators normally prefer data to be transmitted to Earth as it is taken, this is not always possible. No down-link exists for experiments performed in the Shuttle middeck region. One important aspect of a replacement microcomputer is provision for in-flight storage of experimental data. The Write Once, Read Many (WORM) optical disk was studied because of its high storage density, data integrity, and the availability of a space-qualified unit. In keeping with the goals for a replacement microcomputer based upon commercially available components and standard interfaces, the system studied includes a Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) for interfacing the WORM drive. The system itself is designed around the STD bus, using readily available boards. Configurations examined were: (1) master processor board and slave processor board with the SCSI interface; (2) master processor with SCSI interface; (3) master processor with SCSI and Direct Memory Access (DMA); (4) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board; and (5) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board with DMA.

  3. Charge loss experiments in surface channel CCD's explained by the McWhorter interface states model

    Penning De Vries, R.G.M.; Wallinga, Hans

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the McWhorter interface states model the CCD charge loss is derived as a function of bias charge, signal charge and channel width. As opposed to existing models, the charge loss is now attributed to interface states in the entire gate area, even for high bias charge levels.

  4. Mapping the Stacks: Sustainability and User Experience of Animated Maps in Library Discovery Interfaces

    McMillin, Bill; Gibson, Sally; MacDonald, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Animated maps of the library stacks were integrated into the catalog interface at Pratt Institute and into the EBSCO Discovery Service interface at Illinois State University. The mapping feature was developed for optimal automation of the update process to enable a range of library personnel to update maps and call-number ranges. The development…

  5. European X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry payload for Spacelab

    Andresen, R D; Whitcomb, G [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Brinkman, A C [Space Research Laboratory, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Beuermann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik; Culhane, J L [University Coll., London (UK). Mullard Space Science Lab.; Griffiths, R [Leicester Univ. (UK); Manno, V [ESA Headquarters, Paris, France; Rocchia, R [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1976-08-01

    A group of instruments for X-ray spectroscopy and polarimetry studies of a number of cosmic X-ray sources is being designed for possible use on Spacelab. Large area Bragg spectrometers and polarimeters for photon energies above 2 keV are described. For the energy range below 2 keV, both dispersive and non-dispersive spectrometers are employed at the common focus of a nested array of paraboloids. Following a brief outline of the scientific background to the mission, the properties of the individual instruments are discussed.

  6. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  7. Attachment of composite porous supra-particles to air-water and oil-water interfaces: theory and experiment.

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Al-Shehri, Hamza; Horozov, Tommy S

    2016-09-29

    We developed and tested a theoretical model for the attachment of fluid-infused porous supra-particles to a fluid-liquid interface. We considered the wetting behaviour of agglomerated clusters of particles, typical of powdered materials dispersed in a liquid, as well as of the adsorption of liquid-infused colloidosomes at the liquid-fluid interface. The free energy of attachment of a composite spherical porous supra-particle made from much smaller aggregated spherical particles to the oil-water interface was calculated. Two cases were considered: (i) a water-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the water phase, and, (ii) an oil-filled porous supra-particle adsorbed at the oil-water interface from the oil-phase. We derived equations relating the three-phase contact angle of the smaller "building block" particles and the contact angle of the liquid-infused porous supra-particles. The theory predicts that the porous supra-particle contact angle attached at the liquid interface strongly depends on the type of fluid infused in the particle pores and the fluid phase from which it approaches the liquid interface. We tested the theory by using millimetre-sized porous supra-particles fabricated by evaporation of droplets of polystyrene latex suspension on a pre-heated super-hydrophobic surface, followed by thermal annealing at the glass transition temperature. Such porous particles were initially infused with water or oil and approached to the oil-water interface from the infusing phase. The experiment showed that when attaching at the hexadecane-water interface, the porous supra-particles behaved as hydrophilic when they were pre-filled with water and hydrophobic when they were pre-filled with hexadecane. The results agree with the theoretically predicted contact angles for the porous composite supra-particles based on the values of the contact angles of their building block latex particles measured with the Gel Trapping Technique. The

  8. Interfacing with in-Situ Data Networks during the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)

    McInerney, M.; Griffith, P. C.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Schnase, J. L.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is designed to improve understanding of the causes and impacts of ecological changes in Arctic/boreal regions, and will integrate field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. ABoVE will result in a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability and resilience to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal regions of western North America, and provide scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The studies sponsored by NASA during ABoVE will be coordinated with research and in-situ monitoring activities being sponsored by a number of national and international partners. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud (ASC). The ASC combines high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks identified by the ABoVE Science Definition Team. In this talk, we will present the scientific requirements driving the development of the ABoVE Science Cloud, discuss the necessary interfaces, both computational and human, with in-situ monitoring networks, and show examples of how the ASC is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign.

  9. Web-based Java application to advanced JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System for remote experiments

    Totsuka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Sakata, Shinya; Oshima, Takayuki; Iba, Katsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Since remote participation in ITER experiments is planned, it is expected to demonstrate that the JT-60SA experiment is controlled from a Japanese remote experiment center located in Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken, Japan as a part of the ITER-BA project. Functions required for this experiment are monitoring of the discharge sequence status, handling of the discharge parameter, checking of experiment data, and monitoring of plant data, all of which are included in the existing JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System (MMIF). The MMIF is now only available to on-site users at the Naka site due to network safety. The motivation for remote MMIF is prompted by the issue of developing and achieving compatibility with network safety. The Java language has been chosen to implement this task. This paper deals with details of the JT-60 MMIF for the remote experiment that has evolved using the Java language

  10. The weak interfaces within tough natural composites: experiments on three types of nacre.

    Khayer Dastjerdi, Ahmad; Rabiei, Reza; Barthelat, Francois

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization is a typical strategy used in natural materials to achieve high stiffness and hardness for structural functions such as skeletal support, protection or predation. High mineral content generally leads to brittleness, yet natural materials such as bone, mollusk shells or glass sponge achieve relatively high toughness considering the weakness of their constituents through intricate microstructures. In particular, nanometers thick organic interfaces organized in micro-architectures play a key role in providing toughness by various processes including crack deflection, crack bridging or energy dissipation. While these interfaces are critical in these materials, their composition, structure and mechanics is often poorly understood. In this work we focus on nacre, one of the most impressive hard biological materials in terms of toughness. We performed interfacial fracture tests on chevron notched nacre samples from three different species: red abalone, top shell and pearl oyster. We found that the intrinsic toughness of the interfaces is indeed found to be extremely low, in the order of the toughness of the mineral inclusions themselves. Such low toughness is required for the cracks to follow the interfaces, and to deflect and circumvent the mineral tablets. This result highlights the efficacy of toughening mechanisms in natural materials, turning low-toughness inclusions and interfaces into high-performance composites. We found that top shell nacre displayed the highest interfacial toughness, because of higher surface roughness and a more resilient organic material, and also through extrinsic toughening mechanisms including crack deflection, crack bridging and process zone. In the context of biomimetics, the main implication of this finding is that the interface in nacre-like composite does not need to be tough; the extensibility or ductility of the interfaces may be more important than their strength and toughness to produce toughness at the macroscale

  11. Usability Analysis of Online Bank Login Interface Based on Eye Tracking Experiment

    Xiaofang YUAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of information technology and rapid popularization of online banking, it is used by the more and more consumers. Studying on the usability of online banking interface, improving the user-friendliness of web interface, and enhancing attraction of bank website, which have gradually become the basic network marketing strategy of the banks. Therefore, this study took three banks as an example to record subjects’’ eye tracking data of time to first fixation, fixation duration and blink count and so on by using Tobii T60XL Eye Tracking equipment, while they login online banking web interface, and analyzed that the factors of webpage layout, colors, the amount of information presentation which impacts on the usability of online banking login interface. The results shows that the login entry, account login information and other key control buttons should be placed in the upper left corner to quickly lock the target, and the interface should have a moderate amount of information presentation, the appropriate proportion, reasonable font size settings, harmonious, simple, and warmth design style.

  12. Electrochemical ion transfer across liquid/liquid interfaces confined within solid-state micropore arrays--simulations and experiments.

    Strutwolf, Jörg; Scanlon, Micheál D; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2009-01-01

    Miniaturised liquid/liquid interfaces provide benefits for bioanalytical detection with electrochemical methods. In this work, microporous silicon membranes which can be used for interface miniaturisation were characterized by simulations and experiments. The microporous membranes possessed hexagonal arrays of pores with radii between 10 and 25 microm, a pore depth of 100 microm and pore centre-to-centre separations between 99 and 986 microm. Cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor ion transfer across arrays of micro-interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (microITIES) formed at these membranes, with the organic phase present as an organogel. The results were compared to computational simulations taking into account mass transport by diffusion and encompassing diffusion to recessed interfaces and overlapped diffusion zones. The simulation and experimental data were both consistent with the situation where the location of the liquid/liquid (l/l) interface was on the aqueous side of the silicon membrane and the pores were filled with the organic phase. While the current for the forward potential scan (transfer of the ion from the aqueous phase to the organic phase) was strongly dependent on the location of the l/l interface, the current peak during the reverse scan (transfer of the ion from the organic phase to the aqueous phase) was influenced by the ratio of the transferring ion's diffusion coefficients in both phases. The diffusion coefficient of the transferring ion in the gelified organic phase was ca. nine times smaller than in the aqueous phase. Asymmetric cyclic voltammogram shapes were caused by the combined effect of non-symmetrical diffusion (spherical and linear) and by the inequality of the diffusion coefficient in both phases. Overlapping diffusion zones were responsible for the observation of current peaks instead of steady-state currents during the forward scan. The characterisation of the diffusion behaviour is an important requirement

  13. ISLAM PROJECT: Interface between the signals from various experiments of a Van Graaff accelerator and PDP 11/44 computer

    Martinez Piquer, T. A.; Yuste Santos, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describe an interface between the signals from an in-beam experiment of a Van de Graaff accelerator and a PDP 11/44 computer. The information corresponding to one spectrum is taken from one digital voltammeter and is processed by mean of an equipment controlled by a M6809 microprocessor. The software package has been developed in assembly language and has a size of 1/2 K. (Author) 12 refs

  14. NEOCE: a new external occulting coronagraph experiment for ultimate observations of the chromosphere, corona and interface

    Damé, Luc; Fineschi, Silvano; Kuzin, Sergey; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert

    Several ground facilities and space missions are currently dedicated to the study of the Sun at high resolution and of the solar corona in particular. However, and despite significant progress with the advent of space missions and UV, EUV and XUV direct observations of the hot chromosphere and million-degrees coronal plasma, much is yet to be achieved in the understanding of these high temperatures, fine dynamic dissipative structures and of the coronal heating in general. Recent missions have shown the definite role of a wide range of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic and physically fundamental changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled and governed by the emerging magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. The solar corona consists of many localised loop-like structures or threads with the plasmas brightening and fading independently. The plasma evolution in each thread is believed to be related to the formation of filaments, each one being dynamic, in a non-equilibrium state. The mechanism sustaining this dynamics, oscillations or waves (Alfvén or other magneto-plasma waves), requires both very high-cadence, multi-spectral observations, and high resolution and coronal magnetometry. This is foreseen in the future Space Mission NEOCE (New External Occulting Coronagraph Experiment), the ultimate new generation high-resolution coronagraphic heliospheric mission, to be proposed for ESA M4. NEOCE, an evolution of the HiRISE mission, is ideally placed at the L5 Lagrangian point (for a better follow-up of CMEs), and provides FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (two satellites in formation flying 375 m apart minimizing scattered light) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and

  15. A high speed, selective multi-ADC to computer data transfer interface, for nuclear physics experiments

    Arctaedius, T.; Ekstroem, R.E.

    1986-08-01

    A link connecting up to fifteen Analog to Digital Converters with a computer, through a Direct Memory Access interface, is described. The interface decides which of the connected ADC:s that participate in an event, and transfers the output-data from these to the computer, accompanied with a 2-byte word identifying the participating ADC:s. This data format can be recorded on tape without further transformations, and is easy to unfold at the off-line analysis. Data transfer is accomplished in less than a few microseconds, which is made possible by the use of high speed TTL circuits. (authors)

  16. Teacher Education: Interface Between Practices and Policies: The Malaysian Experience 1979-1997.

    Ratnavadivel, Nagendralingan

    1999-01-01

    Describes preservice teacher education in Malaysia, focusing on the interface between policies and practices as orchestrated by the Teacher Education Division of the Ministry of Education. Looks at changes in the political, economic, and sociocultural spheres, both locally and internationally, that have helped ensure qualitative and quantitative…

  17. The North Carolina State University Libraries Search Experience: Usability Testing Tabbed Search Interfaces for Academic Libraries

    Teague-Rector, Susan; Ballard, Angela; Pauley, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Creating a learnable, effective, and user-friendly library Web site hinges on providing easy access to search. Designing a search interface for academic libraries can be particularly challenging given the complexity and range of searchable library collections, such as bibliographic databases, electronic journals, and article search silos. Library…

  18. Guidance from the Graphical User Interface (GUI) Experience: What GUI Teaches about Technology Access.

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This report investigates the use of the graphical user interface (GUI) in computer programs, the problems it creates for individuals with visual impairments or blindness, and advocacy efforts concerning this issue, which have been targeted primarily at Microsoft, producer of Windows. The report highlights the concerns of individuals with visual…

  19. Mind the Sheep! User Experience Evaluation & Brain-Computer Interface Games

    Gürkök, Hayrettin

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) infers our actions (e.g. a movement), intentions (e.g. preparation for a movement) and psychological states (e.g. emotion, attention) by interpreting our brain signals. It uses the inferences it makes to manipulate a computer. Although BCIs have long been used

  20. New Materials = New Expressive Powers: Smart Material Interfaces and Arts, experience via smart materials

    Minuto, A.; Pittarello, Fabio; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    It is not easy for a growing artist to find his poetry. Smart materials could be an answer for those who are looking for new forms of art. Smart Material Interfaces (SMI) define a new interaction paradigm based on dynamic modications of the innovative materials' properties. SMI can be applied in

  1. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers' Touch-Interface User Experiences

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users' shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the…

  2. Hematology and biochemical findings of Spacelab 1 flight

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Chen, J. P.; Crosby, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.; Larkin, E.; Tavassoli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The changes in erythropoiesis in astronauts caused by weightlessness was experimentally studied during the Spacelab 1 flight. Immediately after landing showed a mean decrease of 9,3 percent in the four astronauts. Neither hyperoxia nor an increase in blood phosphate caused the decrease. Red cell survival time and iron incorporation postflight were not significantly different from their preflight levels. Serum haptoglobin did not decrease, indicating that intravascular hemolysis was not a major cause of red cell mass change. An increase in serum ferritin after the second day of flight may have been caused by red cell breakdown early in flight. The space flight-induced decrease in red cell mass may result from a failure of erythropoesis to replace cells destroyed by the spleen soon after weightlessness is attained.

  3. Hematological measurements in rats flown on Spacelab shuttle SL-3

    Lange, R.D.; Andrews, R.B.; Gibson, L.A.; Congdon, C.C.; Wright, P.; Dunn, C.D.R.; Jones, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a decrease in red cell mass occurs in astronauts, and some studies indicate a leukocytosis occurs. A life science module housing young and mature rats was flown on shuttle mission Spacelab 3 (SL-3), and the results of hematology studies of flight and control rats are presented. Statistically significant increases in the hematocrit, red blood cell counts, and hemoglobin determinations, together with a mild neutrophilia and lymphopenia, were found in flight animals. No significant changes were found in bone marrow and spleen cell differentials or erythropoietin determinations. Clonal assays demonstrated an increased erythroid colony formation of flight animal bone marrow cells at erythropoietin doses of 0.02 and 1.0 U/ml but not 0.20 U/ml. These results agree with some but vary from other previously published studies. Erythropoietin assays performed by radioimmunoassay and clonal studies were performed for the first time

  4. Definition of Life Sciences laboratories for shuttle/Spacelab. Volume 1: Executive summary

    1975-01-01

    Research requirements and the laboratories needed to support a Life Sciences research program during the shuttle/Spacelab era were investigated. A common operational research equipment inventory was developed to support a comprehensive but flexible Life Sciences program. Candidate laboratories and operational schedules were defined and evaluated in terms of accomodation with the Spacelab and overall program planning. Results provide a firm foundation for the initiation of a life science program for the shuttle era.

  5. FELIX: The New Approach for Interfacing to Front-end Electronics for the ATLAS Experiment

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754725; The ATLAS collaboration; Anderson, John Thomas; Borga, Andrea; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Kai; Drake, Gary; Donszelmann, Mark; Francis, David; Gorini, Benedetto; Guest, Daniel; Lanni, Francesco; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Levinson, Lorne; Roich, Alexander; Schreuder, Frans Philip; Schumacher, J\\"orn; Vandelli, Wainer; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    From the ATLAS Phase-I upgrade and onward, new or upgraded detectors and trigger systems will be interfaced to the data acquisition, detector control and timing (TTC) systems by the Front-End Link eXchange (FELIX). FELIX is the core of the new ATLAS Trigger/DAQ architecture. Functioning as a router between custom serial links and a commodity network, FELIX is implemented by server PCs with commodity network interfaces and PCIe cards with large FPGAs and many high speed serial fiber transceivers. By separating data transport from data manipulation, the latter can be done by software in commodity servers attached to the network. Replacing traditional point-to-point links between Front-end components and the DAQ system by a switched network, FELIX provides scaling, flexibility uniformity and upgradability and reduces the diversity of custom hardware solutions in favour of software.

  6. Radiation Tolerance Qualification Tests of the Final Source Interface Unit for the ALICE Experiment

    Dénes, E; Futó, E; Kerék, A; Kiss, T; Molnár, J; Novák, D; Soós, C; Tölyhi, T; Van de Vyvre, P

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Detector Data Link (DDL) is a high-speed optical link designed to interface the readout electronics of ALICE sub-detectors to the DAQ computers. The Source Interface Unit (SIU) of the DDL will operate in radiation environment. Previous tests showed that a configuration loss of SRAM-based FPGA devices may happen and the frequency of undetected data errors in the FPGA user memory area is also not acceptable. Therefore, we redesigned the SIU card using another FPGA based on flash technology. In order to detect bit errors in the user memory we added parity check logic to the design. The new SIU has been extensively tested using neutron and proton irradiation to verify its radiation tolerance. In this paper we summarize the design changes, introduce the final design, and the results of the radiation tolerance measurements on the final card.

  7. Operational plans for life science payloads - From experiment selection through postflight reporting

    Mccollum, G. W.; Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Key features of operational plans developed in a study of the Space Shuttle era life science payloads program are presented. The data describes the overall acquisition, staging, and integration of payload elements, as well as program implementation methods and mission support requirements. Five configurations were selected as representative payloads: (a) carry-on laboratories - medical emphasis experiments, (b) mini-laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (c) seven-day dedicated laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (d) 30-day dedicated laboratories - Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) with selected life science experiments, and (e) Biomedical Experiments Scientific Satellite (BESS) - extended duration primate (Type I) and small vertebrate (Type II) missions. The recommended operational methods described in the paper are compared to the fundamental data which has been developed in the life science Spacelab Mission Simulation (SMS) test series. Areas assessed include crew training, experiment development and integration, testing, data-dissemination, organization interfaces, and principal investigator working relationships.

  8. Touch in Computer-Mediated Environments: An Analysis of Online Shoppers’ Touch-Interface User Experiences

    Chung, Sorim

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, one of the most fundamental changes in current computer-mediated environments has been input devices, moving from mouse devices to touch interfaces. However, most studies of online retailing have not considered device environments as retail cues that could influence users’ shopping behavior. In this research, I examine the underlying mechanisms between input device environments and shoppers’ decision-making processes. In particular, I investigate the impact of input d...

  9. Experiment on interface separation detection of concrete-filled steel tubular arch bridge using accelerometer array

    Pan, Shengshan; Zhao, Xuefeng; Zhao, Hailiang; Mao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Based on the vibration testing principle, and taking the local vibration of steel tube at the interface separation area as the study object, a real-time monitoring and the damage detection method of the interface separation of concrete-filled steel tube by accelerometer array through quantitative transient self-excitation is proposed. The accelerometers are arranged on the steel tube area with or without void respectively, and the signals of accelerometers are collected at the same time and compared under different transient excitation points. The results show that compared with the signal of compact area, the peak value of accelerometer signal at void area increases and attenuation speed slows down obviously, and the spectrum peaks of the void area are much more and disordered and the amplitude increases obviously. whether the input point of transient excitation is on void area or not is irrelevant with qualitative identification results. So the qualitative identification of the interface separation of concrete-filled steel tube based on the signal of acceleration transducer is feasible and valid.

  10. Designing Social Interfaces Principles, Patterns, and Practices for Improving the User Experience

    Crumlish, Christian

    2009-01-01

    From the creators of Yahoo!'s Design Pattern Library, Designing Social Interfaces provides you with more than 100 patterns, principles, and best practices, along with salient advice for many of the common challenges you'll face when starting a social website. Designing sites that foster user interaction and community-building is a valuable skill for web developers and designers today, but it's not that easy to understand the nuances of the social web. Now you have help. Christian Crumlish and Erin Malone share hard-won insights into what works, what doesn't, and why. You'll learn how to bala

  11. Continuous Microfluidics (Ecology-on-a-Chip) Experiments for Long Term Observation of Bacteria at Liquid-Liquid Interfaces

    Miranda, Michael; White, Andrew; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2017-11-01

    A microfluidic bioassay incorporating a peristaltic pump and chemostat capable of continuously culturing a bacterial suspension through a microchannel for an extended period of time relevant to ecological processes is presented. A single crude oil droplet is dispensed on-chip and subsequently pinned to the top and bottom surfaces of the microchannel to establish a vertical curved oil-water interface to observe bacteria without boundary interference. The accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), microbial film formation, and aggregation is provided by DIC microscopy with an EMCCD camera at an interval of 30 sec. Cell-interface interactions such as cell translational and angular motilities as well as encountering, attachment, detachment to the interface are obtained by a high speed camera at 1000 fps with a sampling interval of 10 min. Experiments on Pseudomonas sp. (P62) and isolated EPS suspensions from Sagitulla Stelleta and Roseobacter show rapid formation of bacterial aggregates including EPS streamers stretching tens of drop diameters long. These results provide crucial insights into environmentally relevant processes such as the initiation of marine oil snow, an alternative mode of biodegradation to conventional bioconsumption. Funded by GoMRI, NSF, ARO.

  12. Tire-rim interface pressure of a commercial vehicle wheel under radial loads: theory and experiment

    Wan, Xiaofei; Shan, Yingchun; Liu, Xiandong; He, Tian; Wang, Jiegong

    2017-11-01

    The simulation of the radial fatigue test of a wheel has been a necessary tool to improve the design of the wheel and calculate its fatigue life. The simulation model, including the strong nonlinearity of the tire structure and material, may produce accurate results, but often leads to a divergence in calculation. Thus, a simplified simulation model in which the complicated tire model is replaced with a tire-wheel contact pressure model is used extensively in the industry. In this paper, a simplified tire-rim interface pressure model of a wheel under a radial load is established, and the pressure of the wheel under different radial loads is tested. The tire-rim contact behavior affected by the radial load is studied and analyzed according to the test result, and the tire-rim interface pressure extracted from the test result is used to evaluate the simplified pressure model and the traditional cosine function model. The results show that the proposed model may provide a more accurate prediction of the wheel radial fatigue life than the traditional cosine function model.

  13. Evaluating user experience with respect to user expectations in brain-computer interface games

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Hakvoort, G.; Poel, Mannes; Müller-Putz, G.R.; Scherer, R.; Billinger, M.; Kreilinger, A.; Kaiser, V.; Neuper, C.

    Evaluating user experience (UX) with respect to previous experiences can provide insight into whether a product can positively aect a user's opinion about a technology. If it can, then we can say that the product provides a positive UX. In this paper we propose a method to assess the UX in BCI

  14. Initial Experiments with the Leap Motion as a User Interface in Robotic Endonasal Surgery.

    Travaglini, T A; Swaney, P J; Weaver, Kyle D; Webster, R J

    The Leap Motion controller is a low-cost, optically-based hand tracking system that has recently been introduced on the consumer market. Prior studies have investigated its precision and accuracy, toward evaluating its usefulness as a surgical robot master interface. Yet due to the diversity of potential slave robots and surgical procedures, as well as the dynamic nature of surgery, it is challenging to make general conclusions from published accuracy and precision data. Thus, our goal in this paper is to explore the use of the Leap in the specific scenario of endonasal pituitary surgery. We use it to control a concentric tube continuum robot in a phantom study, and compare user performance using the Leap to previously published results using the Phantom Omni. We find that the users were able to achieve nearly identical average resection percentage and overall surgical duration with the Leap.

  15. Applying Spatial Audio to Human Interfaces: 25 Years of NASA Experience

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Godfrey, Martine; Miller, Joel D.; Anderson, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    From the perspective of human factors engineering, the inclusion of spatial audio within a human-machine interface is advantageous from several perspectives. Demonstrated benefits include the ability to monitor multiple streams of speech and non-speech warning tones using a cocktail party advantage, and for aurally-guided visual search. Other potential benefits include the spatial coordination and interaction of multimodal events, and evaluation of new communication technologies and alerting systems using virtual simulation. Many of these technologies were developed at NASA Ames Research Center, beginning in 1985. This paper reviews examples and describes the advantages of spatial sound in NASA-related technologies, including space operations, aeronautics, and search and rescue. The work has involved hardware and software development as well as basic and applied research.

  16. Practical experience with graphical user interfaces and object-oriented design in the clinical laboratory.

    Wells, I G; Cartwright, R Y; Farnan, L P

    1993-12-15

    The computing strategy in our laboratories evolved from research in Artificial Intelligence, and is based on powerful software tools running on high performance desktop computers with a graphical user interface. This allows most tasks to be regarded as design problems rather than implementation projects, and both rapid prototyping and an object-oriented approach to be employed during the in-house development and enhancement of the laboratory information systems. The practical application of this strategy is discussed, with particular reference to the system designer, the laboratory user and the laboratory customer. Routine operation covers five departments, and the systems are stable, flexible and well accepted by the users. Client-server computing, currently undergoing final trials, is seen as the key to further development, and this approach to Pathology computing has considerable potential for the future.

  17. Initial Experiments with the Leap Motion as a User Interface in Robotic Endonasal Surgery

    Travaglini, T. A.; Swaney, P. J.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Webster, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Leap Motion controller is a low-cost, optically-based hand tracking system that has recently been introduced on the consumer market. Prior studies have investigated its precision and accuracy, toward evaluating its usefulness as a surgical robot master interface. Yet due to the diversity of potential slave robots and surgical procedures, as well as the dynamic nature of surgery, it is challenging to make general conclusions from published accuracy and precision data. Thus, our goal in this paper is to explore the use of the Leap in the specific scenario of endonasal pituitary surgery. We use it to control a concentric tube continuum robot in a phantom study, and compare user performance using the Leap to previously published results using the Phantom Omni. We find that the users were able to achieve nearly identical average resection percentage and overall surgical duration with the Leap. PMID:26752501

  18. Gaseous environment of the Shuttle early in the Spacelab 2 mission

    Pickett, Jolene S.; Murphy, Gerald B.; Kurth, William S.

    1988-01-01

    A cold-cathode ionization gage was flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-5IF as part of the Spacelab 2 payload. Neutral pressure data that were taken in the payload bay during the first few hours on orbit are presented. These data show that when the payload bay is oriented such that the atmospheric gases are ramming into it, the pressure rises to a peak of 4 x 10 to the -6th Torr. Pressure is also slightly higher during the sunlit portion of each orbit. Outgassing of the payload bay causes the pressure to be elevated to a few times 10 to the -6th Torr early in the mission. In addition, several effects on pressure have been identified that are due to chemical releases. Substantial increases (50-150 percent) are seen during another experiment's gas purge. Orbiter chemical-release effects include: pressure increases of 200 percent up to 7 x 10 to the -6th Torr due to Orbital Maneuvering System burns, minor perturbations in pressure due to vernier thruster firings and little or no increase in pressure due to water dumps. In the case of vernier thruster firings, effects are seen only from down-firing thrusters in the back of the Orbiter, which are probably due to reflection of thruster gases off Orbiter surfaces.

  19. Communication network for decentralized remote tele-science during the Spacelab mission IML-2

    Christ, Uwe; Schulz, Klaus-Juergen; Incollingo, Marco

    1994-01-01

    The ESA communication network for decentralized remote telescience during the Spacelab mission IML-2, called Interconnection Ground Subnetwork (IGS), provided data, voice conferencing, video distribution/conferencing and high rate data services to 5 remote user centers in Europe. The combination of services allowed the experimenters to interact with their experiments as they would normally do from the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at MSFC. In addition, to enhance their science results, they were able to make use of reference facilities and computing resources in their home laboratory, which typically are not available in the POCC. Characteristics of the IML-2 communications implementation were the adaptation to the different user needs based on modular service capabilities of IGS and the cost optimization for the connectivity. This was achieved by using a combination of traditional leased lines, satellite based VSAT connectivity and N-ISDN according to the simulation and mission schedule for each remote site. The central management system of IGS allows minimization of staffing and the involvement of communications personnel at the remote sites. The successful operation of IGS for IML-2 as a precursor network for the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF) has proven the concept for communications to support the operation of the COF decentralized scenario.

  20. Effects of rectilinear acceleration, caloric and optokinetic stimulation of human subjects in the Spacelab D-1 mission

    Wetzig, J.; von Baumgarten, R.

    A set of vestibular experiments was performed during the course of the German Spacelab D-1 mission from 30 October to 6 November 1985 by a consortium of experimenters from various european countries. Similar to the Spacelab SL-1 mission all of the scientific crew members were theoretically and practically trained for the experiments. Baseline measurements for all tests were collected 113, 86, 44, 30 and 18 days prior to the mission and compared with data taken inflight, on the landing day and the consecutive 7 to 14 days. The hardware comprised mainly a motordriven accelerating platform, the SPACE SLED, and the vestibular helmet, a multi-purpose instrument in support of a variety of vestibular experiments including air-calorisation of the ears, optokinetic stimulation pattern presentation and optical and nystagmographic recording of eye movements. Measurements of the threshold for the perception of detection of whole body movement did not reveal any dramatic changes in the 2 measured axes inflight when compared to preflight values. Early postflight values show a significantly elevated threshold for all axes in 3 out of 4 subjects. The caloric nystagmus, already found during the SL-1 mission, was confirmed on all three tested subjects during the D-1 mission. It's amplitude and in some instances it's direction were influenced by horizontal acceleration on the SLED. The amplitude of optokinetic nystagmus increased when subjects were allowed to free-float over that seen when subjects were fixed. Stimulation of the neck receptors by roll movements of the body against the fixated head resulted in illusory object motion to the contralateral side. Torsional movements of the eyes during such neck receptor stimulation was present inflight and postflight, while it had not been observed preflight. Most results point to a reduction of otolithic effects in favour of visual and proprioceptive influences for spatial orientation.

  1. Back-end and interface implementation of the STS-XYTER2 prototype ASIC for the CBM experiment

    Kasinski, K.; Szczygiel, R.; Zabolotny, W.

    2016-01-01

    Each front-end readout ASIC for the High-Energy Physics experiments requires robust and effective hit data streaming and control mechanism. A new STS-XYTER2 full-size prototype chip for the Silicon Tracking System and Muon Chamber detectors in the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, Germany) is a 128-channel time and amplitude measuring solution for silicon microstrip and gas detectors. It operates at 250 kHit/s/channel hit rate, each hit producing 27 bits of information (5-bit amplitude, 14-bit timestamp, position and diagnostics data). The chip back-end implements fast front-end channel read-out, timestamp-wise hit sorting, and data streaming via a scalable interface implementing the dedicated protocol (STS-HCTSP) for chip control and hit transfer with data bandwidth from 9.7 MHit/s up to 47 MHit/s. It also includes multiple options for link diagnostics, failure detection, and throttling features. The back-end is designed to operate with the data acquisition architecture based on the CERN GBTx transceivers. This paper presents the details of the back-end and interface design and its implementation in the UMC 180 nm CMOS process.

  2. Subjective user experience and performance with active tangibles on a tabletop interface

    Erp, J.B. van; Toet, A.; Meijer, K.; Janssen, J.; Jong, A. de

    2015-01-01

    We developed active tangibles (Sensators) that can be used in combination with multitouch tabletops and that can provide multisensory (visual, auditory, and vibrotactile) feedback. For spatial alignment and rotation tasks we measured subjective user experience and objective performance with these

  3. Subjective User Experience and Performance with Active Tangibles on a Tabletop Interfaces

    van Erp, Johannes Bernardus Fransiscus; Toet, Alexander; Meijer, Koos; Janssen, Joris; Jong, Arnoud; Streitz, Norbert; Markopoulos, Panos

    We developed active tangibles (Sensators) that can be used in combination with multitouch tabletops and that can provide multisensory (visual, auditory, and vibrotactile) feedback. For spatial alignment and rotation tasks we measured subjective user experience and objective performance with these

  4. Research on lettuce growth technology onboard Chinese Tiangong II Spacelab

    Shen, Yunze; Guo, Shuangsheng; Zhao, Pisheng; Wang, Longji; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jian; Bian, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    Lettuce was grown in a space vegetable cultivation facility onboard the Tiangong Ⅱ Spacelab during October 18 to November 15, 2016, in order to testify the key cultivating technology in CELSS under spaceflight microgravity condition. Potable water was used for irrigation of rooting substrate and the SRF (slowly released fertilizer) offered mineral nutrition for plant growth. Water content and electric conductivity in rooting substrate were measured based on FDR(frequency domain reflectometry) principle applied first in spaceflight. Lettuce germinated with comparative growth vigor as the ground control, showing that the plants appeared to be not stressed by the spaceflight environment. Under microgravity, lettuce grew taller and showed deeper green color than the ground control. In addition, the phototropism of the on-orbit plants was more remarkable. The nearly 30-d spaceflight test verified the seed fixation technology and water& nutrition management technology, which manifests the feasibility of FDR being used for measuring moisture content and electric conductivity in rooting zone under microgravity. Furthermore, the edibility of the space-grown vegetable was proved, providing theoretical support for astronaut to consume the space vegetable in future manned spaceflight.

  5. Immersion-scanning-tunneling-microscope for long-term variable-temperature experiments at liquid-solid interfaces

    Ochs, Oliver; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Lackinger, Markus

    2018-05-01

    Fundamental insights into the kinetics and thermodynamics of supramolecular self-assembly on surfaces are uniquely gained by variable-temperature high-resolution Scanning-Tunneling-Microscopy (STM). Conventionally, these experiments are performed with standard ambient microscopes extended with heatable sample stages for local heating. However, unavoidable solvent evaporation sets a technical limit on the duration of these experiments, hence prohibiting long-term experiments. These, however, would be highly desirable to provide enough time for temperature stabilization and settling of drift but also to study processes with inherently slow kinetics. To overcome this dilemma, we propose a STM that can operate fully immersed in solution. The instrument is mounted onto the lid of a hermetically sealed heatable container that is filled with the respective solution. By closing the container, both the sample and microscope are immersed in solution. Thereby solvent evaporation is eliminated and an environment for long-term experiments with utmost stable and controllable temperatures between room-temperature and 100 °C is provided. Important experimental requirements for the immersion-STM and resulting design criteria are discussed, the strategy for protection against corrosive media is described, the temperature stability and drift behavior are thoroughly characterized, and first long-term high resolution experiments at liquid-solid interfaces are presented.

  6. One dimensional two-body collisions experiment based on LabVIEW interface with Arduino

    Saphet, Parinya; Tong-on, Anusorn; Thepnurat, Meechai

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to build a physics lab apparatus that is modern, low-cost and simple. In one dimensional two-body collisions experiment, we used the Arduino UNO R3 as a data acquisition system which was controlled by LabVIEW program. The photogate sensors were designed using LED and LDR to measure position as a function of the time. Aluminium frame houseware and blower were used for the air track system. In both totally inelastic and elastic collision experiments, the results of momentum and energy conservation are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  7. Effects of Trait Hostility, Mapping Interface, and Character Identification on Aggressive Thoughts and Overall Game Experience After Playing a Violent Video Game.

    Jung, Younbo; Park, Namkee; Lee, Kwan Min

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of trait-level hostility, interface types, and character identification on aggressive thoughts and overall game experience after playing a violent video game. Results showed that the mapping interface made participants with high trait-level hostility more readily accessible to aggressive contracts, yet it did not have any significant impact for participants with low trait-level hostility. Participants with low trait-level hostility reported more positive game experience in the mapping interface condition, while participants with high trait-level hostility in the same condition reported more negative game experience. Results also indicated that character identification has moderating effects on activating aggressive thoughts and mediating effects on overall game experience. Implications regarding possible ways of reducing potentially negative outcomes from violent games are discussed.

  8. Interfacing detectors and collecting data for large-scale experiments in high energy physics using COTS technology

    Schumacher, Joern

    2017-01-01

    Data-acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at the European particle-physics research institute CERN are used to record experimental physics data and are essential for the effective operation of an experiment. Located in underground facilities with limited space, power, cooling, and exposed to ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields, data-acquisition systems have unique requirements and are challenging to design and build. Traditionally, these systems have been composed of custom-designed electronic components to be able to cope with the large data volumes that high-energy physics experiments generate and at the same time meet technological and environmental requirements. Custom-designed electronics is costly to develop,effortful to maintain and typically not very flexible. This thesis explores an alternative architecture for data-acquisition systems based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A COTS-based data distribution device called FELIX that will be integrated in ATLAS is presented. The hardware and software implementation of this device is discussed, with a specific focus on performance, heterogenity of systems and traffic patterns. The COTS-based readout approach is evaluated in the context of the future requirements of the ATLAS experiment. The main contributions of the thesis are an analysis of the ATLAS data-acquisition system with a focus on the readout system, a software architecture for the main application on FELIX hosts, a performance analysis and tuning based on computer science methods for central FELIX software components with respect to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, a network communication library with a high-level software interface to utilize high-performance computing network technology for the purpose of data-acquisition systems, and an evaluation and discussion of ATLAS data-acquisition using FELIX systems as a case study for COTS-based data-acquisition in high

  9. Interfacing detectors and collecting data for large-scale experiments in high energy physics using COTS technology

    Schumacher, Joern

    2017-07-01

    Data-acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at the European particle-physics research institute CERN are used to record experimental physics data and are essential for the effective operation of an experiment. Located in underground facilities with limited space, power, cooling, and exposed to ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields, data-acquisition systems have unique requirements and are challenging to design and build. Traditionally, these systems have been composed of custom-designed electronic components to be able to cope with the large data volumes that high-energy physics experiments generate and at the same time meet technological and environmental requirements. Custom-designed electronics is costly to develop,effortful to maintain and typically not very flexible. This thesis explores an alternative architecture for data-acquisition systems based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A COTS-based data distribution device called FELIX that will be integrated in ATLAS is presented. The hardware and software implementation of this device is discussed, with a specific focus on performance, heterogenity of systems and traffic patterns. The COTS-based readout approach is evaluated in the context of the future requirements of the ATLAS experiment. The main contributions of the thesis are an analysis of the ATLAS data-acquisition system with a focus on the readout system, a software architecture for the main application on FELIX hosts, a performance analysis and tuning based on computer science methods for central FELIX software components with respect to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, a network communication library with a high-level software interface to utilize high-performance computing network technology for the purpose of data-acquisition systems, and an evaluation and discussion of ATLAS data-acquisition using FELIX systems as a case study for COTS-based data-acquisition in high

  10. STS-40 Spacelab Life Science 1 (SLS-1) module in OV-102's payload bay (PLB)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Spacelab Life Science 1 (SLS-1) module is documented in the payload bay (PLB) of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Included in the view are: the spacelab (SL) transfer tunnel joggle section and support struts; SLS-1 module forward end cone with the European Space Agency (ESA) SL insignia, SLS-1 payload insignia, and the upper feed through plate (center); the orbiter maneuvering system (OMS) pods; and the vertical stabilizer with the Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 901 Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensing (SILTS) at the top 24 inches. The vertical stabilizer points to the Earth's limb and the cloud-covered surface of the Earth below.

  11. The design and development of an oil-free compressor for Spacelab Refrigerator/Freezer

    Hye, A.

    1984-01-01

    Design features and test results of an oil-free compressor developed for Spacelab Mission-4 Refrigerator/Freezer are detailed. The compressor has four identical pistons activated by a common eccentric shaft, operated by a brushless dc motor at 1300 rpm. The stroke of each piston is 0.28 cm, with the piston ends connected to the shaft by means of sealed needle bearings, eliminating the ned for oil. The mass flow rates produced by the compressor are by over 100 percent higher compared to the original Amfridge unit. Test results show that the compressor can meet the Spacelab refrigerator/freezer requirements.

  12. "Virtual shear box" experiments of stress and slip cycling within a subduction interface mélange

    Webber, Sam; Ellis, Susan; Fagereng, Åke

    2018-04-01

    What role does the progressive geometric evolution of subduction-related mélange shear zones play in the development of strain transients? We use a "virtual shear box" experiment, based on outcrop-scale observations from an ancient exhumed subduction interface - the Chrystalls Beach Complex (CBC), New Zealand - to constrain numerical models of slip processes within a meters-thick shear zone. The CBC is dominated by large, competent clasts surrounded by interconnected weak matrix. Under constant slip velocity boundary conditions, models of the CBC produce stress cycling behavior, accompanied by mixed brittle-viscous deformation. This occurs as a consequence of the reorganization of competent clasts, and the progressive development and breakdown of stress bridges as clasts mutually obstruct one another. Under constant shear stress boundary conditions, the models show periods of relative inactivity punctuated by aseismic episodic slip at rapid rates (meters per year). Such a process may contribute to the development of strain transients such as slow slip.

  13. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section, part A

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, l985, through June 30, l988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The scientific analyses during the performance period consisted of follow-up studies of shuttle orbiter environment and orbiter/ionosphere interactions and various plasma particle and wave studies which dealt with data taken when the PDP was on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm and when the PDP was in free flight. Of particular interest during the RMS operations and free flight were the orbiter wake studies and joint studies of beam/plasma interactions with the SL-2 Fast Pulse Electron Generator (FPEG) of the Vehicle Charging and Potential Investigation (VCAP). Internal reports, published papers and presentations which involve PDP/SL-2 data are listed in Sections 3 and 4. A PDP/SL-2 scientific results meeting was held at the University of Iowa on June 10, l986. This meeting was attended by most of the PDP and VCAP investigators and provided a forum for discussing and comparing the various results, particularly with regard to the PDP free flight.

  14. Optical and electrical experiments at some transition-metal oxide foil-electrolyte interfaces

    Sari, S.O.; Ahlgren, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Metal-oxide layers formed from transition-metal foils oxidized by heating in air have been examined for their photoelectrolytic response. The metals examined are Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Mo, W, and Pt. Weak photoeffects are observed for oxide layers of all of these metals. Sizable light-dependent oxygen gas evolution rates are found in Ti and also in W oxides. The spectral dependence of the oxygen response in these compounds is investigated, and interpretation is given of these experiments

  15. Interface learning

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2014-01-01

    "Interface learning - New goals for museum and upper secondary school collaboration" investigates and analyzes the learning that takes place when museums and upper secondary schools in Denmark work together in local partnerships to develop and carry out school-related, museum-based coursework...... for students. The research focuses on the learning that the students experience in the interface of the two learning environments: The formal learning environment of the upper secondary school and the informal learning environment of the museum. Focus is also on the learning that the teachers and museum...... professionals experience as a result of their collaboration. The dissertation demonstrates how a given partnership’s collaboration affects the students’ learning experiences when they are doing the coursework. The dissertation presents findings that museum-school partnerships can use in order to develop...

  16. Facility - transportation system interface at COGEMA (experience in taking delivery of spent fuel)

    Lenail, B.

    1983-01-01

    COGEMA has long experience in taking delivery of spent fuel from LWR's. This activity is now fully industrialized. Great care is taken by COGEMA and their affiliates in this business, generally beyond the normal regulatory limits, and this is quite normal, COGEMA wanting to prevent, by all possible means, causes of incidents or accidents which could destroy the position it has established and the confidence placed in it by many customers. It is clear that the situation is quite different at reactors and at reprocessing plants; the limited number of flasks handled at reactors (in general five per year) is generally not enough to lead reactor operators to invest in sophisticated equipment and to adopt procedures allowing extremely small exposures of their personnel, while the great number of flasks received each year in a plant like La Hague (not fewer than 200 per year) justifies the investment in more specialized equipment (automation, remote operation, more sophisticated tools, etc.) and allows the personnel to be very well trained to that particular type of work. These are factors leading to very limited exposures of the personnel although the work performed in a repocessing plant is generally more complex (deeper decontamination, closer work, maintenance, etc.) than in a reactor

  17. A Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) for support of on orbit experiments

    Hancock, Thomas M., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a Modular Artificial Intelligence Inference Engine System (MAIS) support tool that would provide health and status monitoring, cognitive replanning, analysis and support of on-orbit Space Station, Spacelab experiments and systems.

  18. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 2: Requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratories. [for Spacelab

    1974-01-01

    The task phase concerned with the requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratory (COL) began with a definition of biomedical research areas and candidate research equipment, and then went on to develop conceptual layouts for COL which were each evaluated in order to arrive at a final conceptual design. Each step in this design/evaluation process concerned itself with man/systems integration research and hardware, and life support and protective systems research and equipment selection. COL integration studies were also conducted and include attention to electrical power and data management requirements, operational considerations, and shuttle/Spacelab interface specifications. A COL program schedule was compiled, and a cost analysis was finalized which takes into account work breakdown, annual funding, and cost reduction guidelines.

  19. Cybathlon experiences of the Graz BCI racing team Mirage91 in the brain-computer interface discipline.

    Statthaler, Karina; Schwarz, Andreas; Steyrl, David; Kobler, Reinmar; Höller, Maria Katharina; Brandstetter, Julia; Hehenberger, Lea; Bigga, Marvin; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2017-12-28

    In this work, we share our experiences made at the world-wide first CYBATHLON, an event organized by the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zürich), which took place in Zurich in October 2016. It is a championship for severely motor impaired people using assistive prototype devices to compete against each other. Our team, the Graz BCI Racing Team MIRAGE91 from Graz University of Technology, participated in the discipline "Brain-Computer Interface Race". A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device facilitating control of applications via the user's thoughts. Prominent applications include assistive technology such as wheelchairs, neuroprostheses or communication devices. In the CYBATHLON BCI Race, pilots compete in a BCI-controlled computer game. We report on setting up our team, the BCI customization to our pilot including long term training and the final BCI system. Furthermore, we describe CYBATHLON participation and analyze our CYBATHLON result. We found that our pilot was compliant over the whole time and that we could significantly reduce the average runtime between start and finish from initially 178 s to 143 s. After the release of the final championship specifications with shorter track length, the average runtime converged to 120 s. We successfully participated in the qualification race at CYBATHLON 2016, but performed notably worse than during training, with a runtime of 196 s. We speculate that shifts in the features, due to the nonstationarities in the electroencephalogram (EEG), but also arousal are possible reasons for the unexpected result. Potential counteracting measures are discussed. The CYBATHLON 2016 was a great opportunity for our student team. We consolidated our theoretical knowledge and turned it into practice, allowing our pilot to play a computer game. However, further research is required to make BCI technology invariant to non-task related changes of the EEG.

  20. Colour Association with Music Is Mediated by Emotion: Evidence from an Experiment Using a CIE Lab Interface and Interviews.

    Lindborg, PerMagnus; Friberg, Anders K

    2015-01-01

    Crossmodal associations may arise at neurological, perceptual, cognitive, or emotional levels of brain processing. Higher-level modal correspondences between musical timbre and visual colour have been previously investigated, though with limited sets of colour. We developed a novel response method that employs a tablet interface to navigate the CIE Lab colour space. The method was used in an experiment where 27 film music excerpts were presented to participants (n = 22) who continuously manipulated the colour and size of an on-screen patch to match the music. Analysis of the data replicated and extended earlier research, for example, that happy music was associated with yellow, music expressing anger with large red colour patches, and sad music with smaller patches towards dark blue. Correlation analysis suggested patterns of relationships between audio features and colour patch parameters. Using partial least squares regression, we tested models for predicting colour patch responses from audio features and ratings of perceived emotion in the music. Parsimonious models that included emotion robustly explained between 60% and 75% of the variation in each of the colour patch parameters, as measured by cross-validated R2. To illuminate the quantitative findings, we performed a content analysis of structured spoken interviews with the participants. This provided further evidence of a significant emotion mediation mechanism, whereby people tended to match colour association with the perceived emotion in the music. The mixed method approach of our study gives strong evidence that emotion can mediate crossmodal association between music and visual colour. The CIE Lab interface promises to be a useful tool in perceptual ratings of music and other sounds.

  1. Chronic multisite brain recordings from a totally implantable bidirectional neural interface: experience in 5 patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Swann, Nicole C; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Luciano, Marta San; Wang, Sarah S; Ziman, Nathan; Taylor, Robin; Starr, Philip A

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Dysfunction of distributed neural networks underlies many brain disorders. The development of neuromodulation therapies depends on a better understanding of these networks. Invasive human brain recordings have a favorable temporal and spatial resolution for the analysis of network phenomena but have generally been limited to acute intraoperative recording or short-term recording through temporarily externalized leads. Here, the authors describe their initial experience with an investigational, first-generation, totally implantable, bidirectional neural interface that allows both continuous therapeutic stimulation and recording of field potentials at multiple sites in a neural network. METHODS Under a physician-sponsored US Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption, 5 patients with Parkinson's disease were implanted with the Activa PC+S system (Medtronic Inc.). The device was attached to a quadripolar lead placed in the subdural space over motor cortex, for electrocorticography potential recordings, and to a quadripolar lead in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), for both therapeutic stimulation and recording of local field potentials. Recordings from the brain of each patient were performed at multiple time points over a 1-year period. RESULTS There were no serious surgical complications or interruptions in deep brain stimulation therapy. Signals in both the cortex and the STN were relatively stable over time, despite a gradual increase in electrode impedance. Canonical movement-related changes in specific frequency bands in the motor cortex were identified in most but not all recordings. CONCLUSIONS The acquisition of chronic multisite field potentials in humans is feasible. The device performance characteristics described here may inform the design of the next generation of totally implantable neural interfaces. This research tool provides a platform for translating discoveries in brain network dynamics to improved neurostimulation

  2. Colour Association with Music Is Mediated by Emotion: Evidence from an Experiment Using a CIE Lab Interface and Interviews

    Lindborg, PerMagnus; Friberg, Anders K.

    2015-01-01

    Crossmodal associations may arise at neurological, perceptual, cognitive, or emotional levels of brain processing. Higher-level modal correspondences between musical timbre and visual colour have been previously investigated, though with limited sets of colour. We developed a novel response method that employs a tablet interface to navigate the CIE Lab colour space. The method was used in an experiment where 27 film music excerpts were presented to participants (n = 22) who continuously manipulated the colour and size of an on-screen patch to match the music. Analysis of the data replicated and extended earlier research, for example, that happy music was associated with yellow, music expressing anger with large red colour patches, and sad music with smaller patches towards dark blue. Correlation analysis suggested patterns of relationships between audio features and colour patch parameters. Using partial least squares regression, we tested models for predicting colour patch responses from audio features and ratings of perceived emotion in the music. Parsimonious models that included emotion robustly explained between 60% and 75% of the variation in each of the colour patch parameters, as measured by cross-validated R 2. To illuminate the quantitative findings, we performed a content analysis of structured spoken interviews with the participants. This provided further evidence of a significant emotion mediation mechanism, whereby people tended to match colour association with the perceived emotion in the music. The mixed method approach of our study gives strong evidence that emotion can mediate crossmodal association between music and visual colour. The CIE Lab interface promises to be a useful tool in perceptual ratings of music and other sounds. PMID:26642050

  3. Spacelab Level 4 Programmatic Implementation Assessment Study. Volume 2: Ground Processing requirements

    1978-01-01

    Alternate ground processing options are summarized, including installation and test requirements for payloads, space processing, combined astronomy, and life sciences. The level 4 integration resource requirements are also reviewed for: personnel, temporary relocation, transportation, ground support equipment, and Spacelab flight hardware.

  4. Contemporary achievements in astronautics: Salyut-7, the Vega Project and Spacelab

    Kubasov, V. N.; Balebanov, V. M.; Goldovskiy, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The latest achievements in Soviet aeronautics are described; the new stage in the space program to study Venus using Soviet automated space probes, and the next space mission by cosmonauts to the Salyut-7 station. Information is also presented on the flight of the Spacelab orbiting laboratory created by Western European specialists.

  5. Graphical Interfaces for Simulation.

    Hollan, J. D.; And Others

    This document presents a discussion of the development of a set of software tools to assist in the construction of interfaces to simulations and real-time systems. Presuppositions to the approach to interface design that was used are surveyed, the tools are described, and the conclusions drawn from these experiences in graphical interface design…

  6. Interface superconductivity

    Gariglio, S., E-mail: stefano.gariglio@unige.ch [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Gabay, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bat 510, Université Paris-Sud 11, Centre d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Triscone, J.-M. [DQMP, Université de Genève, 24 Quai E.-Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We discuss interfacial superconductivity, a field boosted by the discovery of the superconducting interface between LaAlO. • This system allows the electric field control and the on/off switching of the superconducting state. • We compare superconductivity at the interface and in bulk doped SrTiO. • We discuss the role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. • We briefly discuss superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments. • Recent observations of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} are presented. - Abstract: Low dimensional superconducting systems have been the subject of numerous studies for many years. In this article, we focus our attention on interfacial superconductivity, a field that has been boosted by the discovery of superconductivity at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}. We explore the properties of this amazing system that allows the electric field control and on/off switching of superconductivity. We discuss the similarities and differences between bulk doped SrTiO{sub 3} and the interface system and the possible role of the interfacially induced Rashba type spin–orbit. We also, more briefly, discuss interface superconductivity in cuprates, in electrical double layer transistor field effect experiments, and the recent observation of a high T{sub c} in a monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3}.

  7. SimLabel: a graphical user interface to simulate continuous wave EPR spectra from site-directed spin labeling experiments.

    Etienne, E; Le Breton, N; Martinho, M; Mileo, E; Belle, V

    2017-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) combined with continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions in proteins. SDSL-EPR is based on the selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study, followed by cw EPR analysis. To extract valuable quantitative information from SDSL-EPR spectra and thus give reliable interpretation on biological system dynamics, numerical simulations of the spectra are required. Such spectral simulations can be carried out by coding in MATLAB using functions from the EasySpin toolbox. For non-expert users of MATLAB, this could be a complex task or even impede the use of such simulation tool. We developed a graphical user interface called SimLabel dedicated to run cw EPR spectra simulations particularly coming from SDSL-EPR experiments. Simlabel provides an intuitive way to visualize, simulate, and fit such cw EPR spectra. An example of SDSL-EPR spectra simulation concerning the study of an intrinsically disordered region undergoing a local induced folding is described and discussed. We believe that this new tool will help the users to rapidly obtain reliable simulated spectra and hence facilitate the interpretation of their results. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Evolution of Spacelab Ultraviolet Astronomy Missions from OSS-3 through -7 to Astro-1

    Gull, Theodore

    2018-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s, NASA was building towards a robust program in space astronomy. An evolutionary step from ground-based astronomy to space astronomy was human operation of space telescopes as astronomy in general evolved from astronomers directly at the telescope to application of computers and long distance communications to control to operate remote telescopes. Today ground-based telescopes and space observatories from cubesats to the Hubble Space Telescope and soon the James Webb Space Telescope are routinely operated remotely.In response to the Spacelab Announcement of Opportunity in the early 1980s, three ultraviolet experiments – the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope and the Wisconsin Ultraviolet PhotoPolarimetry Experiment -- all instruments derived from multiple sounding rocket flights--were selected to fly as an integrated payload attached to a space shuttle. The justification for professional astronomers, both as Mission Specialists from the astronaut cadre and Payload Specialists from the instrument teams, was built to ensure key technical skills both of the science and the instruments. Bundled together as OSS-3 through -7 flights focused on Comet Halley, the experiments went through many changes and delays as a pathfinder for an anticipated series of attached astronomy payloads.By 1986, the five-flight mission had evolved into two missions, Astro-1 dedicated primarily to observe Halley’s Comet in early March 1986 and Astro-2 to fly about one year later. Due to the Challenger disaster 35 days before scheduled launch of Astro-1, the mission went through an initial cancellation and then re-scheduling once the instrument complement of Astro-1 was expanded to include Broad Band X-ray Telescope with emphasis on studying SN1987A. Ultimately Astro-1 flew in December 1990 partnered with an X-ray experiment focused on SN1987A.The nine-day mission was mostly successful despite multiple technical issues overcome by the NASA

  9. Garbage collector interface

    Ive, Anders; Blomdell, Anders; Ekman, Torbjörn; Henriksson, Roger; Nilsson, Anders; Nilsson, Klas; Robertz, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the presented garbage collector interface is to provide a universal interface for many different implementations of garbage collectors. This is to simplify the integration and exchange of garbage collectors, but also to support incremental, non-conservative, and thread safe implementations. Due to the complexity of the interface, it is aimed at code generators and preprocessors. Experiences from ongoing implementations indicate that the garbage collector interface successfully ...

  10. Phase constitution and interface structure of nano-sized Ag-Cu/AlN multilayers: Experiment and ab initio modeling

    Pigozzi, Giancarlo; Janczak-Rusch, Jolanta; Passerone, Daniele; Antonio Pignedoli, Carlo; Patscheider, Joerg; Jeurgens, Lars P. H. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Antusek, Andrej [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); University of Rzeszow, Institute of Physics, ul. Rejtana 16a, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Bissig, Vinzenz [Kirsten Soldering AG, Hinterbergstrasse 32, CH-6330 Cham (Switzerland)

    2012-10-29

    Nano-sized Ag-Cu{sub 8nm}/AlN{sub 10nm} multilayers were deposited by reactive DC sputtering on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. Investigation of the phase constitution and interface structure of the multilayers evidences a phase separation of the alloy sublayers into nanosized grains of Ag and Cu. The interfaces between the Ag grains and the quasi-single-crystalline AlN sublayers are semi-coherent, whereas the corresponding Cu/AlN interfaces are incoherent. The orientation relationship between Ag and AlN is constant throughout the entire multilayer stack. These observations are consistent with atomistic models of the interfaces as obtained by ab initio calculations.

  11. Engineering of the chemical reactivity of the Ti/HfO₂ interface for RRAM: experiment and theory.

    Calka, Pauline; Sowinska, Malgorzata; Bertaud, Thomas; Walczyk, Damian; Dabrowski, Jarek; Zaumseil, Peter; Walczyk, Christian; Gloskovskii, Andrei; Cartoixà, Xavier; Suñé, Jordi; Schroeder, Thomas

    2014-04-09

    The Ti/HfO2 interface plays a major role for resistance switching performances. However, clear interface engineering strategies to achieve reliable and reproducible switching have been poorly investigated. For this purpose, we present a comprehensive study of the Ti/HfO2 interface by a combined experimental-theoretical approach. Based on the use of oxygen-isotope marked Hf*O2, the oxygen scavenging capability of the Ti layer is clearly proven. More importantly, in line with ab initio theory, the combined HAXPES-Tof-SIMS study of the thin films deposited by MBE clearly establishes a strong impact of the HfO2 thin film morphology on the Ti/HfO2 interface reactivity. Low-temperature deposition is thus seen as a RRAM processing compatible way to establish the critical amount of oxygen vacancies to achieve reproducible and reliable resistance switching performances.

  12. User-Centered Design, Experience, and Usability of an Electronic Consent User Interface to Facilitate Informed Decision-Making in an HIV Clinic.

    Ramos, S Raquel

    2017-11-01

    Health information exchange is the electronic accessibility and transferability of patient medical records across various healthcare settings and providers. In some states, patients have to formally give consent to allow their medical records to be electronically shared. The purpose of this study was to apply a novel user-centered, multistep, multiframework approach to design and test an electronic consent user interface, so patients with HIV can make more informed decisions about electronically sharing their health information. This study consisted of two steps. Step 1 was a cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study that used user-centric design interviews to create the user interface. This informed Step 2. Step 2 consisted of a one group posttest to examine perceptions of usefulness, ease of use, preference, and comprehension of a health information exchange electronic consent user interface. More than half of the study population had college experience, but challenges remained with overall comprehension regarding consent. The user interface was not independently successful, suggesting that in addition to an electronic consent user interface, human interaction may also be necessary to address the complexities associated with consenting to electronically share health information. Comprehension is key factor in the ability to make informed decisions.

  13. Transition of care: experiences and preferences of patients across the primary/secondary interface – a qualitative study

    Dekker Janny H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordination between care providers of different disciplines is essential to improve the quality of care, in particular for patients with chronic diseases. The way in which general practitioners (GP's and medical specialists interact has important implications for any healthcare system in which the GP plays the role of gatekeeper to specialist care. Patient experiences and preferences have proven to be increasingly important in discussing healthcare policy. The Dutch government initiated the development of a special website with information for patients on performance indicators of hospitals as well as information on illness or treatment. In the present study we focus on the transition of care at the primary – secondary interface with reference to the impact of patients' ability to make choices about their secondary care providers. The purpose of this study is to (a explore experiences and preferences of patients regarding the transition between primary and secondary care, (b study informational resources on illness/treatment desired by patients and (c determine how information supplied could make it easier for the patient to choose between different options for care (hospital or specialist. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured focus group interviews among 71 patients referred for various indications in the north and west of The Netherlands. Results Patients find it important that they do not have to wait, that they are taken seriously, and receive adequate and individually relevant information. A lack of continuity from secondary to primary care was experienced. The patient's desire for free choice of type of care did not arise in any of the focus groups. Conclusion Hospital discharge information needs to be improved. The interval between discharge from specialist care and the report of the specialist to the GP might be a suitable performance indicator in healthcare. Patients want to receive

  14. Kinetic Interface

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  15. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter - POLAR onboard the China’s Spacelab “Tiangong-2”

    Sun, Jianchao; BAO, T. W.; BATSCH, T.; BRITVITCH, I.; CADOUX, F.; DONG, Y. W.; GAUVIN, N.; HAJDAS, W.; KOLE, M.; LECHANOINE-LELUC, C.; LI, L.; MARCINKOWSKI, R.; ORSI, S.; POHL, M.; PRODUIT, N.; RAPIN, D.; RUTCZYNSKA, A.; RYBKA, D.; SZABELSKI, J.; WANG, R. J.; WU, B. B.; XIAO, H. L.; ZHANG, S. N.; ZHANG, Y. J.; ZWOLINSKA, A.

    2015-08-01

    POLAR is a novel compact space-borne Compton polarimeter conceived for a precise measurement of hard X-ray/Gamma-ray polarization and optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in the energy range 50 - 500 keV. The future detailed measurement of the polarization of GRB will lead to a better understanding of its radiation region geometry and emission mechanisms. Thanks to its remarkable properties on large effective area, field of view (4.14 sr or 1/3 of the visible sky) and obvious modulation factor, POLAR will be able to reach a minimum detectable polarization (1-σ level) of about 3% for several GRB measurements per year. POLAR consists of 25 detector modular units (DMU). Each DMU is composed of 64 low-Z plastic scintillator bars, read out by a flat-panel multi-anode photomultipliers and ASIC front-end electronics. The incoming photons undergo Compton scattering in the bars and produce a modulation pattern. Simulations and hard X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments have shown that the polarization degree and angle can be retrieved from this pattern with the accuracy necessary for pinning down the GRB mechanisms. A full flight model of POLAR has been constructed, in view of a flight on the Chinese spacelab TG-2 expected in 2016. The design of POLAR, Monte-Carlo simulation analysis as well as the performance test results will be all addressed in details in this talk.

  16. Linear mixed-effects models for within-participant psychology experiments: an introductory tutorial and free, graphical user interface (LMMgui).

    Magezi, David A

    2015-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMMs) are increasingly being used for data analysis in cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology, where within-participant designs are common. The current article provides an introductory review of the use of LMMs for within-participant data analysis and describes a free, simple, graphical user interface (LMMgui). LMMgui uses the package lme4 (Bates et al., 2014a,b) in the statistical environment R (R Core Team).

  17. In-silico experiments on characteristic time scale at a shear-free gas-liquid interface in fully developed turbulence

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi [Research Center for Compact Chemical System (CCS), AIST, 4-2-1 Nigatake, Miyagino, Sendai 983-8551 (Japan); Handler, Robert A, E-mail: ryuichi.nagaosa@aist.go.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States)

    2011-12-22

    The purpose of this study is to model scalar transfer mechanisms in a fully developed turbulence for accurate predictions of the turbulent scalar flux across a shear-free gas-liquid interface. The concept of the surface-renewal approximation (Dankwerts, 1951) is introduced in this study to establish the predictive models for the interfacial scalar flux. Turbulent flow realizations obtained by a direct numerical simulation technique are employed to prepare details of three-dimensional information on turbulence in the region very close to the interface. Two characteristic time scales at the interface have been examined for exact prediction of the scalar transfer flux. One is the time scale which is reciprocal of the root-mean-square surface divergence, T{sub {gamma}} = ({gamma}{gamma}){sup -1/2}, where {gamma} is the surface divergence. The other time scale to be examined is T{sub S} = {Lambda}/V, where {Lambda} is the zero-correlation length of the surface divergence as the interfacial length scale, and V is the root-mean-square velocity fluctuation in the streamwise direction as the interfacial velocity scale. The results of this study suggests that T{sub {gamma}} is slightly unsatisfactory to correlate the turbulent scalar flux at the gas-liquid interface based on the surface-renewal approximation. It is also found that the proportionality constant appear to be 0.19, which is different with that observed in the laboratory experiments, 0.34 (Komori, Murakami, and Ueda, 1989). It is concluded that the time scale, T{sub {gamma}}, is considered a different kind of the time scale observed in the laboratory experiments. On the other hand, the present in-silico experiments indicate that T{sub s} predicts the turbulent scalar flux based on the surface-renewal approximation in a satisfactory manner. It is also elucidated that the proportionality constant for T{sub s} is approximately 0.36, which is very close to that found by the laboratory experiments. This fact shows

  18. In-silico experiments on characteristic time scale at a shear-free gas-liquid interface in fully developed turbulence

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi; Handler, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to model scalar transfer mechanisms in a fully developed turbulence for accurate predictions of the turbulent scalar flux across a shear-free gas-liquid interface. The concept of the surface-renewal approximation (Dankwerts, 1951) is introduced in this study to establish the predictive models for the interfacial scalar flux. Turbulent flow realizations obtained by a direct numerical simulation technique are employed to prepare details of three-dimensional information on turbulence in the region very close to the interface. Two characteristic time scales at the interface have been examined for exact prediction of the scalar transfer flux. One is the time scale which is reciprocal of the root-mean-square surface divergence, T γ = (γγ) −1/2 , where γ is the surface divergence. The other time scale to be examined is T S = Λ/V, where Λ is the zero-correlation length of the surface divergence as the interfacial length scale, and V is the root-mean-square velocity fluctuation in the streamwise direction as the interfacial velocity scale. The results of this study suggests that T γ is slightly unsatisfactory to correlate the turbulent scalar flux at the gas-liquid interface based on the surface-renewal approximation. It is also found that the proportionality constant appear to be 0.19, which is different with that observed in the laboratory experiments, 0.34 (Komori, Murakami, and Ueda, 1989). It is concluded that the time scale, T γ , is considered a different kind of the time scale observed in the laboratory experiments. On the other hand, the present in-silico experiments indicate that T s predicts the turbulent scalar flux based on the surface-renewal approximation in a satisfactory manner. It is also elucidated that the proportionality constant for T s is approximately 0.36, which is very close to that found by the laboratory experiments. This fact shows that the time scale T s appears to be essentially the same as the time scale

  19. Research and technology, 1993. Salute to Skylab and Spacelab: Two decades of discovery

    1993-01-01

    A summary description of Skylab and Spacelab is presented. The section on Advanced Studies includes projects in space science, space systems, commercial use of space, and transportation systems. Within the Research Programs area, programs are listed under earth systems science, space physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Technology Programs include avionics, materials and manufacturing processes, mission operations, propellant and fluid management, structures and dynamics, and systems analysis and integration. Technology transfer opportunities and success are briefly described. A glossary of abbreviations and acronyms is appended as is a list of contract personnel within the program areas.

  20. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.; Ferguson, S.; Finch, M.; Frank, Z.; Kelly, G.; Lindgren, R.; Morrill, M.; Pope, T.; Reeves, R.; Rehse, R.; Shine, R.; Simon, G.; Harvey, J.; Leibacher, J.; Livingston, W.; November, L.; Zirker, J.

    The time sequences of diffraction limited granulation images obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter on Spacelab 2 are presented. The uncorrection autocorrelation limetime in magnetic regions is dominated by the 5-min oscillation. The removal of this oscillation causes the autocorrelation lifetime to increase by more than a factor of 2. The results suggest that a significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Horizontal displacements and transverse velocities in the intensity field are measured. Lower limits to the lifetime in the quiet and magnetic sun are set at 440 s and 950 s, respectively.

  1. A flexible user-interface for audiovisual presentation and interactive control in neurobehavioral experiments [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/wt

    Christopher T Noto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A major problem facing behavioral neuroscientists is a lack of unified, vendor-distributed data acquisition systems that allow stimulus presentation and behavioral monitoring while recording neural activity. Numerous systems perform one of these tasks well independently, but to our knowledge, a useful package with a straightforward user interface does not exist. Here we describe the development of a flexible, script-based user interface that enables customization for real-time stimulus presentation, behavioral monitoring and data acquisition. The experimental design can also incorporate neural microstimulation paradigms. We used this interface to deliver multimodal, auditory and visual (images or video stimuli to a nonhuman primate and acquire single-unit data. Our design is cost-effective and works well with commercially available hardware and software. Our design incorporates a script, providing high-level control of data acquisition via a sequencer running on a digital signal processor to enable behaviorally triggered control of the presentation of visual and auditory stimuli. Our experiments were conducted in combination with eye-tracking hardware. The script, however, is designed to be broadly useful to neuroscientists who may want to deliver stimuli of different modalities using any animal model.

  2. Interface Consistency

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  3. Interface models

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  4. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to the modernization of the interface man-machine

    Valdivia Martin, C.; Fernandez Illobre, L.; Trueba Alonso, P.; Cerezal Diez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows some of the experience gained during the application of the IFH to the modernization of the IHM. The experience of the application of IFH in modernization and modifications of design shows a positive effect, improving the IHM associated, with the acceptance of the end user. (Author)

  5. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a spacelab mission payload

    1976-01-01

    The Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) task flow is shown. Current progress is identified. The requirements generated in task 1 have been used to formulate an initial ACPL baseline design concept. ACPL design/functional features are illustrated. A timetable is presented of the routines for ACPL integration with the spacelab system.

  6. Development of flight experiment work performance and workstation interface requirements, part 1. Technical report and appendices A through G

    Hatterick, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A skill requirement definition method was applied to the problem of determining, at an early stage in system/mission definition, the skills required of on-orbit crew personnel whose activities will be related to the conduct or support of earth-orbital research. The experiment data base was selected from proposed experiments in NASA's earth orbital research and application investigation program as related to space shuttle missions, specifically those being considered for Sortie Lab. Concepts for two integrated workstation consoles for Sortie Lab experiment operations were developed, one each for earth observations and materials sciences payloads, utilizing a common supporting subsystems core console. A comprehensive data base of crew functions, operating environments, task dependencies, task-skills and occupational skills applicable to a representative cross section of earth orbital research experiments is presented. All data has been coded alphanumerically to permit efficient, low cost exercise and application of the data through automatic data processing in the future.

  7. Interfacing Detectors and Collecting Data for Large-Scale Experiments in High Energy Physics Using COTS Technology

    Schumacher, Jorn; Wandelli, Wainer

    Data-acquisition systems for high-energy physics experiments like the ATLAS experiment at the European particle-physics research institute CERN are used to record experimental physics data and are essential for the effective operation of an experiment. Located in underground facilities with limited space, power, cooling, and exposed to ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields, data-acquisition systems have unique requirements and are challenging to design and build. Traditionally, these systems have been composed of custom-designed electronic components to be able to cope with the large data volumes that high-energy physics experiments generate and at the same time meet technological and environmental requirements. Custom-designed electronics is costly to develop, effortful to maintain and typically not very flexible. This thesis explores an alternative architecture for data-acquisition systems based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A COTS-based data distribution device called FELIX that w...

  8. Upgrading the Interface and Developer Tools of the Trigger Supervisor Software Framework of the CMS experiment at CERN

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097518; Karsmakers, Peter

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Trigger Supervisor (TS) is a software framework that has been designed to handle the CMS Level-1 trigger setup, configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. The interface consists of a web-based GUI rendered by a back-end C++ framework (AjaXell) and a front-end JavaScript framework (Dojo). These provide developers with the tools they need to to write their own custom control panels. However, currently there is much frustration with this framework given the age of the Dojo library and the various hacks needed to implement modern use cases. The task at hand is to renew this library and its developer tools, updating it to use the newest standards and technologies, while maintaining full compatibility with legacy code. This document describes the requirements, development process, and changes to this framework that were included in the upgrade from v2.x to v3.x. Keywords: CERN, CMS, L1 Trigger, C++, Polymer, Web Com...

  9. Energy-level alignment and open-circuit voltage at graphene/polymer interfaces: theory and experiment

    Noori, Keian; Konios, Dimitrios; Stylianakis, Minas M.; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-03-01

    Functionalized graphene promises to become a key component of novel solar cell architectures, owing to its versatile ability to act either as transparent conductor, electron acceptor, or buffer layer. In spite of this promise, the solar energy conversion efficiency of graphene-based devices falls short of the performance of competing solution-processable photovoltaic technologies. Here we address the question of the maximum achievable open-circuit voltage of all-organic graphene: polymer solar cells using a combined theoretical/experimental approach, going from the atomic scale level to the device level. Our calculations on very large atomistic models of the graphene/polymer interface indicate that the ideal open-circuit voltage approaches one volt, and that epoxide functional groups can have a dramatic effect on the photovoltage. Our predictions are confirmed by direct measurements on complete devices where we control the concentration of functional groups via chemical reduction. Our findings indicate that the selective removal of epoxide groups and the use of ultradisperse polymers are key to achieving graphene solar cells with improved energy conversion efficiency.

  10. Control by personal computer and Interface 1

    Kim, Eung Mug; Park, Sun Ho

    1989-03-01

    This book consists of three chapters. The first chapter deals with basic knowledge of micro computer control which are computer system, micro computer system, control of the micro computer and control system for calculator. The second chapter describes Interface about basic knowledge such as 8255 parallel interface, 6821 parallel interface, parallel interface of personal computer, reading BCD code in parallel interface, IEEE-488 interface, RS-232C interface and transmit data in personal computer and a measuring instrument. The third chapter includes control experiment by micro computer, experiment by eight bit computer and control experiment by machine code and BASIC.

  11. Assessment of patient's experiences across the interface between primary and secondary care : Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    Berendsen, A.J.; Groenier, K.H.; de Jong, G.M.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; van der Veen, W.J.; Dekker, Janny; de Waal, M.W.M.; Schuling, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Development and validation of a questionnaire that measures patients' experiences of collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists. Methods: A questionnaire was developed using the method of the consumer quality index and validated in a cross-sectional study among a

  12. Ethical challenges that arise at the community interface of health research: village reporters' experiences in Western Kenya.

    Chantler, Tracey; Otewa, Faith; Onyango, Peter; Okoth, Ben; Odhiambo, Frank; Parker, Michael; Geissler, Paul Wenzel

    2013-04-01

    Community Engagement (CE) has been presented by bio-ethicists and scientists as a straightforward and unequivocal good which can minimize the risks of exploitation and ensure a fair distribution of research benefits in developing countries. By means of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Kenya between 2007 and 2009 we explored how CE is understood and enacted in paediatric vaccine trials conducted by the Kenyan Medical Research Institute and the US Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC). In this paper we focus on the role of paid volunteers who act as an interface between villagers KEMRI/CDC. Village Reporters' (VRs) position of being both with the community and with KEMRI/CDC is advantageous for the conduct of trials. However it is also problematic in terms of exercising trust, balancing allegiances and representing community views. VRs role is shaped by ambiguities related to their employment status and their dual accountability to researchers and their villages. VRs are understandably careful to stress their commitment to self-less community service since it augments their respectability at community level and opens up opportunities for financial gain and self-development. Simultaneously VRs association with KEMRI/CDC and proximity to trial participants requires them to negotiate implicit and explicit expectations for material and medical assistance in a cultural setting in which much importance is placed on sharing and mutuality. To ensure continuity of productive interactions between VRs, and similar community intermediaries, and researchers, open discussion is needed about the problematic aspects of relational ethics, issues concerning undue influence, power relations and negotiating expectations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Organic interfaces

    Poelman, W.A.; Tempelman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the consequences for product designers resulting from the replacement of traditional interfaces by responsive materials. Part 1 presents a theoretical framework regarding a new paradigm for man-machine interfacing. Part 2 provides an analysis of the opportunities offered by new

  14. Interface Realisms

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...

  15. System for data acquisition and processing on the base of the minicomputers and CAMAC interfaces in the experiments on the L-2 stellarator

    Blokh, M.A.; Kamolova, T.I.; Kutsenko, A.V.; Kutsenko, V.A.; Nechaev, YU.I.; Fedyanin, O.I.; Shelobkov, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The system for data acquisition and processing intended for automation of experiments on the L-2 stellarator is described. Hardware peculiarities and sofrware flowsheet are considered. The system is realized on the base of the TRAI minicomputer and CAMAC modules. The system provides data input from diagnostic sensors into the computer memory during the stellarator operational pulse and preliminary data processing in the interval between stellarator pulses, putout of the results a display device or a printer. For programming the Focal language is chosen. CAMAC module control and organization of the whole numbers massive for experimental data storage is realized by means of new functions written in Assembler. The system successfully operates since 1976. In 1978 the system is switched on through the CAMAC interfaces to the EC computer in order to provide the long-term information storage

  16. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of exposure to microgravity on pituitary gland was investigated by examining cells isolated from anterior pituitaries of rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission and, subsequently, cultured for 6 days. Compared with ground controls, flight cells contained more intracellular growth hormone (GH); however, the flight cells released less GH over the 6-day culture period and after implantation into hypophysectomized rats than did the control cells. Compared with control rats, glands from large rats (400 g) contained more somatotrophs (44 percent compared with 37 percent in control rats); small rats (200 g) showed no difference. No major differences were found in the somatotroph ultrastructure (by TEM) or in the pattern of the immunoactive GH variants. However, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that flight cells released much less of a biologically active high-molecular weight GH variant, suggesting that space flight may lead to secretory dysfunction.

  17. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section. Part B: Thesis projects. Final science report

    Pickett, J.S.; Frank, L.A.; Kurth, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, 1985, through June 30, 1988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). Three Master's and three Ph.D. theses were written using PDP instrumentation data. These theses are listed in Volume 2, Part B

  18. Plasma diagnostics package. Volume 2: Spacelab 2 section. Part B: Thesis projects

    Pickett, Jolene S. (Compiler); Frank, L. A. (Compiler); Kurth, W. S. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    This volume (2), which consists of two parts (A and B), of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) Final Science Report contains a summary of all of the data reduction and scientific analyses which were performed using PDP data obtained on STS-51F as a part of the Spacelab 2 (SL-2) payload. This work was performed during the period of launch, July 29, 1985, through June 30, 1988. During this period the primary data reduction effort consisted of processing summary plots of the data received by 12 of the 14 instruments located on the PDP and submitting these data to the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). Three Master's and three Ph.D. theses were written using PDP instrumentation data. These theses are listed in Volume 2, Part B.

  19. Man in space - A time for perspective. [crew performance on Space Shuttle-Spacelab program

    Winter, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Factors affecting crew performances in long-term space flights are examined with emphasis on the Space Shuttle-Spacelab program. Biomedical investigations carried out during four Skylab missions indicate that initially rapid changes in certain physiological parameters, notably in cardiovascular response and red-blood-cell levels, lead to an adapted condition. Calcium loss remains a potential problem. Space Shuttle environmental control and life-support systems are described together with technology facilitating performance of mission objectives in a weightless environment. It is concluded that crew requirements are within the physical and psychological capability of astronauts, but the extent to which nonastronaut personnel will be able to participate without extensive training and pre-conditioning remains to be determined.

  20. Interim Report of the Astronomy Spacelab Payloads Study. Volume 2; Ultraviolet and Optical Astronomy

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle will comprise NASA's primary transportation system into near-earth orbit during the 1980s. The Shuttle will provide the astronomical community with a major new capability to send a wide variety of instrumentation into orbit, to utilize it there under manned or automatic control for periods from seven to thirty days, and to return it to the ground. To this end the European Space Research Organization (ESRO) is developing Spacelab, an array of interchangeable components -pressurized manned modules, unpressurized pallets and related support systems - to be mounted in the Shuttle payload bay. Spacelab will offer important opportunities to carry out astronomical research with instruments optimized for specific objectives. With a high flight frequency and with the ability to modify or interchange telescopes and instruments between flights, one will not need to make rigid long-term commitments to specific and compromised telescope/instrument/ detector combinations as is the case for automated satellites. Observational techniques demanding the physical return of data and equipment - in particular the use of photographic film, instruments requiring tight calibration controls, cryogens, high-risk detectors and degradeable optical coatings -will open research areas not readily addressed by automated satellites. Although Shuttle flight duration will be limited to periods from seven to thirty days, substantial data can be obtained with a single instrument on short missions, if targets are carefully selected and prioritized, and a large number of instruments can be accommodated on a single flight. Important astronomical data are regularly obtained on sounding rocket flights of five minutes duration. Spacelab will provide far longer observing periods for large and small telescopes, with resources greatly exceeding those of sounding rockets, while retaining much of the sounding rocket philosophy in terms of instrument flexibility, simplicity, reliability

  1. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  2. Microprocessor interfacing

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  3. Experience for plant monitoring design in Italian BWR NPP and future trends in man-machine interface

    Maestri, F.; Sepielli, M.

    1987-01-01

    TMI accidental sequence and daily-gained operating experience on italian and abroad NPPs have affected in depth the approach to the design of information presentation to the Control Room staff. It has been cleared that most problems in plant operation arise from a poor and inadequate information system. The main lacks have been identified in the Control Room lay-out and information organization. This has pushed designers both to improve the Control Room environment and to better exploit the computer data processing and data presentation capabilities. The paper deals with the basic criteria for the design and the design review of a computerized system to be inserted in a hybrid Control Room in Italian 981 Mwe BWR-6 NPP, where the concepts outlined above were taken-up from the very beginning. The Control Room keeps conventional instrumentation arranged in a human-factor lay-out, according to post-TMI requirements, and adds a powerful computer-based information system for advanced alarm presentation and plant supervision during both normal and emergency conditions with high data reliability. Colour videounits and operating panels are functionally integrated to create powerful operator work-stations. Emphasis is mostly given on the revision work for video-unit displays and Man-System Communication carried out in cooperation with Halden Reactor Project human factor and plant operation experts. The work peculiarity has been a strong care on the integration between conventional and computerized information presentation, with particular regard to common information and code consistency. (author)

  4. Summary of experience and practice in Japanese nuclear desalination plants at the interface between nuclear and desalination systems

    Shiota, Y.; Minato, A.

    1998-01-01

    The widely prevalent large scale desalination of seawater is accomplished by two primary methods: Distillation and reverse osmosis (RO). In any case, an external energy supply source is mandatory for the operation of the desalination plants. Reverse Osmosis is more energy efficient than distillation. The energy input for RO is usually supplied by electric power, whereas thermal energy is extracted from an electric power plant for the distillation processes (dual purpose plant). There are no impediments in using nuclear power plants to supply energy to desalination plants in an integral site. However, it is essential to eliminate the possibility of penetration of radioactive contamination into produced water. Besides, the investigation of possible back-up facilities is detrimental to meet the demand of electric power and water. In accordance with the Japanese regulations, a nuclear power plant cannot be operated if any amount of radioactive contamination resulted from the failure of fuel is detected in the cooling water. In our experience, we have found that no special provisions and no additional selection criteria are needed to install the desalination plants within the nuclear power plants, except for the carbon steel shell utilized for the RO module. (author)

  5. Photo-induced charge transfer at heterogeneous interfaces: Dye-sensitized tin disulfide, the theory and the experiment

    Lanzafame, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The study of photo-induced charge transfer is an endeavor that spans the entire industrial period of man's history. Its great importance demands an ever greater understanding of its underlying principles. The work discussed here attempts to probe elementary aspects of the charge transfer process. Investigations into the theory of charge transfer reactions are made in an attempt to isolate the relevant parameters. An analytical discussion is made of a simple Golden Rule type rate equation to describe the transfer kinetics. Then a quantum simulation is carried out to follow the wavefunction propagation as a test of the applicability of the assumptions made in deriving the simpler rate equation. Investigation of charge transfer at surfaces is bet served by the application of ultrafast optical spectroscopies to probe carrier dynamics. A discussion of the properties of the short pulse laser systems employed is included along with a discussion of the different optical spectroscopies available. These tools are then brought to bear upon dye-sensitized SnS 2 , a model system for the study of charge injection processes. The unique properties of the semiconductor are discussed with respect to the charge transfer process. The unique properties of the semiconductor are discussed with respect to the charge transfer process. The optical experiments performed on the dye/SnS 2 systems elucidate the fundamental carrier dynamics and these dynamics are discussed within the theoretical framework to provide a complete picture of the charge transfer kinetics

  6. Transport and reaction kinetics at the glass:solution interface region: results of repository-oriented leaching experiments

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bates, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Repository-oriented leaching experiments involving Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 165 type glass under a γ-radiation field (1 +/- 0.2 x 10 4 R/h) have been performed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. In this communication, they discuss glass surface analyses obtained by SEM, nuclear resonance profiling, and SIMS together with leachate solution data in relation to a mechanism that couples diffusion, hydrolysis (etching and gelation), and precipitation to qualitatively describe the release of different glass components to the leachant solutions. The release of mobile (e.g., Li) and partly mobile (e.g., B) species is controlled primarily by interdiffusion with water species across the interdiffusion zone. Glass components that are immobile in the interdiffusion zone are released to the solution by etching. For prediction of long-term steady-state concentrations of glass components with low solubility, the relative rates of release from the glass and secondary mineral precipitation must be taken into account. 20 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  7. Interface Anywhere

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  8. Investigating the Role of Hydrologic Residence Time in Nitrogen Transformations at the Sediment-Water Interface using Controlled Variable Head Experiments

    Hampton, T. B.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Briggs, M. A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2017-12-01

    Many important biogeochemical processes governing both carbon and nitrogen dynamics in streams take place at the sediment-water interface (SWI). This interface is highly variable in biogeochemical function, with stream stage often influencing the magnitude and direction of water and solute exchange through the SWI. It is well known that the SWI can be an important location for carbon and nitrogen transformations, including denitrification and greenhouse gas production. The degree of mixing of carbon and nitrate, along with oxygen from surface waters, is strongly influenced by hydrologic exchange at the SWI. We hypothesize that hydrologic residence time, which is also determined by the magnitude of exchange, is a key control on the fate of nitrate at the SWI and on the end products of denitrification. Previous studies in the headwaters of the Ipswich River in MA as part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiments (LINX II) and other long-term monitoring suggest that the Ipswich River SWI represents an important source of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. Using a novel constant-head infiltrometer ring embedded in the stream sediments, we created four unique controlled down-welling (i.e., recharge) conditions, and tested how varying this hydrologic flux and thus the residence time distribution influenced biogeochemical function of the Ipswich River SWI. Specifically, we added isotopically-labelled 15N-nitrate to stream water during each controlled hydrologic flux experiment to quantify nitrate transformation rates, including denitrification end products, under the different hydrologic conditions. We also measured a suite of carbon and nitrogen solutes, along with dissolved oxygen conditions throughout each experiment to characterize the broader residence timescale and biogeochemical responses to the hydrologic manipulations. Initial results show that the oxic conditions of the SWI were strongly responsive to changes in hydrologic flux rates, thereby changing the

  9. An interactive computer approach to performing resource analysis for a multi-resource/multi-project problem. [Spacelab inventory procurement planning

    Schlagheck, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    New planning techniques and supporting computer tools are needed for the optimization of resources and costs for space transportation and payload systems. Heavy emphasis on cost effective utilization of resources has caused NASA program planners to look at the impact of various independent variables that affect procurement buying. A description is presented of a category of resource planning which deals with Spacelab inventory procurement analysis. Spacelab is a joint payload project between NASA and the European Space Agency and will be flown aboard the Space Shuttle starting in 1980. In order to respond rapidly to the various procurement planning exercises, a system was built that could perform resource analysis in a quick and efficient manner. This system is known as the Interactive Resource Utilization Program (IRUP). Attention is given to aspects of problem definition, an IRUP system description, questions of data base entry, the approach used for project scheduling, and problems of resource allocation.

  10. Tribology experiment. [journal bearings and liquid lubricants

    Wall, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional concept for Spacelab rack 7 was developed to study the interaction of liquid lubricants and surfaces under static and dynamic conditions in a low-gravity environment fluid wetting and spreading experiments of a journal bearing experiments, and means to accurately measure and record the low-gravity environment during experimentation are planned. The wetting and spreading process of selected commercial lubricants on representative surface are to the observes in a near-zero gravity environment.

  11. A critical review of the life sciences project management at Ames Research Center for the Spacelab Mission development test 3

    Helmreich, R. L.; Wilhelm, J. M.; Tanner, T. A.; Sieber, J. E.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    A management study was initiated by ARC (Ames Research Center) to specify Spacelab Mission Development Test 3 activities and problems. This report documents the problems encountered and provides conclusions and recommendations to project management for current and future ARC life sciences projects. An executive summary of the conclusions and recommendations is provided. The report also addresses broader issues relevant to the conduct of future scientific missions under the constraints imposed by the space environment.

  12. Transport processes at fluidic interfaces

    Reusken, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    There are several physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of multiphase fluid systems – e.g., the fluid dynamics in the different phases and the dynamics of the interface(s), mass transport between the fluids, adsorption effects at the interface, and transport of surfactants on the interface – and result in heterogeneous interface properties. In general, these processes are strongly coupled and local properties of the interface play a crucial role. A thorough understanding of the behavior of such complex flow problems must be based on physically sound mathematical models, which especially account for the local processes at the interface. This book presents recent findings on the rigorous derivation and mathematical analysis of such models and on the development of numerical methods for direct numerical simulations. Validation results are based on specifically designed experiments using high-resolution experimental techniques. A special feature of this book is its focus on an interdisciplina...

  13. High temperature interface superconductivity

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • This review article covers the topic of high temperature interface superconductivity. • New materials and techniques used for achieving interface superconductivity are discussed. • We emphasize the role played by the differences in structure and electronic properties at the interface with respect to the bulk of the constituents. - Abstract: High-T_c superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-T_c Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  14. Designing Interfaces

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  15. User Experience May be Producing Greater Heart Rate Variability than Motor Imagery Related Control Tasks during the User-System Adaptation in Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz M.; Gutiérrez-Begovich, David A.; Argüello-García, Janet; Sepulveda, Francisco; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) is technology that is developing fast, but it remains inaccurate, unreliable and slow due to the difficulty to obtain precise information from the brain. Consequently, the involvement of other biosignals to decode the user control tasks has risen in importance. A traditional way to operate a BCI system is via motor imagery (MI) tasks. As imaginary movements activate similar cortical structures and vegetative mechanisms as a voluntary movement does, heart rate variability (HRV) has been proposed as a parameter to improve the detection of MI related control tasks. However, HR is very susceptible to body needs and environmental demands, and as BCI systems require high levels of attention, perceptual processing and mental workload, it is important to assess the practical effectiveness of HRV. The present study aimed to determine if brain and heart electrical signals (HRV) are modulated by MI activity used to control a BCI system, or if HRV is modulated by the user perceptions and responses that result from the operation of a BCI system (i.e., user experience). For this purpose, a database of 11 participants who were exposed to eight different situations was used. The sensory-cognitive load (intake and rejection tasks) was controlled in those situations. Two electrophysiological signals were utilized: electroencephalography and electrocardiography. From those biosignals, event-related (de-)synchronization maps and event-related HR changes were respectively estimated. The maps and the HR changes were cross-correlated in order to verify if both biosignals were modulated due to MI activity. The results suggest that HR varies according to the experience undergone by the user in a BCI working environment, and not because of the MI activity used to operate the system. PMID:27458384

  16. Experimental determination and chemical modelling of radiolytic processes at the spent fuel/water interface. Experiments carried out in carbonate solutions in absence and presence of chloride

    Bruno, Jordi; Cera, Esther; Grive, Mireia; Duro, Lara [Enviros Spain SL (Spain); Eriksen, Trygve [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    We report on the recent experimental and modelling results of a research programme that started in 1995. The aim has been to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that control the radiolytic generation of oxidants and reductants at the spent fuel water interface and their consequences for spent fuel matrix stability and radionuclide release. This has been done by carrying out well-controlled dissolution experiments of PWR Ringhals spent fuel fragments in an initially anoxic closed system and by using different solution compositions. Experimental series started with several tests carried out with deionised water as solvent, in a second phase experiments were conducted with 10 mM bicarbonate solutions. New experimental series were set up during the last two years by using the same bicarbonate content in solutions with varying NaCl concentrations in order to ascertain the role of this ligand on the radiolytic products and its consequence for radionuclide release. The selected NaCl concentrations are in the range of 0.1 to 10 mM. Experimental data shows that uranium dissolution at early contact times is controlled by the oxidation of the UO{sub 2} matrix. This process controls the co-dissolution of most of the analysed radionuclides, including Sr, Mo, Tc, Np and surprisingly enough, Cs. In the overall the release rates for U and the matrix associated radionuclides are in the range of 10{sup -6} moles/day with a clear decreasing trend with exposure time and after 2 years the initial release rates have decreased down to 3x10{sup -8} moles/day. The solubility of the released actinides appears to be limited by the formation of An(IV) hydroxide phases, although Np concentrations in solution did not reach solubility levels during the time intervals of the present tests. No secondary solid phase appears to control the solubility of the rest of the elements.

  17. Interface unit

    Keyson, D.V.; Freudenthal, A.; De Hoogh, M.P.A.; Dekoven, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to an interface unit comprising at least a display unit for communication with a user, which is designed for being coupled with a control unit for at least one or more parameters in a living or working environment, such as the temperature setting in a house, which control unit

  18. Salivary gland ultrastructure and cyclic AMP-dependent reactions in Spacelab 3 rats

    Mednieks, M.I.; Hand, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Environmental stimuli influencing catecholamine levels induce changes in cyclic AMP-dependent reactions and cell morphology in the rat parotid. Responses of salivary glands to spaceflight were determined by measurement of cyclic AMP-mediated reactions in fresh-frozen salivary glands and by microscopic evaluation of ultrastructure in fixed parotid glands. Decreased cell-free protein phosphorylation, determined by autoradiography, occurred in parotid glands in three of five flight animals. Protein kinase activity ratios were decreased in the soluble and increased in the particulate fractions of Spacelab 3 (SL-3) rat sublingual glands, compared with ground controls. Biochemical analyses show that effects of space flight on salivary glands are similar to those induced experimentally by physiological manipulation or alteration of catecholamine levels. Morphological evaluation of three SL-3 rat parotid glands showed increased numbers of lysosomes, autophagic vacuoles containing degenerating secretory product, and accumulation of lipid droplets. Since these animals lost weight, consistent with disruption of food and water consumption, morphological changes may in part be due to decreased masticatory stimulation, as occurs with reduced food intake or a liquid diet. The observed changes may reflect physiological responses of the gastrointestinal and autonomic systems to effects of spaceflight

  19. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution

  20. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-11-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution.

  1. Using Advances in Research on Louisiana Coastal Restoration and Protection to Develop Undergraduate Hydrology Education Experiences Delivered via a Web Interface

    Bodin, M.; Habib, E. H.; Meselhe, E. A.; Visser, J.; Chimmula, S.

    2014-12-01

    Utilizing advances in hydrologic research and technology, learning modules can be developed to deliver visual, case-based, data and simulation driven educational experiences. This paper focuses on the development of web modules based on case studies in Coastal Louisiana, one of three ecosystems that comprise an ongoing hydrology education online system called HydroViz. The Chenier Plain ecosystem in Coastal Louisiana provides an abundance of concepts and scenarios appropriate for use in many undergraduate water resource and hydrology curricula. The modules rely on a set of hydrologic data collected within the Chenier Plain along with inputs and outputs of eco-hydrology and vegetation-change simulation models that were developed to analyze different restoration and protection projects within the 2012 Louisiana Costal Master Plan. The modules begin by investigating the basic features of the basin and it hydrologic characteristics. The eco-hydrology model is then introduced along with its governing equations, numerical solution scheme and how it represents the study domain. Concepts on water budget in a coastal basin are then introduced using the simulation model inputs, outputs and boundary conditions. The complex relationships between salinity, water level and vegetation changes are then investigated through the use of the simulation models and associated field data. Other student activities focus on using the simulation models to evaluate tradeoffs and impacts of actual restoration and protection projects that were proposed as part of 2012 Louisiana Master Plan. The hands-on learning activities stimulate student learning of hydrologic and water management concepts by providing real-world context and opportunity to build fundamental knowledge as well as practical skills. The modules are delivered through a carefully designed user interface using open source and free technologies which enable wide dissemination and encourage adaptation by others.

  2. Horn amplification at a tyre/road interface. Pt. 1. Experiment and computation; Tire/romenkan ni okeru horn koka. Jikken to keisan

    Fujikawa, T. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    Tyre/road interface noise can be amplified by a horn type space formed by the tread face of the tyre and the road. This paper is a report on studies on experiment and computation to elucidate the above phenomenon in detail. Measurement and computation were carried out on a tyre replaced with a single cylinder, whereas it was verified that the horn effect by each frequency can be calculated by BEM computation. Then, discussions were given on actual tyres combined with the BEM computation, and the following results were acquired: (1) the horn effect is small in zones of low frequencies; (2) the larger the tread width, the larger the horn effect increases; (3) the relationship between the tread width and the horn effect is governed by the ratio of the road contact width to noise wavelength; (4) the frequency characteristics of the horn effect vary largely according to whether the sound source exists in forward or rearward locations; (5) the relationship between the forward and rearward locations of the sound source with the horn effect is governed by the distance between the front and rear ends of the road contact face of the tyre; (6) the smaller the radius of the tread shoulder, the greater the horn effect; (7) tread deformation due to load applied on the tyre slightly changes the frequency characteristics of the horn effect; (8) with the sound source existing closer to the center of ground contacting width, the horn effect increases; and (9) the present study has verified the horn effect of 22 dB as the maximum. If the sound source is not present at the center of ground contacting width, the horn effect is reduced to about 10 dB, but the value cannot be ignored as the influence on traffic noise. (translated by NEDO)

  3. VMEbus interface for spectroscopy ADCs

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, M.

    1987-01-01

    A high performance VMEbus interface for spectroscopy ADCs and other similar devices used in nuclear spectroscopy coincidence experiments has been developed. This new module can be used to interface existing spectroscopy ADCs with fast parallel data transfer into the industry standard multiprocessor VMEbus. The unit provides a fast direct readout of the ADC data into the VMEbus memory. The interface also has built-in capabilities that enable it to be used in coincidence experiments for slow data timing and ADC pattern recognition. (orig.)

  4. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (235U < 20 pct) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing consisted of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates were fabricated using a friction bonding process, tested in INL's advanced test reactor (ATR), and then subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. In the samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface, possible indications of porosity/debonding were found, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  5. Soft Interfaces

    Strzalkowski, Ireneusz

    1997-01-01

    This book presents an extended form of the 1994 Dirac Memorial Lecture delivered by Pierre Gilles de Gennes at Cambridge University. The main task of the presentation is to show the beauty and richness of structural forms and phenomena which are observed at soft interfaces between two media. They are much more complex than forms and phenomena existing in each phase separately. Problems are discussed including both traditional, classical techniques, such as the contact angle in static and dynamic partial wetting, as well as the latest research methodology, like 'environmental' scanning electron microscopes. The book is not a systematic lecture on phenomena but it can be considered as a compact set of essays on topics which particularly fascinate the author. The continuum theory widely used in the book is based on a deep molecular approach. The author is particularly interested in a broad-minded rheology of liquid systems at interfaces with specific emphasis on polymer melts. To study this, the author has developed a special methodology called anemometry near walls. The second main topic presented in the book is the problem of adhesion. Molecular processes, energy transformations and electrostatic interaction are included in an interesting discussion of the many aspects of the principles of adhesion. The third topic concerns welding between two polymer surfaces, such as A/A and A/B interfaces. Of great worth is the presentation of various unsolved, open problems. The kind of topics and brevity of description indicate that this book is intended for a well prepared reader. However, for any reader it will present an interesting picture of how many mysterious processes are acting in the surrounding world and how these phenomena are perceived by a Nobel Laureate, who won that prize mainly for his investigations in this field. (book review)

  6. Interface Screenings

    Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2015-01-01

    In Wim Wenders' film Until the End of the World (1991), three different diagrams for the visual integration of bodies are presented: 1) GPS tracking and mapping in a landscape, 2) video recordings layered with the memory perception of these recordings, and 3) data-created images from dreams...... and memories. From a transvisual perspective, the question is whether or not these (by now realized) diagrammatic modes involving the body in ubiquitous global media can be analysed in terms of the affects and events created in concrete interfaces. The examples used are filmic as felt sensations...

  7. Influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters of a two-layer structure in photoacoustic experiments

    Aguirre, N Munoz; Perez, L MartInez; Garibay-Febles, V; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2004-01-01

    From the theoretical point of view, the influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters in a two-layer structure of the photoacoustic technique is discussed. It is shown that the effective thermal parameters depend strongly upon the thermal resistance value associated with the solid-gas interface. New expressions for the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in the low frequency limit are obtained. In the high frequency limit, the 'resonant' behaviour of the effective thermal diffusivity is maintained and a new complex dependence on frequency of the effective thermal conductivity is shown

  8. Museets interface

    Pold, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Søren Pold gør sig overvejelser med udgangspunkt i museumsprojekterne Kongedragter.dk og Stigombord.dk. Han argumenterer for, at udviklingen af internettets interfaces skaber nye måder at se, forstå og interagere med kulturen på. Brugerne får nye medievaner og perceptionsmønstre, der må medtænkes i...... tilrettelæggelsen af den fremtidige formidling. Samtidig får museets genstande en ny status som flygtige ikoner i det digitale rum, og alt i alt inviterer det til, at museerne kan forholde sig mere åbent og eksperimenterende til egen praksis og rolle som kulturinstitution....

  9. Reactive transport of CO2-rich fluids in simulated wellbore interfaces : Flow-through experiments on the 1–6 m length scale

    Wolterbeek, Timotheus K.T.; Peach, Colin J.; Raoof, Amir; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Debonding at casing-cement interfaces poses a leakage pathway risk that may compromise well integrity in CO2 storage systems. The present study addresses the effects of long-range, CO2-induced, reactive transport on the conductance of such interfacial pathways. This is done by means of reactive

  10. Erratum to : Modeling of complex interfaces for pendant drop experiments (Rheologica Acta, , 55, 10, (801-822), 10.1007/s00397-016-0956-1)

    Balemans, C.; Hulsen, M.A.; Tervoort, T.A.; Anderson, P.D.

    2017-01-01

    The original version of this article unfortunately contained mistakes. Theo A. Tervoort was not listed among the authors. The correct information is given above. In Balemans et al. (2016), an axisymmetric finite element model is presented to study the behaviour of complex interfaces in pendant drop

  11. Human-machine interface upgrade

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The article describes a new human-machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human-machine interface upgrade was completed in the summer 2001. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between the reactor operator and the nuclear reactor I and C. The second display is a graphical one. It presents the status of the reactor, principal parameters (as power, period), control rods positions, course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human-machine interface was produced with the InTouch developing tool of the Wonder-Ware Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors to the reactor. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the new human-machine interface with the present reactor I and C. The new human-machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the comfort and safety of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support for foreign visitors. (orig.)

  12. Interfaces habladas

    María Teresa Soto Sanfiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo describe y piensa al fenómeno de las Interfaces habladas (IH desde variados puntos de vista y niveles de análisis. El texto se ha concebido con los objetivos específicos de: 1.- procurar una visión panorámica de aspectos de la producción y consumo comunicativo de las IH; 2.- ofrecer recomendaciones para su creación y uso eficaz, y 3.- llamar la atención sobre su proliferación e inspirar su estudio desde la comunicación. A pesar de la creciente presencia de las IF en nues-tras vidas cotidianas, hay ausencia de textos que las caractericen y analicen por sus aspectos comunicativos. El trabajo es pertinente porque el fenómeno significa un cambio respecto a estadios comunica-tivos precedentes con consecuencias en las concepciones intelectuales y emocionales de los usuarios. La proliferación de IH nos abre a nue-vas realidades comunicativas: hablamos con máquinas.

  13. The impact of interface design during an initial high-technology AAC experience: a collective case study of people with aphasia.

    Dietz, Aimee; Weissling, Kristy; Griffith, Julie; McKelvey, Miechelle; Macke, Devan

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this collective case study was to describe the communication behaviors of five people with chronic aphasia when they retold personal narratives to an unfamiliar communication partner using four variants of a visual scene display (VSD) interface. The results revealed that spoken language comprised roughly 70% of expressive modality units; variable patterns of use for other modalities emerged. Although inconsistent across participants, several people with aphasia experienced no trouble sources during the retells using VSDs with personally relevant photographs and text boxes. Overall, participants perceived the personally relevant photographs and the text as helpful during the retells. These patterns may serve as a springboard for future experimental investigations regarding how interface design influences the communicative and linguistic performance of people with aphasia.

  14. Playful user interfaces interfaces that invite social and physical interaction

    2014-01-01

    The book is about user interfaces to applications that have been designed for social and physical interaction. The interfaces are ‘playful’, that is, users feel challenged to engage in social and physical interaction because that will be fun. The topics that will be present in this book are interactive playgrounds, urban games using mobiles, sensor-equipped environments for playing, child-computer interaction, tangible game interfaces, interactive tabletop technology and applications, full-body interaction, exertion games, persuasion, engagement, evaluation, and user experience. Readers of the book will not only get a survey of state-of-the-art research in these areas, but the chapters in this book will also provide a vision of the future where playful interfaces will be ubiquitous, that is, present and integrated in home, office, recreational, sports and urban environments, emphasizing that in the future in these environments game elements will be integrated and welcomed.

  15. Space experiments with particle accelerators: SEPAC

    Obayashi, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the program of the space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) is described. The SEPAC is to be prepared for the Space Shuttle/First Spacelab Mission. It is planned in the SEPAC to carry out the active and interactive experiments on and in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. It is also intended to make an initial performance test for the overall program of Spacelab/SEPAC experiments. The instruments to be used are electron beam accelerators, MPD arcjects, and associated diagnostic equipments. The main scientific objectives of the experiments are Vehicle Charge Neutralization, Beam Plasma Physics, and Beam Atmosphere Interactions. The SEPAC system consists of the following subsystems. Those are accelerators, monitoring and diagnostic equipments, and control and data management equipments. The SEPAC functional objectives for experiment operations are SEPAC system checkout, EBA firing test, MPD firing test, electron beam experiments, plasma beam propagation, artificial aurora excitation, equatorial aerochemistry, electron echo experiment, E parallel B experiment, passive experiments, SEPAC system deactivation, and battery charging. Most experiment procedures are carried out by the pre-set computer program. (Kato, T.)

  16. Experimental investigation of interface conditions between oxidic melt and ablating concrete during MCCI by means of simulating material experiments: the Artemis program

    Veteau, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DTN/SE2T/LPTM, 17 rue des Martyrs 38 - Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame work of R and D on Severe Accidents in PWR plants, an estimation by codes of time of basemat melt-through by Corium is required. For this, the heat flux distribution along the cavity wall must be properly modelled. Hence the knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient as well as the temperature at the interface between the melt and the solid become key issues. Phase diagram of the melt and composition governs the interface temperature which controls, at least partly, the thickness of the Corium crust formed on the molten concrete. Crust behaviour (time evolution of thickness, mechanical interaction with gas) implies a release mode of molten concrete in Corium which in turn alters the melt composition. Clearly, the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomenon is the result of a strong coupling between physico-chemistry and thermohydraulics. The main goal of the first test series of the Artemis program is to make a link between the interface temperature and the physico-chemistry of the melt (phase diagram) through tests conducted with simulating materials and to provide an insight on the existence, the behaviour and the composition of the crust. This test series considers 1D MCCI using a non eutectic LiCl-BaCl{sub 2} mixture poured at 1000 deg. C in a cylindrical test section (internal diameter 0.3 m) to interact with the 0.35 m deep basemat made of the same salt mixture at the eutectic composition. This 'concrete' was especially manufactured with sintered granulates to allow gas flow from the bottom (argon), then simulating gas released by concrete in the reactor case. Constant power is applied in the pool with an helical coil and 1D MCCI is ensured by counterbalancing heat losses by controlled heating at the lateral walls and at the top of the test section. Concrete ablation is followed from the output of 45 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples. An instrumented rod periodically investigates the temperature

  17. Experimental investigation of interface conditions between oxidic melt and ablating concrete during MCCI by means of simulating material experiments: the Artemis program

    Veteau, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame work of R and D on Severe Accidents in PWR plants, an estimation by codes of time of basemat melt-through by Corium is required. For this, the heat flux distribution along the cavity wall must be properly modelled. Hence the knowledge of the heat transfer coefficient as well as the temperature at the interface between the melt and the solid become key issues. Phase diagram of the melt and composition governs the interface temperature which controls, at least partly, the thickness of the Corium crust formed on the molten concrete. Crust behaviour (time evolution of thickness, mechanical interaction with gas) implies a release mode of molten concrete in Corium which in turn alters the melt composition. Clearly, the molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomenon is the result of a strong coupling between physico-chemistry and thermohydraulics. The main goal of the first test series of the Artemis program is to make a link between the interface temperature and the physico-chemistry of the melt (phase diagram) through tests conducted with simulating materials and to provide an insight on the existence, the behaviour and the composition of the crust. This test series considers 1D MCCI using a non eutectic LiCl-BaCl 2 mixture poured at 1000 deg. C in a cylindrical test section (internal diameter 0.3 m) to interact with the 0.35 m deep basemat made of the same salt mixture at the eutectic composition. This 'concrete' was especially manufactured with sintered granulates to allow gas flow from the bottom (argon), then simulating gas released by concrete in the reactor case. Constant power is applied in the pool with an helical coil and 1D MCCI is ensured by counterbalancing heat losses by controlled heating at the lateral walls and at the top of the test section. Concrete ablation is followed from the output of 45 0.5 mm diameter thermocouples. An instrumented rod periodically investigates the temperature and the position

  18. Data Linkage from Clinical to Study Databases via an R Data Warehouse User Interface. Experiences from a Large Clinical Follow-up Study.

    Kaspar, Mathias; Ertl, Maximilian; Fette, Georg; Dietrich, Georg; Toepfer, Martin; Angermann, Christiane; Störk, Stefan; Puppe, Frank

    2016-08-05

    Data that needs to be documented for clinical studies has often been acquired and documented in clinical routine. Usually this data is manually transferred to Case Report Forms (CRF) and/or directly into an electronic data capture (EDC) system. To enhance the documentation process of a large clinical follow-up study targeting patients admitted for acutely decompensated heart failure by accessing the data created during routine and study visits from a hospital information system (HIS) and by transferring it via a data warehouse (DWH) into the study's EDC system. This project is based on the clinical DWH developed at the University of Würzburg. The DWH was extended by several new data domains including data created by the study team itself. An R user interface was developed for the DWH that allows to access its source data in all its detail, to transform data as comprehensively as possible by R into study-specific variables and to support the creation of data and catalog tables. A data flow was established that starts with labeling patients as study patients within the HIS and proceeds with updating the DWH with this label and further data domains at a daily rate. Several study-specific variables were defined using the implemented R user interface of the DWH. This system was then used to export these variables as data tables ready for import into our EDC system. The data tables were then used to initialize the first 296 patients within the EDC system by pseudonym, visit and data values. Afterwards, these records were filled with clinical data on heart failure, vital parameters and time spent on selected wards. This solution focuses on the comprehensive access and transformation of data for a DWH-EDC system linkage. Using this system in a large clinical study has demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for a study with a complex visit schedule.

  19. Embodiment and Interface

    Gregersen, Andreas Lindegaard; Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses – based on neurological and phenomenological theory - how the human embodiment supports and constrains the interaction between players and video games. It analyses embodied interaction with the specific hardware/software configuration of the Nintendo Wii and Wii Tennis as well...... as other game system configurations. The article argues that playing video games may provide experiences of extended embodiment where players may experience ownership of both actions and virtual bodies related to the represented game world. The article shows how ownership may be related to differences...... of the player as patient, i.e. being the object of another agent’s actions.  Keywords: Video games, embodiment, interface, agency, action, control, cognition  ...

  20. NSS design and plant construction interfaces

    Stewart, J.J.; Cobb, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Interface management between NSS design, balance-of-plant design, and plant construction may have a significant effect on schedule stretchout and total plant costs. The paper discusses the importance of the NSS supplier's interface management role, the favorable and unfavorable influencing factors, and examples of interface areas in which experience has demonstrated that problems may arise. Where appropriate, actions are defined to avoid the problems or mitigate the consequences

  1. Interfaces for a simple local network

    Nekhanevich, Eh.L.; Yasenev, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A system of communication and interfaces for a simple local network of computers is described. The data on technical parameters, fields of application and operation features of the interfaces developed are presented. The data indispensable for the development of software are given. The experience in operation of the subsystem of software for remote terminal computers which makes use of the above interfaces is briefly presented. 7 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Design and Realization of Universal Data Interface

    Jong-Woo Kim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available KARI studied data interface of Space Applications for developing Space Experimental Instrument in International Space Station, designed, and manufactured the UDIS (International Sapce Station Universal Data Interface simulator according to requirements of the data interface. This paper explains the design and implementation of UDIS for space application. UDIS is the instrument which simulate to interface the data from ISS to experiment module, payload and habitation module and use the development of a experiment system in the space. This simulator will be used to the GSE (Ground Support Equipment for test of experiment system. By realization of the simulator, we ensure data interface skills for a manned-space data communication system.

  3. Interface Simulation Distances

    Pavol Černý

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical (boolean notion of refinement for behavioral interfaces of system components is the alternating refinement preorder. In this paper, we define a distance for interfaces, called interface simulation distance. It makes the alternating refinement preorder quantitative by, intuitively, tolerating errors (while counting them in the alternating simulation game. We show that the interface simulation distance satisfies the triangle inequality, that the distance between two interfaces does not increase under parallel composition with a third interface, and that the distance between two interfaces can be bounded from above and below by distances between abstractions of the two interfaces. We illustrate the framework, and the properties of the distances under composition of interfaces, with two case studies.

  4. Experimentation at the interface of science and policy : a multi-case analysis of how policy experiments influence political decision-makers

    McFadgen, Belinda; Huitema, Dave

    2017-01-01

    For decades now, scholars have grappled with questions about how knowledge producers can enhance the influence of their knowledge on users and improve policy making. However, little attention has been paid to how policy experiments, a flexible and ex ante method of policy appraisal, obtain influence

  5. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-01

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO 3 solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 μmol/m 2 ) to high (26 μmol/m 2 ) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range ≅ 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 μM). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 μmol/m 2 ). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  6. The Ni-YSZ interface

    Jensen, Karin Vels

    The anode/electrolyte interface in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is known to cause electrical losses. Geometrically simple Ni/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interfaces were examined to gain information on the structural and chemical changes occurring during experiments at 1000°C in an atmosphere...... of 97% H2/3% H2O. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at open circuit voltage (OCV) and at anodic and cathodic polarisations (100 mV) was performed. A correlation of the electrical data with the structure development and the chemical composition was attempted. Nickel wires with different impurity...... between polarised and non-polarised samples. With pure nickel wires, however, the microstructures depended on the polarisation/non-polarisation conditions. At non-polarised conditions a hill and valley type structure was found. Anodic polarisation produced an up to 1 μm thick interface layer consisting...

  7. Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces

    Ibach, Harald

    2006-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook covers the major developments in surface sciences of recent decades, from experimental tricks and basic techniques to the latest experimental methods and theoretical understanding. It is unique in its attempt to treat the physics of surfaces, thin films and interfaces, surface chemistry, thermodynamics, statistical physics and the physics of the solid/electrolyte interface in an integral manner, rather than in separate compartments. The Physics of Surfaces and Interfaces is designed as a handbook for the researcher as well as a study-text for graduate students in physics or chemistry with special interest in the surface sciences, material science, or the nanosciences. The experienced researcher, professional or academic teacher will appreciate the opportunity to share many insights and ideas that have grown out of the author's long experience. Readers will likewise appreciate the wide range of topics treated, each supported by extensive references. Graduate students will benefit f...

  8. Urban Media and Interfaces

    2013-01-01

    For ten weeks in 2013, nineteen eclectic students from Anthropology, Ethnology and Design formed cross-disciplinary teams to research existing practices and possible futures in Blågården. Social media is radically changing how urban space is explored, experienced and communicated. For example...... for current and potential visitors as mentioned in the social housing plan for the area. On the other hand, the area's mixed ethnicity, colorful shops and cafes are valued by city tourists and other visitors who seek authentic experiences in local contexts. Against this background, Det Gode Naboskab......, Wonderful Copenhagen and Socialsquare jointly raise these questions: What is the role of social media as interface between the area around Blågårds Plads, its local communities and (potential) visitors, considering perspectives of security, control and planning? What are the challenges and opportunities...

  9. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    Casajus Ramo, A; Sapunov, M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  10. Brain–muscle interface

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... Clipboard: Brain–muscle interface: The next-generation BMI. Radhika Rajan Neeraj Jain ... Keywords. Assistive devices; brain–machine interface; motor cortex; paralysis; spinal cord injury ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  11. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  12. Interface magnons. Magnetic superstructure

    Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Dobrzynski, L.

    1975-01-01

    The localized magnons at an interface between two Heisenberg ferromagnets are studied with a simple model. The effect of the coupling at the interface on the existence condition for the localized modes, the dispersion laws and the possible occurrence of magnetic superstructures due to soft modes are investigated. Finally a comparison is made with the similar results obtained for interface phonons [fr

  13. Water at Interfaces

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Hodgson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives...

  14. User Interface History

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms; Myers, Brad A

    2008-01-01

    User Interfaces have been around as long as computers have existed, even well before the field of Human-Computer Interaction was established. Over the years, some papers on the history of Human-Computer Interaction and User Interfaces have appeared, primarily focusing on the graphical interface e...

  15. Video image processor on the Spacelab 2 Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter /SL2 SOUP/

    Lindgren, R. W.; Tarbell, T. D.

    1981-01-01

    The SOUP instrument is designed to obtain diffraction-limited digital images of the sun with high photometric accuracy. The Video Processor originated from the requirement to provide onboard real-time image processing, both to reduce the telemetry rate and to provide meaningful video displays of scientific data to the payload crew. This original concept has evolved into a versatile digital processing system with a multitude of other uses in the SOUP program. The central element in the Video Processor design is a 16-bit central processing unit based on 2900 family bipolar bit-slice devices. All arithmetic, logical and I/O operations are under control of microprograms, stored in programmable read-only memory and initiated by commands from the LSI-11. Several functions of the Video Processor are described, including interface to the High Rate Multiplexer downlink, cosmetic and scientific data processing, scan conversion for crew displays, focus and exposure testing, and use as ground support equipment.

  16. Multi-parameter brain tissue microsensor and interface systems: calibration, reliability and user experiences of pressure and temperature sensors in the setting of neurointensive care.

    Childs, Charmaine; Wang, Li; Neoh, Boon Kwee; Goh, Hok Liok; Zu, Mya Myint; Aung, Phyo Wai; Yeo, Tseng Tsai

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to investigate sensor measurement uncertainty for intracerebral probes inserted during neurosurgery and remaining in situ during neurocritical care. This describes a prospective observational study of two sensor types and including performance of the complete sensor-bedside monitoring and readout system. Sensors from 16 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were obtained at the time of removal from the brain. When tested, 40% of sensors achieved the manufacturer temperature specification of 0.1 °C. Pressure sensors calibration differed from the manufacturers at all test pressures in 8/20 sensors. The largest pressure measurement error was in the intraparenchymal triple sensor. Measurement uncertainty is not influenced by duration in situ. User experiences reveal problems with sensor 'handling', alarms and firmware. Rigorous investigation of the performance of intracerebral sensors in the laboratory and at the bedside has established measurement uncertainty in the 'real world' setting of neurocritical care.

  17. Quantization of interface currents

    Kotani, Motoko [AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Schulz-Baldes, Hermann [Department Mathematik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen (Germany); Villegas-Blas, Carlos [Instituto de Matematicas, Cuernavaca, UNAM, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    At the interface of two two-dimensional quantum systems, there may exist interface currents similar to edge currents in quantum Hall systems. It is proved that these interface currents are macroscopically quantized by an integer that is given by the difference of the Chern numbers of the two systems. It is also argued that at the interface between two time-reversal invariant systems with half-integer spin, one of which is trivial and the other non-trivial, there are dissipationless spin-polarized interface currents.

  18. Water at Interfaces.

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin H; Hodgson, Andrew; Liu, Li-Min; Limmer, David T; Michaelides, Angelos; Pedevilla, Philipp; Rossmeisl, Jan; Shen, Huaze; Tocci, Gabriele; Tyrode, Eric; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Werner, Josephina; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-07-13

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding.

  19. Shape-changing interfaces:

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2015-01-01

    Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address these shortc......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...... these shortcomings. We identify eight types of shape that are transformed in various ways to serve both functional and hedonic design purposes. Interaction with shape-changing interfaces is simple and rarely merges input and output. Three questions are discussed based on the review: (a) which design purposes may...

  20. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    de Vries Martine C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1 a narrative review of (primarily qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology research practice, and (2 comparison of these experiences with existing theoretical ethical concepts about (pediatric research. The use of empirical evidence enriches these concepts by taking into account the peculiarities that ethical challenges pose in practice. Results Analysis of the 22 studies reviewed revealed that the integration of research and care has consequences for the informed consent process, the promotion of the child's best interests, and the role of the physician (doctor vs. scientist. True consent to research is difficult to achieve due to the complexity of research protocols, emotional stress and parents' dependency on their child's physician. Parents' role is to promote their child's best interests, also when they are asked to consider enrolling their child in a trial. Parents are almost never in equipoise on trial participation, which leaves them with the agonizing situation of wanting to do what is best for their child, while being fearful of making the wrong decision. Furthermore, a therapeutic misconception endangers correct assessment of participation, making parents inaccurately attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures. Physicians prefer the perspective of a therapist over a researcher. Consequently they may truly believe that in the research setting they promote the child's best interests, which maintains the

  1. Brookhaven fastbus/unibus interface

    Benenson, G.; Bauernfeind, J.; Larsen, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    A typical high energy physics experiment requires both a high speed data acquisition and processing system, for data collection and reduction; and a general purpose computer to handle further reduction, bookkeeping and mass storage. Broad differences in architecture, format or technology, will often exist between these two systems, and interface design can become a formidable task. The PDP-11 series minicomputer is widely used in physics research, and the Brookhaven FASTBUS is the only standard high speed data acquisition system which is fully implemented in a current high energy physics experiment. This paper will describe the design and operation of an interface between these two systems. The major issues are elucidated by a preliminary discussion on the basic principles of Bus Systems, and their application to Brookhaven FASTBUS and UNIBUS

  2. Charge interaction between particle-laden fluid interfaces.

    Xu, Hui; Kirkwood, John; Lask, Mauricio; Fuller, Gerald

    2010-03-02

    Experiments are described where two oil/water interfaces laden with charged particles move at close proximity relative to one another. The particles on one of the interfaces were observed to be attracted toward the point of closest approach, forming a denser particle monolayer, while the particles on the opposite interface were repelled away from this point, forming a particle depletion zone. Such particle attraction/repulsion was observed even if one of the interfaces was free of particles. This phenomenon can be explained by the electrostatic interaction between the two interfaces, which causes surface charges (charged particles and ions) to redistribute in order to satisfy surface electric equipotential at each interface. In a forced particle oscillation experiment, we demonstrated the control of charged particle positions on the interface by manipulating charge interaction between interfaces.

  3. Xeml Lab: a tool that supports the design of experiments at a graphical interface and generates computer-readable metadata files, which capture information about genotypes, growth conditions, environmental perturbations and sampling strategy.

    Hannemann, Jan; Poorter, Hendrik; Usadel, Björn; Bläsing, Oliver E; Finck, Alex; Tardieu, Francois; Atkin, Owen K; Pons, Thijs; Stitt, Mark; Gibon, Yves

    2009-09-01

    Data mining depends on the ability to access machine-readable metadata that describe genotypes, environmental conditions, and sampling times and strategy. This article presents Xeml Lab. The Xeml Interactive Designer provides an interactive graphical interface at which complex experiments can be designed, and concomitantly generates machine-readable metadata files. It uses a new eXtensible Mark-up Language (XML)-derived dialect termed XEML. Xeml Lab includes a new ontology for environmental conditions, called Xeml Environment Ontology. However, to provide versatility, it is designed to be generic and also accepts other commonly used ontology formats, including OBO and OWL. A review summarizing important environmental conditions that need to be controlled, monitored and captured as metadata is posted in a Wiki (http://www.codeplex.com/XeO) to promote community discussion. The usefulness of Xeml Lab is illustrated by two meta-analyses of a large set of experiments that were performed with Arabidopsis thaliana during 5 years. The first reveals sources of noise that affect measurements of metabolite levels and enzyme activities. The second shows that Arabidopsis maintains remarkably stable levels of sugars and amino acids across a wide range of photoperiod treatments, and that adjustment of starch turnover and the leaf protein content contribute to this metabolic homeostasis.

  4. Gestures in an Intelligent User Interface

    Fikkert, Wim; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    In this chapter we investigated which hand gestures are intuitive to control a large display multimedia interface from a user's perspective. Over the course of two sequential user evaluations, we defined a simple gesture set that allows users to fully control a large display multimedia interface, intuitively. First, we evaluated numerous gesture possibilities for a set of commands that can be issued to the interface. These gestures were selected from literature, science fiction movies, and a previous exploratory study. Second, we implemented a working prototype with which the users could interact with both hands and the preferred hand gestures with 2D and 3D visualizations of biochemical structures. We found that the gestures are influenced to significant extent by the fast paced developments in multimedia interfaces such as the Apple iPhone and the Nintendo Wii and to no lesser degree by decades of experience with the more traditional WIMP-based interfaces.

  5. Potential Interface Issues in Spent Fuel Management

    2015-10-01

    This publication is an output of a series of meetings to identify and evaluate issues and opportunities associated with interfaces in the back end of the fuel cycle (BEFC) and to describe effective management approaches based on the experience of Member States. During the meetings, participants from Member States and other international organizations shared and evaluated the main interfaces and potential interface issues among the spent fuel storage, transport, reprocessing and disposal of the BEFC, and also reviewed the national approaches to addressing these issues. The aim of this publication is to provide an approach to identify the interfaces in the BEFC as well as the potential issues that should be addressed. It also aims at responding to the solutions Member States most often find to be effective and, in some cases, were adjusted or revisited to reach the fixed target. Most of the interfaces and issues are country specific, as evidenced by the variety and diversity of examples provided in this publication

  6. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    Juntunen, Janne; Merikoski, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuous-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modeled by continuous-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution dominates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces.

  7. User interface support

    Lewis, Clayton; Wilde, Nick

    1989-01-01

    Space construction will require heavy investment in the development of a wide variety of user interfaces for the computer-based tools that will be involved at every stage of construction operations. Using today's technology, user interface development is very expensive for two reasons: (1) specialized and scarce programming skills are required to implement the necessary graphical representations and complex control regimes for high-quality interfaces; (2) iteration on prototypes is required to meet user and task requirements, since these are difficult to anticipate with current (and foreseeable) design knowledge. We are attacking this problem by building a user interface development tool based on extensions to the spreadsheet model of computation. The tool provides high-level support for graphical user interfaces and permits dynamic modification of interfaces, without requiring conventional programming concepts and skills.

  8. Complex Interfaces Under Change

    Rosbjerg, Dan

    The hydrosphere is dynamic across the major compartments of the Earth system: the atmosphere, the oceans and seas, the land surface water, and the groundwater within the strata below the two last compartments. The global geography of the hydrosphere essentially depends on thermodynamic and mechan...... these interfaces and interfaced compartments and processes. Climate, sea-level, oceanographic currents and hydrological processes are all affected, while anthropogenic changes are often intense in the geographic settings corresponding to such interfaces....... and mechanical processes that develop within this structure. Water-related processes at the interfaces between the compartments are complex, depending both on the interface itself, and on the characteristics of the interfaced compartments. Various aspects of global change directly or indirectly impact...

  9. Refinement by interface instantiation

    Hallerstede, Stefan; Hoang, Thai Son

    2012-01-01

    be easily refined. Our first contribution hence is a proposal for a new construct called interface that encapsulates the external variables, along with a mechanism for interface instantiation. Using the new construct and mechanism, external variables can be refined consistently. Our second contribution...... is an approach for verifying the correctness of Event-B extensions using the supporting Rodin tool. We illustrate our approach by proving the correctness of interface instantiation....

  10. Universal computer interfaces

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  11. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  12. Solar wind stream interfaces

    Gosling, J.T.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements aboard Imp 6, 7, and 8 reveal that approximately one third of all high-speed solar wind streams observed at 1 AU contain a sharp boundary (of thickness less than approx.4 x 10 4 km) near their leading edge, called a stream interface, which separates plasma of distinctly different properties and origins. Identified as discontinuities across which the density drops abruptly, the proton temperature increases abruptly, and the speed rises, stream interfaces are remarkably similar in character from one stream to the next. A superposed epoch analysis of plasma data has been performed for 23 discontinuous stream interfaces observed during the interval March 1971 through August 1974. Among the results of this analysis are the following: (1) a stream interface separates what was originally thick (i.e., dense) slow gas from what was originally thin (i.e., rare) fast gas; (2) the interface is the site of a discontinuous shear in the solar wind flow in a frame of reference corotating with the sun; (3) stream interfaces occur at speeds less than 450 km s - 1 and close to or at the maximum of the pressure ridge at the leading edges of high-speed streams; (4) a discontinuous rise by approx.40% in electron temperature occurs at the interface; and (5) discontinuous changes (usually rises) in alpha particle abundance and flow speed relative to the protons occur at the interface. Stream interfaces do not generally recur on successive solar rotations, even though the streams in which they are embedded often do. At distances beyond several astronomical units, stream interfaces should be bounded by forward-reverse shock pairs; three of four reverse shocks observed at 1 AU during 1971--1974 were preceded within approx.1 day by stream interfaces. Our observations suggest that many streams close to the sun are bounded on all sides by large radial velocity shears separating rapidly expanding plasma from more slowly expanding plasma

  13. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  14. Icinga Monitoring System Interface

    Neculae, Alina Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a web interface that would be used by the Icinga monitoring system to manage the CMS online cluster, in the experimental site. The interface would allow users to visualize the information in a compressed and intuitive way, as well as modify the information of each individual object and edit the relationships between classes.

  15. Verden som interface

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07......Oversættelse af Peter Weibels tekst "The World as Interface" i Passepartout # 27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07...

  16. Ecological Interface Design

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex human-machine systems is proposed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), is based on the skills, rules, knowledge taxonomy of cognitive control. The basic goal of EID is twofold: first, not to force processing...

  17. Engineering Musculoskeletal Tissue Interfaces

    Ece Bayrak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering aims to bring together biomaterials, cells, and signaling molecules within properly designed microenvironments in order to create viable treatment options for the lost or malfunctioning tissues. Design and production of scaffolds and cell-laden grafts that mimic the complex structural and functional features of tissues are among the most important elements of tissue engineering strategy. Although all tissues have their own complex structure, an even more complex case in terms of engineering a proper carrier material is encountered at the tissue interfaces, where two distinct tissues come together. The interfaces in the body can be examined in four categories; cartilage-bone and ligament-bone interfaces at the knee and the spine, tendon-bone interfaces at the shoulder and the feet, and muscle-tendon interface at the skeletal system. These interfaces are seen mainly at the soft-to-hard tissue transitions and they are especially susceptible to injury and tear due to the biomechanical inconsistency between these tissues where high strain fields are present. Therefore, engineering the musculoskeletal tissue interfaces remain a challenge. This review focuses on recent advancements in strategies for musculoskeletal interface engineering using different biomaterial-based platforms and surface modification techniques.

  18. Adaptive user interfaces

    1990-01-01

    This book describes techniques for designing and building adaptive user interfaces developed in the large AID project undertaken by the contributors.Key Features* Describes one of the few large-scale adaptive interface projects in the world* Outlines the principles of adaptivity in human-computer interaction

  19. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  20. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species; Chimie de l'uranium (VI) a l'interface solution/mineraux (quartz et hydroxyde d'aluminium): experiences et caracterisations spectroscopiques

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-15

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) to high (26 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range {approx_equal} 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 {mu}M). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  1. Biological and Medical Experiments on the Space Shuttle, 1981 - 1985

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor); Dufour, Patricia A. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This volume is the first in a planned series of reports intended to provide a comprehensive record of all the biological and medical experiments and samples flown on the Space Shuttle. Experiments described have been conducted over a five-year period, beginning with the first plant studies conducted on STS-2 in November 1981, and extending through STS 61-C, the last mission to fly before the tragic Challenger accident of January 1986. Experiments were sponsored within NASA not only by the Life Sciences Division of the Office of Space Science and Applications, but also by the Shuttle Student Involvement Program (SSIP) and the Get Away Special (GAS) Program. Independent medical studies were conducted as well on the Shuttle crew under the auspices of the Space Biomedical Research Institute at Johnson Space Center. In addition, cooperative agreements between NASA and foreign government agencies led to a number of independent experiments and also paved the way for the joint US/ESA Spacelab 1 mission and the German (DFVLR) Spacelab D-1. Experiments included: (1) medically oriented studies of the crew aimed at identifying, preventing, or treating health problems due to space travel; (2) projects to study morphological, physiological, or behavioral effects of microgravity on animals and plants; (3) studies of the effects of microgravity on cells and tissues; and (4) radiation experiments monitoring the spacecraft environment with chemical or biological dosimeters or testing radiation effects on simple organisms and seeds.

  2. Tribology Experiment in Zero Gravity

    Pan, C. H. T.; Gause, R. L.; Whitaker, A. F.; Finckenor, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    A tribology experiment in zero gravity was performed during the orbital flight of Spacelab 1 to study the motion of liquid lubricants over solid surfaces. The absence of a significant gravitational force facilitates observation of such motions as controlled by interfacial and capillary forces. Two experimental configurations were used. One deals with the liquid on one solid surface, and the other with the liquid between a pair of closed spaced surfaces. Time sequence photographs of fluid motion on a solid surface yielded spreading rate data of several fluid-surface combinations. In general, a slow spreading process as governed by the tertiary junction can be distinguished from a more rapid process which is driven by surface tension controlled internal fluid pressure. Photographs were also taken through the transparent bushings of several experimental journal bearings. Morphology of incomplete fluid films and its fluctuation with time suggest the presence or absence of unsteady phenomena of the bearing-rotor system in various arrangements.

  3. The Java Legacy Interface

    Korsholm, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    The Java Legacy Interface is designed to use Java for encapsulating native legacy code on small embedded platforms. We discuss why existing technologies for encapsulating legacy code (JNI) is not sufficient for an important range of small embedded platforms, and we show how the Java Legacy...... Interface offers this previously missing functionality. We describe an implementation of the Java Legacy Interface for a particular virtual machine, and how we have used this virtual machine to integrate Java with an existing, commercial, soft real-time, C/C++ legacy platform....

  4. Operator interface for vehicles

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  5. The interface effect

    Galloway, Alexander R

    2013-01-01

    Interfaces are back, or perhaps they never left. The familiar Socratic conceit from the Phaedrus, of communication as the process of writing directly on the soul of the other, has returned to center stage in today's discussions of culture and media. Indeed Western thought has long construed media as a grand choice between two kinds of interfaces. Following the optimistic path, media seamlessly interface self and other in a transparent and immediate connection. But, following the pessimistic path, media are the obstacles to direct communion, disintegrating self and other into misunderstanding

  6. The computer graphics interface

    Steinbrugge Chauveau, Karla; Niles Reed, Theodore; Shepherd, B

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Graphics Interface provides a concise discussion of computer graphics interface (CGI) standards. The title is comprised of seven chapters that cover the concepts of the CGI standard. Figures and examples are also included. The first chapter provides a general overview of CGI; this chapter covers graphics standards, functional specifications, and syntactic interfaces. Next, the book discusses the basic concepts of CGI, such as inquiry, profiles, and registration. The third chapter covers the CGI concepts and functions, while the fourth chapter deals with the concept of graphic obje

  7. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  8. The GEANT-CALOR interface

    Zeitnitz, C.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The simulation of large scale high energy physics experiments is based mainly on the GEANT package. In the current version 3.15 the simulation of hadronic interacting particles is based on GHEISHA or FLUKA. Both programs miss an accurate simulation of the interaction of low energy neutrons (E kin < 20 MeV) with the materials of the detector. The CALOR89 program package contains a low energetic neutron code. An interface between the CALOR program parts and the GEANT package has been developed

  9. COMPUTER CONTROL OF BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS.

    SIEGEL, LOUIS

    THE LINC COMPUTER PROVIDES A PARTICULAR SCHEDULE OF REINFORCEMENT FOR BEHAVIORAL EXPERIMENTS BY EXECUTING A SEQUENCE OF COMPUTER OPERATIONS IN CONJUNCTION WITH A SPECIALLY DESIGNED INTERFACE. THE INTERFACE IS THE MEANS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE EXPERIMENTAL CHAMBER AND THE COMPUTER. THE PROGRAM AND INTERFACE OF AN EXPERIMENT INVOLVING A PIGEON…

  10. User interface development

    Aggrawal, Bharat

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the development of user interfaces for OS/2 versions of computer codes for the analysis of seals. Current status, new features, work in progress, and future plans are discussed.

  11. Natural gesture interfaces

    Starodubtsev, Illya

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the implementation of the system of interaction with virtual objects based on gestures. The paper describes the common problems of interaction with virtual objects, specific requirements for the interfaces for virtual and augmented reality.

  12. Pattern formation at interfaces

    Maier, Giulio; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Applying modern nonlinear stability theory to problems of continuous media mechanics in the presence of interfaces, this text is relevant to materials science, chemical engineering, and heat transfer technologies, as well as to reaction-diffusion systems.

  13. Universal quantum interfaces

    Lloyd, Seth; Landahl, Andrew J.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    2004-01-01

    To observe or control a quantum system, one must interact with it via an interface. This article exhibits simple universal quantum interfaces--quantum input/output ports consisting of a single two-state system or quantum bit that interacts with the system to be observed or controlled. It is shown that under very general conditions the ability to observe and control the quantum bit on its own implies the ability to observe and control the system itself. The interface can also be used as a quantum communication channel, and multiple quantum systems can be connected by interfaces to become an efficient universal quantum computer. Experimental realizations are proposed, and implications for controllability, observability, and quantum information processing are explored

  14. Scalable coherent interface

    Alnaes, K.; Kristiansen, E.H.; Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.

    1990-01-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface (IEEE P1596) is establishing an interface standard for very high performance multiprocessors, supporting a cache-coherent-memory model scalable to systems with up to 64K nodes. This Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) will supply a peak bandwidth per node of 1 GigaByte/second. The SCI standard should facilitate assembly of processor, memory, I/O and bus bridge cards from multiple vendors into massively parallel systems with throughput far above what is possible today. The SCI standard encompasses two levels of interface, a physical level and a logical level. The physical level specifies electrical, mechanical and thermal characteristics of connectors and cards that meet the standard. The logical level describes the address space, data transfer protocols, cache coherence mechanisms, synchronization primitives and error recovery. In this paper we address logical level issues such as packet formats, packet transmission, transaction handshake, flow control, and cache coherence. 11 refs., 10 figs

  15. Introduction to interfaces 3

    Mortensen, Lars Boje; Høgel, Christian; Borsa, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The Editors introduce Issue No. 3 of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures, dedicated to "Rediscovery and Canonization: The Roman Classics in the Middle Ages," and offer a general overview of the matter and contents of the contributions.......The Editors introduce Issue No. 3 of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures, dedicated to "Rediscovery and Canonization: The Roman Classics in the Middle Ages," and offer a general overview of the matter and contents of the contributions....

  16. MER SPICE Interface

    Sayfi, Elias

    2004-01-01

    MER SPICE Interface is a software module for use in conjunction with the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and the SPICE software system of the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (SPICE is used to acquire, record, and disseminate engineering, navigational, and other ancillary data describing circumstances under which data were acquired by spaceborne scientific instruments.) Given a Spacecraft Clock value, MER SPICE Interface extracts MER-specific data from SPICE kernels (essentially, raw data files) and calculates values for Planet Day Number, Local Solar Longitude, Local Solar Elevation, Local Solar Azimuth, and Local Solar Time (UTC). MER SPICE Interface was adapted from a subroutine, denoted m98SpiceIF written by Payam Zamani, that was intended to calculate SPICE values for the Mars Polar Lander. The main difference between MER SPICE Interface and m98SpiceIf is that MER SPICE Interface does not explicitly call CHRONOS, a time-conversion program that is part of a library of utility subprograms within SPICE. Instead, MER SPICE Interface mimics some portions of the CHRONOS code, the advantage being that it executes much faster and can efficiently be called from a pipeline of events in a parallel processing environment.

  17. Lectures on random interfaces

    Funaki, Tadahisa

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces are created to separate two distinct phases in a situation in which phase coexistence occurs. This book discusses randomly fluctuating interfaces in several different settings and from several points of view: discrete/continuum, microscopic/macroscopic, and static/dynamic theories. The following four topics in particular are dealt with in the book. Assuming that the interface is represented as a height function measured from a fixed-reference discretized hyperplane, the system is governed by the Hamiltonian of gradient of the height functions. This is a kind of effective interface model called ∇φ-interface model. The scaling limits are studied for Gaussian (or non-Gaussian) random fields with a pinning effect under a situation in which the rate functional of the corresponding large deviation principle has non-unique minimizers. Young diagrams determine decreasing interfaces, and their dynamics are introduced. The large-scale behavior of such dynamics is studied from the points of view of the hyd...

  18. Touchfree medical interfaces.

    Rossol, Nathaniel; Cheng, Irene; Rui Shen; Basu, Anup

    2014-01-01

    Real-time control of visual display systems via mid-air hand gestures offers many advantages over traditional interaction modalities. In medicine, for example, it allows a practitioner to adjust display values, e.g. contrast or zoom, on a medical visualization interface without the need to re-sterilize the interface. However, when users are holding a small tool (such as a pen, surgical needle, or computer stylus) the need to constantly put the tool down in order to make hand gesture interactions is not ideal. This work presents a novel interface that automatically adjusts for gesturing with hands and hand-held tools to precisely control medical displays. The novelty of our interface is that it uses a single set of gestures designed to be equally effective for fingers and hand-held tools without using markers. This type of interface was previously not feasible with low-resolution depth sensors such as Kinect, but is now achieved by using the recently released Leap Motion controller. Our interface is validated through a user study on a group of people given the task of adjusting parameters on a medical image.

  19. Rapid Prototyping Human Interfaces Using Stretchable Strain Sensor

    Tokiya Yamaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern society with a variety of information electronic devices, human interfaces increase their importance in a boundary of a human and a device. In general, the human is required to get used to the device. Even if the device is designed as a universal device or a high-usability device, the device is not suitable for all users. The usability of the device depends on the individual user. Therefore, personalized and customized human interfaces are effective for the user. To create customized interfaces, we propose rapid prototyping human interfaces using stretchable strain sensors. The human interfaces comprise parts formed by a three-dimensional printer and the four strain sensors. The three-dimensional printer easily makes customized human interfaces. The outputs of the interface are calculated based on the sensor’s lengths. Experiments evaluate three human interfaces: a sheet-shaped interface, a sliding lever interface, and a tilting lever interface. We confirm that the three human interfaces obtain input operations with a high accuracy.

  20. Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment: Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software development

    Gibson, M. Alan; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment, the objective of which is to determine the solar constant value and its variability, is scheduled for launch as part of the Space Shuttle/Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science (ATLAS) spacelab mission. The Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software was developed to monitor and analyze the SOLCON telemetry data during flight and to test the instrument on the ground. The design and development of the GSE software are discussed. The SOLCON instrument was tested during Davos International Solar Intercomparison, 1989 and the SOLCON data collected during the tests are analyzed to study the behavior of the instrument.

  1. Standard interfaces for program-modular multiprocessor systems

    Chernykh, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The peculiarities of the structures of existing and developed standard interfaces used in automation systems for nuclear physical experiments are considered. general structural characteristics of multiprocessor system interfaces are revealed. The comparison of the existing system CAMAC crate and designed standards of COMPEX, E3S and FASTBUS interfaces by capacity and relative cost is carried out. The analysis of the given data shows that operation of any interface is more advantageous at the rates close to capacity values, the relative cost being minimum. In this case the advantage is on the side of interfaces with greater capacity values for which at a moderated decrease of the exchange or requests processing rate the relative costs grow slower. A higher capacity of one-cycle exchange is provided with functional data way specialization in the interface. The conclusion is drawn that most perspective trend in the development of automation systems for high energy physics experiments is using FASTBUS standard

  2. Environmental materials and interfaces

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig

  3. Assessment of VME-PCI Interfaces with Linux Drivers

    Schossmater, K; CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This report summarises the performance measurements and experiences recorded by testing three commercial VME-PCI interfaces with their Linux drivers. These interfaces are manufactured by Wiener, National Instruments and SBS Bit 3. The developed C programs are reading/writing a VME memory in different transfer modes via these interfaces. A dual processor HP Kayak XA-s workstation was used with the CERN certified Red Hat Linux 6.1 running on it.

  4. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  5. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  6. Interface Management for a NASA Flight Project Using Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Shull, Thomas A.; Infeld, Samatha; Price, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The goal of interface management is to identify, define, control, and verify interfaces; ensure compatibility; provide an efficient system development; be on time and within budget; while meeting stakeholder requirements. This paper will present a successful seven-step approach to interface management used in several NASA flight projects. The seven-step approach using Model Based Systems Engineering will be illustrated by interface examples from the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The MISSE-X was being developed as an International Space Station (ISS) external platform for space environmental studies, designed to advance the technology readiness of materials and devices critical for future space exploration. Emphasis will be given to best practices covering key areas such as interface definition, writing good interface requirements, utilizing interface working groups, developing and controlling interface documents, handling interface agreements, the use of shadow documents, the importance of interface requirement ownership, interface verification, and product transition.

  7. User interface design considerations

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding......When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...

  8. Workshop on Interface Phenomena

    Kreuzer, Hans

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the first Workshop on Interface Phenomena, organized jointly by the surface science groups at Dalhousie University and the University of Maine. It was our intention to concentrate on just three topics related to the kinetics of interface reactions which, in our opinion, were frequently obscured unnecessarily in the literature and whose fundamental nature warranted an extensive discussion to help clarify the issues, very much in the spirit of the Discussions of the Faraday Society. Each session (day) saw two principal speakers expounding the different views; the session chairmen were asked to summarize the ensuing discussions. To understand the complexity of interface reactions, paradigms must be formulated to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimen­ tal data and for the construction of theoretical models. Phenomenological approaches have been based on a small number of rate equations for the concentrations or mole numbers of the various species involved i...

  9. High-bandwidth memory interface

    Kim, Chulwoo; Song, Junyoung

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in memory interface design at both the architecture and circuit levels. Coverage includes signal integrity and testing, TSV interface, high-speed serial interface including equalization, ODT, pre-emphasis, wide I/O interface including crosstalk, skew cancellation, and clock generation and distribution. Trends for further bandwidth enhancement are also covered.   • Enables readers with minimal background in memory design to understand the basics of high-bandwidth memory interface design; • Presents state-of-the-art techniques for memory interface design; • Covers memory interface design at both the circuit level and system architecture level.

  10. An Approach to Interface Synthesis

    Madsen, Jan; Hald, Bjarne

    1995-01-01

    Presents a novel interface synthesis approach based on a one-sided interface description. Whereas most other approaches consider interface synthesis as optimizing a channel to existing client/server modules, we consider the interface synthesis as part of the client/server module synthesis (which...... may contain the re-use of existing modules). The interface synthesis approach describes the basic transformations needed to transform the server interface description into an interface description on the client side of the communication medium. The synthesis approach is illustrated through a point...

  11. Gas Gun Studies of Interface Wear Effects

    Jackson, Tyler; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of interface wear were studied by performing gas gun experiments at velocities up to 1 km/s. The approach involved developing coefficients of constitutive strength models for Al 6061 and OFHC-Cu, then using those to design die geometry for interface wear gas gun experiments. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact experiments were performed to obtain coefficients of the Johnson-Cook constitutive strength model by correlating experimentally obtained deformed states of impacted samples with those predicted using ANSYS AUTODYN hydrocode. Simulations were used with validated strength models to design geometry involving acceleration of Al rods through a copper concentric cylindrical angular extrusion die. Experiments were conducted using 7.62 mm and 80 mm diameter gas guns. Differences in the microstructure of the interface layer and microhardness values illustrate that stress-strain conditions produced during acceleration of Al through the hollow concentric copper die, at velocities less than 800 m/s, result in formation of a layer via solid state alloying due to severe plastic deformation, while higher velocities produce an interface layer consisting of melted and re-solidified aluminum.

  12. Brain-computer interfaces for arts

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; Nijholt, Antinus; D' Mello, S.; Pantic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We experience positive emotions when our hedonic needs, such as virtuosity or relatedness, are satisfied. Creating art is one way of satisfying these needs, so artistic computer applications can be considered as ‘affective’. Artistic braincomputer interfaces (BCIs), which allow people to create art

  13. ISLAM PROJECT: Interface between the signals from various experiments of a Van Graaff accelerator and PDP 11/44 computer; PROYECTO ISLAM: Interfase para las senales de diversas experinecias de un acelerador de Van de Graaf y un ordenador PDP 11/44

    Martinez Piquer, T A; Yuste Santos, C

    1986-07-01

    This paper describe an interface between the signals from an in-beam experiment of a Van de Graaff accelerator and a PDP 11/44 computer. The information corresponding to one spectrum is taken from one digital voltammeter and is processed by mean of an equipment controlled by a M6809 microprocessor. The software package has been developed in assembly language and has a size of 1/2 K. (Author) 12 refs.

  14. Natural User Interfaces

    Câmara , António

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Engenharia Informática apresentada à Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra This project’s main subject are Natural User Interfaces. These interfaces’ main purpose is to allow the user to interact with computer systems in a more direct and natural way. The popularization of touch and gesture devices in the last few years has allowed for them to become increasingly common and today we are experiencing a transition of interface p...

  15. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed

  16. Virtual interface environment workstations

    Fisher, S. S.; Wenzel, E. M.; Coler, C.; Mcgreevy, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture has been developed at NASA's Ames Research Center for use as a multipurpose interface environment. This Virtual Interface Environment Workstation (VIEW) system provides a multisensory, interactive display environment in which a user can virtually explore a 360-degree synthesized or remotely sensed environment and can viscerally interact with its components. Primary applications of the system are in telerobotics, management of large-scale integrated information systems, and human factors research. System configuration, research scenarios, and research directions are described.

  17. After Rigid Interfaces

    Troiano, Giovanni Maria

    (1) a user study with a prototype of an elastic, deformable display, and (2) a user study of deformable interfaces for performing music. The first study reports a guessability study with an elastic, deformable display where 17 participants suggested fitting gestures for 29 tasks, including navigation......, Transformation, Adaptation and Physicalization. In synthesis, the work presented in this thesis shows (1) implications of usefulness for deformable interfaces and how their new input modalities can redefine the way users interact with computers, and (2) how a systematic understanding of conventional design...

  18. Interface or Interlace?

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Wamberg, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Departing from an analysis of the computer's indeterminate location between medium and machine, this paper problematises the idea of a clear-cut interface in complex computing, especially Augmented Reality. The idea and pratice of the interface is derived from the medium as a representational...... surface and thus demands the overview of an autonomous consciouness. Instead we introduce the term interlace, a mingling of representational and physical levels, thus describing the computer's ambiguous blending of imaginary and real. The proposition is demonstrated through analysis of different recent...

  19. CAMAC to GPIB interface

    Naivar, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A CAMAC module developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory allows any device conforming to the GPIB standard to be connected to a CAMAC system. This module incorporates a microprocessor to control up to 14 GPIB-compatible instruments using a restricted set of CAMAC F-N-A commands. The marriage of a device-independent bus (IEEE Standard 488-1975) to a computer-independent bus (IEEE Standard 583-1975) provides a general method for interfacing a system of programmable instruments to any computer. This module is being used to interface a variety of interactive devices on a control console to a control computer

  20. Nonlinear optics at interfaces

    Chen, C.K.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of surface nonlinear optics are explored in this thesis. The first part is a theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear intraction of surface plasmons and bulk photons at metal-dielectric interfaces. The second part is a demonstration and study of surface enhanced second harmonic generation at rough metal surfaces. A general formulation for nonlinear interaction of surface plasmons at metal-dielectric interfaces is presented and applied to both second and third order nonlinear processes. Experimental results for coherent second and third harmonic generation by surface plasmons and surface coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are shown to be in good agreement with the theory

  1. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  2. Project Interface Requirements Process Including Shuttle Lessons Learned

    Bauch, Garland T.

    2010-01-01

    Most failures occur at interfaces between organizations and hardware. Processing interface requirements at the start of a project life cycle will reduce the likelihood of costly interface changes/failures later. This can be done by adding Interface Control Documents (ICDs) to the Project top level drawing tree, providing technical direction to the Projects for interface requirements, and by funding the interface requirements function directly from the Project Manager's office. The interface requirements function within the Project Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) Office would work in-line with the project element design engineers early in the life cycle to enhance communications and negotiate technical issues between the elements. This function would work as the technical arm of the Project Manager to help ensure that the Project cost, schedule, and risk objectives can be met during the Life Cycle. Some ICD Lessons Learned during the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Life Cycle will include the use of hardware interface photos in the ICD, progressive life cycle design certification by analysis, test, & operations experience, assigning interface design engineers to Element Interface (EI) and Project technical panels, and linking interface design drawings with project build drawings

  3. End User Development Toolkit for Developing Physical User Interface Applications

    Abrahamsen, Daniel T; Palfi, Anders; Svendsen, Haakon Sønsteby

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tangible user interfaces and end user development are two increasingresearch areas in software technology. Physical representation promoteopportunities to ease the use of technology and reinforce personality traits ascreativeness, collaboration and intuitive actions. However, designing tangibleuser interfaces are both cumbersome and require several layers of architecture.End user development allows users with no programming experience to createor customize their own applications. ...

  4. Space as interface

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    multiple projects spanning over fields such as tangible user interfaces, augmented reality, and mobile computing, a conceptual framework characterizing camera-based mixed interaction spaces is developed. To show the applicability of the framework, it is deployed on one of the presented cases and discussed...

  5. The Liquid Vapour Interface

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1985-01-01

    In this short review we are concerned with the density variation across the liquid-vapour interface, i.e. from the bulk density of the liquid to the essentially zero density of the vapour phase. This density variation can in principle be determined from the deviation of the reflectivity from...

  6. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  7. Is the interface OK?

    Suresh, T.

    When a peripheral device fails, software methods can be initially resorted to before the usual hardware test procedures are used. A test program is presented here that allows various peripherals, inter-faced to a Norsk Data computer, to be tested...

  8. Workflow User Interfaces Patterns

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta una colección de patrones de diseño de interfaces de usuario para sistemas de información para el flujo de trabajo; la colección incluye cuarenta y tres patrones clasificados en siete categorías identificados a partir de la lógica del ciclo de vida de la tarea sobre la base de la oferta y la asignación de tareas a los responsables de realizarlas (i. e. recursos humanos durante el flujo de trabajo. Cada patrón de la interfaz de usuario de flujo de trabajo (WUIP, por sus siglas en inglés se caracteriza por las propiedades expresadas en el lenguaje PLML para expresar patrones y complementado por otros atributos y modelos que se adjuntan a dicho modelo: la interfaz de usuario abstracta y el modelo de tareas correspondiente. Estos modelos se especifican en un lenguaje de descripción de interfaces de usuario. Todos los WUIPs se almacenan en una biblioteca y se pueden recuperar a través de un editor de flujo de trabajo que vincula a cada patrón de asignación de trabajo a su WUIP correspondiente.A collection of user interface design patterns for workflow information systems is presented that contains forty three resource patterns classified in seven categories. These categories and their corresponding patterns have been logically identified from the task life cycle based on offering and allocation operations. Each Workflow User Interface Pattern (WUIP is characterized by properties expressed in the PLML markup language for expressing patterns and augmented by additional attributes and models attached to the pattern: the abstract user interface and the corresponding task model. These models are specified in a User Interface Description Language. All WUIPs are stored in a library and can be retrieved within a workflow editor that links each workflow pattern to its corresponding WUIP, thus giving rise to a user interface for each workflow pattern.

  9. Liferay 6.2 user interface development

    Chen, Xinsheng

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial, targeting the Liferay 6.2 version. This book takes a step-by-step approach to customizing the look and feel of your website, and shows you how to build a great looking user interface as well.""Liferay 6.2 User Interface Development"" is for anyone who is interested in the Liferay Portal. It contains text that explicitly introduces you to the Liferay Portal. You will benefit most from this book if you have Java programming experience and have coded servlets or JavaServer Pages before. Experienced Liferay portal developers will also find this book useful because it expla

  10. Interface evaluation for soft robotic manipulators

    Moore, Kristin S.; Rodes, William M.; Csencsits, Matthew A.; Kwoka, Martha J.; Gomer, Joshua A.; Pagano, Christopher C.

    2006-05-01

    The results of two usability experiments evaluating an interface for the operation of OctArm, a biologically inspired robotic arm modeled after an octopus tentacle, are reported. Due to the many degrees-of-freedom (DOF) for the operator to control, such 'continuum' robotic limbs provide unique challenges for human operators because they do not map intuitively. Two modes have been developed to control the arm and reduce the DOF under the explicit direction of the operator. In coupled velocity (CV) mode, a joystick controls changes in arm curvature. In end-effector (EE) mode, a joystick controls the arm by moving the position of an endpoint along a straight line. In Experiment 1, participants used the two modes to grasp objects placed at different locations in a virtual reality modeling language (VRML). Objective measures of performance and subjective preferences were recorded. Results revealed lower grasp times and a subjective preference for the CV mode. Recommendations for improving the interface included providing additional feedback and implementation of an error recovery function. In Experiment 2, only the CV mode was tested with improved training of participants and several changes to the interface. The error recovery function was implemented, allowing participants to reverse through previously attained positions. The mean time to complete the trials in the second usability test was reduced by more than 4 minutes compared with the first usability test, confirming the interface changes improved performance. The results of these tests will be incorporated into future versions of the arm and improve future usability tests.

  11. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  12. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  13. Easy-to-use interface

    Blattner, D O; Blattner, M M; Tong, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Easy-to-use interfaces are a class of interfaces that fall between public access interfaces and graphical user interfaces in usability and cognitive difficulty. We describe characteristics of easy-to-use interfaces by the properties of four dimensions: selection, navigation, direct manipulation, and contextual metaphors. Another constraint we introduced was to include as little text as possible, and what text we have will be in at least four languages. Formative evaluations were conducted to identify and isolate these characteristics. Our application is a visual interface for a home automation system intended for a diverse set of users. The design will be expanded to accommodate the visually disabled in the near future

  14. Evaluation of Explanation Interfaces in Recommender Systems

    Sergio Cleger-Tamayo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Explaining interfaces become a useful tool in systems that have a lot of content to evaluate by users. The different interfaces represent a help for the undecided users or those who consider systems as boxed black smart. These systems present recommendations to users based on different learning models. In this paper, we present the different objectives of the explanation interfaces and some of the criteria that you can evaluate, as well as a proposal of metrics to obtain results in the experiments. Finally, we showed the main results of a study with real users and their interaction with e-commerce systems. Among the main results, highlight the positive impact in relation to the time of interaction with the applications and acceptance of the recommendations received.

  15. Science at the interface

    Knorr Cetina, K.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratories have advantages One of these is that a laboratory science does not have to put up with its objects of investigation as they occur in nature. First, it does not need to accommodate a natural object where it is, anchored in a natural environment; laboratory sciences bring objects inside and manipulate them on their own terms in the lab. Second, a laboratory science need not accommodate an event when it happens; it can dispense with natural cycles of occurrence and make events happen frequently enough for continuous study. Third, a laboratory science does not have to put up with an object as it is; it can substitute transformed and partial versions. Dissociating natural objects from their environment and re-configuring them in the lab is not simple, but it has epistemic advantages when it can be accomplished. For example, the objects of interest tend to become miniaturized (cell cultures rather than whole plants, image measurements rather than cosmological objects), they tend to become continually available in laboratories world-wide for inquiry, and planetary and stellar time scales are replaced by the time scales of the social order. Laboratories also impose conditions, for example sharp boundaries between the internal and the external world. Most laboratories in the natural sciences have procedures (and walls) to fend off unwanted transgressions of objects from the natural and human environment which they see as potential contaminants. A wild-type mouse in a molecular biology lab is not, for example, an animal caught in the wild. It is a special mouse strain inbred over many generations in breeding labs to serve as a control in relevant experiments. Animals that live in the wild (or in the buildings where labs are located) are strictly prohibited from entering a lab facility as potential disease carriers and pollutants. Laboratories, then, are not only specialized places, they are places that set up barriers against the environment and attempt to raise

  16. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.; Blaysat, Benoî t; Lubineau, Gilles; Geers, Marc G D

    2013-01-01

    , but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical

  17. Language workbench user interfaces for data analysis

    Benson, Victoria M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological data analysis is frequently performed with command line software. While this practice provides considerable flexibility for computationally savy individuals, such as investigators trained in bioinformatics, this also creates a barrier to the widespread use of data analysis software by investigators trained as biologists and/or clinicians. Workflow systems such as Galaxy and Taverna have been developed to try and provide generic user interfaces that can wrap command line analysis software. These solutions are useful for problems that can be solved with workflows, and that do not require specialized user interfaces. However, some types of analyses can benefit from custom user interfaces. For instance, developing biomarker models from high-throughput data is a type of analysis that can be expressed more succinctly with specialized user interfaces. Here, we show how Language Workbench (LW) technology can be used to model the biomarker development and validation process. We developed a language that models the concepts of Dataset, Endpoint, Feature Selection Method and Classifier. These high-level language concepts map directly to abstractions that analysts who develop biomarker models are familiar with. We found that user interfaces developed in the Meta-Programming System (MPS) LW provide convenient means to configure a biomarker development project, to train models and view the validation statistics. We discuss several advantages of developing user interfaces for data analysis with a LW, including increased interface consistency, portability and extension by language composition. The language developed during this experiment is distributed as an MPS plugin (available at http://campagnelab.org/software/bdval-for-mps/). PMID:25755929

  18. Language workbench user interfaces for data analysis

    Victoria M. Benson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological data analysis is frequently performed with command line software. While this practice provides considerable flexibility for computationally savy individuals, such as investigators trained in bioinformatics, this also creates a barrier to the widespread use of data analysis software by investigators trained as biologists and/or clinicians. Workflow systems such as Galaxy and Taverna have been developed to try and provide generic user interfaces that can wrap command line analysis software. These solutions are useful for problems that can be solved with workflows, and that do not require specialized user interfaces. However, some types of analyses can benefit from custom user interfaces. For instance, developing biomarker models from high-throughput data is a type of analysis that can be expressed more succinctly with specialized user interfaces. Here, we show how Language Workbench (LW technology can be used to model the biomarker development and validation process. We developed a language that models the concepts of Dataset, Endpoint, Feature Selection Method and Classifier. These high-level language concepts map directly to abstractions that analysts who develop biomarker models are familiar with. We found that user interfaces developed in the Meta-Programming System (MPS LW provide convenient means to configure a biomarker development project, to train models and view the validation statistics. We discuss several advantages of developing user interfaces for data analysis with a LW, including increased interface consistency, portability and extension by language composition. The language developed during this experiment is distributed as an MPS plugin (available at http://campagnelab.org/software/bdval-for-mps/.

  19. Spectrometer user interface to computer systems

    Salmon, L.; Davies, M.; Fry, F.A.; Venn, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    A computer system for use in radiation spectrometry should be designed around the needs and comprehension of the user and his operating environment. To this end, the functions of the system should be built in a modular and independent fashion such that they can be joined to the back end of an appropriate user interface. The point that this interface should be designed rather than just allowed to evolve is illustrated by reference to four related computer systems of differing complexity and function. The physical user interfaces in all cases are keyboard terminals, and the virtues and otherwise of these devices are discussed and compared with others. The language interface needs to satisfy a number of requirements, often conflicting. Among these, simplicity and speed of operation compete with flexibility and scope. Both experienced and novice users need to be considered, and any individual's needs may vary from naive to complex. To be efficient and resilient, the implementation must use an operating system, but the user needs to be protected from its complex and unfamiliar syntax. At the same time the interface must allow the user access to all services appropriate to his needs. The user must also receive an image of privacy in a multi-user system. The interface itself must be stable and exhibit continuity between implementations. Some of these conflicting needs have been overcome by the SABRE interface with languages operating at several levels. The foundation is a simple semimnemonic command language that activates indididual and independent functions. The commands can be used with positional parameters or in an interactive dialogue the precise nature of which depends upon the operating environment and the user's experience. A command procedure or macrolanguage allows combinations of commands with conditional branching and arithmetic features. Thus complex but repetitive operations are easily performed

  20. An ecological interface for supporting situation awareness during malfunction and process and automation

    Ohtsu, Masataka; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Inagaki, Toshiyuki; Monta, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the outline of an experiment to investigate the effect of an ecological interface for supporting situation awareness during malfunction of process. We developed an ecological interface and an conventional interface for the simulator SCARLETT of a virtual plant that have two process control modes (automatic process control mode and manual process control mode). The purpose of this experiment is to investigate how interface and process control mode have any effects on situation awareness of human operator during malfunction of process, whether there are any interaction between interface and process control mode. We have been conducted this experiment now. (author)

  1. Safety Parameters Graphical Interface

    Canamero, B.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear power plant data are received at the Operations Center of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear in emergency situations. In order to achieve the required interface and to prepare those data to perform simulation and forecasting with already existing computer codes a Safety Parameters Graphical Interface (IGPS) has been developed. The system runs in a UNIX environment and use the Xwindows capabilities. The received data are stored in such a way that it can be easily used for further analysis and training activities. The system consists of task-oriented modules (processes) which communicate each other using well known UNIX mechanisms (signals, sockets and shared memory segments). IGPS conceptually have two different parts: Data collection and preparation, and Data monitorization. (Author)

  2. Politics at the interface

    Kannabiran, Gobinaath; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2010-01-01

    At the birth of participatory design, there was a strong political consciousness surrounding the design of new technology, the design process in particular, establishing a rich set of methods and tools for user-centered design. Today, the term design has extended its scope of concern beyond...... the process of design and into how users interact with the designed product on a day-to-day basis. This paper is an attempt to call to attention the need for a new set of methods, attitudes and approaches, along with the existing, to discuss, analyze and reflect upon the politics at the interface....... By presenting a critical analysis of two design cases, we elicit the importance of such an agenda and the implications for design in doing so. We use the Foucauldian notion of power to analyze the power relationships in these two cases and to articulate the politics at the interface. We conclude by emphasizing...

  3. Urban Sound Interfaces

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live. In this pa......This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live....... In this paper, three sound works are discussed in relation to the iPod, which is considered as a more private way to explore urban environments, and as a way to control the individual perception of urban spaces....

  4. The technical supervision interface

    Sollander, P

    1998-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) is currently using 30 different applications for the remote supervision of the technical infrastructure at CERN. These applications have all been developed with the CERN made Uniform Man Machine Interface (UMMI) tools built in 1990. However, the visualization technology has evolved phenomenally since 1990, the Technical Data Server (TDS) has radically changed our control system architecture, and the standardization and the maintenance of the UMMI applications have become important issues as their number increases. The Technical Supervision Interface is intended to replace the UMMI and solve the above problems. Using a standard WWW-browser for the display, it will be inherently multi-platform and hence available for control room operators, equipment specialists and on-call personnel.

  5. Virtual button interface

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  6. Noise at the Interface

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  7. Frontiers of controlling energy levels at interfaces

    Koch, Norbert

    The alignment of electron energy levels at interfaces between semiconductors, dielectrics, and electrodes determines the function and efficiency of all electronic and optoelectronic devices. Reliable guidelines for predicting the level alignment for a given material combination and methods to adjust the intrinsic energy landscape are needed to enable efficient engineering approaches. These are sufficiently understood for established electronic materials, e.g., Si, but for the increasing number of emerging materials, e.g., organic and 2D semiconductors, perovskites, this is work in progress. The intrinsic level alignment and the underlying mechanisms at interfaces between organic and inorganic semiconductors are discussed first. Next, methods to alter the level alignment are introduced, which all base on proper charge density rearrangement at a heterojunction. As interface modification agents we use molecular electron acceptors and donors, as well as molecular photochromic switches that add a dynamic aspect and allow device multifunctionality. For 2D semiconductors surface transfer doping with molecular acceptors/donors transpires as viable method to locally tune the Fermi-level position in the energy gap. The fundamental electronic properties of a prototypical 1D interface between intrinsic and p-doped 2D semiconductor regions are derived from local (scanning probe) and area-averaged (photoemission) spectroscopy experiments. Future research opportunities for attaining unsurpassed interface control through charge density management are discussed.

  8. Planning and User Interface Affordances

    St. Amant, Robert

    1999-01-01

    .... We identify a number of similarities between executing plans and interacting with a graphical user interface, and argue that affordances for planning environments apply equally well to user interface environments...

  9. Interface Input/Output Automata

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch’s I/O, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit separation of assumptions...... a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata....

  10. Planet in a Test Tube Experiment

    1985-01-01

    A 16mm film frame shows convective regions inside silicone oil playing the part of a stellar atmosphere in the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC). An electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. Numbers of the frame indicate temperatures and other conditions. This image is from the Spacelab-3 flight in 1985. GFFC was reflown on U.S. Microgravity Laboratory-2 in 1995. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  11. NESSUS/NASTRAN Interface

    Millwater, Harry; Riha, David

    1996-01-01

    The NESSUS probabilistic analysis computer program has been developed with a built-in finite element analysis program NESSUS/FEM. However, the NESSUS/FEM program is specialized for engine structures and may not contain sufficient features for other applications. In addition, users often become well acquainted with a particular finite element code and want to use that code for probabilistic structural analysis. For these reasons, this work was undertaken to develop an interface between NESSUS and NASTRAN such that NASTRAN can be used for the finite element analysis and NESSUS can be used for the probabilistic analysis. In addition, NESSUS was restructured such that other finite element codes could be more easily coupled with NESSUS. NESSUS has been enhanced such that NESSUS will modify the NASTRAN input deck for a given set of random variables, run NASTRAN and read the NASTRAN result. The coordination between the two codes is handled automatically. The work described here was implemented within NESSUS 6.2 which was delivered to NASA in September 1995. The code runs on Unix machines: Cray, HP, Sun, SGI and IBM. The new capabilities have been implemented such that a user familiar with NESSUS using NESSUS/FEM and NASTRAN can immediately use NESSUS with NASTRAN. In other words, the interface with NASTRAN has been implemented in an analogous manner to the interface with NESSUS/FEM. Only finite element specific input has been changed. This manual is written as an addendum to the existing NESSUS 6.2 manuals. We assume users have access to NESSUS manuals and are familiar with the operation of NESSUS including probabilistic finite element analysis. Update pages to the NESSUS PFEM manual are contained in Appendix E. The finite element features of the code and the probalistic analysis capabilities are summarized.

  12. Magnons and interface magnetic substructures

    Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Dobrzynski, L.

    1975-01-01

    The localized magnons at an interface between two Heisenberg ferromagnets and the ferromagnetic stability at the interface are studied. The authors consider simple cubic crystals having the same lattice parameter and the same spin value in the fundamental state on each site, but different exchange integrals between first and second nearest neighbours. An interface by coupling two semi-infinite crystals having the same crystallographic surface is defined. The conditions for the existence of localized magnons at (001) interfaces as well as the dispersion curves of localized and resonant magnons in the high symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone are studied. The effect of the interface interactions on these modes is determined. It is shown that magnetic superstructures may exist at (110) interfaces. Such an instability is given by the existence of a soft localized mode at the interface [fr

  13. NESSUS/NASTRAN Interface

    Millwater, Harry; Riha, David

    1996-01-01

    The NESSUS and NASTRAN computer codes were successfully integrated. The enhanced NESSUS code will use NASTRAN for the structural Analysis and NESSUS for the probabilistic analysis. Any quantities in the NASTRAN bulk data input can be random variables. Any NASTRAN result that is written to the output2 file can be returned to NESSUS as the finite element result. The interfacing between NESSUS and NASTRAN is handled automatically by NESSUS. NESSUS and NASTRAN can be run on different machines using the remote host option.

  14. Curriculum at the Interface

    This Symposium presents curriculum design and content issues in a Scandinavian business school at its Centenary. The aim is an exploration of an educational institution at the interface of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) within the historical trends of the European Union. We hope...... of interdisciplinarity, use of text production as a tool in support of project and thesis writing, and the use of plurilingual content based teaching in a cooperative learning model for European studies. The history of one curriculum model initiated to educate better citizens, combining interdisciplinary methods...

  15. Virtual interface environment

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1986-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture has been developed for use as a multipurpose interface environment. The system provides a multisensory, interactive display environment in which a user can virtually explore a 360-degree synthesized or remotely sensed environment and can viscerally interact with its components. Primary applications of the system are in telerobotics, management of large-scale integrated information systems, and human factors research. System configuration, application scenarios, and research directions are described.

  16. Interfaces para control cerebral

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  17. Brain-computer interface

    2014-01-01

    A computer-implemented method of providing an interface between a user and a processing unit, the method comprising : presenting one or more stimuli to a user, each stimulus varying at a respective stimulation frequency, each stimulation frequency being associated with a respective user......-selectable input; receiving at least one signal indicative of brain activity of the user; and determining, from the received signal, which of the one or more stimuli the user attends to and selecting the user-selectable input associated with the stimulation frequency of the determined stimuli as being a user...

  18. Superconductivity at disordered interfaces

    Simanek, E.

    1979-01-01

    The increase of the superconducting transition temperature Tsub(c) due to the tunneling of conduction electrons into negative-u centers at a disordered metal-semiconductor interface is calculated. The strong dependence of the experimental increase of Tsub(c) on the Fermi energy of the metal is accounted for by the polaronic reduction of the tunneling matrix elements. The latter reduction is dynamically suppressed by the decreasing lifetime of the localized state as Esub(F) increases. The theoretical enhancement is sufficiently strong to explain the increase of Tsub(c) observed in eutectic alloys. (author)

  19. Websites for children: search strategies and interface design. Three studies on children's search performance and evaluation

    Jochmann-Mannak, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Children experience all kinds of problems using search interfaces for adults such as Google. The research reported in this dissertation is about the design of informational interfaces for children between 8 and 12 years old. The goal of the research was to learn more about interfaces that ‘work’ for

  20. Internal Interface Diversification as a Security Measure in Sensor Networks

    Sampsa Rauti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available More actuator and sensor devices are connected to the Internet of Things (IoT every day, and the network keeps growing, while software security of the devices is often incomplete. Sensor networks and the IoT in general currently cover a large number of devices with an identical internal interface structure. By diversifying the internal interfaces, the interfaces on each node of the network are made unique, and it is possible to break the software monoculture of easily exploitable identical systems. This paper proposes internal interface diversification as a security measure for sensor networks. We conduct a study on diversifiable internal interfaces in 20 IoT operating systems. We also present two proof-of-concept implementations and perform experiments to gauge the feasibility in the IoT environment. Internal interface diversification has practical limitations, and not all IoT operating systems have that many diversifiable interfaces. However, because of low resource requirements, compatibility with other security measures and wide applicability to several interfaces, we believe internal interface diversification is a promising and effective approach for securing nodes in sensor networks.

  1. Virtual sculpting with advanced gestural interface

    Kılıboz, Nurettin Çağrı

    2013-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Computer Engineering and the Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2013. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2013. Includes bibliographical references leaves 54-58. In this study, we propose a virtual reality application that can be utilized to design preliminary/conceptual models similar to real world clay sculpting. The proposed system makes use of the innovative gestural interface that enhances the experience of...

  2. Portraying User Interface History

    Jørgensen, Anker Helms

    2008-01-01

    history. Next the paper analyses a selected sample of papers on UI history at large. The analysis shows that the current state-of-art is featured by three aspects: Firstly internalism, in that the papers adress the tech­nologies in their own right with little con­text­ualization, secondly whiggism...... in that they largely address prevailing UI techno­logies, and thirdly history from above in that they focus on the great deeds of the visionaries. The paper then compares this state-of-art in UI history to the much more mature fields history of computing and history of technology. Based hereon, some speculations......The user interface is coming of age. Papers adressing UI history have appeared in fair amounts in the last 25 years. Most of them address particular aspects such as an in­novative interface paradigm or the contribution of a visionary or a research lab. Contrasting this, papers addres­sing UI...

  3. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    Underwood, Keith D [Albuquerque, NM; Hemmert, Karl Scott [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  4. Development of experimental concepts for investigating the strength behavior of fine-grained cohesive soil in the Spacelab/space shuttle zero-g environment

    Bonaparte, R.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Three different sets of tests are proposed for the NASA Spacelab experimental program. The first of tests, designed to measure the true cohesion of several different soils, would be carried out in space through use of a specially prepared direct shear apparatus. As part of this first series of tests, it is recommended that a set of drained unconfined compression tests be performed terrestrially on the same soils as tested in space. A form of the direct tension test is planned to measure the true tensile strength of the same types of soils used in the first series of tests. The direct tension tests could be performed terrestrially. The combined results of the direct shear tests, direct tension tests, and unconfined compression tests can be used to construct approximate failure envelopes for the soils tested in the region of the stress origin. Relationships between true cohesion and true tensile strength can also be investigated. In addition, the role of physio-chemical variables should be studied. The third set of tests involves using a multiaxial cubical or true triaxial test apparatus to investigate the influence of gravity induced fabric anisotropy and stress nonhomogeneities on the stress strain behavior of cohesive soils at low effective stress levels. These tests would involve both in space and terrestrial laboratory testing.

  5. Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Experiment Laboratory engineering concepts/design tradeoffs. Volume 1: Study results

    Greco, R. V.; Eaton, L. R.; Wilkinson, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The work is summarized which was accomplished from January 1974 to October 1974 for the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineation of candidate experiments that require the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity are reported. The experiment program and the laboratory concept for a Spacelab payload to perform cloud microphysics research are defined. This multimission laboratory is planned to be available to the entire scientific community to utilize in furthering the basic understanding of cloud microphysical processes and phenomenon, thereby contributing to improved weather prediction and ultimately to provide beneficial weather control and modification.

  6. TaskMaster: a prototype graphical user interface to a schedule optimization model

    Banham, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited This thesis investigates the use of current graphical interface techniques to build more effective computer-user interfaces to Operations Research (OR) schedule optimization models. The design is directed at the scheduling decision maker who possesses limited OR experience. The feasibility and validity of building an interface for this kind of user is demonstrated in the development of a prototype graphical user interface called TaskMa...

  7. Thin films and buried interfaces characterization with X-ray standing waves

    Lagomarsino, S [CNR, Rome (Italy). Istituto Elettronica Stato Solido

    1996-09-01

    The X-ray standing wave techniques is a powerful, non destructive method to study interfaces at the atomic level. Its basic features are described here together with the peculiarities of its applications to epitaxial films and buried interfaces. As examples of applications, experiments carried out on Si/silicide interfaces, on GaAs/InAs/GaAs buried interfaces and on Si/Ge superlattices are shown.

  8. An Object-Oriented Architecture for User Interface Management in Distributed Applications

    Denzer, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    User interfaces for large distributed applications have to handle specific problems: the complexity of the application itself and the integration of online-data into the user interface. A main task of the user interface architecture is to provide powerful tools to design and augment the end-user system easily, hence giving the designer more time to focus on user requirements. Our experiences developing a user interface system for a process control room showed that a lot of time during the dev...

  9. Noncontact evaluation for interface states by photocarrier counting

    Furuta, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kojiro; Maeta, Takahiro; Miyashita, Moriya; Izunome, Koji; Kubota, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a noncontact measurement method that enables in-line measurement and does not have any test element group (TEG) formation. In this method, the number of photocarriers excited from the interface states are counted which is called “photocarrier counting”, and then the energy distribution of the interface states density (D it) is evaluated by spectral light excitation. In our previous experiment, the method used was a preliminary contact measurement method at the oxide on top of the Si wafer. We developed, at this time, a D it measurement method as a noncontact measurement with a gap between the probes and the wafer. The shallow trench isolation (STI) sidewall has more localized interface states than the region under the gate electrode. We demonstrate the noncontact measurement of trapped carriers from interface states using wafers of three different crystal plane orientations. The demonstration will pave the way for evaluating STI sidewall interface states in future studies.

  10. An ecological interface design for BWR nuclear power plants

    Monta, K.; Itoh, J.

    1992-01-01

    An ecological interface design was applied to realize the support function for the operator's direct perception and analytical reasoning in the development of an intelligent man-machine system for BWR nuclear power plants. The abstraction-aggregation functional hierarchy representation of the work domain is a base of the ecological interface design. Another base is the concept of the level of cognitive control. The former was mapped into the interface to externalize the operator's normative mental model of the plants, which will reduce his/her cognitive work load and support knowledge-based problem solving. In addition, the same framework can be used for the analytical evaluation of man-machine interfaces. The information content and structure of a prototype interface were evaluated. This approach seems promising from these experiences. (author)

  11. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  12. A Development of Lightweight Grid Interface

    Iwai, G; Kawai, Y; Sasaki, T; Watase, Y

    2011-01-01

    In order to help a rapid development of Grid/Cloud aware applications, we have developed API to abstract the distributed computing infrastructures based on SAGA (A Simple API for Grid Applications). SAGA, which is standardized in the OGF (Open Grid Forum), defines API specifications to access distributed computing infrastructures, such as Grid, Cloud and local computing resources. The Universal Grid API (UGAPI), which is a set of command line interfaces (CLI) and APIs, aims to offer simpler API to combine several SAGA interfaces with richer functionalities. These CLIs of the UGAPI offer typical functionalities required by end users for job management and file access to the different distributed computing infrastructures as well as local computing resources. We have also built a web interface for the particle therapy simulation and demonstrated the large scale calculation using the different infrastructures at the same time. In this paper, we would like to present how the web interface based on UGAPI and SAGA achieve more efficient utilization of computing resources over the different infrastructures with technical details and practical experiences.

  13. Combinatorial Nano-Bio Interfaces.

    Cai, Pingqiang; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Ming; Wu, Yun-Long; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-06-08

    Nano-bio interfaces are emerging from the convergence of engineered nanomaterials and biological entities. Despite rapid growth, clinical translation of biomedical nanomaterials is heavily compromised by the lack of comprehensive understanding of biophysicochemical interactions at nano-bio interfaces. In the past decade, a few investigations have adopted a combinatorial approach toward decoding nano-bio interfaces. Combinatorial nano-bio interfaces comprise the design of nanocombinatorial libraries and high-throughput bioevaluation. In this Perspective, we address challenges in combinatorial nano-bio interfaces and call for multiparametric nanocombinatorics (composition, morphology, mechanics, surface chemistry), multiscale bioevaluation (biomolecules, organelles, cells, tissues/organs), and the recruitment of computational modeling and artificial intelligence. Leveraging combinatorial nano-bio interfaces will shed light on precision nanomedicine and its potential applications.

  14. Porphyrins at interfaces

    Auwärter, Willi; Écija, David; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V.

    2015-02-01

    Porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole macrocycles possess an impressive variety of functional properties that have been exploited in natural and artificial systems. Different metal centres incorporated within the tetradentate ligand are key for achieving and regulating vital processes, including reversible axial ligation of adducts, electron transfer, light-harvesting and catalytic transformations. Tailored substituents optimize their performance, dictating their arrangement in specific environments and mediating the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures. Here we review the current understanding of these species at well-defined interfaces, disclosing exquisite insights into their structural and chemical properties, and also discussing methods by which to manipulate their intramolecular and organizational features. The distinct characteristics arising from the interfacial confinement offer intriguing prospects for molecular science and advanced materials. We assess the role of surface interactions with respect to electronic and physicochemical characteristics, and describe in situ metallation pathways, molecular magnetism, rotation and switching. The engineering of nanostructures, organized layers, interfacial hybrid and bio-inspired systems is also addressed.

  15. APST interfaces in LINCS

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1995-07-01

    APST is an acronym for the four highest of the seven layers of the LINCS hierarchy of communication protocols: (from high to low) Application, Presentation, Session, and Transport. Routines in each but the lowest of these APST layers can utilize the facilities of any lower APST layer (normally, but not necessarily, the immediately next lower layer) by invoking various primitives (macros that in most cases are subroutine calls) defining the upper interface of the lower layer. So there are three APST interfaces: Presentation layer, used by the Application layer; Session layer, normally used by the Presentation layer; and Transport layer, normally used by the Session layer. Logically, each end of a stream (unidirectional sequence of transmitted information) is handled by three modules, one module each for the Presentation, Session, and Transport layers, and each of these modules deals with only that one end of that one stream. The internal workings of the layers, particularly the Transport layer, do not necessarily exhibit this same modularization; for example, the two oppositely directed streams between the same two ends (constituting an association) may interact within a layer. However, such interaction is an implementational detail of no direct interest to those utilizing the layer. The present document does not describe implementation, nor does it discuss in any detail how the modules employ packet headings and data formats to communicate with their partner modules at the other end of a stream. There being one logical module per end of stream is a characteristic only of the Presentation, Session, and Transport layers. An Application layer module usually manages several streams, orchestrating them to achieve some desired purpose. The modules of the layers (Network, Link, and Physical) below the APST layers each handle many streams, multiplexing them through the nodes and channels of the network to transmit them from their origins to their destinations.

  16. Acid chat: gestural interface design

    Gökhan, Ali Oytun; Gokhan, Ali Oytun

    2005-01-01

    AcidChat is an experimental design project that aims to create an innovative computer software interface for Internet chat software using today's well known technologies; Adobe Photoshop, Macromedia Freehand and digital photography. The aim of the project is to create new understandings of interface and it's usage, by adding new conceptions to chat based interfaces which creates a totally new look at the computer software and application. One of the key features is to add a gestural approach ...

  17. Ecohydrological Interfaces as Dynamic Hotspots of Biogeochemical Cycling

    Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg; Hannah, David; McDonald, Karlie; Folegot, Silvia; Baranov, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ecohydrological interfaces, represent the boundaries between water-dependent ecosystems that can alter substantially the fluxes of energy and matter. There is still a critical gap of understanding the organisational principles of the drivers and controls of spatially and temporally variable ecohydrological interface functions. This knowledge gap limits our capacity to efficiently quantify, predict and manage the services provided by complex ecosystems. Many ecohydrological interfaces are characterized by step changes in microbial metabolic activity, steep redox gradients and often even thermodynamic phase shifts, for instance at the interfaces between atmosphere and water or soil matrix and macro-pores interfaces. This paper integrates investigations from point scale laboratory microcosm experiments with reach and subcatchment scale tracer experiments and numerical modeling studies to elaborate similarities in the drivers and controls that constitute the enhanced biogeochemical activity of different types of ecohydrologica interfaces across a range of spatial and temporal scales. We therefore combine smart metabolic activity tracers to quantify the impact of bioturbating benthic fauna onto ecosystem respiration and oxygen consumption and investigate at larger scale, how microbial metabolic activity and carbon turnover at the water-sediment interface are controlled by sediment physical and chemical properties as well as water temperatures. Numerical modeling confirmed that experimentally identified hotspots of streambed biogeochemical cycling were controlled by patterns of physical properties such as hydraulic conductivities or bioavailability of organic matter, impacting on residence time distributions and hence reaction times. In contrast to previous research, our investigations thus confirmed that small-scale variability of physical and chemical interface properties had a major impact on biogeochemical processing at the investigated ecohydrological interfaces

  18. Proposal of adaptive human interface and study of interface evaluation method for plant operators

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Kubota, Ryuji.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, a new concept of human interface adaptive to plant operators' mental model, cognitive process and psychological state which change with time is proposed. It is composed of a function to determine information which should be indicated to operators based on the plant situation, a function to estimate operators' internal conditions, and a function to arrange the information amount, position, timing, form etc. based on their conditions. The method to evaluate the fitness of the interface by using the analysis results based on cognitive science, ergonomics, psychology and physiology is developed to achieve such an interface. Fundamental physiological experiments have been performed. Stress and workload can be identified by the ratio of the power average of the α wave fraction of a brain wave and be distinguished by the ratio of the standard deviation of the R-R interval in test and at rest, in the case of low stress such as mouse operation, calculation and walking. (author)

  19. Proposal of adaptive human interface and study of interface evaluation method for plant operators

    Ujita, Hiroshi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.; Kubota, Ryuji

    1994-07-01

    In this report, a new concept of human interface adaptive to plant operators' mental model, cognitive process and psychological state which change with time is proposed. It is composed of a function to determine information which should be indicated to operators based on the plant situation, a function to estimate operators' internal conditions, and a function to arrange the information amount, position, timing, form etc. based on their conditions. The method to evaluate the fitness of the interface by using the analysis results based on cognitive science, ergonomics, psychology and physiology is developed to achieve such an interface. Fundamental physiological experiments have been performed. Stress and workload can be identified by the ratio of the power average of the [alpha] wave fraction of a brain wave and be distinguished by the ratio of the standard deviation of the R-R interval in test and at rest, in the case of low stress such as mouse operation, calculation and walking. (author).

  20. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to the modernization of the interface man-machine; Experiencias en la aplicacion de ingenieria de factores humanos a la modernizacion de la interfaz hombre-maquina

    Valdivia Martin, C.; Fernandez Illobre, L.; Trueba Alonso, P.; Cerezal Diez, J. E.

    2014-07-01

    This paper shows some of the experience gained during the application of the IFH to the modernization of the IHM. The experience of the application of IFH in modernization and modifications of design shows a positive effect, improving the IHM associated, with the acceptance of the end user. (Author)

  1. Evaluation of navigation interfaces in virtual environments

    Mestre, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    When users are immersed in cave-like virtual reality systems, navigational interfaces have to be used when the size of the virtual environment becomes larger than the physical extent of the cave floor. However, using navigation interfaces, physically static users experience self-motion (visually-induced vection). As a consequence, sensorial incoherence between vision (indicating self-motion) and other proprioceptive inputs (indicating immobility) can make them feel dizzy and disoriented. We tested, in two experimental studies, different locomotion interfaces. The objective was twofold: testing spatial learning and cybersickness. In a first experiment, using first-person navigation with a flystick ®, we tested the effect of sensorial aids, a spatialized sound or guiding arrows on the ground, attracting the user toward the goal of the navigation task. Results revealed that sensorial aids tended to impact negatively spatial learning. Moreover, subjects reported significant levels of cybersickness. In a second experiment, we tested whether such negative effects could be due to poorly controlled rotational motion during simulated self-motion. Subjects used a gamepad, in which rotational and translational displacements were independently controlled by two joysticks. Furthermore, we tested first- versus third-person navigation. No significant difference was observed between these two conditions. Overall, cybersickness tended to be lower, as compared to experiment 1, but the difference was not significant. Future research should evaluate further the hypothesis of the role of passively perceived optical flow in cybersickness, but manipulating the virtual environment'sperrot structure. It also seems that video-gaming experience might be involved in the user's sensitivity to cybersickness.

  2. Playful User Interfaces. Interfaces that Invite Social and Physical Interaction.

    Nijholt, Antinus; Unknown, [Unknown

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  3. Configurations of NPD : production interfaces and interface integration mechanisms

    Smulders, F.E.H.M.; Boer, H.; Hansen, P.H.K.; Gubi, E.; Dorst, C.H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes and illustrates different configurations of the interface between new product development and production processes, including both intra–firm and inter–firm interfaces. These configurations are partly based on a process view of product innovation and partly on a structural view

  4. Atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders

    2016-01-01

    realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via the I–V curve. In particular, it will be demonstrated how doping — and bias — modifies the Schottky barrier, and how finite size models (the slab approach) are unable to describe these interfaces......We present a general framework for simulating interfaces using an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions. The method includes all the relevant ingredients, such as doping and an accurate value of the semiconductor band gap, required to model...

  5. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  6. Moisture transfer across the interface between brick and mortar joint

    Derluyn, Hannelore; Moonen, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental and modelling work on moisture transport in masonry, with special attention to the liquid transport across the interface between brick and mortar joint. Experiments and simulations reveal that two aspects need to be taken into account: (1) the dependence of moisture transport properties on the curing of the mortar; (2) the presence of a hydraulic interface resistance between brick and mortar. The resistance is due to imperfect contact between brick and morta...

  7. Universal Library for Building Radar Operator Interface

    A. A. Karankevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of the development of a software library, used for building software interfaces for radars being developed in BMSTU Radioelectronic Technics Scientific and Research Institute. The library is a software application library written in C++ using Qt and OpenGL libraries.The article describes the requirements, that the library is supposed to meet, in particular — cross-platform capabilities and versatility of the solution. The data types, that library uses, are described. The description of theinterface elements developed is shown, and some pictures of their operation are given.The article shows the main interface elements used. They are: «Matrix» that shows twodimensional data, «Waterfall», that is used for time scanning of the parameter specified, and «Plan Position Indicator» that shows circular scan from surveillance radar without geometric distortions.The part «Library implementation» shows the example of radiolocation station interface, that was based on this library, used in the working model of ultrashortpulse radar. Some results of the operation of this interface are also shown. The experiment shows the system working with two people in the field. As people start to move, the system becomes capable of distinguishing moving targets and stationary surface. The article shows the system operation the same way as the system operator can see it through his interface.The conclusion contains brief results of the development, the sphere of application of the software, and the prospects of the further development of the library.

  8. Innovative interfaces for Serious Games

    J. Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The tangible interaction approach has, in recent years, become a promising alternative to tactile interaction for very young children. Children playing with Tangible User Interfaces (TUI are motivated by the novel and digital environment and benefit from the same values as conventional physical playing. Young children build their mental image of the world through action and motor responses and, with physical handling, they become conscious of reality. Within TUIs, digitally augmented surfaces (interactive blackboards and tabletops are becoming popular in educative environments. Tabletop devices are horizontal surfaces capable of supporting interaction and image feedback on their surface, and are especially interesting for reinforcing face-to-face social relations and group activities. However, most of current children-oriented applications for tabletops are based on tactile interaction, thus losing the benefits of physical playing. The paper describes our experiences building tangible tabletops, and designing tangible games and toys. In particular, we present NIKVision, a tabletop device intended to give leisure and fun while reinforcing physical manipulation and colocated gaming for 3-6 year old children. Several hybrid (physical/digital games based on the manipulation of passive and active toys have been developed for NIKVision. From our experience several useful lessons can be extracted. Among them, the necessity of bridging the gap between designers and developers making it easier the prototyping of tabletop games stands out. To tackle this difficulty a toolkit for the prototyping of tabletop games called ToyVision has been created. The toolkit supports designers to fully explore the physical feasibilities of the manipulation of physical playing pieces, while minimizing the technical difficulties of implementing tabletop games based on physical manipulation. This way, NIKVision and ToyVision are becoming powerful tools to develop innovative

  9. Development of a wearable haptic game interface

    J. Foottit

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the ongoing development of a wearable haptic game interface, in this case for controlling a flight simulator. The device differs from many traditional haptic feedback implementations in that it combines vibrotactile feedback with gesture based input, thus becoming a two-way conduit between the user and the virtual environment. The device is intended to challenge what is considered an “interface” and sets out to purposefully blur the boundary between man and machine. This allows for a more immersive experience, and a user evaluation shows that the intuitive interface allows the user to become the aircraft that is controlled by the movements of the user's hand.

  10. The scalable coherent interface, IEEE P1596

    Gustavson, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    IEEE P1596, the scalable coherent interface (formerly known as SuperBus) is based on experience gained while developing Fastbus (ANSI/IEEE 960--1986, IEC 935), Futurebus (IEEE P896.x) and other modern 32-bit buses. SCI goals include a minimum bandwidth of 1 GByte/sec per processor in multiprocessor systems with thousands of processors; efficient support of a coherent distributed-cache image of distributed shared memory; support for repeaters which interface to existing or future buses; and support for inexpensive small rings as well as for general switched interconnections like Banyan, Omega, or crossbar networks. This paper presents a summary of current directions, reports the status of the work in progress, and suggests some applications in data acquisition and physics

  11. Furthering interface design in services

    Secomandi, F.; Snelders, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically discusses ideas from the book Interface: An Approach to Design (Bonsiepe 1999) as a springboard for thinking through the design and use of services. We introduce Bonsiepe’s take on phenomenological philosophy of technology in his conception of the user interface. Next to that,

  12. Modeling soft interface dominated systems

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The two main continuum frameworks used for modeling the dynamics of soft multiphase systems are the Gibbs dividing surface model, and the diffuse interface model. In the former the interface is modeled as a two dimensional surface, and excess properties such as a surface density, or surface energy

  13. GRAPHIC INTERFACES FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

    Ion PANA,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using effective the method of calculating Fitness for Service requires the achievement of graphical interfaces. This paper presents an example of such interfaces, made with Visual Basic program and used in the evaluation of pipelines in a research contract [4

  14. Preface (to Playful User Interfaces)

    Unknown, [Unknown; Nijholt, A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2014-01-01

    This book is about user interfaces to applications that can be considered as ‘playful’. The interfaces to such applications should be ‘playful’ as well. The application should be fun, and interacting with such an application should, of course, be fun as well. Maybe more. Why not expect that the

  15. Overview of Graphical User Interfaces.

    Hulser, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of graphical user interfaces for online public access catalogs (OPACs) covers the history of OPACs; OPAC front-end design, including examples from Indiana University and the University of Illinois; and planning and implementation of a user interface. (10 references) (EA)

  16. Playful Interfaces : Introduction and History

    Nijholt, Anton; Nijholt, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this short survey we have some historical notes about human-computer interface development with an emphasis on interface technology that has allowed us to design playful interactions with applications. The applications do not necessarily have to be entertainment applications. We can have playful

  17. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  18. Power User Interface

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  19. INTERFACING INFANT MENTAL HEALTH KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS: REFLECTIONS ON THE NARRATIVES OF LAY HOME VISITORS' EXPERIENCES OF LEARNING AND APPLYING RELATIONAL CONCEPTS OF DEVELOPMENT IN A SOUTH AFRICAN INTERVENTION PROGRAM.

    Baradon, Tessa; Bain, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    The question of interfacing research and clinically generated knowledge in the field of infant mental health (IMH) with local cultural knowledge and belief systems has provoked extended discussion in recent years. This article explores convergences and divergences between current research-based, relational IMH mental health models and "community" knowledge held by a group of South African lay home visitors from a socioeconomically deprived township. These women were trained in a psychoanalytic and attachment-informed infant mental health program that promotes a relational model of infant development. They provide an intervention that supports high risk mother-infant relationships in the same locality. A two-tiered approach was taken to the analysis of the home visitor interviews and focused on the home visitors' constructed narratives of infant development posttraining as well as the personal impact of the training and work on the home visitors themselves. The study found that psychoanalytic and attachment-informed thinking about development makes sense to those operating within the local South African cultural context, but that the accommodation of this knowledge is a complex and challenging process. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  20. Banking of environmental samples for short-term biochemical and chemical monitoring of organic contamination in coastal marine environments: the GICBEM experience (1986-1990). Groupe Interface Chimie Biologie des Ecosystèmes, Marins.

    Garrigues, P; Narbonne, J F; Lafaurie, M; Ribera, D; Lemaire, P; Raoux, C; Michel, X; Salaun, J P; Monod, J L; Romeo, M

    1993-11-01

    The GICBEM (Groupe Interface Chimie Biologie des Ecosystèmes Marins) program consists of an evaluation of the ecosystem health status in the Mediterranean Sea mainly based on chemical and biochemical approaches. Specific chemical contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorobiphenyls (PCB), heavy metals) in waters, sediments, and related biotransformation indicators in target organisms (mussels, fish) have been selected for a complete survey of the coastal waters. In order to provide an appropriate sampling program for standardization for each sampling cruise, various aspects have been studied: (a) parameters for the choice of the sample sites; (b) ways of collection the samples (waters, sediments, marine organisms); and (c) preparation of the samples for a short term storage on board ship and for further analyses in the ground laboratory. Methods of preparation and storage of the samples are described and could be used to initiate an environmental banking program including both possible retrospective analyses of chemical pollutants and biochemical indicators. Moreover, the correlation between chemicals (PAH) and biochemical (mixed function oxygenase activities) parameters has been studied and this demonstrates the capability of the enzyme activities as reliable pollution biomarkers.

  1. The Schultz MIDI Benchmarking Toolbox for MIDI interfaces, percussion pads, and sound cards

    Schultz, Benjamin G

    2018-01-01

    The Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) was readily adopted for auditory sensorimotor synchronization experiments. These experiments typically use MIDI percussion pads to collect responses, a MIDI-USB converter (or MIDI-PCI interface) to record responses on a PC and manipulate feedback, and

  2. At the Knowledge Interface

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine; Buono, Anthony; Poulfelt, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    of the authors’ experiences with and studies of a group of researchers for whom both academic and practical impact is set by contract under a state initiated Industrial PhD Program. Drawing on a framework by Prahalad and Ramaswamy (2004), research impact competency is conceptualized as mastery of the building...

  3. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    Russell, Thomas P. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  4. Through the Interface - a human activity approach to user interfaces

    Bødker, Susanne

    In providing a theoretical framework for understanding human- computer interaction as well as design of user interfaces, this book combines elements of anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, software engineering, and computer science. The framework examines the everyday work practices of us...

  5. Experimental study of an isochorically heated heterogeneous interface. A progress report

    Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-20

    Outline of the presentation: Studying possible mix / interface motion between heterogeneous low/high Z interfaces driven by 2-fluid or kinetic plasma effects (Heated to few eV, Sharp (sub µm) interface); Isochoric heating to initialize interface done with Al quasimonoenergetic ion beams on Trident; Have measured isochoric heating in individual materials intended for compound targets; Fielded experiments on Trident to measure interface motion (Gold-diamond, tin-aluminium); Measured heated-sample temperature with streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) (UT Austin led (research contract), SOP tests → heating uniformity Vs thickness on Al foils. Results are being analyzed.

  6. Practical speech user interface design

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  7. Designing end-user interfaces

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  8. Interfaces and thin films physics

    Equer, B.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Interfaces and Thin Film Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School France) is presented. The research program is focused on the thin films and on the interfaces of the amorphous semiconductor materials: silicon and silicon germanium, silicon-carbon and silicon-nitrogen alloys. In particular, the following topics are discussed: the basic processes and the kinetics of the reactive gas deposition, the amorphous materials manufacturing, the physico-chemical characterization of thin films and interfaces and the electron transport in amorphous semiconductors. The construction and optimization of experimental devices, as well as the activities concerning instrumentation, are also described [fr

  9. Molecular characterization of composite interfaces

    Ishida, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was applied to elucidate the molecular structures of the glass/matrix interface. The various interfaces and interphases were studied. It is found that the structure of the silane in a treating solution is important in determining the structure of the silane on glass fibers, influences the macroscopic properties of composites. The amount of silane on glass fibers, the state of hydrogen bonding, orientation, copolymerization of the organicfunctionality with the matrix, curing of the silane, and effect of water on the interface were investigated. It is shown that the molecular approach is useful to interpret and predict physicomechanical properties of composites

  10. Search-User Interface Design

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  11. The molecule-metal interface

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  12. An adaptive interface (KNOWBOT) for nuclear power industry data bases

    Heger, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive interface, KNOWBOT, has been designed to solve some of the problems that face the users of large centralized databases. The interface applies the neural network approach to information retrieval from a database. The database is a subset of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). KNOWBOT preempts an existing database interface and works in conjunction with it. By design, KNOWBOT starts as a tabula rasa but acquires knowledge through its interactions with the user and the database. The interface uses its gained knowledge to personalize the database retrieval process and to induce new queries. In addition, the interface forgets the information that is no longer needed by the user. These self-organizing features of the interface reduce the scope of the database to the subsets that are highly relevant to the user needs. A proof-of-principle version of this interface has been implemented in Common LISP on a Texas Instruments Explorer I workstation. Experiments with KNOWBOT have successfully demonstrated the robustness of the model especially with induction and self-organization

  13. Operator interface programs for KSTAR operation

    Lee, Sangil; Park, Mikyung; Park, Jinseop; Na, Hoonkyun; Kwon, M.

    2013-01-01

    Beginning the first plasma discharging experiment of KSTAR since 2008, KSTAR performed the third plasma discharging experiment by 2010. During the experiment of three times, KSTAR OPerator Interface (OPI) programs have been developed for KSTAR operation by itself. OPI programs used in KSTAR were implemented by KSTAR widget plug-in Toolkit (KWT). The KWT means the plug-in library implemented by Qt-based user interface development software. The main purpose of developing the KWT library is to implement full automation libraries having interface with the automated EPICS channel access (CA) guaranteeing the flexibility for requirements of operators. In addition, it has advantages in minimizing human code error and maximizing utilization of the limited human resource. According to the increasing of control systems, a number of OPI servers connected to one EPICS gateway server caused the connection problem and increased the amount of the network data packets. To solve these problems, an algorithm of “CachedChannelAccess” for shared memory base was implemented into an inner logic of the KWT library. KSTAR control system monitoring (CSM) program is one of applications developed by using KWT library. The function of CSM program is to notify alarm to operators by checking health status of every server's network health status and resource (cpu, memory, network packets, disk usage rate and system/user defined process) usage state. Another application is a post-shot sequencing program which is activated after every shot is completed. This application is to display major plasma parameters and diagnostic data in chart form, to save this data to database, and to transfer a chart image file to a web server. This paper describes the technical details how to develop OPI applications which have high productivity using Qt on the EPICS-based control system

  14. Operator interface programs for KSTAR operation

    Lee, Sangil, E-mail: leesi@nfri.re.kr; Park, Mikyung, E-mail: mkpark@nfri.re.kr; Park, Jinseop, E-mail: linupark@nfri.re.kr; Na, Hoonkyun, E-mail: hkna@nfri.re.kr; Kwon, M., E-mail: kwonm@nfri.re.kr

    2013-11-15

    Beginning the first plasma discharging experiment of KSTAR since 2008, KSTAR performed the third plasma discharging experiment by 2010. During the experiment of three times, KSTAR OPerator Interface (OPI) programs have been developed for KSTAR operation by itself. OPI programs used in KSTAR were implemented by KSTAR widget plug-in Toolkit (KWT). The KWT means the plug-in library implemented by Qt-based user interface development software. The main purpose of developing the KWT library is to implement full automation libraries having interface with the automated EPICS channel access (CA) guaranteeing the flexibility for requirements of operators. In addition, it has advantages in minimizing human code error and maximizing utilization of the limited human resource. According to the increasing of control systems, a number of OPI servers connected to one EPICS gateway server caused the connection problem and increased the amount of the network data packets. To solve these problems, an algorithm of “CachedChannelAccess” for shared memory base was implemented into an inner logic of the KWT library. KSTAR control system monitoring (CSM) program is one of applications developed by using KWT library. The function of CSM program is to notify alarm to operators by checking health status of every server's network health status and resource (cpu, memory, network packets, disk usage rate and system/user defined process) usage state. Another application is a post-shot sequencing program which is activated after every shot is completed. This application is to display major plasma parameters and diagnostic data in chart form, to save this data to database, and to transfer a chart image file to a web server. This paper describes the technical details how to develop OPI applications which have high productivity using Qt on the EPICS-based control system.

  15. Quasiparticle Level Alignment for Photocatalytic Interfaces.

    Migani, Annapaoala; Mowbray, Duncan J; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-13

    Electronic level alignment at the interface between an adsorbed molecular layer and a semiconducting substrate determines the activity and efficiency of many photocatalytic materials. Standard density functional theory (DFT)-based methods have proven unable to provide a quantitative description of this level alignment. This requires a proper treatment of the anisotropic screening, necessitating the use of quasiparticle (QP) techniques. However, the computational complexity of QP algorithms has meant a quantitative description of interfacial levels has remained elusive. We provide a systematic study of a prototypical interface, bare and methanol-covered rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, to determine the type of many-body theory required to obtain an accurate description of the level alignment. This is accomplished via a direct comparison with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. We consider GGA DFT, hybrid DFT, and G0W0, scQPGW1, scQPGW0, and scQPGW QP calculations. Our results demonstrate that G0W0, or our recently introduced scQPGW1 approach, are required to obtain the correct alignment of both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied interfacial molecular levels (HOMO/LUMO). These calculations set a new standard in the interpretation of electronic structure probe experiments of complex organic molecule/semiconductor interfaces.

  16. Man-machine interface for the MFTF

    Speckert, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    In any complex system, the interesting problems occur at the interface of dissimilar subsystems. Control of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) begins with the US Congress, which controls the dollars, which control the people, who control the nine top-level minicomputers, which control the 65 microprocessors, which control the hardware that controls the physics experiment. There are many interesting boundaries across which control must pass, and the one that this paper addresses is the man-machine one. For the MFTF, the man-machine interface consists of a system of seven control consoles, each allowing one operator to communicate with one minicomputer. These consoles are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and both hardware and software were designed in a top-down fashion. This paper describes the requirements and the design of the console system as a whole, as well as the design and operation of the hardware and software of each console, and examines the possible form of a future man-machine interface

  17. Man-machine interface for the MFTF

    Speckert, G.C.

    1979-11-09

    In any complex system, the interesting problems occur at the interface of dissimilar subsystems. Control of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) begins with the US Congress, which controls the dollars, which control the people, who control the nine top-level minicomputers, which control the 65 microprocessors, which control the hardware that controls the physics experiment. There are many interesting boundaries across which control must pass, and the one that this paper addresses is the man-machine one. For the MFTF, the man-machine interface consists of a system of seven control consoles, each allowing one operator to communicate with one minicomputer. These consoles are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and both hardware and software were designed in a top-down fashion. This paper describes the requirements and the design of the console system as a whole, as well as the design and operation of the hardware and software of each console, and examines the possible form of a future man-machine interface.

  18. The LOCUS interface to the MFE database

    Miner, W.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The MFE database now consists of over 900 shots from TFTR, PDX, PLT, T-10, JT-60, TEXT, JET and ASDEX. A variety of discharge conditions is represented, ranging from single time slice Ohmic discharges to multiple time-slice auxiliary heated discharges. Included with most datasets is a reference that describes the experiment being performed when the data was taken. The MFE database is currently implemented under INGRES on a VAX that is on Internet. LOCUS, a database utility, developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is now available as an interface to the database. The LOCUS front end provides a graphic interface to the database from any generic graphics terminal that supports Tektronix 4010 emulation. It provides a variety of procedures for extracting, manipulating and graphing data from the MFE database. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the LOCUS interface, the authors examine, in detail, one of the recently added JET, H-mode discharges. In this example, they address some new concepts such as monitor functions, which have been introduced in order to help users more fully understand the multiple time-slice datasets. They also describe some of the more advanced techniques available in LOCUS for data access and manipulation. Specific areas of interest that are discussed are searching for and retrieving datasets, graphics, data fitting, and linear regression analysis

  19. Semiconductor/dielectric interface engineering and characterization

    Lucero, Antonio T.

    The focus of this dissertation is the application and characterization of several, novel interface passivation techniques for III-V semiconductors, and the development of an in-situ electrical characterization. Two different interface passivation techniques were evaluated. The first is interface nitridation using a nitrogen radical plasma source. The nitrogen radical plasma generator is a unique system which is capable of producing a large flux of N-radicals free of energetic ions. This was applied to Si and the surface was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Ultra-thin nitride layers could be formed from 200-400° C. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated using this passivation technique. Interface nitridation was able to reduce leakage current and improve the equivalent oxide thickness of the devices. The second passivation technique studied is the atomic layer deposition (ALD) diethylzinc (DEZ)/water treatment of sulfur treated InGaAs and GaSb. On InGaAs this passivation technique is able to chemically reduce higher oxidation states on the surface, and the process results in the deposition of a ZnS/ZnO interface passivation layer, as determined by XPS. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of MOSCAPs made on p-InGaAs reveal a large reduction in accumulation dispersion and a reduction in the density of interfacial traps. The same technique was applied to GaSb and the process was studied in an in-situ half-cycle XPS experiment. DEZ/H2O is able to remove all Sb-S from the surface, forming a stable ZnS passivation layer. This passivation layer is resistant to further reoxidation during dielectric deposition. The final part of this dissertation is the design and construction of an ultra-high vacuum cluster tool for in-situ electrical characterization. The system consists of three deposition chambers coupled to an electrical probe station. With this setup, devices can be processed and subsequently electrically characterized

  20. Active skin as new haptic interface

    Vuong, Nguyen Huu Lam; Kwon, Hyeok Yong; Chuc, Nguyen Huu; Kim, Duksang; An, Kuangjun; Phuc, Vuong Hong; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Jachoon; Lee, Youngkwan; Nam, Jae-Do; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new haptic interface, called "active skin", which is configured with a tactile sensor and a tactile stimulator in single haptic cell, and multiple haptic cells are embedded in a dielectric elastomer. The active skin generates a wide variety of haptic feel in response to the touch by synchronizing the sensor and the stimulator. In this paper, the design of the haptic cell is derived via iterative analysis and design procedures. A fabrication method dedicated to the proposed device is investigated and a controller to drive multiple haptic cells is developed. In addition, several experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of the active skin.

  1. Designing new interfaces for ROOT data processing

    Vuorinen, Kalle Elmer

    2016-01-01

    ROOT is a C++ framework for data analysis provided with a Python interface (PyRoot). ROOT is used in every Large Hadron Collider experiment. This project presents a way of reading ROOT TTree by using a new class called DataFrame, which allows the usage of cache and functional chains. Reading TTrees in Python has been quite slow compared to the C++ way of doing it and for this reason we also bring the possibility to read them with just-in-time (JIT) compiled C++ code, using another new Python class called TreeReader.

  2. ScienceOrganizer System and Interface Summary

    Keller, Richard M.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    ScienceOrganizer is a specialized knowledge management tool designed to enhance the information storage, organization, and access capabilities of distributed NASA science teams. Users access ScienceOrganizer through an intuitive Web-based interface that enables them to upload, download, and organize project information - including data, documents, images, and scientific records associated with laboratory and field experiments. Information in ScienceOrganizer is "threaded", or interlinked, to enable users to locate, track, and organize interrelated pieces of scientific data. Linkages capture important semantic relationships among information resources in the repository, and these assist users in navigating through the information related to their projects.

  3. The HEASARC graphical user interface

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Jacobs, P.; Oneel, B.

    1992-01-01

    An OSF/Motif-based graphical user interface has been developed to facilitate the use of the database and data analysis software packages available from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). It can also be used as an interface to other, similar, routines. A small number of tables are constructed to specify the possible commands and command parameters for a given set of analysis routines. These tables can be modified by a designer to affect the appearance of the interface screens. They can also be dynamically changed in response to parameter adjustments made while the underlying program is running. Additionally, a communication protocol has been designed so that the interface can operate locally or across a network. It is intended that this software be able to run on a variety of workstations and X terminals.

  4. Physics, mathematics and numerics of particle adsorption on fluid interfaces

    Schmuck, Markus; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2012-11-01

    We study two arbitrary immiscible fuids where one phase contains small particles of the size of the interface and smaller. We primarily focus on charge-free particles with wetting characteristics described by the contact angle formed at the interface between the two phases and the particles. Based on the experimental observation that particles are adsorbed on the interface to reduce the interfacial energy and hence the surface tension as well, we formulate a free-energy functional that accounts for these physical effects. Using elements from calculus of variations and formal gradient flow theory, we derive partial differential equations describing the location of the interface and the density of the particles in the fluid phases. Via numerical experiments we analyse the time evolution of the surface tension, the particle concentration, and the free energy over time and reflect basic experimentally observed phenomena.

  5. Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks

    2007-05-01

    technology for recording and stimulating from the auditory and olfactory sensory nervous systems of the awake, swimming nurse shark , G. cirratum (Figures...overlay of the central nervous system of the nurse shark on a horizontal MR image. Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks ...Neural Interfaces for Characterizing Population Responses to Odorants and Electrical Stimuli in the Nurse Shark , Ginglymostoma cirratum.” AChemS Abs

  6. Flippable User Interfaces for Internationalization

    Khaddam, Iyad; Vanderdonckt, Jean; 3rd ACM Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems EICS’2011

    2011-01-01

    The language reading direction is probably one of the most determinant factors influencing the successful internationalization of graphical user interfaces, beyond their mere translation. Western languages are read from left to right and top to bottom, while Arabic languages and Hebrew are read from right to left and top to bottom, and Oriental languages are read from top to bottom. In order to address this challenge, we introduce flippable user interfaces that enable the end user to change t...

  7. Interface of Chemistry and Biology

    I. Kira Astakhova

    2013-01-01

    Many exciting research studies in Science today lie at the interface between various disciplines. The interface between Chemistry and Biology is particularly rich, since it closely reflects Nature and the origins of Life. Multiple research groups in the Chemistry Departments around the world have made substantial efforts to interweave ideas from Chemistry and Biology to solve important questions related to material science and healthcare, just to name a few. International Journal of Bioorgani...

  8. Fluid mechanics of environmental interfaces

    Gualtieri, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid Mechanics of Environmental Interfaces describes the concept of the environmental interface, defined as a surface between two either abiotic or biotic systems. These are in relative motion and exchange mass, heat and momentum through biophysical and/or chemical processes. These processes are fluctuating temporally and spatially.The book will be of interest to graduate students, PhD students as well as researchers in environmental sciences, civil engineering and environmental engineering, (geo)physics and applied mathematics.

  9. Optoelectronics Interfaces for Power Converters

    Ovidiu Neamtu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The most important issue interface is galvanicseparation between the signal part and the power board.Standards in the field have increased continuouslyelectro-security requirements on the rigidity of thedielectric and insulation resistance. Recommendations forclassical solutions require the use of galvanic separationoptoelectronics devices. Interfacing with a PC or DSP -controller is a target of interposition optical signals viathe power hardware commands.

  10. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Herman, F

    1983-02-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.

  11. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  12. Attempt on construction of human friendly man-machine interface. Study and apply about human communication; Human friendly na man machine interface kochiku no kokoromi. Ningen no communication no kento to sono oyo

    Tatsuno, J. [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Kokubo, Y.; Matsumura, I.; Kobayashi, H. [Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an attempt on a construction way of human friendly man-machine interface. At first, we do a simple experiment to find out the characteristic of human verbal communication. From the experimental results, we get some rules in case in human verbal communication. We construct the man-machine interface which is based on these rules. Through teaching process, we examine our verbal communication interface comparing with conventional interfaces. From this comparison, we recognize that the verbal communication interface is valid to construct the user-friendly man-machine interface. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. New human machine interface for VR-1 training reactor

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution describes a new human machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human machine interface update was completed in the summer 2001. The human machine interface enables to operate the training reactor. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between a reactor operator and the control and safety system of the nuclear reactor. Messages appear from the control system, the operator can write commands and send them there. The second display is a graphical one. It is possible to represent there the status of the reactor, principle parameters (as power, period), control rods' positions, the course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human machine interface was produced in the InTouch developing environment of the WonderWare Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors at the reactor. The former operator's desk was completely removed and superseded with a new one. Besides of the computer and the two displays, there are control buttons, indicators and individual numerical displays of instrumentation there. Utilised components guarantee high quality of the new equipment. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the contemporary control and safety system with the personal computer of the human machine interface and the individual displays. New human machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the safety and comfort of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support of foreign visitors.(author)

  14. Integrated global digital image correlation for interface delamination characterization

    Hoefnagels, Johan P.M.

    2013-07-23

    Interfacial delamination is a key reliability challenge in composites and micro-electronic systems due to (high-density) integration of dissimilar materials. Predictive finite element models are used to minimize delamination failures during design, but require accurate interface models to capture (irreversible) crack initiation and propagation behavior observed in experiments. Therefore, an Integrated Global Digital Image Correlation (I-GDIC) strategy is developed for accurate determination of mechanical interface behavior from in-situ delamination experiments. Recently, a novel miniature delamination setup was presented that enables in-situ microscopic characterization of interface delamination while sensitively measuring global load-displacement curves for all mode mixities. Nevertheless, extraction of detailed mechanical interface behavior from measured images is challenging, because deformations are tiny and measurement noise large. Therefore, an advanced I-GDIC methodology is developed which correlates the image patterns by only deforming the images using kinematically-admissible \\'eigenmodes\\' that correspond to the few parameters controlling the interface tractions in an analytic description of the crack tip deformation field, thereby greatly enhancing accuracy and robustness. This method is validated on virtual delamination experiments, simulated using a recently developed self-adaptive cohesive zone (CZ) finite element framework. © The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2014.

  15. Citizen Journalism & Public Interfaces

    Brynskov, Martin; Strøbech, Kristian; Bang, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    of views or plain information dissemination. Form the media institution’s point of view the goal was to create a platform for hyper local journalism as a source for journalistic coverage in commercial media. The group investigating civic communication within the Digital Urban Living project...... followed the upstart of Dinby.dk in 2008 and has returned to the experiment in 2010. Our main interest is to explore the condition in which it is possible to create hyper local citizens produced digital content. And, furthermore, to understand which incitements are needed to make local actors or groups act...... as digital providers of their own activities. In the paper we present our findings and reflect them in relation to the design of the web-portal and the profile of the users. Finally we discuss the further perspectives of this form of user/citizens involvement in public communication....

  16. Molecular line parameters for the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy experiment

    Brown, L. R.; Farmer, C. B.; Toth, R. A.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1987-01-01

    During its first mission in 1985 onboard Spacelab 3, the ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) instrument, a high speed Fourier transform spectrometer, produced a large number of high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded in the occultation mode. The analysis and interpretation of these data in terms of composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the earth's upper atmosphere required good knowledge of the molecular line parameters for those species giving rise to the absorptions in the atmospheric spectra. This paper describes the spectroscopic line parameter database compiled for the ATMOS experiment and referenced in other papers describing ATMOS results. With over 400,000 entries, the linelist catalogs parameters of 46 minor and trace species in the 1-10,000/cm region.

  17. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to

  18. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  19. Immersive Virtual Environments and Multisensory Interfaces

    Stenslie, Ståle

    2009-01-01

    Based on my work with virtual environments dating back to the early 1990s, and with practical and engineering limitations on building tactile bodysuits that enhance the sense of immersion within detailed and dynamic virtual worlds overcome, this paper will take as its subject the example of my...... immersive artwork the Erotogod experiment (2001). A key aspect of interaction and immersion for the participant was the use of tactile bodysuit. I will analyze the multisensory nature of this experience, how tactility was engendered and, in fact, engineered through a mixture of technologies and approaches....... The paper will focus on the multisensory aspect of my interfaces as they have evolved through my projects, discussing how engineering problems were overcome to enhance tactility, the experimentations with tactile technologies in order to engineer the right feeling, and what is involved in the multisensory...

  20. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  1. A Study of an Assistance SystemUsing a Haptic Interface

    浅川, 貴史

    2011-01-01

    We make a proposal for a music baton system for visual handicapped persons. This system is constituted by an acceleration sensor. a radio module. and a haptic interface device. The acceleration sensor is built in the music baton grip and the data are transmitted by the radio module. A performer has a receiver with the haptic interface device. The receiver's CPU picks up rhythm from the data and vibrates the haptic interface device. This paper is described about an experiment of comparing the ...

  2. UsiGesture: Test and Evaluation of an Environment for Integrating Gestures in User Interfaces

    Beuvens, François; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    2014-01-01

    User interfaces allowing gesture recognition and manipulation are becoming more and more popular these last years. It however remains a hard task for programmers to developer such interfaces : some knowledge of recognition systems is required, along with user experience and user interface management knowledge. It is often difficult for only one developer to handle all this knowledge by itself and it is why a team gathering different skills is most of the time needed. We previously presented a...

  3. Data collection from FASTBUS to a DEC UNIBUS processor through the UNIBUS-Processor Interface

    Larwill, M.; Barsotti, E.; Lesny, D.; Pordes, R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the UNIBUS Processor Interface, an interface between FASTBUS and the Digital Equipment Corporation UNIBUS. The UPI was developed by Fermilab and the University of Illinois. Details of the use of this interface in a high energy physics experiment at Fermilab are given. The paper includes a discussion of the operation of the UPI on the UNIBUS of a VAX-11, and plans for using the UPI to perform data acquisition from FASTBUS to a VAX-11 Processor

  4. First Insights with a Vibrotactile Interface for Children with Multiple Disabilities

    Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Morrison, Ann; Jordi Muntaner, Joan

    2015-01-01

    for users with multiple disabilities. We developed V-Sense, a vibrotactile interface that encourages children with multiple disabilities to move their arms by using vibrations and exploiting the saltation perceptual illusion. In this paper we describe our initial experience evaluating the interface with 5...... children for 7 weeks and we discuss the first insights concerning the use of the interface and the difficulties encountered while conducting the evaluation sessions....

  5. EFFECTS OF INTERFACES ON GAMMA SHIELDING

    Clifford, C. E.

    1963-06-15

    A survey is presented of studies of interface effects in gamma shielding problems. These studies are grouped into three types of approaches, viz.: sources at the interface; radiation backscattered from the interface; and radiation transmitted through the interface. A bibliography of 54 references is included. Limitations on the applicability of the results are discussed. (T.F.H.)

  6. Repartition of ultrasonic energies at the interfaces

    Deleuze, M.; Bourdarios, M.; Lepoutre, M.

    1983-06-01

    Energy repartition of ultrasonic waves at the interfaces is studied as a function of incidence angle of the acoustic beam in immersion testing. For each interface type mathematical relations give the ratio of incident energy and energy of the wave reemitted by the interface. As an example curves for the interfaces water-uranium are given [fr

  7. Mainstreaming gesture based interfaces

    David Procházka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestures are a common way of interaction with mobile devices. They emerged especially with the iPhone production. Gestures in currently used devices are usually based on the original gestures presented by Apple in its iOS (iPhone Operating System. Therefore, there is a wide agreement on the mobile gesture design. In last years, it is possible to see experiments with gesture usage also in the other areas of consumer electronics and computers. The examples can include televisions, large projections etc. These gestures can be marked as spatial or 3D gestures. They are connected with a natural 3D environment rather than with a flat 2D screen. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a comparable design agreement within the spatial gestures. Various projects are based on completely different gesture sets. This situation is confusing for their users and slows down spatial gesture adoption.This paper is focused on the standardization of spatial gestures. The review of projects focused on spatial gesture usage is provided in the first part. The main emphasis is placed on the usability point-of-view. On the basis of our analysis, we argue that the usability is the key issue enabling the wide adoption. The mobile gesture emergence was possible easily because the iPhone gestures were natural. Therefore, it was not necessary to learn them.The design and implementation of our presentation software, which is controlled by gestures, is outlined in the second part of the paper. Furthermore, the usability testing results are provided as well. We have tested our application on a group of users not instructed in the implemented gestures design. These results were compared with the other ones, obtained with our original implementation. The evaluation can be used as the basis for implementation of similar projects.

  8. Usable Interface Design for Everyone

    de Castro Lozano, Carlos; Salcines, Enrique García; Sainz de Abajo, Beatriz; Burón Fernández, F. Javier; Ramírez, José Miguel; Recellado, José Gabriel Zato; Montoya, Rafael Sanchez; Bell, John; Marin, Francisco Alcantud

    When designing "interfaces for everyone" for interactive systems, it is important to consider factors such as cost, the intended market, the state of the environment, etc. User interfaces are fundamental for the developmental process in any application, and its design must be contemplated from the start. Of the distinct parts of a system (hardware and software), it is the interface that permits the user access to computer resources. The seven principles of "Universal Design" or "Design for Everyone" focus on a universal usable design, but at the same time acknowledge the influences of internal and external factors. Structural changes in social and health services could provide an increase in the well-being of a country's citizens through the use of self-care programming and proactive management/prevention of disease. Automated home platforms can act as an accessibility instrument which permits users to avoid, compensate, mitigate, or neutralize the deficiencies and dependencies caused by living alone.

  9. Multi-robot control interface

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Walton, Miles C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  10. Energy level alignment at Co/AlOx/pentacene interfaces

    Popinciuc, M.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) experiments were performed in order to study the energy level alignment and electronic structure at Co/AlOx/pentacene interfaces as a function of the aluminum oxide (AlOx) tunnel barrier thickness and the oxidation state of Co. XPS was

  11. Positron beam analysis of polymer/metal interfaces under stress

    Escobar Galindo, R.; van Veen, A.; Garcia, A.A.; Schut, H.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Triftshauser, W; Kogel, G; Sperr, P

    2001-01-01

    The polymers Epoxy and Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) spin coated on Interstitial Free (IF) steel were subjected to external stresses and studied using the Delft Variable Energy Positron (VEP) beam facility. The polymer/metal interface was identified using an S-W map. After tensile experiments vacancy

  12. Normal-superfluid interface for polarized fermion gases

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments on imbalanced fermion gases have proved the existence of a sharp interface between a superfluid and a normal phase. We show that, at the lowest experimental temperatures, a temperature difference between normal N and superfluid SF phases can appear as a consequence of the blocking

  13. Taming the plasma-material interface with the snowflake divertor.

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2015-04-24

    Experiments in several tokamaks have provided increasing support for the snowflake configuration as a viable tokamak heat exhaust concept. This white paper summarizes the snowflake properties predicted theoretically and studied experimentally, and identifies outstanding issues to be resolved in existing and future facilities before the snowflake divertor can qualify for the reactor interface.

  14. The Voice Pump: an Affectively Engaging Interface for Changing Attachments

    Fritsch, Jonas; Jacobsen, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the preliminary results from an ongoing interaction design experiment, the Voice Pump. The Voice Pump is an affectively engaging air-based interface for attuning to the differential qualities of voices in order to change attachments between native Danish speakers and non-native...

  15. Advanced Displays and Natural User Interfaces to Support Learning

    Martin-SanJose, Juan-Fernando; Juan, M. -Carmen; Mollá, Ramón; Vivó, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Advanced displays and natural user interfaces (NUI) are a very suitable combination for developing systems to provide an enhanced and richer user experience. This combination can be appropriate in several fields and has not been extensively exploited. One of the fields that this combination is especially suitable for is education. Nowadays,…

  16. Interface control scheme for computer high-speed interface unit

    Ballard, B. K.

    1975-01-01

    Control scheme is general and performs for multiplexed and dedicated channels as well as for data-bus interfaces. Control comprises two 64-pin, dual in-line packages, each of which holds custom large-scale integrated array built with silicon-on-sapphire complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology.

  17. Interface language for diagnostic control

    Matone, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron multichannel collimator diagnostic on TFTR is run with the help of a keyboard-entered interface language. The language allows the user to interact with the real-time control and data analysis systems in a consistent and efficient manner. It uses a vocabulary that can be abbreviated into one character commands which the proficient user may concatenate into command words. This allows the user to progress quickly from a novice to an expert operating mode. A similar type interface language could be applied to many interactive applications accepting keyboard inputs

  18. Polymers and biopolymers at interfaces

    Hall, A. R.; Geoghegan, M.

    2018-03-01

    This review updates recent progress in the understanding of the behaviour of polymers at surfaces and interfaces, highlighting examples in the areas of wetting, dewetting, crystallization, and ‘smart’ materials. Recent developments in analysis tools have yielded a large increase in the study of biological systems, and some of these will also be discussed, focussing on areas where surfaces are important. These areas include molecular binding events and protein adsorption as well as the mapping of the surfaces of cells. Important techniques commonly used for the analysis of surfaces and interfaces are discussed separately to aid the understanding of their application.

  19. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  20. Statistics of zero crossings in rough interfaces with fractional elasticity

    Zamorategui, Arturo L.; Lecomte, Vivien; Kolton, Alejandro B.

    2018-04-01

    We study numerically the distribution of zero crossings in one-dimensional elastic interfaces described by an overdamped Langevin dynamics with periodic boundary conditions. We model the elastic forces with a Riesz-Feller fractional Laplacian of order z =1 +2 ζ , such that the interfaces spontaneously relax, with a dynamical exponent z , to a self-affine geometry with roughness exponent ζ . By continuously increasing from ζ =-1 /2 (macroscopically flat interface described by independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes [Phys. Rev. 36, 823 (1930), 10.1103/PhysRev.36.823]) to ζ =3 /2 (super-rough Mullins-Herring interface), three different regimes are identified: (I) -1 /2 value in the system size, or decays as a power-law towards (II) a subextensive or (III) an intensive value. In the steady state, the distribution of intervals between zeros changes from an exponential decay in (I) to a power-law decay P (ℓ ) ˜ℓ-γ in (II) and (III). While in (II) γ =1 -θ with θ =1 -ζ the steady-state persistence exponent, in (III) we obtain γ =3 -2 ζ , different from the exponent γ =1 expected from the prediction θ =0 for infinite super-rough interfaces with ζ >1 . The effect on P (ℓ ) of short-scale smoothening is also analyzed numerically and analytically. A tight relation between the mean interval, the mean width of the interface, and the density of zeros is also reported. The results drawn from our analysis of rough interfaces subject to particular boundary conditions or constraints, along with discretization effects, are relevant for the practical analysis of zeros in interface imaging experiments or in numerical analysis.

  1. Interfacing robotics with plutonium fuel fabrication

    Bowen, W.W.; Moore, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Interfacing robotic systems with nuclear fuel fabrication processes resulted in a number of interfacing challenges. The system not only interfaces with the fuel process, but must also interface with nuclear containment, radiation control boundaries, criticality control restrictions, and numerous other safety systems required in a fuel fabrication plant. The robotic system must be designed to allow operator interface during maintenance and recovery from an upset as well as normal operations

  2. Hierarchy of on-orbit servicing interfaces

    Moe, Rud V.

    1989-01-01

    A series of equipment interfaces is involved in on-orbit servicing operations. The end-to-end hierarchy of servicing interfaces is presented. The interface concepts presented include structure and handling, and formats for transfer of resources (power, data, fluids, etc.). Consequences on cost, performance, and service ability of the use of standard designs or unique designs with interface adapters are discussed. Implications of the interface designs compatibility with remote servicing using telerobotic servicers are discussed.

  3. A database for TMT interface control documents

    Gillies, Kim; Roberts, Scott; Brighton, Allan; Rogers, John

    2016-08-01

    The TMT Software System consists of software components that interact with one another through a software infrastructure called TMT Common Software (CSW). CSW consists of software services and library code that is used by developers to create the subsystems and components that participate in the software system. CSW also defines the types of components that can be constructed and their roles. The use of common component types and shared middleware services allows standardized software interfaces for the components. A software system called the TMT Interface Database System was constructed to support the documentation of the interfaces for components based on CSW. The programmer describes a subsystem and each of its components using JSON-style text files. A command interface file describes each command a component can receive and any commands a component sends. The event interface files describe status, alarms, and events a component publishes and status and events subscribed to by a component. A web application was created to provide a user interface for the required features. Files are ingested into the software system's database. The user interface allows browsing subsystem interfaces, publishing versions of subsystem interfaces, and constructing and publishing interface control documents that consist of the intersection of two subsystem interfaces. All published subsystem interfaces and interface control documents are versioned for configuration control and follow the standard TMT change control processes. Subsystem interfaces and interface control documents can be visualized in the browser or exported as PDF files.

  4. Frictional processes of bimaterial interfaces at seismic slip rates.

    Passelegue, F. X.; Fabbri, O.; Leclère, H.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-12-01

    Large subduction earthquakes ruptures propagate from crustal rock toward the sea floor along frictional interfaces of different lythologies. Up to now, frictional processes of rocks were mainly investigated along single material experimental faults. Here, we present the results of high velocity friction experiments coupled with high frequency acoustic monitoring system on biomaterial interfaces including gabbro, pyroxenite and serpentinized peridotite (>95%), following a recent field investigation highlighting bimaterial contacts in the Corsica ophiolitic nappe. We first studied the frictional processes of single materials which result in a mechanical behaviour comparable to previous studies. Both gabbro and pyroxenite exhibit two weakening stages. The first one corresponds to flash heating and the second stage occurs concomitantly with complete melting of the interface. In the case of serpentinite, only one weakening stage is observed, after a weakening slip distance of only few centimeters. We then conducted bimaterial experiments. The two couples tested were gabbro/pyroxenite and gabbro/serpentinite, as observed along natural fault zones (Corsica, France). In the case of gabbro/serpentinite, we observe that frictional processes are controlled by serpentinite. Mechanical curves replicate the behaviour of single serpentinite friction experiments. We observe that few melting occurs, and that the product of experiments consists in fine grained cataclasite, as observed in the field. The case of gabbro/pyroxenite is more complicated. The first weakening is controlled by the lithology of the sample installed on the static part of the rotary apparatus. However, the second weakening is controlled by the gabbro and mechanical curves are identical than those obtained in the case of single gabbro experiments. Supported by microstructural analysis and acoustic activity, our results suggest that frictional processes of bimaterial interfaces are controlled by the material

  5. Event Handler II: a fast, programmable, CAMAC-coupled data acquisition interface

    Hensley, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    The architecture of the Event Handler II, a fast, programmable data acquisition interface linked to and through CAMAC is described. The special features of this interface make it a powerful tool in implementing data acquisition systems for experiments in nuclear physics. 1 figure, 1 table

  6. Event Handler: a fast programmable, CAMAC-coupled data acquisition interface

    Hensley, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the architecture and performance of the Event Handler, a fast, programmable data acquisition interface which is linked to and through CAMAC. The special features of this interface make it a powerful tool in implementing data acquisition systems for experiments in nuclear physics

  7. Latent interface-trap building in power VDMOSFETs: new experimental evidence and numerical simulation

    Ristic, G.F.; Jaksic, A.B.; Pejovic, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents new experimental evidence of the latent interface-trap buildup during annealing of gamma-ray irradiated power VDMOSFETs. We try to reveal the nature of this still ill-understood phenomenon by isothermal annealing, switching temperature annealing and switching bias annealing experiments. The results of numerical simulation of interface-trap kinetics during annealing are also shown. (authors)

  8. Fermi level pinning by integer charge transfer at electrode-organic semiconductor interfaces

    Bokdam, Menno; Cakir, Deniz; Brocks, G.

    2011-01-01

    The atomic structure of interfaces between conducting electrodes and molecular organic materials varies considerably. Yet experiments show that pinning of the Fermi level, which is observed at such interfaces, does not depend upon the structural details. In this letter, we develop a general model to

  9. Interface design for digital courses

    Tabbers, H.; Kester, L.; Hummel, H.; Nadolski, R.; Jochems, W.; Merriënboer, J.; Koper, R.

    2003-01-01

    An important question in web-based education is how to deal with the design of the interface. What will the actual screen look like? Two main issues that are especially relevant for educational purposes are discussed, both from a Human-Computer Interaction and an Educational Psychology perspective.

  10. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  11. Embodied agents in de interface

    Evers, M.J.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2001-01-01

    Steeds meer zien we het gebruik van mensachtige, geanimeerde figuren in interfaces en andere software applicaties, niet alleen in onderzoeksprojecten maar ook in commerciële software. Een voorbeeld dat bijna iedereen wel kent (en waar velen wel wat op aan te merken hebben) is de ‘office assistant’

  12. Adhesive forces at bimetallic interfaces

    Das, M.P.; Nafari, N.; Ziesche, P.; Kaschner, H.R.

    1987-03-01

    Force concepts in condensed systems have progressed significantly in recent years. In the context of bimetallic interfaces we consider the Pauli-Hellman-Feynman theorem, use it to check the variational calculations of interfacial energies and estimate the force constants. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Diagnostic interface problems on TFTR

    Goldfarb, S.

    1977-01-01

    Diagnostic equipment on TFTR has functional interfaces with many machine systems. Salient requirements include plasma access, environmental resistance to thermal, magnetic and radiation effects, automated data acquisition and controls, remote handling and personnel safety. Problems imposed by these requirements and the solutions being considered are described

  14. Control system oriented human interface

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  15. PACE: A Browsable Graphical Interface.

    Beheshti, Jamshid; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes PACE (Public Access Catalogue Extension), an alternative interface designed to enhance online catalogs by simulating images of books and library shelves to help users browse through the catalog. Results of a test in a college library against a text-based online public access catalog, including student attitudes, are described.…

  16. Web OPAC Interfaces: An Overview.

    Babu, B. Ramesh; O'Brien, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Web-based online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a review of six Web OPAC interfaces in use in academic libraries in the United Kingdom. Presents a checklist and guidelines of important features and functions that are currently available, including search strategies, access points, display, links, and layout. (Author/LRW)

  17. Robust Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Reuderink, B.

    2011-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables direct communication from the brain to devices, bypassing the traditional pathway of peripheral nerves and muscles. Current BCIs aimed at patients require that the user invests weeks, or even months, to learn the skill to intentionally modify their brain

  18. Interface design for digital courses

    Tabbers, Huib; Kester, Liesbeth; Hummel, Hans; Nadolski, Rob

    2005-01-01

    This text should be referred to as: Tabbers, H., Kester, L., Hummel, H. G. K., & Nadolski, R. J. (2003). Interface design for digital courses. In W. Jochems, J. van Merriënboer, & R. Koper (Eds). Integrated e-learning: implications for pedagogy, technology & organisation (pp. 100-111). London:

  19. Concentrations of ethane (C2H6) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and acetylene (C2H2) in the upper troposphere deduced from Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy/Spacelab 3 spectra

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Zander, R.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the spectroscopic analysis of C2H6 and C2H2 absorption spectra obtained by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument flown on the Shuttle as part of the Spacelab 3 mission. The spectra were recorded during sunset occultations occurring between 25 deg N and 31 deg N latitudes, yielding volume-mixing ratio profiles of C2H6 in the lower stratosphere and the upper troposphere, and an upper tropospheric profile of C2H2. These results compare well with previous in situ and remote sounding data obtained at similar latitudes and with model calculations. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the ATMOS instrument to sound the lower atmosphere from space.

  20. Atomistic Simulation of Interfaces in Materials of Solid State Ionics

    Ivanov-Schitz, A. K.; Mazo, G. N.

    2018-01-01

    The possibilities of describing correctly interfaces of different types in solids within a computer experiment using molecular statics simulation, molecular dynamics simulation, and quantum chemical calculations are discussed. Heterophase boundaries of various types, including grain boundaries and solid electrolyte‒solid electrolyte and ionic conductor‒electrode material interfaces, are considered. Specific microstructural features and mechanisms of the ion transport in real heterophase structures (cationic conductor‒metal anode and anionic conductor‒cathode) existing in solid state ionics devices (such as solid-state batteries and fuel cells) are discussed.