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Sample records for spacecraft potential electron

  1. Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential due to electron beam emission or impact

    Lai, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Triple-root jump in spacecraft potential is well understood in the double Maxwellian model of the natural space environment. In this paper, however, the author points out that triple-root jumps in spacecraft potential may also occur during photoemission or electron beam emission from a spacecraft. Impact of an incoming electron beam on a spacecraft may also cause triple-root jumps provided that the beam, ambient plasma, and surface parameters satisfy certain inequality conditions. The parametric conditions under which such beam induced triple-root jumps may occur are presented

  2. Electric potential structures and propagation of electron beams injected from a spacecraft into a plasma

    Singh, Nagendra; Hwang, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of electron beams injected from a spacecraft into an ambient plasma and the associated potential structures are investigated by one-dimensional Vlasov simulations. For moderate beams, for which the time average spacecraft potential (Φ sa ) lies in the range T e much-lt eΦ sa approx-lt W B , where T e is the electron temperature in energy units and W B is the average beam energy, a double layer forms near the beam head which propagates into the ambient plasma much more slowly than the initial beam velocity. The double layer formation is being reported for the first time. For weak beams, for which |eΦ sa | approx-lt T e , the beam propagates with the initial beam velocity, and no double layer formation occurs. On the other hand, for strong beams for which eΦ sa > W B , the bulk of the beam is returned to the spacecraft, and the main feature of the potential structure is a sheath formation with an intense electric field limited to distances d near the spacecraft surface. These features of the potential structures are compared with those seen in laboratory and space experiments on electron beam injections

  3. Results from active spacecraft potential control on the Geotail spacecraft

    Schmidt, R.; Arends, H.; Pedersen, A.

    1995-01-01

    A low and actively controlled electrostatic potential on the outer surfaces of a scientific spacecraft is very important for accurate measurements of cold plasma electrons and ions and the DC to low-frequency electric field. The Japanese/NASA Geotail spacecraft carriers as part of its scientific payload a novel ion emitter for active control of the electrostatic potential on the surface of the spacecraft. The aim of the ion emitter is to reduce the positive surface potential which is normally encountered in the outer magnetosphere when the spacecraft is sunlit. Ion emission clamps the surface potential to near the ambient plasma potential. Without emission control, Geotail has encountered plasma conditions in the lobes of the magnetotail which resulted in surface potentials of up to about +70 V. The ion emitter proves to be able to discharge the outer surfaces of the spacecraft and is capable of keeping the surface potential stable at about +2 V. This potential is measured with respect to one of the electric field probes which are current biased and thus kept at a potential slightly above the ambient plasma potential. The instrument uses the liquid metal field ion emission principle to emit indium ions. The ion beam energy is about 6 keV and the typical total emission current amounts to about 15 μA. Neither variations in the ambient plasma conditions nor operation of two electron emitters on Geotail produce significant variations of the controlled surface potential as long as the resulting electron emission currents remain much smaller than the ion emission current. Typical results of the active potential control are shown, demonstrating the surface potential reduction and its stability over time. 25 refs., 5 figs

  4. Spacecraft charging: incoming and outgoing electrons

    Lai, Shu T.

    2013-04-22

    This paper presents an overview of the roles played by incoming and outgoing electrons in spacecraft surface and stresses the importance of surface conditions for spacecraft charging. The balance between the incoming electron current from the ambient plasma and the outgoing currents of secondary electrons, backscattered electrons, and photoelectrons from the surfaces determines the surface potential. Since surface conditions significantly affect the outgoing currents, the critical temperature and the surface potential are also significantly affected. As a corollary, high level differential charging of adjacent surfaces with very different surface conditions is a space hazard.

  5. Cluster PEACE observations of electrons of spacecraft origin

    S. Szita

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The two PEACE (Plasma Electron And Current Experiment sensors on board each Cluster spacecraft sample the electron velocity distribution across the full 4 solid angle and the energy range 0.7 eV to 26 keV with a time resolution of 4 s. We present high energy and angular resolution 3D observations of electrons of spacecraft origin in the various environments encountered by the Cluster constellation, including a lunar eclipse interval where the spacecraft potential was reduced but remained positive, and periods of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control operation which reduced the spacecraft potential. We demonstrate how the spacecraft potential may be found from a gradient change in the PEACE low energy spectrum, and show how the observed spacecraft electrons are confined by the spacecraft potential. We identify an intense component of the spacecraft electrons with energies equivalent to the spacecraft potential, the arrival direction of which is seen to change when ASPOC is switched on. Another spacecraft electron component, observed in the sunward direction, is reduced in the eclipse but unaffected by ASPOC, and we believe this component is produced in the analyser by solar UV. We find that PEACE anodes with a look direction along the spacecraft surfaces are more susceptible to spacecraft electron contamination than those which look perpendicular to the surface, which justifies the decision to mount PEACE with its field-of-view radially outward rather than tangentially.Key words. Magnetosheric physics (general or miscellaneous Space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  6. A corrector for spacecraft calculated electron moments

    J. Geach

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of a numerical method to correct electron moments calculated on-board spacecraft from the effects of potential broadening and energy range truncation. Assuming a shape for the natural distribution of the ambient plasma and employing the scalar approximation, the on-board moments can be represented as non-linear integral functions of the underlying distribution. We have implemented an algorithm which inverts this system successfully over a wide range of parameters for an assumed underlying drifting Maxwellian distribution. The outputs of the solver are the corrected electron plasma temperature Te, density Ne and velocity vector Ve. We also make an estimation of the temperature anisotropy A of the distribution. We present corrected moment data from Cluster's PEACE experiment for a range of plasma environments and make comparisons with electron and ion data from other Cluster instruments, as well as the equivalent ground-based calculations using full 3-D distribution PEACE telemetry.

  7. Particle-in-Cell Simulation Study on the Floating Potential of Spacecraft in the Low Earth Orbit

    Tang Daotan; Yang Shengsheng; Zheng Kuohai; Qin Xiaogang; Li Detian; Liu Qing; Zhao Chengxuan; Du Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    In order to further understand the characteristics of the floating potential of low earth orbit spacecraft, the effects of the electron current collection area, background electron temperature, photocurrent emission, spacecraft wake, and the shape of spacecraft on spacecraft floating potential were studied here by particle-in-cell simulation in the low earth orbit. The simulation results show that the electron current collection area and background electron temperature impact on the floating potential by changing the electron current collection of spacecraft. By increasing the electron current collection area or background electron temperature, the spacecraft will float at a lower electric potential with respect to the surrounding plasma. However, the spacecraft wake affects the floating potential by increasing the ion current collected by spacecraft. The emission of the photocurrent from the spacecraft surface, which compensates for the electrons collected from background plasma, causes the floating potential to increase. The shape of the spacecraft is also an important factor influencing the floating potential. (paper)

  8. Study of the Spacecraft Potential Under Active Control and Plasma Density Estimates During the MMS Commissioning Phase

    Andriopoulou, M.; Nakamura, R.; Torkar, K.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Dorelli, John Charles; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Each spacecraft of the recently launched magnetospheric multiscale MMS mission is equipped with Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instruments, which control the spacecraft potential in order to reduce spacecraft charging effects. ASPOC typically reduces the spacecraft potential to a few volts. On several occasions during the commissioning phase of the mission, the ASPOC instruments were operating only on one spacecraft at a time. Taking advantage of such intervals, we derive photoelectron curves and also perform reconstructions of the uncontrolled spacecraft potential for the spacecraft with active control and estimate the electron plasma density during those periods. We also establish the criteria under which our methods can be applied.

  9. Electromagnetic Dissociation and Spacecraft Electronics Damage

    Norbury, John W.

    2016-01-01

    When protons or heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or solar particle events (SPE) interact with target nuclei in spacecraft, there can be two different types of interactions. The more familiar strong nuclear interaction often dominates and is responsible for nuclear fragmentation in either the GCR or SPE projectile nucleus or the spacecraft target nucleus. (Of course, the proton does not break up, except possibly to produce pions or other hadrons.) The less familiar, second type of interaction is due to the very strong electromagnetic fields that exist when two charged nuclei pass very close to each other. This process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) and primarily results in the emission of neutrons, protons and light ions (isotopes of hydrogen and helium). The cross section for particle production is approximately defined as the number of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions or other types of reactions. (There are various kinematic and other factors which multiply the particle number to arrive at the cross section.) Strong, nuclear interactions usually dominate the nuclear reactions of most interest that occur between GCR and target nuclei. However, for heavy nuclei (near Fe and beyond) at high energy the EMD cross section can be much larger than the strong nuclear interaction cross section. This paper poses a question: Are there projectile or target nuclei combinations in the interaction of GCR or SPE where the EMD reaction cross section plays a dominant role? If the answer is affirmative, then EMD mechanisms should be an integral part of codes that are used to predict damage to spacecraft electronics. The question can become more fine-tuned and one can ask about total reaction cross sections as compared to double differential cross sections. These issues will be addressed in the present paper.

  10. Printable Spacecraft: Flexible Electronic Platforms for NASA Missions. Phase One

    Short, Kendra (Principal Investigator); Van Buren, David (Principal Investigator)

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric confetti. Inchworm crawlers. Blankets of ground penetrating radar. These are some of the unique mission concepts which could be enabled by a printable spacecraft. Printed electronics technology offers enormous potential to transform the way NASA builds spacecraft. A printed spacecraft's low mass, volume and cost offer dramatic potential impacts to many missions. Network missions could increase from a few discrete measurements to tens of thousands of platforms improving areal density and system reliability. Printed platforms could be added to any prime mission as a low-cost, minimum resource secondary payload to augment the science return. For a small fraction of the mass and cost of a traditional lander, a Europa flagship mission might carry experimental printed surface platforms. An Enceladus Explorer could carry feather-light printed platforms to release into volcanic plumes to measure composition and impact energies. The ability to print circuits directly onto a variety of surfaces, opens the possibility of multi-functional structures and membranes such as "smart" solar sails and balloons. The inherent flexibility of a printed platform allows for in-situ re-configurability for aerodynamic control or mobility. Engineering telemetry of wheel/soil interactions are possible with a conformal printed sensor tape fit around a rover wheel. Environmental time history within a sample return canister could be recorded with a printed sensor array that fits flush to the interior of the canister. Phase One of the NIAC task entitled "Printable Spacecraft" investigated the viability of printed electronics technologies for creating multi-functional spacecraft platforms. Mission concepts and architectures that could be enhanced or enabled with this technology were explored. This final report captures the results and conclusions of the Phase One study. First, the report presents the approach taken in conducting the study and a mapping of results against the proposed

  11. Charge Dissipating Transparent Conformal Coatings for Spacecraft Electronics, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The space environment poses significant challenges to spacecraft electronics in the form of electrostatic discharge (ESD) as a result of exposure to highly charged...

  12. Investigation of tenuous plasma environment using Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) on Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    Nakamura, Rumi; Jeszenszky, Harald; Torkar, Klaus; Andriopoulou, Maria; Fremuth, Gerhard; Taijmar, Martin; Scharlemann, Carsten; Svenes, Knut; Escoubet, Philippe; Prattes, Gustav; Laky, Gunter; Giner, Franz; Hoelzl, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    The NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission is planned to be launched on March 12, 2015. The scientific objectives of the MMS mission are to explore and understand the fundamental plasma physics processes of magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and turbulence in the Earth's magnetosphere. The region of scientific interest of MMS is in a tenuous plasma environment where the positive spacecraft potential reaches an equilibrium at several tens of Volts. An Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) instrument neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. ASPOC thereby reduces the potential in order to improve the electric field and low-energy particle measurement. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each of the MMS spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for MMS includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics enabling lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. A perfectly stable spacecraft potential precludes the utilization of the spacecraft as a plasma probe, which is a conventional technique used to estimate ambient plasma density from the spacecraft potential. The small residual variations of the potential controlled by ASPOC, however, still allow to determine ambient plasma density by comparing two closely separated spacecraft and thereby reconstructing the uncontrolled potential variation from the controlled potential. Regular intercalibration of controlled and uncontrolled potentials is expected to increase the reliability of this new method.

  13. Maintainability design criteria for packaging of spacecraft replaceable electronic equipment.

    Kappler, J. R.; Folsom, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Maintainability must be designed into long-duration spacecraft and equipment to provide the required high probability of mission success with the least cost and weight. The ability to perform repairs quickly and easily in a space environment can be achieved by imposing specific maintainability design criteria on spacecraft equipment design and installation. A study was funded to investigate and define design criteria for electronic equipment that would permit rapid removal and replacement in a space environment. The results of the study are discussed together with subsequent simulated zero-g demonstration tests of a mockup with new concepts for packaging.

  14. Microscopic Electron Variations Measured Simultaneously By The Cluster Spacecraft

    Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T. D.; Gough, M. P.; Beloff, N.

    Data is used from the Particle Correlator experiments running on each of the four Cluster spacecraft so as to determine common microscopic behaviour in the elec- tron population observed over the macroscopic Cluster separations. The Cluster par- ticle correlator experiments operate by forming on board Auto Correlation Functions (ACFs) generated from short time series of electron counts obtained, as a function of electron energy, from the PEACE HEEA sensor. The information on the microscopic variation of the electron flux covers the frequency range DC up to 41 kHz (encom- passing typical electron plasma frequencies and electron gyro frequencies and their harmonics), the electron energy range is that covered by the PEACE HEEA sensor (within the range 1 eV to 26 keV). Results are presented of coherent electron struc- tures observed simultaneously by the four spacecraft in the differing plasma interac- tion regions and boundaries encountered by Cluster. As an aid to understanding the plasma interactions, use is made of numerical simulations which model both the un- derlying statistical properties of the electrons and also the manner in which particle correlator experiments operate.

  15. Correcting PSP electron measurements for the effects of spacecraft electrostatic and magnetic fields

    McGinnis, D.; Halekas, J. S.; Larson, D. E.; Whittlesey, P. L.; Kasper, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The near-Sun environment which the Parker Solar Probe will investigate presents a unique challenge for the measurement of thermal and suprathermal electrons. Over one orbital period, the ionizing photon flux and charged particle densities vary to such an extent that the spacecraft could charge to electrostatic potentials ranging from a few volts to tens of volts or more, and it may even develop negative electrostatic potentials near closest approach. In addition, significant permanent magnetic fields from spacecraft components will perturb thermal electron trajectories. Given these effects, electron distribution function (EDF) measurements made by the SWEAP/SPAN electron sensors will be significantly affected. It is thus important to try to understand the extent and nature of such effects, and to remediate them as much as possible. To this end, we have incorporated magnetic fields and a model electrostatic potential field into particle tracing simulations to predict particle trajectories through the near spacecraft environment. These simulations allow us to estimate how the solid angle elements measured by SPAN deflect and stretch in the presence of these fields and therefore how and to what extent EDF measurements will be distorted. In this work, we demonstrate how this technique can be used to produce a `dewarping' correction factor. Further, we show that this factor can correct synthetic datasets simulating the warped EDFs that the SPAN instruments are likely to measure over a wide range of spacecraft potentials and plasma Debye lengths.

  16. Electronic Systems for Spacecraft Vehicles: Required EDA Tools

    Bachnak, Rafic

    1999-01-01

    The continuous increase in complexity of electronic systems is making the design and manufacturing of such systems more challenging than ever before. As a result, designers are finding it impossible to design efficient systems without the use of sophisticated Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools. These tools offer integrated simulation of the electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing functions and lead to a correct by design methodology. This report identifies the EDA tools that would be needed to design, analyze, simulate, and evaluate electronic systems for spacecraft vehicles. In addition, the report presents recommendations to enhance the current JSC electronic design capabilities. This includes cost information and a discussion as to the impact, both positive and negative, of implementing the recommendations.

  17. Compendium of Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Cochran, Donna J.; Boutte, Alvin J.; Chen, Dakai; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Casey, Megan C.; Campola, Michael J.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Obryan, Martha V.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage is studied. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear, and hybrid devices.

  18. How to emit a high-power electron beam from a magnetospheric spacecraft?

    Delzanno, G. L.; Lucco Castello, F.; Borovsky, J.; Miars, G.; Leon, O.; Gilchrist, B. E.

    2017-12-01

    The idea of using a high-power electron beam to actively probe magnetic-field-line connectivity in space has been discussed since the 1970's. It could solve longstanding questions in magnetospheric/ionospheric physics by establishing causality between phenomena occurring in the magnetosphere and their image in the ionosphere. However, this idea has never been realized onboard a magnetospheric spacecraft because the tenuous magnetospheric plasma cannot provide the return current necessary to keep the charging of the spacecraft under control. Recently, Delzanno et al. [1] have proposed a spacecraft-charging mitigation scheme to enable the emission of a high-power electron beam from a magnetospheric spacecraft. It is based on the plasma contactor, i.e. a high-density neutral plasma emitted prior to and with the electron beam. The contactor acts as an ion emitter (not as an electron collector, as previously thought): a high ion current can be emitted off the quasi-spherical contactor surface, without the strong space-charge limitations typical of planar ion beams, and the electron-beam current can be successfully compensated. In this work, we will discuss our theoretical/simulation effort to improve the understanding of contactor-based ion emission. First, we will present a simple mathematical model useful for the interpretation of the results of [1]. The model is in spherical geometry and the contactor dynamics is described by only two surfaces (its quasi-neutral surface and the front of the outermost ions). It captures the results of self-consistent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations with good accuracy and highlights the physics behind the charge-mitigation scheme clearly. PIC simulations connecting the 1D model to the actual geometry of the problem will be presented to obtain the scaling of the spacecraft potential varying contactor emission area. Finally, results for conditions relevant to an actual mission will also be discussed. [1] G. L. Delzanno, J. E. Borovsky

  19. Application of advanced electronics to a future spacecraft computer design

    Carney, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Advancements in hardware and software technology are summarized with specific emphasis on spacecraft computer capabilities. Available state of the art technology is reviewed and candidate architectures are defined.

  20. The Use of Liquid Isopropyl Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma to Biologically Decontaminate Spacecraft Electronics

    Bonner, J. K.; Tudryn, Carissa D.; Choi, Sun J.; Eulogio, Sebastian E.; Roberts, Timothy J.; Tudryn, Carissa D.

    2006-01-01

    Legitimate concern exists regarding sending spacecraft and their associated hardware to solar system bodies where they could possibly contaminate the body's surface with terrestrial microorganisms. The NASA approved guidelines for sterilization as set forth in NPG 8020.12C, which is consistent with the biological contamination control objectives of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), recommends subjecting the spacecraft and its associated hardware to dry heat-a dry heat regimen that could potentially employ a temperature of 110(deg)C for up to 200 hours. Such a temperature exposure could prove detrimental to the spacecraft electronics. The stimulated growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in metallic interconnects and/or thermal degradation of organic materials composing much of the hardware could take place over a prolonged temperature regimen. Such detrimental phenomena would almost certainly compromise the integrity and reliability of the electronics. Investigation of sterilization procedures in the medical field suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H202) gas plasma (HPGP) technology can effectively function as an alternative to heat sterilization, especially for heat-sensitive items. Treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in liquid form prior to exposure of the hardware to HPGP should also prove beneficial. Although IPA is not a sterilant, it is frequently used as a disinfectant because of its bactericidal properties. The use of IPA in electronics cleaning is widely recognized and has been utilized for many years with no adverse affects reported. In addition, IPA is the principal ingredient of the test fluid used in ionic contamination testers to assess the amount of ionic contamination found on the surfaces of printed wiring assemblies. This paper will set forth experimental data confirming the feasibility of the IPA/H202 approach to reach acceptable microbial reduction (MR) levels of spacecraft electronic hardware. In addition, a proposed process flow in

  1. Injection of an electron beam into a plasma and spacecraft charging

    Okuda, H.; Kan, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Injection of a nonrelativistic electron beam into a fully ionized plasma from a spacecraft including the effect of charging has been studied using a one-dimensional particle simulation model. It is found that the spacecraft charging remains negligible and the beam can propagate into a plasma, if the beam density is much smaller than the ambient density. When the injection current is increased by increasing the beam density, significant spacecraft charging takes place and the reflection of beam electrons back to the spacecraft reduces the beam current significantly. On the other hand, if the injection current is increased by increasing the beam energy, spacecraft charging remains negligible and a beam current much larger than the thermal return current can be injected. It is shown that the electric field caused by the beam--plasma instability accelerates the ambient electrons toward the spacecraft thereby enhancing the return current

  2. Semi-Automated Diagnosis, Repair, and Rework of Spacecraft Electronics

    Struk, Peter M.; Oeftering, Richard C.; Easton, John W.; Anderson, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program for Exploration of the Moon and Mars places human crews in extreme isolation in resource scarce environments. Near Earth, the discontinuation of Space Shuttle flights after 2010 will alter the up- and down-mass capacity for the International Space Station (ISS). NASA is considering new options for logistics support strategies for future missions. Aerospace systems are often composed of replaceable modular blocks that minimize the need for complex service operations in the field. Such a strategy however, implies a robust and responsive logistics infrastructure with relatively low transportation costs. The modular Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) used for ISS requires relatively large blocks of replacement hardware even though the actual failed component may really be three orders of magnitude smaller. The ability to perform in-situ repair of electronics circuits at the component level can dramatically reduce the scale of spares and related logistics cost. This ability also reduces mission risk, increases crew independence and improves the overall supportability of the program. The Component-Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task under the NASA Supportability program was established to demonstrate the practicality of repair by first investigating widely used soldering materials and processes (M&P) performed by modest manual means. The work will result in program guidelines for performing manual repairs along with design guidance for circuit reparability. The next phase of CLEAR recognizes that manual repair has its limitations and some highly integrated devices are extremely difficult to handle and demand semi-automated equipment. Further, electronics repairs require a broad range of diagnostic capability to isolate the faulty components. Finally repairs must pass functional tests to determine that the repairs are successful and the circuit can be returned to service. To prevent equipment demands from exceeding spacecraft volume

  3. Modification of spacecraft charging and the near-plasma environment caused by the interaction of an artificial electron beam with the earth's upper atmosphere

    Neubert, Torsten; Banks, P. M.; Gilchrist, B.E.

    1991-01-01

    V, it is shown that secondary electrons supply a significant contribution to the return current to the spacecraft and thereby reduce the spacecraft potential. Our numerical results are in good agreement with observations from the CHARGE-2 sounding rocket experiment.A more detailed study of the BAI as it relates...

  4. Current Single Event Effects Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    OBryan, Martha V.; Seidleck, Christina M.; Carts, Martin A.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert A.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Hawkins, Donald K.; Cox, Stephen R.; Kniffin, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects. Devices tested include digital, analog, linear bipolar, and hybrid devices, among others.

  5. Injection and propagation of a nonrelativistic electron beam and spacecraft charging

    Okuda, H.; Berchem, J.

    1987-05-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out in order to study the injection and propagation of a nonrelativistic electron beam from a spacecraft into a fully ionized plasma in a magnetic field. Contrary to the earlier results in one-dimension, a high density electron beam whose density is comparable to the ambient density can propagate into a plasma. A strong radial electric field resulting from the net charges in the beam causes the beam electrons to spread radially reducing the beam density. When the injection current exceeds the return current, significant charging of the spacecraft is observed along with the reflection of the injected electrons back to the spacecraft. Recent data on the electron beam injection from the Spacelab 1 (SEPAC) are discussed

  6. Solar wind and magnetosphere plasma diagnostics by spacecraft electrostatic potential measurements

    A. Pedersen

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Several satellites (GEOS-1, GEOS-2, ISEE-1, Viking and CRRES carried electric field experiments on which probes were driven by a current from the satellite to be close to the plasma potential. The potential difference between an electric field probe and its spacecraft (with conductive surfaces can be used to determine the ambient electron density and/or electron flux with limited accuracy but with high time resolution, of the order of 10-100 ms. It is necessary for the development of this diagnostic method to understand the photoemission characteristics of probes and satellites. According to the electric field experiments on the above-mentioned satellites, all materials develop very similar photoemission properties when they are beyond the influence of atmospheric oxygen. The photoelectron yield steadily increases over the first few months in space and reaches values well above those measured on clean surfaces in the laboratory. The method can be used for solar radiation levels corresponding to distances from 0.4 to 5 AU from the Sun.

  7. Recent Total Ionizing Dose Results and Displacement Damage Results for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Cochran, Donna J.; Buchner, Stephen P.; Irwin, Tim L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Marshall, Cheryl J.; Reed, Robert A.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Hawkins, Donald K.; Flanigan, Ryan J.; Cox, Stephen R.

    2005-01-01

    We present data on the vulnerability of a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to total ionizing dose and displacement damage. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, hybrid devices, Analog-to- Digital Converters (ADCs), and Digital-to-Analog Converters (DACs), among others. T

  8. Materials Characterization at Utah State University: Facilities and Knowledge-base of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging

    Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, C. D.; Kite, J.; Zavyalov, V.; Corbridge, Jodie

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to improve the reliability and versatility of spacecraft charging models designed to assist spacecraft designers in accommodating and mitigating the harmful effects of charging on spacecraft, the NASA Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program has funded development of facilities at Utah State University for the measurement of the electronic properties of both conducting and insulating spacecraft materials. We present here an overview of our instrumentation and capabilities, which are particularly well suited to study electron emission as related to spacecraft charging. These measurements include electron-induced secondary and backscattered yields, spectra, and angular resolved measurements as a function of incident energy, species and angle, plus investigations of ion-induced electron yields, photoelectron yields, sample charging and dielectric breakdown. Extensive surface science characterization capabilities are also available to fully characterize the samples in situ. Our measurements for a wide array of conducting and insulating spacecraft materials have been incorporated into the SEE Charge Collector Knowledge-base as a Database of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging. This Database provides an extensive compilation of electronic properties, together with parameterization of these properties in a format that can be easily used with existing spacecraft charging engineering tools and with next generation plasma, charging, and radiation models. Tabulated properties in the Database include: electron-induced secondary electron yield, backscattered yield and emitted electron spectra; He, Ar and Xe ion-induced electron yields and emitted electron spectra; photoyield and solar emittance spectra; and materials characterization including reflectivity, dielectric constant, resistivity, arcing, optical microscopy images, scanning electron micrographs, scanning tunneling microscopy images, and Auger electron spectra. Further

  9. Multipurpose Electric Potential Sensor for Spacecraft Applications, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is based on a new, compact, solid-state electric potential sensor that has over an order of magnitude lower voltage noise than the prior...

  10. On-orbit assembly of a team of flexible spacecraft using potential field based method

    Chen, Ti; Wen, Hao; Hu, Haiyan; Jin, Dongping

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a novel control strategy is developed based on artificial potential field for the on-orbit autonomous assembly of four flexible spacecraft without inter-member collision. Each flexible spacecraft is simplified as a hub-beam model with truncated beam modes in the floating frame of reference and the communication graph among the four spacecraft is assumed to be a ring topology. The four spacecraft are driven to a pre-assembly configuration first and then to the assembly configuration. In order to design the artificial potential field for the first step, each spacecraft is outlined by an ellipse and a virtual leader of circle is introduced. The potential field mainly depends on the attitude error between the flexible spacecraft and its neighbor, the radial Euclidian distance between the ellipse and the circle and the classical Euclidian distance between the centers of the ellipse and the circle. It can be demonstrated that there are no local minima for the potential function and the global minimum is zero. If the function is equal to zero, the solution is not a certain state, but a set. All the states in the set are corresponding to the desired configurations. The Lyapunov analysis guarantees that the four spacecraft asymptotically converge to the target configuration. Moreover, the other potential field is also included to avoid the inter-member collision. In the control design of the second step, only small modification is made for the controller in the first step. Finally, the successful application of the proposed control law to the assembly mission is verified by two case studies.

  11. Electrostatic interaction between Interball-2 and the ambient plasma. 1. Determination of the spacecraft potential from current calculations

    M. Bouhram

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Interball-2 spacecraft travels at altitudes extending up to 20 000 km, and becomes positively charged due to the low-plasma densities encountered and the photoemission on its sunlit surface. Therefore, a knowledge of the spacecraft potential Fs is required for correcting accurately thermal ion measurements on Interball-2. The determination of Fs  is based on the balance of currents between escaping photoelectrons and incoming plasma electrons. A three-dimensional model of the potential structure surrounding Interball-2, including a realistic geometry and neglecting the space-charge densities, is used to find, through particle simulations, current-voltage relations of impacting plasma electrons Ie (Fs and escaping photoelectrons Iph (Fs . The inferred relations are compared to analytic relationships in order to quantify the effects of the spacecraft geometry, the ambient magnetic field B0 and the electron temperature Te . We found that the complex geometry has a weak effect on the inferred currents, while the presence of B0 tends to decrease their values. Providing that the photoemission saturation current density Jph0 is known, a relation between Fs and the plasma density Ne can be derived by using the current balance. Since Jph0 is critical to this process, simultaneous measurements of Ne from Z-mode observations in the plasmapause, and data on the potential difference Fs  - Fp  between the spacecraft and an electric probe (p are used in order to reverse the process. A value Jph0 ~ = 32 µAm-2 is estimated, close to laboratory tests, but less than typical measurements in space. Using this value, Ne and Fs  can be derived systematically from electric field measurements without any additional calculation. These values are needed for correcting the distributions of low-energy ions measured by the Hyperboloid experiment on Interball-2. The effects of the potential structure on ion trajectories reaching Hyperboloid are discussed

  12. Charging in the environment of large spacecraft

    Lai, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses some potential problems of spacecraft charging as a result of interactions between a large spacecraft, such as the Space Station, and its environment. Induced electric field, due to VXB effect, may be important for large spacecraft at low earth orbits. Differential charging, due to different properties of surface materials, may be significant when the spacecraft is partly in sunshine and partly in shadow. Triple-root potential jump condition may occur because of differential charging. Sudden onset of severe differential charging may occur when an electron or ion beam is emitted from the spacecraft. The beam may partially return to the ''hot spots'' on the spacecraft. Wake effects, due to blocking of ambient ion trajectories, may result in an undesirable negative potential region in the vicinity of a large spacecraft. Outgassing and exhaust may form a significant spacecraft induced environment; ionization may occur. Spacecraft charging and discharging may affect the electronic components on board

  13. Spacecraft Charge Monitor

    Goembel, L.

    2003-12-01

    We are currently developing a flight prototype Spacecraft Charge Monitor (SCM) with support from NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The device will use a recently proposed high energy-resolution electron spectroscopic technique to determine spacecraft floating potential. The inspiration for the technique came from data collected by the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) satellites in the 1970s. The data available from the AE satellites indicate that the SCM may be able to determine spacecraft floating potential to within 0.1 V under certain conditions. Such accurate measurement of spacecraft charge could be used to correct biases in space plasma measurements. The device may also be able to measure spacecraft floating potential in the solar wind and in orbit around other planets.

  14. Influence of the Ambient Electric Field on Measurements of the Actively Controlled Spacecraft Potential by MMS

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Andriopoulou, M.; Giles, B. L.; Jeszenszky, H.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Space missions with sophisticated plasma instrumentation such as Magnetospheric Multiscale, which employs four satellites to explore near-Earth space benefit from a low electric potential of the spacecraft, to improve the plasma measurements and therefore carry instruments to actively control the potential by means of ion beams. Without control, the potential varies in anticorrelation with plasma density and temperature to maintain an equilibrium between the plasma current and the one of photoelectrons produced at the surface and overcoming the potential barrier. A drawback of the controlled, almost constant potential is the difficulty to use it as convenient estimator for plasma density. This paper identifies a correlation between the spacecraft potential and the ambient electric field, both measured by double probes mounted at the end of wire booms, as the main responsible for artifacts in the potential data besides the known effect of the variable photoelectron production due to changing illumination of the surface. It is shown that the effect of density variations is too weak to explain the observed correlation with the electric field and that a correction of the artifacts can be achieved to enable the reconstruction of the uncontrolled potential and plasma density in turn. Two possible mechanisms are discussed: the asymmetry of the current-voltage characteristic determining the probe to plasma potential and the fact that a large equipotential structure embedded in an electric field results in asymmetries of both the emission and spatial distribution of photoelectrons, which results in an increase of the spacecraft potential.

  15. Electric potential structures of auroral acceleration region border from multi-spacecraft Cluster data

    Sadeghi, S.; Emami, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    This paper studies an auroral event using data from three spacecraft of the Cluster mission, one inside and two at the poleward edge of the bottom of the Auroral Acceleration Region (AAR). The study reveals the three-dimensional profile of the region's poleward boundary, showing spatial segmentation of the electric potential structures and their decay in time. It also depicts localized magnetic field variations and field-aligned currents that appear to have remained stable for at least 80 s. Such observations became possible due to the fortuitous motion of the three spacecraft nearly parallel to each other and tangential to the AAR edge, so that the differences and variations can be seen when the spacecraft enter and exit the segmentations, hence revealing their position with respect to the AAR.

  16. Development and qualification of materials and processes for radiation shielding of Galileo spacecraft electronic components

    Hribar, F.; Bauer, J.L.; O'Donnell, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Several materials and processing methods were evaluated for use on the JPL Galileo spacecraft in the area of radiation shielding for electronics. Development and qualification activities involving an aluminum structural laminate are described. These activities included requirements assessment, design tradeoffs, materials selection, adhesive bonding development, mechanical properties measurements, thermal stability assessment, and nondestructive evaluation. This paper presents evaluation of three adhesives for bonding tantalum to aluminum. The concept of combining a thin sheet of tantalum with two outer aluminum face sheets using adhesive bonding was developed successfully. This radiation shield laminate also provides a structural shear plate for mounting electronic assemblies

  17. Increased electric sail thrust through removal of trapped shielding electrons by orbit chaotisation due to spacecraft body

    P. Janhunen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available An electric solar wind sail is a recently introduced propellantless space propulsion method whose technical development has also started. The electric sail consists of a set of long, thin, centrifugally stretched and conducting tethers which are charged positively and kept in a high positive potential of order 20 kV by an onboard electron gun. The positively charged tethers deflect solar wind protons, thus tapping momentum from the solar wind stream and producing thrust. The amount of obtained propulsive thrust depends on how many electrons are trapped by the potential structures of the tethers, because the trapped electrons tend to shield the charged tether and reduce its effect on the solar wind. Here we present physical arguments and test particle calculations indicating that in a realistic three-dimensional electric sail spacecraft there exist a natural mechanism which tends to remove the trapped electrons by chaotising their orbits and causing them to eventually collide with the conducting tethers. We present calculations which indicate that if these mechanisms were able to remove trapped electrons nearly completely, the electric sail performance could be about five times higher than previously estimated, about 500 nN/m, corresponding to 1 N thrust for a baseline construction with 2000 km total tether length.

  18. Low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer (LEPe) onboard the Arase spacecraft

    Kazama, Yoichi; Wang, Bo-Jhou; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tzu-Fang; Chiang, Chih-Yu; Asamura, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we describe the low-energy electron instrument LEPe (low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer) onboard the Arase (ERG) spacecraft. The instrument measures a three-dimensional distribution function of electrons with energies of ˜ 19 eV-19 keV. Electrons in this energy range dominate in the inner magnetosphere, and measurement of such electrons is important in terms of understanding the magnetospheric dynamics and wave-particle interaction. The instrument employs a toroidal tophat electrostatic energy analyzer with a passive 6-mm aluminum shield. To minimize background radiation effects, the analyzer has a background channel, which monitors counts produced by background radiation. Background counts are then subtracted from measured counts. Electronic components are radiation tolerant, and 5-mm-thick shielding of the electronics housing ensures that the total dose is less than 100 kRad for the one-year nominal mission lifetime. The first in-space measurement test was done on February 12, 2017, showing that the instrument functions well. On February 27, the first all-instrument run test was done, and the LEPe instrument measured an energy dispersion event probably related to a substorm injection occurring immediately before the instrument turn-on. These initial results indicate that the instrument works fine in space, and the measurement performance is good for science purposes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Spacecraft radio scattering observations of the power spectrum of electron density fluctuations in the solar wind

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind electron density power spectra in the solar equatorial region are inferred from observations of phase scintillations and spectral broadening made with the Viking, Helios, and Pioneer spacecraft. The heliocentric distance range covered is 2--215 R/sub S/, and for some observations close to the sun the spectra extend to fluctuation frequencies as high as 100 Hz. For heliocentric distances > or approx. =20 R/sub S/ the equivalent spacecraft-measured one-dimensional density spectrym V/sub n/e is well modeled by a single power law (f/sup -alpha/) in the frequency range 10 -4 -5 x 10 -2 Hz. The mean spectral index α is 1.65, very close to the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Under the assumption of constant solar wind speed, V/sub n/e varies as R/sup -3.45/, where R is heliocentric distance. Within 20 R/sub S/, V/sub n/e can still be modeled by a single power law over the frequency range 10 -3 -10 1 Hz, but the spectral index becomes smaller, αapprox.1.1. The flattening of the density spectrum with 20 R/sub S/ is presumably associated with energy deposition in the near-sun region and acceleration of the solar wind

  20. Compendium of Single Event Effects, Total Ionizing Dose, and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Chen, Dakai; Campola, Michael J.; Casey, Megan C.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present results and analysis investigating the effects of radiation on a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects (SEE), proton-induced displacement damage (DD), and total ionizing dose (TID). Introduction: This paper is a summary of test results.NASA spacecraft are subjected to a harsh space environment that includes exposure to various types of ionizing radiation. The performance of electronic devices in a space radiation environment is often limited by its susceptibility to single event effects (SEE), total ionizing dose (TID), and displacement damage (DD). Ground-based testing is used to evaluate candidate spacecraft electronics to determine risk to spaceflight applications. Interpreting the results of radiation testing of complex devices is quite difficult. Given the rapidly changing nature of technology, radiation test data are most often application-specific and adequate understanding of the test conditions is critical. Studies discussed herein were undertaken to establish the application-specific sensitivities of candidate spacecraft and emerging electronic devices to single-event upset (SEU), single-event latchup (SEL), single-event gate rupture (SEGR), single-event burnout (SEB), single-event transient (SET), TID, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS), and DD effects.

  1. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  2. Effective exchange potentials for electronically inelastic scattering

    Schwenke, D.W.; Staszewska, G.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose new methods for solving the electron scattering close coupling equations employing equivalent local exchange potentials in place of the continuum-multiconfiguration-Hartree--Fock-type exchange kernels. The local exchange potentials are Hermitian. They have the correct symmetry for any symmetries of excited electronic states included in the close coupling expansion, and they have the same limit at very high energy as previously employed exchange potentials. Comparison of numerical calculations employing the new exchange potentials with the results obtained with the standard nonlocal exchange kernels shows that the new exchange potentials are more accurate than the local exchange approximations previously available for electronically inelastic scattering. We anticipate that the new approximations will be most useful for intermediate-energy electronically inelastic electron--molecule scattering

  3. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  4. Spacecraft observations of a Maxwell Demon coating the separatrix of asymmetric magnetic reconnection with crescent-shaped electron distributions

    Egedal, J.; Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Wetherton, B.; Cassak, Pa; Chen, Lj; Lavraud, B.; Dorell, J.; Avanov, L.; Gershman, D.

    2016-10-01

    During asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the dayside magnetopause in situ spacecraft mea- surements show that electrons from the high density inflow penetrate some distance into the low density inflow. Supported by a kinetic simulation, we present a general derivation of an exclusion energy parameter, which provides a lower kinetic energy bound for an electron to jump across the reconnection region from one inflow region to the other. As by a Maxwell Demon, only high energy electrons are permitted to cross the inner reconnection region, strongly impacting the form of the electron distribution function observed along the low density side separatrix. The dynamics produce two distinct flavors of crescent-shaped electron distributions in a thin boundary layer along the separatrix between the magnetospheric inflow and the reconnection exhaust. The analytical model presented relates these salient details of the distribution function to the electron dynamics in the inner reconnection region.

  5. Research supporting potential modification of the NASA specification for dry heat microbial reduction of spacecraft hardware

    Spry, James A.; Beaudet, Robert; Schubert, Wayne

    Dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is the primary method currently used to reduce the microbial load of spacecraft and component parts to comply with planetary protection re-quirements. However, manufacturing processes often involve heating flight hardware to high temperatures for purposes other than planetary protection DHMR. At present, the specifica-tion in NASA document NPR8020.12, describing the process lethality on B. atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) bacterial spores, does not allow for additional planetary protection bioburden reduction credit for processing outside a narrow temperature, time and humidity window. Our results from a comprehensive multi-year laboratory research effort have generated en-hanced data sets on four aspects of the current specification: time and temperature effects in combination, the effect that humidity has on spore lethality, and the lethality for spores with exceptionally high thermal resistance (so called "hardies"). This paper describes potential modifications to the specification, based on the data set gener-ated in the referenced studies. The proposed modifications are intended to broaden the scope of the current specification while still maintaining confidence in a conservative interpretation of the lethality of the DHMR process on microorganisms.

  6. Physical Properties of Asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, a Potential Spacecraft Target, from Spitzer Observations

    Mueller, Michael; Harris, A. W.

    2006-09-01

    We report on results from recent Spitzer observations of near-Earth asteroid (10302) 1989 ML, which is among the lowest-ranking objects in terms of the specific momentum Δv required to reach it from Earth. It was originally considered as a target for Hayabusa and is now under consideration as a target of the planned ESA mission Don Quijote. Unfortunately, little is known about the physical properties of 1989 ML, in particular its size and albedo are unknown. Its exhibits an X type reflection spectrum, so depending on its albedo, 1989 ML may be an E, M, or P type asteroid. Provisional results from thermal-infrared observations carried out with Spitzer indicate that the albedo of 1989 ML is compatible with an M- or E-type classification. We will discuss our results and their implications for the physical properties and the rotation period of 1989 ML, and its importance as a potential spacecraft target. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  7. MULTI-SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS AND TRANSPORT MODELING OF ENERGETIC ELECTRONS FOR A SERIES OF SOLAR PARTICLE EVENTS IN AUGUST 2010

    Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y. [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Dresing, N.; Klassen, A. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    During 2010 August a series of solar particle events was observed by the two STEREO spacecraft as well as near-Earth spacecraft. The events, occurring on August 7, 14, and 18, originated from active regions 11093 and 11099. We combine in situ and remote-sensing observations with predictions from our model of three-dimensional anisotropic particle propagation in order to investigate the physical processes that caused the large angular spreads of energetic electrons during these events. In particular, we address the effects of the lateral transport of the electrons in the solar corona that is due to diffusion perpendicular to the average magnetic field in the interplanetary medium. We also study the influence of two coronal mass ejections and associated shock waves on the electron propagation, and a possible time variation of the transport conditions during the above period. For the August 18 event we also utilize electron observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft at a distance of 0.31 au from the Sun for an attempt to separate between radial and longitudinal dependencies in the transport process. Our modelings show that the parallel and perpendicular diffusion mean free paths of electrons can vary significantly not only as a function of the radial distance, but also of the heliospheric longitude. Normalized to a distance of 1 au, we derive values of λ {sub ∥} in the range of 0.15–0.6 au, and values of λ {sub ⊥} in the range of 0.005–0.01 au. We discuss how our results relate to various theoretical models for perpendicular diffusion, and whether there might be a functional relationship between the perpendicular and the parallel mean free path.

  8. Fast solar electrons, interplanetary plasma and km-wave type-III radio bursts observed from the IMP-6 spacecraft

    Alvarez, H.; Lin, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    IMP-6 spacecraft observations of low frequency radio emission, fast electrons, and solar wind plasma are used to examine the dynamics of the fast electron streams which generate solar type-III radio bursts. Of twenty solar electron events observed between April 1971 and August 1972, four were found to be amenable to detailed analysis. Observations of the direction of arrival of the radio emission at different frequencies were combined with the solar wind density and velocity measurements at 1 AU to define an Archimedean spiral trajectory for the radio burst exciter. The propagation characteristics of the exciter and of the fast electrons observed at 1 AU were then compared. It is found that: (1) the fast electrons excite the radio emission at the second harmonic; (2) the total distance travelled by the electrons was between 30 and 70% longer than the length of the smooth spiral defined by the radio observations; (3) this additional distance travelled is the result of scattering of the electrons in the interplanetary medium; (4) the observations are consistent with negligible true energy loss by the fast electrons.(Auth.)

  9. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    Krupnikov, K.K.; Makletsov, A.A.; Mileev, V.N.; Novikov, L.S.; Sinolits, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language

  10. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction

    Krupnikov, K K; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-01-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991-1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  11. Model potential for electron scattering from rubidium

    Gien, T.E. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NF (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-11-28

    An analytic model potential for the e[sup -]-Rb[sup +] system is generated from experimental data, using an iteration method. The potential obtained can reproduce rather accurately the energy levels of rubidium. We employed it in the calculation of elastic differential cross sections for electron (and positron) scatterings from rubidium in the conventional Glauber approximation. The differential cross sections calculated in the model potential approach are compared to those in the frozen-core approach, employing either the Clementi-Roetti or the Szasz-McGinn wavefunctions. The core correlation and polarization effects are found to significantly affect the cross section results. (author).

  12. Model potential for electron scattering from rubidium

    Gien, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic model potential for the e - -Rb + system is generated from experimental data, using an iteration method. The potential obtained can reproduce rather accurately the energy levels of rubidium. We employed it in the calculation of elastic differential cross sections for electron (and positron) scatterings from rubidium in the conventional Glauber approximation. The differential cross sections calculated in the model potential approach are compared to those in the frozen-core approach, employing either the Clementi-Roetti or the Szasz-McGinn wavefunctions. The core correlation and polarization effects are found to significantly affect the cross section results. (author)

  13. Time delay occultation data of the Helios spacecraft for probing the electron density distribution in the solar corona

    Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    S-band time delay measurements were collected from the spacecraft Helios A and B during three solar occultations in 1975/76 within heliocentric distances of about 3 and 215 earth radius in terms of range, Doppler frequency shift, and electron content. Characteristic features of measurement and data processing are described. Typical data sets are discussed to probe the electron density distribution near the sun (west and east limb as well) including the outer and extended corona. Steady-state and dynamical aspects of the solar corona are presented and compared with earth-bound-K-coronagraph measurements. Using a weighted least squares estimation, parameters of an average coronal electron density profile are derived in a preliminary analysis to yield electron densities at r = 3, 65, 215 earth radius. Transient phenomena are discussed and a velocity of propagation v is nearly equal to 900 km/s is determined for plasma ejecta from a solar flare observed during an extraordinary set of Helios B electron content measurements.

  14. Miniaturized Spacecraft Platform for Command, Data Handling and Electronics, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microelectronics Research Development Corporation (Micro RDC) proposes to develop a platform of low mass/volume/power, reliable miniaturized electronic modules that...

  15. Implosion lessons from national security, high reliability spacecraft, electronics, and the forces which changed them

    Temple, L Parker

    2012-01-01

    Implosion is a focused study of the history and uses of high-reliability, solid-state electronics, military standards, and space systems that support our national security and defense. This book is unique in combining the interdependent evolution of and interrelationships among military standards, solid-state electronics, and very high-reliability space systems. Starting with a brief description of the physics that enabled the development of the first transistor, Implosion covers the need for standardizing military electronics, which began during World War II and continu

  16. Initial Results from the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric Atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) on the FASTSAT Spacecraft

    Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas; Keller, John W.; Chornay, Dennis; Khazanov, George; Herrero, Federico; Moore, Thomas E.; Kujawski, Joseph; Casas, Joseph C.; Wilson, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    The MINI-ME instrument is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the U.S. Naval Academy, funded solely through GSFC Internal Research and Development (IRAD) awards. It detects neutral atoms from about 10 eV to about 700 eV (in 30 energy steps) in its current operating configuration with an approximately 10 degree by 360 degree field-of-view, divided into six sectors. The instrument was delivered on August 3, 2009 to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for integration with the FASTSAT-HSV01 small spacecraft bus developed by MSFC and a commercial partner, one of six Space Experiment Review Board (SERB) experiments on FASTSAT and one of three GSFC instruments (PISA and TTI being the other two). The FASTSAT spacecraft was launched on November 21, 2010 from Kodiak, Alaska on a Minotaur IV as a secondary payload and inserted into a 650 km, 72 degree inclination orbit, very nearly circular. MINI-ME has been collecting science data, as spacecraft resources would permit, in "optimal science mode" since January 20, 2011. In this presentation, we report initial science results including the potential first observations of neutral molecular ionospheric outflow. At the time of this abstract, we have identified 15 possible molecular outflow events. All these events occur between about 65 and 82 degrees geomagnetic latitude and most map to the auroral oval. The MINI-ME results provide an excellent framework for interpretation of the MILENA data, two instruments almost identical to MINI-ME that will launch on the VISIONS suborbital mission

  17. Electron tunneling across a tunable potential barrier

    Mangin, A; Anthore, A; Rocca, M L Della; Boulat, E; Lafarge, P

    2009-01-01

    We present an experiment where the elementary quantum electron tunneling process should be affected by an independent gate voltage parameter. We have realized nanotransistors where the source and drain electrodes are created by electromigration inducing a nanometer sized gap acting as a tunnel barrier. The barrier potential shape is in first approximation considered trapezoidal. The application of a voltage to the gate electrode close to the barrier region can in principle affect the barrier shape. Simulations of the source drain tunnel current as a function of the gate voltage predict modulations as large as one hundred percent. The difficulty of observing the predicted behaviour in our samples might be due to the peculiar geometry of the realized tunnel junction.

  18. The Jovian and galactic electrons in the heliosphere as seen by the KET experiment on board the spacecraft named ULYSSE

    Rastoin, Cecile

    1995-01-01

    The KET electron telescope onboard the Ulysse spacecraft flawlessly provides measurements of electrons, protons and alphas of energies above some MeV. This present work focuses on the electron data analysis and interpretation from the Ulysse's launch in 90 to the beginning of 95. The first stage of the odyssey was the Jovian encounter in February 92. The MeV electrons are here used as markers of the magnetic field global structure. We specially study the complex and highly dynamic outer magnetosphere. With reference of previous fly-by, the KET observations permit to characterize the 10-hour modulation of the Jovian electron flux and spectrum and suggest a mechanism involving the rotation of the north low-latitude polar cap. The boundary layers are seen as thick regions with transitions from magnetosheath to magnetospheric particle populations and field properties. The electron anisotropy and flux discontinuities are investigated with support of field data and provide the first evidence of magnetic reconnection occurring around the Jovian magnetopause. Taking advantage of the gravity assistance of the giant planet, Ulysse dipped towards the south heliospheric regions. Along its trajectory KET has detected Jovian electrons in interplanetary space. The first type of events is non-diffusive, with rapid increases discovered by KET at less than 1 AU from the magnetosphere: Jovian electrons have probably escaped through reconnection process which preserves their spectrum modulation and anisotropy characteristics. The events of second category are diffusive, observed since launch up to 30 degrees south. This work highlights the roles of interplanetary shocks and of the heliospheric current sheet in the propagation. A 3D transport model including adiabatic deceleration is presented here and accounts for the Jovian electron flux detected along the Ulysse's trajectory. New estimates of the 3D diffusion coefficients are performed for MeV electrons: K(perpendicular) = 8 * 10

  19. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    Shume, E. B.; Vergados, P.; Komjathy, A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents electron number density profiles derived from high resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations performed using the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) payload on the high inclination CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE...... good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over nearby stations to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points, (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere...

  20. Integrating standard operating procedures with spacecraft automation, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft automation has the potential to assist crew members and spacecraft operators in managing spacecraft systems during extended space missions. Automation can...

  1. Potential application of electron accelerators in Malaysia

    Alang Md Rashid, Nahrul Khair; Mohd Dahlan, Khairul Zaman [Nuclear Energy Unit, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1994-12-31

    Briefly discussed some applications of electron accelerators i.e. sterilization, pasteurization (high energy EBM - up to 10 MV), crosslinking of wire and cable and insulation (medium energy EBM - 1 to 5 MV), treatment of flue gases for removal of NO sub x and SO sub x from burning coal(low energy EBM - 700 to 900 kV), curing of surface coatings, printing ink, adhesives (low energy EBM - 200 to 500 kV); advantages and electron beam processing.

  2. Potential application of electron accelerators in Malaysia

    Nahrul Khair Alang Md Rashid; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    1994-01-01

    Briefly discussed some applications of electron accelerators i.e. sterilization, pasteurization (high energy EBM - up to 10 MV), crosslinking of wire and cable and insulation (medium energy EBM - 1 to 5 MV), treatment of flue gases for removal of NO sub x and SO sub x from burning coal(low energy EBM - 700 to 900 kV), curing of surface coatings, printing ink, adhesives (low energy EBM - 200 to 500 kV); advantages and electron beam processing

  3. Multi electron species and shielding potentials in plasmas

    Khan, Arroj A.; Murtaza, G.; Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of Debye shielding is investigated in electron ion plasmas using the approach of two temperature electrons. We get different profiles of potential for different parameters and observe that the potentials fall very slowly than the standard Coulomb and Debye potentials. The importance of work is pointed out in the introduction.

  4. Potentials and limits of electronic situation displays

    Hable, K.; Hoebler, C.; Bieringer, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the field of precautionary radiation protection and disaster response, the amount of information and the number of its sources is steadily increasing. Central compilation and instant availability of information for all involved authorities becomes more and more important. In this context the structured presentation of documents on a web server in terms of an ''Electronic Situation Display'' (ESD) has been established. In Germany, there are several Electronic Situation Display prototypes run by federal and state authorities for various purposes and using different technical approaches. The systems of the federal states focus on workflow management. They provide emergency log books and information on the implementation of countermeasures for disaster response authorities. The Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) tasked the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) to develop the Federal Electronic Situation Display (ELAN) that is mainly used as an information platform for decision making in case of nuclear emergencies. Documents containing radiological data or results from Decision Support Systems are almost automatically integrated into ELAN. Read and write permissions for users are managed by a concept of specific roles. The federal ESD and the systems of the federal states will be coordinated in order to achieve a better harmonisation. Interfaces for data exchange and data processing must be defined. Authorities of the federal states can use protected areas within the federal ESD where information is kept confidential for internal use before it is distributed to other states and federal authorities. In addition, key information of Electronic Situation Displays from the federal states can automatically be integrated into ELAN. Several task groups of the IAEA are working on the development and realization of a prototype for an information platform harmonising ESDs on international level. (orig.)

  5. Electronic conductance of quantum wire with serial periodic potential structures

    Fayad, Hisham M.; Shabat, Mohammed M.; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-08-01

    A theory based on the total transfer matrix is presented to investigate the electronic conductance in a quantum wire with serial periodic potentials. We apply the formalism in computation of the electronic conductance in a wire with different physical parameters of the wire structure. The numerical results could be used in designing some future quantum electronic devices. (author)

  6. Potentials of electronic business development in Serbia

    Milovanović Slavoljub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive application of information and communication technology (ICT, particularly Internet in selling and buying business processes have caused development of electronic business (e-business concept. Numerous organizations in the world and in Serbia as well have implemented the concept. The basic aim of the paper is to analyze level of internet technology and e-business implementation in Serbia. The paper has theoretical background explaining concept of e-business and ICT which supports the implementation of this concept. However, empirical or practical contribution of the paper is articulated through analysis of data considering application of ICT and e-business concept in Serbia. The data considering application of ICT and e-business concept in Serbia is collected by Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia and encompasses households/individuals and enterprises in Serbia. Results of the research presented in the paper can help executives in Serbian organizations in planning e-business concept implementation as well as researchers in deeper study of this theme.

  7. Potential Formation in Front of an Electron Emitting Electrode in a Two-Electron Temperature Plasma

    Gyergyek, T.; Cercek, M.; Erzen, D.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potential formation in the pre-sheath region of a floating electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied theoretically in a two-electron-temperature plasma using a static kinetic plasma-sheath model. Dependence of the collector floating potential, the plasma potential in the pre-sheath region, and the critical emission coefficient on the hot electron density and temperature is calculated. It is found that for high hot to cool electron temperature ratio a double layer like solutions exist in a certain range of hot to cool electron densities

  8. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    Hay, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    In this review an approach is outlined for studying molecules containing heavy atoms with the use of relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's). These potentials play the dual roles of (1) replacing the chemically-inert core electrons and (2) incorporating the mass velocity and Darwin term into a one-electron effective potential. This reduces the problem to a valence-electron problem and avoids computation of additional matrix elements involving relativistic operators. The spin-orbit effects are subsequently included using the molecular orbitals derived from the RECP calculation as a basis

  9. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  10. Understanding electron magnetic circular dichroism in a transition potential approach

    Barthel, J.; Mayer, J.; Rusz, J.; Ho, P.-L.; Zhong, X. Y.; Lentzen, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Urban, K. W.; Brown, H. G.; Findlay, S. D.; Allen, L. J.

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduces an approach based on transition potentials for inelastic scattering to understand the underlying physics of electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). The transition potentials are sufficiently localized to permit atomic-scale EMCD. Two-beam and three-beam systematic row cases are discussed in detail in terms of transition potentials for conventional transmission electron microscopy, and the basic symmetries which arise in the three-beam case are confirmed experimentally. Atomic-scale EMCD in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), using both a standard STEM probe and vortex beams, is discussed.

  11. Auger electron spectroscopy, ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance potential spectroscopy

    Riwan, R.

    1973-01-01

    The spectroscopy of surfaces using an incident electron beam is studied. The fundamental mechanisms are discussed together with the parameters involved in Auger emission: excitation of the atom, de-excitation by electron emission, and the migration of electrons towards the surface and their ejection. Some examples of applications are given (surface structures, metallurgy, chemical information). Two new techniques for analyzing surfaces are studied: ionization spectroscopy, and appearance potential spectroscopy [fr

  12. Potential applications of electron emission membranes in medicine

    Bilevych, Yevgen [Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM), Berlin (Germany); University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brunner, Stefan E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Chan, Hong Wah; Charbon, Edoardo [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Graaf, Harry van der, E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hagen, Cornelis W. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D. [Photonis, Roden (Netherlands); Prodanović, Violeta [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rotman, Daan [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Santagata, Fabio [State Key Lab for Solid State Lighti Changzhou base, F7 R& D HUB 1, Science and Education Town, Changzhou 213161, Jangsu Province (China); Sarro, Lina; Schaart, Dennis R. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M.M.G. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-11

    With a miniaturised stack of transmission dynodes, a noise free amplifier is being developed for the detection of single free electrons, with excellent time- and 2D spatial resolution and efficiency. With this generic technology, a new family of detectors for individual elementary particles may become possible. Potential applications of such electron emission membranes in medicine are discussed.

  13. Electron-hole drop (EHD) stability in deformation potential well

    Makarov, A.G.; Tikhodeev, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    In heterogeneously-deformed Ge the stability of electron-hole droplets (EHD) being in a potential well is considered. It is shown that the potential well effect is equivalent to the decrease of effective density of phonon EHD charge. It is pointed out that heating EHD (for example, by IR radiation), can increase the phonon droplet charge and affect its stability

  14. Path integral approach to electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential

    Xu Chuang; Feng Feng; Li Ying-Jun

    2016-01-01

    As is known to all, the electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential is one of the most widespread applications of quantum theory. Nevertheless, many discussions about electron scattering are based upon single-particle Schrodinger equation or Dirac equation in quantum mechanics rather than the method of quantum field theory. In this paper, by using the path integral approach of quantum field theory, we perturbatively evaluate the scattering amplitude up to the second order for the electron scattering by the classical electromagnetic potential. The results we derive are convenient to apply to all sorts of potential forms. Furthermore, by means of the obtained results, we give explicit calculations for the one-dimensional electric potential. (paper)

  15. Three-dimensional data assimilation and reanalysis of radiation belt electrons: Observations of a four-zone structure using five spacecraft and the VERB code

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Kondrashov, D.; Subbotin, D.; Makarevich, R. A.; Donovan, E.; Nagai, T.

    2014-11-01

    Obtaining the global state of radiation belt electrons through reanalysis is an important step toward validating our current understanding of radiation belt dynamics and for identification of new physical processes. In the current study, reanalysis of radiation belt electrons is achieved through data assimilation of five spacecraft with the 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code using a split-operator Kalman filter technique. The spacecraft data are cleaned for noise, saturation effects, and then intercalibrated on an individual energy channel basis, by considering phase space density conjunctions in the T96 field model. Reanalysis during the CRRES era reveals a never-before-reported four-zone structure in the Earth's radiation belts during the 24 March 1991 shock-induced injection superstorm: (1) an inner belt, (2) the high-energy shock-injection belt, (3) a remnant outer radiation belt, and (4) a second outer radiation belt. The third belt formed near the same time as the second belt and was later enhanced across keV to MeV energies by a second particle injection observed by CRRES and the Northern Solar Terrestrial Array riometer network. During the recovery phase of the storm, the fourth belt was created near L*=4RE, lasting for several days. Evidence is provided that the fourth belt was likely created by a dominant local heating process. This study outlines the necessity to consider all diffusive processes acting simultaneously and the advantage of supporting ground-based data in quantifying the observed radiation belt dynamics. It is demonstrated that 3-D data assimilation can resolve various nondiffusive processes and provides a comprehensive picture of the electron radiation belts.

  16. Potential applications of MMC and aluminum-lithium alloys in cameras for CRAF spacecraft. [Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby Mission

    Lane, Marc; Hsieh, Cheng; Adams, Lloyd

    1989-01-01

    In undertaking the design of a 2000-mm focal length camera for the Mariner Mark II series of spacecraft, JPL sought novel materials with the requisite dimensional and thermal stability, outgassing and corrosion resistance, low mass, high stiffness, and moderate cost. Metal-matrix composites and Al-Li alloys have, in addition to excellent mechanical properties and low density, a suitably low coefficient of thermal expansion, high specific stiffness, and good electrical conductivity. The greatest single obstacle to application of these materials to camera structure design is noted to have been the lack of information regarding long-term dimensional stability.

  17. Model potentials in liquid water ionization by fast electron impact

    De Sanctis, M L; Stia, C R; Fojón, O A; Politis, M-F; Vuilleumier, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the ionization of water molecules in liquid phase by fast electron impact. We use our previous first-order model within an independent electron approximation that allows the reduction of the multielectronic problem into a monoelectronic one. The initial molecular states of the liquid water are represented in a realistic way through a Wannier orbital formalism. We complete our previous study by taking into account approximately the influence of the passive electrons of the target by means of different model potentials. We compute multiple differential cross sections for the most external orbital 1B 1 and compare them with other results

  18. Potential and electron density calculated for freely expanding plasma by an electron beam

    Ho, C. Y.; Tsai, Y. H.; Ma, C.; Wen, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the radial distributions of potential and electron density in free expansion plasma induced by an electron beam irradiating on the plate. The region of plasma production is assumed to be cylindrical, and the plasma expansion is assumed to be from a cylindrical source. Therefore, the one-dimensional model in cylindrical coordinates is employed in order to analyze the radial distributions of the potential and electron density. The Runge-Kutta method and the perturbation method are utilized in order to obtain the numerical and approximate solutions, respectively. The results reveal that the decrease in the initial ion energy makes most of the ions gather near the plasma production region and reduces the distribution of the average positive potential, electron, and ion density along the radial direction. The oscillation of steady-state plasma along the radial direction is also presented in this paper. The ions induce a larger amplitude of oscillation along the radial direction than do electrons because the electrons oscillate around slowly moving ions due to a far smaller electron mass than ion mass. The radial distributions of the positive potential and electron density predicted from this study are compared with the available experimental data.

  19. Optical-potential model for electron-atom scattering

    Callaway, J.; Oza, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the addition of a matrix optical potential to a close-coupling calculation should lead to improved results in studies of electron-atom scattering. This procedure is described with use of a pseudostate expansion to evaluate the optical potential. The integro-differential equations are solved by a linear-algebraic method. As a test case, applications are made to electron-hydrogen scattering, and the results are compared with those obtained by other calculational procedures, and with experiment

  20. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure

    Theoretical investigations of electronic structure of quantum dots is of current interest in nanophase materials. Empirical theories such as effective mass approximation, tight binding methods and empirical pseudo-potential method are capable of explaining the experimentally observed optical properties. We employ the ...

  2. Quasielastic electron scattering: effect of relativistic nuclear potentials

    Do Dang, G.; Nguyen Van Giai.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown that a solution to the difficulty encountered in reproducing simultaneously the experimental longitudinal and transverse response functions deduced from deep inelastic electron scattering may be found in a consistent treatment of the electromagnetic interaction in a Dirac equation in which Lorentz scalar and vector potentials are explicitly introduced. Results for 12 C and 40 Ca are given and compared with experiments

  3. Dips spacecraft integration issues

    Determan, W.R.; Harty, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy, in cooperation with the Department of Defense, has recently initiated the dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) demonstration program. DIPS is designed to provide 1 to 10 kW of electrical power for future military spacecraft. One of the near-term missions considered as a potential application for DIPS was the boost surveillance and tracking system (BSTS). A brief review and summary of the reasons behind a selection of DIPS for BSTS-type missions is presented. Many of these are directly related to spacecraft integration issues; these issues will be reviewed in the areas of system safety, operations, survivability, reliability, and autonomy

  4. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Holmans, Walter [Planetary Systems Corporation

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  5. Spacecraft operations

    Sellmaier, Florian; Schmidhuber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The book describes the basic concepts of spaceflight operations, for both, human and unmanned missions. The basic subsystems of a space vehicle are explained in dedicated chapters, the relationship of spacecraft design and the very unique space environment are laid out. Flight dynamics are taught as well as ground segment requirements. Mission operations are divided into preparation including management aspects, execution and planning. Deep space missions and space robotic operations are included as special cases. The book is based on a course held at the German Space Operation Center (GSOC).

  6. Spectra of electron pair under harmonic and Debye potential

    Munjal, D. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi (India); Prasad, V. [Department of Physics, Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi (India)

    2017-02-15

    Two electron systems confined by harmonic potential is known as harmonium. Such a system has been studied for many reasons in the literature. In this work we study harmonium under Debye potential. We use higher order finite difference method for the solution of Schrodinger equation. Complete energy spectrum of harmonium and harmonium under Debye potential is studied. Debye screening length shows considerable effect on the energy levels and the radial matrix elements. The results are analysed in the light of existing results and the comparison with available results shows remarkable agreement. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Rocket potential measurements during electron beam injection into the ionosphere

    Gringauz, K.I.; Shutte, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Electron flux measurements were made during pulsed injection of electron beams at a current of about 0.5 A and energy of 15 or 27 keV, using a retarding potential analyzer which was mounted on the lateral surface of the Eridan rocket during the ARAKS experiment of January 26, 1975. The general character of the retardation curves was found to be the same regardless of the electron injection energy, and regardless of the fact whether the plasma generator, injecting quasineutral cesium plasma with an ion current of about 10 A, was switched on. A sharp current increase in the interval between 10 to the -7th and 10 to the -6th A was observed with a decrease of the retarding potential. The rocket potential did not exceed approximately 150 V at about 130 to 190 km, and decreased to 20 V near 100 km. This was explained by the formation of a highly conducting region near the rocket, which was formed via intense plasma waves generated by the beam. Measurements of electron fluxes with energies of 1 to 3 keV agree well with estimates based on the beam plasma discharge theory

  8. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Spacecraft Circuit Diagnostics by Analog and Complex Signature Analysis

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Wade, Raymond P.; Izadnegahdar, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is aimed at developing technologies that will enable space-flight crews to perform in situ component-level repair of electronics on Moon and Mars outposts, where there is no existing infrastructure for logistics spares. These technologies must provide effective repair capabilities yet meet the payload and operational constraints of space facilities. Effective repair depends on a diagnostic capability that is versatile but easy to use by crew members that have limited training in electronics. CLEAR studied two techniques that involve extensive precharacterization of "known good" circuits to produce graphical signatures that provide an easy-to-use comparison method to quickly identify faulty components. Analog Signature Analysis (ASA) allows relatively rapid diagnostics of complex electronics by technicians with limited experience. Because of frequency limits and the growing dependence on broadband technologies, ASA must be augmented with other capabilities. To meet this challenge while preserving ease of use, CLEAR proposed an alternative called Complex Signature Analysis (CSA). Tests of ASA and CSA were used to compare capabilities and to determine if the techniques provided an overlapping or complementary capability. The results showed that the methods are complementary.

  9. Pumping Electron-Positron Pairs from a Well Potential.

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Fu, Li-Bin

    2016-04-29

    In the presence of very deep well potential, electrons will spontaneously occupy the empty embedded bound states and electron-positron pairs are created by means of a non-perturbative tunneling process. In this work, by slowly oscillating the width or depth, the population transfer channels are opened and closed periodically. We find and clearly show that by the non-synchronous ejections of particles, the saturation of pair number in a static super-critical well can be broken, and electrons and positrons can be pumped inexhaustibly from vacuum with a constant production rate. In the adiabatic limit, final pair number after a single cycle has quantized values as a function of the upper boundary of the oscillating, and the critical upper boundaries indicate the diving points of the bound states.

  10. Stabilization of electron beam spot size by self bias potential

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Moir, D.C.; Snell, C.M.; Kang, M.

    1998-01-01

    In high resolution flash x-ray imaging technology the electric field developed between the electron beam and the converter target is large enough to draw ions from the target surface. The ions provide fractional neutralization and cause the electron beam to focus radially inward, and the focal point subsequently moves upstream due to the expansion of the ion column. A self-bias target concept is proposed and verified via computer simulation that the electron charge deposited on the target can generate an electric potential, which can effectively limit the ion motion and thereby stabilize the growth of the spot size. A target chamber using the self bias target concept was designed and tested in the Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The authors have obtained good agreement between computer simulation and experiment

  11. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  12. Localized electronic states: the small radius potential approximation

    Steslicka, M.; Jurczyszyn, L.

    1984-09-01

    Using a quasi three-dimensional crystal model we investigate the localized electronic states, generated by the crystal surface covered by foreign atoms. Two such states are found in the first forbidden energy gap and, because of their localization properties, called the Tamm-like and adsorption-like states. Using the small radius potential approximation, the properties of both types of states were discussed in detail. (author)

  13. Electron injection dynamics in high-potential porphyrin photoanodes.

    Milot, Rebecca L; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2015-05-19

    There is a growing need to utilize carbon neutral energy sources, and it is well known that solar energy can easily satisfy all of humanity's requirements. In order to make solar energy a viable alternative to fossil fuels, the problem of intermittency must be solved. Batteries and supercapacitors are an area of active research, but they currently have relatively low energy-to-mass storage capacity. An alternative and very promising possibility is to store energy in chemical bonds, or make a solar fuel. The process of making solar fuel is not new, since photosynthesis has been occurring on earth for about 3 billion years. In order to produce any fuel, protons and electrons must be harvested from a species in its oxidized form. Photosynthesis uses the only viable source of electrons and protons on the scale needed for global energy demands: water. Because artificial photosynthesis is a lofty goal, water oxidation, which is a crucial step in the process, has been the initial focus. This Account provides an overview of how terahertz spectroscopy is used to study electron injection, highlights trends from previously published reports, and concludes with a future outlook. It begins by exploring similarities and differences between dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) for producing electricity and a putative device for splitting water and producing a solar fuel. It then identifies two important problems encountered when adapting DSSC technology to water oxidation-improper energy matching between sensitizer energy levels with the potential for water oxidation and the instability of common anchoring groups in water-and discusses steps to address them. Emphasis is placed on electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides because this process is the initial step in charge transport. Both the rate and efficiency of electron injection are analyzed on a sub-picosecond time scale using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrins are

  14. Obtaining the crystal potential by inversion from electron scattering intensities

    Allen, L.T.; Josefsson, T.W.; Leeb, H.

    1998-01-01

    A method to obtain the crystal potential from the intensities of the diffracted beams in high energy electron diffraction is proposed. It is based on a series of measurements for specific well determined orientations of the incident beam which determine the moduli of all elements of the scattering matrix. Using unitarity and the specific form of the scattering matrix (including symmetries) an overdetermined set of non-linear equations is obtained from these data. Solution of these equations yields the required phase information and allows the determination of a (projected) crystal potential by inversion which is unique up to an arbitrary shift of the origin. The reconstruction of potentials from intensities is illustrated for two realistic examples, a [111] systematic row case in ZnS and a [110] zone axis orientation in GaAs (both noncentrosymmetric crystals)

  15. Electronic Polarizability and the Effective Pair Potentials of Water

    Leontyev, I. V.; Stuchebrukhov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Employing the continuum dielectric model for electronic polarizability, we have developed a new consistent procedure for parameterization of the effective nonpolarizable potential of liquid water. The model explains the striking difference between the value of water dipole moment μ~3D reported in recent ab initio and experimental studies with the value μeff~2.3D typically used in the empirical potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC/E. It is shown that the consistency of the parameterization scheme can be achieved if the magnitude of the effective dipole of water is understood as a scaled value μeff=μ∕εel, where εel =1.78 is the electronic (high-frequency) dielectric constant of water, and a new electronic polarization energy term, missing in the previous theories, is included. The new term is evaluated by using Kirkwood - Onsager theory. The new scheme is fully consistent with experimental data on enthalpy of vaporization, density, diffusion coefficient, and static dielectric constant. The new theoretical framework provides important insights into the nature of the effective parameters, which is crucial when the computational models of liquid water are used for simulations in different environments, such as proteins, or for interaction with solutes. PMID:25383062

  16. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    Ben-Hu, Zhou; Ben-Liang, Zhou; Guang-Hui, Zhou; Zi-Gang, Duan

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the electronic transport property through a square potential barrier in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR). Using the Dirac equation with the continuity condition for wave functions at the interfaces between regions with and without a barrier, we calculate the mode-dependent transmission probability for both semiconducting and metallic AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, the transmission probability is generally an oscillating function of the height and range of the barrier for both types of AGNRs. The main difference between the two types of systems is that the magnitude of oscillation for the semiconducting AGNR is larger than that for the metallic one. This fact implies that the electronic transport property for AGNRs depends sensitively on their widths and edge details due to the Dirac nature of fermions in the system

  17. Situations of potential exposure in self-shielding electron accelerators

    Rios, D.A.S.; Rios, P.B.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.; Carneiro, J.C.G.G.

    2017-01-01

    The study discusses situations in the industrial environment that may lead to potential exposure of Occupationally Exposed Individuals and Public Individuals in self-shielding electron accelerators. Although these exposure situations are unlikely, simulation exercises can lead to improvements in the operating procedure as well as suggest changes in production line design in order to increase radiation protection at work. These studies can also be used in training and demonstrate a solid application of the ALARA principle in the daily activities of radiative installations

  18. Electronic transport for armchair graphene nanoribbons with a potential barrier

    Zhou Benliang; Zhou Benhu; Liao Wenhu; Zhou Guanghui

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties through a rectangular potential barrier embedded in armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) of various widths. Using the Landauer formula and Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the conductance and Fano factor for the both metallic and semiconducting AGNRs, respectively. It is shown that, by some numerical examples, at Dirac point the both types of AGNRs own a minimum conductance associated with the maximum Fano factor. The results are discussed and compared with the previous relevant works.

  19. Electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact in a linear algebraic, separable potential approach

    Collins, L.A.; Schneider, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The linear algebraic, separable potential approach is applied to the electronic excitation of atoms and molecules by electron impact. By representing the exchange and off-diagonal direct terms on a basis, the standard set of coupled inelastic equations is reduced to a set of elastic inhomogeneous equations. The procedure greatly simplifies the formulation by allowing a large portion of the problem to be handled by standard bound-state techniques and by greatly reducing the order of the scattering equations that must be solved. Application is made to the excitation of atomic hydrogen in the three-state close-coupling (1s, 2s, 2p) approximation. (author)

  20. Optical potential study of electron scattering by rubidium

    Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhou, Y. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-10-15

    The coupled-channel optical method (CCOM) has been implemented in a study of electronrubidium scattering. This method includes the continuum effect in the calculation via an ab-initio optical potential. Eight atomic states (5s, 5p, 4d, 6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p) were used together with the continuum optical potential in the 5s-5s, 5s-5p, and 5p-5p coupling. The elastic, inelastic and total cross sections for electron-rubidium scattering at low and intermediate energies, ranging from 10 eV to 100 eV, are reported. The results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  1. The use and potential application of electron accelerator in Indonesia

    Danu, Sugiarto

    2003-01-01

    The use of electron accelerator in Indonesia for research and development, radiation services, commercial purposes and potential application in the future is described. A pilot plant for radiation curing technology particularly for wood surface coating using low energy electron accelerator (300 keV, 50 mA; installed in 1984) and a EBM GJ 2 (2 MeV, 10 mA, installed in 1994) for R and D of crosslinking process such as wire and cable and heat shrinkable tube and sheets in Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta, and also a low energy electron accelerator (installed in 1998) in a private company, PT Gajah Tunggai, are being mainly used. Their performances are presented with activities achieved in the fields of wood surface coating, vulcanization of natural rubber latex, grafting of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), radiation sterilization, degradation of cellulose and, as promising applications, radiation curing for composite production and uses for environmental preservation are introduced. (S. Ohno)

  2. The use and potential application of electron accelerator in Indonesia

    Danu, Sugiarto [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2003-02-01

    The use of electron accelerator in Indonesia for research and development, radiation services, commercial purposes and potential application in the future is described. A pilot plant for radiation curing technology particularly for wood surface coating using low energy electron accelerator (300 keV, 50 mA; installed in 1984) and a EBM GJ 2 (2 MeV, 10 mA, installed in 1994) for R and D of crosslinking process such as wire and cable and heat shrinkable tube and sheets in Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, Jakarta, and also a low energy electron accelerator (installed in 1998) in a private company, PT Gajah Tunggai, are being mainly used. Their performances are presented with activities achieved in the fields of wood surface coating, vulcanization of natural rubber latex, grafting of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), radiation sterilization, degradation of cellulose and, as promising applications, radiation curing for composite production and uses for environmental preservation are introduced. (S. Ohno)

  3. Comparison between the 30- to 80-keV electron channels at ATS 6 and 1976-059A during conjunction and application to spacecraft charging prediction

    Garrett, H.B.; Schwank, D.C.; Higbie, P.R.; Baker, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    The ATS 6 satellite, during an orbital maneuver in September 1976, passed within a few hundred kilometers of the geosynchronous satellite 1976-059A. Analysis of the 30- to 80-keV electron data from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) electrostatic analyzers on ATS 6 and the 30- to 300-keV electron data from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory instrument on 1976-059A during this period reveals good agreement between the two instruments even when the separation is +- 7 0 . The low-energy UCSD ion data from ATS 6 allow a simultaneous determination of the potential difference between ATS 6 and th ambient medium. Use of the 1976-059A electron data to approximate the ambient plasma electron density and temperature during these charging periods indicates sufficient information exists in order to estimate the maximum potentials to which ATS 6 charges in sunlight an eclipse. As data from 1976-059A and similar satellites are potentially available in real time, the information therefore exists to create a satellite charging index for the geosynchronous regime that would be valid within at least +- 7 0 longitude of the position of each measurement

  4. Spacecraft radiator systems

    Anderson, Grant A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft radiator system designed to provide structural support to the spacecraft. Structural support is provided by the geometric "crescent" form of the panels of the spacecraft radiator. This integration of radiator and structural support provides spacecraft with a semi-monocoque design.

  5. Spacecraft Charging and the Microwave Anisotropy Probe Spacecraft

    Timothy, VanSant J.; Neergaard, Linda F.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP), a MIDEX mission built in partnership between Princeton University and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), will study the cosmic microwave background. It will be inserted into a highly elliptical earth orbit for several weeks and then use a lunar gravity assist to orbit around the second Lagrangian point (L2), 1.5 million kilometers, anti-sunward from the earth. The charging environment for the phasing loops and at L2 was evaluated. There is a limited set of data for L2; the GEOTAIL spacecraft measured relatively low spacecraft potentials (approx. 50 V maximum) near L2. The main area of concern for charging on the MAP spacecraft is the well-established threat posed by the "geosynchronous region" between 6-10 Re. The launch in the autumn of 2000 will coincide with the falling of the solar maximum, a period when the likelihood of a substorm is higher than usual. The likelihood of a substorm at that time has been roughly estimated to be on the order of 20% for a typical MAP mission profile. Because of the possibility of spacecraft charging, a requirement for conductive spacecraft surfaces was established early in the program. Subsequent NASCAP/GEO analyses for the MAP spacecraft demonstrated that a significant portion of the sunlit surface (solar cell cover glass and sunshade) could have nonconductive surfaces without significantly raising differential charging. The need for conductive materials on surfaces continually in eclipse has also been reinforced by NASCAP analyses.

  6. Training for spacecraft technical analysts

    Ayres, Thomas J.; Bryant, Larry

    1989-01-01

    Deep space missions such as Voyager rely upon a large team of expert analysts who monitor activity in the various engineering subsystems of the spacecraft and plan operations. Senior teammembers generally come from the spacecraft designers, and new analysts receive on-the-job training. Neither of these methods will suffice for the creation of a new team in the middle of a mission, which may be the situation during the Magellan mission. New approaches are recommended, including electronic documentation, explicit cognitive modeling, and coached practice with archived data.

  7. Electronic cigarettes: a safer alternative or potential poison?

    Smith, Janet E

    2014-10-01

    Electronic cigarettes have been marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes, and their use is expanding exponentially. However, there is a severe lack of scientific data about the ingredients in the liquid used in the device and the health consequences of using electronic cigarettes. As technology has outpaced regulations, the production and sale of electronic cigarettes are, as yet, unregulated and do not fall under the purview of the Food and Drug Administration. This article will review the mechanism of action and what is currently known about the safety of electronic cigarettes. The risk of poisoning for children will also be identified, as well as the implications for home healthcare clinicians.

  8. Laser-Compton Scattering as a Potential Electron Beam Monitor

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Lancaster, G.; Jones, J.

    2002-01-01

    LCS experiments were carried out at the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC); sharp monochromatic x-ray lines were observed. These are produced using the so-called inverse Compton effect, whereby optical laser photons are collided with a relativistic electron beam. The back-scattered photons are then kinematically boosted to keV x-ray energies. We have first demonstrated these beams using a 20 MeV electron beam collided with a 100 MW, 7 ns Nd; YAG laser. We observed narrow LCS x-ray spectral peaks resulting from the interaction of the electron beam with the Nd; YAG laser second harmonic (532 nm). The LCS x-ray energy lines and energy deviations were measured as a function of the electron beam energy and energy-spread respectively. The results showed good agreement with the predicted valves. LCS could provide an excellent probe of electron beam energy, energy spread, transverse and longitudinal distribution and direction

  9. Electromotive Potential Distribution and Electronic Leak Currents in Working YSZ Based SOCs

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Jacobsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    The size of electronic leak currents through the YSZ electrolyte of solid oxide cells have been calculated using basic solid state electrochemical relations and literature data. The distribution of the electromotive potential, of Galvani potential, of concentration of electrons, e, and electron...... holes, h, was also calculated as these parameters are the basis for the understanding of the electronic conductivity that causes the electronic leak currents. The results are illustrated with examples. The effects of electrolyte thickness, temperature and cell voltage on the electronic leak current...

  10. Electron beam pasteurised oil palm waste: a potential feed resource

    Mat Rasol Awang; Hassan Hamdani Mutaat; Tamikazu Kume; Tachibana, H.

    2002-01-01

    Pasteurization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) was performed using electron beam single sided irradiation. The dose profiles of oil palm EFB samples for different thickness in both directions X and Y were established. The results showed the usual characteristics dose uniformity as sample thickness decreased. The mean average absorbed dose on both sides at the surface and bottom of the samples for different thickness samples lead to establishing depth dose curve. Based on depth dose curve and operation conditions of electron beam machine, the process throughput for pasteurized oil palm EFB were estimated. (Author)

  11. CLOPW; a mixed basis set full potential electronic structure method

    Bekker, H.G.; Bekker, Hermie Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of the full potental CLOPW package for electronic structure calculations. Chapter 1 provides the necessary background in the theory of solid state physics. It gives a short overview of the effective one particle model as commonly used in solid state physics. It

  12. Potential ceramics processing applications with high-energy electron beams

    Struve, K.W.; Turman, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    High-energy, high-current electron beams may offer unique features for processing of ceramics that are not available with any other heat source. These include the capability to instantaneously heat to several centimeters in depth, to preferentially deposit energy in dense, high-z materials, to process at atmospheric pressures in air or other gases, to have large control over heating volume and heating rate, and to have efficient energy conversion. At a recent workshop organized by the authors to explore opportunities for electron beam processing of ceramics, several applications were identified for further development. These were ceramic joining, fabrication of ceramic powders, and surface processing of ceramics. It may be possible to join ceramics by either electron-beam brazing or welding. Brazing with refractory metals might also be feasible. The primary concern for brazing is whether the braze material can wet to the ceramic when rapidly heated by an electron beam. Raw ceramic powders, such as silicon nitride and aluminum nitride, which are difficult to produce by conventional techniques, could possibly be produced by vaporizing metals in a nitrogen atmosphere. Experiments need to be done to verify that the vaporized metal can fully react with the nitrogen. By adjusting beam parameters, high-energy beams can be used to remove surface flaws which are often sites of fracture initiation. They can also be used for surface cleaning. The advantage of electron beams rather than ion beams for this application is that the heat deposition can be graded into the material. The authors will discuss the capabilities of beams from existing machines for these applications and discuss planned experiments

  13. Applications of electron linacs to ADS: one potential path forward

    Wells, D.P.; Harmon, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    The application of electron linac accelerators to ADS systems offers a number of advantages for ADS applications. We propose a path forward with electron linac-driven ADS that takes advantage of those important ADS applications that are most easily achieved at relatively low cost, and then building on those successes to enable the more difficult applications with larger impact. We argue that the applications that are most easily achieved are medical isotope production, materials irradiation and environmental applications. The accelerator and target demands for each of these applications are essentially the same as for the ADS needs in energy production and the transmutation of waste. The successful demonstration of these important and highly-visible applications will, in turn, lead to greater visibility and funding to further major advances of ADS systems in energy production, nuclear waste transmutation, and applications to the thorium fuel cycle. (author)

  14. Anti-collimation of ballistic electrons by a potential barrier

    Coleridge, P. T.; Taylor, R. P.; Sachrajda, A. S.; Adams, J. A.

    1994-03-01

    A pair of Quantum Point Contacts separated by a continuous barrier have been fabricated using the surface gate technique. Transport measurements for each component of this system and for various combinations have shown both additive and non-additive behaviour. The results are explained by a combination of reflection by the barrier of electrons collimated by the Quantum Point Contacts and transport by diffusion across the barrier.

  15. A note on the standard electron transfer potential at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions

    Samec, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2009), s. 75-81 ISSN 0034-6691 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions * interfacial electron transfer * standard electron trasfer potential * homogeneous electron transfer Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  16. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ e ) and chemical hardness (η e ) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ e . Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness

  17. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  18. Spacecraft Spin Test Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to correct unbalances of spacecraft by using dynamic measurement techniques and static/coupled measurements to provide products of...

  19. Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential with multi electron species in magnetoplasmas

    Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Murtaza, G.

    2013-02-01

    The phenomenon of shielding of test charge in the presence of an external magnetic field (Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential) is investigated in electron ion plasmas using the approach of two temperature electrons. The modified dispersion relations of ion acoustic waves under different conditions are derived. We get different profiles of potential for different parameters and observe that the potentials fall very slowly than the standard Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential given in the reference.

  20. Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential with multi electron species in magnetoplasmas

    Khan, Arroj A.; Murtaza, G.; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of shielding of test charge in the presence of an external magnetic field (Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential) is investigated in electron ion plasmas using the approach of two temperature electrons. The modified dispersion relations of ion acoustic waves under different conditions are derived. We get different profiles of potential for different parameters and observe that the potentials fall very slowly than the standard Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential given in the reference.

  1. Potential application of UV radiation processing in electronic packaging

    Ng Chee Mang; Lim Yoke Keem; Kumar, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    UV-curable epoxies have been formulated for use in place of the established heat cure epoxy systems for coating, adhesion and encapsulation of electronic devices. The UV-cured epoxy systems can be formulated to give comparable or even better physical and chemical properties than the more common heat cured systems. The UV systems offer significant advantage in very fast cure and hence very short production cycle time. UV systems can also be formulated to give desired properties of increased strength, high Tg, increased humidity resistance and improved temperature cycling performance

  2. Electron optics with magnetic vector potential barriers in graphene

    Ghosh, Sankalpa; Sharma, Manish

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of electron transport in graphene in the presence of various arrangements of delta-function like magnetic barriers is presented. The motion through one such barrier gives an unusual non-specular refraction leading to asymmetric transmission. The symmetry is restored by putting two such barriers in opposite directions side by side. Periodic arrangements of such barriers can be used as Bragg reflectors whose reflectivity has been calculated using a transfer matrix formalism. Such Bragg reflectors can be used to make resonant cavities. We also analyze the associated band structure for the case of infinite periodic structures. (fast track communication)

  3. The electronic cigarette: potential health benefit or mere business?

    De Marco, Cinzia; Invernizzi, Giovanni; Bosi, Sandra; Pozzi, Paolo; Di Paco, Adriano; Mazza, Roberto; Ruprecht, Ario Alberto; Munarini, Elena; Boffi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have attracted considerable attention as a possible alternative to tobacco cigarettes, but uncertainties about their impact on health and indoor air quality as well as their commercial success without a clear regulatory framework are arousing concern. We have therefore tried to summarize the health-related implications of the use of e-cigarettes in order to help physicians and health professionals provide accurate information on this device. Given the lack of unequivocal scientific data on their toxicity and safety, we conclude that at the moment there is no reason to approve e-cigarettes as a safe alternative to tobacco smoke.

  4. Athermal electron distribution probed by femtosecond multiphoton photoemission from image potential states

    Ferrini, Gabriele; Giannetti, Claudio; Pagliara, Stefania; Banfi, Francesco; Galimberti, Gianluca; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    Image potential states are populated through indirect, scattering-mediated multiphoton absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses and revealed by single-photon photoemission. The measured effective mass is significantly different from that obtained with direct, resonant population. These features reveal a strong coupling of the electrons residing in the image potential state, outside the solid, with the underlying hot electron population created by the laser pulse. The coupling is mediated by a many-body scattering interaction between the image potential state electrons and bulk electrons in highly excited states

  5. Power requirements for commercial communications spacecraft

    Billerbeck, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Historical data on commercial spacecraft power systems are presented and their power requirements to the growth of satellite communications channel usage are related. Some approaches for estimating future power requirements of this class of spacecraft through the year 2000 are proposed. The key technology drivers in satellite power systems are addressed. Several technological trends in such systems are described, focusing on the most useful areas for research and development of major subsystems, including solar arrays, energy storage, and power electronics equipment.

  6. Determination of one-electron reduction potentials of some radiosensitive compounds by pulse radiolysis

    Zuo Zhihua; Yao Side; Li Hucheng; Lin Nianyun; Jin Yizun

    1994-01-01

    One-electron reduction potential (E 7 1 ) is one of the important parameters of radiosensitive compound with high electron affinity. In this work one-electron reduction potentials of some radiosensitizers, such as Miso, 911, CMNa, SMU-1, SMU-2, SMD, SNN, S 3 and BSO, were determined pulse radiolytically by using anthraquinone-2-sulfate (AQS), duroquinone (DQ) and methyl viologen (MV 2+ ) as references

  7. Potentialities in electronics of new high critical temperature superconductors

    Hartemann, P.

    1989-01-01

    The main electronic applications of superconductors involve the signal processing, the electromagnetic wave detection and the magnetometry. Characteristics of devices based on conventional superconductors cooled by liquid helium are given and the changes induced by incorporating high-temperature superconductors are estimated. After a survey of new superconductor properties, the superconducting devices for analog or digital signal processing are reviewed. The gains predicted for high-temperature superconducting analog devices are considered in greater detail. Different sections deal with the infrared or (sub)millimeter wave detection. The most sensitive apparatuses for magnetic measurements are based on SQUIDs. Features of SQUIDs made of granular high-temperature superconducting material samples (grain boundaries behave as barriers of intrinsic junctions) are discussed [fr

  8. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  9. Unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing on pharmacy workflow in the outpatient pharmacy.

    Nanji, Karen C; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Boehne, Jennifer J; Keohane, Carol A; Ash, Joan S; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Electronic prescribing systems have often been promoted as a tool for reducing medication errors and adverse drug events. Recent evidence has revealed that adoption of electronic prescribing systems can lead to unintended consequences such as the introduction of new errors. The purpose of this study is to identify and characterize the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing on pharmacy workflow in an outpatient pharmacy. A multidisciplinary team conducted direct observations of workflow in an independent pharmacy and semi-structured interviews with pharmacy staff members about their perceptions of the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing systems. We used qualitative methods to iteratively analyze text data using a grounded theory approach, and derive a list of major themes and subthemes related to the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing. We identified the following five themes: Communication, workflow disruption, cost, technology, and opportunity for new errors. These contained 26 unique subthemes representing different facets of our observations and the pharmacy staff's perceptions of the unrealized potential and residual consequences of electronic prescribing. We offer targeted solutions to improve electronic prescribing systems by addressing the unrealized potential and residual consequences that we identified. These recommendations may be applied not only to improve staff perceptions of electronic prescribing systems but also to improve the design and/or selection of these systems in order to optimize communication and workflow within pharmacies while minimizing both cost and the potential for the introduction of new errors.

  10. Modeling ambipolar potential formation due to ICRF heating effects on electrons

    Johnson, J.W.; Callen, J.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1985-08-01

    A mechanism for the potential bump observed near the region of ICRF heating in the endplugs of the Phaedrus tandem mirror experiment is investigated by numerical simulation of electron orbits in a simple mirror geometry. Given initial magnetic and ambipolar potential wells that trap the electrons, the ''near field'' parallel electric field E-tilde/sub z/e/sup -iωt/, which is localized near and due to the ICRF heating, tends to eject electrons from the region where E-tilde/sub z/ is nonzero. This depletion of the local electron population causes a local increase in the ambipolar potential. The rate at which the electrons are ejected, (dn/dt), is calculated from the electron orbit computation for a given potential well depth. The rate at which passing particles ''fill in'' the potential well can also be calculated. An estimate of how large the bump in the ambipolar potential becomes is obtained by finding the well depth at which (dn/dt) approximately equals the ''filling'' rate. For Phaedrus parameters (n 0 approx. = 4.0 x 10 12 cm -3 , T/sub e/ = 20 eV, E-tilde/sub z/ approx. = 1.0 V/cm) the electron pumping rate balances the ''filling'' rate at a potential well depth of approximately 40 V, consistent with experimental results

  11. Envisioning a 21st Century, National, Spacecraft Servicing and Protection Infrastructure and Demand Potential: A Logical Development of the Earth Orbit Economy

    Horsham, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    The modern world is extremely dependent on thin strings of several hundred civil, military, and commercial spacecraft/satellites currently stationed in space. They provide a steady stream of commerce, defense, and knowledge data. This dependency will in all likelihood increase significantly during this century. A major disruption of any kind in these essential systems and networks could be socially, economically, and politically catastrophic, on a global scale. The development of a space-based, robotic services economy could be useful in mitigating this growing risk, from an efficiency and security standpoint. This paper attempts to suggest what makes sense to invest in next for the logical, economic development of Earth orbit i.e., after ISS completion. It expands on the results of an advanced market research and analysis study that sampled the opinions of several satellite industry executives and presents these results within a broad policy context. The concept of a spacecraft carrier that serves as the nucleus of a national, space-based or on-orbit, robotic services infrastructure is introduced as the next logical step for United States leadership in space. This is viewed as a reasonable and appropriate followon to the development of ELVs and satellites in the 1950s and 1960s, the Space Shuttle/PRLV in the 1970s and 1980s, and the International Space Station (ISS) in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. Large-scale experience in LEO-to-GEO spacecraft/satellite servicing and protection by robotic means is assumed to be an indispensable prerequisite or stepping-stone toward the development and preservation of the large scientific exploration facilities that are envisioned by NASA for operation beyond GEO. A balanced, return on national investment (RONI) strategy for space, focused on the provision of enhanced national/homeland security for increased protection, national economic/industrial expansion for increased revenue, and national scientific exploration for increased

  12. Electronic Cigarettes: Their Constituents and Potential Links to Asthma.

    Clapp, Phillip W; Jaspers, Ilona

    2017-10-05

    Vaping is gaining popularity in the USA, particularly among teens and young adults. While e-cigs are commonly represented as safer alternatives to tobacco cigarettes, little is known regarding the health effects of their short- or long-term use, especially in individuals with pre-existing respiratory diseases such as asthma. Flavored e-cig liquids (e-liquids) and e-cig aerosols contain airway irritants and toxicants that have been implicated in the pathogenesis and worsening of lung diseases. In this review, we will summarize existing data on potential health effects of components present in e-cig aerosols, such as propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, nicotine, and flavorings, and discuss their relevance in the context of asthma. Recent survey data indicate that adolescents with asthma had a higher prevalence of current e-cig use (12.4%) compared to their non-asthmatics peers (10.2%) and conveyed positive beliefs about tobacco products, especially e-cigs. Similarly, a study conducted among high school students from Ontario, Canada, indicated a greater likelihood of e-cig use in asthmatics as compared to their non-asthmatic peers. Availability of different flavorings is often cited as the main reason among youth/adolescents for trying e-cigs or switching from cigarettes to e-cigs. Occupational inhalation of some common food-safe flavoring agents is reported to cause occupational asthma and worsen asthmatic symptoms. Moreover, workplace inhalation exposures to the flavoring agent diacetyl have caused irreversible obstructive airway disease in healthy workers. Additionally, recent studies report that thermal decomposition of propylene glycol (PG) and vegetable glycerin (VG), the base constituents of e-liquids, produces reactive carbonyls, including acrolein, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, which have known respiratory toxicities. Furthermore, recent nicotine studies in rodents reveal that prenatal nicotine exposures lead to epigenetic reprogramming in the offspring

  13. Topological insulators/superconductors: Potential future electronic materials

    Hor, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    A new material called topological insulator has been discovered and becomes one of the fastest growing field in condensed matter physics. Topological insulator is a new quantum phase of matter which has Dirac-like conductivity on its surface, but bulk insulator through its interior. It is considered a challenging problem for the surface transport measurements because of dominant internal conductance due to imperfections of the existing crystals of topological insulators. By a proper method, the internal bulk conduction can be suppressed in a topological insulator, and permit the detection of the surface currents which is necessary for future fault-tolerant quantum computing applications. Doped topological insulators have depicted a large variety of bulk physical properties ranging from magnetic to superconducting behaviors. By chemical doping, a TI can change into a bulk superconductor. Nb x Bi 2 Se 3 is shown to be a superconductor with T c ∼ 3.2 K, which could be a potential candidate for a topological superconductor

  14. Nonlinear electron acoustic structures generated on the high-potential side of a double layer

    R. Pottelette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High-time resolution measurements of the electron distribution function performed in the auroral upward current region reveals a large asymmetry between the low- and high-potential sides of a double-layer. The latter side is characterized by a large enhancement of a locally trapped electron population which corresponds to a significant part (~up to 30% of the total electron density. As compared to the background hot electron population, this trapped component has a very cold temperature in the direction parallel to the static magnetic field. Accordingly, the differential drift between the trapped and background hot electron populations generates high frequency electron acoustic waves in a direction quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The density of the trapped electron population can be deduced from the frequency where the electron acoustic spectrum maximizes. In the auroral midcavity region, the electron acoustic waves may be modulated by an additional turbulence generated in the ion acoustic range thanks to the presence of a pre-accelerated ion beam located on the high-potential side of the double layer. Electron holes characterized by bipolar pulses in the electric field are sometimes detected in correlation with these electron acoustic wave packets.

  15. On radiation of electrons moving in braking electric fields with distributed potential

    Fedulov, V.I.; Suvorov, V.I.; Umirov, U.R.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of radiation of electron moving in flat structures with braking electric field created by an accelerating electrode and another electrode with distributed potential are investigated. The analytical expressions for definition of conditions for complete loss of energy by electron in structure with distributed potential and for arising the electron vibrations are received. Also expressions connecting the electron energy with the point of entry and its fluctuation frequency are received. The mathematical model of irradiation process is offered depending on energy and point of entry of the electron. The connection between a radiation wave length and position of point of entry of electrons in the braking electric field are found. A possibility of emerging the optical radiation in solid environments at passage of charge particles through substance is shown. (author)

  16. Development of an advanced spacecraft tandem mass spectrometer

    Drew, Russell C.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to apply current advanced technology in electronics and materials to the development of a miniaturized Tandem Mass Spectrometer that would have the potential for future development into a package suitable for spacecraft use. The mass spectrometer to be used as a basis for the tandem instrument would be a magnetic sector instrument, of Nier-Johnson configuration, as used on the Viking Mars Lander mission. This instrument configuration would then be matched with a suitable second stage MS to provide the benefits of tandem MS operation for rapid identification of unknown organic compounds. This tandem instrument is configured with a newly designed GC system to aid in separation of complex mixtures prior to MS analysis. A number of important results were achieved in the course of this project. Among them were the development of a miniaturized GC subsystem, with a unique desorber-injector, fully temperature feedback controlled oven with powered cooling for rapid reset to ambient conditions, a unique combination inlet system to the MS that provides for both membrane sampling and direct capillary column sample transfer, a compact and ruggedized alignment configuration for the MS, an improved ion source design for increased sensitivity, and a simple, rugged tandem MS configuration that is particularly adaptable to spacecraft use because of its low power and low vacuum pumping requirements. The potential applications of this research include use in manned spacecraft like the space station as a real-time detection and warning device for the presence of potentially harmful trace contaminants of the spacecraft atmosphere, use as an analytical device for evaluating samples collected on the Moon or a planetary surface, or even use in connection with monitoring potentially hazardous conditions that may exist in terrestrial locations such as launch pads, environmental test chambers or other sensitive areas. Commercial development of the technology

  17. Plasma potentials and performance of the advanced electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Xie, Z.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The mean plasma potential was measured on the LBL advanced electron cyclotron resonance (AECR) ion source for a variety of conditions. The mean potentials for plasmas of oxygen, argon, and argon mixed with oxygen in the AECR were determined. These plasma potentials are positive with respect to the plasma chamber wall and are on the order of tens of volts. Electrons injected into the plasma by an electron gun or from an aluminum oxide wall coating with a very high secondary electron emission reduce the plasma potential as does gas mixing. A lower plasma potential in the AECR source coincides with enhanced production of high charged state ions indicating longer ion confinement times. The effect of the extra electrons from external injection or wall coatings is to lower the average plasma potential and to increase the n e τ i of the ECR plasma. With sufficient extra electrons, the need for gas mixing can be eliminated or reduced to a lower level, so the source can operate at lower neutral pressures. A reduction of the neutral pressure decreases charge exchange between ions and neutrals and enhances the production of high charge state ions. An aluminum oxide coating results in the lowest plasma potential among the three methods discussed and the best source performance

  18. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    .... Models were developed from a customer-centric perspective to assess different fractionated spacecraft architectures relative to traditional spacecraft architectures using multi-attribute analysis...

  19. Spacecraft momentum control systems

    Leve, Frederick A; Peck, Mason A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this book is to serve both as a practical technical reference and a resource for gaining a fuller understanding of the state of the art of spacecraft momentum control systems, specifically looking at control moment gyroscopes (CMGs). As a result, the subject matter includes theory, technology, and systems engineering. The authors combine material on system-level architecture of spacecraft that feature momentum-control systems with material about the momentum-control hardware and software. This also encompasses material on the theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the control of space vehicles with CMGs. In essence, CMGs are the attitude-control actuators that make contemporary highly agile spacecraft possible. The rise of commercial Earth imaging, the advances in privately built spacecraft (including small satellites), and the growing popularity of the subject matter in academic circles over the past decade argues that now is the time for an in-depth treatment of the topic. CMGs are augmented ...

  20. Spacecraft Material Outgassing Data

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of outgassing data of materials intended for spacecraft use were obtained at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), utilizing equipment developed...

  1. Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration project is to develop and conduct large-scale fire safety experiments on an International Space Station...

  2. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  3. Electron pitch angle variations recorded at the high magnetic latitude boundary layer by the NUADU instrument on the TC-2 spacecraft

    L. Lu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The NUADU (NeUtral Atom Detector Unit experiment aboard TC-2 recorded, with high temporal and spatial resolution, 4π solid angle images of electrons (~50-125 keV spiraling around geomagnetic field lines at high northern magnetic latitudes (L>10, during its in-orbit commissioning phase (September 2004. The ambient magnetic field, as well as electrons in other energy ranges, were simultaneously measured by the TC-2 magnetometer (FGM, the plasma electron and current experiment (PEACE, the low energy ion detector (LEID and the high energy electron detector (HEED. The NUADU data showed that up-flowing electron beams could form "ring-like" and "dumbbell-type" pitch angle distributions (PADs in the region sampled. Changes in these pitch angle distributions due to transient magnetic variations are suggested to have been associated with electron acceleration along the geomagnetic field lines. A nested magnetic bottle configuration that formed due to the propagation towards the Earth of a magnetic pulse, is proposed to have been associated with this process.

  4. A two potential embedding approach to the electronic structure of disordered binary alloys

    Ahmed, M.; Mookerjee, A.

    1988-06-01

    Using an embedding technique introduced in a recent publication by one of us, we study the electronic structure of disordered binary alloys within a pair-cluster coherent potential approximation. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs

  5. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  6. Deployable Brake for Spacecraft

    Rausch, J. R.; Maloney, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Aerodynamic shield that could be opened and closed proposed. Report presents concepts for deployable aerodynamic brake. Brake used by spacecraft returning from high orbit to low orbit around Earth. Spacecraft makes grazing passes through atmosphere to slow down by drag of brake. Brake flexible shield made of woven metal or ceramic withstanding high temperatures created by air friction. Stored until needed, then deployed by set of struts.

  7. Local vs. Non-local core potentials in electron scattering from sodium atoms

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-02-01

    We have tested the use of a local potential instead of the non-local Hartree-Fock potential to represent exchange effects between the valence or the projectile electron and the core in electron scattering from sodium atoms For some of the most detailed observables in this collision system/ the results of the two approaches are nearly identical, even though the effect of the exchange part is shown to be particularly large. (authors). 16 refs., 4 figs

  8. Local versus non-local core potentials in electron scattering from sodium atoms

    Bartschat, K.; Bray, I.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the use of a local potential instead of the non-local Hartree-Fock potential to represent exchange effects between the valence or the projectile electron and the core in electron scattering from sodium atoms. For some of the most detailed observables in this collision system, the results of the two approaches are nearly identical, even though the effect of the exchange part is shown to be particularly large. (Author)

  9. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pronounced improvements in the understanding of semiconductor device performance are expected if electrostatic potential distributions can be measured quantitatively and reliably under working conditions with sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we employ off-axis electron...... holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p-. n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic...

  10. Chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer at metal/C60-doped polymer interfaces

    Heller, C. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.; Barashkov, N. N.; Ferraris, J. P.

    1997-04-01

    We report electroabsorption measurements of the built-in electrostatic potential in metal/C60-doped polymer/metal structures to investigate chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer from a metal contact to the electron acceptor energy level of C60 molecules in the polymer film. The built-in potentials of a series of structures employing thin films of both undoped and C60-doped poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) were measured. For undoped MEH-PPV, which has an energy gap of about 2.4 eV, the maximum built-in potential is about 2.1 eV, whereas for C60-doped MEH-PPV the maximum built-in potential decreases to 1.5 eV. Electron transfer to the C60 molecules close to the metal interface pins the chemical potential of the metal contact near the electron acceptor energy level of C60 and decreases the built-in potential of the structure. From the systematic dependence of the built-in potential on the metal work function we find that the electron acceptor energy level of C60 in MEH-PPV is about 1.7 eV above the hole polaron energy level of MEH-PPV.

  11. Giant titanium electron wave function in gallium oxide: A potential electron-nuclear spin system for quantum information processing

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Binet, Laurent; Vignoles, Gerard; Gourier, Didier; Vezin, Hervé

    2010-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the unpaired electron with eight surrounding G69a and G71a nuclei in Ti-doped β-Ga2O3 were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies. They are dominated by strong isotropic hyperfine couplings due to a direct Fermi contact interaction with Ga nuclei in octahedral sites of rutile-type chains oriented along b axis, revealing a large anisotropic spatial extension of the electron wave function. Titanium in β-Ga2O3 is thus best described as a diffuse (Ti4+-e-) pair rather than as a localized Ti3+ . Both electron and G69a nuclear spin Rabi oscillations could be observed by pulsed EPR and pulsed ENDOR, respectively. The electron spin decoherence time is about 1μs (at 4 K) and an upper bound of 520μs (at 8 K) is estimated for the nuclear decoherence time. Thus, β-Ga2O3:Ti appears to be a potential spin-bus system for quantum information processing with a large nuclear spin quantum register.

  12. Manipulation of electron transport in graphene by nanopatterned electrostatic potential on an electret

    Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Rui; Wang, Shengnan; Zhang, Dongdong; Jiang, Xingbin; Cheng, Zhihai; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2018-01-01

    The electron transport characteristics of graphene can be finely tuned using local electrostatic fields. Here, we use a scanning probe technique to construct a statically charged electret gate that enables in-situ fabrication of graphene devices with precisely designed potential landscapes, including p-type and n-type unipolar graphene transistors and p-n junctions. Electron dynamic simulation suggests that electron beam collimation and focusing in graphene can be achieved via periodic charge lines and concentric charge circles. This approach to spatially manipulating carrier density distribution may offer an efficient way to investigate the novel electronic properties of graphene and other low-dimensional materials.

  13. Impurity with two electrons in the spherical quantum dot with Unite confinement potential

    Baghdasaryan, D A; Ghaltaghchyan, H Ts; Kazaryan, E M; Sarkisyan, H A

    2016-01-01

    Two-electron states in a spherical QD with the hydrogenic impurity located in the center and with a finite height confinement potential barrier are investigated. The effective mass mismatch have been taken into account. The dependence of ground state energy and Coulomb electron-electron interaction energy correction on the QD size is studied. The problem of the state exchange time control in QD is discussed, taking into account the spins of the electrons in the Russell-Saunders approximation. The effect of quantum emission has been shown. (paper)

  14. Plasma potential measurements in the edge region of the ISTTOK plasma, using electron emissive probes

    Ionita, C.; Balan, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Cabral, J.A.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, H. F.C.; Varandas, C.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently started to use electron-emissive probes for direct measurements of the plasma potential and its fluctuations in the edge region of the plasma ring in the tokamak ISTTOK in Lisbon, Portugal. This method is based on the fact that the electron emission current of such a probe is able to compensate electron temperature variations and electron drifts, which can occur in the edge plasma region of magnetized fusion devices, and which are making measurements with cold probes prone to errors. In this contribution we present some of the first results of our investigations in ISTTOK.(author)

  15. Influence of time-periodic potentials on electronic transport in double-well structure

    Chun-Lei, Li; Yan, Xu

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of the Floquet theorem, we have investigated single-electron photon-assisted tunneling in a double-well system using the transfer matrix technique. The transmission probability displays satellite peaks on both sides of the main resonance peaks and these satellite peaks originate from emission or absorption photons. The single-electron resonance tunneling can be controlled through changing the applied harmonically potential positions, such as driven potential in wells, in barriers, or in whole double-well systems. This advantage should be useful in the optimization of the parameters of a transmission device. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  17. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Cooper, David; Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  18. Potential of Electronic Plastic Waste as a Source of Raw Material and Energy Recovery

    Norazli Othman; Nor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Lariyah Mohd Sidek

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the production of electronic equipment is one of the fastest growing industrial activities in this world. The increase use of plastic in this sector resulted in an increase of electronic plastic waste. Basically, electronic plastic material contains various chemical elements which act as a flame retardant when electronic equipment is operated. In general, the concept of recycling electronic plastic waste should be considered in order to protect the environment. For this purpose, research has been conducted to different resins of electronic plastic waste to identify the potential of electronic plastic waste as a source of raw material and energy recovery. This study was divided into two part for example determination of physical and chemical characteristics of plastic resins and calculation of heating value for plastic resins based on Dulong formula. Results of this research show that the average calorific value of electronic waste is 30,872.42 kJ/ kg (7,375 kcal/ kg). The emission factor analysis showed that the concentration of emission value that might occur during waste management activities is below the standard set by the Environment Quality Act 1974. Basically, this research shows that electronic plastic waste has the potential to become the source of raw material and energy recovery. (author)

  19. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  20. Geobacter sulfurreducens adapts to low electrode potential for extracellular electron transfer

    Peng, Luo; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Yin, Jie; Xu, Shuo-Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Xie, De-Ti; Li, Zhen-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) occurring in natural and engineering processes is attracting increasing interests. While a meaningful question for bioenergetics, microbial physiology and microbial electrochemical systems; less is known about the lower limit of electron acceptor reduction potential for EET. It is also unclear how microbes adapt to weak electron acceptors. This study evaluated Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms grown with an electrode poised at −0.25 V vs. SHE. This potential was found to be sufficient for microbial metabolism and proliferation. The turnover cyclic voltammetries found that these biofilms had a half-saturation potential of −0.242 ± 0.004 V, in contrast to −0.151 ± 0.003 V for that of the biofilms grown under 0.2 V. For the biofilms grown under 0.2 V, differential pulse voltammetry showed that the metabolic current was mediated by interfacial cofactors with mid-point potential around −0.16 V performing single-electron electron transfer (ET). The major electron conduits for the biofilms respiring under −0.25 V had mid-point potentials of −0.22 V or −0.26 V, which appeared to perform two-electron ET. Under the non-turnover condition, both biofilms showed similar patterns in voltammograms and the low-potential conduits largely disappeared for the biofilms grown under −0.25 V. Transcriptome analysis identified 17 cytochrome-c genes significantly up-regulated for the biofilms grown under −0.25 V, together with many other genes linked to the ET system. It was also noted that, lowering the poised potential from −0.25 V to −0.28 V (the fuel standard oxidation potential) did not fully inhibit microbial respiration.

  1. On stochastic heating of electrons by intense laser radiation in the presence of electrostatic potential well

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-01-01

    A simple model developed by Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)] for the study of synergistic effects of electrostatic potential well and laser radiation is extended for the case where electric field of the well is accelerating electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. It was found that in these cases, the rate of stochastic heating of energetic electrons remains virtually the same as in Paradkar et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 060703 (2012)], where electric field in electrostatic potential was slowing down electrons moving in the direction of the laser field propagation. However, the heating of electrons with relatively low energy can be sensitive to the orientation of the electrostatic potential well with respect to the direction of the laser radiation propagation

  2. Electron Pitch Angle Variations Recorded at the High Magnetic Latitude Boundary Layer by the NUADU Instrument on the TC-2 Spacecraft

    Lu, L.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Barabash, S.; Liu, Z.; Balaz, J.; Brinkfeldt, K.; Strhansky, I.; Shen, C.; Shi, J.; Cao, J.; Pu, Z.; Fu, S.; Gunell, H.; Kudela, K.; Roelof, E. C.; Brandt, P. C.; Dandouras, I.; Zhang, T.; Carr, C.; Fazakerley, A.

    2005-12-01

    During the first on orbit commission, with the deflection high voltage zero, the NUADU (NeUtral Atom Detector Unit) instrument aboard TC-2, with its high temporal-spatial resolution recorded 4d solid angle images of energetic particles spiraling around the geomagnetic field lines with different configuration at high northern magnetic latitude L>10. The ambient magnetic field and particles in different energy spectrum were simultaneously measured by the magnetometer experiment (FGM), the plasma electron and current experiment (PEACE), the low energy ion detector (LEID), and the high energy electron detector (HEED). The up-flowing electron beams made the pitch angle distribution (PAD) ring like configuration, and even concentrated toward the field lines to form a dumbbell-type PAD. In integration of the variations of ambient magnetic field and particles in different energy spectrums, a temporal string magnetic bottle model was proposed which might be formed by the disturbance of the magnetic pulse. Changes in the particle pitch angle diffusion may be associated with electron acceleration along the geomagnetic field lines.

  3. Simulation of wake potentials induced by relativistic proton bunches in electron clouds

    Petrov, Fedor; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF)

    2012-07-01

    Electron clouds limit the intensity of modern high intensity hadron accelerators. Presently electron clouds are the main limiting factor for the LHC operation with 25 ns bunch trains. The bunches passing through an electron cloud induce a wake field. When the electron cloud density exceeds a certain threshold beam instabilities occur. The presence of electron clouds results in a shift of the synchronous phase, which increases if the bunch spacing is reduced. For LHC and SPS conditions we compare the longitudinal electron cloud wake potentials and stopping powers obtained using a simplified 2D electrostatic Particle-in-Cell code with fully electromagnetic simulations using VORPAL. In addition we analyze the wake fields induced by displaced or tilted bunches.

  4. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

  5. Influence of the variation potential on photosynthetic flows of light energy and electrons in pea.

    Sukhova, Ekaterina; Mudrilov, Maxim; Vodeneev, Vladimir; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    Local damage (mainly burning, heating, and mechanical wounding) induces propagation of electrical signals, namely, variation potentials, which are important signals during the life of plants that regulate different physiological processes, including photosynthesis. It is known that the variation potential decreases the rate of CO 2 assimilation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; however, its influence on light reactions has been poorly investigated. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the variation potential on the light energy flow that is absorbed, trapped and dissipated per active reaction centre in photosystem II and on the flow of electrons through the chloroplast electron transport chain. We analysed chlorophyll fluorescence in pea leaves using JIP-test and PAM-fluorometry; we also investigated delayed fluorescence. The electrical signals were registered using extracellular electrodes. We showed that the burning-induced variation potential stimulated a nonphotochemical loss of energy in photosystem II under dark conditions. It was also shown that the variation potential gradually increased the flow of light energy absorbed, trapped and dissipated by photosystem II. These changes were likely caused by an increase in the fraction of absorbed light distributed to photosystem II. In addition, the variation potential induced a transient increase in electron flow through the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Some probable mechanisms for the influence of the variation potential on the light reactions of photosynthesis (including the potential role of intracellular pH decrease) are discussed in the work.

  6. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on variou...

  7. Mechanical Design of Spacecraft

    1962-01-01

    In the spring of 1962, engineers from the Engineering Mechanics Division of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory gave a series of lectures on spacecraft design at the Engineering Design seminars conducted at the California Institute of Technology. Several of these lectures were subsequently given at Stanford University as part of the Space Technology seminar series sponsored by the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Presented here are notes taken from these lectures. The lectures were conceived with the intent of providing the audience with a glimpse of the activities of a few mechanical engineers who are involved in designing, building, and testing spacecraft. Engineering courses generally consist of heavily idealized problems in order to allow the more efficient teaching of mathematical technique. Students, therefore, receive a somewhat limited exposure to actual engineering problems, which are typified by more unknowns than equations. For this reason it was considered valuable to demonstrate some of the problems faced by spacecraft designers, the processes used to arrive at solutions, and the interactions between the engineer and the remainder of the organization in which he is constrained to operate. These lecture notes are not so much a compilation of sophisticated techniques of analysis as they are a collection of examples of spacecraft hardware and associated problems. They will be of interest not so much to the experienced spacecraft designer as to those who wonder what part the mechanical engineer plays in an effort such as the exploration of space.

  8. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography.

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; van Aken, Peter A; Koch, Christoph T

    2016-06-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inelastic plasmon and inter-band electron-scattering potentials for Si from dielectric matrix calculations

    Josefsson, T.W.; Smith, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of electrons in a crystalline environment may be represented by a complex non-hermitian potential. Completed generalised expressions for this inelastic electron scattering potential matrix, including virtual inelastic scattering, are derived for outer-shell electron and plasmon excitations. The relationship between these expressions and the general anisotropic dielectric response matrix of the solid is discussed. These generalised expressions necessarily include the off-diagonal terms representing effects due to departure from translational invariance in the interaction. Results are presented for the diagonal back structure dependent inelastic and virtual inelastic scattering potentials for Si, from a calculation of the inverse dielectric matrix in the random phase approximation. Good agreement is found with experiment as a function of incident energies from 10 eV to 100 keV. Anisotropy effects and hence the interaction de localisation represented by the off-diagonal scattering potential terms, are found to be significant below 1 keV. 38 refs., 2 figs

  10. Localized second-order optical potential for electron scattering in terms of imaginary-frequency susceptibilities

    Valone, S.M.; Truhlar, D.G.; Thirumialai, D.

    1982-01-01

    A local approximation to the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from ground-state atoms is expressed in terms of the imaginary-frequency susceptibilities of the atom due to a point charge and to modified perturbing potentials. This provides a basis for the physically appealing concept of regarding the perturbation due to the projectile as having a position-dependent effective frequency associated with it. The result is extended to higher energies with the use of the concept of a local kinetic energy. With a semiclassical approximation the result reduces to a simple general form that should be useful for model potential studies of electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering. Alternatively, variational functionals for the susceptibilities can be used to calculate the approximate optical potential most rigorously without making effective-frequency, average-kinetic-energy, or semiclassical approximations. Intermediate levels of rigor are also possible

  11. Accelerated life testing of spacecraft subsystems

    Wiksten, D.; Swanson, J.

    1972-01-01

    The rationale and requirements for conducting accelerated life tests on electronic subsystems of spacecraft are presented. A method for applying data on the reliability and temperature sensitivity of the parts contained in a sybsystem to the selection of accelerated life test parameters is described. Additional considerations affecting the formulation of test requirements are identified, and practical limitations of accelerated aging are described.

  12. Physisorption of an electron in deep surface potentials off a dielectric surface

    Heinisch, R. L.; Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2011-01-01

    We study phonon-mediated adsorption and desorption of an electron at dielectric surfaces with deep polarization-induced surface potentials where multiphonon transitions are responsible for electron energy relaxation. Focusing on multiphonon processes due to the nonlinearity of the coupling between the external electron and the acoustic bulk phonon triggering the transitions between surface states, we calculate electron desorption times for graphite, MgO, CaO, Al 2 O 3 , and SiO 2 and electron sticking coefficients for Al 2 O 3 , CaO, and SiO 2 . To reveal the kinetic stages of electron physisorption, we moreover study the time evolution of the image-state occupancy and the energy-resolved desorption flux. Depending on the potential depth and the surface temperature, we identify two generic scenarios: (i) adsorption via trapping in shallow image states followed by relaxation to the lowest image state and desorption from that state via a cascade through the second strongly bound image state in not too deep potentials, and (ii) adsorption via trapping in shallow image states but followed by a relaxation bottleneck retarding the transition to the lowest image state and desorption from that state via a one-step process to the continuum in deep potentials.

  13. Spacecraft Attitude Determination

    Bak, Thomas

    This thesis describes the development of an attitude determination system for spacecraft based only on magnetic field measurements. The need for such system is motivated by the increased demands for inexpensive, lightweight solutions for small spacecraft. These spacecraft demands full attitude...... determination based on simple, reliable sensors. Meeting these objectives with a single vector magnetometer is difficult and requires temporal fusion of data in order to avoid local observability problems. In order to guaranteed globally nonsingular solutions, quaternions are generally the preferred attitude...... is a detailed study of the influence of approximations in the modeling of the system. The quantitative effects of errors in the process and noise statistics are discussed in detail. The third contribution is the introduction of these methods to the attitude determination on-board the Ørsted satellite...

  14. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The EPOXI flight mission has been testing a new commercial system, Splunk, which employs data mining techniques to organize and present spacecraft telemetry data in a high-level manner. By abstracting away data-source specific details, Splunk unifies arbitrary data formats into one uniform system. This not only reduces the time and effort for retrieving relevant data, but it also increases operational visibility by allowing a spacecraft team to correlate data across many different sources. Splunk's scalable architecture coupled with its graphing modules also provide a solid toolset for generating data visualizations and building real-time applications such as browser-based telemetry displays.

  15. Intelligent spacecraft module

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  16. Spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction in an ion beam shepherd mission

    Cichocki, Filippo; Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a study of the interaction between a spacecraft, a plasma thruster plume and a free floating object, in the context of an active space debris removal mission based on the ion beam shepherd concept. The analysis is performed with the EP2PLUS hybrid code and includes the evaluation of the transferred force and torque to the target debris, its surface sputtering due to the impinging hypersonic ions, and the equivalent electric circuit of the spacecraft-plasma-debris interaction. The electric potential difference that builds up between the spacecraft and the debris, the ion backscattering and the backsputtering contamination of the shepherd satellite are evaluated for a nominal scenario. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate quantitatively the effects of electron thermodynamics, ambient plasma, heavy species collisions, and debris position.

  17. SHARP - Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  18. SHARP: Automated monitoring of spacecraft health and status

    Atkinson, David J.; James, Mark L.; Martin, R. Gaius

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discussed here are the spacecraft and ground systems monitoring process at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Some of the difficulties associated with the existing technology used in mission operations are highlighted. A new automated system based on artificial intelligence technology is described which seeks to overcome many of these limitations. The system, called the Spacecraft Health Automated Reasoning Prototype (SHARP), is designed to automate health and status analysis for multi-mission spacecraft and ground data systems operations. The system has proved to be effective for detecting and analyzing potential spacecraft and ground systems problems by performing real-time analysis of spacecraft and ground data systems engineering telemetry. Telecommunications link analysis of the Voyager 2 spacecraft was the initial focus for evaluation of the system in real-time operations during the Voyager spacecraft encounter with Neptune in August 1989.

  19. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem, E-mail: c.ozsoy@fkf.mpg.de [Stuttgart Center for Electron Microscopy, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Aken, Peter A. van [Stuttgart Center for Electron Microscopy, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Koch, Christoph T. [Structure Research & Electron Microscopy group, Department of Physics, Humboldt University of Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. - Highlights: • Hybrid electron holography approach applied to Au nanoparticles. • Proof of principle of atomic resolution hybrid electron holography experiment demonstrated. • Dynamical scattering artifacts decrease by varying the illumination direction. • The effect of the number of iterations and noise on the low spatial frequencies in the phase are discussed.

  20. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Aken, Peter A. van; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-01-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. - Highlights: • Hybrid electron holography approach applied to Au nanoparticles. • Proof of principle of atomic resolution hybrid electron holography experiment demonstrated. • Dynamical scattering artifacts decrease by varying the illumination direction. • The effect of the number of iterations and noise on the low spatial frequencies in the phase are discussed.

  1. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. One-Body Potential Theory of Molecules and Solids Modified Semiempirically for Electron Correlation

    March, N.H.

    2010-08-01

    The study of Cordero, March and Alonso (CMA) for four spherical atoms, Be,Ne,Mg and Ar, semiempirically fine-tunes the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground-state electron density by inserting the experimentally determined ionization potentials. The present Letter, first of all, relates this approach to the very recent work of Bartlett 'towards an exact correlated orbital theory for electrons'. Both methods relax the requirement of standard DFT that a one-body potential shall generate the exact ground-state density, though both work with high quality approximations. Unlike DFT, the CMA theory uses a modified HF non-local potential. It is finally stressed that this potential generates also an idempotent Dirac density matrix. The CMA approach is thereby demonstrated to relate, albeit approximately, to the DFT exchange-correlation potential. (author)

  3. Exact exchange-correlation potentials of singlet two-electron systems

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Ospadov, Egor; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2017-10-01

    We suggest a non-iterative analytic method for constructing the exchange-correlation potential, v XC ( r ) , of any singlet ground-state two-electron system. The method is based on a convenient formula for v XC ( r ) in terms of quantities determined only by the system's electronic wave function, exact or approximate, and is essentially different from the Kohn-Sham inversion technique. When applied to Gaussian-basis-set wave functions, the method yields finite-basis-set approximations to the corresponding basis-set-limit v XC ( r ) , whereas the Kohn-Sham inversion produces physically inappropriate (oscillatory and divergent) potentials. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by computing accurate exchange-correlation potentials of several two-electron systems (helium isoelectronic series, H2, H3 + ) using common ab initio methods and Gaussian basis sets.

  4. Determination of the mean inner potential of cadmium telluride via electron holography

    Cassidy, C.; Dhar, A.; Shintake, T.

    2017-04-01

    Mean inner potential is a fundamental material parameter in solid state physics and electron microscopy and has been experimentally measured in CdTe, a technologically important semiconductor. As a first step, the inelastic mean free path for electron scattering in CdTe was determined, using electron energy loss spectroscopy, to enable precise thickness mapping of thin CdTe lamellae. The obtained value was λi(CdTe, 300 kV) = 192 ± 10 nm. This value is relatively large, given the high density of the material, and is discussed in the text. Next, electron diffraction and specimen tilting were employed to identify weakly diffracting lattice orientations, to enable the straightforward measurement of the electron phase shift. Finally, electron holography was utilized to quantitatively map the phase shift experienced by electron waves passing through a CdTe crystal, with several different propagation vectors. Utilization of both thickness and phase data allowed computation of mean inner potential as V0 (CdTe) = 14.0 ± 0.9 V, within the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  5. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kardynał, B.E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barnes, C.H.W. [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E., E-mail: rafaldb@gmail.com [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute 5, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness.

  6. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A.; Kardynał, B.E.; Barnes, C.H.W.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness

  7. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Split-illumination electron holography for improved evaluation of electrostatic potential associated with electrophotography

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki, E-mail: tanigaki-toshiaki@riken.jp; Aizawa, Shinji; Soon Park, Hyun [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, Kuniaki; Akase, Zentaro [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke [Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), RIKEN, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawase, Hiromitsu [Product Environment Technology Development Department, Environment and Energy Technology Development Center R and D Group, RICOH Co., Ltd., Shinei-cho, Tsuzuki-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 224-0035 (Japan)

    2014-03-31

    Precise evaluation of the electrostatic potential distributions of and around samples with multiple charges using electron holography has long been a problem due to unknown perturbation of the reference wave. Here, we report the first practical application of split-illumination electron holography (SIEH) to tackle this problem. This method enables the use of a non-perturbed reference wave distant from the sample. SIEH revealed the electrostatic potential distributions at interfaces of the charged particles used for development in electrophotography and should lead to dramatic improvements in electrophotography.

  9. Split-illumination electron holography for improved evaluation of electrostatic potential associated with electrophotography

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Soon Park, Hyun; Sato, Kuniaki; Akase, Zentaro; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Kawase, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Precise evaluation of the electrostatic potential distributions of and around samples with multiple charges using electron holography has long been a problem due to unknown perturbation of the reference wave. Here, we report the first practical application of split-illumination electron holography (SIEH) to tackle this problem. This method enables the use of a non-perturbed reference wave distant from the sample. SIEH revealed the electrostatic potential distributions at interfaces of the charged particles used for development in electrophotography and should lead to dramatic improvements in electrophotography

  10. Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Structural Materials

    Wang, Jy-An J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Hunter, Hamilton T.; Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Research is being conducted to develop an integrated technology for the prediction of aging behavior for space structural materials during service. This research will utilize state-of-the-art radiation experimental apparatus and analysis, updated codes and databases, and integrated mechanical and radiation testing techniques to investigate the suitability of numerous current and potential spacecraft structural materials. Also included are the effects on structural materials in surface modules and planetary landing craft, with or without fission power supplies. Spacecraft structural materials would also be in hostile radiation environments on the surface of the moon and planets without appreciable atmospheres and moons around planets with large intense magnetic and radiation fields (such as the Jovian moons). The effects of extreme temperature cycles in such locations compounds the effects of radiation on structural materials. This paper describes the integrated methodology in detail and shows that it will provide a significant technological advance for designing advanced spacecraft. This methodology will also allow for the development of advanced spacecraft materials through the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of material degradation in the space radiation environment. Thus, this technology holds a promise for revolutionary advances in material damage prediction and protection of space structural components as, for example, in the development of guidelines for managing surveillance programs regarding the integrity of spacecraft components, and the safety of the aging spacecraft. (authors)

  11. Standardizing the information architecture for spacecraft operations

    Easton, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an information architecture developed for the Space Station Freedom as a model from which to derive an information architecture standard for advanced spacecraft. The information architecture provides a way of making information available across a program, and among programs, assuming that the information will be in a variety of local formats, structures and representations. It provides a format that can be expanded to define all of the physical and logical elements that make up a program, add definitions as required, and import definitions from prior programs to a new program. It allows a spacecraft and its control center to work in different representations and formats, with the potential for supporting existing spacecraft from new control centers. It supports a common view of data and control of all spacecraft, regardless of their own internal view of their data and control characteristics, and of their communications standards, protocols and formats. This information architecture is central to standardizing spacecraft operations, in that it provides a basis for information transfer and translation, such that diverse spacecraft can be monitored and controlled in a common way.

  12. Attitude Estimation in Fractionated Spacecraft Cluster Systems

    Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Blackmore, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An attitude estimation was examined in fractioned free-flying spacecraft. Instead of a single, monolithic spacecraft, a fractionated free-flying spacecraft uses multiple spacecraft modules. These modules are connected only through wireless communication links and, potentially, wireless power links. The key advantage of this concept is the ability to respond to uncertainty. For example, if a single spacecraft module in the cluster fails, a new one can be launched at a lower cost and risk than would be incurred with onorbit servicing or replacement of the monolithic spacecraft. In order to create such a system, however, it is essential to know what the navigation capabilities of the fractionated system are as a function of the capabilities of the individual modules, and to have an algorithm that can perform estimation of the attitudes and relative positions of the modules with fractionated sensing capabilities. Looking specifically at fractionated attitude estimation with startrackers and optical relative attitude sensors, a set of mathematical tools has been developed that specify the set of sensors necessary to ensure that the attitude of the entire cluster ( cluster attitude ) can be observed. Also developed was a navigation filter that can estimate the cluster attitude if these conditions are satisfied. Each module in the cluster may have either a startracker, a relative attitude sensor, or both. An extended Kalman filter can be used to estimate the attitude of all modules. A range of estimation performances can be achieved depending on the sensors used and the topology of the sensing network.

  13. Measurement of plasma potential and electron temperature by ball-pen probes in RFX-MOD

    Brotankova, J.; Adamek, J.; Stockel, J.; Martines, E.; Spolaore, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.; Zuin, M.

    2009-01-01

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is an innovative electric probe for direct measurements of the plasma potential. This probe was developed in IPP Prague and it is based on the Katsumata probe concept. Combined measurements of the plasma potential by a BPP and floating potential by a Langmuir probe provide also the value of the electron temperature. First test of the BPP on the RFX-mod reversed field pinch in Padova has been performed in November 2006. The BPP head, made of boron nitride, is equipped with four graphite collectors, which are positioned at four different radial positions h inside four shafts hollow into the probe head. The radial profile of the plasma potential and also the electron temperature were measured

  14. "Spacecraft Reveals Recent Geological Activity on the Moon": Exploring the Features of NASA Twitter Posts and Their Potential to Engage Adolescents

    Lesley, Mellinee

    2014-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 200 "tweets," this study was an exploration into the distinct features of text posted to NASA's "Twitter" site and the potential for these posts to serve as more engaging scientific text than traditional textbooks for adolescents. Results of the content analysis indicated the tweets and linked…

  15. Continuum and bound electronic wavefunctions for anisotropic multiple-scattering potentials

    Siegel, J.; Dill, D.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Standard multiple-scattering treatments of bound and continuum one-electron states are restricted to a monopole potential in each of the various spherical regions. We have extended the treatment within these regions to a general potential. The corresponding multiple-scattering equations should facilitate accurate treatment of effects of the build-up of charge due to bonding, of the dipole character of polar molecules, and of external fields

  16. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential energy curve of Be2 in its ground electronic state

    Špirko, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 235, č. 2 (2006), s. 268-270 ISSN 0022-2852 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400550511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ground electronic state of Be2 * MR-CI ab initio potentials * reduced potential curves Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.260, year: 2006

  18. Comparison of local exchange potentials for electron--N2 scattering

    Rumble, J.R. Jr.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    We consider vibrationally and electronically elastic electron scattering by N 2 at 2--30 eV impact energy. We consider static, static-exchange, and static--exchange-plus-polarization potentials, Cade--Sales--Wahl and INDO/1s wave functions, and semiclassical exchange and Hara free-electron--gas exchange potentials. We show that the semiclassical exchange approximation is too attractive at low energy for N 2 . We show quantitatively by consideration of partial and total integral cross sections how the effects of approximations to exchange become smaller as the incident energy is increased until these differences are about 8% for the total integral cross section at 30 eV

  19. Studies for determining thermal ion extraction potential for aluminium plasma generated by electron beam evaporator

    Kumar, V Dileep; Barnwal, Tripti A; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L M, E-mail: dileepv@barc.gov.i [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2010-02-01

    For effective evaporation of refractory metal, electron beam is found to be most suitable vapour generator source. Using electron beam, high throughput laser based purification processes are carried out. But due to highly concentrated electron beam, the vapour gets ionised and these ions lead to dilution of the pure product of laser based separation process. To estimate the concentration of these ions and extraction potential requirement to remove these ions from vapour stream, experiments have been conducted using aluminium as evaporant. The aluminium ingots were placed in water cooled copper crucible. Inserts were used to hold the evaporant, in order to attain higher number density in the vapour processing zone and also for confining the liquid metal. Parametric studies with beam power, number density and extraction potential were conducted. In this paper we discuss the trend of the generation of thermal ions and electrostatic field requirement for extraction.

  20. A device for determination of the electrical potential of a rocket carrying an electron gun

    Gringauz, K.I.; Musatov, L.S.; Shutte, N.M.; Beliashin, A.P.; Denstchikova, L.I.; Kopilov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    Data on the principle of operation, sensors and electronics of a device for determination of the electrical potential relative to the surrounding medium of a rocket carrying an electric gun are presented. The device operated successfully on board an Eridan rocket during the ARAKS experiment. (Auth.)

  1. Electron structure of molecules with very heavy atoms using effective core potentials

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include effective potential, Hamiltonian for valence-electron motion, molecular calculations, spin-spin coupling, L-S coupling, numerical results of molecular calculations, and results of configuration-interaction Slater-orbital calculations in L-S coupling

  2. Towards automated electron holographic tomography for 3D mapping of electrostatic potentials

    Wolf, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.Wolf@Triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lubk, Axel; Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Friedrich, Heiner [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Electron-holographic tomography (EHT), that is, the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, was successfully applied for the quantitative 3D mapping of electrostatic potentials at the nanoscale. Here we present the first software package (THOMAS) for semi-automated acquisition of holographic tilt series, a prerequisite for efficient data collection. Using THOMAS, the acquisition time for a holographic tilt series, consisting of object and reference holograms, is reduced by a factor of five on average, compared to the previous, completely manual approaches. Moreover, the existing software packages for retrieving amplitude and phase information from electron holograms have been extended, now including a one-step procedure for holographic tilt series reconstruction. Furthermore, a modified SIRT algorithm (WSIRT) was implemented for the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the electrostatic potential from the aligned phase tilt series. Finally, the application of EHT to a polystyrene latex sphere test-specimen and a pn-doped Ge 'needle'-shaped specimen are presented, illustrating the quantitative character of EHT. For both specimens the mean inner potential (MIP) values were accurately determined from the reconstructed 3D potential. For the Ge specimen, additionally the 'built-in' voltage across the pn junction of 0.5 V was obtained.

  3. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular...

  4. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY: AQUEOUS ONE-ELECTRON OXIDATION POTENTIALS FOR SUBSTITUTED ANILINES

    Semiempirical molecular orbital theory and density functional theory are used to compute one-electron oxidation potentials for aniline and a set of 21 mono- and di-substituted anilines in aqueous solution. Linear relationships between theoretical predictions and experiment are co...

  5. Low power arcjet system spacecraft impacts

    Pencil, Eric J.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lichtin, D. A.; Palchefsky, J. W.; Bogorad, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Potential plume contamination of spacecraft surfaces was investigated by positioning spacecraft material samples relative to an arcjet thruster. Samples in the simulated solar array region were exposed to the cold gas arcjet plume for 40 hrs to address concerns about contamination by backstreaming diffusion pump oil. Except for one sample, no significant changes were measured in absorptance and emittance within experimental error. Concerns about surface property degradation due to electrostatic discharges led to the investigation of the discharge phenomenon of charged samples during arcjet ignition. Short duration exposure of charged samples demonstrated that potential differences are consistently and completely eliminated within the first second of exposure to a weakly ionized plume. The spark discharge mechanism was not the discharge phenomenon. The results suggest that the arcjet could act as a charge control device on spacecraft.

  6. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  7. Field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2001-01-01

    The significance of basic experiments on field-aligned plasma-potential structure formed by local electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) is claimed based on the historical development of the investigation on electric double layer and electrostatic potential confinement of open-ended fusion-oriented plasmas. In the presence of a single ECR point in simple mirror-type configurations of magnetic field, a potential dip (thermal barrier) appears around this point, being followed by a subsequent potential hump (plug potential) along a collisionless plasma flow. The observed phenomenon gives a clear-cut physics to the formation of field-aligned plug potential with thermal barrier, which is closely related to the double layer formation triggered by a negative dip. (author)

  8. Effects of periodic scattering potential on Landau quantization and ballistic transport of electrons in graphene

    Gumbs, Godfrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College, CUNY, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P de Manuel Lardizabal, 4, 20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Iurov, Andrii [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM 87117 (United States); Fekete, Paula [West Point Military Academy, West Point, NY (United States); Zhemchuzhna, Liubov [Department of Physics, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina 27707 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A two-dimensional periodic array of scatterers has been introduced to a single layer of graphene in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene layer. The eigenvalue equation for such a system has been solved numerically to display the structure of split Landau subbands as functions of both wave number and magnetic flux. The effects of pseudo-spin coupling and Landau subbands mixing by a strong scattering potential have been demonstrated. Additionally, we investigated the square barrier tunneling problem when magnetic field is present, as well as demonstrate the crucial difference in the modulated band structure between graphene and the two-dimensional electron gas. The low-magnetic field regime is particularly interesting for Dirac fermions and has been discussed. Tunneling of Dirac electrons through a magnetic potential barrier has been investigated to complement the reported results on electrostatic potential scattering in the presence of an ambient magnetic field.

  9. Surface potential measurement of negative-ion-implanted insulators by analysing secondary electron energy distribution

    Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki.

    1994-01-01

    The negative ion implantation method we have proposed is a noble technique which can reduce surface charging of isolated electrodes by a large margin. In this paper, the way to specify the surface potential of negative-ion-implanted insulators by the secondary electron energy analysis is described. The secondary electron energy distribution is obtained by a retarding field type energy analyzer. The result shows that the surface potential of fused quartz by negative-ion implantation (C - with the energy of 10 keV to 40 keV) is negatively charged by only several volts. This surface potential is extremely low compared with that by positive-ion implantation. Therefore, the negative-ion implantation is a very effective method for charge-up free implantation without charge compensation. (author)

  10. Effects of periodic scattering potential on Landau quantization and ballistic transport of electrons in graphene

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Iurov, Andrii; Huang, Danhong; Fekete, Paula; Zhemchuzhna, Liubov

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional periodic array of scatterers has been introduced to a single layer of graphene in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene layer. The eigenvalue equation for such a system has been solved numerically to display the structure of split Landau subbands as functions of both wave number and magnetic flux. The effects of pseudo-spin coupling and Landau subbands mixing by a strong scattering potential have been demonstrated. Additionally, we investigated the square barrier tunneling problem when magnetic field is present, as well as demonstrate the crucial difference in the modulated band structure between graphene and the two-dimensional electron gas. The low-magnetic field regime is particularly interesting for Dirac fermions and has been discussed. Tunneling of Dirac electrons through a magnetic potential barrier has been investigated to complement the reported results on electrostatic potential scattering in the presence of an ambient magnetic field

  11. Excitation and characterization of image potential state electrons on quasi-free-standing graphene

    Lin, Yi; Li, Yunzhe; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Jin, Wencan; Dadap, Jerry I.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Osgood, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the band structure of image potential states in quasi-free-standing graphene (QFG) monolayer islands using angle-resolved two-photon-photoemission spectroscopy. Direct probing by low-energy electron diffraction shows that QFG is formed following oxygen intercalation into the graphene-Ir(111) interface. Despite the apparent decoupling of the monolayer graphene from the Ir substrate, we find that the binding energy of the n =1 image potential state on these QFG islands increases by 0.17 eV, as compared to the original Gr/Ir(111) interface. We use calculations based on density-functional theory to construct an empirical, one-dimensional potential that quantitatively reproduces the image potential state binding energy and links the changes in the interface structure to the shift in energy. Specifically, two factors contribute comparably to this energy shift: a deeper potential well arising from the presence of intercalated oxygen adatoms and a wider potential well associated with the increase in the graphene-Ir distance. While image potential states have not been observed previously on QFG by photoemission, our paper now demonstrates that they may be strongly excited in a well-defined QFG system produced by oxygen intercalation. This opens an opportunity for studying the surface electron dynamics in QFG systems, beyond those found in typical nonintercalated graphene-on-substrate systems.

  12. Electronic band gap and transport in graphene superlattice with a Gaussian profile potential voltage

    Zhang Yu-Ping; Yin Yi-Heng; Lü Huan-Huan; Zhang Hui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    We study the electronic properties for the graphene-based one-dimensional superlattices, whose potential voltages vary according to the envelope of a Gaussian function. It is found that an unusual Dirac point exists and its location is exactly associated with a zero-averaged wave number (zero-k-bar ) gap. This zero-k-bar gap is less sensitive to incident angle and lattice constants, properties opposing those of Bragg gap. The defect mode appearing inside the zero-k-bar gap has an effect on transmission, conductance, and shot noise, which will be useful for further investigation. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  13. Exact Time-Dependent Exchange-Correlation Potential in Electron Scattering Processes

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Lacombe, Lionel; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2017-12-01

    We identify peak and valley structures in the exact exchange-correlation potential of time-dependent density functional theory that are crucial for time-resolved electron scattering in a model one-dimensional system. These structures are completely missed by adiabatic approximations that, consequently, significantly underestimate the scattering probability. A recently proposed nonadiabatic approximation is shown to correctly capture the approach of the electron to the target when the initial Kohn-Sham state is chosen judiciously, and it is more accurate than standard adiabatic functionals but ultimately fails to accurately capture reflection. These results may explain the underestimation of scattering probabilities in some recent studies on molecules and surfaces.

  14. The electronic spectrum of a quasiperiodic potential: From the Hofstadter butterfly to the Fibonacci chain

    Naumis, Gerardo G.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    We show that an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian, defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained using a superposition of Harper potentials. Since the spectrum of the Harper equation as a function of the magnetic flux is a fractal set, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, we follow the transformation of the butterfly to a new one that contains the Fibonacci potential and related approximants. As a result, the equation in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case has the form of a chain with long range interaction between Fourier components. Then, the structure of the resulting spectrum is analyzed by calculating the components in reciprocal space of the related potentials. As an application, the correlator of each potential and some localization properties are obtained

  15. Analysis of Pedagogic Potential of Electronic Educational Resources with Elements of Autodidactics

    Igor A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: in recent years didactic properties of electronic educational resources undergo considerable changes, nevertheless, the question of studying of such complete phenomenon as “an electronic educational resource with autodidactics elements” remains open, despite sufficient scientific base of researches of the terms making this concept. Article purpose – determination of essence of electronic educational resources with autodidactics elements. Materials and Methods: the main method of research was the theoretical analysis of the pedagogical and psychological literature on the problem under study. We used the theoretical (analysis, synthesis, comparison and generalization methods, the method of interpretation, pedagogical modeling, and empirical methods (observation, testing, conversation, interview, analysis of students’ performance, pedagogical experiment, peer review. Results: we detected the advantages of electronic educational resources in comparison with traditional ones. The concept of autodidactics as applied to the subject of research is considered. Properties of electronic educational resources with a linear and nonlinear principle of construction are studied.The influence of the principle of construction on the development of the learners’ qualities is shown. We formulated an integral definition of electronic educational resources with elements of autodidactics, namely, the variability, adaptivity and cyclicity of training. A model of the teaching-learning process with electronic educational resources is developed. Discussion and Conclusions: further development of a problem will allow to define whether electronic educational resources with autodidactics elements pedagogical potential for realization of educational and self-educational activity of teachers have, to modify technological procedures taking into account age features of students, their specialties and features of the organization of process of training of

  16. Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Education Program

    1995-01-01

    A NASA engineer with the Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) at Stennis Space Center works with students from W.P. Daniels High School in New Albany, Miss., through NASA's Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Program. CRSP is teaching students to use remote sensing to locate a potential site for a water reservoir to offset a predicted water shortage in the community's future.

  17. Spacecraft Attitude Control in Hamiltonian Framework

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a design scheme for attitude control algorithms of a generic spacecraft. Along with the system model formulated in the Hamilton's canonical form the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipative term. The control action...

  18. Dynamic Electron Correlation Effects on the Ground State Potential Energy Surface of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    Gozem, Samer; Huntress, Mark; Schapiro, Igor; Lindh, Roland; Granovsky, Alexander A; Angeli, Celestino; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-11-13

    The ground state potential energy surface of the retinal chromophore of visual pigments (e.g., bovine rhodopsin) features a low-lying conical intersection surrounded by regions with variable charge-transfer and diradical electronic structures. This implies that dynamic electron correlation may have a large effect on the shape of the force fields driving its reactivity. To investigate this effect, we focus on mapping the potential energy for three paths located along the ground state CASSCF potential energy surface of the penta-2,4-dieniminium cation taken as a minimal model of the retinal chromophore. The first path spans the bond length alternation coordinate and intercepts a conical intersection point. The other two are minimum energy paths along two distinct but kinetically competitive thermal isomerization coordinates. We show that the effect of introducing the missing dynamic electron correlation variationally (with MRCISD) and perturbatively (with the CASPT2, NEVPT2, and XMCQDPT2 methods) leads, invariably, to a stabilization of the regions with charge transfer character and to a significant reshaping of the reference CASSCF potential energy surface and suggesting a change in the dominating isomerization mechanism. The possible impact of such a correction on the photoisomerization of the retinal chromophore is discussed.

  19. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    Knudsen, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gases consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor

  20. Band structure of an electron in a kind of periodic potentials with singularities

    Hai, Kuo; Yu, Ning; Jia, Jiangping

    2018-06-01

    Noninteracting electrons in some crystals may experience periodic potentials with singularities and the governing Schrödinger equation cannot be defined at the singular points. The band structure of a single electron in such a one-dimensional crystal has been calculated by using an equivalent integral form of the Schrödinger equation. Both the perturbed and exact solutions are constructed respectively for the cases of a general singular weak-periodic system and its an exactly solvable version, Kronig-Penney model. Any one of them leads to a special band structure of the energy-dependent parameter, which results in an effective correction to the previous energy-band structure and gives a new explanation for forming the band structure. The used method and obtained results could be a valuable aid in the study of energy bands in solid-state physics, and the new explanation may trigger investigation to different physical mechanism of electron band structures.

  1. Addressing EO-1 Spacecraft Pulsed Plasma Thruster EMI Concerns

    Zakrzwski, C. M.; Davis, Mitch; Sarmiento, Charles; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) Experiment on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) spacecraft has been designed to demonstrate the capability of a new generation PPT to perform spacecraft attitude control. Results from PPT unit level radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) tests led to concerns about potential interference problems with other spacecraft subsystems. Initial plans to address these concerns included firing the PPT at the spacecraft level both in atmosphere, with special ground support equipment. and in vacuum. During the spacecraft level tests, additional concerns where raised about potential harm to the Advanced Land Imager (ALI). The inadequacy of standard radiated emission test protocol to address pulsed electromagnetic discharges and the lack of resources required to perform compatibility tests between the PPT and an ALI test unit led to changes in the spacecraft level validation plan. An EMI shield box for the PPT was constructed and validated for spacecraft level ambient testing. Spacecraft level vacuum tests of the PPT were deleted. Implementation of the shield box allowed for successful spacecraft level testing of the PPT while eliminating any risk to the ALI. The ALI demonstration will precede the PPT demonstration to eliminate any possible risk of damage of ALI from PPT operation.

  2. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  3. Spacecraft exploration of asteroids

    Veverka, J.; Langevin, Y.; Farquhar, R.; Fulchignoni, M.

    1989-01-01

    After two decades of spacecraft exploration, we still await the first direct investigation of an asteroid. This paper describes how a growing international interest in the solar system's more primitive bodies should remedy this. Plans are under way in Europe for a dedicated asteroid mission (Vesta) which will include multiple flybys with in situ penetrator studies. Possible targets include 4 Vesta, 8 Flora and 46 Hestia; launch its scheduled for 1994 or 1996. In the United States, NASA plans include flybys of asteroids en route to outer solar system targets

  4. Spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenons and problems encountered when a rendezvous manoeuvre, and possible docking, of two spacecrafts has to be performed, have been the topic for numerous studies, and, details of a variety of scenarios has been analysed. So far, all solutions that has been brought into realization has...... been based entirely on direct human supervision and control. This paper describes a vision-based system and methodology, that autonomously generates accurate guidance information that may assist a human operator in performing the tasks associated with both the rendezvous and docking navigation...

  5. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  6. Coupled Cluster Studies of Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Peng, Bo; Govind, Niranjan; Apra, Edoardo; Klemm, Michael; Hammond, Jeff R.; Kowalski, Karol

    2017-02-03

    In this paper we apply equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods in studies of vertical ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) for sin- gled walled carbon nanotubes. EOMCC formulations for ionization potentials and electron affinities employing excitation manifolds spanned by single and double ex- citations (IP/EA-EOMCCSD) are used to study IPs and EAs of nanotubes as a function of nanotube length. Several armchair nanotubes corresponding to C20nH20 models with n = 2 - 6 have been used in benchmark calculations. In agreement with previous studies, we demonstrate that the electronegativity of C20nH20 systems remains, to a large extent, independent of nanotube length. We also compare IP/EA- EOMCCSD results with those obtained with the coupled cluster models with single and double excitations corrected by perturbative triples, CCSD(T), and density func- tional theory (DFT) using global and range-separated hybrid exchange-correlation functionals.

  7. The potentially neglected culprit of DC surface flashover: electron migration under temperature gradients.

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2017-06-12

    This report intends to reveal the role of electron migration and its effects in triggering direct current (DC) surface flashover under temperature gradient conditions when using epoxy-based insulating composites. The surface potential and the surface flashover voltage are both measured using insulators that are bridged between two thermo-regulated electrodes. The space charge injection and migration properties under different temperature are detected. The results show that the surface potential rises significantly because of electron migration near the high voltage (HV) electrode under high temperature conditions, thus creating an "analogous ineffective region". The expansion of this "analogous ineffective region" results in most of the voltage drop occurring near the ground electrode, which serves as an important factor triggering positive streamers across the insulation surface. This work is helpful in understanding of DC surface flashover mechanism from a new perspective and also has important significance in design of a suitable DC insulator to avoid surface flashover problem.

  8. Brain state-dependence of electrically evoked potentials monitored with head-mounted electronics.

    Richardson, Andrew G; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2012-11-01

    Inferring changes in brain connectivity is critical to studies of learning-related plasticity and stimulus-induced conditioning of neural circuits. In addition, monitoring spontaneous fluctuations in connectivity can provide insight into information processing during different brain states. Here, we quantified state-dependent connectivity changes throughout the 24-h sleep-wake cycle in freely behaving monkeys. A novel, head-mounted electronic device was used to electrically stimulate at one site and record evoked potentials at other sites. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) revealed the connectivity pattern between several cortical sites and the basal forebrain. We quantified state-dependent changes in the EEPs. Cortico-cortical EEP amplitude increased during slow-wave sleep, compared to wakefulness, while basal-cortical EEP amplitude decreased. The results demonstrate the utility of using portable electronics to document state-dependent connectivity changes in freely behaving primates.

  9. Research on spacecraft electrical power conversion

    Wilson, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    The history of spacecraft electrical power conversion in literature, research and practice is reviewed. It is noted that the design techniques, analyses and understanding which were developed make today's contribution to power computers and communication installations. New applications which require more power, improved dynamic response, greater reliability, and lower cost are outlined. The switching mode approach in electronic power conditioning is discussed. Technical aspects of the research are summarized.

  10. Event-related potentials elicited by social commerce and electronic-commerce reviews

    Bai, Yan; Yao, Zhong; Cong, Fengyu; Zhang, Linlin

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest regarding the use of electroencephalography (EEG) in social commerce and electronic commerce (e-commerce) research. There are several reviews in the field of social commerce or e-commerce; these have great potential value and mining them is fundamental and significant. To our knowledge, EEG is rarely applied to study these. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of social commerce reviews (SCRs) and e-commerce reviews (ECRs) by using them as stimuli t...

  11. Electron density of states in a one-dimensional distorted system with impurities: Coherent potential approximation

    Bulka, B.R.

    1982-04-01

    A tight-binding one-dimensional distorted system with impurities is considered and the electron density of states is calculated in the coherent potential approximation. It is shown that two types of impurities, an impurity built in a chain and a domain wall (a soliton), play the essential role and a drastic reduction of the energy gap is observed for a few per cent of impurities. The experimental situation in polyacetylene is also discussed. (author)

  12. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams

    Guimaraes, Margarete C.; Silva, Teogenes; Silva, Claudete R.E., E-mail: margaretecristinag@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem

    2015-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed X-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed X-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC X-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed X-rays. (author)

  13. Retrieval of the projected potential by inversion from the scattering matrix in electron-crystal scattering

    Allen, L.J.; Spargo, A.E.C.; Leeb, H.

    1998-01-01

    The retrieval of a unique crystal potential from the scattering matrix S in high energy transmission electron diffraction is discussed. It is shown that, in general, data taken at a single orientation are not sufficient to determine all the elements of S. Additional measurements with tilted incident beam are required for the determination of the whole S-matrix. An algorithm for the extraction of the crystal potential from the S-matrix measured at a single energy and thickness is presented. The limiting case of thin crystals is discussed. Several examples with simulated data are considered

  14. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography.

    Somodi, P K; Twitchett-Harrison, A C; Midgley, P A; Kardynał, B E; Barnes, C H W; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p-n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p-n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electron beam potential measurements on an inductive-store, opening-switch accelerator

    Riordan, J.C.; Goyer, J.R.; Kortbawi, D.; Meachum, J.S.; Mendenhall, R.S.; Roth, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    Direct measurement of the accelerating potential in a relativistic electron beam accelerator is difficult, particularly when the diode is downstream from a plasma opening switch. An indirect potential measurement can be obtained from the high energy tail of the bremsstrahlung spectrum generated as the electron beam strikes the anode. The authors' time-resolved spectrometer contains 7 silicon pin diode detectors filtered with 2 to 15 mm of lead to span an electron energy range of 0.5 to 2 MeV. A Monte-Carlo transport code was used to provide calibration curves, and the resulting potential measurements have been confirmed in experiments on the PITHON accelerator. The spectrometer has recently been deployed on PM1, an inductive-store, opening-switch testbed. The diode voltage measurements from the spectrometer are in good agreement with the diode voltage measured upstream and corrected using transmission line relations. The x-ray signal and spectral voltage rise 10 ns later than the corrected electrical voltage, however, indicating plasma motion between the opening switch and the diode

  16. Low cost spacecraft computers: Oxymoron or future trend?

    Manning, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last few decades, application of current terrestrial computer technology in embedded spacecraft control systems has been expensive and wrought with many technical challenges. These challenges have centered on overcoming the extreme environmental constraints (protons, neutrons, gamma radiation, cosmic rays, temperature, vibration, etc.) that often preclude direct use of commercial off-the-shelf computer technology. Reliability, fault tolerance and power have also greatly constrained the selection of spacecraft control system computers. More recently, new constraints are being felt, cost and mass in particular, that have again narrowed the degrees of freedom spacecraft designers once enjoyed. This paper discusses these challenges, how they were previously overcome, how future trends in commercial computer technology will simplify (or hinder) selection of computer technology for spacecraft control applications, and what spacecraft electronic system designers can do now to circumvent them.

  17. Automating Trend Analysis for Spacecraft Constellations

    Davis, George; Cooter, Miranda; Updike, Clark; Carey, Everett; Mackey, Jennifer; Rykowski, Timothy; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft trend analysis is a vital mission operations function performed by satellite controllers and engineers, who perform detailed analyses of engineering telemetry data to diagnose subsystem faults and to detect trends that may potentially lead to degraded subsystem performance or failure in the future. It is this latter function that is of greatest importance, for careful trending can often predict or detect events that may lead to a spacecraft's entry into safe-hold. Early prediction and detection of such events could result in the avoidance of, or rapid return to service from, spacecraft safing, which not only results in reduced recovery costs but also in a higher overall level of service for the satellite system. Contemporary spacecraft trending activities are manually intensive and are primarily performed diagnostically after a fault occurs, rather than proactively to predict its occurrence. They also tend to rely on information systems and software that are oudated when compared to current technologies. When coupled with the fact that flight operations teams often have limited resources, proactive trending opportunities are limited, and detailed trend analysis is often reserved for critical responses to safe holds or other on-orbit events such as maneuvers. While the contemporary trend analysis approach has sufficed for current single-spacecraft operations, it will be unfeasible for NASA's planned and proposed space science constellations. Missions such as the Dynamics, Reconnection and Configuration Observatory (DRACO), for example, are planning to launch as many as 100 'nanospacecraft' to form a homogenous constellation. A simple extrapolation of resources and manpower based on single-spacecraft operations suggests that trending for such a large spacecraft fleet will be unmanageable, unwieldy, and cost-prohibitive. It is therefore imperative that an approach to automating the spacecraft trend analysis function be studied, developed, and applied to

  18. Characterization of Electrostatic Potential and Trapped Charge in Semiconductor Nanostructures using Off-Axis Electron Holography

    Gan, Zhaofeng

    Off-axis electron holography (EH) has been used to characterize electrostatic potential, active dopant concentrations and charge distribution in semiconductor nanostructures, including ZnO nanowires (NWs) and thin films, ZnTe thin films, Si NWs with axial p-n junctions, Si-Ge axial heterojunction NWs, and Ge/Li xGe core/shell NW. The mean inner potential (MIP) and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of ZnO NWs have been measured to be 15.3V+/-0.2V and 55+/-3nm, respectively, for 200keV electrons. These values were then used to characterize the thickness of a ZnO nano-sheet and gave consistent values. The MIP and IMFP for ZnTe thin films were measured to be 13.7+/-0.6V and 46+/-2nm, respectively, for 200keV electrons. A thin film expected to have a p-n junction was studied, but no signal due to the junction was observed. The importance of dynamical effects was systematically studied using Bloch wave simulations. The built-in potentials in Si NWs across the doped p-n junction and the Schottky junction due to Au catalyst were measured to be 1.0+/-0.3V and 0.5+/-0.3V, respectively. Simulations indicated that the dopant concentrations were ~1019cm-3 for donors and ~1017 cm-3 for acceptors. The effects of positively charged Au catalyst, a possible n+-n --p junction transition region and possible surface charge, were also systematically studied using simulations. Si-Ge heterojunction NWs were studied. Dopant concentrations were extracted by atom probe tomography. The built-in potential offset was measured to be 0.4+/-0.2V, with the Ge side lower. Comparisons with simulations indicated that Ga present in the Si region was only partially activated. In situ EH biasing experiments combined with simulations indicated the B dopant in Ge was mostly activated but not the P dopant in Si. I-V characteristic curves were measured and explained using simulations. The Ge/LixGe core/shell structure was studied during lithiation. The MIP for LixGe decreased with time due to increased Li

  19. One-electron transfer equilibria and redox potentials of radicals studied by pulse radiolysis

    Meisel, D.; Czapski, G.

    1975-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is utilized for measurements of the equilibrium constants for electron transfer between the durosemiquinone radical anion and oxygen, menadione, and indigodisulfonate. These equilibrium constants are in turn used for calculations of one-electron redox potentials for these systems. Each of these equilibrium constants was determined experimentally and independently and found to be self-consistent. Only for the reactions of the semiquinone radical ions with oxygen could the electron transfer reaction be followed directly. For the reactions between the various quinone-semiquinone systems substantial indirect evidence is presented that these equilibria are achieved rapidly. In those cases equilibrium constants were determined from studies of the effect of quinone concentrations on the relative yields of the semiquinones. A method for distinguishing between kinetic competition and equilibrium is outlined and its usefulness is emphasized. The DQ parallel DQ - (DQ = duroquinone) and IDS parallel IDS - (IDS = indigodisulfonate) systems were employed as reference couples as the redox potentials for those systems are either available in the literature (IDS parallel IDS - ) or may be calculated from available data (DQ parallel DQ - ). Taking E 7 1 , the redox potential for the first one-electron reduction step at pH 7, of DQ parallel DQ - as -0.235 V or of IDS parallelIDS - as -0.247 V both yield E 7 1 = -0.325 V for the O 2 parallel O 2 - system (1 atm of O 2 ) and E 2 1 = -0.20 V for the menadione system. (U.S.)

  20. Potential application of electronic nose in processed animal proteins (PAP detection in feedstuffs

    Dell'Orto V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic nose and olfactometry techniques represent a modern analytical approach in food industry since they could potentially improve quality and safety of food processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible application of electronic nose in PA P detection and recognition in feed. For this purpose 6 reference feedstuffs (CRA-W / UE STRAT F E E D Project were used. The basis of the test samples was a compound feed for bovine fortified with processed animal proteins ( PAP consisting of meat and bone meal (MBM and/or fish meal at different concentrations. Each feed sample was tested in glass vials and the odour profile was determined by the ten MOS (metal oxide semi-conductor sensors of the electronic nose. Ten different descriptors, representing each ten sensors of electronic nose, were used to characterise the odour of each sample. In the present study, electronic nose was able to discriminate the blank sample from all other samples containing PA P ( M B M , fish meal or both. Samples containing either 0.5% of MBM or 5% of fish meal were identified, while samples containing a high fish meal content (5% associated with a low MBM content (0.5% were not discriminated from samples containing solely fish meal at that same high level (5%. This latter indicates that probably the high fish meal level, in samples containing both MBM and fish meal, tended to mask MBM odour. It was also evident that two odour descriptors were enough to explain 72.12% of total variability in odour pattern. In view of these results, it could be suggested that electronic nose and olfactometry techniques can provide an interesting approach for screening raw materials in feed industry, even though further studies using a wider set of samples are needed.

  1. A new calculational method to assess the therapeutic potential of Auger electron emission

    Humm, J.L.; Charlton, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a new computer code to estimate the efficacy of Auger electron sources in cancer therapy. Auger electron emission accompanies the decay of many radionuclides already commonly used in nuclear medicine, for example; 99m Tc and 201 Tl. The range of these electrons is in general sub-cellular, therefore, the toxicity of the source depends on the site of decay relative to the genetic material of the cell. Electron track structure methods have been used which enable the study of energy deposition from Auger sources down to the Angstrom level. A figure for the minimum energy required per single strand break is obtained by fitting our energy deposition calculations for 125 I decays in a model of the DNA to experimental data on break lengths from 125 I labeled plasmid fragments. This method is used to investigate the efficiency of double strand break production by other Auger sources which have potential value for therapy. The high RBE of Auger sources depends critically on the distance between the source and target material. The application of Auger emitters for therapy may necessitate a carrier molecule that can append the source to the DNA. Many DNA localizing agents are known in the field of chemotherapy, some of which could be carrier molecules for Auger sources; the halogenated thymidine precursors are under scrutiny in this field. The activation of Auger cascades in situ by high energy, collimated X ray and neutron beams is also assessed

  2. Electronic tunneling through a potential barrier on the surface of a topological insulator

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the tunneling transport for electrons on the surface of a topological insulator (TI) through an electrostatic potential barrier. By using the Dirac equation with the continuity conditions for all segments of wave functions at the interfaces between regions inside and outside the barrier, we calculate analytically the transmission probability and conductance for the system. It is demonstrated that, the Klein paradox can also been observed in the system same as in graphene system. Interestingly, the conductance reaches the minimum value when the incident electron energy is equal to the barrier strength. Moreover, with increasing barrier width, the conductance turns up some tunneling oscillation peaks, and larger barrier strength can cause lower conductance, shorter period but larger oscillation amplitude. The oscillation amplitude decreases as the barrier width increases, which is similar as that of the system consisting of the compressive uniaxial strain applied on a TI, but somewhat different from that of graphene system where the oscillation amplitude is a constant. The findings here imply that an electrostatic barrier can greatly influence the electron tunneling transport of the system, and may provide a new way to realize directional filtering of electrons.

  3. Role and Potential of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer in Anaerobic Digestion

    Gahyun Baek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion (AD is an effective biological treatment for stabilizing organic compounds in waste/wastewater and in simultaneously producing biogas. However, it is often limited by the slow reaction rates of different microorganisms’ syntrophic biological metabolisms. Stable and fast interspecies electron transfer (IET between volatile fatty acid-oxidizing bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens is crucial for efficient methanogenesis. In this syntrophic interaction, electrons are exchanged via redox mediators such as hydrogen and formate. Recently, direct IET (DIET has been revealed as an important IET route for AD. Microorganisms undergoing DIET form interspecies electrical connections via membrane-associated cytochromes and conductive pili; thus, redox mediators are not required for electron exchange. This indicates that DIET is more thermodynamically favorable than indirect IET. Recent studies have shown that conductive materials (e.g., iron oxides, activated carbon, biochar, and carbon fibers can mediate direct electrical connections for DIET. Microorganisms attach to conductive materials’ surfaces or vice versa according to particle size, and form conductive biofilms or aggregates. Different conductive materials promote DIET and improve AD performance in digesters treating different feedstocks, potentially suggesting a new approach to enhancing AD performance. This review discusses the role and potential of DIET in methanogenic systems, especially with conductive materials for promoting DIET.

  4. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    Martinez-Sanchez, M. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Navarro-Cavallé, J. [Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ahedo, E. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, Leganés 28911, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  5. Surface potential measurement of the insulator with secondary electron caused by negative ion implantation

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1994-01-01

    Ion implantation has the merit of the good controllability of implantation profile and low temperature process, and has been utilized for the impurity introduction in LSI production. However, positive ion implantation is carried out for insulator or insulated conductor substrates, their charged potential rises, which is a serious problem. As the requirement for them advanced, charge compensation method is not the effective means for resolving it. The negative ion implantation in which charging is little was proposed. When the experiment on the negative ion implantation into insulated conductors was carried out, it was verified that negative ion implantation is effective as the implantation process without charging. The method of determining the charged potential of insulators at the time of negative ion implantation by paying attention to the energy distribution of the secondary electrons emitted from substrates at the time was devised. The energy analyzer for measuring the energy distribution of secondary electrons was made, and the measurement of the charged potential of insulators was carried out. The principle of the measurement, the measuring system and the experimental results are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Guidance and control of swarms of spacecraft

    Morgan, Daniel James

    There has been considerable interest in formation flying spacecraft due to their potential to perform certain tasks at a cheaper cost than monolithic spacecraft. Formation flying enables the use of smaller, cheaper spacecraft that distribute the risk of the mission. Recently, the ideas of formation flying have been extended to spacecraft swarms made up of hundreds to thousands of 100-gram-class spacecraft known as femtosatellites. The large number of spacecraft and limited capabilities of each individual spacecraft present a significant challenge in guidance, navigation, and control. This dissertation deals with the guidance and control algorithms required to enable the flight of spacecraft swarms. The algorithms developed in this dissertation are focused on achieving two main goals: swarm keeping and swarm reconfiguration. The objectives of swarm keeping are to maintain bounded relative distances between spacecraft, prevent collisions between spacecraft, and minimize the propellant used by each spacecraft. Swarm reconfiguration requires the transfer of the swarm to a specific shape. Like with swarm keeping, minimizing the propellant used and preventing collisions are the main objectives. Additionally, the algorithms required for swarm keeping and swarm reconfiguration should be decentralized with respect to communication and computation so that they can be implemented on femtosats, which have limited hardware capabilities. The algorithms developed in this dissertation are concerned with swarms located in low Earth orbit. In these orbits, Earth oblateness and atmospheric drag have a significant effect on the relative motion of the swarm. The complicated dynamic environment of low Earth orbits further complicates the swarm-keeping and swarm-reconfiguration problems. To better develop and test these algorithms, a nonlinear, relative dynamic model with J2 and drag perturbations is developed. This model is used throughout this dissertation to validate the algorithms

  7. Comparison of the potentials used for the calculation of the resonant coherent electron capture and loss cross sections

    Pauly, N.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-01-01

    For incident protons with velocities around 1 a.u., electron capture and loss processes are known to play an important role. In particular, electron emission as well as electronic stopping power are strongly influenced by the charge changing processes. Several different electron capture and loss processes have been identified [Solid State Phys. 43 (1990) 229], i.e. Auger valence band processes, shell processes and resonant coherent processes. In the latter, the incident projectile undergoes a periodic excitation due to the periodic crystalline potential so that an electron can be lost or captured. In the literature, several different choices have been made for the crystalline potential. It is precisely the aim of the present work to review and compare the various potentials used in the literature and to show the influence of this choice on the resonant coherent electron capture and loss cross sections

  8. A low-cost electronic tensiometer system for continuous monitoring of soil water potential

    Martin Thalheimer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A low cost system for measuring soil water potential and data logging was developed on the basis of an Arduino microcontroller board, electronic pressure transducers and water-filled tensiometers. The assembly of this system requires only minimal soldering, limited to the wiring of the power supply and the pressure sensors to the microcontroller board. The system presented here is, therefore, not only inexpensive, but also suited for easy reproduction by users with only basic technical skills. The utility and reliability of the system was tested in a commercial apple orchard.

  9. Applicability of ISO 16697 Data to Spacecraft Fire Fighting Strategies

    Hirsch, David B.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation Agenda: (1) Selected variables affecting oxygen consumption during spacecraft fires, (2) General overview of ISO 16697, (3) Estimated amounts of material consumed during combustion in typical ISS enclosures, (4) Discussion on potential applications.

  10. Small Spacecraft for Planetary Science

    Baker, John; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bousquet, Pierre-W.; Vane, Gregg; Komarek, Tomas; Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As planetary science continues to explore new and remote regions of the Solar system with comprehensive and more sophisticated payloads, small spacecraft offer the possibility for focused and more affordable science investigations. These small spacecraft or micro spacecraft (attitude control and determination, capable computer and data handling, and navigation are being met by technologies currently under development to be flown on CubeSats within the next five years. This paper will discuss how micro spacecraft offer an attractive alternative to accomplish specific science and technology goals and what relevant technologies are needed for these these types of spacecraft. Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  11. The influence of secondary electron emission on the floating potential of tokamak-born dust

    Vaverka, J; Richterová, I; Vyšinka, M; Pavlů, J; Šafránková, J; Němeček, Z

    2014-01-01

    Dust production and its transport into the core plasma is an important issue for magnetic confinement fusion. Dust grains are charged by various processes, such as the collection of plasma particles and electron emissions, and their charge influences the dynamics of the dust. This paper presents the results of calculations of the surface potential of dust grains in a Maxwellian plasma. Our calculations include the charging balance of a secondary electron emission (SEE) from the dust. The numerical model that we have used accounts for the influence of backscattered electrons and takes into account the effects of grain size, material, and it is also able to handle both spherical and non-spherical grains. We discuss the role of the SEE under tokamak conditions and show that the SEE is a leading process for the grains crossing the scrape-off layer from the edge to core plasma. The results of our calculations are relevant for materials related to fusion experiments in ITER. (paper)

  12. Historical Mass, Power, Schedule, and Cost Growth for NASA Spacecraft

    Hayhurst, Marc R.; Bitten, Robert E.; Shinn, Stephen A.; Judnick, Daniel C.; Hallgrimson, Ingrid E.; Youngs, Megan A.

    2016-01-01

    Although spacecraft developers have been moving towards standardized product lines as the aerospace industry has matured, NASA's continual need to push the cutting edge of science to accomplish unique, challenging missions can still lead to spacecraft resource growth over time. This paper assesses historical mass, power, cost, and schedule growth for multiple NASA spacecraft from the last twenty years and compares to industry reserve guidelines to understand where the guidelines may fall short. Growth is assessed from project start to launch, from the time of the preliminary design review (PDR) to launch and from the time of the critical design review (CDR) to launch. Data is also assessed not just at the spacecraft bus level, but also at the subsystem level wherever possible, to help obtain further insight into possible drivers of growth. Potential recommendations to minimize spacecraft mass, power, cost, and schedule growth for future missions are also discussed.

  13. The dependence of potential well formation on the magnetic field strength and electron injection current in a polywell device

    Cornish, S.; Gummersall, D.; Carr, M.; Khachan, J.

    2014-01-01

    A capacitive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential in a polywell device in order to observe the dependence of potential well formation on magnetic field strength, electron injection current, and polywell voltage bias. The effectiveness of the capacitive probe in a high energy electron plasma was determined by measuring the plasma potential of a planar diode with an axial magnetic field. The capacitive probe was translated along the axis of one of the field coils of the polywell, and the spatial profile of the potential well was measured. The confinement time of electrons in the polywell was estimated with a simple analytical model which used the experimentally observed potential well depths, as well as a simulation of the electron trajectories using particle orbit theory

  14. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    Uchimiya, Minori; Gorb, Leonid; Isayev, Olexandr; Qasim, Mohammad M.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - )). The E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) is an essential thermodynamic parameter for predicting the rate and extent of reductive transformation for energetic residues. In this study, experimental (linear free energy relationships) and theoretical (ab initio calculation) approaches were employed to determine E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) for nitroaromatic, (caged) cyclic nitramine, and nitroimino explosives that are found in military installations or are emerging contaminants. The results indicate a close agreement between experimental and theoretical E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) and suggest a key trend: E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) value decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic (e.g., 2,4-dinitroanisole) to nitramine (e.g., RDX) to nitroimino compound (e.g., nitroguanidine). The observed trend in E o (R-NO 2 /R-NO 2 - ) agrees with reported rate trends for reductive degradation, suggesting a thermodynamic control on the reduction rate under anoxic/suboxic conditions. - Reduction of explosives becomes less thermodynamically favorable as the one-electron standard reduction potential decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic, nitramine, to nitroimino compounds.

  15. A computational perspective of vibrational and electronic analysis of potential photosensitizer 2-chlorothioxanthone

    Ali, Narmeen; Mansha, Asim; Asim, Sadia; Zahoor, Ameer Fawad; Ghafoor, Sidra; Akbar, Muhammad Usman

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with combined theoretical and experimental study of geometric, electronic and vibrational properties of 2-chlorothioxanthone (CTX) molecule which is potential photosensitizer. The FT-IR spectrum of CTX in solid phase was recorded in 4000-400 cm-1 region. The UV-Vis. absorption spectrum was also recorded in the laboratory as well as computed at DFT/B3LYP level in five different phases viz. gas, water, DMSO, acetone and ethanol. The quantum mechanics based theoretical IR and Raman spectra were also calculated for the title compound employing HF and DFT functional with 3-21G+, 6-31G+ and 6-311G+, 6-311G++ basis sets, respectively, and assignment of each vibrational frequency has been done on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). A comparison has been made between theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra as well as for the UV-Vis. absorption spectra. The computed infra red & Raman spectra by DFT compared with experimental spectra along with reliable vibrational assignment based on PED. The calculated electronic properties, results of natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, charge distribution, dipole moment and energies have been reported in the paper. Bimolecular quenching of triplet state of CTX in the presence of triethylamine, 2-propanol triethylamine and diazobicyclooctane (DABCO) reflect the interactions between them. The bimolecular quenching rate constant is fastest for interaction of 3CTX in the presence of DABCO reflecting their stronger interactions.

  16. Spectra and spacecraft

    Moroz, V. I.

    2001-02-01

    In June 1999, Dr. Regis Courtin, Associate Editor of PSS, suggested that I write an article for the new section of this journal: "Planetary Pioneers". I hesitated , but decided to try. One of the reasons for my doubts was my primitive English, so I owe the reader an apology for this in advance. Writing took me much more time than I supposed initially, I have stopped and again returned to manuscript many times. My professional life may be divided into three main phases: pioneering work in ground-based IR astronomy with an emphasis on planetary spectroscopy (1955-1970), studies of the planets with spacecraft (1970-1989), and attempts to proceed with this work in difficult times. I moved ahead using the known method of trials and errors as most of us do. In fact, only a small percentage of efforts led to some important results, a sort of dry residue. I will try to describe below how has it been in my case: what may be estimated as the most important, how I came to this, what was around, etc.

  17. Potential curves and spectroscopic study of the electronic states of the molecular ion LiCs+

    Moughrabi, A.; Korek, M.; Allouche, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Due to a very accurate high-resolution techniques and to the spectacular developments in ultracold alkali atom trapping developments which are at the root of photo association spectroscopy there has been a renewed interest on the spectroscopic study of alkali dimers. The existence of new experimental data on these species has stimulated theoretical approaches, necessary to provide predictions accurate enough to be useful for interpretation and evenly for guidance of experiments. With the aim of improving the accuracy of predictions we will perform a theoretical study of the electronic structure of the molecular ion LiCs + , using a method mainly in the way by which core-valence effects are taken into account. To investigate the electronic structure of LiCs + we will use the package CIPSI (Configuration Interaction by Perturbation of a multiconfiguration wave function Selected Interactively) of the Laboratoire de Physique Quantique (Toulouse, France). The atoms Li and Cs will be treated through non-empirical effective one electron core potentials of Durand and Barthelat type. Molecular orbitals for LiCs + will be derived from Self Consistent Field Calculations (SCF) and full valence Configuration Interaction (IC) calculations. A core-core interaction more elaborated than the usual approximation 1/R will be taken into account as the sum of an exponential repulsive term plus a long range dispersion term approximated by the well known London formula. Potential energy calculations will be performed for different molecular states, for numerous values of the inter-nuclear distance R in a wide range. Spectroscopic constants have been derived for the bound states with a regular shape A ro vibrational study have been performed for the ground states with a calculation of the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. A calculation for the transition dipole moment and matrix elements have been done for the bound states

  18. Parameter-free one-center model potential for an effective one-electron description of molecular hydrogen

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Vanne, Yulian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    For the description of an H2 molecule, an effective one-electron model potential is proposed which is fully determined by the exact ionization potential of the H2 molecule. In order to test the model potential and examine its properties, it is employed to determine excitation energies, transition...

  19. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    Finzel, Kati, E-mail: kati.finzel@liu.se [Linköpings University, IFM Department of Physics, 58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  1. The Next Level of Research on Electronic Play: Potential Benefits and Contextual Influences for Children and Adolescents

    Dorothy E. Salonius-Pasternak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most research on electronic play has focused on its possible negative effects for children and adolescents, and contextual factors such as socioeconomic status (SES and culture are rarely considered. This article considers the potential benefits of electronic play from a psychological perspective, as well as individual and contextual factors that may shape the influence of electronic play for children and adolescents. Demographics of players and the games themselves are presented, and recommendations for research and policy are discussed.

  2. Quantum Effects of Electric Fields and Potentials on Electron Motion: An Introduction to Theoretical and Practical Aspects

    Matteucci, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the so-called electric Aharonov-Bohm effect, a quantum interference pattern shift is produced when electrons move in an electric field free region but, at the same time, in the presence of a time-dependent electric potential. Analogous fringe shifts are observed in interference experiments where electrons, travelling through an electrostatic…

  3. Vacuum Potentials for the Two Only Permanent Free Particles, Proton and Electron. Pair Productions

    Zheng-Johansson, J X

    2012-01-01

    The two only species of isolatable, smallest, or unit charges +e and −e present in nature interact with the universal vacuum in a polarisable dielectric representation through two uniquely defined vacuum potential functions. All of the non-composite subatomic particles containing one-unit charges, +e or −e, are therefore formed in terms of the IED model of the respective charges, of zero rest masses, oscillating in either of the two unique vacuum potential fields, together with the radiation waves of their own charges. In this paper we give a first principles treatment of the dynamics of charge in a dielectric vacuum, based on which, combined with solutions for the radiation waves obtained previously, we subsequently derive the vacuum potential function for a given charge q, which we show to be quadratic and consist each of quantised potential levels, giving therefore rise to quantised characteristic oscillation frequencies of the charge and accordingly quantised, sharply-defined masses of the IED particles. By further combining with relevant experimental properties as input information, we determine the IED particles built from the charges +e, −e at their first excited states in the respective vacuum potential wells to be the proton and the electron, the observationally two only stable (permanently lived) and 'free' particles containing one-unit charges. Their antiparticles as produced in pair productions can be accordingly determined. The characteristics of all of the other more energetic single-charged non-composite subatomic particles can also be recognised. We finally discuss the energy condition for pair production, which requires two successive energy supplies to (1) first disintegrate the bound pair of vaculeon charges +e, −e composing a vacuuon of the vacuum and (2) impart masses to the disintegrated charges.

  4. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-05-30

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  5. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  6. Optical potential approach to the electron-atom impact ionization threshold problem

    Temkin, A.; Hahn, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization is reconsidered as an extrapolation of inelastic cross sections through the ionization threshold. The cross sections are evaluated from a distorted wave matrix element, the final state of which describes the scattering from the Nth excited state of the target atom. The actual calculation is carried for the e-H system, and a model is introduced which is shown to preserve the essential properties of the problem while at the same time reducing the dimensionability of the Schrodinger equation. Nevertheless, the scattering equation is still very complex. It is dominated by the optical potential which is expanded in terms of eigen-spectrum of QHQ. It is shown by actual calculation that the lower eigenvalues of this spectrum descend below the relevant inelastic thresholds; it follows rigorously that the optical potential contains repulsive terms. Analytical solutions of the final state wave function are obtained with several approximations of the optical potential.

  7. Event-related potentials elicited by social commerce and electronic-commerce reviews.

    Bai, Yan; Yao, Zhong; Cong, Fengyu; Zhang, Linlin

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing interest regarding the use of electroencephalography (EEG) in social commerce and electronic commerce (e-commerce) research. There are several reviews in the field of social commerce or e-commerce; these have great potential value and mining them is fundamental and significant. To our knowledge, EEG is rarely applied to study these. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of social commerce reviews (SCRs) and e-commerce reviews (ECRs) by using them as stimuli to evoke event-related potentials. All SCRs were from friends through a social media platform, whereas ECRs were from strangers through an e-commerce platform. The experimental design was similar to that of a priming paradigm, and included 40 pairs of stimuli consisting of product information (prime stimulus) and reviews (target stimulus). The results showed that the P300 component was successfully evoked by SCR and ECR stimuli. Moreover, the P300 components elicited by SCRs had higher amplitudes than those elicited by ECRs. These findings indicate that participants paid more attention to SCRs than to ECRs. In addition, the associations between neural responses and reviews in social commerce have the potential to assist companies in studying consumer behaviors, thus permitting them to enhance their social commerce strategies.

  8. Chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer at metal/C{sub 60}-doped polymer interfaces

    Heller, C.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Smith, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barashkov, N.N.; Ferraris, J.P. [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    We report electroabsorption measurements of the built-in electrostatic potential in metal/C{sub 60}-doped polymer/metal structures to investigate chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer from a metal contact to the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} molecules in the polymer film. The built-in potentials of a series of structures employing thin films of both undoped and C{sub 60}-doped poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2{sup {prime}}-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) were measured. For undoped MEH-PPV, which has an energy gap of about 2.4 eV, the maximum built-in potential is about 2.1 eV, whereas for C{sub 60}-doped MEH-PPV the maximum built-in potential decreases to 1.5 eV. Electron transfer to the C{sub 60} molecules close to the metal interface pins the chemical potential of the metal contact near the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} and decreases the built-in potential of the structure. From the systematic dependence of the built-in potential on the metal work function we find that the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} in MEH-PPV is about 1.7 eV above the hole polaron energy level of MEH-PPV. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Effect of the δ-potential on spin-dependent electron tunneling in double barrier semiconductor heterostructure

    Chandrasekar, L. Bruno; Gnanasekar, K.; Karunakaran, M.

    2018-06-01

    The effect of δ-potential was studied in GaAs/Ga0.6Al0·4As double barrier heterostructure with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction. The role of barrier height and position of the δ- potential in the well region was analysed on spin-dependent electron tunneling using transfer matrix method. The spin-separation between spin-resonances on energy scale depends on both height and position of the δ- potential, whereas the tunneling life time of electrons highly influenced by the position of the δ- potential and not on the height. These results might be helpful for the fabrication of spin-filters.

  10. Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography with improved lateral resolution

    Sickmann, Jan, E-mail: jan.sickmann@triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Formanek, Petr; Linck, Martin [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Muehle, Uwe [Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Electron holography is the highest resolving tool for dopant profiling at nanometre-scale resolution. In order to measure the object areas of interest in a hologram, both a wide field of view and a sufficient lateral resolution are required. The usual path of rays for recording holograms with an electron biprism using the standard objective lens does not meet these requirements, because the field of view amounts to some 10 nm only, however, at a resolution of 0.1 nm better than needed here. Therefore, instead of the standard objective lens, the Lorentz lens is widely used for holography of semiconductors, since it provides a field of view up to 1000 nm at a sufficient lateral resolution of about 10 nm. Since the size of semiconductor structures is steadily shrinking, there is now a need for better lateral resolution at an appropriate field of view. Therefore, additional paths of rays for recording holograms are studied with special emphasis on the parameters field of view and lateral resolution. The findings allow an optimized scheme with a field of view of 200 nm and a lateral resolution of 3.3 nm filling the gap between the existing set-ups. In addition, the Lorentz lens is no longer required for investigation of non-magnetic materials, since the new paths of rays are realized with the standard objective lens and diffraction lens. An example proves the applicability of this arrangement for future semiconductor technology. -- Research highlights: {yields} Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography. {yields} Using objective and diffraction lens for imaging instead of Lorentz lens. {yields} Detailed investigation of four different paths of rays and its basic parameters for holographic application: field of view, lateral resolution, signal resolution. {yields} Measuring the phase profile of a field effect transistor with 3 nm lateral resolution at field of view of 200 nm.

  11. Energy and Momentum Relaxation Times of 2D Electrons Due to Near Surface Deformation Potential Scattering

    Pipa, Viktor; Vasko, Fedor; Mitin, Vladimir

    1997-03-01

    The low temperature energy and momentum relaxation rates of 2D electron gas placed near the free or clamped surface of a semi-infinit sample are calculated. To describe the electron-acoustic phonon interaction with allowance of the surface effect the method of elasticity theory Green functions was used. This method allows to take into account the reflection of acoustic waves from the surface and related mutual conversion of LA and TA waves. It is shown that the strength of the deformation potential scattering at low temperatures substantially depends on the mechanical conditions at the surface: relaxation rates are suppressed for the free surface while for the rigid one the rates are enhanced. The dependence of the conductivity on the distance between the 2D layer and the surface is discussed. The effect is most pronounced in the range of temperatures 2 sl pF < T < (2 hbar s_l)/d, where pF is the Fermi momentum, sl is the velocity of LA waves, d is the width of the quantum well.

  12. Density-density functionals and effective potentials in many-body electronic structure calculations

    Reboredo, Fernando A.; Kent, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of different density-density functionals designed to retain selected properties of the many-body ground state in a non-interacting solution starting from the standard density functional theory ground state. We focus on diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applications that require trial wave functions with optimal Fermion nodes. The theory is extensible and can be used to understand current practices in several electronic structure methods within a generalized density functional framework. The theory justifies and stimulates the search of optimal empirical density functionals and effective potentials for accurate calculations of the properties of real materials, but also cautions on the limits of their applicability. The concepts are tested and validated with a near-analytic model.

  13. Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

    Jeansson, John S

    2013-01-01

    At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process.

  14. Self-energy operator for an electron in an external Coulomb potential. II

    Hostler, L.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic Coulomb Sturmian matrix elements of the operator Oequivalentln(1-rho)/rho, rho = -[πx(1+iσ)xπ]/m 2 , in terms of which the self-energy operator for an electron in an external Coulomb potential has been expressed, are studied. The operator O is dealt with on a term by term basis in a Sturmian expansion. Each term of the Sturmian expansion is separated into a part whose matrix elements are analytic functions of Zα, plus a remainder evaluated in closed form by use of the Cauchy residue theorem. All ignorance about the matrix element of the general term in the Sturmian expansion of O is thereby placed entirely in the analytic part, for which an explicit integral representation is derived

  15. Solvated electron: criticism of a suggested correlation of chemical potential with optical absorption energy

    Farhataziz, M.

    1984-01-01

    A recent theoretical treatment of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron, e - sub(s), maintains that rigorously μ 0 >= -0.75 Esub(av), which gives empirical relationship, μ 0 >= -(0.93 +- 0.02)Esub(max). For e - sub(s) in a particular solvent at a temperature and pressure, μ 0 , Esub(av) and Esub(max) are standard chemical potential, average energy of the absorption spectrum and the energy at the absorption maximum respectively. The temperature and pressure effects on the absorption spectrum of e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia do not support the equality sign in the above cited relationships. The implications of inequality expressed above are discussed for e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia. (author)

  16. Spacecraft charging and related effects during Halley encounter

    Young, D.T.

    1983-01-01

    Hypervelocity (69 km/s) impact of cometary material with surfaces of the GIOTTO spacecraft will induce a number of spurious and possibly harmful phenomena. The most serious of these is likely to be spacecraft charging that results from impact-produced plasma distributions surrounding GIOTTO. The ESA Plasma Environment Working Group, whose studies are the basis for this report, finds that charging may become significant within approx. 10 5 km of the nucleus where potentials of approx. = +20 V are to be expected. In addition to spacecraft charging, impact produced plasma may interfere with in situ plasma measurements, particularly those of ion plasma analyzers and mass spectrometers

  17. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    Uchimiya, Minori, E-mail: sophie.uchimiya@ars.usda.go [Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Gorb, Leonid [SpecPro Inc, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Isayev, Olexandr [Department of Chemistry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Qasim, Mohammad M. [Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Leszczynski, Jerzy [Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States); Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -})). The E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -}) is an essential thermodynamic parameter for predicting the rate and extent of reductive transformation for energetic residues. In this study, experimental (linear free energy relationships) and theoretical (ab initio calculation) approaches were employed to determine E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -}) for nitroaromatic, (caged) cyclic nitramine, and nitroimino explosives that are found in military installations or are emerging contaminants. The results indicate a close agreement between experimental and theoretical E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -}) and suggest a key trend: E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -}) value decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic (e.g., 2,4-dinitroanisole) to nitramine (e.g., RDX) to nitroimino compound (e.g., nitroguanidine). The observed trend in E{sup o}(R-NO{sub 2}/R-NO{sub 2}{sup -}) agrees with reported rate trends for reductive degradation, suggesting a thermodynamic control on the reduction rate under anoxic/suboxic conditions. - Reduction of explosives becomes less thermodynamically favorable as the one-electron standard reduction potential decreases from di- and tri-nitroaromatic, nitramine, to nitroimino compounds.

  18. Quantifying the potential export flows of used electronic products in Macau: a case study of PCs.

    Yu, Danfeng; Song, Qingbin; Wang, Zhishi; Li, Jinhui; Duan, Huabo; Wang, Jinben; Wang, Chao; Wang, Xu

    2017-12-01

    The used electronic product (UEP) has attracted the worldwide attentions because part of e-waste may be exported from developed countries to developing countries in the name of UEP. On the basis of large foreign trade data of electronic products (e-products), this study adopted the trade data approach (TDA) to quantify the potential exports of UEP in Macau, taking a case study of personal computers (PCs). The results show that the desktop mainframes, LCD monitors, and CRT monitors have more low-unit-value trades with higher trade volumes in the past 10 years, while the laptop and tablet PCs, as the newer technologies, owned the higher ratios of the high-unit-value trades. During the period of 2005-2015, the total mean exports for used laptop and tablet PCs, desktop mainframes, and LCD monitors were approximately 18,592, 79,957, and 43,177 units, respectively, while the possible export volume of used CRT monitors was higher, up to 430,098 units in 2000-2010. Noticed that these potential export volumes could be the lower bound because not all used PCs may be shipped using the PC trade code. For all the four kinds of used PCs, the majority (61.6-98.82%) of the export volumes have gone to Hong Kong, followed by Mainland China and Taiwan. Since 2011, there was no CRT monitor export; however, the other kinds of used PC exports will still exist in Macau in the future. The outcomes are helpful to understand and manage the current export situations of used products in Macau, and can also provide a reference for other countries and regions.

  19. SSS-A spacecraft and experiment description.

    Longanecker, G. W.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Explorer-45 mission are discussed. The primary objective is the study of the ring current responsible for the main phase of magnetic storms. Closely associated with this objective is the determination of the relationship between magnetic storms, substorms, and the acceleration of charged particles in the magnetosphere. Further objectives are the measurement of a wide range of proton, electron and alpha-particle energies, and studies of wave-particle interactions responsible for particle transport and loss in the inner magnetosphere. The orbital parameters, the spacecraft itself, and some of its unique features, such as the data handling system, which is programmable from the ground, are described.

  20. Spacecraft Environmental Interactions Technology, 1983

    1985-01-01

    State of the art of environment interactions dealing with low-Earth-orbit plasmas; high-voltage systems; spacecraft charging; materials effects; and direction of future programs are contained in over 50 papers.

  1. Gravity Probe B spacecraft description

    Bennett, Norman R; Burns, Kevin; Katz, Russell; Kirschenbaum, Jon; Mason, Gary; Shehata, Shawky

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, consisted of structures, mechanisms, command and data handling, attitude and translation control, electrical power, thermal control, flight software, and communications. When integrated with the payload elements, the integrated system became the space vehicle. Key requirements shaping the design of the spacecraft were: (1) the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), (2) precise attitude and translational control, (3) thermal protection of science hardware, (4) minimizing aerodynamic, magnetic, and eddy current effects, and (5) the need to provide a robust, low risk spacecraft. The spacecraft met all mission requirements, as demonstrated by dewar lifetime meeting specification, positive power and thermal margins, precision attitude control and drag-free performance, reliable communications, and the collection of more than 97% of the available science data. (paper)

  2. TTEthernet for Integrated Spacecraft Networks

    Loveless, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace projects have traditionally employed federated avionics architectures, in which each computer system is designed to perform one specific function (e.g. navigation). There are obvious downsides to this approach, including excessive weight (from so much computing hardware), and inefficient processor utilization (since modern processors are capable of performing multiple tasks). There has therefore been a push for integrated modular avionics (IMA), in which common computing platforms can be leveraged for different purposes. This consolidation of multiple vehicle functions to shared computing platforms can significantly reduce spacecraft cost, weight, and design complexity. However, the application of IMA principles introduces significant challenges, as the data network must accommodate traffic of mixed criticality and performance levels - potentially all related to the same shared computer hardware. Because individual network technologies are rarely so competent, the development of truly integrated network architectures often proves unreasonable. Several different types of networks are utilized - each suited to support a specific vehicle function. Critical functions are typically driven by precise timing loops, requiring networks with strict guarantees regarding message latency (i.e. determinism) and fault-tolerance. Alternatively, non-critical systems generally employ data networks prioritizing flexibility and high performance over reliable operation. Switched Ethernet has seen widespread success filling this role in terrestrial applications. Its high speed, flexibility, and the availability of inexpensive commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components make it desirable for inclusion in spacecraft platforms. Basic Ethernet configurations have been incorporated into several preexisting aerospace projects, including both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). However, classical switched Ethernet cannot provide the high level of network

  3. One-electron redox potentials and rate of electron transfer in aqueous micellar solution. Partially solubilized quinones

    Almgren, M.; Grieser, F.; Thomas, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    The electron transfer equilibrium between AQS/AQS - and DQ/DQ - (where AQS is sodium 9,10-arthraquinone-2-sulfonate and DQ, duroquinone) has been studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous micellar solutions of sodium lauryl sulfate. The equilibrium constant is changed as would be expected if AQS, AQS - , and DQ- were all mainly in the aqueous solution, and DQ distributed between the micelles and the aqueous phase with a distribution constant of K/sub D//N = 150 M -1 , in agreement with the independently determined value of this constant. The kinetics of the equilibration show, however, that electron transfer at the micelle surface is important, indicating that also AQS and DQ - are associated with the micelle to some extent. With reasonable assumptions regarding the distribution constants of these species (that have some independent support), the observed catalytic effect of the micelles on the electron transfer from DQ - to AQS can be understood

  4. Potential Environmental and Human Health Impacts of Rechargeable Lithium Batteries in Electronic Waste

    Kang, Daniel Hsing Po; Chen, Mengjun; Ogunseitan, Oladele A.

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) and lithium-polymer (Li-poly) batteries have recently become dominant in consumer electronic products because of advantages associated with energy density and product longevity. However, the small size of these batteries, the high rate of disposal of consumer products in which they are used, and the lack of uniform regulatory policy on their disposal means that lithium batteries may contribute substantially to environmental pollution and adverse human health impacts due to potentially toxic materials. In this research, we used standardized leaching tests, life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA), and hazard assessment models to evaluate hazardous waste classification, resource depletion potential, and toxicity potentials of lithium batteries used in cellphones. Our results demonstrate that according to U.S. federal regulations, defunct Li-ion batteries are classified hazardous due to their lead (Pb) content (average 6.29 mg/L; σ = 11.1; limit 5). However, according to California regulations, all lithium batteries tested are classified hazardous due to excessive levels of cobalt (average 163 544 mg/kg; σ = 62 897; limit 8000), copper (average 98 694 mg/kg; σ = 28 734; limit 2500), and nickel (average 9525 mg/kg; σ = 11 438; limit 2000). In some of the Li-ion batteries, the leached concentrations of chromium, lead, and thallium exceeded the California regulation limits. The environmental impact associated with resource depletion and human toxicity is mainly associated with cobalt, copper, nickel, thallium, and silver, whereas the ecotoxicity potential is primarily associated with cobalt, copper, nickel, thallium, and silver. However, the relative contribution of aluminum and lithium to human toxicity and ecotoxicity could not be estimated due to insufficient toxicity data in the models. These findings support the need for stronger government policy at the local, national, and international levels to encourage recovery, recycling, and

  5. Potentials of surfaces in space

    Whipple, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of a body in space is determined by a balance between various charging currents such as the transfer of charge from plasma particles, photoemission, and secondary electron emission. These processes are evaluated for bodies in the solar system and in interstellar space under the headings; an overview of charging, survey of early work on charging, charging processes, effects of non-isotropic plasmas and magnetic and electric fields, calculation of surface potentials, differential charging, potential barriers and discharge processes, measurements of potential, potential modification and control on spacecraft, and astrophysical applications. (U.K.)

  6. Free-Free Transitions in the Presence of Laser Fields and Debye Potential at Very Low Incident Electron Energies

    Bhatia, Anand

    2012-01-01

    We study the free-free transition in electron-helium ion in the ground state and embedded in a Debye potential in the presence of an external laser field at very low incident electron energies. The laser field is treated classically while the collision dynamics is treated quantum mechanically. The laser field is chosen as monochromatic, linearly polarized and homogeneous. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser field in a nonperturbative manner by choosing Volkov wave function for it. The scattering wave function for the incident electron on the target embedded in a Debye potential is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange. We calculate the laser-assisted differential and total cross sections for free-free transition for absorption/emission of a single photon or no photon exchange. The results will be presented at the conference.

  7. The potentials and challenges of electron microscopy in the study of atomic chains

    Banhart, Florian; Torre, Alessandro La; Romdhane, Ferdaous Ben; Cretu, Ovidiu

    2017-04-01

    The article is a brief review on the potential of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the investigation of atom chains which are the paradigm of a strictly one-dimensional material. After the progress of TEM in the study of new two-dimensional materials, microscopy of free-standing one-dimensional structures is a new challenge with its inherent potentials and difficulties. In-situ experiments in the TEM allowed, for the first time, to generate isolated atomic chains consisting of metals, carbon or boron nitride. Besides having delivered a solid proof for the existence of atomic chains, in-situ TEM studies also enabled us to measure the electrical properties of these fundamental linear structures. While ballistic quantum conductivity is observed in chains of metal atoms, electrical transport in chains of sp1-hybridized carbon is limited by resonant states and reflections at the contacts. Although substantial progress has been made in recent TEM studies of atom chains, fundamental questions have to be answered, concerning the structural stability of the chains, bonding states at the contacts, and the suitability for applications in nanotechnology. Contribution to the topical issue "The 16th European Microscopy Congress (EMC 2016)", edited by Richard Brydson and Pascale Bayle-Guillemaud

  8. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    Colard, Stéphane; O’Connell, Grant; Verron, Thomas; Cahours, Xavier; Pritchard, John D.

    2014-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping”) in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents. PMID:25547398

  9. Electronic Cigarettes and Indoor Air Quality: A Simple Approach to Modeling Potential Bystander Exposures to Nicotine

    Stéphane Colard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes (“vaping” in Europe, North America and elsewhere. With such increased prevalence, there is currently a debate on whether the aerosol exhaled following the use of e-cigarettes has implications for the quality of air breathed by bystanders. Conducting chemical analysis of the indoor environment can be costly and resource intensive, limiting the number of studies which can be conducted. However, this can be modelled reasonably accurately based on empirical emissions data and using some basic assumptions. Here, we present a simplified model, based on physical principles, which considers aerosol propagation, dilution and extraction to determine the potential contribution of a single puff from an e-cigarette to indoor air. From this, it was then possible to simulate the cumulative effect of vaping over time. The model was applied to a virtual, but plausible, scenario considering an e-cigarette user and a non-user working in the same office space. The model was also used to reproduce published experimental studies and showed good agreement with the published values of indoor air nicotine concentration. With some additional refinements, such an approach may be a cost-effective and rapid way of assessing the potential exposure of bystanders to exhaled e-cigarette aerosol constituents.

  10. Impact of accelerated electrons on activating process and foaming potential of sludge

    Cuba, V.; Pospisil, M.; Mucka, V.; Silber, R.; Jenicek, P.; Dohanyos, M.; Zabranska, J.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Presently, anaerobic and/or aerobic biological treatment is the cheapest and the most effective method of wastewater and sludge processing. However, due to some non-biodegradable substances present in wastewater and also due to limited capacity of wastewater treatment plants, it is necessary to find effective processes, that would be complementary to existing sludge treatment methods. Beside chemical and physical processes, radiation technology seems to offer improvement of effectivity of biological treatment. The paper describes possibilities of irradiation in activating process. Activated sludge can be affected in all its parameters, including physico chemical properties, such as sedimentation rate, or resulting volume of sludge. For the purpose of this research, laboratory experimental reactors simulating activating process were operated. According to previous results, accelerated electrons were used for irradiation, for e-beam seems to be more expedient than gamma irradiation. Reactor with irradiated sludge has been compared with the one without irradiation. It is shown, that pre-irradiation of sludge can positively affect following process of activation. Beside the activating process, another goal has been pursued. Radiation can strongly affect sludge foaming potential. Biological foaming caused by surfactant microorganisms, represents quite serious problem in many wastewater treatment plants, especially in digesters. It was proved that after irradiation foaming potential of sludge decreases. Pre-irradiation of activated sludge with relatively low doses also results in reduction of number of pathogenic microorganisms, presented in sludge

  11. First Results from ARTEMIS, A New Two-Spacecraft Lunar Mission: Counter-Streaming Plasma Populations in the Lunar Wake

    Halekas, J. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Russell, C. T.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Larson, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present observations from the first passage through the lunar plasma wake by one of two spacecraft comprising ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun), a new lunar mission that re-tasks two of five probes from the THEMIS magnetospheric mission. On Feb 13, 2010, ARTEMIS probe P1 passed through the wake at approximately 3.5 lunar radii downstream from the Moon, in a region between those explored by Wind and the Lunar Prospector, Kaguya, Chandrayaan, and Chang'E missions. ARTEMIS observed interpenetrating proton, alpha particle, and electron populations refilling the wake along magnetic field lines from both flanks. The characteristics of these distributions match expectations from self-similar models of plasma expansion into vacuum, with an asymmetric character likely driven by a combination of a tilted interplanetary magnetic field and an anisotropic incident solar wind electron population. On this flyby, ARTEMIS provided unprecedented measurements of the interpenetrating beams of both electrons and ions naturally produced by the filtration and acceleration effects of electric fields set up during the refilling process. ARTEMIS also measured electrostatic oscillations closely correlated with counter-streaming electron beams in the wake, as previously hypothesized but never before directly measured. These observations demonstrate the capability of the comprehensively instrumented ARTEMIS spacecraft and the potential for new lunar science from this unique two spacecraft constellation.

  12. Electronic structure engineering of ZnO with the modified Becke-Johnson exchange versus the classical correlation potential approaches

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar; Ahmed, Rashid; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Shaari, Amiruddin; Afaq, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    applied. Where for electronic properties in addition to these, Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential has been used. Our computed band gap values of ZnO in WZ and ZB phases with mBJ potential are significantly improved compared to those with LDA

  13. Surface potential measurement of insulators in negative-ion implantation by secondary electron energy-peak shift

    Nagumo, Shoji; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1993-01-01

    Negative-ion implantation is expected to realize charge-up free implantation. In this article, about a way to specify surface potential of negative-ion implanted insulator by secondary-electron-energy distribution, its principle and preliminary experimental results are described. By a measuring system with retarding field type energy analyzer, energy distribution of secondary electron from insulator of Fused Quartz in negative-carbon-ion implantation was measured. As a result the peak-shift of its energy distribution resulted according with the surface potential of insulator. It was found that surface potential of insulator is negatively charged by only several volts. Thus, negative-ion implanted insulator reduced its surface charge-up potential (without any electron supply). Therefore negative-ion implantation is considered to be much more effective method than conventional positive-ion implantation. (author)

  14. Spacecraft navigation at Mars using earth-based and in situ radio tracking techniques

    Thurman, S. W.; Edwards, C. D.; Kahn, R. D.; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Hastrup, R. C.; Cesarone, R. J.

    1992-08-01

    A survey of earth-based and in situ radiometric data types and results from a number of studies investigating potential radio navigation performance for spacecraft approaching/orbiting Mars and for landed spacecraft and rovers on the surface of Mars are presented. The performance of Doppler, ranging and interferometry earth-based data types involving single or multiple spacecraft is addressed. This evaluation is conducted with that of in situ data types, such as Doppler and ranging measurements between two spacecraft near Mars, or between a spacecraft and one or more surface radio beacons.

  15. Probing interferometric parallax with interplanetary spacecraft

    Rodeghiero, G.; Gini, F.; Marchili, N.; Jain, P.; Ralston, J. P.; Dallacasa, D.; Naletto, G.; Possenti, A.; Barbieri, C.; Franceschini, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2017-07-01

    We describe an experimental scenario for testing a novel method to measure distance and proper motion of astronomical sources. The method is based on multi-epoch observations of amplitude or intensity correlations between separate receiving systems. This technique is called Interferometric Parallax, and efficiently exploits phase information that has traditionally been overlooked. The test case we discuss combines amplitude correlations of signals from deep space interplanetary spacecraft with those from distant galactic and extragalactic radio sources with the goal of estimating the interplanetary spacecraft distance. Interferometric parallax relies on the detection of wavefront curvature effects in signals collected by pairs of separate receiving systems. The method shows promising potentialities over current techniques when the target is unresolved from the background reference sources. Developments in this field might lead to the construction of an independent, geometrical cosmic distance ladder using a dedicated project and future generation instruments. We present a conceptual overview supported by numerical estimates of its performances applied to a spacecraft orbiting the Solar System. Simulations support the feasibility of measurements with a simple and time-saving observational scheme using current facilities.

  16. A small spacecraft for multipoint measurement of ionospheric plasma

    Roberts, T. M.; Lynch, K. A.; Clayton, R. E.; Weiss, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of ionospheric plasma is often performed by a single in situ device or remotely using cameras and radar. This article describes a small, low-resource, deployed spacecraft used as part of a local, multipoint measurement network. A B-field aligned sounding rocket ejects four of these spin-stabilized spacecraft in a cross pattern. In this application, each spacecraft carries two retarding potential analyzers which are used to determine plasma density, flow, and ion temperature. An inertial measurement unit and a light-emitting diode array are used to determine the position and orientation of the devices after deployment. The design of this spacecraft is first described, and then results from a recent test flight are discussed. This flight demonstrated the successful operation of the deployment mechanism and telemetry systems, provided some preliminary plasma measurements in a simple mid-latitude environment, and revealed several design issues.

  17. Characteristics of electron cyclotron waves creating field-aligned and transverse plasma-potential structures

    Takahashi, K; Kaneko, T; Hatakeyama, R; Fukuyama, A

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of electromagnetic waves of azimuthal mode number m = ±1 are investigated experimentally, analytically and numerically when the waves triggering the field-aligned and transverse plasma-potential structure modification near an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) point are injected into an inhomogeneously magnetized plasma with high-speed ion flow. The waves of m = +1 and -1 modes generate an electric double layer near the ECR point at the radially central and peripheral areas of the plasma column, respectively, and the transverse electric fields are consequently formed. At these areas the waves have a right-handed polarization and are absorbed through the ECR mechanism, where the experimental and analytical results do show the polarization reversal along the radial axis. The numerical results by plasma analysis by finite element method (FEM)/wave analysis by FEM (PAF/WF) code show that the wave-absorption area is localized at the radially central and peripheral areas for m = +1 and -1 mode waves, respectively, being consistent with the experimental and analytical ones.

  18. Diffusion of Messages from an Electronic Cigarette Brand to Potential Users through Twitter.

    Kar-Hai Chu

    Full Text Available This study explores the presence and actions of an electronic cigarette (e-cigarette brand, Blu, on Twitter to observe how marketing messages are sent and diffused through the retweet (i.e., message forwarding functionality. Retweet networks enable messages to reach additional Twitter users beyond the sender's local network. We follow messages from their origin through multiple retweets to identify which messages have more reach, and the different users who are exposed.We collected three months of publicly available data from Twitter. A combination of techniques in social network analysis and content analysis were applied to determine the various networks of users who are exposed to e-cigarette messages and how the retweet network can affect which messages spread.The Blu retweet network expanded during the study period. Analysis of user profiles combined with network cluster analysis showed that messages of certain topics were only circulated within a community of e-cigarette supporters, while other topics spread further, reaching more general Twitter users who may not support or use e-cigarettes.Retweet networks can serve as proxy filters for marketing messages, as Twitter users decide which messages they will continue to diffuse among their followers. As certain e-cigarette messages extend beyond their point of origin, the audience being exposed expands beyond the e-cigarette community. Potential implications for health education campaigns include utilizing Twitter and targeting important gatekeepers or hubs that would maximize message diffusion.

  19. Calculations of wavefunctions and energies of electron system in Coulomb potential by variational method without a basis set

    Bykov, V.P.; Gerasimov, A.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new variational method without a basis set for calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of Hamiltonians is suggested. The expansion of this method for the Coulomb potentials is given. Calculation of the energy and charge distribution in the two-electron system for different values of the nuclear charge Z is made. It is shown that at small Z the Coulomb forces disintegrate the electron cloud into two clots. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Artist concept of Galileo spacecraft

    1988-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft is illustrated in artist concept. Gallileo, named for the Italian astronomer, physicist and mathematician who is credited with construction of the first complete, practical telescope in 1620, will make detailed studies of Jupiter. A cooperative program with the Federal Republic of Germany the Galileo mission will amplify information acquired by two Voyager spacecraft in their brief flybys. Galileo is a two-element system that includes a Jupiter-orbiting observatory and an entry probe. Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is Galileo project manager and builder of the main spacecraft. Ames Research Center (ARC) has responsibility for the entry probe, which was built by Hughes Aircraft Company and General Electric. Galileo will be deployed from the payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during mission STS-34.

  1. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University College, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-04

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background.

  2. Electrostatic modulation of periodic potentials in a two-dimensional electron gas: From antidot lattice to quantum dot lattice

    Goswami, Srijit; Aamir, Mohammed Ali; Shamim, Saquib; Ghosh, Arindam; Siegert, Christoph; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Pepper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We use a dual gated device structure to introduce a gate-tuneable periodic potential in a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Using only a suitable choice of gate voltages we can controllably alter the potential landscape of the bare 2DEG, inducing either a periodic array of antidots or quantum dots. Antidots are artificial scattering centers, and therefore allow for a study of electron dynamics. In particular, we show that the thermovoltage of an antidot lattice is particularly sensitive to the relative positions of the Fermi level and the antidot potential. A quantum dot lattice, on the other hand, provides the opportunity to study correlated electron physics. We find that its current-voltage characteristics display a voltage threshold, as well as a power law scaling, indicative of collective Coulomb blockade in a disordered background

  3. Investigation of the shape of the imaginary part of the optical-model potential for electron scattering by rare gases

    Staszewska, G.; Schwenke, D.W.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    We present a comparative study of several empirical and nonempirical models for the absorption potential, which is the imaginary part of an optical-model potential, for electron scattering by rare gases. We show that the elastic differential cross section is most sensitive to the absorption potential for high-impact energy and large scattering angles. We compare differential cross sections calculated by several models for the absorption potential and by several arbitrary modifications of these model potentials. We are able to associate the effect of the absorption potential on the elastic differential cross section with its form at small electron-atom distances r, and we are able to deduce various qualitative features that the absorption potential must possess at small and large r in order to predict both accurate differential cross sections and accurate absorption cross sections. Based on these observations, the Pauli blocking conditions of the quasifree scattering model for the absorption potential are modified empirically, thus producing a more accurate model that may be applied to other systems; e.g., electron-molecule scattering, with no adjustable parameters

  4. Big data from electronic health records for early and late translational cardiovascular research: challenges and potential.

    Hemingway, Harry; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Danesh, John; Dobson, Richard; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Maggioni, Aldo; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M; Cronin, Maureen; Brobert, Gunnar; Vardas, Panos; Anker, Stefan D; Grobbee, Diederick E; Denaxas, Spiros

    2018-04-21

    Cohorts of millions of people's health records, whole genome sequencing, imaging, sensor, societal and publicly available data present a rapidly expanding digital trace of health. We aimed to critically review, for the first time, the challenges and potential of big data across early and late stages of translational cardiovascular disease research. We sought exemplars based on literature reviews and expertise across the BigData@Heart Consortium. We identified formidable challenges including: data quality, knowing what data exist, the legal and ethical framework for their use, data sharing, building and maintaining public trust, developing standards for defining disease, developing tools for scalable, replicable science and equipping the clinical and scientific work force with new inter-disciplinary skills. Opportunities claimed for big health record data include: richer profiles of health and disease from birth to death and from the molecular to the societal scale; accelerated understanding of disease causation and progression, discovery of new mechanisms and treatment-relevant disease sub-phenotypes, understanding health and diseases in whole populations and whole health systems and returning actionable feedback loops to improve (and potentially disrupt) existing models of research and care, with greater efficiency. In early translational research we identified exemplars including: discovery of fundamental biological processes e.g. linking exome sequences to lifelong electronic health records (EHR) (e.g. human knockout experiments); drug development: genomic approaches to drug target validation; precision medicine: e.g. DNA integrated into hospital EHR for pre-emptive pharmacogenomics. In late translational research we identified exemplars including: learning health systems with outcome trials integrated into clinical care; citizen driven health with 24/7 multi-parameter patient monitoring to improve outcomes and population-based linkages of multiple EHR sources

  5. THE MARKET POTENTIAL FOR ELECTRONIC PAYMENT APPLICATIONS IN GHANA AND UGANDA. CASE COMPANY– MAVIANCE GMBH

    Terekhova, Mariia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, electronic payment solutions are widespread all around the world. Besides, their popularity is rapidly growing in emerging markets bringing numerous business opportunities to the international companies specializing in electronic payment systems. The aim of this thesis is to create a marketing strategy for the penetration of Ghana and Uganda with Smobilpay, which is an electronic payment application of Maviance GmbH. The research is done with the help of an analysis of the busin...

  6. Control of secondary electrons from ion beam impact using a positive potential electrode

    Crowley, T. P., E-mail: tpcrowley@xanthotechnologies.com; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J. [Xantho Technologies, LLC, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Secondary electrons emitted when an ion beam impacts a detector can amplify the ion beam signal, but also introduce errors if electrons from one detector propagate to another. A potassium ion beam and a detector comprised of ten impact wires, four split-plates, and a pair of biased electrodes were used to demonstrate that a low-voltage, positive electrode can be used to maintain the beneficial amplification effect while greatly reducing the error introduced from the electrons traveling between detector elements.

  7. Passive Plasma Contact Mechanisms for Small-Scale Spacecraft

    McTernan, Jesse K.

    Small-scale spacecraft represent a paradigm shift in how entities such as academia, industry, engineering firms, and the scientific community operate in space. However, although the paradigm shift produces unique opportunities to build satellites in unique ways for novel missions, there are also significant challenges that must be addressed. This research addresses two of the challenges associated with small-scale spacecraft: 1) the miniaturization of spacecraft and associated instrumentation and 2) the need to transport charge across the spacecraft-environment boundary. As spacecraft decrease in size, constraints on the size, weight, and power of on-board instrumentation increase--potentially limiting the instrument's functionality or ability to integrate with the spacecraft. These constraints drive research into mechanisms or techniques that use little or no power and efficiently utilize existing resources. One limited resource on small-scale spacecraft is outer surface area, which is often covered with solar panels to meet tight power budgets. This same surface area could also be needed for passive neutralization of spacecraft charging. This research explores the use of a transparent, conductive layer on the solar cell coverglass that is electrically connected to spacecraft ground potential. This dual-purpose material facilitates the use of outer surfaces for both energy harvesting of solar photons as well as passive ion collection. Mission capabilities such as in-situ plasma measurements that were previously infeasible on small-scale platforms become feasible with the use of indium tin oxide-coated solar panel coverglass. We developed test facilities that simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit to test the dual-purpose material and the various application of this approach. Particularly, this research is in support of two upcoming missions: OSIRIS-3U, by Penn State's Student Space Programs Lab, and MiTEE, by the University of Michigan. The purpose of

  8. Potential up-scaling of inkjet-printed devices for logical circuits in flexible electronics

    Mitra, Kalyan Yoti, E-mail: kalyan-yoti.mitra@mb.tu-chemnitz.de, E-mail: enrico.sowade@mb.tu-chemnitz.de; Sowade, Enrico, E-mail: kalyan-yoti.mitra@mb.tu-chemnitz.de, E-mail: enrico.sowade@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Chemnitz (Germany); Martínez-Domingo, Carme [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain and Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology (ICN), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Ramon, Eloi, E-mail: eloi.ramon@uab.cat [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology (ICN), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Carrabina, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.carrabina@uab.cat [Printed Microelectronics Group, CAIAC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gomes, Henrique Leonel, E-mail: hgomes@ualg.pt [Universidade do Algarve, Institute of Telecommunications, Faro (Portugal); Baumann, Reinhard R., E-mail: reinhard.baumann@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Department of Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Chemnitz (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Department of Printed Functionalities, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-02-17

    Inkjet Technology is often mis-believed to be a deposition/patterning technology which is not meant for high fabrication throughput in the field of printed and flexible electronics. In this work, we report on the 1) printing, 2) fabrication yield and 3) characterization of exemplary simple devices e.g. capacitors, organic transistors etc. which are the basic building blocks for logical circuits. For this purpose, printing is performed first with a Proof of concept Inkjet printing system Dimatix Material Printer 2831 (DMP 2831) using 10 pL small print-heads and then with Dimatix Material Printer 3000 (DMP 3000) using 35 pL industrial print-heads (from Fujifilm Dimatix). Printing at DMP 3000 using industrial print-heads (in Sheet-to-sheet) paves the path towards industrialization which can be defined by printing in Roll-to-Roll format using industrial print-heads. This pavement can be termed as 'Bridging Platform'. This transfer to 'Bridging Platform' from 10 pL small print-heads to 35 pL industrial print-heads help the inkjet-printed devices to evolve on the basis of functionality and also in form of up-scaled quantities. The high printed quantities and yield of inkjet-printed devices justify the deposition reliability and potential to print circuits. This reliability is very much desired when it comes to printing of circuits e.g. inverters, ring oscillator and any other planned complex logical circuits which require devices e.g. organic transistors which needs to get connected in different staged levels. Also, the up-scaled inkjet-printed devices are characterized and they reflect a domain under which they can work to their optimal status. This status is much wanted for predicting the real device functionality and integration of them into a planned circuit.

  9. Potential up-scaling of inkjet-printed devices for logical circuits in flexible electronics

    Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Sowade, Enrico; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Ramon, Eloi; Carrabina, Jordi; Gomes, Henrique Leonel; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet Technology is often mis-believed to be a deposition/patterning technology which is not meant for high fabrication throughput in the field of printed and flexible electronics. In this work, we report on the 1) printing, 2) fabrication yield and 3) characterization of exemplary simple devices e.g. capacitors, organic transistors etc. which are the basic building blocks for logical circuits. For this purpose, printing is performed first with a Proof of concept Inkjet printing system Dimatix Material Printer 2831 (DMP 2831) using 10 pL small print-heads and then with Dimatix Material Printer 3000 (DMP 3000) using 35 pL industrial print-heads (from Fujifilm Dimatix). Printing at DMP 3000 using industrial print-heads (in Sheet-to-sheet) paves the path towards industrialization which can be defined by printing in Roll-to-Roll format using industrial print-heads. This pavement can be termed as 'Bridging Platform'. This transfer to 'Bridging Platform' from 10 pL small print-heads to 35 pL industrial print-heads help the inkjet-printed devices to evolve on the basis of functionality and also in form of up-scaled quantities. The high printed quantities and yield of inkjet-printed devices justify the deposition reliability and potential to print circuits. This reliability is very much desired when it comes to printing of circuits e.g. inverters, ring oscillator and any other planned complex logical circuits which require devices e.g. organic transistors which needs to get connected in different staged levels. Also, the up-scaled inkjet-printed devices are characterized and they reflect a domain under which they can work to their optimal status. This status is much wanted for predicting the real device functionality and integration of them into a planned circuit

  10. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu; Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H 2 S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H 2 S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“without H 2 S”) and H 2 S–CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“with H 2 S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H 2 S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H 2 S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H 2 S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO 2 and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs

  11. Disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain function potentiates the pro-apoptotic effects of MAPK inhibition.

    Trotta, Andrew P; Gelles, Jesse D; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Loi, Patrick; Arbiser, Jack L; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2017-07-14

    The mitochondrial network is a major site of ATP production through the coupled integration of the electron transport chain (ETC) with oxidative phosphorylation. In melanoma arising from the V600E mutation in the kinase v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF V600E ), oncogenic signaling enhances glucose-dependent metabolism while reducing mitochondrial ATP production. Likewise, when BRAF V600E is pharmacologically inhibited by targeted therapies ( e.g. PLX-4032/vemurafenib), glucose metabolism is reduced, and cells increase mitochondrial ATP production to sustain survival. Therefore, collateral inhibition of oncogenic signaling and mitochondrial respiration may help enhance the therapeutic benefit of targeted therapies. Honokiol (HKL) is a well tolerated small molecule that disrupts mitochondrial function; however, its underlying mechanisms and potential utility with targeted anticancer therapies remain unknown. Using wild-type BRAF and BRAF V600E melanoma model systems, we demonstrate here that HKL administration rapidly reduces mitochondrial respiration by broadly inhibiting ETC complexes I, II, and V, resulting in decreased ATP levels. The subsequent energetic crisis induced two cellular responses involving cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). First, loss of CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of the mitochondrial division GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 promoted mitochondrial fusion, thus coupling mitochondrial energetic status and morphology. Second, HKL decreased CDK2 activity, leading to G 1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, although pharmacological inhibition of oncogenic MAPK signaling increased ETC activity, co-treatment with HKL ablated this response and vastly enhanced the rate of apoptosis. Collectively, these findings integrate HKL action with mitochondrial respiration and shape and substantiate a pro-survival role of mitochondrial function in melanoma cells after oncogenic MAPK inhibition.

  12. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  13. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conduc...... for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems....

  14. Two-extremum electrostatic potential of metal-lattice plasma and the work function of an electron

    Surma S.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal-lattice plasma is treated as a neutral two-component two-phase system of 2D surface and 3D bulk. Free electron density and bulk chemical potential are used as intensive parameters of the system with the phase boundary position determined in the crystalline lattice. A semiempirical expression for the electron screened electrostatic potential is constructed using the lattice-plasma polarization concept. It comprises an image term and three repulsion/attraction terms of second and fourth orders. The novel curve has two extremes and agrees with certain theoretical forms of potential. A practical formula for the electron work function of metals and a simplified schema of electronic structure at the metal/vacuum interface are proposed. This yields 10.44 eV for the Fermi energy of free electron gas; -5.817 eV for the Fermi energy level; 4.509 eV for the average work function of bcc tungsten. Selected data are also given for fcc Cu and hcp Re. For harmonic frequencies ~ 10E16 per s of the self-excited metal-lattice plasma, energy gaps of 14.54 and 8.02 eV are found, which correspond to the bulk and surface plasmons, respectively. Further extension of this thermodynamics and metal-lattice theory based approach may contribute to a better understanding of theoretical models which are employed in chemical physics, catalysis and materials science of nanostructures.

  15. Quantum effects of electric fields and potentials on electron motion: an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects

    Matteucci, G

    2007-01-01

    In the so-called electric Aharonov-Bohm effect, a quantum interference pattern shift is produced when electrons move in an electric field free region but, at the same time, in the presence of a time-dependent electric potential. Analogous fringe shifts are observed in interference experiments where electrons, travelling through an electrostatic field, suffer a classical lag effect produced by electric forces. Since these experiments are reported mainly in specialized journals, it could be rather difficult and time consuming for a student to attain a comprehensive overview of the subject. Therefore, particular attention has been addressed to reviewing the theory, to describing a couple of experiments and to the interpretation of the results. We believe that students can be suitably introduced to exploring the 'paradoxical' aspects of the interaction of electrons with electric potentials and fields

  16. Quantum effects of electric fields and potentials on electron motion: an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects

    Matteucci, G [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and CNISM, V/le B. Pichat, 6/2, I 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    In the so-called electric Aharonov-Bohm effect, a quantum interference pattern shift is produced when electrons move in an electric field free region but, at the same time, in the presence of a time-dependent electric potential. Analogous fringe shifts are observed in interference experiments where electrons, travelling through an electrostatic field, suffer a classical lag effect produced by electric forces. Since these experiments are reported mainly in specialized journals, it could be rather difficult and time consuming for a student to attain a comprehensive overview of the subject. Therefore, particular attention has been addressed to reviewing the theory, to describing a couple of experiments and to the interpretation of the results. We believe that students can be suitably introduced to exploring the 'paradoxical' aspects of the interaction of electrons with electric potentials and fields.

  17. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-08-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  18. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Getoff, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.a [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hartmann, Johannes [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schittl, Heike [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Gerschpacher, Marion [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, Ruth Maria [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light ({lambda}=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  19. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  20. Set anode potentials affect the electron fluxes and microbial community structure in propionate-fed microbial electrolysis cells

    Rao, Hari Ananda

    2016-12-09

    Anode potential has been shown to be a critical factor in the rate of acetate removal in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), but studies with fermentable substrates and set potentials are lacking. Here, we examined the impact of three different set anode potentials (SAPs; −0.25, 0, and 0.25 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode) on the electrochemical performance, electron flux to various sinks, and anodic microbial community structure in two-chambered MECs fed with propionate. Electrical current (49–71%) and CH4 (22.9–41%) were the largest electron sinks regardless of the potentials tested. Among the three SAPs tested, 0 V showed the highest electron flux to electrical current (71 ± 5%) and the lowest flux to CH4 (22.9 ± 1.2%). In contrast, the SAP of −0.25 V had the lowest electron flux to current (49 ± 6%) and the highest flux to CH4 (41.1 ± 2%). The most dominant genera detected on the anode of all three SAPs based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing were Geobacter, Smithella and Syntrophobacter, but their relative abundance varied among the tested SAPs. Microbial community analysis implies that complete degradation of propionate in all the tested SAPs was facilitated by syntrophic interactions between fermenters and Geobacter at the anode and ferementers and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in suspension.

  1. Improving the Assessment of Pediatric Chronic Pain: Harnessing the Potential of Electronic Diaries

    Jennifer N Stinson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for evaluating chronic pain in children suffer from methodological problems. Real-time data capture approaches using electronic diaries have been proposed as a new standard for pain measurement. However, there is limited information available regarding the development, feasibility and validity of these approaches in children. The present paper reviews problems with current measures; rationale for developing real-time data capture approaches using electronic diaries; mechanics of developing electronic pain diaries; current evidence regarding their usability, feasibility and validity; and discusses future directions for research in this area.

  2. Potential Applications and Limitations of Electronic Nose Devices for Plant Disease Diagnosis

    Antonio Cellini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Electronic nose technology has recently been applied to the detection of several plant diseases and pests, with promising results. However, in spite of its numerous advantages, including operational simplicity, non-destructivity, and bulk sampling, drawbacks include a low sensitivity and specificity in comparison with microbiological and molecular methods. A critical review of the use of an electronic nose for plant disease diagnosis and pest detection is presented, describing the instrumental and procedural advances of sensorial analysis, for the improvement of discrimination between healthy and infected or infested plants. In conclusion, the use of electronic nose technology is suggested to assist, direct, and optimise traditionally adopted diagnostic techniques.

  3. Heat pipe applications for future Air Force spacecraft

    Mahefkey, T.; Barthelemy, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarizes the envisioned, future usage of high and low temperature heat pipes in advanced Air Force spacecraft. Thermal control requirements for a variety of communications, surveillance, and space defense missions are forecast. Thermal design constraints implied by survivability to potential weapons effects are outlined. Applications of heat pipes to meet potential low and high power spacecraft mission requirements and envisioned design constraints are suggested. A brief summary of past Air Force sponsored heat pipe development efforts is presented and directions for future development outlined, including those applicable to advanced photovoltaic and nuclear power subsystem applications of heat pipes

  4. Spacecraft TT&C and information transmission theory and technologies

    Liu, Jiaxing

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft TT&C and Information Transmission Theory and Technologies introduces the basic theory of spacecraft TT&C (telemetry, track and command) and information transmission. Combining TT&C and information transmission, the book presents several technologies for continuous wave radar including measurements for range, range rate and angle, analog and digital information transmissions, telecommand, telemetry, remote sensing and spread spectrum TT&C. For special problems occurred in the channels for TT&C and information transmission, the book represents radio propagation features and its impact on orbit measurement accuracy, and the effects caused by rain attenuation, atmospheric attenuation and multi-path effect, and polarization composition technology. This book can benefit researchers and engineers in the field of spacecraft TT&C and communication systems. Liu Jiaxing is a professor at The 10th Institute of China Electronics Technology Group Corporation.

  5. Cross-field gradients: general concept, importance of multi-spacecraft measurements and study at 1 AU of the source intensity gradient for E > 30 keV solar event electrons

    P. A. Chaizy

    Full Text Available Three main physical processes (and associated properties are currently used to describe the flux and anisotropy time profiles of solar energetic par- ticle events, called SEP profiles. They are (1 the particle scattering (due to magnetic waves, (2 the particle focusing (due to the decrease of the amplitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF with the radial distance to the Sun and (3 the finite injection profile at the source. If their features change from one field line to another, i.e. if there is a cross IMF gradient (CFG, then the shape of the SEP profiles will depend, at onset time, on the relative position of the spacecraft to the IMF and might vary significantly on small distance scale (e.g. 106 km. One type of CFG is studied here. It is called intensity CFG and considers variations, at the solar surface, only of the intensity of the event. It is shown here that drops of about two orders of magnitude over distances of ~104 km at the Sun (1° of angular distance can influence dramatically the SEP profiles at 1 AU. This CFG can lead to either an under or overestimation of both the parallel mean free path and of the injection parameters by factor up to, at least, ~2-3 and 18, respectively. Multi-spacecraft analysis can be used to identify CFG. Three basic requirements are proposed to identify, from the observation, the type of the CFG being measured.

    Key words: Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections - Space plasma physics (transport processes

  6. A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the cabin (both air and its structure if manned) and electronic equipment within a narrow temperature range even though...

  7. Electronics

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  8. A solar cycle of spacecraft anomalies due to internal charging

    G. L. Wrenn

    Full Text Available It is important to appreciate how the morphology of internal charging of spacecraft systems, due to penetrating electrons, differs from that of the more common surface charging, due to electrons with lower energy. A specific and recurrent anomaly on a geostationary communication satellite has been tracked for ten years so that solar cycle and seasonal dependencies can be clearly established. Concurrent measurements of sunspot number, solar wind speed and 2-day >2 MeV electron fluence are presented to highlight pertinent space weather relationships, and the importance of understanding the complex particle interaction processes involved.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles; trapped; solar wind – magnetosphere interactions – space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  9. A solar cycle of spacecraft anomalies due to internal charging

    G. L. Wrenn

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important to appreciate how the morphology of internal charging of spacecraft systems, due to penetrating electrons, differs from that of the more common surface charging, due to electrons with lower energy. A specific and recurrent anomaly on a geostationary communication satellite has been tracked for ten years so that solar cycle and seasonal dependencies can be clearly established. Concurrent measurements of sunspot number, solar wind speed and 2-day >2 MeV electron fluence are presented to highlight pertinent space weather relationships, and the importance of understanding the complex particle interaction processes involved.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles; trapped; solar wind – magnetosphere interactions – space plasma physics (spacecraft sheaths, wakes, charging

  10. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M., E-mail: Mahjoub.Ahmed@jpl.nasa.gov [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H{sub 2}S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H{sub 2}S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“without H{sub 2}S”) and H{sub 2}S–CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“with H{sub 2}S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H{sub 2}S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H{sub 2}S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H{sub 2}S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO{sub 2}and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs.

  11. Plasma potential and electron temperature evaluated by ball-pen and Langmuir probes in the COMPASS tokamak

    Dimitrova, M.; Popov, Tsv K.; Adamek, J.; Kovačič, J.; Ivanova, P.; Hasan, E.; López-Bruna, D.; Seidl, J.; Vondráček, P.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Imríšek, M.; Panek, R.; the COMPASS Team

    2017-12-01

    The radial distributions of the main plasma parameters in the scrape-off-layer of the COMPASS tokamak are measured during L-mode and H-mode regimes by using both Langmuir and ball-pen probes mounted on a horizontal reciprocating manipulator. The radial profile of the plasma potential derived previously from Langmuir probes data by using the first derivative probe technique is compared with data derived using ball-pen probes. A good agreement can be seen between the data acquired by the two techniques during the L-mode discharge and during the H-mode regime within the inter-ELM periods. In contrast with the first derivative probe technique, the ball-pen probe technique does not require a swept voltage and, therefore, the temporal resolution is only limited by the data acquisition system. In the electron temperature evaluation, in the far scrape-off layer and in the limiter shadow, where the electron energy distribution is Maxwellian, the results from both techniques match well. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface, where the electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian, the ball-pen probe technique results are in agreement with the high-temperature components of the electron distribution only. We also discuss the application of relatively large Langmuir probes placed in parallel and perpendicularly to the magnetic field lines to studying the main plasma parameters. The results obtained by the two types of the large probes agree well. They are compared with Thomson scattering data for electron temperatures and densities. The results for the electron densities are compared also with the results from ASTRA code calculation of the electron source due to the ionization of the neutrals by fast electrons and the origin of the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is briefly discussed.

  12. Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft design and development teams concerned with cost and schedule, the Quick Spacecraft Thermal Analysis Tool (QuickSTAT) is an innovative software suite...

  13. Stabilization of rotational motion with application to spacecraft attitude control

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    for global stabilization of a rotary motion. Along with a model of the system formulated in the Hamilton's canonical from the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipation term. The control action is the sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipation force......The objective of this paper is to develop a control scheme for stabilization of a hamiltonian system. The method generalizes the results available in the literature on motion control in the Euclidean space to an arbitrary differrential manifol equipped with a metric. This modification is essencial...... on a Riemannian manifold. The Lyapnov stability theory is adapted and reformulated to fit to the new framework of Riemannian manifolds. Toillustrate the results a spacecraft attitude control problem is considered. Firstly, a global canonical representation for the spacecraft motion is found, then three spacecraft...

  14. Stabilization of rotational motion with application to spacecraft attitude control

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2001-01-01

    for global stabilization of a rotary motion. Along with a model of the system formulated in the Hamilton's canonical from the algorithm uses information about a required potential energy and a dissipation term. The control action is the sum of the gradient of the potential energy and the dissipation force......The objective of this paper is to develop a control scheme for stabilization of a hamiltonian system. The method generalizes the results available in the literature on motion control in the Euclidean space to an arbitrary differrential manifol equipped with a metric. This modification is essencial...... on a Riemannian manifold. The Lyapnov stability theory is adapted and reformulated to fit to the new framework of Riemannian manifolds. Toillustrate the results a spacecraft attitude control problem is considered. Firstly, a global canonical representation for the spacecraft motion is found, then three spacecraft...

  15. Multiple spacecraft Michelson stellar interferometer

    Stachnik, R. V.; Arnold, D.; Melroy, P.; Mccormack, E. F.; Gezari, D. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Results of an orbital analysis and performance assessment of SAMSI (Spacecraft Array for Michelson Spatial Interferometry) are presented. The device considered includes two one-meter telescopes in orbits which are identical except for slightly different inclinations; the telescopes achieve separations as large as 10 km and relay starlight to a central station which has a one-meter optical delay line in one interferometer arm. It is shown that a 1000-km altitude, zero mean inclination orbit affords natural scanning of the 10-km baseline with departures from optical pathlength equality which are well within the corrective capacity of the optical delay line. Electric propulsion is completely adequate to provide the required spacecraft motions, principally those needed for repointing. Resolution of 0.00001 arcsec and magnitude limits of 15 to 20 are achievable.

  16. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  17. Attitude Fusion Techniques for Spacecraft

    Bjarnø, Jonas Bækby

    Spacecraft platform instability constitutes one of the most significant limiting factors in hyperacuity pointing and tracking applications, yet the demand for accurate, timely and reliable attitude information is ever increasing. The PhD research project described within this dissertation has...... served to investigate the solution space for augmenting the DTU μASC stellar reference sensor with a miniature Inertial Reference Unit (IRU), thereby obtaining improved bandwidth, accuracy and overall operational robustness of the fused instrument. Present day attitude determination requirements are met...... of the instrument, and affecting operations during agile and complex spacecraft attitude maneuvers. As such, there exists a theoretical foundation for augmenting the high frequency performance of the μASC instrument, by harnessing the complementary nature of optical stellar reference and inertial sensor technology...

  18. Spacecraft fabrication and test MODIL. Final report

    Saito, T.T.

    1994-05-01

    This report covers the period from October 1992 through the close of the project. FY 92 closed out with the successful briefing to industry and with many potential and important initiatives in the spacecraft arena. Due to the funding uncertainties, we were directed to proceed as if our funding would be approximately the same as FY 92 ($2M), but not to make any major new commitments. However, the MODIL`s FY 93 funding was reduced to $810K and we were directed to concentrate on the cryocooler area. The cryocooler effort completed its demonstration project. The final meetings with the cryocooler fabricators were very encouraging as we witnessed the enthusiastic reception of technology to help them reduce fabrication uncertainties. Support of the USAF Phillips Laboratory cryocooler program was continued including kick-off meetings for the Prototype Spacecraft Cryocooler (PSC). Under Phillips Laboratory support, Gill Cruz visited British Aerospace and Lucas Aerospace in the United Kingdom to assess their manufacturing capabilities. In the Automated Spacecraft & Assembly Project (ASAP), contracts were pursued for the analysis by four Brilliant Eyes prime contractors to provide a proprietary snap shot of their current status of Integrated Product Development. In the materials and structure thrust the final analysis was completed of the samples made under the contract (``Partial Automation of Matched Metal Net Shape Molding of Continuous Fiber Composites``) to SPARTA. The Precision Technologies thrust funded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to prepare a plan to develop a Computer Aided Alignment capability to significantly reduce the time for alignment and even possibly provide real time and remote alignment capability of systems in flight.

  19. Interplanetary Parameters Leading to Relativistic Electron Enhancement and Persistent Depletion Events at Geosynchronous Orbit and Potential for Prediction

    Pinto, Victor A.; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Lyons, Larry R.; Bortnik, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    We have identified 61 relativistic electron enhancement events and 21 relativistic electron persistent depletion events during 1996 to 2006 from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 8 and 10 using data from the Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS) >2 MeV fluxes. We then performed a superposed epoch time analysis of the events to find the characteristic solar wind parameters that determine the occurrence of such events, using the OMNI database. We found that there are clear differences between the enhancement events and the persistent depletion events, and we used these to establish a set of threshold values in solar wind speed, proton density and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz that can potentially be useful to predict sudden increases in flux. Persistent depletion events are characterized by a low solar wind speed, a sudden increase in proton density that remains elevated for a few days, and a northward turning of IMF Bz shortly after the depletion starts. We have also found that all relativistic electron enhancement or persistent depletion events occur when some geomagnetic disturbance is present, either a coronal mass ejection or a corotational interaction region; however, the storm index, SYM-H, does not show a strong connection with relativistic electron enhancement events or persistent depletion events. We have tested a simple threshold method for predictability of relativistic electron enhancement events using data from GOES 11 for the years 2007-2010 and found that around 90% of large increases in electron fluxes can be identified with this method.

  20. Electronic structure and pair potential energy analysis of 4-n-methoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl: A nematic liquid crystal

    Sharma, Dipendra, E-mail: d-11sharma@rediffmail.com; Tiwari, S. N., E-mail: sntiwari123@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Dwivedi, M. K., E-mail: dwivedi-ji@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2016-05-06

    Electronic structure properties of 4-n-methoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl, a pure nematic liquid crystal have been examined using an ab‒initio, HF/6‒31G(d,p) technique with GAMESS program. Conformational and charge distribution analysis have been carried out. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the liquid crystal molecule have been calculated. Further, stacking, side by side and end to end interactions between a molecular pair have been evaluated. Results have been used to elucidate the physico-chemical and liquid crystalline properties of the system.

  1. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  2. Nonlinearity-induced spacecraft tumbling

    Amos, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    An existing tumbling criterion for the dumbbell satellite in planar librations is reexamined and modified to reflect a recently identified tumbling mode associated with the horizontal attitude orientation. It is shown that for any initial attitude there exists a critical angular rate below which the motion is oscillatory and harmonic and beyond which a continuous tumbling will ensue. If the angular rate is at the critical value the spacecraft drifts towards the horizontal attitude from which a spontaneous periodic tumbling occurs

  3. Worldwide Spacecraft Crew Hatch History

    Johnson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Flight Safety Office has developed this compilation of historical information on spacecraft crew hatches to assist the Safety Tech Authority in the evaluation and analysis of worldwide spacecraft crew hatch design and performance. The document is prepared by SAIC s Gary Johnson, former NASA JSC S&MA Associate Director for Technical. Mr. Johnson s previous experience brings expert knowledge to assess the relevancy of data presented. He has experience with six (6) of the NASA spacecraft programs that are covered in this document: Apollo; Skylab; Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Space Shuttle, ISS and the Shuttle/Mir Program. Mr. Johnson is also intimately familiar with the JSC Design and Procedures Standard, JPR 8080.5, having been one of its original developers. The observations and findings are presented first by country and organized within each country section by program in chronological order of emergence. A host of reference sources used to augment the personal observations and comments of the author are named within the text and/or listed in the reference section of this document. Careful attention to the selection and inclusion of photos, drawings and diagrams is used to give visual association and clarity to the topic areas examined.

  4. Magnetopause boundary structure deduced from the high-time resolution particle experiment on the Equator-S spacecraft

    G. K. Parks

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrostatic analyser (ESA onboard the Equator-S spacecraft operating in coordination with a potential control device (PCD has obtained the first accurate electron energy spectrum with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV in the vicinity of the magnetopause. On 8 January, 1998, a solar wind pressure increase pushed the magnetopause inward, leaving the Equator-S spacecraft in the magnetosheath. On the return into the magnetosphere approximately 80 min later, the magnetopause was observed by the ESA and the solid state telescopes (the SSTs detected electrons and ions with energies ≈20–300 keV. The high time resolution (3 s data from ESA and SST show the boundary region contains of multiple plasma sources that appear to evolve in space and time. We show that electrons with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV permeate the outer regions of the magnetosphere, from the magnetopause to ≈6Re. Pitch-angle distributions of ≈20–300 keV electrons show the electrons travel in both directions along the magnetic field with a peak at 90° indicating a trapped configuration. The IMF during this interval was dominated by Bx and By components with a small Bz.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  5. Kinetics of two-dimensional electron plasma, interacting with fluctuating potential

    Boiko, I.I.; Sirenko, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, from the first principles, after the fashion of Klimontovich, the authors derive quantum kinetic equation for electron gas, inhomogeneous in z-direction and homogeneous in XY-plane. Special attention is given to the systems with quasi-two-dimensional electron gas (2 DEG), which are widely explored now. Both interaction between the particles of 2 DEG (in general, of several sorts), and interaction with an external system (phonons, impurities, after change carries etc.) are considered. General theory is used to obtain energy and momentum balance equations and relaxation frequencies for 2 DEG in the basis of plane waves. The case of crossed electric and magnetic fields is also treated. As an illustration the problems of 2 DEG scattering on semibounded three-dimensional electron gas and on two-dimensional hole gas are considered; transverse conductivity of nondegenerate 2 DEG, scattered by impurities in ultraquantum magnetic field, is calculated

  6. Kohn-Sham potentials from electron densities using a matrix representation within finite atomic orbital basis sets

    Zhang, Xing; Carter, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the static response function-based Kohn-Sham (KS) inversion procedure for determining the KS effective potential that corresponds to a given target electron density within finite atomic orbital basis sets. Instead of expanding the potential in an auxiliary basis set, we directly update the potential in its matrix representation. Through numerical examples, we show that the reconstructed density rapidly converges to the target density. Preliminary results are presented to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a local potential in real space from the optimized potential in its matrix representation. We have further applied this matrix-based KS inversion approach to density functional embedding theory. A proof-of-concept study of a solvated proton transfer reaction demonstrates the method's promise.

  7. Factors Influencing Mean Inner Potentials As Studied Using Electron Holography and Density Functional Theory

    Pennington, Robert S.

    reflect properties of the specimen. The phase can yield quantitative measurements of nanoscale electric and magnetic potentials. One such electrostatic potential is called the mean inner potential. The mean inner potential is the average electrostatic potential measured between the bulk of a material...... to analyze diffraction effects on the amplitude and the phase. There is relatively good comparison between image simulation and experimental data, but the experimental absorption parameter is found to differ between strongly and weakly diffracting conditions. Density functional theory simulations of the mean...

  8. Deceleration of probe beam by stage bias potential improves resolution of serial block-face scanning electron microscopic images.

    Bouwer, James C; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Astakhov, Vadim; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Peltier, Steven T; Ellisman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) is quickly becoming an important imaging tool to explore three-dimensional biological structure across spatial scales. At probe-beam-electron energies of 2.0 keV or lower, the axial resolution should improve, because there is less primary electron penetration into the block face. More specifically, at these lower energies, the interaction volume is much smaller, and therefore, surface detail is more highly resolved. However, the backscattered electron yield for metal contrast agents and the backscattered electron detector sensitivity are both sub-optimal at these lower energies, thus negating the gain in axial resolution. We found that the application of a negative voltage (reversal potential) applied to a modified SBEM stage creates a tunable electric field at the sample. This field can be used to decrease the probe-beam-landing energy and, at the same time, alter the trajectory of the signal to increase the signal collected by the detector. With decelerated low landing-energy electrons, we observed that the probe-beam-electron-penetration depth was reduced to less than 30 nm in epoxy-embedded biological specimens. Concurrently, a large increase in recorded signal occurred due to the re-acceleration of BSEs in the bias field towards the objective pole piece where the detector is located. By tuning the bias field, we were able to manipulate the trajectories of the  primary and secondary electrons, enabling the spatial discrimination of these signals using an advanced ring-type BSE detector configuration or a standard monolithic BSE detector coupled with a blocking aperture.

  9. A survey of electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive potential for spherical tokamaks

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Shevchenko, V.; Taylor, G.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 8 (2011), 083050-083050 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0419; GA MŠk 7G10072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : spherical tokamak * electron Bernstein wave (EBW) * heating * current drive * electron cyclotron wave Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.090, year: 2011 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/51/8/083050/pdf/0029-5515_51_8_083050.pdf

  10. In situ electron holography of electric potentials inside a solid-state electrolyte: Effect of electric-field leakage

    Aizawa, Yuka; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sato, Takeshi [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Murata, Hidekazu [Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 468-8502 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryuji; Fisher, Craig A.J. [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan); Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Hirayama, Tsukasa, E-mail: t-hirayama@jfcc.or.jp [Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8587 (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    In situ electron holography is used to observe changes of electric-potential distributions in an amorphous lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) solid-state electrolyte when different voltages are applied. 2D phase images are simulated by integrating the 3D potential distribution along the electron trajectory through a thin Cu/LiPON/Cu region. Good agreement between experimental and simulated phase distributions is obtained when the influence of the external electric field is taken into account using the 3D boundary-charge method. Based on the precise potential changes, the lithium-ion and lithium-vacancy distributions inside the LiPON layer and electric double layers (EDLs) are inferred. The gradients of the phase drops at the interfaces in relation to EDL widths are discussed. - Highlights: • Solid-state electrolyte LiPON has been observed by in situ electron holography. • Observed phase distributions are compared with those simulated numerically. • 3D electric fields around the specimen are taken into account in the simulation. • Electric-potential distributions inside LiPON have been obtained. • The lithium-ion and lithium-vacancy distributions inside the LiPON are inferred.

  11. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of KLi molecule: Adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves and dipole moments

    Dardouri, Riadh; Habli, Héla; Oujia, Brahim; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We present the resulting 12 1 Σ + diabatic potential energy curves where they are labeled D 1 for the ionic Li − K + and D 2 to D 12 for other. Highlights: ► Our ab initio study has been conducted for 48 electronic states of LiK molecule. ► We use pseudo-potential for the core and large basis sets for the Rydberg states. ► The calculations rely on ab initio pseudo-potential and full valence CI approaches. ► Diabatic potentials are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic 1 Σ + state. - Abstract: For all states dissociating below the ionic limit Li − K + , we perform an adiabatic and diabatic study for 1 Σ + electronic states dissociating into K (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p, 5d, 6s) + Li (2s, 2p, 3s). Furthermore, we present the adiabatic results for the 1–11 3 Σ, 1–8 1,3 Π and 1–4 1,3 Δ states. The present calculations on the KLi molecule are complementary to previous theoretical work on this system, including recently observed electronic states that had not been calculated previously. The calculations rely on an ab initio pseudo-potential, Core Polarization Potential operators for the core–valence correlation and full valence CI approaches, combined to an efficient diabatization procedure. For the low-lying states, our spectroscopic constants and vibrational level spacing are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Diabatic potentials and permanent dipole moments are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic state in the 1 Σ + adiabatic states.

  12. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of KLi molecule: Adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves and dipole moments

    Dardouri, Riadh, E-mail: dardouririad@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l' Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Habli, Hela [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, Avenue de l' Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Oujia, Brahim; Gadea, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantique, UMR 5626 du CNRS, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: We present the resulting 12 {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} diabatic potential energy curves where they are labeled D{sub 1} for the ionic Li{sup -}K{sup +} and D{sub 2} to D{sub 12} for other. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our ab initio study has been conducted for 48 electronic states of LiK molecule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use pseudo-potential for the core and large basis sets for the Rydberg states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculations rely on ab initio pseudo-potential and full valence CI approaches. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diabatic potentials are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} state. - Abstract: For all states dissociating below the ionic limit Li{sup -}K{sup +}, we perform an adiabatic and diabatic study for {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} electronic states dissociating into K (4s, 4p, 4d, 5s, 5p, 5d, 6s) + Li (2s, 2p, 3s). Furthermore, we present the adiabatic results for the 1-11 {sup 3}{Sigma}, 1-8 {sup 1,3}{Pi} and 1-4 {sup 1,3}{Delta} states. The present calculations on the KLi molecule are complementary to previous theoretical work on this system, including recently observed electronic states that had not been calculated previously. The calculations rely on an ab initio pseudo-potential, Core Polarization Potential operators for the core-valence correlation and full valence CI approaches, combined to an efficient diabatization procedure. For the low-lying states, our spectroscopic constants and vibrational level spacing are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Diabatic potentials and permanent dipole moments are analyzed, revealing the strong imprint of the ionic state in the {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} adiabatic states.

  13. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    Haslinger, Stefan

    2014-11-03

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  14. Making oxidation potentials predictable: Coordination of additives applied to the electronic fine tuning of an iron(II) complex

    Haslinger, Stefan; Kü ck, Jens W.; Hahn, Eva M.; Cokoja, Mirza; Pö thig, Alexander; Basset, Jean-Marie; Kü hn, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the impact of axially coordinating additives on the electronic structure of a bioinspired octahedral low-spin iron(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (Fe-NHC) complex. Bearing two labile trans-acetonitrile ligands, the Fe-NHC complex, which is also an excellent oxidation catalyst, is prone to axial ligand exchange. Phosphine- and pyridine-based additives are used for substitution of the acetonitrile ligands. On the basis of the resulting defined complexes, predictability of the oxidation potentials is demonstrated, based on a correlation between cyclic voltammetry experiments and density functional theory calculated molecular orbital energies. Fundamental insights into changes of the electronic properties upon axial ligand exchange and the impact on related attributes will finally lead to target-oriented manipulation of the electronic properties and consequently to the effective tuning of the reactivity of bioinspired systems.

  15. Plus Ca Change: Minitel and Teletel, Electronic Marvels with Language Teaching Potential.

    Carney, William J.

    The impact and cultural implications of the French Minitel and Teletel system are discussed, and second language clasroom applications are examined. These electronic instruments were developed for nationwide transmission of computerized data using small television-like terminals connected by modem to existing telephone circuits. Wise marketing…

  16. The inclusion of electron correlation in intermolecular potentials: Applications to the formamide dimer and liquid formamide

    Brdarski, S.; Åstrand, P.-O.; Karlström, G.

    2000-01-01

    dipole moment is 11% lower at the MP2 level than at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level, whereas the isotropic part of the polarizability is increased by 36% by adding electron correlation and using a considerably larger basis set. The atomic charges, dipole moments and polarizabilities obtained at the HF level...

  17. Generation of a membrane potential by Lactococcus lactis through aerobic electron transport

    Brooijmans, R. J. W.; Poolman, B.; Schuurman-Wolters, G. K.; de Vos, W. M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    Lactococcus lactis, a facultative anaerobic lactic acid bacterium, is known to have an increased growth yield when grown aerobically in the presence of heme. We have now established the presence of a functional, proton motive force-generating electron transfer chain (ETC) in L. lactis under these

  18. Potential to Improve the Competitiveness of China's Electronic and Mechanical Products Exports

    Wei Hao; Wang Xi; Wang Luxi

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since launching the reform and opening policy,and particularly since the mid-1990s with accelerating industrialization processes and further policy changes,the electronics and mechanical industry in China has made huge strides in production and foreign trade value,now accounting for approximately half of total exports from China and becoming a pillar industry of China's foreign trade.

  19. New Oxime Ligand with Potential for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactions

    Deville, Claire; Sundberg, Jonas; McKenzie, Christine Joy

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) is found in a range of oxidation-reduction reactions in biology.1 This mechanism is of interest for applications in energy conversion processes. The PCET reaction has been shown to be facilitated when the proton is transferred to an intramolecular basic sit...

  20. Infinite dwell time and group delay in resonant electron tunneling through double complex potential barrier

    Opacak, Nikola; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2017-12-01

    Tunneling times in complex potentials are investigated. Analytical expressions for dwell time, self-interference time and group delay are obtained for the case of complex double delta potentials. It is shown that we can always find a set of parameters of the potential so that the tunneling times achieve very large values and even approach infinity for the case of resonance. The phenomenon of infinite tunneling times occurs for only one particular positive value of the imaginary part of the potential, if all other parameters are given.

  1. Spacecraft Jitter Attenuation Using Embedded Piezoelectric Actuators

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing from spacecraft requires precise pointing of measurement devices in order to achieve adequate spatial resolution. Unfortunately, various spacecraft disturbances induce vibrational jitter in the remote sensing instruments. The NASA Langley Research Center has performed analysis, simulations, and ground tests to identify the more promising technologies for minimizing spacecraft pointing jitter. These studies have shown that the use of smart materials to reduce spacecraft jitter is an excellent match between a maturing technology and an operational need. This paper describes the use of embedding piezoelectric actuators for vibration control and payload isolation. In addition, recent advances in modeling, simulation, and testing of spacecraft pointing jitter are discussed.

  2. Antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus racemosus root extract against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice

    Bhandary, B. Satheesh Kumar; Sharmila, K.P.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Bhat, Vadish S.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.; Fernandes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antigenotoxic potential of Asparagus Racemosus Root ethanolic extract (ARE) against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation in Swiss albino mice. Micronucleus assay was performed in the bone marrow of Swiss albino mice according to the method of Hosseinimehr et al., 2003. The experimental animals were orally administered 200 mg/kg body weight of ARE once daily for 15 consecutive days. At the end of experimental period, the animals were euthanized and the bone marrow was collected from the femur. Control (C), Radiation control (RC) and drug control (DC) group was also maintained. The number of radiation induced Micronucleated Polychromatic Erythrocytes (MnPCE) and Micronucleated Normochromatic Erythrocytes were decreased in the ARE treated mice which was statistically significant (p<0.05) compared to radiation control group. Present findings demonstrate the antigenotoxic potential of ARE against electron beam radiation induced micronuclei formation which may be attributed to scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals

  3. Solitary waves observed in the auroral zone: the Cluster multi-spacecraft perspective

    J. S. Pickett

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on recent measurements of solitary waves made by the Wideband Plasma Wave Receiver located on each of the four Cluster spacecraft at 4.5-6.5RE (well above the auroral acceleration region as they cross field lines that map to the auroral zones. These solitary waves are observed in the Wideband data as isolated bipolar and tripolar waveforms. Examples of the two types of pulses are provided. The time durations of the majority of both types of solitary waves observed in this region range from about 0.3 up to 5ms. Their peak-to-peak amplitudes range from about 0.05 up to 20mV/m, with a few reaching up to almost 70mV/m. There is essentially no potential change across the bipolar pulses. There appears to be a small, measurable potential change, up to 0.5V, across the tripolar pulses, which is consistent with weak or hybrid double layers. A limited cross-spacecraft correlation study was carried out in order to identify the same solitary wave on more than one spacecraft. We found no convincing correlations of the bipolar solitary waves. In the two cases of possible correlation of the tripolar pulses, we found that the solitary waves are propagating at several hundred to a few thousand km/s and that they are possibly evolving (growing, decaying as they propagate from one spacecraft to the next. Further, they have a perpendicular (to the magnetic field width of 50km or greater and a parallel width of about 2-5km. We conclude, in general, however, that the Cluster spacecraft at separations along and perpendicular to the local magnetic field direction of tens of km and greater are too large to obtain positive correlations in this region. Looking at the macroscale of the auroral zone at 4.5-6.5RE, we find that the onsets of the broadband electrostatic noise associated with the solitary waves observed in the spectrograms of the WBD data are generally consistent with propagation of the solitary waves up the field lines (away from Earth, or with

  4. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective one-body potential of DFT plus correlated kinetic energy density for two-electron spherical model atoms

    March, N.H.; Ludena, Eduardo V.

    2004-01-01

    For three model problems concerning two-electron spin-compensated ground states with spherical density, the third-order linear homogeneous differential equation constructed for the determination of ρ(r) is used here in conjunction with the von Weizsacker functional to characterize the one-body potential of density functional theory (DFT). Correlated von Weizsacker-type terms are compared to the exact DFT functional

  6. Third version of a program for calculating the static interaction potential between an electron and a diatomic molecule

    Raseev, G.

    1980-01-01

    This program calculates the one-centre expansion of a two-centre wave function of a diatomic molecule and also the multipole expansion of its static interaction with a point charge. It is an extension to some classes of open-shell targets of the previous versions and it provides both the wave function and the potential in a form suitable for use in an electron-molecule scattering program. (orig./HSI)

  7. Lane fuzzy collision in channel with potential deformation by photon-phonon-electron excitation and sub-atomic control

    Shen Jing

    1998-01-01

    Collision between μ + and the μ - beams in the crystal are forbidden due to the two beams having different ''lanes'' in a channel. A laser pulse of ps-fs shocks lattice kernel vibration and dilates lattice electron distribution. It deforms the Lindhard's potential which is then expressed in a quantized form as the Huang-Zhu's potential[1]. The dynamic lanes can be made to overlap in a channel to allow collision without ductile fracture. This raises a new technology of sub-atomic information and control, which has been raised by T. D. Lee

  8. Application of square-root filtering for spacecraft attitude control

    Sorensen, J. A.; Schmidt, S. F.; Goka, T.

    1978-01-01

    Suitable digital algorithms are developed and tested for providing on-board precision attitude estimation and pointing control for potential use in the Landsat-D spacecraft. These algorithms provide pointing accuracy of better than 0.01 deg. To obtain necessary precision with efficient software, a six state-variable square-root Kalman filter combines two star tracker measurements to update attitude estimates obtained from processing three gyro outputs. The validity of the estimation and control algorithms are established, and the sensitivity of their performance to various error sources and software parameters are investigated by detailed digital simulation. Spacecraft computer memory, cycle time, and accuracy requirements are estimated.

  9. The measurement of electrostatic potentials in core/shell GaN nanowires using off-axis electron holography

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciechonski, R

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell GaN nanowires are expected to be building blocks of future light emitting devices. Here we apply off-axis electron holography to map the electrostatic potential distributions in such nanowires. To access the cross-section of selected individual nanowires, focused ion beam (FIB) milling...... is used. Furthermore, to assess the influence of FIB damage, the dopant potential measured from an intact NW is compared with a FIB prepared one. It is shown that in addition to the built-in potential between the p-type shell and unintentionally n-type under-layer there is a potential barrier between...... the core and under-layer which are both unintentionally n-type doped....

  10. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    Sugioka, Yuji; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dissociative electron attachment cross sections for polyatomic molecules are calculated by a simple theoretical approach. ► Temperature effects can be reasonably reproduced with the present model. ► All the degrees-of-freedom are taken into account in the present dynamics approach. -- Abstract: We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H 2 O and CF 3 Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  11. A practical approach to temperature effects in dissociative electron attachment cross sections using local complex potential theory

    Sugioka, Yuji [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takayanagi, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tako@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2012-09-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissociative electron attachment cross sections for polyatomic molecules are calculated by a simple theoretical approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature effects can be reasonably reproduced with the present model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the degrees-of-freedom are taken into account in the present dynamics approach. -- Abstract: We propose a practical computational scheme to obtain temperature dependence of dissociative electron attachment cross sections to polyatomic molecules within a local complex potential theory formalism. First we perform quantum path-integral molecular dynamics simulations on the potential energy surface for the neutral molecule in order to sample initial nuclear configurations as well as momenta. Classical trajectories are subsequently integrated on the potential energy surface for the anionic state and survival probabilities are simultaneously calculated along the obtained trajectories. We have applied this simple scheme to dissociative electron attachment processes to H{sub 2}O and CF{sub 3}Cl, for which several previous studies are available from both the experimental and theoretical sides.

  12. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    Masters, Elizabeth T.; Emir,Birol; Mardekian,Jack; Clair,Andrew; Kuhn,Max; Silverman,Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may fa...

  13. Role of Mitochondrial Reverse Electron Transport in ROS Signaling: Potential Roles in Health and Disease

    Filippo Scialò

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of aging and age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, mitochondria from old individuals have higher levels of ROS. However, ROS also participate in cellular signaling, are instrumental for several physiological processes and boosting ROS levels in model organisms extends lifespan. The current consensus is that low levels of ROS are beneficial, facilitating adaptation to stress via signaling, whereas high levels of ROS are deleterious because they trigger oxidative stress. Based on this model the amount of ROS should determine the physiological effect. However, recent data suggests that the site at which ROS are generated is also instrumental in determining effects on cellular homeostasis. The best example of site-specific ROS signaling is reverse electron transport (RET. RET is produced when electrons from ubiquinol are transferred back to respiratory complex I, reducing NAD+ to NADH. This process generates a significant amount of ROS. RET has been shown to be instrumental for the activation of macrophages in response to bacterial infection, re-organization of the electron transport chain in response to changes in energy supply and adaptation of the carotid body to changes in oxygen levels. In Drosophila melanogaster, stimulating RET extends lifespan. Here, we review what is known about RET, as an example of site-specific ROS signaling, and its implications for the field of redox biology.

  14. Small Spacecraft Constellation Concept for Mars Atmospheric Radio Occultations

    Asmar, S. W.; Mannucci, A. J.; Ao, C. O.; Kobayashi, M. M.; Lazio, J.; Marinan, A.; Massone, G.; McCandless, S. E.; Preston, R. A.; Seubert, J.; Williamson, W.

    2017-12-01

    First demonstrated in 1965 when Mariner IV flew by Mars and determined the salient features of its atmosphere, radio occultation experiments have been carried out on numerous planetary missions with great discoveries. These experiments utilize the now classic configuration of a signal from a single planetary spacecraft to Earth receiving stations, where the science data are acquired. The Earth science community advanced the technique to utilizing a constellation of spacecraft with the radio occultation links between the spacecraft, enabled by the infrastructure of the Global Positioning System. With the advent of small and less costly spacecraft, such as planetary CubeSats and other variations, such as the anticipated innovative Mars Cube One mission, crosslinks among small spacecraft can be used to study other planets in the near future. Advantages of this type of experiment include significantly greater geographical coverage, which could reach global coverage over a few weeks with a small number of spacecraft. Repeatability of the global coverage can lead to examining temperature-pressure profiles and ionospheric electron density profiles, on daily, seasonal, annual, or other time scales of interest. The higher signal-to-noise ratio for inter-satellite links, compared to a link to Earth, decreases the design demands on the instrumentation (smaller antennas and transmitters, etc.). After an actual Mars crosslink demonstration, this concept has been in development using Mars as a possible target. Scientific objectives, delivery methods, operational scenarios and end-to-end configuration have been documented. Science objectives include determining the state and variability of the lower Martian atmosphere, which has been an identified as a high priority objective by the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group, particularly as it relates to entry, descent, and landing and ascent for future crewed and robotic missions. This paper will present the latest research on the

  15. Comprehension of Spacecraft Telemetry Using Hierarchical Specifications of Behavior

    Havelund, Klaus; Joshi, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in operating remote spacecraft is that ground operators must rely on the limited visibility available through spacecraft telemetry in order to assess spacecraft health and operational status. We describe a tool for processing spacecraft telemetry that allows ground operators to impose structure on received telemetry in order to achieve a better comprehension of system state. A key element of our approach is the design of a domain-specific language that allows operators to express models of expected system behavior using partial specifications. The language allows behavior specifications with data fields, similar to other recent runtime verification systems. What is notable about our approach is the ability to develop hierarchical specifications of behavior. The language is implemented as an internal DSL in the Scala programming language that synthesizes rules from patterns of specification behavior. The rules are automatically applied to received telemetry and the inferred behaviors are available to ground operators using a visualization interface that makes it easier to understand and track spacecraft state. We describe initial results from applying our tool to telemetry received from the Curiosity rover currently roving the surface of Mars, where the visualizations are being used to trend subsystem behaviors, in order to identify potential problems before they happen. However, the technology is completely general and can be applied to any system that generates telemetry such as event logs.

  16. A Shaftless Magnetically Levitated Multifunctional Spacecraft Flywheel Storage System

    Stevens, Ken; Thornton, Richard; Clark, Tracy; Beaman, Bob G.; Dennehy, Neil; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Presently many types of spacecraft use a Spacecraft Attitude Control System (ACS) with momentum wheels for steering and electrochemical batteries to provide electrical power for the eclipse period of the spacecraft orbit. Future spacecraft will use Flywheels for combined use in ACS and Energy Storage. This can be done by using multiple wheels and varying the differential speed for ACS and varying the average speed for energy storage and recovery. Technology in these areas has improved since the 1990s so it is now feasible for flywheel systems to emerge from the laboratory for spacecraft use. This paper describes a new flywheel system that can be used for both ACS and energy storage. Some of the possible advantages of a flywheel system are: lower total mass and volume, higher efficiency, less thermal impact, improved satellite integration schedule and complexity, simplified satellite orbital operations, longer life with lower risk, less pointing jitter, and greater capability for high-rate slews. In short, they have the potential to enable new types of missions and provide lower cost. Two basic types of flywheel configurations are the Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) and the Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS).

  17. Spacecraft Design Thermal Control Subsystem

    Miyake, Robert N.

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal Control Subsystem engineers task is to maintain the temperature of all spacecraft components, subsystems, and the total flight system within specified limits for all flight modes from launch to end-of-mission. In some cases, specific stability and gradient temperature limits will be imposed on flight system elements. The Thermal Control Subsystem of "normal" flight systems, the mass, power, control, and sensing systems mass and power requirements are below 10% of the total flight system resources. In general the thermal control subsystem engineer is involved in all other flight subsystem designs.

  18. A model for estimation of potential generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Brazil

    Araújo, Marcelo Guimarães; Magrini, Alessandra; Mahler, Cláudio Fernando; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Literature of WEEE generation in developing countries is reviewed. ► We analyse existing estimates of WEEE generation for Brazil. ► We present a model for WEEE generation estimate. ► WEEE generation of 3.77 kg/capita year for 2008 is estimated. ► Use of constant lifetime should be avoided for non-mature market products. - Abstract: Sales of electrical and electronic equipment are increasing dramatically in developing countries. Usually, there are no reliable data about quantities of the waste generated. A new law for solid waste management was enacted in Brazil in 2010, and the infrastructure to treat this waste must be planned, considering the volumes of the different types of electrical and electronic equipment generated. This paper reviews the literature regarding estimation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), focusing on developing countries, particularly in Latin America. It briefly describes the current WEEE system in Brazil and presents an updated estimate of generation of WEEE. Considering the limited available data in Brazil, a model for WEEE generation estimation is proposed in which different methods are used for mature and non-mature market products. The results showed that the most important variable is the equipment lifetime, which requires a thorough understanding of consumer behavior to estimate. Since Brazil is a rapidly expanding market, the “boom” in waste generation is still to come. In the near future, better data will provide more reliable estimation of waste generation and a clearer interpretation of the lifetime variable throughout the years.

  19. Silicotungstate, a Potential Electron Transporting Layer for Low-Temperature Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Choi, Yoon Ho; Kim, Hyun Bin; Yang, In Seok; Sung, Sang Do; Choi, Young Sik; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Wan In

    2017-08-02

    Thin films of a heteropolytungstate, lithium silicotungstate (Li 4 SiW 12 O 40 , termed Li-ST), prepared by a solution process at low temperature, were successfully applied as electron transporting layer (ETL) of planar-type perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Dense and uniform Li-ST films were prepared on FTO glass by depositing a thin Li-ST buffer layer, followed by coating of a main Li-ST layer. The film thickness was controlled by varying the number of coating cycles, consisting of spin-coating and thermal treatment at 150 °C. In particular, by employing 60 nm-thick Li-ST layer obtained by two cycles of coating, the fabricated CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 PSC device demonstrates the photovoltaic conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.26% with J SC of 22.16 mA cm -2 , V OC of 0.993 mV and FF of 64.81%. The obtained PCE is significantly higher than that of the PSC employing a TiO 2 layer processed at the same temperature (PCE = 12.27%). Spectroscopic analyses by time-resolved photoluminescence and pulsed light-induced transient measurement of photocurrent indicate that the Li-ST layer collects electrons from CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 more efficiently and also exhibits longer electron lifetime than the TiO 2 layer thermally treated at 150 °C. Thus, Li-ST is considered to be a promising ETL material that can be applied for the fabrication of flexible PSC devices.

  20. The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2014-01-01

    The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model

  1. Electronic structure engineering of ZnO with the modified Becke-Johnson exchange versus the classical correlation potential approaches

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we report investigations of structural and electronic properties of ZnO in wurtzite (WZ), rock salt (RS) and zinc-blende (ZB) phases. Calculations have been done with full-potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method developed within the frame work of Density Functional Theory (DFT). For structural properties investigations, Perdew and Wang proposed local density approximations (LDA) and Perdew et al. proposed generalized gradient approximations (GGA) have been applied. Where for electronic properties in addition to these, Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential has been used. Our computed band gap values of ZnO in WZ and ZB phases with mBJ potential are significantly improved compared to those with LDA and GGA; however, in RS phase, energy gap is significantly overestimated compared to experimental measurements. The Zn-d band was found to be more narrower with mBJ potential than that of LDA and GGA. On the other hand, our evaluated crystal field splitting energy values overestimate the experimental values. © 2013 Taylor and Francis.

  2. Generating Animated Displays of Spacecraft Orbits

    Candey, Robert M.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Harris, Bernard T.

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Interactive Plotting, Sonification, and 3D Orbit Display (TIPSOD) is a computer program for generating interactive, animated, four-dimensional (space and time) displays of spacecraft orbits. TIPSOD utilizes the programming interface of the Satellite Situation Center Web (SSCWeb) services to communicate with the SSC logic and database by use of the open protocols of the Internet. TIPSOD is implemented in Java 3D and effects an extension of the preexisting SSCWeb two-dimensional static graphical displays of orbits. Orbits can be displayed in any or all of the following seven reference systems: true-of-date (an inertial system), J2000 (another inertial system), geographic, geomagnetic, geocentric solar ecliptic, geocentric solar magnetospheric, and solar magnetic. In addition to orbits, TIPSOD computes and displays Sibeck's magnetopause and Fairfield's bow-shock surfaces. TIPSOD can be used by the scientific community as a means of projection or interpretation. It also has potential as an educational tool.

  3. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  4. Space power systems--''Spacecraft 2000''

    Faymon, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    The National Space programs of the 21st century will require abundant and relatively low cost power and energy produced by high reliability-low mass systems. Advancement of current power system related technologies will enable the U.S. to realize increased scientific payload for government missions or increased revenue producing payload for commercial space endeavors. Autonomous, unattended operation will be a highly desirable characteristic of these advanced power systems. Those space power-energy related technologies, which will comprise the space craft of the late 1990's and the early 2000's, will evolve from today's state-of-the-art systems and those long term technology development programs presently in place. However, to foster accelerated development of the more critical technologies which have the potential for high-payoffs, additional programs will be proposed and put in place between now and the end of the century. Such a program is ''Spacecraft 2000'', which is described in this paper

  5. Benefits of Spacecraft Level Vibration Testing

    Gordon, Scott; Kern, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    NASA-HDBK-7008 Spacecraft Level Dynamic Environments Testing discusses the approaches, benefits, dangers, and recommended practices for spacecraft level dynamic environments testing, including vibration testing. This paper discusses in additional detail the benefits and actual experiences of vibration testing spacecraft for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) flight projects. JPL and GSFC have both similarities and differences in their spacecraft level vibration test approach: JPL uses a random vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending to as high as 250 Hz. GSFC uses a sine sweep vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending only to the limits of the coupled loads analysis (typically 50 to 60 Hz). However, both JPL and GSFC use force limiting to realistically notch spacecraft resonances and response (acceleration) limiting as necessary to protect spacecraft structure and hardware from exceeding design strength capabilities. Despite GSFC and JPL differences in spacecraft level vibration test approaches, both have uncovered a significant number of spacecraft design and workmanship anomalies in vibration tests. This paper will give an overview of JPL and GSFC spacecraft vibration testing approaches and provide a detailed description of spacecraft anomalies revealed.

  6. Theoretical study of ionization and one-electron oxidation potentials of N-heterocyclic compounds.

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla K; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    A number of density functionals was utilized to predict gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials (IPs) for nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Various solvation models were applied to the calculation of difference in free energies of solvation of oxidized and reduced forms of heterocyclic compounds in acetonitrile (AN) for correct reproduction of their standard oxidation potentials. We developed generally applicable protocols that could successfully predict the gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials of nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds and their standard oxidation potentials in AN. This approach is supported by a MPW1K/6-31+G(d) level of theory which uses SMD(UA0) approximation for estimation of solvation energy of neutral molecules and PCM(UA0) model for ionized ones. The mean absolute derivation (MAD) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the current theoretical models for IP are equal to 0.22 V and 0.26, respectively, and for oxidation potentials MAD = 0.13 V and RMSE = 0.17. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hybrid spacecraft attitude control system

    Renuganth Varatharajoo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid subsystem design could be an attractive approach for futurespacecraft to cope with their demands. The idea of combining theconventional Attitude Control System and the Electrical Power System ispresented in this article. The Combined Energy and Attitude ControlSystem (CEACS consisting of a double counter rotating flywheel assemblyis investigated for small satellites in this article. Another hybrid systemincorporating the conventional Attitude Control System into the ThermalControl System forming the Combined Attitude and Thermal ControlSystem (CATCS consisting of a "fluid wheel" and permanent magnets isalso investigated for small satellites herein. The governing equationsdescribing both these novel hybrid subsystems are presented and theironboard architectures are numerically tested. Both the investigated novelhybrid spacecraft subsystems comply with the reference missionrequirements.The hybrid subsystem design could be an attractive approach for futurespacecraft to cope with their demands. The idea of combining theconventional Attitude Control System and the Electrical Power System ispresented in this article. The Combined Energy and Attitude ControlSystem (CEACS consisting of a double counter rotating flywheel assemblyis investigated for small satellites in this article. Another hybrid systemincorporating the conventional Attitude Control System into the ThermalControl System forming the Combined Attitude and Thermal ControlSystem (CATCS consisting of a "fluid wheel" and permanent magnets isalso investigated for small satellites herein. The governing equationsdescribing both these novel hybrid subsystems are presented and theironboard architectures are numerically tested. Both the investigated novelhybrid spacecraft subsystems comply with the reference missionrequirements.

  8. Fabrication and performance evaluation of flexible heat pipes for potential thermal control of foldable electronics

    Yang, Chao; Chang, Chao; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A flexible and high-performance heat pipe is fabricated. • Bending effect on thermal performance of flexible heat pipes is evaluated. • Theoretical analysis is carried out to reveal the change of thermal resistance with bending. • Thermal control of foldable electronics with flexible heat pipes is demonstrated. - Abstract: In this work, we report the fabrication and thermal performance evaluation of flexible heat pipes prepared by using a fluororubber tube as the connector in the adiabatic section and using strong base treated hydrophilic copper meshes as the wick structure. Deionized water was chosen as working fluid and three different filling ratios (10%, 20%, and 30%) of working fluid were loaded into the heat pipe to investigate its impact on thermal performance. The fabricated heat pipes can be easily bended from 0"o to 180"o in the horizontal operation mode and demonstrated consistently low thermal resistances after repeated bending. It was found that with optimized amount of working fluid, the thermal resistance of flexible heat pipes increased with larger bending angles. Theoretical analysis reveals that bending disturbs the normal vapor flow from evaporator to condenser in the heat pipe, thus leads to increased liquid–vapor interfacial thermal resistance in the evaporator section. The flexible heat pipes have been successfully applied for thermal control of foldable electronic devices showing superior uniform heat-transfer performance.

  9. A survey of electron Bernstein wave heating and current drive potential for spherical tokamaks

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2011-08-01

    The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) is typically the only wave in the electron cyclotron (EC) range that can be applied in spherical tokamaks for heating and current drive (H&CD). Spherical tokamaks (STs) operate generally in high-β regimes, in which the usual EC O- and X-modes are cut off. In this case, EBWs seem to be the only option that can provide features similar to the EC waves—controllable localized H&CD that can be used for core plasma heating as well as for accurate plasma stabilization. The EBW is a quasi-electrostatic wave that can be excited by mode conversion from a suitably launched O- or X-mode; its propagation further inside the plasma is strongly influenced by the plasma parameters. These rather awkward properties make its application somewhat more difficult. In this paper we perform an extensive numerical study of EBW H&CD performance in four typical ST plasmas (NSTX L- and H-mode, MAST Upgrade, NHTX). Coupled ray-tracing (AMR) and Fokker-Planck (LUKE) codes are employed to simulate EBWs of varying frequencies and launch conditions, which are the fundamental EBW parameters that can be chosen and controlled. Our results indicate that an efficient and universal EBW H&CD system is indeed viable. In particular, power can be deposited and current reasonably efficiently driven across the whole plasma radius. Such a system could be controlled by a suitably chosen launching antenna vertical position and would also be sufficiently robust.

  10. The characterisation of non-evaporable getters by Auger electron spectroscopy Analytical potential and artefacts

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M

    2002-01-01

    The surfaces of getter materials are particularly difficult to analyse because of their high chemical reactivity. The results obtained can be strongly influenced by the experimental set-up and procedures. In this paper the experimental influence on the Auger electron spectroscopy results is discussed, based on the measurements of more than 100 different non-evaporable getter (NEG) materials. There are four typical changes in the Auger electron spectra when a NEG becomes activated. The oxygen peak intensity decreases, the shape of the metal peaks changes, the carbon peak shape changes shape and intensity and a chlorine peak occurs. All these changes are affected by instrumental artefacts. The Zr-MNV peak shape changes occurring during the reduction of ZrO2 are well suited to determine the onset of NEG activation, while the slope with which the O-KLL peak intensity decreases in a certain temperature range is a better criterion for the determination of the temperature at which activation is complete. The O-KLL i...

  11. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  12. Von Neumann Entropy of an Electron in One-Dimensional Determined Potentials

    GONG Long-Yan; TONG Pei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ By using the measure of von Neumann entropy, we numerically investigate quantum entanglement of an electronmoving in the one-dimensional Harper model and in the one-dimensional slowly varying potential model. Thedelocalized and localized eigenstates can be distinguished by von Neumann entropy of the individual eigenstates.There are drastic decreases in yon Neumann entropy of the individual eigenstates at mobility edges. In the curveof the spectrum averaged yon Neumann entropy as a function of potential parameter λ, a sharp transition existsat the metal-insulator transition point λc = 2. It is found that the yon Neumann entropy is a good quantity toreflect localization and metal-insulator transition.

  13. Exact time-dependent exchange-correlation potentials for strong-field electron dynamics

    Lein, Manfred; Kuemmel, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    By solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation and inverting the time-dependent Kohn-Sham scheme we obtain the exact time-dependent exchange-correlation potential of density-functional theory for the strong-field dynamics of a correlated system. We demonstrate that essential features of the exact exchange-correlation potential can be related to derivative discontinuities in stationary density-functional theory. Incorporating the discontinuity in a time-dependent density-functional calculation greatly improves the description of the ionization process

  14. Potential energies for the two lowest 1A' electronic states of H3+

    Ichihara, Akira; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Iwamoto, Osamu

    1998-11-01

    Potential energies for the two lowest 1 A' states of H 3 + at 701 different spatial geometries are tabulated. These energies have been calculated by the ab initio full configuration interaction method with a (8s6p2d1f) Gaussian type basis set. Features of avoided crossing of two surfaces as well as the potential well in the ground state can be produced by interpolating calculated energies. These ab initio energies are expressed as a function of three internuclear distances in the range from 0.6 to 10.0 bohr, and they are applicable to the molecular dynamics study for the H + + H 2 system. (author)

  15. Effect of the track potential on the motion and energy flow of secondary electrons created from heavy-ion irradiation

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2018-05-01

    Using simulations, we have evaluated the effect of the track potential on the motion and energy flow of secondary electrons, with the goal of determining the spatial distribution of energy deposition due to irradiation with heavy ions. We have simulated this effect as a function of the mean path τ between the incident ion-impact-ionization events at ion energies Eion. Here, the track potential is the potential formed from electric field near this incident ion path. The simulations indicate that this effect is mainly determined by τ and hardly depends on Eion. To understand heavy ion beam science more deeply and to reduce the time required by simulations, we have proposed simple approximation methods that almost reproduce the simulation results here.

  16. The electronic states calculated using the sinusoidal potential for Cd1-xZnxS quantum dot superlattices

    Sakly, A.; Safta, N.; Mejri, H.; Lamine, A. Ben

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This paper is dedicated to structures based on Cd 1-x Zn x S. - Abstract: The present work reports on a theoretical investigation of superlattices based on Cd 1-x Zn x S quantum dots embedded in an insulating material. The system to model is assumed to be a series of flattened cylindrical quantum dots with a finite barrier at the boundary and is studied using a sinusoidal potential. The electronic states of both Γ 1 - (ground) and Γ 2 - (first excited) minibands have been computed as a function of inter-quantum dot separation and Zn composition. An analysis of the results shows that the widths of Γ 1 - and Γ 2 - minibands decrease as the superlattice period and Zn content increase separately. Moreover, the sinusoidal shape of the confining potential accounts for the coupling between quantum dots quantitatively less than the Kronig-Penney potential model.

  17. Potential energy curve of N2 in its ground electronic state

    Špirko, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 6 (2005), 731-739 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400550511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : N2 molecule * coupled-cluster calculations * reduced potential curve Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.949, year: 2005

  18. Environmentally-induced discharge transient coupling to spacecraft

    Viswanathan, R.; Barbay, G.; Stevens, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Hughes SCREENS (Space Craft Response to Environments of Space) technique was applied to generic spin and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft models. It involved the NASCAP modeling for surface charging and lumped element modeling for transients coupling into a spacecraft. A differential voltage between antenna and spun shelf of approx. 400 V and current of 12 A resulted from discharge at antenna for the spinner and approx. 3 kv and 0.3 A from a discharge at solar panels for the 3-axis stabilized Spacecraft. A typical interface circuit response was analyzed to show that the transients would couple into the Spacecraft System through ground points, which are most vulnerable. A compilation and review was performed on 15 years of available data from electron and ion current collection phenomena. Empirical models were developed to match data and compared with flight data of Pix-1 and Pix-2 mission. It was found that large space power systems would float negative and discharge if operated at or above 300 V. Several recommendations are given to improve the models and to apply them to large space systems.

  19. Potential Application of Electronic Olfaction Systems in Feedstuffs Analysis and Animal Nutrition

    Vittorio Dell'Orto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Olfaction Systems (EOSs based on a variety of gas-sensing technologies have been developed to simulate in a simplified manner animal olfactory sensing systems. EOSs have been successfully applied to many applications and fields, including food technology and agriculture. Less information is available for EOS applications in the feed technology and animal nutrition sectors. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs, which are derived from both forages and concentrate ingredients of farm animal rations, are considered and described in this review as olfactory markers for feedstock quality and safety evaluation. EOS applications to detect VOCs from feedstuffs (as analytical matrices are described, and some future scenarios are hypothesised. Furthermore, some EOS applications in animal feeding behaviour and organoleptic feed assessment are also described.

  20. Use of analytical Born amplitude representation in studies of dispersion potentials and electron-atom scattering

    Carvalho, I.L. de.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinct problems have been studied using simplifield Born's Amplitude Analitical Expressions. The first problem deals with the dispersion energy between the constituent members of the systems He - Ne, - He and H 2 - H 2 . In the second problem second order Born Aproximation has been used for the Electron - Atom Inelastic Scattering for the transitions 1 1 S → 2 1 S and 1 1 S → 2 1 P of helium atom and 1 S → 1 s 2 ([3s' {1/2} sup(o) 1; M sub(j)>) of neon atom (in the case of neon we have used the coupling scheme proposed by Cowan and Andrew). The results obtained by us have been compared with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature. (author) [pt

  1. Photonic Potential of Haloarchaeal Pigment Bacteriorhodopsin for Future Electronics: A Review.

    Ashwini, Ravi; Vijayanand, S; Hemapriya, J

    2017-08-01

    Haloarchaea are known for its adaptation in extreme saline environment. Halophilic archaea produces carotenoid pigments and proton pumps to protect them from extremes of salinity. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a light-driven proton pump that resides in the membrane of haloarchaea Halobacterium salinarum. The photocycle of Bacteriorhodopsin passes through several states from K to O, finally liberating ATP for host's survival. Extensive studies on Bacteriorhodopsin photocycle has provided in depth knowledge on their sequential mechanism of converting solar energy into chemical energy inside the cell. This ability of Bacteriorhodopsin to harvest sunlight has now been experimented to exploit the unexplored and extensively available solar energy in various biotechnological applications. Currently, bacteriorhodopsin finds its importance in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), logic gates (integrated circuits, IC's), optical switching, optical memories, storage devices (random access memory, RAM), biosensors, electronic sensors and optical microcavities. This review deals with the optical and electrical applications of the purple pigment Bacteriorhodopsin.

  2. Master equations for degenerate systems: electron radiative cascade in a Coulomb potential

    Uskov, D B; Pratt, R H

    2004-01-01

    We examine the effects of degeneracy and its lifting for the problem of electron radiative cascade, described by master equations of the Lindblad form (quantum optical master equations). A weak external field approximation is used to study the resulting gradual transformation of cascade dynamics between degenerate and non-degenerate forms. Exploiting the spherical symmetry properties of the system we demonstrate significant difference between perturbations commuting with angular momentum and perturbations breaking the spherical symmetry, such as a homogeneous external field. We discuss the possibility and the general approach for reduction of the Lindblad master equations in the case of spectral degeneracy to the Pauli balance equations. This determines the appropriate choice of basis as, for example, spherical or parabolic

  3. Potential value of electronic prescribing in health economic and outcomes research

    Catherine E Cooke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Catherine E Cooke1, Brian J Isetts2, Thomas E Sullivan3, Maren Fustgaard4, Daniel A Belletti51PosiHealth Inc., Ellicott City, MD, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Women’s Health Center, Danvers, MA, USA; 4Assistant Director for Regional Outcomes Research, 5Associate Director for Regional Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USAAbstract: Improving access and quality while reducing expenditures in the United States health system is expected to be a priority for many years. The use of health information technology (HIT, including electronic prescribing (eRx, is an important initiative in efforts aimed at improving safety and outcomes, increasing quality, and decreasing costs. Data from eRx has been used in studies that document reductions in medication errors, adverse drug events, and pharmacy order-processing time. Evaluating programs and initiatives intended to improve health care can be facilitated through the use of HIT and eRx. eRx data can be used to conduct research to answer questions about the outcomes of health care products, services, and new clinical initiatives with the goal of providing guidance for clinicians and policy makers. Given the recent explosive growth of eRx in the United States, the purpose of this manuscript is to assess the value and suggest enhanced uses and applications of eRx to facilitate the role of the practitioner in contributing to health economics and outcomes research.Keywords: electronic prescribing, outcomes research, health information technology

  4. Auger-electron cascades, charge potential and microdosimetry of iodine-125

    Booz, J.; Pomplun, E.; Olko, P.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1987-06-01

    This paper is a contribution to the microdosimetry of I-125. It shows microdosimetric spectra of individual and average disintegrations of I-125 for various target sizes and gives evidence for the relative contributions of energy-depositon events of low and high LET. It further presents information on the relative efficiencies of Auger-electrons and multiple charges in terms of local energy deposition, e.g. to model targets of DNA, and discusses their radiobiological implications, e.g. the microdosimetric understanding of the different efficiencies of specific and random incorporations of I-125. When I-125 is specifically incorporated into DNA, most of the energy deposition events are very large, e.g. above 40 keV/..mu..m for a simulated target volume of 20 nm diameter, regardless of the number and energy of Auger electrons emitted. Therefore it is not necessary, for the discussion of the radiobiological implications, to distinguish between different classes of disintegrations. For unspecific, homogeneous incorporation of I-125 somewhere into tissue, about 20% of the dose to critical targets of 25 nm diameter is made up by disintegrations that happen to occur within these targets. When assuming that other critical targets and target structures can be neglected, this part of the dose will be equally effective as in the case of specific incorporation of I-125 into such target models. In addition, there are the normal, low-LET radiation effects from the other, 80% large fraction of the dose. With this information, for the biological systems and end points for which a short section of the elemental chromatine fiber can be taken as the relevant critical target, it is shown that the expected D/sub 37/ value for homogeneous unspecific incorporation of I-125 can be estimated when the D/sub 37/ for specific incorporation in DNA is known.

  5. An effective potential for electron-nucleus scattering in neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung in neutron star crust

    Ofengeim, D D; Kaminker, A D; Yakovlev, D G

    2015-01-01

    We derive an analytic approximation for the emissivity of neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung (NPB) due to scattering of electrons by atomic nuclei in a neutron star (NS) crust of any realistic composition. The emissivity is expressed through generalized Coulomb logarithm by introducing an effective potential of electron-nucleus scattering. In addition, we study the conditions at which NPB in the crust is affected by strong magnetic fields and outline the main effects of the fields on neutrino emission in NSs. The results can be used for modelling of many phenomena in NSs, such as cooling of young isolated NSs, thermal relaxation of accreting NSs with overheated crust in soft X-ray transients and evolution of magnetars. (paper)

  6. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  7. Optimal Autonomous Spacecraft Resiliency Maneuvers Using Metaheuristics

    2014-09-15

    This work was accepted for published by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets in July 2014...publication in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets . Chapter 5 introduces an impulsive maneuvering strategy to deliver a spacecraft to its final...upon arrival r2 and v2 , respectively. The variable T2 determines the time of flight needed to make the maneuver, and the variable θ2 determines the

  8. Influence of polarization potential on probabilities of free-free transitions of electrons

    Dobrolyubov, N.Yu.; Kukin, V.D.; Rostovskij, V.S.

    1997-01-01

    The method for calculating the matrix element of electrical dipole transition between the continuos spectrum states with an account of existence of coulomb and polarization potentials in the atom external area is considered. The recurrent of formulae, enabling the calculation of contribution to the matrix element from integrals over the area outside the atom with application of values of radial wave functions and their first derivatives at the boundary, are obtained

  9. Preferences of Current and Potential Patients and Family Members Regarding Implementation of Electronic Communication Portals in Intensive Care Units.

    Brown, Samuel M; Bell, Sigall K; Roche, Stephanie D; Dente, Erica; Mueller, Ariel; Kim, Tae-Eun; O'Reilly, Kristin; Lee, Barbara Sarnoff; Sands, Ken; Talmor, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The quality of communication with patients and family members in intensive care units (ICUs) is a focus of current interest for clinical care improvement. Electronic communication portals are commonly used in other healthcare settings to improve communication. We do not know whether patients and family members desire such portals in ICUs, and if so, what functionality they should provide. To define interest in and desired elements of an electronic communication portal among current and potential ICU patients and their family members. We surveyed, via an Internet panel, 1,050 English-speaking adults residing in the United States with a personal or family history of an ICU admission within 10 years (cohort A) and 1,050 individuals without a history of such admission (cohort B). We also administered a survey instrument in person to 105 family members of patients currently admitted to ICUs at an academic medical center in Boston (cohort C). Respondents, especially current ICU family members, supported an electronic communication portal, including access via an electronic tablet. They wanted at least daily updates, one-paragraph summaries of family meetings including a list of key decisions made, and knowledge of the role and experience of treating clinicians. Overall, they preferred detailed rather than "big picture" information. Respondents were generally comfortable sharing information with their family members. Preferences regarding a communication portal varied significantly by age, sex, ethnicity, and prior experience with ICU hospitalization. Electronic communication portals appear welcome in contemporary ICUs. Frequent updates, knowledge about the professional qualifications of clinicians, detailed medical information, and documentation of family meetings are particularly desired.

  10. Ulysses spacecraft control and monitoring system

    Hamer, P. A.; Snowden, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The baseline Ulysses spacecraft control and monitoring system (SCMS) concepts and the converted SCMS, residing on a DEC/VAX 8350 hardware, are considered. The main functions of the system include monitoring and displaying spacecraft telemetry, preparing spacecraft commands, producing hard copies of experimental data, and archiving spacecraft telemetry. The SCMS system comprises over 20 subsystems ranging from low-level utility routines to the major monitoring and control software. These in total consist of approximately 55,000 lines of FORTRAN source code and 100 VMS command files. The SCMS major software facilities are described, including database files, telemetry processing, telecommanding, archiving of data, and display of telemetry.

  11. Operationally Responsive Spacecraft Subsystem, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Saber Astronautics proposes spacecraft subsystem control software which can autonomously reconfigure avionics for best performance during various mission conditions....

  12. Plasma potential and electron temperature evaluated by ball-pen and Langmuir probes in the COMPASS tokamak.

    Dimitrova, Miglena; Popov, Tsv.K.; Adámek, Jiří; Kovačič, J.; Ivanova, P.; Hasan, E.; López-Bruna, D.; Seidl, Jakub; Vondráček, Petr; Dejarnac, Renaud; Stöckel, Jan; Imríšek, Martin; Pánek, Radomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 12 (2017), č. článku 125001. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-10723S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015045 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma potential * electron temperature * bi-Maxwellian EEDF * ball-pen probe * Langmuir probe * COMPASS tokamak * last closed flux surface Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016

  13. Purification and treatment of industrial wastewater by electron beam process: it's potential and effectiveness evaluation

    Zulkafli Ghazali; Khomsaton Abu Bakar; Ting Teo Ming; Siti Aiasah Hashim; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    2002-01-01

    Demand for water has grown dramatically globally. We have seen how acute is the demand for treated water in Malaysia during dry spell of late. Between 1900 and 1995, water consumption increased by over six times, globally, more than double the rate of population growth. This rapid growth in water demand is due to the increasing reliance on irrigation to achieve food security, the growth of industries, and the increasing use for domestic purposes. Given the seriousness of the situation and future risk of crises, there is an urgent need to develop the water-efficient technologies including economical treatment methods of wastewater and polluted water. Electron beam treatment (E-Beam treatment) is a comparatively new method of wastewater purification. E-beam treatment is also an environment-friendly approach for the cleanup of contaminated groundwater and industrial wastewater. E-beam treatment treats multi-components waste streams and does not require any hazardous chemical additives nor does it create any secondary wastes. It uses fast formation of short-lived reactive particles, which are capable of efficient decomposition of pollutants inside wastewater. This paper highlights the practical treatment of wastewater using E-Beam method that gives essential conveniences and advantages of the followings: - strongest reducing and oxidizing agents; - universality and interchangeability of redox agents; - variety of paths for pollutant conversion; - process controllability; - wide choice of equipment and technological regimes; - compatibility with conventional methods. (Author)

  14. Is There Evidence for Potential Harm of Electronic Cigarette Use in Pregnancy?

    Suter, Melissa A.; Mastrobattista, Joan; Sachs, Maike; Aagaard, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other nicotine containing products is increasing among women of reproductive age. The short- and long-term effects of these products on both mother and fetus are unknown. Methods Because e-cigarettes are nicotine delivery systems, we sought to conduct a comprehensive review of the effects of nicotine on the fetus. Results In utero nicotine exposure in animal models is associated with adverse effects for the offspring lung, cardiovascular system and brain. In the lung, this included reduced surface area, weight, and volume, as well as emphysema-like lesions. In adulthood, exposed offspring demonstrate elevated blood pressure and increased perivascular adipose tissue. In the brain, exposure alters offspring serotonergic, dopaminergic, and norepinephrine networks, which in turn are associated with behavioral and cognitive impairments. We also review current data on the lack of efficacy of nicotine replacement therapy in pregnant women, and highlight different nicotine containing products such as snuff, snus, and hookah. Conclusion We conclude that no amount of nicotine is known to be safe during pregnancy, and studies specifically addressing this risk are crucial and an imminent public health issue. PMID:25366492

  15. Electronic memory devices based on the chalcone with negative electrostatic potential regions

    Yan, Bao-Long; Sun, Ru; Ge, Jian-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Hua; Lu, Jian-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) properties were used for the explanation of organic electric memory ability. Several chalcone compounds, owning a negative ESP region locates at the oxygen atom, were selected in this paper to validate the selection of compounds for organic memory materials. The synthesis, characterization, fabrication of the organic memory devices and the electrical properties for them were reported, and they were shown as WORM (write once read many times) type memory devices. The molecular geometries were optimized by the addition of a changeable electric field in the x direction inside the molecules using FF-DFT (Finite Field-Density Functionary Theory) method. The relationship between ESP of the molecules under different electric field and the property was discussed, and the mechanisms associated with the memory effect were also elucidated from DFT calculation results. - Highlights: • The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) properties were used. • The chalcone compounds were used for the WORM type device. • The molecular geometries were optimized by the addition of a changeable electric field in the x direction. • The structure–property relationship was discussed

  16. Spectrum of allergenic pollen in Karachi and their characterization using conventional and electron microscopy: Potential candidates for allergy vaccines

    Parveen, A.; Noori, M.Y.; Qureshi, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of naturally growing plants with possible allergenic potential and study their pollen morphology in Karachi, Pakistan. Methodology: We performed field surveys of naturally growing plants with possible allergenic potential and studied their pollen morphology using conventional (light) as well as scanning electron microscopy. Results: About 80 allergenic pollen producing species were identified which are distributed in 45 genera and 9 angiospermic families. Grasses belonging to Graminae are most abundant followed by plants from family Fabaceae (Leguminosae). Highly allergenic weeds were also found widely growing in the city areas belonging to Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae family. Conclusion: Our study provides an updated information about the allergenic plants growing in Karachi city. All desensitization efforts should be designed in accordance to the available information regarding the prevalent allergens in the environment so that appropriate therapy can be given to the affected population. (author)

  17. An ab initio study on four low-lying electronic potential energy curves for atomic cesium and rare gas pairs

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Yuki, Kenta; Matsuoka, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations with single and double excitation levels, Davidson correction, and a spin-orbit (SO) effective core potential, we have developed a series of four low-lying electronic potential energy curves (PECs) for the pairs formed between a cesium atom (Cs) and a rare gas (Rg = He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe). The results obtained at the MRCI level were compared with those generated at the SOCI level, which were recently reported by Blank et al. The shapes of the PECs were essentially the same when the same basis set was used. Based on this agreement, more precise PECs for Cs-Rg pairs were calculated using a larger basis set for Rg. (author)

  18. Multifractal analysis of electronic transitions in a family of quasiperiodic potentials

    Thakur, P.K.; Brouers, F.; Ananthakrishna, G.

    1989-12-01

    We analyze the nature of extended, localized and critical states in an extension of the Aubry model where mobility edges have been reported. We calculate the multifractal spectra of exact eigenstates of this model for varying chain lengths and confirm the existence of mobility edges. Moreover we are able to show that the localized states can exhibit a behaviour rather different from the usual exponentially decaying states in a random potential. Lyapounov exponents or participation ratios are unable to produce such information. Our results also indicate that a stable multifractal distribution is a general feature of crossovers of states of different nature. This conjecture should be confirmed in other models. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs

  19. Plasma potential in a magnetic mirror with electron-cyclotron-resonance heating

    Smith, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the ECRH plasma in the University of Wisconsin DE Machine magnetic mirror have been undertaken. Typical plasma parameters in these experiments were T/sub e/ - 10 to 30 eV, T/sub i/ - 4 eV, V/sub po/ (plasma potential at midplane) - 20 to 50 V, midplane plasma density n 0 - 10 16 m - 3 , B 0 (magnetic field strength on axis at midplane) - .005 to .01 T, mirror ratio R - 5 to 20. The principal experimental findings were the appearance of strong density peaks (approx. 2 x background) and notable V/sub f/ dips (approx. kT/sub e//e) in a narrow (approx. 1 cm) region near the axial positions of cyclotron resonance. The properties of these dips do not change greatly over the range of operating parameters, but are narrower at higher pressures

  20. Nonequilibrium chemical potential in a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum-Hall-effect regime

    Pokhabov, D. A., E-mail: pokhabov@isp.nsc.ru; Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Zhdanov, E. Yu.; Bakarov, A. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The nonequilibrium state of a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum-Hall-effect regime is studied in Hall bars equipped with additional inner contacts situated within the bar. The magnetic-field dependence of the voltage drop between different contact pairs are studied at various temperatures. It was found that the voltage between the inner and outer contacts exhibits peaks of significant amplitude in narrow magnetic-field intervals near integer filling factors. Furthermore, the magnetic-field dependence of the voltage in these intervals exhibits a hysteresis, whereas the voltage between the outer contacts remains zero in the entire magnetic-field range. The appearance of the observed voltage peaks and their hysteretic behavior can be explained by an imbalance between the chemical potentials of edge and bulk states, resulting from nonequilibrium charge redistribution between the edge and bulk states when the magnetic field sweeps under conditions of the quantum Hall effect. The results of the study significantly complement the conventional picture of the quantum Hall effect, explicitly indicating the existence of a significant imbalance at the edge of the two-dimensional electron gas: the experimentally observed difference between the electrochemical potentials of the edge and bulk exceeds the distance between Landau levels by tens of times.

  1. The potential impact of developments in electronic technology on the future conduct of air warfare, volume 3

    1986-12-01

    Advances in microelectronics have resulted in circuit densities many orders of magnitude greater than in current usage, making possible higher speed circuitry and greater storage capacity. RF techniques are also leading to monolithic microwave integrated circuits and microstrip antennas with corresponding reductions in size and weight. In addition, rapid advances are taking place in computer architecture and software that will provide improved information processing and control. This, coupled with progress in artificial intelligence and man-machine interface, offers promise of greatly improved battle management in the cockpit. The scale of changes is such that the nature of air warfare should be significantly affected over the next twenty years. This study examined the potential of electronic technology and potential benefits such as improvements in information processing, reduction in size and weight, increased reliability and maintainability; determined the applicability of such improvements to avionics and command and control systems and such functions as navigation and guidance, communications, surveillance, cockpit engineering and electronic warfare; and examined the impact on air warfare in the time period 2000 to 2010.

  2. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.; Thayer, Frederick

    2016-04-01

    Electric field and plasma wave instruments act as dust detectors picking up voltage pulses induced by impacts of particulates on the spacecraft body. These signals enable the characterization of cosmic dust environments even with missions without dedicated dust instruments. For example, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft performed the first detection of dust particles near Uranus, Neptune, and in the outer solar system [Gurnett et al., 1987, 1991, 1997]. The two STEREO spacecraft observed distinct signals at high rate that were interpreted as nano-sized particles originating from near the Sun and accelerated to high velocities by the solar wind [MeyerVernet et al, 2009a, Zaslavsky et al., 2012]. The MAVEN spacecraft is using the antennas onboard to characterize the dust environment of Mars [Andersson et al., 2014] and Solar Probe Plus will do the same in the inner heliosphere. The challenge, however, is the correct interpretation of the impact signals and calculating the mass of the dust particles. The uncertainties result from the incomplete understanding of the signal pickup mechanisms, and the variation of the signal amplitude with impact location, the ambient plasma environment, and impact speed. A comprehensive laboratory study of impact generated antenna signals has been performed recently using the IMPACT dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado. Dust particles of micron and submicron sizes with velocities of tens of km/s are generated using a 3 MV electrostatic analyzer. A scaled down model spacecraft is exposed to the dust impacts and one or more antennas, connected to sensitive electronics, are used to detect the impact signals. The measurements showed that there are three clearly distinct signal pickup mechanisms due to spacecraft charging, antenna charging and antenna pickup sensing space charge from the expanding plasma cloud. All mechanisms vary with the spacecraft and antenna bias voltages and, furthermore, the latter two

  3. Benchmark study of ionization potentials and electron affinities of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes using density functional theory

    Zhou, Bin; Hu, Zhubin; Jiang, Yanrong; He, Xiao; Sun, Zhenrong; Sun, Haitao

    2018-05-01

    The intrinsic parameters of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) are closely related to their unique properties and associated applications. In this work, we demonstrated the success of optimal tuning method based on range-separated (RS) density functionals for both accurate and efficient prediction of vertical IPs and electron affinities (EAs) of a series of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes C20n H20 (n  =  2–6) compared to the high-level IP/EA equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions (IP/EA-EOM-CCSD). Notably, the resulting frontier orbital energies (–ε HOMO and –ε LUMO) from the tuning method exhibit an excellent approximation to the corresponding IPs and EAs, that significantly outperform other conventional density functionals. In addition, it is suggested that the RS density functionals that possess both a fixed amount of exact exchange in the short-range and a correct long-range asymptotic behavior are suitable for calculating electronic structures of finite-sized CNTs. Next the performance of density functionals for description of various molecular properties such as chemical potential, hardness and electrophilicity are assessed as a function of tube length. Thanks to the efficiency and accuracy of this tuning method, the related behaviors of much longer armchair single-walled CNTs until C200H20 were studied. Lastly, the present work is proved to provide an efficient theoretical tool for future materials design and reliable characterization of other interesting properties of CNT-based systems.

  4. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Materials and processes for spacecraft and high reliability applications

    D Dunn, Barrie

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this book is to assist scientists and engineers select the ideal material or manufacturing process for particular applications; these could cover a wide range of fields, from light-weight structures to electronic hardware. The book will help in problem solving as it also presents more than 100 case studies and failure investigations from the space sector that can, by analogy, be applied to other industries. Difficult-to-find material data is included for reference. The sciences of metallic (primarily) and organic materials presented throughout the book demonstrate how they can be applied as an integral part of spacecraft product assurance schemes, which involve quality, material and processes evaluations, and the selection of mechanical and component parts. In this successor edition, which has been revised and updated, engineering problems associated with critical spacecraft hardware and the space environment are highlighted by over 500 illustrations including micrographs and fractographs. Sp...

  6. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    B Scott Perrin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing web portal (www.charmming.org. The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis.

  7. Spacecraft command and control using expert systems

    Norcross, Scott; Grieser, William H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a product called the Intelligent Mission Toolkit (IMT), which was created to meet the changing demands of the spacecraft command and control market. IMT is a command and control system built upon an expert system. Its primary functions are to send commands to the spacecraft and process telemetry data received from the spacecraft. It also controls the ground equipment used to support the system, such as encryption gear, and telemetry front-end equipment. Add-on modules allow IMT to control antennas and antenna interface equipment. The design philosophy for IMT is to utilize available commercial products wherever possible. IMT utilizes Gensym's G2 Real-time Expert System as the core of the system. G2 is responsible for overall system control, spacecraft commanding control, and spacecraft telemetry analysis and display. Other commercial products incorporated into IMT include the SYBASE relational database management system and Loral Test and Integration Systems' System 500 for telemetry front-end processing.

  8. Propulsion Trade Studies for Spacecraft Swarm Mission Design

    Dono, Andres; Plice, Laura; Mueting, Joel; Conn, Tracie; Ho, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft swarms constitute a challenge from an orbital mechanics standpoint. Traditional mission design involves the application of methodical processes where predefined maneuvers for an individual spacecraft are planned in advance. This approach does not scale to spacecraft swarms consisting of many satellites orbiting in close proximity; non-deterministic maneuvers cannot be preplanned due to the large number of units and the uncertainties associated with their differential deployment and orbital motion. For autonomous small sat swarms in LEO, we investigate two approaches for controlling the relative motion of a swarm. The first method involves modified miniature phasing maneuvers, where maneuvers are prescribed that cancel the differential delta V of each CubeSat's deployment vector. The second method relies on artificial potential functions (APFs) to contain the spacecraft within a volumetric boundary and avoid collisions. Performance results and required delta V budgets are summarized, indicating that each method has advantages and drawbacks for particular applications. The mini phasing maneuvers are more predictable and sustainable. The APF approach provides a more responsive and distributed performance, but at considerable propellant cost. After considering current state of the art CubeSat propulsion systems, we conclude that the first approach is feasible, but the modified APF method of requires too much control authority to be enabled by current propulsion systems.

  9. Embedded Thermal Control for Subsystems for Next Generation Spacecraft Applications

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. NASA, the Defense Department and commercial interests are actively engaged in developing miniaturized spacecraft systems and scientific instruments to leverage smaller cheaper spacecraft form factors such as CubeSats. This paper outlines research and development efforts among Goddard Space Flight Center personnel and its several partners to develop innovative embedded thermal control subsystems. Embedded thermal control subsystems is a cross cutting enabling technology integrating advanced manufacturing techniques to develop multifunctional intelligent structures to reduce Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) consumption of both the thermal control subsystem and overall spacecraft. Embedded thermal control subsystems permit heat acquisition and rejection at higher temperatures than state of the art systems by employing both advanced heat transfer equipment (integrated heat exchangers) and high heat transfer phenomena. The Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Engineering Branch has active investigations seeking to characterize advanced thermal control systems for near term spacecraft missions. The embedded thermal control subsystem development effort consists of fundamental research as well as development of breadboard and prototype hardware and spaceflight validation efforts. This paper will outline relevant fundamental investigations of micro-scale heat transfer and electrically driven liquid film boiling. The hardware development efforts focus upon silicon based high heat flux applications (electronic chips, power electronics etc.) and multifunctional structures. Flight validation efforts include variable gravity campaigns and a proposed CubeSat based flight demonstration of a breadboard embedded thermal control system. The CubeSat investigation is technology demonstration will characterize in long-term low earth orbit a breadboard embedded thermal subsystem and its individual components to develop

  10. Omni-directional Particle Detector (ODPD) on Tiangong-2 Spacecraft

    Guohong, S.; Zhang, S.; Yang, X.; Wang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Tiangong-2 spacecraft is the second space laboratory independently developed by china after Tiangong-1, which was launched on 15 September 2016. It is also the first real space laboratory in china, which will be used to further validate the space rendezvous and docking technology and to carry out a series of space tests. The spacecraft's orbit is 350km height and 42° inclination. The omni-directional particle detector (ODPD) on Tiangong-2 spacecraft is a new instrument developed by China. Its goal is the anisotropy and energy spectra of space particles on manned space flight orbit. The ODPD measures the energy spectra and pitch angle distributions of high energy electrons and protons. It consists of one electron spectrum telescope, one proton spectrum telescope and sixteen directional flux telescopes. The ODPD is designed to measure the protons spectrum from 2.5MeV to 150MeV, electrons spectrum from 0.2MeV to 1.5MeV, the flux of electrons energy >200keV and protons energy>1.5MeV on 2∏ space, also the ODPD has a small sensor to measure the LET spectrum from 1-100MeV/cm2sr. The primary advantage can give the particle's pitch angle distributions at any time because of the sixteen flux telescopes arrange form 0 to 180 degree. This is the first paper dealing with ODPD data, so we firstly spend some time describing the instrument, its theory of operation and its calibration. Then we give the preliminary detecting results.

  11. Optimal Electrical Energy Slewing for Reaction Wheel Spacecraft

    Marsh, Harleigh Christian

    The results contained in this dissertation contribute to a deeper level of understanding to the energy required to slew a spacecraft using reaction wheels. This work addresses the fundamental manner in which spacecrafts are slewed (eigenaxis maneuvering), and demonstrates that this conventional maneuver can be dramatically improved upon in regards to reduction of energy, dissipative losses, as well as peak power. Energy is a fundamental resource that effects every asset, system, and subsystem upon a spacecraft, from the attitude control system which orients the spacecraft, to the communication subsystem to link with ground stations, to the payloads which collect scientific data. For a reaction wheel spacecraft, the attitude control system is a particularly heavy load on the power and energy resources on a spacecraft. The central focus of this dissertation is reducing the burden which the attitude control system places upon the spacecraft in regards to electrical energy, which is shown in this dissertation to be a challenging problem to computationally solve and analyze. Reducing power and energy demands can have a multitude of benefits, spanning from the initial design phase, to in-flight operations, to potentially extending the mission life of the spacecraft. This goal is approached from a practical standpoint apropos to an industry-flight setting. Metrics to measure electrical energy and power are developed which are in-line with the cost associated to operating reaction wheel based attitude control systems. These metrics are incorporated into multiple families of practical high-dimensional constrained nonlinear optimal control problems to reduce the electrical energy, as well as the instantaneous power burdens imposed by the attitude control system upon the spacecraft. Minimizing electrical energy is shown to be a problem in L1 optimal control which is nonsmooth in regards to state variables as well as the control. To overcome the challenge of nonsmoothness, a

  12. A Sampling Based Approach to Spacecraft Autonomous Maneuvering with Safety Specifications

    Starek, Joseph A.; Barbee, Brent W.; Pavone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a methods for safe spacecraft autonomous maneuvering that leverages robotic motion-planning techniques to spacecraft control. Specifically the scenario we consider is an in-plan rendezvous of a chaser spacecraft in proximity to a target spacecraft at the origin of the Clohessy Wiltshire Hill frame. The trajectory for the chaser spacecraft is generated in a receding horizon fashion by executing a sampling based robotic motion planning algorithm name Fast Marching Trees (FMT) which efficiently grows a tree of trajectories over a set of probabillistically drawn samples in the state space. To enforce safety the tree is only grown over actively safe samples for which there exists a one-burn collision avoidance maneuver that circularizes the spacecraft orbit along a collision-free coasting arc and that can be executed under potential thrusters failures. The overall approach establishes a provably correct framework for the systematic encoding of safety specifications into the spacecraft trajectory generations process and appears amenable to real time implementation on orbit. Simulation results are presented for a two-fault tolerant spacecraft during autonomous approach to a single client in Low Earth Orbit.

  13. Trapped electrons as a free energy source for the auroral kilometric radiation

    Louarn, P.; Roux, A.; de Feraudy, H.; Le Queau, D.; Andre, M.; Matson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of electromagnetic fields and particle distributions, measured during the crossing by the Swedish spacecraft Viking of an auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) source, are presented. It is shown that AKR is generated within an acceleration region characterized by an upward directed parallel electric field, as evidenced by its signature on the proton and electron distributions. From particle observations inside the AKR source it is clear that the potential drop below the spacecraft produces upward moving field-aligned ion beams and a depletion in the density of low energy electrons. The potential drop above the spacecraft produces downward accelerated electrons. A large fraction of these electrons have small parallel velocities; they mirror above the ionosphere. These trapped electrons lie in a region of velocity space which should be empty in a simple adiabatic theory. The authors suggest that these electrons get trapped when they experience a time-varying (or space-varying) parallel electric field. This conclusion is supported by the comparison between the observed electron distribution function and a model distribution function built by applying Liouville theorem. Since trapped electrons can cause positive gradients (∂f e /∂V perpendicular > 0) over a broad range of parallel velocities, around v parallel ∼ 0, it is suggested that they are the free energy source for the AKR. This conclusion is substantiated by an evaluation of the convective growth rate, where the various input parameters have been determined by fitting particle data

  14. Differential Evolution Optimization for Targeting Spacecraft Maneuver Plans

    Mattern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Previous analysis identified specific orbital parameters as being safer for conjunction avoidance for the TDRS fleet. With TDRS-9 being considered an at-risk spacecraft, a potential conjunction concern was raised should TDRS-9 fail while at a longitude of 12W. This document summarizes the analysis performed to identify if these specific orbital parameters could be targeted using the remaining drift-termination maneuvers for the relocation of TDRS-9 from 41W longitude to 12W longitude.

  15. Spacecraft Line-of-Sight Stabilization Using LWIR Earth Signature

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of using the bright and near-uniform Earth infrared (or wavelength infrared, LWIR) signature as a stable reference for accurate (micro-rad or less) inertial pointing and tracking on-board an space vehicle, including the determination of the fundamental limits of applicability of the proposed method for space missions. We demonstrate sub-micro radian level pointing accuracy under a representative set of disturbances experienced by the spacecraft in orbit.

  16. Ion- and electron-acoustic solitons in two-electron temperature space plasmas

    Lakhina, G. S.; Kakad, A. P.; Singh, S. V.; Verheest, F.

    2008-01-01

    Properties of ion- and electron-acoustic solitons are investigated in an unmagnetized multicomponent plasma system consisting of cold and hot electrons and hot ions using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. The analysis is based on fluid equations and the Poisson equation. Solitary wave solutions are found when the Mach numbers exceed some critical values. The critical Mach numbers for the ion-acoustic solitons are found to be smaller than those for electron-acoustic solitons for a given set of plasma parameters. The critical Mach numbers of ion-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of hot electron temperature and the decrease of cold electron density. On the other hand, the critical Mach numbers of electron-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of the cold electron density as well as the hot electron temperature. The ion-acoustic solitons have positive potentials for the parameters considered. However, the electron-acoustic solitons have positive or negative potentials depending whether the fractional cold electron density with respect to the ion density is greater or less than a certain critical value. Further, the amplitudes of both the ion- and electron-acoustic solitons increase with the increase of the hot electron temperature. Possible application of this model to electrostatic solitary waves observed on the auroral field lines by the Viking spacecraft is discussed

  17. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    Trushnikov, D. N., E-mail: trdimitr@yandex.ru [The department for Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Mladenov, G. M., E-mail: gmmladenov@abv.bg; Koleva, E. G., E-mail: eligeorg@abv.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Shose, 1784, Sofia (Bulgaria); Technology Centre of Electron Beam and Plasma Technologies and Techniques, 68-70 Vrania, ap.10, Banishora,1309, Sofia (Bulgaria); Belenkiy, V. Ya., E-mail: mtf@pstu.ru; Varushkin, S. V., E-mail: stepan.varushkin@mail.ru [The department for Welding Production and Technology of Constructional Materials, Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  18. Wedge-Shaped GaN Nanowalls: A Potential Candidate for Two-Dimensional Electronics and Spintronics

    Deb, Swarup; Dhar, Subhabrata

    Schrödingerand Poisson equations are solved self-consistently in order to obtain the potential and charge density distribution in n-type GaN nanowalls tapered along c-axis by different angles. The study shows two-dimensional (2D) quantum confinement of electrons in the central vertical plane of the wall for the entire range of tapering. Calculation of room temperature electron mobility in the 2D channel shows a steady decrease with the increase of the inclination angle of the side facets with respect to the base. However, it is interesting to note that the mobility remains to be much larger than that of bulk GaN even for the inclination angle of 65∘. The properties of high mobility and the vertical orientation of the 2DEG plane in this system can be exploited in fabricating highly conducting transparent interconnects and field effect transistors, which can lead to large scale integration of 2D devices in future.

  19. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  20. The effects of 1 kW class arcjet thruster plumes on spacecraft charging and spacecraft thermal control materials

    Bogorad, A.; Lichtin, D. A.; Bowman, C.; Armenti, J.; Pencil, E.; Sarmiento, C.

    1992-01-01

    Arcjet thrusters are soon to be used for north/south stationkeeping on commercial communications satellites. A series of tests was performed to evaluate the possible effects of these thrusters on spacecraft charging and the degradation of thermal control material. During the tests the interaction between arcjet plumes and both charged and uncharged surfaces did not cause any significant material degradation. In addition, firing an arcjet thruster benignly reduced the potential of charged surfaces to near zero.

  1. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  2. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  3. Analysis of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection by a Spacecraft Radio Signal: A Case Study

    Molera Calvés, G.; Kallio, E.; Cimo, G.; Quick, J.; Duev, D. A.; Bocanegra Bahamón, T.; Nickola, M.; Kharinov, M. A.; Mikhailov, A. G.

    2017-11-01

    Tracking radio communication signals from planetary spacecraft with ground-based telescopes offers the possibility to study the electron density and the interplanetary scintillation of the solar wind. Observations of the telemetry link of planetary spacecraft have been conducted regularly with ground antennae from the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network, aiming to study the propagation of radio signals in the solar wind at different solar elongations and distances from the Sun. We have analyzed the Mars Express spacecraft radio signal phase fluctuations while, based on a 3-D heliosphere plasma simulation, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) crossed the radio path during one of our observations on 6 April 2015. Our measurements showed that the phase scintillation indices increased by a factor of 4 during the passage of the ICME. The method presented here confirms that the phase scintillation technique based on spacecraft signals provides information of the properties and propagation of the ICMEs in the heliosphere.

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Spacecraft Lithium Ion Battery Micro-Cycling Investigation

    Dakermanji, George; Lee, Leonine; Spitzer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft was jointly developed by NASA and JAXA. It is a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft launched on February 27, 2014. The power system is a Direct Energy Transfer (DET) system designed to support 1950 watts orbit average power. The batteries use SONY 18650HC cells and consist of three 8s by 84p batteries operated in parallel as a single battery. During instrument integration with the spacecraft, large current transients were observed in the battery. Investigation into the matter traced the cause to the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) phased array radar which generates cyclical high rate current transients on the spacecraft power bus. The power system electronics interaction with these transients resulted in the current transients in the battery. An accelerated test program was developed to bound the effect, and to assess the impact to the mission.

  5. Recent Observations of Energetic Particles from the Voyager Spacecraft

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.

    2013-05-01

    The Voyager spacecraft have been exploring the heliosheath since their crossings of the solar wind termination shock on December 2004 (Voyager 1) and August 2007 (Voyager 2). Starting on 7 May 2012, dramatic short-term changes in the intensities of heliospheric particles and galactic cosmic rays have been occurring periodically at Voyager 1. In July, a series of encounters with a heliospheric depletion region occurred, culminating on 25 August 2012 with the durable entry into the region by Voyager 1 (durable at least through the time of this writing in early February 2012). This depletion region is characterized by the disappearance of particles accelerated in the heliosphere, the anomalous cosmic rays and termination shock particles, and the increased intensity of galactic cosmic ray nuclei and electrons. The result is that the low-energy part of the galactic cosmic ray spectra is being revealed for the first time. Data from the magnetometer experiment on Voyager 1 implies that the spacecraft is not yet in the interstellar medium, but it apparently has a good connection path to it. At Voyager 2, dramatic changes haven't occurred but there are longer-term trends in the intensities that are different from what were observed on Voyager 1. We will report on the recent observations of energetic particles from both spacecraft. This work was supported by NASA under contract NNN12AA012.

  6. The first collection of spacecraft-associated microorganisms: a public source for extremotolerant microorganisms from spacecraft assembly clean rooms.

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Rettberg, Petra; Pukall, Rüdiger

    2012-11-01

    very unusual properties of microbes. For ESA, this collection is an essential resource with which to evaluate the contamination potential of spacecraft-associated biology and validate new biological contamination control and reduction procedures.

  7. Effects of electron pressure anisotropy on current sheet configuration

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere have demonstrated that the magnetotail current sheet can be supported by currents of anisotropic electron population. Strong electron currents are responsible for the formation of very thin (intense) current sheets playing the crucial role in stability of the Earth's magnetotail. We explore the properties of such thin current sheets with hot isotropic ions and cold anisotropic electrons. Decoupling of the motions of ions and electrons results in the generation of a polarization electric field. The distribution of the corresponding scalar potential is derived from the electron pressure balance and the quasi-neutrality condition. We find that electron pressure anisotropy is partially balanced by a field-aligned component of this polarization electric field. We propose a 2D model that describes a thin current sheet supported by currents of anisotropic electrons embedded in an ion-dominated current sheet. Current density profiles in our model agree well with THEMIS observations in the Earth's magnetotail.

  8. Feasibility studies on the potential of employing electron beam machine for non-medical products irradiation in Malaysia

    Siti Aiasah Hashim; Sarada Idris

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia, two 10 MeV irradiators were installed by private companies as part of in-house manufacturing or as third party sterilization service provider. At the same time, the 3 MeV EPS 3000 machine at Nuclear Malaysia is providing irradiation services for various purposes and products. With the current increase in demand in automotive manufacturing for better quality harnesses and components, the irradiation service at Nuclear Malaysia had to provide extended time to cope with the requests. This paper looks at the potential of setting up a commercial irradiation facility to cater for non-medical products such as automotive wires and tubing, food, fruits, cosmetic and semiconductors. Intensive interviews with related industries were carried out throughout Malaysia to evaluate the potential of installing electron beam machine for commercial irradiation. The results show that a majority of non-medical industries are not aware of the irradiation service provided by Nuclear Malaysia, although many understand the need for it. A multipurpose irradiator is desired in order to optimize the usage since a single dedicated machine may be too costly to sustain. (author)

  9. Distributed Autonomous Control of Multiple Spacecraft During Close Proximity Operations

    McCamish, Shawn B

    2007-01-01

    This research contributes to multiple spacecraft control by developing an autonomous distributed control algorithm for close proximity operations of multiple spacecraft systems, including rendezvous...

  10. Spacecraft Swarm Coordination and Planning Tool, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fractionated spacecraft architectures to distribute mission performance from a single, monolithic satellite across large number of smaller spacecraft, for missions...

  11. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have built and tested an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This sensor sensitive to particle sizes ranging from a few...

  12. SSTI- Lewis Spacecraft Nickel-Hydrogen Battery

    Tobias, R. F.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: NASA-Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) objectives, SSTI-Lewis overview, battery requirement, two cells Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) design summary, CPV electric performance, battery design summary, battery functional description, battery performance.

  13. Spacecraft Cabin Particulate Monitor, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test an optical extinction monitor for the detection of spacecraft cabin particulates. This monitor will be sensitive to particle...

  14. Automated constraint checking of spacecraft command sequences

    Horvath, Joan C.; Alkalaj, Leon J.; Schneider, Karl M.; Spitale, Joseph M.; Le, Dang

    1995-01-01

    Robotic spacecraft are controlled by onboard sets of commands called "sequences." Determining that sequences will have the desired effect on the spacecraft can be expensive in terms of both labor and computer coding time, with different particular costs for different types of spacecraft. Specification languages and appropriate user interface to the languages can be used to make the most effective use of engineering validation time. This paper describes one specification and verification environment ("SAVE") designed for validating that command sequences have not violated any flight rules. This SAVE system was subsequently adapted for flight use on the TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft. The relationship of this work to rule-based artificial intelligence and to other specification techniques is discussed, as well as the issues that arise in the transfer of technology from a research prototype to a full flight system.

  15. Computational Model for Spacecraft/Habitat Volume

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Please note that funding to Dr. Simon Hsiang, a critical co-investigator for the development of the Spacecraft Optimization Layout and Volume (SOLV) model, was...

  16. Industry perspectives on Plug-& -Play Spacecraft Avionics

    Franck, R.; Graven, P.; Liptak, L.

    This paper describes the methodologies and findings from an industry survey of awareness and utility of Spacecraft Plug-& -Play Avionics (SPA). The survey was conducted via interviews, in-person and teleconference, with spacecraft prime contractors and suppliers. It focuses primarily on AFRL's SPA technology development activities but also explores the broader applicability and utility of Plug-& -Play (PnP) architectures for spacecraft. Interviews include large and small suppliers as well as large and small spacecraft prime contractors. Through these “ product marketing” interviews, awareness and attitudes can be assessed, key technical and market barriers can be identified, and opportunities for improvement can be uncovered. Although this effort focuses on a high-level assessment, similar processes can be used to develop business cases and economic models which may be necessary to support investment decisions.

  17. Spacecraft Multiple Array Communication System Performance Analysis

    Hwu, Shian U.; Desilva, Kanishka; Sham, Catherine C.

    2010-01-01

    The Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center is tasked to perform spacecraft and ground network communication system simulations, design validation, and performance verification. The CSSL has developed simulation tools that model spacecraft communication systems and the space and ground environment in which the tools operate. In this paper, a spacecraft communication system with multiple arrays is simulated. Multiple array combined technique is used to increase the radio frequency coverage and data rate performance. The technique is to achieve phase coherence among the phased arrays to combine the signals at the targeting receiver constructively. There are many technical challenges in spacecraft integration with a high transmit power communication system. The array combining technique can improve the communication system data rate and coverage performances without increasing the system transmit power requirements. Example simulation results indicate significant performance improvement can be achieved with phase coherence implementation.

  18. Formation of disintegration particles in spacecraft recorders

    Kurnosova, L.V.; Fradkin, M.I.; Razorenov, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments performed on the spacecraft Salyut 1, Kosmos 410, and Kosmos 443 enable us to record the disintegration products of particles which are formed in the material of the detectors on board the spacecraft. The observations were made by means of a delayed coincidence method. We have detected a meson component and also a component which is apparently associated with the generation of radioactive isotopes in the detectors

  19. A Reconfigurable Testbed Environment for Spacecraft Autonomy

    Biesiadecki, Jeffrey; Jain, Abhinandan

    1996-01-01

    A key goal of NASA's New Millennium Program is the development of technology for increased spacecraft on-board autonomy. Achievement of this objective requires the development of a new class of ground-based automony testbeds that can enable the low-cost and rapid design, test, and integration of the spacecraft autonomy software. This paper describes the development of an Autonomy Testbed Environment (ATBE) for the NMP Deep Space I comet/asteroid rendezvous mission.

  20. Determination of the Projected Atomic Potential by Deconvolution of the Auto-Correlation Function of TEM Electron Nano-Diffraction Patterns

    Liberato De Caro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to determine the projected atomic potential of a specimen directly from transmission electron microscopy coherent electron nano-diffraction patterns, overcoming common limitations encountered so far due to the dynamical nature of electron-matter interaction. The projected potential is obtained by deconvolution of the inverse Fourier transform of experimental diffraction patterns rescaled in intensity by using theoretical values of the kinematical atomic scattering factors. This novelty enables the compensation of dynamical effects typical of transmission electron microscopy (TEM experiments on standard specimens with thicknesses up to a few tens of nm. The projected atomic potentials so obtained are averaged on sample regions illuminated by nano-sized electron probes and are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical expectations. Contrary to lens-based microscopy, here the spatial resolution in the retrieved projected atomic potential profiles is related to the finer lattice spacing measured in the electron diffraction pattern. The method has been successfully applied to experimental nano-diffraction data of crystalline centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric specimens achieving a resolution of 65 pm.

  1. 8 MeV electron beam induced modifications in the thermal, structural and electrical properties of nanophase CeO2 for potential electronics applications

    Babitha, K. K.; Sreedevi, A.; Priyanka, K. P.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the thermal, structural and electrical properties of CeO2 nanoparticles synthesized by chemical precipitation route was investigated. The dose dependent effect of electron irradiation was studied using various characterization techniques such as, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. Systematic investigation based on the results of structural studies confirm that electron beam irradiation induces defects and particle size variation on CeO2 nanoparticles, which in turn results improvements in AC conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent. Structural modifications and high value of dielectric constant for CeO2 nanoparticles due to electron beam irradiation make it as a promising material for the fabrication of gate dielectric in metal oxide semiconductor devices.

  2. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; hide

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  3. Effects of hydrogen-like impurity and electromagnetic field on quantum transition of an electron in a Gaussian potential with QD thickness

    Xin, Wei; Zhao, Yu-Wei; Sudu; Eerdunchaolu

    2018-05-01

    Considering Hydrogen-like impurity and the thickness effect, the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the electronic ground and first exited states in a quantum dot (QD) are derived by using the Lee-Low-Pins-Pekar variational method with the harmonic and Gaussian potentials as the transverse and longitudinal confinement potentials, respectively. A two-level system is constructed on the basis of those two states, and the electronic quantum transition affected by an electromagnetic field is discussed in terms of the two-level system theory. The results indicate the Gaussian potential reflects the real confinement potential more accurately than the parabolic one; the influence of the thickness of the QD on the electronic transition probability is interesting and significant, and cannot be ignored; the electronic transition probability Γ is influenced significantly by some physical quantities, such as the strength of the electron-phonon coupling α, the electric-field strength F, the magnetic-field cyclotron frequency ωc , the barrier height V0 and confinement range L of the asymmetric Gaussian potential, suggesting the transport and optical properties of the QD can be manipulated further though those physical quantities.

  4. Space Weather Magnetometer Set with Automated AC Spacecraft Field Correction for GEO-KOMPSAT-2A

    Auster, U.; Magnes, W.; Delva, M.; Valavanoglou, A.; Leitner, S.; Hillenmaier, O.; Strauch, C.; Brown, P.; Whiteside, B.; Bendyk, M.; Hilgers, A.; Kraft, S.; Luntama, J. P.; Seon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring the solar wind conditions, in particular its magnetic field (interplanetary magnetic field) ahead of the Earth is essential in performing accurate and reliable space weather forecasting. The magnetic condition of the spacecraft itself is a key parameter for the successful performance of the magnetometer onboard. In practice a condition with negligible magnetic field of the spacecraft cannot always be fulfilled and magnetic sources on the spacecraft interfere with the natural magnetic field measured by the space magnetometer. The presented "ready-to-use" Service Oriented Spacecraft Magnetometer (SOSMAG) is developed for use on any satellite implemented without magnetic cleanliness programme. It enables detection of the spacecraft field AC variations on a proper time scale suitable to distinguish the magnetic field variations relevant to space weather phenomena, such as sudden increase in the interplanetary field or southward turning. This is achieved through the use of dual fluxgate magnetometers on a short boom (1m) and two additional AMR sensors on the spacecraft body, which monitor potential AC disturbers. The measurements of the latter sensors enable an automated correction of the AC signal contributions from the spacecraft in the final magnetic vector. After successful development and test of the EQM prototype, a flight model (FM) is being built for the Korean satellite Geo-Kompsat 2A, with launch foreseen in 2018.

  5. Multi-spacecraft observations of solar hard X-ray bursts

    Kane, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The role of multi-spacecraft observations in solar flare research is examined from the point of view of solar hard X-ray bursts and their implications with respect to models of the impulsive phase. Multi-spacecraft measurements provide a stereoscopic view of the flare region, and hence represent the only direct method of measuring directivity of X-rays. In absence of hard X-ray imaging instruments with high spatial and temporal resolution, multi-spacecraft measurements provide the only means of determining the radial (vertical) structure of the hard X-ray source. This potential of the multi-spacecraft observations is illustrated with an analysis of the presently available observations of solar hard X-ray bursts made simultaneously by two or more of the following spacecraft: International Sun Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3), Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), Helios-B and High Energy Astrophysical Observatory-A (HEAO-A). In particular, some conclusions have been drawn about the spatial structure and directivity of 50-100 keV X-rays from impulsive flares. Desirable features of future multi-spacecraft missions are briefly discussed followed by a short description of the hard X-ray experiment on the International Solar Polar Mission which has been planned specifically for multi-spacecraft observations of the Sun. (orig.)

  6. Strain effects on the electronic structure of ZnSnP{sub 2} via modified Becke–Johnson exchange potential

    Xu, Ying, E-mail: yingxuy@126.com [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Ao, Zhi Min [Centre for Clean Energy Technology, School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Zou, Dai Feng; Nie, Guo Zheng; Sheng, Wei [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Yuan, Ding Wang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, ChangSha 410082 (China)

    2015-02-20

    ZnSnP{sub 2} is a promising photovoltaic absorber material with a direct band gap of 1.68 eV, further reducing the band gap of ZnSnP{sub 2} that can achieve higher photovoltaic conversion efficiency. To achieve this target, the influence of biaxial in-plane strain (±3%) on the band gap, hole effective mass and optical properties of ZnSnP{sub 2} were investigated by first-principles calculations via Modified Becke–Johnson exchange potential. The results indicate that the biaxial tensile strain can reduce the band gap of ZnSnP{sub 2} from 1.3 eV to 1.0 eV and enhance the absorption of visible light of c-axis direction, while the biaxial compress strain increases the band gap of ZnSnP{sub 2} slightly. This research provides an alternative approach to tune the band gap of ZnSnP{sub 2} by strains. The variation of the band gap under different strains is determined by the highest-energy valance band state, and it can be explained by the redistribution of electrons under different strain. - Highlights: • The influence of biaxial in-plane strain (±3%) on the band gap of ZnSnP{sub 2} were investigated by DFT calculations. • MBJ exchange potential can describe the band structure of ZnSnP{sub 2} quite well. • Tensile strain brings a substantial decrease of the band gap, while the compress strain has no evident effect. • The calculated visible light adsorption coefficient increases along c-axis direction under tensile strain.

  7. REQUIREMENTS FOR IMAGE QUALITY OF EMERGENCY SPACECRAFTS

    A. I. Altukhov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the method for formation of quality requirements to the images of emergency spacecrafts. The images are obtained by means of remote sensing of near-earth space orbital deployment in the visible range. of electromagnetic radiation. The method is based on a joint taking into account conditions of space survey, characteristics of surveillance equipment, main design features of the observed spacecrafts and orbital inspection tasks. Method. Quality score is the predicted linear resolution image that gives the possibility to create a complete view of pictorial properties of the space image obtained by electro-optical system from the observing satellite. Formulation of requirements to the numerical value of this indicator is proposed to perform based on the properties of remote sensing system, forming images in the conditions of outer space, and the properties of the observed emergency spacecraft: dimensions, platform construction of the satellite, on-board equipment placement. For method implementation the authors have developed a predictive model of requirements to a linear resolution for images of emergency spacecrafts, making it possible to select the intervals of space shooting and get the satellite images required for quality interpretation. Main results. To verify the proposed model functionality we have carried out calculations of the numerical values for the linear resolution of the image, ensuring the successful task of determining the gross structural damage of the spacecrafts and identifying changes in their spatial orientation. As input data were used with dimensions and geometric primitives corresponding to the shape of deemed inspected spacecrafts: Resurs-P", "Canopus-B", "Electro-L". Numerical values of the linear resolution images have been obtained, ensuring the successful task solution for determining the gross structural damage of spacecrafts.

  8. Low-lying electronic states of the OH radical: potential energy curves, dipole moment functions, and transition probabilities

    Qin, X.; Zhang, S. D. [Qufu Normal University, Qufu (China)

    2014-12-15

    The six doublet and the two quartet electronic states ({sup 2}Σ{sup +}(2), {sup 2}Σ{sup -}, {sup 2}Π(2), {sup 2}Δ, {sup 4}Σ{sup -}, and {sup 4}Π) of the OH radical have been studied using the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method where the Davidson correction, core-valence interaction and relativistic effect are considered with large basis sets of aug-cc-pv5z, aug-cc-pcv5z, and cc-pv5z-DK, respectively. Potential energy curves (PECs) and dipole moment functions are also calculated for these states for internuclear distances ranging from 0.05 nm to 0.80 nm. All possible vibrational levels and rotational constants for the bound state X{sup 2}Π and A{sup 2}Σ{sup +} of OH are predicted by numerical solving the radial Schroedinger equation through the Level program, and spectroscopic parameters, which are in good agreements with experimental results, are obtained. Transition dipole moments between the ground state X{sup 2}Π and other excited states are also computed using MRCI, and the transition probability, lifetime, and Franck-Condon factors for the A{sup 2}Σ{sup +} - X{sup 2}Π transition are discussed and compared with existing experimental values.

  9. Plasma density enhancements created by the ionization of the Earth's upper atmosphere by artificial electron beams

    Neubert, Torsten; Banks, P.M.

    line) and down-going differential energy flux. The equations are solved numerically, using the MSIS atmospheric model and the IRI ionospheric model. The results from the model compare well with recent observations from the CHARGE 2 sounding rocket experiment. Two aspects of the beam-neutral atmosphere...... interaction are discussed: First we investigate the limits on the electron beam current that can be emitted from a space. craft without substantial spacecraft charging. This question is important because the charging of the spacecraft to positive potentials limits the current and the escape energy of the beam...... electrons and thereby limits the ionization of the neutral atmosphere. As an example we find from CHARGE 2 observations and from the model calculations that below about 180 km, secondary electrons generated through the ionization of the neutral atmosphere by 1-10 keV electron beams from sounding rockets...

  10. Modeling the fundamental characteristics and processes of the spacecraft functioning

    Bazhenov, V. I.; Osin, M. I.; Zakharov, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of modeling of spacecraft characteristics by using computing means are considered. Particular attention is devoted to the design studies, the description of physical appearance of the spacecraft, and simulated modeling of spacecraft systems. The fundamental questions of organizing the on-the-ground spacecraft testing and the methods of mathematical modeling were presented.

  11. Na2 Vibrating in the Double-Well Potential of State 2 1Σu+ (JM = 00): A Pulsating "Quantum Bubble" with Antagonistic Electronic Flux.

    Diestler, D J; Jia, D; Manz, J; Yang, Y

    2018-03-01

    The theory of concerted electronic and nuclear flux densities associated with the vibration and dissociation of a multielectron nonrotating homonuclear diatomic molecule (or ion) in an electronic state 2S+1 Σ g,u + (JM = 00) is presented. The electronic population density, nuclear probability density, and nuclear flux density are isotropic. A theorem of Barth , presented in this issue, shows that the electronic flux density (EFD) is also isotropic. Hence, the evolving system appears as a pulsating, or exploding, "quantum bubble". Application of the theory to Na 2 vibrating in the double-minimum potential of the 2   1 Σ u + (JM = 00) excited state reveals that the EFD consists of two antagonistic components. One arises from electrons that flow essentially coherently with the nuclei. The other, which is oppositely directed (i.e., antagonistic) and more intense, is due to the transition in electronic structure from "Rydberg" to "ionic" type as the nuclei traverse the potential barrier between inner and outer potential wells. This "transition" component of the EFD rises and falls sharply as the nuclei cross the barrier.

  12. Asymptotic value of screening parameter as determined from the one-electron fragment of the kinetic energy or electrostatic potential at the nucleus

    Teruya, Hirohide; Anno, Tosinobu

    1985-01-01

    Numerical value of lim sub(Z → infinity) delta(i, j)/delta Zsub(i), where (i, j) stands for average interaction energy of a pair of electrons embedded in hydrogenic orbitals (HAO's) is presented for a wide range of HAO's. Data to be presented should be useful to calculate the asymptotic limit of screening effect seen by an electron embedded in a given kind of orbital for an isoelectronic series of atoms as determined from the ''one-electron component'' of the total kinetic energy of or of the electrostatic potential at the nucleus within an atom. (author)

  13. Asymptotic value of screening parameter as determined from the one-electron fragment of the kinetic energy or electrostatic potential at the nucleus

    Teruya, Hirohide; Anno, Tosinobu

    1985-09-01

    Numerical value of lim sub(Z ..-->.. infinity) delta(i, j)/delta Zsub(i), where (i, j) stands for average interaction energy of a pair of electrons embedded in hydrogenic orbitals (HAO's) is presented for a wide range of HAO's. Data to be presented should be useful to calculate the asymptotic limit of screening effect seen by an electron embedded in a given kind of orbital for an isoelectronic series of atoms as determined from the ''one-electron component'' of the total kinetic energy of or of the electrostatic potential at the nucleus within an atom.

  14. SpaceX's Dragon America's next generation spacecraft

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2016-01-01

    This book describes Dragon V2, a futuristic vehicle that not only provides a means for NASA to transport its astronauts to the orbiting outpost but also advances SpaceX’s core objective of reusability. A direct descendant of Dragon, Dragon V2 can be retrieved, refurbished and re-launched. It is a spacecraft with the potential to completely revolutionize the economics of an industry where equipment costing hundreds of millions of dollars is routinely discarded after a single use. It was presented by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk in May 2014 as the spaceship that will carry NASA astronauts to the International Space Station as soon as 2016 SpaceX’s Dragon – America’s Next Generation Spacecraft describes the extraordinary feats of engineering and human achievement that have placed this revolutionary spacecraft at the forefront of the launch industry and positioned it as the precursor for ultimately transporting humans to Mars. It describes the design and development of Dragon, provides mission highlights of the f...

  15. Multipurpose Electric Potential Sensor for Spacecraft Applications, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The original goal of Phase I was to study the feasibility of developing an electric sensor that can be used for as many NASA sensing applications as possible. During...

  16. Particle Morphology and Elemental Composition of Smoke Generated by Overheating Common Spacecraft Materials

    Meyer, Marit E.

    2015-01-01

    Fire safety in the indoor spacecraft environment is concerned with a unique set of fuels which are designed to not combust. Unlike terrestrial flaming fires, which often can consume an abundance of wood, paper and cloth, spacecraft fires are expected to be generated from overheating electronics consisting of flame resistant materials. Therefore, NASA prioritizes fire characterization research for these fuels undergoing oxidative pyrolysis in order to improve spacecraft fire detector design. A thermal precipitator designed and built for spacecraft fire safety test campaigns at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) successfully collected an abundance of smoke particles from oxidative pyrolysis. A thorough microscopic characterization has been performed for ten types of smoke from common spacecraft materials or mixed materials heated at multiple temperatures using the following techniques: SEM, TEM, high resolution TEM, high resolution STEM and EDS. Resulting smoke particle morphologies and elemental compositions have been observed which are consistent with known thermal decomposition mechanisms in the literature and chemical make-up of the spacecraft fuels. Some conclusions about particle formation mechanisms are explored based on images of the microstructure of Teflon smoke particles and tar ball-like particles from Nomex fabric smoke.

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Study of Kinetic scale Turbulence Using MMS Observations in the Solar Wind

    Chasapis, A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T.; Fuselier, S. A.; Maruca, B.; Burch, J.; Moore, T. E.; Phan, T.; Pollock, C. J.; Gershman, D. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a study investigating kinetic scale turbulence in the solar wind. Most previous studies relied on single spacecraft measurements, employing the Taylor hypothesis in order to probe different scales. The small separation of MMS spacecraft, well below the ion inertial scale, allow us for the first time to directly probe turbulent fluctuations at the kinetic range. Using multi-spacecraft measurements, we are able to measure the spatial characteristics of turbulent fluctuations and compare with the traditional Taylor-based single spacecraft approach. Meanwhile, combining observations from Cluster and MMS data we were able to cover a wide range of scales from the inertial range where the turbulent cascade takes place, down to the kinetic range where the energy is eventually dissipated. These observations present an important step in understanding the nature of solar wind turbulence and the processes through which turbulent energy is dissipated into particle heating and acceleration. We compute statistical quantities such as the second order structure function and the scale-dependent kurtosis, along with their dependence on the parameters such as the mean magnetic field direction. Overall, we observe an overall agreement between the single spacecraft and the multi-spacecraft approach. However, a small but significant deviation is observed at the smaller scales near the electron inertial scale. The high values of the scale dependent kurtosis at very small scales, observed via two-point measurements, open up a compelling avenue of investigation for theory and numerical modelling.

  18. The Potential That Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Can be a Disruptive Technology: Results From a National Survey.

    Pechacek, Terry F; Nayak, Pratibha; Gregory, Kyle R; Weaver, Scott R; Eriksen, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the reasons for use and acceptance of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) among current and former cigarette smokers to assess if ENDS may become a satisfying alternative to cigarettes. Data are from a national probability sample of 5717 US adults, surveyed June-November 2014. The survey contained questions on awareness, usage, and reasons for use of traditional and novel tobacco products. The analytic sample was current and former smokers who ever used ENDS (n = 729) and was divided into four mutually exclusive categories. Among the 585 current smokers, 337 were no longer using ENDS ("E-Cig Rejecters"), and 248 were continuing to use both ENDS and cigarettes ("E-Cig Dual Users"). Among 144 former cigarette smokers, 101 were non-recent users of ENDS ("Quit All Products"), and 43 were continuing to use ENDS exclusively ("Switchers"). Former smokers (the "Switchers") report finding ENDS a satisfying alternative to regular cigarettes, with only 15.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4-27.1) rating ENDS as less enjoyable than regular cigarettes. However, greater than fivefold more current smokers did not find them satisfying and stopped using them (77.3%; 95% CI 72.1-82.4 of "E-Cig Rejecters" rated ENDS as less enjoyable). Being less harmful was the most highly rated reason for continuing to use ENDS among "Switchers." Most (80.9%) "Switchers" reported that ENDS helped them quit cigarettes. Since many current smokers who have tried ENDS reject them as a satisfying alternative to regular cigarettes, ENDS will not replace regular cigarettes unless they improve. Since about one-half of recent former smokers are trying ENDS with about one-fourth continuing to use them, and many reporting that these products have helped them quit regular cigarettes, the potential impact of ENDS on population quit rates deserves continued surveillance. However, since most current smokers who have tried ENDS reject them as a satisfying alternative to regular

  19. Robust Spacecraft Component Detection in Point Clouds

    Quanmao Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Automatic component detection of spacecraft can assist in on-orbit operation and space situational awareness. Spacecraft are generally composed of solar panels and cuboidal or cylindrical modules. These components can be simply represented by geometric primitives like plane, cuboid and cylinder. Based on this prior, we propose a robust automatic detection scheme to automatically detect such basic components of spacecraft in three-dimensional (3D point clouds. In the proposed scheme, cylinders are first detected in the iteration of the energy-based geometric model fitting and cylinder parameter estimation. Then, planes are detected by Hough transform and further described as bounded patches with their minimum bounding rectangles. Finally, the cuboids are detected with pair-wise geometry relations from the detected patches. After successive detection of cylinders, planar patches and cuboids, a mid-level geometry representation of the spacecraft can be delivered. We tested the proposed component detection scheme on spacecraft 3D point clouds synthesized by computer-aided design (CAD models and those recovered by image-based reconstruction, respectively. Experimental results illustrate that the proposed scheme can detect the basic geometric components effectively and has fine robustness against noise and point distribution density.

  20. Robust Spacecraft Component Detection in Point Clouds.

    Wei, Quanmao; Jiang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Haopeng

    2018-03-21

    Automatic component detection of spacecraft can assist in on-orbit operation and space situational awareness. Spacecraft are generally composed of solar panels and cuboidal or cylindrical modules. These components can be simply represented by geometric primitives like plane, cuboid and cylinder. Based on this prior, we propose a robust automatic detection scheme to automatically detect such basic components of spacecraft in three-dimensional (3D) point clouds. In the proposed scheme, cylinders are first detected in the iteration of the energy-based geometric model fitting and cylinder parameter estimation. Then, planes are detected by Hough transform and further described as bounded patches with their minimum bounding rectangles. Finally, the cuboids are detected with pair-wise geometry relations from the detected patches. After successive detection of cylinders, planar patches and cuboids, a mid-level geometry representation of the spacecraft can be delivered. We tested the proposed component detection scheme on spacecraft 3D point clouds synthesized by computer-aided design (CAD) models and those recovered by image-based reconstruction, respectively. Experimental results illustrate that the proposed scheme can detect the basic geometric components effectively and has fine robustness against noise and point distribution density.

  1. Attitude coordination for spacecraft formation with multiple communication delays

    Guo Yaohua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Communication delays are inherently present in information exchange between spacecraft and have an effect on the control performance of spacecraft formation. In this work, attitude coordination control of spacecraft formation is addressed, which is in the presence of multiple communication delays between spacecraft. Virtual system-based approach is utilized in case that a constant reference attitude is available to only a part of the spacecraft. The feedback from the virtual systems to the spacecraft formation is introduced to maintain the formation. Using backstepping control method, input torque of each spacecraft is designed such that the attitude of each spacecraft converges asymptotically to the states of its corresponding virtual system. Furthermore, the backstepping technique and the Lyapunov–Krasovskii method contribute to the control law design when the reference attitude is time-varying and can be obtained by each spacecraft. Finally, effectiveness of the proposed methodology is illustrated by the numerical simulations of a spacecraft formation.

  2. On the calculation of the energies of dissociation, cohesion, vacancy formation, electron attachment, and the ionization potential of small metallic clusters containing a monovacancy

    Pogosov, V. V.; Reva, V. I.

    2017-09-01

    In terms of the model of stable jellium, self-consistent calculations of spatial distributions of electrons and potentials, as well as of energies of dissociation, cohesion, vacancy formation, electron attachment, and ionization potentials of solid clusters of Mg N , Li N (with N ≤ 254 ) and of clusters containing a vacancy ( N ≥ 12) have been performed. The contribution of a monovacancy to the energy of the cluster and size dependences of its characteristics and of asymptotics have been discussed. Calculations have been performed using a SKIT-3 cluster at Glushkov Institute of Cybernetics, National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine (Rpeak = 7.4 Tflops).

  3. NASA Spacecraft Fault Management Workshop Results

    Newhouse, Marilyn; McDougal, John; Barley, Bryan; Fesq, Lorraine; Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fault Management is a critical aspect of deep-space missions. For the purposes of this paper, fault management is defined as the ability of a system to detect, isolate, and mitigate events that impact, or have the potential to impact, nominal mission operations. The fault management capabilities are commonly distributed across flight and ground subsystems, impacting hardware, software, and mission operations designs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that 4 out of the 5 missions studied had significant overruns due to underestimating the complexity and support requirements for fault management. As a result of this and other recent experiences, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Planetary Science Division (PSD) commissioned a workshop to bring together invited participants across government, industry, academia to assess the state of the art in fault management practice and research, identify current and potential issues, and make recommendations for addressing these issues. The workshop was held in New Orleans in April of 2008. The workshop concluded that fault management is not being limited by technology, but rather by a lack of emphasis and discipline in both the engineering and programmatic dimensions. Some of the areas cited in the findings include different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; unclear ownership of end-to-end fault management engineering; inadequate understanding of the impact of mission-level requirements on fault management complexity; and practices, processes, and

  4. SSTL based thermal and power efficient RAM design on 28nm FPGA for spacecraft

    Kalia, Kartik; Pandey, Bishwajeet; Hussain, D. M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach is made to design a Thermal and Power efficient RAM for that reason we have used DDR4L memory and six different members of SSTL I/Os standards on 28nm technology. Every spacecraft requires most energy efficient electronic system and for that very purpose we have designe...

  5. Relativistic Spacecraft Propelled by Directed Energy

    Kulkarni, Neeraj; Lubin, Philip; Zhang, Qicheng

    2018-04-01

    Achieving relativistic flight to enable extrasolar exploration is one of the dreams of humanity and the long-term goal of our NASA Starlight program. We derive a relativistic solution for the motion of a spacecraft propelled by radiation pressure from a directed energy (DE) system. Depending on the system parameters, low-mass spacecraft can achieve relativistic speeds, thus enabling interstellar exploration. The diffraction of the DE system plays an important role and limits the maximum speed of the spacecraft. We consider “photon recycling” as a possible method to achieving higher speeds. We also discuss recent claims that our previous work on this topic is incorrect and show that these claims arise from an improper treatment of causality.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Sail Spacecraft

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Usui, Hideyuki; Funaki, Ikkoh; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2008-01-01

    To capture the kinetic energy of the solar wind by creating a large magnetosphere around the spacecraft, magneto-plasma sail injects a plasma jet into a strong magnetic field produced by an electromagnet onboard the spacecraft. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) on the magnetosphere of magneto-plasma sail. First, using an axi-symmetric two-dimensional MHD code, we numerically confirm the magnetic field inflation, and the formation of a magnetosphere by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field. The expansion of an artificial magnetosphere by the plasma injection is then simulated, and we show that the magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field expanded by the plasma jet from the spacecraft. This simulation indicates the size of the artificial magnetosphere becomes smaller when applying the IMF.

  7. Autonomous Spacecraft Communication Interface for Load Planning

    Dever, Timothy P.; May, Ryan D.; Morris, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based controllers can remain in continuous communication with spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) with near-instantaneous communication speeds. This permits near real-time control of all of the core spacecraft systems by ground personnel. However, as NASA missions move beyond LEO, light-time communication delay issues, such as time lag and low bandwidth, will prohibit this type of operation. As missions become more distant, autonomous control of manned spacecraft will be required. The focus of this paper is the power subsystem. For present missions, controllers on the ground develop a complete schedule of power usage for all spacecraft components. This paper presents work currently underway at NASA to develop an architecture for an autonomous spacecraft, and focuses on the development of communication between the Mission Manager and the Autonomous Power Controller. These two systems must work together in order to plan future load use and respond to unanticipated plan deviations. Using a nominal spacecraft architecture and prototype versions of these two key components, a number of simulations are run under a variety of operational conditions, enabling development of content and format of the messages necessary to achieve the desired goals. The goals include negotiation of a load schedule that meets the global requirements (contained in the Mission Manager) and local power system requirements (contained in the Autonomous Power Controller), and communication of off-plan disturbances that arise while executing a negotiated plan. The message content is developed in two steps: first, a set of rapid-prototyping "paper" simulations are preformed; then the resultant optimized messages are codified for computer communication for use in automated testing.

  8. Study on the effect of shape-stabilized phase change materials on spacecraft thermal control in extreme thermal environment

    Wu, Wan-fan; Liu, Na; Cheng, Wen-long; Liu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A shape-stabilized PCM is used to protect the spacecraft attacked by high energy. ► Taking a satellite as example, it proves the solution given in the work is feasible. ► Low thermal conductivity makes the material above its thermal stability limit. ► It provides guidance on how to choose the shape-stabilized PCM for similar problems. - Abstract: In space, the emergencies such as short-term high heat flux is prone to cause spacecraft thermal control system faults, resulting in temperature anomalies of electronic equipment of the spacecraft and even failures in them. In order to protect the spacecraft attacked by the high energy, a new guard method is proposed. A shape-stabilized phase change material (PCM), which has high thermal conductivity and does not require being tightly packaged, is proposed to be used on the spacecraft. To prove the feasibility of using the material on spacecraft attacked by high energy, the thermal responses for spacecraft with shape-stabilized PCM are investigated in situations of normal and short-term high heat flux, in contrast to that with conventional thermal control system. The results indicate that the shape-stabilized PCM can effectively absorb the heat to prevent the thermal control system faults when the spacecraft’s outer heat flux changes dramatically and has no negative effect on spacecraft in normal heat flux. Additionally the effect of thermal conductivity of PCM on its application effectiveness is discussed

  9. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  10. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  11. Testing programs for the Multimission Modular Spacecraft

    Greenwell, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) provides a standard spacecraft bus to a user for a variety of space missions ranging from near-earth to synchronous orbits. The present paper describes the philosophy behind the MMS module test program and discusses the implementation of the test program. It is concluded that the MMS module test program provides an effective and comprehensive customer buy-off at the subsystem contractor's plant, is an optimum approach for checkout of the subsystems prior to use for on-orbit servicing in the Shuttle Cargo Bay, and is a cost-effective technique for environmental testing.

  12. Robust Parametric Control of Spacecraft Rendezvous

    Dake Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to design the robust parametric control for autonomous rendezvous of spacecrafts with the inertial information with uncertainty. We consider model uncertainty of traditional C-W equation to formulate the dynamic model of the relative motion. Based on eigenstructure assignment and model reference theory, a concise control law for spacecraft rendezvous is proposed which could be fixed through solving an optimization problem. The cost function considers the stabilization of the system and other performances. Simulation results illustrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed control.

  13. Event-triggered attitude control of spacecraft

    Wu, Baolin; Shen, Qiang; Cao, Xibin

    2018-02-01

    The problem of spacecraft attitude stabilization control system with limited communication and external disturbances is investigated based on an event-triggered control scheme. In the proposed scheme, information of attitude and control torque only need to be transmitted at some discrete triggered times when a defined measurement error exceeds a state-dependent threshold. The proposed control scheme not only guarantees that spacecraft attitude control errors converge toward a small invariant set containing the origin, but also ensures that there is no accumulation of triggering instants. The performance of the proposed control scheme is demonstrated through numerical simulation.

  14. The spacecraft encounters of Comet Halley

    Asoka Mendis, D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of the Comet Halley spacecraft 'fleet' (VEGA 1 and VEGA 2, Giotto, Suisei, and Sakigake) are presented. The major aims of these missions were (1) to discover and characterize the nucleus, (2) to characterize the atmosphere and ionosphere, (3) to characterize the dust, and (4) to characterize the nature of the large-scale comet-solar wind interaction. While the VEGA and Giotto missions were designed to study all four areas, Suisei addressed the second and fourth. Sakigake was designed to study the solar wind conditions upstream of the comet. It is noted that NASA's Deep Space Network played an important role in spacecraft tracking.

  15. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  16. Fish scale deformation analysis using scanning electron microscope: New potential biomarker in aquatic environmental monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination

    Hidayati, Dewi; Sulaiman, Norela; Othman, Shuhaimi; Ismail, B. S.

    2013-11-01

    Fish scale has the potential to be a rapid biomarker due to its structure and high possibility to come into contact with any pollutant in the aquatic environment. The scale structure consists of osteoblastic cells and other bone materials such as collagen where it is possible to form a molecular complex with heavy metals such as aluminum and iron. Hence, aluminum and iron in water could possibly destroy the scale material and marked as a scale deformation that quantitatively could be analyzed by comparing it to the normal scale structure. Water sampling and fish cage experiment were performed between June and July 2011 in Porong river which represented the water body that has high aluminum and iron contamination. The filtered water samples were preserved and extracted using the acid-mixture procedure prior to measurement of the aluminum and iron concentrations using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), while samples for total suspended solid (TSS) analysis were kept at 4 °C in cool-boxes. The scales were cleaned with sterile water, then dehydrated in 30, 50, 70, and 90% ethanol and dried on filter papers. They were then mounted on an aluminum stub and coated with gold in a sputter coater prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation. According to the SEM analysis, it was found that there were several deformations on the scale samples taken from sites that have high concentrations of aluminum and iron i.e. the increasing number of pits, deformation and decreasing number of spherules and ridges while the control scale exhibited the normal features. However, the site with higher TSS and pH indicated lower aluminum effect. A moderate correlation was found between the number of pits with aluminum (r=0.43) and iron (r=0.41) concentrations. Fish scale deformation using SEM analysis can potentially be a rapid biomarker in aquatic monitoring of aluminum and iron contamination. However, the measurement must be accompanied by pH and

  17. Phase-space holes due to electron and ion beams accelerated by a current-driven potential ramp

    M. V. Goldman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional open-boundary simulations have been carried out in a current-carrying plasma seeded with a neutral density depression and with no initial electric field. These simulations show the development of a variety of nonlinear localized electric field structures: double layers (unipolar localized fields, fast electron phase-space holes (bipolar fields moving in the direction of electrons accelerated by the double layer and trains of slow alternating electron and ion phase-space holes (wave-like fields moving in the direction of ions accelerated by the double layer. The principal new result in this paper is to show by means of a linear stability analysis that the slow-moving trains of electron and ion holes are likely to be the result of saturation via trapping of a kinetic-Buneman instability driven by the interaction of accelerated ions with unaccelerated electrons.

  18. Spacecraft and propulsion technician error

    Schultz, Daniel Clyde

    Commercial aviation and commercial space similarly launch, fly, and land passenger vehicles. Unlike aviation, the U.S. government has not established maintenance policies for commercial space. This study conducted a mixed methods review of 610 U.S. space launches from 1984 through 2011, which included 31 failures. An analysis of the failure causal factors showed that human error accounted for 76% of those failures, which included workmanship error accounting for 29% of the failures. With the imminent future of commercial space travel, the increased potential for the loss of human life demands that changes be made to the standardized procedures, training, and certification to reduce human error and failure rates. Several recommendations were made by this study to the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation, space launch vehicle operators, and maintenance technician schools in an effort to increase the safety of the space transportation passengers.

  19. Application of software technology to a future spacecraft computer design

    Labaugh, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how major improvements in spacecraft computer systems can be obtained from recent advances in hardware and software technology. Investigations into integrated circuit technology indicated that the CMOS/SOS chip set being developed for the Air Force Avionics Laboratory at Wright Patterson had the best potential for improving the performance of spaceborne computer systems. An integral part of the chip set is the bit slice arithmetic and logic unit. The flexibility allowed by microprogramming, combined with the software investigations, led to the specification of a baseline architecture and instruction set.

  20. Jumbo Space Environment Simulation and Spacecraft Charging Chamber Characterization

    2015-04-09

    probes for Jumbo. Both probes are produced by Trek Inc. Trek probe model 370 is capable of -3 to 3kV and has an extremely fast, 50µs/kV response to...changing surface potentials. Trek probe 341B is capable of -20 to 20kV with a 200 µs/kV response time. During our charging experiments the probe sits...unlimited. 12 REFERENCES [1] R. D. Leach and M. B. Alexander, "Failures and anomalies attributed to spacecraft charging," NASA RP-1375, Marshall Space