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Sample records for space-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic

  1. Time- and Space-Resolved Spectroscopic Investigation on Pi-Conjugated Nanostructures - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Defocused wide-field fluorescence (DWFI) microscopy suggests that molecular heterogeneities and flexibilities clearly depend on ring size and that site... Confocal   Microscopy   Setup Wild‐field  Microscopy   Setup Femtosecond Z‐scan  experiment Setup Figure 3. Instruments of Time- and space-resolved...approved for public release. 3. Space-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy - Confocal Microscopy - Wild-field Microscopy 4. Non-Linear Spectroscopy

  2. Simultaneously time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charatis, G.; Young, B.K.F.; Busch, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The CHROMA laser facility at KMS Fusion has been used to irradiate a variety of microdot targets. These include aluminum dots and mixed bromine dots doped with K-shell (magnesium) emitters. Simultaneously time- and space-resolved K-shell and L-shell spectra have been measured and compared to dynamic model predictions. The electron density profiles are measured using holographic interferometry. Temperatures, densities, and ionization distributions are determined using K-shell and L-shell spectral techniques. Time and spatial gradients are resolved simultaneously using three diagnostics: a framing crystal x-ray spectrometer, an x-ray streaked crystal spectrometer with a spatial imaging slit, and a 4-frame holographic interferometer. Significant differences have been found between the interferometric and the model-dependent spectral measurements of plasma density. Predictions by new non-stationary L-shell models currently being developed are also presented. 14 refs., 10 figs

  3. Time- and space-resolved light emission and spectroscopic research of the flashover plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Leopold, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Rafael Laboratories, Box 2250, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2015-02-21

    The results of an experimental study of the evolution of surface flashover across the surface of an insulator in vacuum subject to a high-voltage pulse and the parameters of the flashover plasma are reported. For the system studied, flashover is always initiated at the cathode triple junctions. Using time-resolved framing photography of the plasma light emission the velocity of the light emission propagation along the surface of the insulator was found to be ∼2.5·10{sup 8} cm/s. Spectroscopic measurements show that the flashover is characterized by a plasma density of 2–4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and neutral and electron temperatures of 2–4 eV and 1–3 eV, respectively, corresponding to a plasma conductivity of ∼0.2 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} and a discharge current density of up to ∼10 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Time and space resolved spectroscopic investigation during anode plume formation in a high-current vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakpour, A.; Methling, R.; Uhrlandt, D.; Franke, St.; Gortschakow, S.; Popov, S.; Batrakov, A.; Weltmann, K. D.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents time and space resolved results of spectroscopic measurements during the formation of an anode plume in the late current pulse phase of a high-current vacuum arc. The formation of the anode plume is investigated systematically based on the occurrence of high-current anode spots, depending on gap distance and current for AC 100 Hz and CuCr7525 butt contacts with a diameter of 10 mm. The anode plume is observed after the extinction of anode spot type 2 in which both the anode and cathode are active. It is concluded from the spatial profiles of the atomic and ionic radiation, parallel and perpendicular to anode surface, that the inner part of the plume is dominated by Cu I radiation, whereas a halo of light emitted by Cu II covers the plume. The radiation intensity of Cu III lines is quite low across the whole anode plume. Upper level excited state densities corresponding to Cu I lines at 510.55, 515.32, 521.82, 578.21 nm are determined. The temporal evolution of the resulting excitation temperature in the centre of the plume varies from 8500 K to 6000 K at 500 µs to 100 µs before current zero, respectively. The density calculated for Cu I at position in the plume is in the range of 1-5  ×  1019 m-3.

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopic imaging reveals the fundamentals of cellular NADH fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y

    2008-10-15

    A time-resolved spectroscopic imaging system is built to study the fluorescence characteristics of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), an important metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore in cells. The system provides a unique approach to measure fluorescence signals in different cellular organelles and cytoplasm. The ratios of free over protein-bound NADH signals in cytosol and nucleus are slightly higher than those in mitochondria. The mitochondrial fluorescence contributes about 70% of overall cellular fluorescence and is not a completely dominant signal. Furthermore, NADH signals in mitochondria, cytosol, and the nucleus respond to the changes of cellular activity differently, suggesting that cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence may complicate the well-known relationship between mitochondrial fluorescence and cellular metabolism.

  6. Fluorescent-Spectroscopic Research of in Vivo Tissues Pathological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Medzhidov, R. T.

    The steady-state spectra of autofluorescence and the reflection coefficient on the excitation wavelength of some stomach tissues in vivo with various pathological conditions (surface gastritis, displasia, cancer) are measured under excitation by the nitrogen laser irradiation (λex=337.1 nm). The contour expansion of obtained fluorescence spectra into contributions of components is conducted by the Gaussian-Lorentzian curves method. It is shown that at least 7 groups of fluorophores forming a total luminescence spectrum can be distinguished during the development of displasia and tumor processes. The correlation of intensities of flavins and NAD(P)·H fluorescence is determined and the degree of respiratory activity of cells for the functional condition considered is estimated. The evaluations of the fluorescence quantum yield of the tissue's researched are given.

  7. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Poła, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers.

  8. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic determination of heavy metals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the heavy metal and trace element composition of the powdered aerial parts of Origanum sipyleum L. and its water extract. Methods: The heavy metal and trace elements content of the powdered plant material and 2 % aqueous extract were evaluated by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with silicon ...

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on binding of a flavonoid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    six principal binding sites have been identified for several important biomolecules.4 ... lized), tryptophan and quercetin from Sigma were used as received. .... +..... (6). Here Fo and F are the fluorescence intensity from the fluorophore, albumin, at 342 nm in the absence and the presence of different concentrations of ...

  10. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic study of solvatochromic curcumin dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Digambara; Barakat, Christelle

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin, the main yellow bioactive component of turmeric, has recently acquired attention by chemists due its wide range of potential biological applications as an antioxidant, an anti-inflammatory, and an anti-carcinogenic agent. This molecule fluoresces weakly and poorly soluble in water. In this detailed study of curcumin in thirteen different solvents, both the absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin was found to be broad, however, a narrower and simple synchronous fluorescence spectrum of curcumin was obtained at Δ λ = 10-20 nm. Lippert-Mataga plot of curcumin in different solvents illustrated two sets of linearity which is consistent with the plot of Stokes' shift vs. the ET30. When Stokes's shift in wavenumber scale was replaced by synchronous fluorescence maximum in nanometer scale, the solvent polarity dependency measured by λSFSmax vs. Lippert-Mataga plot or ET30 values offered similar trends as measured via Stokes' shift for protic and aprotic solvents for curcumin. Better linear correlation of λSFSmax vs. π* scale of solvent polarity was found compared to λabsmax or λemmax or Stokes' shift measurements. In Stokes' shift measurement both absorption/excitation as well as emission (fluorescence) spectra are required to compute the Stokes' shift in wavenumber scale, but measurement could be done in a very fast and simple way by taking a single scan of SFS avoiding calculation and obtain information about polarity of the solvent. Curcumin decay properties in all the solvents could be fitted well to a double-exponential decay function.

  11. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of fluorescent complexes of tyrosine 8-hydroxyquinoline and tyrosine-8-hydroxyquinaldine in aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhrani, M.A.; Kazi, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    A new method has been developed by preparing complexes involving condensation of tyrosine with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) and 8-hydroxyquinaldine (Quinaldine) respectively, producing fluorescent products. The products obtained have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation using different spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence activity of newly synthesized products. 8-hydroxyquinaldine and 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) condensed with tyrosine separately produced water soluble fluorescent complexes. The complexes have been investigated for identification and quantitative estimation of amino acids. Identification of amino acids in nano mole or below than nano mole has become possible by present fluorometric activity of these complexes involving different excitation and emission wavelengths. The fluorometric activity of complexes has been observed to be 100 to 1000 times higher than assay method involving ninhydrin and amino acid analyzer. The method adopted in our laboratory is rapid, versatile with good reproducibility and provides excellent results for adoption by analytical, agricultural and biomedical laboratories to estimate amino acids and metals in composite matrix. (author)

  13. Interaction of tea polyphenols with serum albumins: A fluorescence spectroscopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Adity, E-mail: adityc17j@gmail.com

    2016-01-15

    Interactions of some tea polyphenols, namely (−) Catechin (C), (−)-epicatechin (EC), (–) epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC) and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are outlined with the serum albumin proteins. These interactions had all resulted in binding with the proteins with a concomitant static quenching of the protein fluorescence. A fluorescence technique has been considered as the tool to comprehend the polyphenol–protein interactions mainly and simultaneously other spectroscopic techniques used to verify the results have been discussed. In this mini review the different types of equations usually employed to calculate the binding constant values have been outlined, namely, modified Stern Volmer plot, Scatchard plot and Lineweaver Burk equation, with their corresponding results. The n values (number of binding sites) had always been close to unity suggesting a 1:1 complexation with the polyphenols and the protein. A structural change in the polyphenols has been found to alter the binding constant value and the galloyl moiety attached to the C ring of the polyphenols have been found to play a crucial role in this regard. It has been found that an increase in galloyl moiety increases binding of the catechins with proteins. - Highlights: • Review on interactions of some tea polyphenols with the serum albumin proteins. • Tea polyphenols include Catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epigallocatechin, epicatechin-3-gallate and epicatechin. • Fluorescence spectroscopic technique is mainly outlined. • Binding constant studies have been given importance. • Galloyl moiety in the C ring is crucial in increasing binding constant.

  14. Steady-state fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopic studies of bacterial luciferase tryptophan mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Meighen, E A

    1994-09-01

    Bacterial luciferase, which catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction in luminous bacteria, consists of two nonidentical polypeptides, α and β. Eight mutants of luciferase with each of the tryptophans replaced by tyrosine were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and purified to homogeneity. The steady-state tryptophan fluorescence and low-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopic properties of these mutants were characterized. In some instances, mutation of only a single tryptophan residue resulted in large spectral changes. The tryptophan residues conserved in both the α and the β subunits exhibited distinct fluorescence emission properties, suggesting that these tryptophans have different local enviroments. The low-temperature phosphorescence data suggest that the tryptophans conserved in bot the α and the β subunits are not located at the subunit interface and/or involved in subunit interactions. The differences in the spectral properties of the mutants have provided useful information on the local environment of the individual tryptophan residues as well as on the quaternary structure of the protein.

  15. Biochemical activity of a fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G: Molecular modeling, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masum, Abdulla; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Ghosh, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Karmakar, Parimal; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of CT DNA with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been studied using molecular docking, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic methods. From the study, it was illustrated that Rhodamine 6G binds to the minor groove of CT DNA. The binding was cooperative in nature. Circular voltametric study showed significant change in peak current and peak potential due to complexation. All the studies showed that the binding constant was in the order of 10 6 M -1 . Circular dichroic spectra showed significant conformational change on binding and DNA unwind during binding. Thermodynamic study showed that binding was favored by negative enthalpy and positive entropy change. From thermodynamic study it was also observed that several positive and negative free energies played significant role during binding and the unfavorable conformational free energy change was overcame by highly negative hydrophobic and salt dependent free energy changes. The experimental results were further validated using molecular docking study and the effect of structure on binding has been studied theoretically. From docking study it was found that the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds played a significant role during binding. The dye was absorbed by cell and this phenomenon was studied using fluorescent microscope. Cell survivability test showed that the dye active against Human Breast Cancer cells MDA-MB 468. ROS study showed that the activity is due to the production of reactive oxygen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluorometric detection of nitroaromatics by fluorescent lead complexes: A spectroscopic assessment of detection mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmay; Chatterjee, Sourav; Majumder, Ishani; Ghosh, Soumen; Yoon, Sangee; Sim, Eunji

    2018-04-01

    Three Schiff base ligands such as 2-[(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (HL1), 2-[(2-Hydroxy-benzylidene)-amino]-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (HL2), 2-[(3,5-Dichloro-2-hydroxy-benzylidene)-amino]-2-hydroxymethyl-propane-1,3-diol (HL3) have been synthesized by condensation of aldehydes (such as 3,5-Dichloro-2-hydroxy benzaldehyde, 2-Hydroxy-benzaldehyde, and 2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzaldehyde) with Tris-(hydroxymethyl)amino methane and characterized by IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Then all these three ligands have been used to prepare Pb(II) complexes by reaction with lead(II) acetate tri-hydrate in methanol. In view of analytical and spectral (IR, UV-vis and Mass) studies, it has been concluded that, except HL2, other two ligands form 1:1 metal complexes (1 and 3) with lead. Between two complexes, complex 3 is highly fluorescent and this property has been used to identify the pollutant nitroaromatics. Finally, the quenching mechanism has been established by means of spectroscopic investigation.

  17. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  18. Time-and Space-Resolved Spectroscopic Investigation on pi-Conjugated Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    molecular photonic devices, artificial photosynthesis systems, and dye-sensitized solar cells. Strenuous research efforts have focused on developing...public release; distribution is unlimited. 17 relationships can predict these spectra, and the database of nonlinear spectra is sparse. To fill this

  19. Spectroscopic detection of oral and skin tissue transformation in a model for squamous cell carcinoma: Autofluorescence versus systemic aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderBreggen, E. W. J.; Rem, A. I.; Christian, M. M.; Yang, C. J.; Calhoun, K. H.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Motamedi, M.

    1996-01-01

    In recent Sears, applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to detect premalignant and malignant changes in various types of tissue has been proposed, The development of a safe and specific fluorescent agent that could enhance the spectroscopic contrast between normal and malignant tissue is highly

  20. Spectroscopic investigations on the interaction of thioacetamide with ZnO quantum dots and application for its fluorescence sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipika; Negi, Devendra P S

    2018-01-15

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a method for the sensing of thioacetamide by using spectroscopic techniques. Thioacetamide is a carcinogen and it is important to detect its presence in food-stuffs. Semiconductor quantum dots are frequently employed as sensing probes since their absorption and fluorescence properties are highly sensitive to the interaction with substrates present in the solution. In the present work, the interaction between thioacetamide and ZnO quantum dots has been investigated by using UV-visible, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. Besides, dynamic light scattering (DLS) has also been utilized for the interaction studies. UV-visible absorption studies indicated the bonding of the lone pair of sulphur atom of thioacetamide with the surface of the semiconductor. The fluorescence band of the ZnO quantum dots was found to be quenched in the presence of micromolar concentrations of thioacetamide. The quenching was found to follow the Stern-Volmer relationship. The Stern-Volmer constant was evaluated to be 1.20×10 5 M -1 . Infrared spectroscopic measurements indicated the participation of the NH 2 group and the sulphur atom of thioacetamide in bonding with the surface of the ZnO quantum dots. DLS measurements indicated that the surface charge of the semiconductor was shielded by the thioacetamide molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spectroscopic investigations on the interaction of thioacetamide with ZnO quantum dots and application for its fluorescence sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipika; Negi, Devendra P. S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a method for the sensing of thioacetamide by using spectroscopic techniques. Thioacetamide is a carcinogen and it is important to detect its presence in food-stuffs. Semiconductor quantum dots are frequently employed as sensing probes since their absorption and fluorescence properties are highly sensitive to the interaction with substrates present in the solution. In the present work, the interaction between thioacetamide and ZnO quantum dots has been investigated by using UV-visible, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy. Besides, dynamic light scattering (DLS) has also been utilized for the interaction studies. UV-visible absorption studies indicated the bonding of the lone pair of sulphur atom of thioacetamide with the surface of the semiconductor. The fluorescence band of the ZnO quantum dots was found to be quenched in the presence of micromolar concentrations of thioacetamide. The quenching was found to follow the Stern-Volmer relationship. The Stern-Volmer constant was evaluated to be 1.20 × 105 M- 1. Infrared spectroscopic measurements indicated the participation of the sbnd NH2 group and the sulphur atom of thioacetamide in bonding with the surface of the ZnO quantum dots. DLS measurements indicated that the surface charge of the semiconductor was shielded by the thioacetamide molecules.

  2. New fluorescence spectroscopic method for the simultaneous determination of alkaloids in aqueous extract of green coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yisak, Hagos; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2018-05-11

    There is no fluorescence spectroscopic method for the determination of trigonelline and theobromine in green coffee beans. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a new fluorescence spectroscopic method to determine the alkaloids simultaneously in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans. The calibration curves were linear in the range 2-6, 1-6, 1-5 mg/L for caffeine, theobromine and trigonelline, respectively, with R 2  ≥ 0.9987. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2, 6 and 7 µg/L and 40, 20 and 20 µg/L for caffeine, theobromine and trigonelline, respectively. Caffeine and trigonelline exhibited well separated fluorescence excitation spectra and therefore the two alkaloids were selectively quantified in the aqueous extract of green coffee. While theobromine showed overlapping fluorescence excitation spectra with caffeine and hence theobromine could not be determined in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans. The amount of caffeine and trigonelline in the three samples of green coffee beans were found to be 0.95-1.10 and 1.00-1.10% (w/w), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD ≤ 4%) of the method for the three compounds of interest were of very good. The accuracy of the developed analytical method was evaluated by spiking standard caffeine and trigonelline to green coffee beans and the average recoveries were 99 ± 2% for both the alkaloids. A fast, sensitive and reliable fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of caffeine and trigonelline in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans was developed and validated. The developed method reflected an effective performance to the direct determination of the two alkaloids in the aqueous extract of green coffee beans.

  3. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  4. LaPO4:Eu fluorescent nanorods, synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic studies on interaction with human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingjia; Yao, Jie; Liu, Xuehui; Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Lizhi; Xu, Liping; Hao, Aijun

    2018-06-01

    Eu3+ doped LaPO4 fluorescent nanorods (LaPO4:Eu) was successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal process. The obtained LaPO4:Eu nanorods under the optimal conditions were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nanorods with a length of 50-100 nm and a diameter of about 10 nm, can emit strong red fluorescence upon excitation at 241 nm. The FTIR result confirmed that there are lots of phosphate groups on the surfaces of nanorods. In order to better understand the physiological behavior of nanorods in human body, multiple spectroscopic methods were used to study the interaction between the LaPO4:Eu nanorods and human serum albumin (HSA) in the simulated physiological conditions. The results indicated that the nanorods can effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through a dynamic quenching mode with the association constants of the order of 103 L mol-1. The values of the thermodynamic parameters suggested that the binding of the nanorods to HSA was a spontaneous process and van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds played a predominant role. The displacement experiments verified that the binding site of nanorods on HSA was mainly located in the hydrophobic pocket of subdomain IIA (site I) of HSA. The binding distance between nanorods and HSA was calculated to be 4.2 nm according to the theory of Förster non-radiation energy transfer. The analysis of synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence (3D) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that there the addition of LaPO4:Eu nanorods did not caused significant alterations in conformation of HSA secondary structure and the polarity around the amino acid residues.

  5. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Macromolecular Competition Titration Method: Accessing Thermodynamics of the Unmodified Macromolecule–Ligand Interactions Through Spectroscopic Titrations of Fluorescent Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand–macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein–nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein–nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein–nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand–macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined. PMID:21195223

  7. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of a fluorescent pyrrole derivative containing electron acceptor and donor groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A. K. A.; Monteiro, M. P.; Dias, J. M. M.; Omena, L.; da Silva, A. J. C.; Tonholo, J.; Mortimer, R. J.; Navarro, M.; Jacinto, C.; Ribeiro, A. S.; de Oliveira, I. N.

    2014-07-01

    The synthesis and fluorescence characterization of a new pyrrole derivative (PyPDG) containing the electron donor-acceptor dansyl substituent is reported. The effects of temperature and solvent polarity on the steady-state fluorescence of this compound are investigated. Our results show that PyPDG exhibits desirable fluorescent properties which makes it a promising candidate to be used as the photoactive material in optical thermometry and thermography applications. Further, the electrochemical and emission properties of polymeric films obtained from the oxidation polymerization of PyPDG are also analyzed.

  8. Chemical and physical properties of the normal and aging lens: spectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and NMR) analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, S.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro [UV absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)] spectroscopic studies on the normal human lens demonstrate age-related changes which can be correlated with biochemical and photobiologic mechanisms occurring during our lifetime. Chronic cumulative UV exposure results in an age-related increase of photochemically induced chromophores and in color of the lens nucleus. This enables the lens to filter the incident UV radiation, thereby protecting the underlying aging retina from UV photodamage. We have measured the age-related increase in lens fluorescence in vivo on more than 300 normal subjects (1st to 9th decade) by UV slitlamp densitography. These data show a good correlation with the in vitro lens fluorescence studies reported previously and demonstrate that molecular photodamage can be monitored in the lens. In vitro NMR (human and animal lenses) and in vivo experiments currently in progress are rapidly elucidating the physicochemical basis for transparency and the development of light scattering areas. Surface scanning NMR can monitor organophosphate metabolism in the ocular lens in vivo as well as in vitro. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using biophysical methods (optical spectroscopy and NMR analyses) to delineate age-related parameters in the lens, in vivo as well as in vitro. 46 references

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on substituted porphyrins in homogeneous solvents and cationic micellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phukan, Smritakshi; Mishra, Bhupendra; Chandra Shekar, K.P.; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Dalip; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2013-01-01

    Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of porphyrin appended 1,3,4-oxadiazoles and thiazoles were described in homogeneous medium as well as in presence of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The electron withdrawing substituent on the porphyrin moiety in both the cases make a donor–spacer–acceptor type of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) system resulting substantial quenching in porphyrin fluorescence due to partial energy migration towards the acceptor in the excited state. The increase in fluorescence yield as well as appreciable difference in fluorescence decay behavior in aqueous buffer solution of pH 4.2 from that in chloroform solution is believed due to partial protonation of the porphyrin ring. All the investigated systems show preferential binding into the interfacial region of the micellar sub-domain with varying degree of penetration depending on the nature of the substituent. Almost 2–4 fold increase in fluorescence yield for the probes is explained on the basis of restricted flexibility and corresponding decrease in total nonradiative rate inside the micellar interface layer. - Highlights: ► Synthesis and detail fluorescence studies of a series of porphyrin appended 1,3,4-oxadiazoles and thiazoles. ► Comparison of homogeneous solvent study with that in CTAB. ► Substantial porphyrin fluorescence quenching in donor–spacer–acceptor type system. ► Preferential binding of the substituted porphyrins in micellar sub-domain. ► Appreciable increase in fluorescence yield in micellar interface layer is due to decrease in total nonradiative rate.

  10. The fluorescence spectroscopic studies on the interaction of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaboudin, B.; Moradi, K.; Faghihi, M.R.; Mohammadi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Six novel aminomethylphosphinic acids have been synthesized and characterized. The interaction between the aminophosphinic acids and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a result of the formation of aminophosphinic acid–BSA complex; static quenching and non-radiative energy transferring were confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching. The number of binding sites n, the apparent binding constant K A and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures. The process of binding of the aminophosphinic acid molecules to BSA was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure in which entropy increased and Gibbs free energy decreased. Hydrophobic interaction force plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. The effect of aminophosphinic acids on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Graphical abstarct: The binding interactions of the water-soluble aminoalkylphosphinic acids APA 1–6 to bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed that the interaction process was spontaneous and the major interaction forces were found to be hydrophobic. Highlights: ► Binding of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin. ► Hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding attraction play major role in the binding process. ► Binding did not cause conformational changes in the protein. ► The quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a static quenching process

  11. Fluorescent bovine serum albumin interacting with the antitussive quencher dextromethorphan: a spectroscopic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgannavar, Amar K; Patgar, Manjanath B; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DXM) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is studied by using fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS), 3D fluorescence spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism under simulated physiological conditions. DXM effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. Values of the binding constant, K(A), are 7.159 × 10(3), 9.398 × 10(3) and 16.101 × 10(3)  L/mol; the number of binding sites, n, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° between DXM and BSA were calculated at different temperatures. The interaction between DXM and BSA occurs through dynamic quenching and the effect of DXM on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using SFS. The average binding distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (DXM) was determined based on Förster's theory. The results of fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and SFS show that the secondary structure of the protein has been changed in the presence of DXM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The fluorescence spectroscopic studies on the interaction of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaboudin, B., E-mail: kaboudin@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Gava Zang, Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, K.; Faghihi, M.R.; Mohammadi, F. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Gava Zang, Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Six novel aminomethylphosphinic acids have been synthesized and characterized. The interaction between the aminophosphinic acids and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a result of the formation of aminophosphinic acid–BSA complex; static quenching and non-radiative energy transferring were confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching. The number of binding sites n, the apparent binding constant K{sub A} and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures. The process of binding of the aminophosphinic acid molecules to BSA was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure in which entropy increased and Gibbs free energy decreased. Hydrophobic interaction force plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. The effect of aminophosphinic acids on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Graphical abstarct: The binding interactions of the water-soluble aminoalkylphosphinic acids APA 1–6 to bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed that the interaction process was spontaneous and the major interaction forces were found to be hydrophobic. Highlights: ► Binding of novel aminophosphinic acids with bovine serum albumin. ► Hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding attraction play major role in the binding process. ► Binding did not cause conformational changes in the protein. ► The quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BSA by aminophosphinic acids is a static quenching process.

  13. Updating a synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic virgin olive oil adulteration calibration to a new geographical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew Ross; Ottaway, Joshua; Kalivas, John H; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Mousdis, George A

    2011-02-23

    Detecting and quantifying extra virgin olive adulteration is of great importance to the olive oil industry. Many spectroscopic methods in conjunction with multivariate analysis have been used to solve these issues. However, successes to date are limited as calibration models are built to a specific set of geographical regions, growing seasons, cultivars, and oil extraction methods (the composite primary condition). Samples from new geographical regions, growing seasons, etc. (secondary conditions) are not always correctly predicted by the primary model due to different olive oil and/or adulterant compositions stemming from secondary conditions not matching the primary conditions. Three Tikhonov regularization (TR) variants are used in this paper to allow adulterant (sunflower oil) concentration predictions in samples from geographical regions not part of the original primary calibration domain. Of the three TR variants, ridge regression with an additional 2-norm penalty provides the smallest validation sample prediction errors. Although the paper reports on using TR for model updating to predict adulterant oil concentration, the methods should also be applicable to updating models distinguishing adulterated samples from pure extra virgin olive oil. Additionally, the approaches are general and can be used with other spectroscopic methods and adulterants as well as with other agriculture products.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of the interaction of citrinin with native and chemically modified cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poór, Miklós, E-mail: poor.miklos@pte.hu [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Toxicology Section, University of Pécs, Szigeti út 12, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Matisz, Gergely; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); János Szentágothai Research Center, Ifjúság útja 20, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Derdák, Diána [Department of General and Physical Chemistry, University of Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6, Pécs H-7624 (Hungary); Szente, Lajos [CycloLab Cyclodextrin Research & Development Laboratory Ltd., Illatos út 7, Budapest H-1097 (Hungary); and others

    2016-04-15

    Citrinin (CIT) is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium and Monascus species. CIT is unavoidable contaminant of different foods and drinks due to its wide occurrence and high thermal stability. For this reason, development of new, more sensitive analytical methods and decontamination strategies has high importance. In our study, the complex formation of CIT with native and chemically modified cyclodextrins was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, thermodynamic and molecular modeling studies were also performed for the deeper understanding of these host-guest interactions. Our results show that among the tested compounds methylated β-cyclodextrins form the most stable complexes with CIT and these derivatives cause the highest fluorescence enhancement of CIT as well. These observations recommend that some of the chemically modified derivatives show more favourable properties than the native cyclodextrin, and suggesting more promising analytical applicability and higher affinity as potential toxin binders.

  15. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirak, P. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Schiereis, T. [Institut fuer Biologie, Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie, Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Jung, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlichting, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-08-08

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA{sub 148} (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA{sub 126} (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF{sub r,f} and BLUF{sub r,sl}) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF{sub nc}). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF{sub s,f} and BLUF{sub s,sl}) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  17. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  18. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-01-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl ) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc ). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl ) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation

  19. Spectroscopic study of harmane in micelles at 77 K using fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. D. S.; Souza, H. F.; Costa, I. C.; de Azevedo, W. M.

    2000-03-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission for spectroscopic techniques at 77 K, and molecular orbital calculations using PM3-MOPAC/93 and HAM/3-CI have been used to study the two forms of harmane, the neutral (HN) and the monoprotonated (HH), in different environments. In hydrophobic media, for (HN), four species were determined and in hydrophilic medium, for (HH), we found just one species. The photophysical properties of all these species were determined, and we verified that each one of them displays distinct photophysical properties from one to another. For example, for monomer of (HN), the lowest electronic singlet state S 1 is (π,π ∗) and the lowest electronic triplet state T 1 is (π,π ∗), due to the phosphorescence lifetime it is t=0.8 s. For the (HH) monomer, the S 1 is (π,π ∗) and T 1 is (π,π ∗) and the spin-orbital coupling is inefficient. These determinations were used to characterise and to identify the harmane species that is solubilised into the interior of neutral (triton X-100), anionic (dodecyl lithium sulphate) and cationic (hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide) micelles, all of them were prepared under physiological conditions. The results indicated that active species in the interior of the micelles is a hydrogen bond complex between (HN) and micellar environments that is anchored in the aqueous region of micelles.

  20. Space-resolved vacuum ultra-violet spectroscopy on T.F.R. Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported of space-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopy (between 100 A and 2000A) on T.F.R. Tokamak plasmas and examples are given of profiles for both heavy and light impurity ions. The experimental method and the associated uncertainties and problems are stressed. The great importance of numerical calculations in the interpretation of the impurity profiles is pointed out. (author)

  1. Experimental Spectroscopic Studies of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Fluorescence at High Temperatures and Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrivain, Olivier; Orain, Mikael; Dorval, Nelly; Morin, Celine; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-10-01

    Two-photon excitation laser-induced fluorescence of carbon monoxide (CO-LIF) is investigated experimentally in order to determine the applicability of this technique for imaging CO concentration in aeronautical combustors. Experiments are carried out in a high temperature, high-pressure test cell, and in a laminar premixed CH 4 /air flame. Influence of temperature and pressure on CO-LIF spectra intensity and shape is reported. The experimental results show that as pressure increases, the CO-LIF excitation spectrum becomes asymmetric. Additionally, the spectrum strongly shifts to the red with a quadratic dependence of the collisional shift upon pressure, which is different from the classical behavior where the collisional shift is proportional to pressure. Moreover, pressure line broadening cannot be reproduced by a Lorenztian profile in the temperature range investigated here (300-1750 K) and, therefore, an alternative line shape is suggested.

  2. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands: A Spectroscopic and Structural Study of 4-(4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and APP+ Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP+) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP+), has been investigated. Optical spectroscopy reveals that these probes are highly sensitive to their chemical microenvironment, responding to variations in polarity with changes in transition energies and responding to changes in viscosity or rotational freedom with emission enhancements. Molecular docking calculations reveal that the probes are able to access the nonpolar and conformationally restrictive binding pocket of SERT. As a result, the probes exhibit previously not identified binding-induced turn-on emission that is spectroscopically distinct from dyes that have accumulated intracellularly. Thus, binding and transport dynamics of SERT ligands can be resolved both spatially and spectroscopically. PMID:24460204

  3. [Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of fulvic acid from the long-term located fertilization in black soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ping; Wei, Dan; Zhou, Bao-Ku; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Xi-Lin; Wei, Zi-Min; Li, Shu-Ling

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of long-term located fertilization on soil fulvic acid (FA), in this study, four soil samples were taken from black soil with long-term located fertilization (about 30 year) in Harbin, Heilongjiang province. The fertilization treatments included control (CK), N, P and K fertilization (NPK), horse manure (OM), combination of organic manure and chemical fertilizations (MNPK). Soil FA was extracted from the samples and purified. The excitation, emission, synchronous, and three-dimensional-excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM) characteristics of the FA were determined. The excitation, emission and synchronous scan spectra all indicated that the main peaks of FA in the NPK treatment exhibited a significantly blue shift compared with CK, while those of MNPK, OM treatment caused a red shift to some extent. 3DEEM spectra of FA in all treatments exhibited four peaks (peak a, peak b, peak c, and peak d), compared with FA in CK, the wavelengths shift tendency of peak a, peak b, and peak c of FA 3DEEM in NPK, MNPK and OM treatments were similar to that of traditional spectra in FA. In order to provide quantitative information of FA humification degree in different treatments, we investigated the fluorescence index f450/500 (FI), area integration (A370-600 nm, A1 370-412 nm, A4 538-600 nm). Compared with CK, the f450/500, ratio of A1/A in NPK and A4/A in MNPK treatment increased by 4.62%, 6.12%, 7.22%, respectively. However, the f450/500, the ratio of A1/A in MNPK and A4/A in NPK treatment decreased by 3.86%, 15.31%, and 7.22% respectively. This indicated that NPK application gave a lower degree of FA humification, and combination of organic manure and chemical fertilizations would lead to a greater degree of FA aromatization in black soil with long-term located fertilization than CK.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of neutral and chemically oxidized species of β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin in CH2Cl2: Fluorescence from intermediate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwis, D.D.D.H; Chandrika, U.G.; Jayaweera, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cations, dications and oxidized intermediate species of three carotenoids, namely, β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin, were generated in CH 2 Cl 2 solutions via chemical oxidation using anhydrous FeCl 3 . UV–vis, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopic studies were performed to understand and compare the nature of intermediate species generated during the chemical oxidation process and subsequent degradation. The intense emission observed at 550 nm can be assigned to the S 2 →S 0 (1 1 B u →1 1 A g ) transition of the carotenoid molecules. The 350 nm excitation during the oxidation process for β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin exhibit intense fluorescence peaks at 492 nm, 493 nm and 500 nm, respectively. These peaks are assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy compounds of the three molecules that are formed with molecular oxygen prior to the formation of oxidized short-chain stable compounds. - Highlights: • Fluorescence and UV–vis studies on β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin. • Oxidation, induced by FeCl 3 in CH 2 Cl 2 shows blue shifted fluorescence peaks. • Fluorescence peaks were assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy forms of carotenoids. • The D0→D3 transition of radical cations are observed in the near IR region

  5. Spectroscopic studies of neutral and chemically oxidized species of β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}: Fluorescence from intermediate compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwis, D.D.D.H [Department of Chemistry, The Open University of Sri Lanka, Nawala (Sri Lanka); Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Chandrika, U.G. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka); Jayaweera, P.M., E-mail: pradeep@sjp.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda (Sri Lanka)

    2015-02-15

    Radical cations, dications and oxidized intermediate species of three carotenoids, namely, β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin, were generated in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solutions via chemical oxidation using anhydrous FeCl{sub 3}. UV–vis, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopic studies were performed to understand and compare the nature of intermediate species generated during the chemical oxidation process and subsequent degradation. The intense emission observed at 550 nm can be assigned to the S{sub 2}→S{sub 0} (1{sup 1}B{sub u}→1{sup 1}A{sub g}) transition of the carotenoid molecules. The 350 nm excitation during the oxidation process for β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin exhibit intense fluorescence peaks at 492 nm, 493 nm and 500 nm, respectively. These peaks are assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy compounds of the three molecules that are formed with molecular oxygen prior to the formation of oxidized short-chain stable compounds. - Highlights: • Fluorescence and UV–vis studies on β-carotene, lycopene and norbixin. • Oxidation, induced by FeCl{sub 3} in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} shows blue shifted fluorescence peaks. • Fluorescence peaks were assigned to intermediate peroxy/epoxy forms of carotenoids. • The D0→D3 transition of radical cations are observed in the near IR region.

  6. Space resolved measurements of neutrons and ion emission on plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, U.

    1980-05-01

    This report describes space-resolved measurements of neutrons and of accelerated charged particles, emitted by a plasmafocus-device. The neutron source has been measured with one and two-dimensional paraffin collimators. The space resolution is 5 mm along the axis and the radius, with a time resolution of 10 ns. In order to make quantitative statements about the neutron yield, neutron-scattering, absorption and nuclear reactions were taken into account. Part of the neutron measurements are carried out together with time and space resolved measurements of the electron density to study possible correlations between nsub(e) and Ysub(n). The following results about the neutron measurement were obtained: The neutron emission reaches its maximum between 40 and 60 ns after the maximum compression. The emission region is limited to a well defined range of 0 50 ns it has been observed a broadening of the emission region in + z-direction. The emission profiles in lower and in higher pressure regimes are almost the same. (orig./HT) [de

  7. Space-resolved characterization of high frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma in nitrogen, applying optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Ruhrmann, Cornelia; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Averaged plasma parameters such as electron distribution function and electron density are determined by characterization of high frequency (2.4 GHz) nitrogen plasma using both experimental methods, namely optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and microphotography, and numerical simulation. Both direct and step-wise electron-impact excitation of nitrogen emissions are considered. The determination of space-resolved electron distribution function, electron density, rate constant for electron-impact dissociation of nitrogen molecule and the production of nitrogen atoms, applying the same methods, is discussed. Spatial distribution of intensities of neutral nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecular ion from the microplasma is imaged by a CCD camera. The CCD images are calibrated using the corresponding emissions measured by absolutely calibrated OES, and are then subjected to inverse Abel transformation to determine space-resolved intensities and other parameters. The space-resolved parameters are compared, respectively, with the averaged parameters, and an agreement between them is established. (paper)

  8. Space resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of the supercooled state of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Shinya; Nishida, Akira; Mina, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    In order to measure an ordering process of polymers, the supercooled state near the crystallizing surface was observed by a space resolved X-ray diffraction method at Photon Factory (PF). Using temperature slope crystallization, low density polyethylene and even-number paraffins were examined during crystallization from the melt state. The results indicate that polyethylene shows a sharp b-axis orientation where the lamellar normal and crystalline c-axis are perpendicular to the temperature slope. The crystalline lamellae are well-developed with lamellar thickness of 180 A. The supercooled melt state just above the crystallizing plane shows some diffraction in the small angle region without any crystalline reflection in the wide angle. This fact suggests that a long-range ordering (lamellar structure) appears prior to the short-range one (crystalline structure). The in-situ crystallizing surface was observed by an optical microscope connected to a TV system. The crystallizing surface of even-number paraffins moves to upwards in the temperature slope. In-situ X-ray measurements at PF revealed that the crystalline c-axis and lamellar normal of the even number paraffins are parallel to the temperature slope. From these results, the crystalline ordering and the surface movement of even number paraffins are explained using special nucleation mechanism including a screw dislocation. (author)

  9. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A dual spectroscopic fluorescence probe based on carbon dots for detection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol/Fe (III) ion by fluorescence and frequency doubling scattering spectra and its analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinxia; Bai, Zhangjun; Zu, Fanlin; Yan, Fanyong; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Saihui; Luo, Yunmei

    2018-07-05

    A convenient, highly sensitive and reliable assay for 2,4,6‑trinitrophenol (TNP) and Fe (III) ion (Fe 3+ ) in the dual spectroscopic manner is developed based on novel carbon dots (CDs). The CDs with highly blue emitting fluorescent were easily prepared via the one-step potassium hydroxide-assisted reflux method from dextrin. The as-synthesized CDs exhibited the high crystalline quality, the excellent fluorescence characteristics with a high quantum yield of ~13.1%, and the narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 6.3±0.5nm. Fluorescence and frequency doubling scattering (FDS) spectra of CDs show the unique changes in the presence of TNP/Fe 3+ by different mechanism. The fluorescence of CDs decreased apparently in the presence of TNP via electron-transfer. Thus, after the experimental conditions were optimized, the linear range for detection TNP is 0-50μM, the detection limit was 19.1nM. With the addition of Fe 3+ , the FDS of CDs appeared to be highly sensitive with a quick response to Fe 3+ as a result of the change concentration of the scattering particle. The emission peak for FDS at 450nm was enhanced under the excitation wavelength at 900nm. The fluorescence response changes linearly with Fe 3+ concentration in the range of 8-40μM, the detection limits were determined to be 44.1nM. The applications of CDs were extended for the detection of TNP, Fe 3+ in real water samples with a high recovery. The results reported here may become the potential tools for the fast response of TNP and Fe 3+ in the analysis of environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic exploration of carboxylic acid derivatives of 6-hydroxy-1-keto-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole: Hydrogen bond sensitive fluorescent probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Mitra, Amrit; Ghosh, Sujay; Chakraborty, Suchandra; Basu, Samita; Saha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluorescent carboxylic acid derivatives having 6-hydroxy-1-keto-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole moiety, 2-(1-oxo-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-6-yloxy)acetic acid [OTHCA] and 2-(7-methoxy-1-oxo-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-6-yloxy)acetic acid [MOTHCA] were synthesized by Japp–Klingemann reaction followed by Fischer indole cyclization. Extensive spectroscopic investigation has been carried out on the compounds in sixteen different aprotic and protic solvents as well as in binary solvent mixtures using absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence maxima of the compounds have shifted consistently to longer wavelength in mediums of higher polarity and hydrogen bonding ability. Dipole moment change of the molecules upon photoexcitation has been calculated using Lippert–Mataga theory of solvatochromic shifts. Kamlet–Taft solvatochromic comparison method has been used to determine the dependence of spectral shifts upon empirical solvent parameters. Formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding of both OTHCA and MOTHCA with protic solvents has been proved by comparing their spectral responses in toluene–acetonitrile and toluene–methanol solvent mixtures. -- Highlights: • The compounds have similar electronic distribution in ground and excited state. • Emission maxima shift towards red with increase in the E T (30) value of the solvents. • Dipole moment change in the excited state is different in protic and aprotic solvents. • OTHCA and MOTHCA form intermolecular hydrogen bond with protic solvents. • Fluorescence lifetime decays are bi-exponential in long chain alcoholic solvents

  12. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  13. Simultaneous time-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements of dielectrics excited with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Haahr-Lillevang, L.; Siegel, J.; Balling, P.; Guizard, S.; Solis, J.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous time-and-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements over a temporal span of 300 ps have been performed in fused silica and sapphire samples excited with 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses at energies slightly and well above the ablation threshold. The experimental results have been simulated in the frame of a multiple-rate equation model including light propagation. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the reflectivity and the interferometric measurements at 400 nm clearly shows that the two techniques interrogate different material volumes during the course of the process. While the former is sensitive to the evolution of the plasma density in a very thin ablating layer at the surface, the second yields an averaged plasma density over a larger volume. It is shown that self-trapped excitons do not appreciably contribute to carrier relaxation in fused silica at fluences above the ablation threshold, most likely due to Coulomb screening effects at large excited carrier densities. For both materials, at fluences well above the ablation threshold, the maximum measured plasma reflectivity shows a saturation behavior consistent with a scattering rate proportional to the plasma density in this fluence regime. Moreover, for both materials and for pulse energies above the ablation threshold and delays in the few tens of picoseconds range, a simultaneous "low reflectivity" and "low transmission" behavior is observed. Although this behavior has been identified in the past as a signature of femtosecond laser-induced ablation, its origin is alternatively discussed in terms of the optical properties of a material undergoing strong isochoric heating, before having time to substantially expand or exchange energy with the surrounding media.

  14. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence in the gas phase: a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular spectroscopy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2017-11-01

    Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) extends the usual laser induced fluorescence technique by adding a second dimension, the wavelength at which excited states emit, thereby significantly enhancing the information that can be extracted. It allows overlapping absorption features, whether they arise from within the same molecule or from different molecules in a mixture, to be associated with their appropriate "parent" state and/or molecule. While the first gas phase version of the technique was published a decade ago, the technique is in its infancy, having been exploited by only a few groups to date. However, its potential in gas phase spectroscopy and dynamics is significant. In this article we provide an overview of the technique and illustrate its potential with examples, with a focus on those utilising high resolution in the dispersed fluorescence dimension.

  15. FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF THE FORMATION OF HYDROPHOBIC MICRODOMAINS IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS OF POLY(ALKYLMETHYLDIALLYLAMMONIUM BROMIDES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    YANG, YJ; Engberts, Jan B F N

    The conformational state of poly(alkylmethyldiallylammonium bromides) was studied in aqueous solutions using pyrene as a fluorescence probe. The results are indicative for the formation of hydrophobic microdomains in the case of several copolymers which possess sufficiently hydrophobic alkyl side

  16. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  17. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of the Interactions of Ionic Liquids and Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Yang, Peng; Kong, Jichuan; Li, Dandan; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing

    2016-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of nine ionic liquids (ILs) on the catalase activity were investigated using fluorescence, absorption ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The interactions of ILs and catalase on the molecular level were studied. The experimental results indicated that ILs could inhibit the catalase activity and their inhibitory abilities depended on their chemical structures. Fluorescence experiments showed that hydrogen bonding played an important role in the interaction process. The inhibitory abilities of ILs on catalase activity could be simply described by their hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding abilities. Unexpected less inhibitory effects of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO - ) might be ascribed to its larger size, which makes it difficult to go through the substrate channel of catalase to the active site. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. High resolution time- and 2-dimensional space-resolved x-ray imaging of plasmas at NOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landen, O.L.

    1992-01-01

    A streaked multiple pinhole camera technique, first used by P. Choi et al. to record time- and 2-D space-resolved soft X-ray images of plasma pinches, has been implemented on laser plasmas at NOVA. The instrument is particularly useful for time-resolved imaging of small sources ( 2.5 key imaging, complementing the existing 1--3 key streaked X-ray microscope capabilities at NOVA

  19. State-of-the-Art Fluorescence Fluctuation-Based Spectroscopic Techniques for the Study of Protein Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Kinjo, Masataka

    2018-03-23

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, are devastating proteinopathies with misfolded protein aggregates accumulating in neuronal cells. Inclusion bodies of protein aggregates are frequently observed in the neuronal cells of patients. Investigation of the underlying causes of neurodegeneration requires the establishment and selection of appropriate methodologies for detailed investigation of the state and conformation of protein aggregates. In the current review, we present an overview of the principles and application of several methodologies used for the elucidation of protein aggregation, specifically ones based on determination of fluctuations of fluorescence. The discussed methods include fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), imaging FCS, image correlation spectroscopy (ICS), photobleaching ICS (pbICS), number and brightness (N&B) analysis, super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), and transient state (TRAST) monitoring spectroscopy. Some of these methodologies are classical protein aggregation analyses, while others are not yet widely used. Collectively, the methods presented here should help the future development of research not only into protein aggregation but also neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  1. Binding and relaxation behavior of Coumarin-153 in lecithin-taurocholate mixed micelles: A time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Debdeep; Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Hazra, Partha; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2005-09-01

    The microenvironment of the bile salt-lecithin mixed aggregates has been investigated using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The steady state spectra show that the polarity of the bile salt is higher compared to lecithin vesicles or the mixed aggregates. We have observed slow solvent relaxation in bile salt micelles and lecithin vesicles. The solvation time is gradually slowed down due to gradual addition of the bile salt in lecithin vesicles. Addition of bile salt leads to the tighter head group packing in lecithin. Thus, mobility of the water molecules becomes slower and consequently the solvation time is also retarded. We have observed bimodal slow rotational relaxation time in all these systems.

  2. Separation of 248Cm (III) from 252Cf (III) and its use in time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic (TRFS) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, M.S.; Nair, A.G.C.; Gujar, R.B.; Jain, A.; Tomar, B.S.; Godbole, S.V.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    The present report gives a description of the methodology for the separation of 248 Cm(III) from decayed 252 Cf (III) waste solution. The waste solution was first assayed for 252 Cf content by neutron counting using a neutron well coincidence counter. The sample was subjected to the chemical separation of 248 Cm (III) from 252 Cf (III) following anion and cation exchange chromatography. The alpha spectrum of the separated curium fraction showed peaks due to 246 Cm and 248 Cm while the corresponding alpha spectrum of californium fraction showed 249,250,251,252 Cf. The gamma ray abundances of 249 Cf were determined with respect to its gamma rays of 387 keV and the data agreed well with that in literature. Separated Cm(III) was further characterized by recording its time resolved fluorescence spectrum (TRFS) in aqueous medium. (author)

  3. A study on the interaction of horse heart cytochrome c with some conventional and ionic liquid surfactants probed by ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Das, Bijan

    2018-06-05

    The interactions of a protein cytochrome c with some selected conventional and ionic liquid surfactants have been investigated at pH7.4 using ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. We used four conventional surfactants - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate (SDDS), and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10), and a surface active ionic liquid 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C 16 MeImCl). All the investigated surfactants were found to induce an unfolding of the protein cytochrome c. In presence of CTAB, SDDS and C 16 MeImCl, the heme iron atom was found to loose methionine from its axial position. Differential binding of the surfactant monomers and their micelles to the protein molecules was inferred. The ionic surfactants were found to be more effective than the nonionic one in unfolding the investigated protein. However, the extent of binding of CTAB/C 16 MeImCl to cytochrome c reaches a plateau past the critical micellization concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. For each of the cytochrome c-DTAB, cytochrome c-SDDS and cytochrome c-Mega 10 system, although there exists an inflection in the surfactant-binding, saturation point could not be detected. It has been demonstrated from the ultraviolet-visible spectral studies that the oxidation state of iron in cytochrome c does not change when the protein binds with the investigated surfactants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A study on the interaction of horse heart cytochrome c with some conventional and ionic liquid surfactants probed by ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Das, Bijan

    2018-06-01

    The interactions of a protein cytochrome c with some selected conventional and ionic liquid surfactants have been investigated at pH 7.4 using ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. We used four conventional surfactants - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate (SDDS), and N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamine (Mega 10), and a surface active ionic liquid 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MeImCl). All the investigated surfactants were found to induce an unfolding of the protein cytochrome c. In presence of CTAB, SDDS and C16MeImCl, the heme iron atom was found to loose methionine from its axial position. Differential binding of the surfactant monomers and their micelles to the protein molecules was inferred. The ionic surfactants were found to be more effective than the nonionic one in unfolding the investigated protein. However, the extent of binding of CTAB/C16MeImCl to cytochrome c reaches a plateau past the critical micellization concentration (cmc) of the surfactant. For each of the cytochrome c-DTAB, cytochrome c-SDDS and cytochrome c-Mega 10 system, although there exists an inflection in the surfactant-binding, saturation point could not be detected. It has been demonstrated from the ultraviolet-visible spectral studies that the oxidation state of iron in cytochrome c does not change when the protein binds with the investigated surfactants.

  5. Diagnostics of underwater electrical wire explosion through a time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftman, D; Shafer, D; Efimov, S; Gruzinsky, K; Gleizer, S; Krasik, Ya E

    2012-10-01

    A time- and space-resolved hard x-ray source was developed as a diagnostic tool for imaging underwater exploding wires. A ~4 ns width pulse of hard x-rays with energies of up to 100 keV was obtained from the discharge in a vacuum diode consisting of point-shaped tungsten electrodes. To improve contrast and image quality, an external pulsed magnetic field produced by Helmholtz coils was used. High resolution x-ray images of an underwater exploding wire were obtained using a sensitive x-ray CCD detector, and were compared to optical fast framing images. Future developments and application of this diagnostic technique are discussed.

  6. Space-resolved analysis of trace elements in fresh vegetables using ultraviolet nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juve, Vincent; Portelli, Richard; Boueri, Myriam; Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to analyze trace elements contained in fresh vegetables. A quadrupled Nd:YAG laser is used in the experiments for ablation. Analyzed samples come from local markets and represent frequently consumed vegetables. For a typical root vegetable, such as potato, spectral analysis of the plasma emission reveals more than 400 lines emitted by 27 elements and 2 molecules, C 2 and CN. Among these species, one can find trace as well as ultra-trace elements. A space-resolved analysis of several trace elements with strong emissions is then applied to typical root, stem and fruit vegetables. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of an interesting tool for botanical and agricultural studies as well for food quality/safety and environment pollution assessment and control

  7. A spectroscopic system for time- and space-resolved studies of impurities on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1998-06-01

    The radial distribution of impurity line emission in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied with a five viewing chord, absolutely calibrated, spectrometer system. The light is analyzed with a single 0.5 m grating spectrometer. Different parts of the entrance slit are used for different channels. This arrangement makes it possible to use the system over a wide wavelength range, from 2500 to 6500 Å, without having to recalibrate the relative sensitivity for the different channels. The rather short plasma pulses of 10-15 ms require a high time resolution. The use of photomultiplier tubes provides a time resolution of 10 μs which is limited by the transient recorders used. The result is a robust, low-cost system that produces reliable measurements of the radial dependence of emission from a wide range of impurity ions.

  8. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of Indium Bromide for lighting purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, H.C.J.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Haverlag, M.; Haverlag, M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Tagushi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence was used to study the radiative properties of InBr for lighting purposes. Results include the temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay time, spectroscopic constants and rotational temperature determination from a LIF spectrum.

  10. Semiconductor Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Kailasa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs or nanoparticles (NPs exhibit very unusual physico-chemcial and optical properties. This review article introduces the applications of semiconductor nanomaterials (NMs in fluorescence spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS for biomolecule analysis. Due to their unique physico-chemical and optical properties, semiconductors NMs have created many new platforms for investigating biomolecular structures and information in modern biology. These semiconductor NMs served as effective fluorescent probes for sensing proteins and cells and acted as affinity or concentrating probes for enriching peptides, proteins and bacteria proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  12. Supersonic pulsed free-jet of atoms and molecules of refractory metals: laser induced fluorescence spectroscopic studies on zirconium atoms and zirconium oxide molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhale, S.G.

    2004-11-01

    The experimental setup for generating supersonic pulsed free-jet containing atoms and molecules of refractory nature has been built. The technique of laser vaporization in conjunction with supersonic cooling is used to generate these species. The cooled atoms and molecules in supersonic free-jet are probed by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. In particular, the technique has been used to perform low-resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, limited by laser linewidth, on cold Zr atoms and ZrO molecules. The translational temperatures of ∼ 26.5 K and the rotational temperatures of ∼ 81 K have been achieved. It is possible to achieve the Doppler width of few tens of MHz allowing it to perform high-resolution spectroscopy on these atomic and molecular species. Also because of low rotational temperature of molecules the spectral congestion is greatly reduced. In general, this technique can be applied to perform spectroscopy on atoms and molecules of refractory nature. (author)

  13. Selective fluorescence resonance energy transfer from serum albumins to a bio-active 3-pyrazolyl-2-pyrazoline derivative: A spectroscopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Arindam [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra, E-mail: sbjuchem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2012-10-15

    A novel fluorescent probe and pharmaceutically significant: 3-pyrazolyl-2-pyrazoline derivative (PYZ) has been selected as an acceptor molecule for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) interaction with serum albumins. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques were applied to elucidate the nature of interaction of PYZ with serum albumins (BSA and HSA). Negligible FRET mediated emission occurred in the case of HSA but an efficient FRET mediated emission resulted in case of BSA. To gain further insight into the FRET selectivity of PYZ with the proteins, FRET from L-tryptophan (donor; native tryptophan) to PYZ (acceptor) was performed with the aim of getting an idea about the steric restrictions imposed on PYZ by the other groups present in BSA and HSA. The studies revealed that the surface bound Trp-134 in BSA allows an efficient FRET process with PYZ while the buried Trp-214 in HSA does not. The unusual selectivity for FRET in case of PYZ and the serum albumins has also been attributed to the complex structure of PYZ due to the presence of bulkier phenyl moieties in it. The complex nature of the excited state photophysics of tryptophan (Trp) in proteins also accounts for this FRET selectivity of PYZ with BSA and HSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET from BSA/HSA to PYZ was monitored using steady state and time resolved fluorescence methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient FRET process resulted in BSA-PYZ system in contrast with the HSA-PYZ system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface bound Trp-134 in BSA facilitates the FRET process with PYZ than the buried Trp-214 in HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigid and complex structure of PYZ also accounts for the FRET selectivity of PYZ with BSA/HSA.

  14. Spectroscopic and TD-DFT studies on the dual mode fluorescent chemosensors based on pyrene thiosemicarbazones, and its application as molecular-scale logic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basheer, Sabeel M. [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India); Willis, Anthony C. [Research School of Chemistry, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Sreekanth, Anandaram, E-mail: sreekanth@nitt.edu [Department of Chemistry, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India)

    2017-03-15

    Two newly synthesised pyrene based molecules are hereby reported as molecular switches. The absorption and emission response for receptors with and without F{sup −}, CN{sup −} and Cu{sup 2+} ions can mimic multiple logic gate such as AND, NOR, XNOR, OR, XOR, INHIBITION and TRANSFER gates. The fluorescence reversibility was checked with the alternative addition of fluoride and calcium ions, which can be explained by the “Read-Erase-Read-Write” logic loop. The calculated binding constant value show PyBTSC is better chemosensor than PyCTSC, and the binding affinity is in the order of Cu{sup 2+}Г‹Ж’F{sup -}Г‹Ж’CN{sup −.} The detailed mechanism was investigated using DFT and TD-DFT calculations. The fluorescence quenching behaviour of receptor-F complex can be explained by PET mechanism along with ESPT process. The proton attached to the nitrogen which is adjacent to pyrene moiety is first make the hydrogen bond with fluoride ion at the excited state, which has confirmed by natural bond orbital (NBO) and potential energy surface (PES) analysis. - Graphical abstract: The newly synthesised thiocarbazone derivates used as an effective and selective colourimetric and “turn on” fluorescence sensor for copper ion and ‘turn off’ for fluoride and cyanide anion. The presence and absence of ions were considered as input signals and the corresponding absorption and emission responses were consired as output. The proton transfer from the nitrogen adjacent to pyrene moiety, and which takes place at the excited state (ESPT).

  15. Space-resolved XUV spectra of CVI and BV lines from a 10 ps KrF laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, E.J.; Griem, H.R.; Elton, R.C.; Scott, H.

    1999-01-01

    We produced a plasma using highly focused ∼50 mJ, 10 ps pulses from a KrF laser on graphite and boron-carbide targets. We measured space-resolved (along the plasma axis) line profiles of Hydrogen-like and Helium-like Carbon and Boron resonance lines, using a crossed-slit, 1 m grazing-incidence spectrometer, with a spatial resolution ∼50 μm. Synthetic spectra generated with the atomic postprocessor CRETIN provided preliminary estimates of the plasma electron temperature and density. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Spectroscopic investigations of OH- influence on near-infrared fluorescence quenching of Yb3+/Tm3+ co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, I.A.A.; Camargo, A.S.S. de; Terrile, M.C.; Nunes, L.A.O.

    2008-01-01

    Energy transfer processes were studied in two sets of Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses, prepared in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Using Foerster, Dexter, and Miyakawa theoretical models, the energy transfer parameters were calculated. The main ion-ion energy transfer processes analyzed were energy migration among Yb 3+ ions, cross-relaxations between Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ ions, and interactions with OH - radicals. The results indicated that Yb→Tm energy transfer favors 1.8 μm emissions, and there is no evidence of concentration quenching up to 2% Tm 2 O 3 doping. As expected, samples prepared in nitrogen atmosphere present higher fluorescence quantum efficiency than those prepared in air, and this feature is specially noted in the near-infrared region, where the interaction with the OH - radicals is more pronounced

  17. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  18. Comparing the Spectroscopic and Molecular Characteristics of Different Dissolved Organic Matter Fractions Isolated by Hydrophobic and Anionic Exchange Resins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy and FT-ICR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Derrien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the environmental significance of dissolved organic matter (DOM, characterizing DOM is still challenging due to its structural complexity and heterogeneity. In this study, three different chemical fractions, including hydrophobic acid (HPOA, transphilic acid (TPIA, and hydrophilic neutral and base (HPIN/B fractions, were separated from bulk aquatic DOM samples, and their spectral features and the chemical composition at the molecular level were compared using both fluorescence excitation emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS. The HPIN/B fraction was distinguished from the two acidic fractions (i.e., HPOA and TPIA by the EEM-PARAFAC, while the TPIA fraction was discriminated by using the molecular parameters derived from the FT-ICR MS analyses. Statistical comparison suggests that the spectral dissimilarity among the three chemical fractions might result from the acido-basic properties of DOM samples, while the differences in molecular composition were more likely to be affected by the hydrophobicity of the DOM fractions. The non-metric multidimensional scaling map further revealed that the HPOA was the most heterogeneous among the three fractions. The number of overlapping formulas among the three chemical fractions constituted only <5% of all identified formulas, and those between two different fractions ranged from 2.0% to 24.1%, implying relatively homogeneous properties of the individual chemical fractions with respect to molecular composition. Although employing chemical fractionation achieved a lowering of the DOM heterogeneity, prevalent signatures of either acido-basic property or the hydrophobic nature of DOM on the characteristics of three chemical isolated fractions were not found for this study.

  19. Preparation of Curcumin-Piperazine Coamorphous Phase and Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Density Functional Theory Simulation Studies on the Interaction with Bovine Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wenzhe; Lv, Jie; Du, Shuang; Wang, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Yanli

    2017-09-05

    In the present study, a new coamorphous phase (CAP) of bioactive herbal ingredient curcumin (CUR) with high solubilitythe was screened with pharmaceutically acceptable coformers. Besides, to provide basic information for the best practice of physiological and pharmaceutical preparations of CUR-based CAP, the interaction between CUR-based CAP and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied at the molecular level in this paper. CAP of CUR and piperazine with molar ratio of 1:2 was prepared by EtOH-assisted grinding. The as-prepared CAP was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier-transform infrared, and solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance. The 1:2 CAP stoichioimetry was sustained by C═O···H hydrogen bonds between the N-H group of the piperazine and the C═O group of CUR; piperazine stabilized the diketo structure of CUR in CAP. The dissolution rate of CUR-piperazine CAP in 30% ethanol-water was faster than that of CUR; the t 50 values were 243.1 min for CUR and 4.378 min for CAP. Furthermore, interactions of CUR and CUR-piperazine CAP with BSA were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The binding constants (K b ) of CUR and CUR-piperazine CAP with BSA were 10.0 and 9.1 × 10 3 L mol -1 at 298 K, respectively. Moreover, DFT simulation indicated that the interaction energy values of hydrogen-bonded interaction in the tryptophan-CUR and tryptophan-CUR-piperazine complex were -26.1 and -17.9 kJ mol -1 , respectively. In a conclusion, after formation of CUR-piperazine CAP, the interaction forces between CUR and BSA became weaker.

  20. Challenge for real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy of surface chemical reactions. Aiming at trace of irreversible and inhomogeneous reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, time-resolved wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy, is proposed in order to achieve real-time and real-space resolved spectroscopy for the observation of irreversible and inhomogeneous surface chemical reactions. By combining the wavelength-dispersed soft X rays, in which the X-ray wavelength (photon energy) changes as a function of position on the sample, with the photoelectron emission microscope, the soft X-ray absorption spectra are separately obtained at different positions on the sample without scanning the X-ray monochromator. Therefore, the real-time resolved measurement of site-selective soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy is realized in one event without repeating the chemical reaction. It is expected that the spatial distribution of different chemical species is traced during the surface chemical reaction, which is essential to understand the reaction mechanism. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  2. Spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Arroyo, R.

    1999-01-01

    This work is focused about the spectroscopic properties of a polymer material which consists of Polyacrylic acid (Paa) doped at different concentrations of Europium ions (Eu 3+ ). They show that to stay chemically joined with the polymer by a study of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of 1 H, 13 C and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (Ft-IR) they present changes in the intensity of signals, just as too when this material is irradiated at λ = 394 nm. In according with the results obtained experimentally in this type of materials it can say that is possible to unify chemically the polymer with this type of cations, as well as, varying the concentration of them, since that these are distributed homogeneously inside the matrix maintaining its optical properties. These materials can be obtained more quickly and easy in solid or liquid phase and they have the best conditions for to make a quantitative analysis. (Author)

  3. Development of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics for the free electron density of laser-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, M.; Frank, A.; Pelka, A.; Schaumann, G.; Schoekel, A.; Schumacher, D.; Roth, M.; Fils, J.; Blazevic, A.; Hessling, T.; Basko, M. M.; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, An.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the development and set-up of a Nomarski-type multi-frame interferometer as a time and space resolving diagnostics of the free electron density in laser-generated plasma. The interferometer allows the recording of a series of 4 images within 6 ns of a single laser-plasma interaction. For the setup presented here, the minimal accessible free electron density is 5 x 10 18 cm -3 , the maximal one is 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . Furthermore, it provides a resolution of the electron density in space of 50 μm and in time of 0.5 ns for one image with a customizable magnification in space for each of the 4 images. The electron density was evaluated from the interferograms using an Abel inversion algorithm. The functionality of the system was proven during first experiments and the experimental results are presented and discussed. A ray tracing procedure was realized to verify the interferometry pictures taken. In particular, the experimental results are compared to simulations and show excellent agreement, providing a conclusive picture of the evolution of the electron density distribution.

  4. The Catalytic Conversion of Thiophenes over Large H-ZSM-5 Crystals: An X-Ray, UV/Vis, and Fluorescence Microspectroscopic Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.H.F.; Mijovilovich, A.E.; S ättler, J.J.H.B.; Stavitski, I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray absorption, UV/Vis, and fluorescence microspectroscopy have been used to characterize the catalytic conversion of thiophene derivatives within the micropores of an individual H-ZSM-5 zeolite crystal. Space-resolved information into the Si/ Al ratios and sulfur content was provided by X-ray

  5. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  6. Spectroscopic Tools for Quantitative Studies of DNA Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preus, Søren

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop quantitative fluorescence-based, spectroscopic tools for probing the 3D structure and dynamics of DNA and RNA. The thesis is founded on six peer-reviewed papers covering mainly the development, characterization and use of fluorescent nucleobase...... analogues. In addition, four software packages is presented for the simulation and quantitative analysis of time-resolved and steady-state UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence experiments....

  7. Analysis of time- and space-resolved Na-, Ne-, and F-like emission from a laser-produced bromine plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, W.H.; Young, B.K.F.; Osterheld, A.L.; Stewart, R.E.; Walling, R.S.; Bar-Shalom, A.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in the efficiency and accuracy of computational atomic physics and collisional radiative modeling promise to place the analysis and diagnostic application of L-shell emission on a par with the simpler K-shell regime. Coincident improvements in spectroscopic plasma measurements yield optically thin emission spectra from small, homogeneous regions of plasma, localized both in space and time. Together, these developments can severely test models for high-density, high-temperature plasma formation and evolution, and non-LTE atomic kinetics. In this paper we present highly resolved measurements of n=3 to n=2 X-ray line emission from a laser-produced bromine micro plasma. The emission is both space- and time-resolved, allowing us to apply simple, steady-state, 0-dimensional spectroscopic models to the analysis. These relativistic, multi-configurational, distorted wave collisional-radiative models were created using the HULLAC atomic physics package. Using these models, we have analyzed the F-like, Ne-like and Na-like (satellite) spectra with respect to temperature, density and charge-state distribution. This procedure leads to a full characterization of the plasma conditions. 9 refs., 3 figs

  8. Polarized spectroscopic properties of Nd3+-doped KGd(WO4)2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yujin; Lin Yanfu; Gong Xinghong; Tan Qiguang; Zhuang Jian; Luo Zundu; Huang Yidong

    2007-01-01

    The polarized absorption spectra, infrared fluorescence spectra, upconversion visible fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence decay curve of orientated Nd 3+ :KGd(WO 4 ) 2 crystal were measured at room-temperature. Some important spectroscopic parameters were investigated in detail in the framework of the Judd-Ofelt theory and the Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg formula. The effect of the crystal structure on the spectroscopic properties of the Nd 3+ ions was analyzed. The relation among the spectroscopic parameters and the laser performances of the Nd 3+ :KGd(WO 4 ) 2 crystal was discussed

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopic study of the aggregation behavior of non-cross-linked and cross-linked poly(alkylmethyldiallylammonium bromides) having decyl, octyl, and hexyl side chains in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.J; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    The conformational state of a series of non-cross-linked and cross-linked poly(alkylmethyldiallylammonium bromides) bearing decyl, octyl, and hexyl side chains ((CL)-CopolC1-10, (CL)-CopolC1-8, and (CL)-CopolC1-6, respectively) in aqueous solutions were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy

  10. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahpour, Nooshin; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, JamshidKhan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  11. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahpour, Nooshin [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, Ahmad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saberi, Mohammad Reza [Department of Medical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chamani, JamshidKhan, E-mail: chamani@ibb.ut.ac.ir [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  12. Spectroscopic classification of transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Fraser, M.; Hummelmose, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of several transients based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with ALFOSC, over the nights 23-25 August 2017.......We report the spectroscopic classification of several transients based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with ALFOSC, over the nights 23-25 August 2017....

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  14. Possible Radiation-Induced Damage to the Molecular Structure of Wooden Artifacts Due to Micro-Computed Tomography, Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Kozachuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to ascertain whether radiation produced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, micro-computed tomography (μCT and/or portable handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF equipment might damage wood artifacts during analysis. Changes at the molecular level were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. No significant changes in FTIR spectra were observed as a result of μCT or handheld XRF analysis. No substantial changes in the collected FTIR spectra were observed when XPS analytical times on the order of minutes were used. However, XPS analysis collected over tens of hours did produce significant changes in the FTIR spectra.

  15. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  16. Radiometric dating and quantitative analysis of elements in depth profiles of sediments by means of nuclear physical as well as X-ray fluorescence and atomic emission spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenburg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heavy metal concentration in sediments is of great importance for the assessment of water quality. If dating of the different layers of sediment cores is possible, informations about the history of pollution can be inferred. This paper describes the development and practical test of a procedure suitable for the investigation of sediment cores. Both the element analysis and the dating are based on physical methods. For element concentration determination inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are used. The techniques are described and compared. For dating radiometric measurements of 210 Pb and 137 Cs are carried out with a coaxial well-type germanium γ-ray detector in a special low-level arrangement. Results of the systematic investigations are presented and a few individual depth profiles are discussed. (orig.) With 34 figs., 20 tabs [de

  17. Spectroscopic investigations of OH{sup -} influence on near-infrared fluorescence quenching of Yb{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, I.A.A. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, CEP 13566-590, USP-Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: idelma@ifsc.usp.br; Camargo, A.S.S. de; Terrile, M.C.; Nunes, L.A.O. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, CEP 13566-590, USP-Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-05-15

    Energy transfer processes were studied in two sets of Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} co-doped sodium-metaphosphate glasses, prepared in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Using Foerster, Dexter, and Miyakawa theoretical models, the energy transfer parameters were calculated. The main ion-ion energy transfer processes analyzed were energy migration among Yb{sup 3+} ions, cross-relaxations between Yb{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions, and interactions with OH{sup -} radicals. The results indicated that Yb{yields}Tm energy transfer favors 1.8 {mu}m emissions, and there is no evidence of concentration quenching up to 2% Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping. As expected, samples prepared in nitrogen atmosphere present higher fluorescence quantum efficiency than those prepared in air, and this feature is specially noted in the near-infrared region, where the interaction with the OH{sup -} radicals is more pronounced.

  18. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  19. Synthesis, single crystal X-ray, spectroscopic (FT-IR, UV-vis, fluorescence, 1H &13C NMR), computational (DFT/B3LYP) studies of some imidazole based picrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockia doss, M.; Rajarajan, G.; Thanikachalam, V.; Selvanayagam, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2018-04-01

    2,4,5-triphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (1), 2-(4-fluorophenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (2), 2-(4-methylphenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (3) were synthesised. These compounds 1-3 were characterized by elemental, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR analyses. The structure of compound 3 was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The studies reveal that the molecule is associated with weak Nsbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯N and van der Waals interactions which are responsible for the formation and strengthening of supramolecular assembly. The nature of the interactions and their importance are explored using the Hirshfeld surface method. The physicochemical properties of the compounds 1-3 were evaluated by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. According to thermal data the salts possess excellent thermal stabilities with decomposition temperatures ranging from 220 to 280 °C. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) results exposed that the picrates 1-3 were about 1.13-1.50 times greater than potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). Here we also used Density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to investigate the opto-electronic properties. The obtained theoretical results validate with available experimental data.

  20. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  1. Spectroscopic surveys of LAMOST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongheng

    2015-01-01

    The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), a new type of reflecting Schmidt telescope, has been designed and produced in China. It marks a breakthrough for large scale spectroscopic survey observation in that both large aperture and wide field of view have been achieved. LAMOST has the highest spectrum acquisition rate, and from October 2011 to June 2014 it has obtained 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects, of which 3.78 million are spectra of stars, with the stellar parameters of 2.20 million stars included. (author)

  2. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poves, P.

    2007-01-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  3. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of Venus at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Charlotte C; Dedecker, Peter; De Cremer, Gert; Verstraeten, Natalie; Kint, Cyrielle; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Venus is a recently developed, fast maturating, yellow fluorescent protein that has been used as a probe for in vivo applications. In the present work the photophysical characteristics of Venus were analyzed spectroscopically at the bulk and single molecule level. Through time-resolved single molecule measurements we found that single molecules of Venus display pronounced fluctuations in fluorescence emission, with clear fluorescence on- and off-times. These fluorescence intermittencies were found to occupy a broad range of time scales, ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Such long off-times can complicate the analysis of single molecule counting experiments or single-molecule FRET experiments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  5. Spectroscopic identification of rare earth elements in phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devangad, Praveen; Tamboli, Maktum; Muhammed Shameem, K. M.; Nayak, Rajesh; Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan, V. K.; Santhosh, C.; Kumar, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, rare earth-doped phosphate glasses were synthesized and characterized using three different spectroscopic techniques. The absorption spectra of the prepared praseodymium (Pr) and samarium (Sm) doped glasses, recorded by a UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer, show the characteristic absorption bands of these elements. To confirm this inference, laser-induced fluorescence spectra of Pr and Sm were obtained at a laser excitation of 442 nm. Their emission bands are reported here. The elemental analysis of these samples was carried out using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system. Characteristic emission lines of Pr and Sm have been identified and reported by the recorded LIBS spectra of glass samples. Results prove that using these three complimentary spectroscopic techniques (absorption, fluorescence and LIBS), we can meaningfully characterize rare earth-doped glass samples.

  6. Novel spectroscopic techniques with using soft x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gejo, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress of experimental techniques related to synchrotron radiation makes possible of detail investigation of molecular dynamics after irradiation of soft X-ray. We introduce several novel spectroscopic techniques with using soft X-ray: Symmetry-resolved zero kinetic energy electron spectroscopy, symmetry-resolved metastable photofragment spectroscopy, soft X-ray emission spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and time-resolved-fluorescence mass-selected-ion coincidence spectroscopy. We also show new techniques performed by other groups at BL27SU in SPring-8. (author)

  7. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  9. Quenching of p-Cyanophenylalanine Fluorescence by Various Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Roesch, Rachel M; Gai, Feng

    2013-03-20

    To expand the spectroscopic utility of the non-natural amino acid p -cyanophenylalanine (Phe CN ), we examine the quenching efficiencies of a series of commonly encountered anions toward its fluorescence. We find that iodide exhibits an unusually large Stern-Volmer quenching constant, making it a convenient choice in Phe CN fluorescence quenching studies. Indeed, using the villin headpiece subdomain as a testbed we demonstrate that iodide quenching of Phe CN fluorescence offers a convenient means to reveal protein conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, we show that the amino group of Phe CN strongly quenches its fluorescence, suggesting that Phe CN could be used as a local pH sensor.

  10. Spectroscopic methods for detection of impurities in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashnikova, Natalia V.; Papiashvili, Nona; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Mark, Shlomo; Shilon, Guy; Khankin, Daniel; Kalisky, Yehoshua; Kalisky, Ofra; Parola, Abraham H.

    2011-11-01

    Optical photoluminescence spectroscopic method for detection of impurities, hazardous materials, pesticides, and pollutants in water resources, both qualitatively and quantitatively, is presented. The method is based on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of organic aromatic compounds, or poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and is carried out by following simultaneously their excitation and emission spectra. The full excitation emission matrix (EEM) generated in this way provides a 2-D and 3-D fluorescence map of the tested sample and the diagonals through the axes origin provide the synchronous fluorescence spectra at a constant wavelengths differences between the emission and excitation wavelengths, thus enabling multitude components identification. This map contains all the relevant spectroscopic information of the tested sample, and serves as a unique "fingerprint" with a very specific and accurate identification. When compared with pre-determined spectra and calibration curves from a "databank", there is a one-toone correspondence between the image and the specific compound, and it can be identified accurately both qualitatively and quantitatively. This method offers several significant advantages, and it provides a sensitive (ppm detection level), accurate and simple spectroscopic tool to monitor impurities and pollutants in water. The design and performance of the spectrofluorimeter prototype, as well as the software development and analysis of chemical organic compounds and mixtures in water will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Fluorescence of berberine in microheterogeneous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, Ariel N.; Díaz, Marta S.; Gutiérrez, María Isela, E-mail: isela@unpata.edu.ar

    2013-12-15

    Spectral properties of the alkaloid berberine were studied in micellar solution and microemulsions based on anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were determined. For screening the influence of type and concentration of micelles on the fluorescence of berberine a 3{sup 2} full factorial design was used. Higher responses were obtained when berberine was dissolved in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles 0.01 M. Comparative results of fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub f}) reveal that the highest values (Φ{sub f}≥0.01) were observed in microemulsions. In the microheterogeneous systems investigated the most probable location of berberine is the micellar interfacial region. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic propereies of berberine in microheterogeneous media were investigated. • Berberine shows enhanced fluorescence in SDS micelles as compared to water • Berberine is probably located in the interface of the microheterogeneous systems.

  12. Fluorescence of berberine in microheterogeneous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colina, Ariel N.; Díaz, Marta S.; Gutiérrez, María Isela

    2013-01-01

    Spectral properties of the alkaloid berberine were studied in micellar solution and microemulsions based on anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were determined. For screening the influence of type and concentration of micelles on the fluorescence of berberine a 3 2 full factorial design was used. Higher responses were obtained when berberine was dissolved in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles 0.01 M. Comparative results of fluorescence quantum yields (Φ f ) reveal that the highest values (Φ f ≥0.01) were observed in microemulsions. In the microheterogeneous systems investigated the most probable location of berberine is the micellar interfacial region. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic propereies of berberine in microheterogeneous media were investigated. • Berberine shows enhanced fluorescence in SDS micelles as compared to water • Berberine is probably located in the interface of the microheterogeneous systems

  13. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic determination of heavy metals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Antimony. < 6.1. < 6.1. 52. Te. Tellurium. < 7.1. < 7.1. 53. I. Iodine. < 7.1. < 7.1. 55. Cs. Cesium. < 8.1. < 8.1. 56. Ba. Barium. < 8.1. < 600. 57. La. Lanthanum. < 10. < 10. 58. Ce. Cerium. < 12. < 12. 80. Hg. Mercury. < 2. < 2. 81. Tl. Thallium. < 2.9.

  15. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  16. Spectroscopic and chemometric exploration of food quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Kjær

    2002-01-01

    and multi-way chemometrics demonstrated the potential for screening of environmental contamination in complex food samples. Significant prediction models were established with correlation coefficients in the range from r = 0.69 to r = 0.97 for dioxin. Further development of the fluorescence measurements......The desire to develop non-invasive rapid measurements of essential quality parameters in foods is the motivation of this thesis. Due to the speed and noninvasive properties of spectroscopic techniques, they have potential as on-line or atline methods and can be employed in the food industry...... in order to control the quality of the end product and to continuously monitor the production. In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of the application of spectroscopy and chemometrics in rapid control of food quality are discussed and demonstrated by the examples in the eight included...

  17. Fluorescence studies on 2-(het)aryl perimidine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giani, Arianna Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale “A. Avogadro”, Largo Donegani 2/3, I-28100 Novara (Italy); Lamperti, Marco; Maspero, Angelo; Cimino, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Negri, Roberto; Giovenzana, Giovanni Battista [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale “A. Avogadro”, Largo Donegani 2/3, I-28100 Novara (Italy); Palmisano, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Nardo, Luca, E-mail: luca.nardo@unimib.it [Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, I-20900 Monza (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Perimidines are extensively studied for their different therapeutic properties, including antiulcer, antifungal, antimicrobial, immunosuppressive and anticancer activities. Moreover, their heterocyclic structure embodies the naphthalene moiety, exploited in bio-imaging and biomolecules staining due to its high fluorescence. In this work we present the spectroscopic characterization of a family of perimidine derivatives, in order to obtain information potentially useful for the design of compounds combining biological activity and detectable fluorescence in physiological environment.

  18. Multi-site and multi-depth in vivo cancer localization enhancement after auto-fluorescence removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montcuquet, A.S.; Herve, L.; Navarro, F.; Dinten, J.M.; Mars, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in diffusive media locates tumors tagged by injected fluorescent markers in NIR wavelengths. For deep embedded markers, natural auto-fluorescence of tissues comes to be a limiting factor to tumor detection and accurate FDOT reconstructions. A spectroscopic approach coupled with Non-negative Matrix Factorization source separation method is explored to discriminate fluorescence sources according to their fluorescence spectra and remove unwanted auto-fluorescence. We successfully removed auto-fluorescence from acquisitions on living mice with a single subcutaneous tumor or two capillary tubes inserted at different depths. (authors)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of photoswitchable fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölling, Jonas; Polyakova, Svetlana; Belov, Vladimir; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Bossi, Mariano L; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a new functional (amino reactive) highly efficient fluorescent molecular switch (FMS) with a photochromic diarylethene and a rhodamine fluorescent dye. The reactive group in this FMS -N-hydroxysuccinimide ester- allows selective labeling of amino containing molecules or other materials. In ethanolic solutions, the compound displays a large fluorescent quantum yield of 52 % and a large fluorescence modulation ratio (94 %) between two states that may be interconverted with red and near-UV light. Silica nanoparticles incorporating the new FMS were prepared and characterized, and their spectroscopic and switching properties were also studied. The dye retained its properties after the incorporation into the silica, thereby allowing light-induced reversible high modulation of the fluorescence signal of a single particle for up to 60 cycles, before undergoing irreversible photobleaching. Some applications of these particles in fluorescence microscopy are also demonstrated. In particular, subdiffraction images of nanoparticles were obtained, in the focal plane of a confocal microscope.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of matrix isolated transient species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Christopher J.

    short lived fluorescence was assigned to UCl 4, and the long-lived fluorescence was assigned to UOCl x. A low resolution map for the electronic levels in UOCl x was created. One of the first LIF studies of actinide containing molecules was performed by Grzybowski and Andrews[1] for UF6. While, the same group later recorded IR spectra for the UFx fragements[2], no fluorescence spectra were recorded. Spectra were recorded here of UF x fragments trapped in solid formed by either passing UF 6 through a microwave discharge or ablating U atoms into an F2 /Ar mixture. At the time of these experiments, the IR spectrometer was not available, and the molecules producing the fluorescence could not be deduced solely from the LIF spectra. A comparison with previous IR spectra[2] gave some indication of possible candidates. In all the experiments that investigated uranium containing matrices with IR spectroscopy, UN2 was observed. A search was undertaken to observe fluorescence from UN2. To insure a good yield of UN 2, 1% N2 was added to the carrier gas. The fluorescence spectra observed in these experiments was very intriguing, but was determined not to be coming from UN2, rather it appears to be coming from U atom clusters. However further experiments are necessary to confirm how many atoms are in the clusters. The final part of this thesis focuses on the electronic spectra of Xe-OH isolated solid Ar. Rare gas radical systems (Rg-X) such as Rg-OH are a good model system for studying weak, long range intermolecular interactions. It is known that when Rg=Xe, the strength of the interaction is much larger. For most Rg-OH complexes, the spectroscopic constants have been determined previously[3]. However, the constants for Xe-OH ares currently undetermined. Gas-phase studies were undertaken to determined these constants.[4] However, these experiments were in conflict with previous LIF spectra recorded in a matrix in which Goodman and Brus[5] observed that the A → X emission band for

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of alkaline earth uranyl carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amayri, Samer; Reich, Tobias; Arnold, Thuro; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert

    2005-01-01

    A series of alkaline uranyl carbonates, M[UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ].nH 2 O (M=Mg 2 , Ca 2 , Sr 2 , Ba 2 , Na 2 Ca, and CaMg) was synthesized and characterized by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after nitric acid digestion, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The molecular structure of these compounds was characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Crystalline Ba 2 [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ].6H 2 O was obtained for the first time. The EXAFS analysis showed that this compound consists of (UO 2 )(CO 3 ) 3 clusters similar to the other alkaline earth uranyl carbonates. The average U-Ba distance is 3.90+/-0.02A.Fluorescence wavelengths and life times were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The U-O bond distances determined by EXAFS, TRLFS, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy agree within the experimental uncertainties. The spectroscopic signatures observed could be useful for identifying uranyl carbonate species adsorbed on mineral surfaces

  2. Biophysical influence of coumarin 35 on bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktutan, Tuğba; Onganer, Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    The binding mechanism and protein-fluorescence probe interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and coumarin 35 (C35) was investigated by using UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies since they remain major research topics in biophysics. The spectroscopic data indicated that a fluorescence quenching process for BSA-C35 system was occurred. The fluorescence quenching processes were analyzed using Stern-Volmer method. In this regard, Stern-Volmer quenching constants (KSV) and binding constants were calculated at different temperatures. The distance r between BSA (donor) and C35 (acceptor) was determined by exploiting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method. Synchronous fluorescence spectra were also studied to observe information about conformational changes. Moreover, thermodynamics parameters were calculated for better understanding of interactions and conformational changes of the system.

  3. Intrinsic fluorescence of protein in turbid media using empirical relation based on Monte Carlo lookup table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Gnanatheepam; Udayakumar, Kanniyappan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence of Protein has been widely used in diagnostic oncology for characterizing cellular metabolism. However, the intensity of fluorescence emission is affected due to the absorbers and scatterers in tissue, which may lead to error in estimating exact protein content in tissue. Extraction of intrinsic fluorescence from measured fluorescence has been achieved by different methods. Among them, Monte Carlo based method yields the highest accuracy for extracting intrinsic fluorescence. In this work, we have attempted to generate a lookup table for Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence emission by protein. Furthermore, we fitted the generated lookup table using an empirical relation. The empirical relation between measured and intrinsic fluorescence is validated using tissue phantom experiments. The proposed relation can be used for estimating intrinsic fluorescence of protein for real-time diagnostic applications and thereby improving the clinical interpretation of fluorescence spectroscopic data.

  4. Spectroscopic and dynamical studies of highly energized small polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.W.; Silbey, R.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have initiated a program to perform spectroscopic and dynamic studies of small molecules. Large amplitude motions in excited acetylene were discussed along with plans to record the dispersed fluorescence (DF) and the stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra. SEP spectra were reported for the formyl radical. A Fourier transform spectrometer was discussed with respect to its ability to probe the structure of radicals. This instrument is capable of performing studies using various techniques such as magnetic rotation spectroscopy and sub-Doppler sideband-OODR Zeman (SOODRZ) spectroscopy.

  5. Spectroscopic study of photo and thermal destruction of riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanov, Salikh; Sharipov, Mirzo Z.; Fayzullaev, Askar R.; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat

    2014-08-01

    Influence of temperature and light irradiation on the spectroscopic properties of aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using linear dichroism method, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was established that in a wide temperature range 290-423 K there is a decline of absorbance and fluorescence ability, which is explained by thermodestruction of riboflavin. It is shown that the proportion of molecules, which have undergone degradation, are in the range of 4-28%, and depends on the concentration and quantity of temperature effects. Introduction of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, as well as different metal ions leads to an increase in the photostability of riboflavin solutions by 2-2.5 times. The observed phenomena are explained by the formation protonation form of riboflavin and a complex between the metal ions and oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group of riboflavin, respectively.

  6. Spectroscopic analysis of optoelectronic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with standard spectroscopic techniques which can be used to analyze semiconductor samples or devices, in both, bulk, micrometer and submicrometer scale. The book aims helping experimental physicists and engineers to choose the right analytical spectroscopic technique in order to get specific information about their specific demands. For this purpose, the techniques including technical details such as apparatus and probed sample region are described. More important, also the expected outcome from experiments is provided. This involves also the link to theory, that is not subject of this book, and the link to current experimental results in the literature which are presented in a review-like style. Many special spectroscopic techniques are introduced and their relationship to the standard techniques is revealed. Thus the book works also as a type of guide or reference book for people researching in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between ZnSe nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Dudu

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between ZnSe nanoparticles (NPs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by UV–vis, fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that the fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by ZnSe NPs and the quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure, which was proved by quenching constant (K q ). The recorded UV–vis data and the fluorescence data quenching by the ZnSe NPs showed that the interaction between them leads to the formation of ZnSe–BSA complex. Based on the synchronous fluorescence spectra, it was established that the conformational change of BSA was induced by the interaction of ZnSe with the tyrosine micro-region of the BSA molecules. Furthermore, the temperature effects on the structural and spectroscopic properties of individual ZnSe NPs and protein and their bioconjugates (ZnSe–BSA) were also researched. It was found that, compared to the monotonic decrease of the individual ZnSe NPs fluorescence intensity, the temperature dependence of the ZnSe–BSA emission had a much more complex behavior, which was highly sensitive to the conformational changes of the protein. - Highlights: ►Interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ZnSe nanoparticles was studied. ► UV–vis data and fluorescence data demonstrated the formation of ZnSe–BSA complex. ► Temperature dependence of ZnSe–BSA emission was sensitive to the conformational changes of protein.

  8. Photobleaching and Fluorescence Recovery of RPE Bisretinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available The autofluorescence of the retina that originates primarily from lipofuscin fluorophores in retinal pigment epithelial cells, is observed to undergo photobleaching during the acquisition of fundus autofluorescence images. Bisretinoid fluorophores isolated from retinal pigment epithelial cells have the spectral characteristics consistent with their being the source of fundus autofluorescence. Clinically relevant experiments were designed to better understand conditions in the micromilieu of bisretinoid fluorophores that can influence fluorescence efficiencies, photobleaching, and subsequent fluorescence recovery of this fluorophore. The consumption of the bisretinoid A2E due to photooxidation-induced degradation was quantified in solvent systems of variable relative permittivity (formerly called dielectric constant, in micelles, and in phospholipid vesicles of varying composition. Reorganization within biphasic systems was also examined. A2E content was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and fluorescence intensity was quantified spectroscopically. As solvent polarity was increased, A2E fluorescent spectra exhibited red-shifted maxima and reduced intensity. A2E was depleted by light irradiation and the loss was more pronounced in less polar solvents, lower concentrations of anionic surfactant, and in gel- versus fluid-ordered phospholipid liposomes. Conditions that permit A2E aggregation promoted photooxidation/photodegradation, while movement of A2E between bisphasic systems was associated with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The fluorescence characteristics of A2E are subject to environmental modulation. Photooxidation and photodegradation of bisretinoid can account for fundus autofluorescence photobleaching. Return of fluorescence intensity after photobleaching likely occurs due to redistribution of A2E fractions amongst co-existing heterogeneous microdomains of the lysosomal compartment.

  9. Specific binding of a dihydropyrimidinone derivative with DNA: Spectroscopic, calorimetric and modeling investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gongke; Yan Changling; Wang Dongchao; Li Dan; Lu Yan

    2012-01-01

    One of the dihydropyrimidinone derivative 5-(ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl) -3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMMD) was synthesized, and its binding properties with calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated using spectroscopic, viscometric, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence spectra suggested that the fluorescence enhancement of the binding interaction of EMMD to ctDNA was a static process with ground state complex formation. The binding constant determined with spectroscopic titration and ITC was found to be in the same order of 10 4 M −1 . According to the results of the viscosity analysis, fluorescence competitive binding experiment, fluorescence quenching studies, absorption spectral and ITC investigations, it can be concluded that EMMD is intercalative binding to ctDNA. Furthermore, the results of molecular modeling confirmed those obtained from spectroscopic, viscosimetric and ITC investigations. Additionally, ITC studies also indicated that the binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven. - Highlights: ► Medically important dihydropyrimidinones derivative EMMD is synthesized. ► EMMD is intercalative binding into ctDNA helix. ► Hydrogen bonding may play an essential role in the binding of EMCD with ctDNA. ► This binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven.

  10. Universal relation between spectroscopic constants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) The author has used eq. (6) of his paper to calculate De. This relation leads to a large deviation from the correct value depending upon the extent to which experimental values are known. Guided by this fact, in our work, we used experimentally observed De values to derive the relation between spectroscopic constants.

  11. The VANDELS ESO spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, R. J.; Pentericci, L.; Cimatti, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Fontana, A.; Nandra, K.; Amorin, R.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Carnall, A. C.; Castellano, M.; Cirasuolo, M.; Cucciati, O.; Cullen, F.; De Barros, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Fontanot, F.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Gargiulo, A.; Garilli, B.; Guaita, L.; Hartley, W. G.; Iovino, A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Juneau, S.; Karman, W.; Maccagni, D.; Marchi, F.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Pompei, E.; Pozzetti, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Almaini, O.; Balestra, I.; Bardelli, S.; Bell, E. F.; Bourne, N.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Brusa, M.; Buitrago, F.; Caputi, K. I.; Cassata, P.; Charlot, S.; Citro, A.; Cresci, G.; Cristiani, S.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Dickinson, M.; Fazio, G. G.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fiore, F.; Franco, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Galametz, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Jung, I.; Kim, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Khusanova, Y.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lotz, J. M.; Mannucci, F.; Maltby, D. T.; Matsuoka, K.; McLeod, D. J.; Mendez-Hernandez, H.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Mignoli, M.; Moresco, M.; Mortlock, A.; Nonino, M.; Pannella, M.; Papovich, C.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D. P.; Salvato, M.; Santini, P.; Schaerer, D.; Schreiber, C.; Stark, D. P.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Treu, T.; Vanzella, E.; Wild, V.; Williams, C. C.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2018-05-01

    VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 motivation, survey design and target selection.

  12. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  13. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  14. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  15. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  16. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  17. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  18. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  19. How spectroscopic x-ray imaging benefits from inter-pixel communication

    CERN Document Server

    Koenig, Thomas; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Ballabriga, Rafael; Campbell, Michael; Ruat, Marie; Tlustos, Lukas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging based on pixellated semiconductor detectors can be sensitive to charge sharing and K-fluorescence, depending on the sensor material used, its thickness and the pixel pitch employed. As a consequence, spectroscopic resolution is partially lost. In this paper, we study a new detector ASIC, the Medipix3RX, that offers a novel feature called charge summing, which is established by making adjacent pixels communicate with each other. Consequently, single photon interactions resulting in multiple hits are almost completely avoided. We investigate this charge summing mode with respect to those of its imaging properties that are of interest in medical physics and benchmark them against the case without charge summing. In particular, we review its influence on spectroscopic resolution and find that the low energy bias normally present when recording energy spectra is dramatically reduced. Furthermore, we show that charge summing provides a modulation transfer function which is almost indepen...

  20. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw [Moraga, CA; Cang, Hu [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Cangshan [Berkeley, CA; Wong, Chung M [San Gabriel, CA

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  1. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, L.; Vergo, N.; Salisbury, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed

  2. Multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis; Samartzis, Peter C.; Stamataki, Katerina; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Katsoprinakis, George E.; Papadakis, Vassilis; Schimowski, Xavier; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Loppinet, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is an established technique, particularly useful for thickness measurements of thin films. It measures polarization rotation after a single reflection of a beam of light on the measured substrate at a given incidence angle. In this paper, we report the development of multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry where the light beam reflects multiple times on the sample. We have investigated both theoretically and experimentally the effect of sample reflectivity, number of reflections (passes), angles of incidence and detector dynamic range on ellipsometric observables tanΨ and cosΔ. The multiple pass approach provides increased sensitivity to small changes in Ψ and Δ, opening the way for single measurement determination of optical thickness T, refractive index n and absorption coefficient k of thin films, a significant improvement over the existing techniques. Based on our results, we discuss the strengths, the weaknesses and possible applications of this technique. - Highlights: • We present multi-pass spectroscopic ellipsometry (MPSE), a multi-pass approach to ellipsometry. • Different detectors, samples, angles of incidence and number of passes were tested. • N passes improve polarization ratio sensitivity to the power of N. • N reflections improve phase shift sensitivity by a factor of N. • MPSE can significantly improve thickness measurements in thin films

  3. Spectroscopic amplifier for pin diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso M, M. S.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    The photodiode remains the basic choice for the photo-detection and is widely used in optical communications, medical diagnostics and field of corpuscular radiation. In detecting radiation it has been used for monitoring radon and its progeny and inexpensive spectrometric systems. The development of a spectroscopic amplifier for Pin diode is presented which has the following characteristics: canceler Pole-Zero (P/Z) with a time constant of 8 μs; constant gain of 57, suitable for the acquisition system; 4th integrator Gaussian order to waveform change of exponential input to semi-Gaussian output and finally a stage of baseline restorer which prevents Dc signal contribution to the next stage. The operational amplifier used is the TLE2074 of BiFET technology of Texas Instruments with 10 MHz bandwidth, 25 V/μs of slew rate and a noise floor of 17 nv/(Hz)1/2. The integrated circuit has 4 operational amplifiers and in is contained the total of spectroscopic amplifier that is the goal of electronic design. The results show like the exponential input signal is converted to semi-Gaussian, modifying only the amplitude according to the specifications in the design. The total system is formed by the detector, which is the Pin diode, a sensitive preamplifier to the load, the spectroscopic amplifier that is what is presented and finally a pulse height analyzer (Mca) which is where the spectrum is shown. (Author)

  4. Correlated topographic and spectroscopic imaging by combined atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dehong; Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suh, Y.D.; Lu, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Near-field scanning microscopy is a powerful approach to obtain topographic and spectroscopic characterization simultaneously for imaging biological and nanoscale systems. To achieve optical imaging at high spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, aperture-less metallic scanning tips have been utilized to enhance the laser illumination local electromagnetic field at the apex of the scanning tips. In this paper, we discuss and review our work on combined fluorescence imaging with AFM-metallic tip enhancement, finite element method simulation of the tip enhancement, and their applications on AFM-tip enhanced fluorescence lifetime imaging (AFM-FLIM) and correlated AFM and FLIM imaging of the living cells

  5. Influence of degree of methyl methacrylate polymerization on spectroscopic properties of ethyl 5-(4-aminophenyl)- and 5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-3-amino-2,4-dicyanobenzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Józefowicz, M.; Bajorek, A.; Pietrzak, M.; Jędrzejewska, B.; Heldt, J.R.; Heldt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of degree of methyl methacrylate (MM) polymerization on the both emission modes (LE—locally excited and ICT—intramolecular charge transfer) of the fluorescence spectrum of ethyl 5-(4-aminophenyl)-3-amino-2,4-dicyanobenzoate (EAADCy) and ethyl 5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-3-amino-2,4-dicyanobenzoate (EDMAADCy) has been studied using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic technique. The purpose of these studies was to find a relationship between the changes in the spectroscopic characteristics (fluorescence intensity, wavelength of maximum intensity, fluorescence full-width at half maximum, emission anisotropy, fluorescence decay time) of the tested compounds and degree of monomer conversion into polymer. On the basis of the experimental results, it was shown that the ICT fluorescence full-width at half maximum for EDMAADCy shows a linear dependence on the time of MM polymerization. Our findings predestine the molecule EDMAADCy to be used as fluorescence probe for monitoring the polymerization process of MM. - Highlights: ► The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra in MM possess a complex nature. ► Fluorescence decay kinetics for different degrees of polymerization of MM were investigated. ► The ICT fluorescence FWHM for EDMAADCy shows a linear dependence on the time of polymerization. ► EDMAADCy can be used as fluorescence probe for monitoring the polymerization process of MM

  6. Mossbauer spectroscopic studies in ferroboron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ravi Kumar; Govindaraj, R.; Amarendra, G.

    2017-05-01

    Mossbauer spectroscopic studies have been carried out in a detailed manner on ferroboron in order to understand the local structure and magnetic properties of the system. Evolution of the local structure and magnetic properties of the amorphous and crystalline phases and their thermal stability have been addressed in a detailed manner in this study. Role of bonding between Fe 4s and/or 4p electrons with valence electrons of boron (2s,2p) in influencing the stability and magnetic properties of Fe-B system is elucidated.

  7. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  8. Fluorescence of irradiated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulis, I.G.; Evdokimenko, V.M.; Lapkovskij, M.P.; Petrov, P.T.; Gulis, I.M.; Markevich, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    A visible fluorescence has been found out in γ-irradiated aqueous of carbohydrates. Two bands have been distinguished in fluorescence spectra of the irradiated solution of dextran: a short-wave band lambdasub(max)=140 nm (where lambda is a wave length) at lambdasub(β)=380 nm and a long-wave band with lambdasub(max)=540 nm at lambdasub(β)=430 nm. A similar form of the spectrum has been obtained for irradiated solutions of starch, amylopectin, lowmolecular glucose. It has been concluded that a macromolecule of polysaccharides includes fluorescent centres. A relation between fluorescence and α-oxiketon groups formed under irradiation has been pointed out

  9. Intermolecular interaction of fosinopril with bovine serum albumin (BSA): The multi-spectroscopic and computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Li; Pan, Dong-Qi; Lou, Yan-Yue; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2018-04-16

    The intermolecular interaction of fosinopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor with bovine serum albumin (BSA), has been investigated in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking technique. The results obtained from fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy revealed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA induced by fosinopril was mediated by the combined dynamic and static quenching, and the static quenching was dominant in this system. The binding constant, K b , value was found to lie between 2.69 × 10 3 and 9.55 × 10 3  M -1 at experimental temperatures (293, 298, 303, and 308 K), implying the low or intermediate binding affinity between fosinopril and BSA. Competitive binding experiments with site markers (phenylbutazone and diazepam) suggested that fosinopril preferentially bound to the site I in sub-domain IIA on BSA, as evidenced by molecular docking analysis. The negative sign for enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ) and entropy change (ΔS 0 ) indicated that van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds played important roles in the fosinopril-BSA interaction, and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate binding assay experiments offered evidence of the involvements of hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, spectroscopic results (synchronous fluorescence, 3-dimensional fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) indicated a slight conformational change in BSA upon fosinopril interaction. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Conformational studies of the (+)-trans, (-)-trans, (+)-cis, and (-)-cis adducts of anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide to N2-dG in duplex oligonucleotides using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suh, Myungkoo; Ariese, Freek; Small, Gerald J.; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Liu, Tong Ming; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    1995-01-01

    Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and low-temperature, laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) and non-line narrowing (NLN) spectroscopic methods, the conformational characteristics of stereochemically defined and site-specific adducts derived from the binding of

  11. Spectroscopic study on the stability of morin in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bark, Ki Min [Dept. of Chemical Education and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seo Eun; Seo, Jung Ja; Park, Ok Hyun; Park, Hyoung Ryun [Dept. of Chemistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chul Ho [Dept. of Cosmetic Science, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Morin (3,2,4,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a flavonol conjugated to a resorcinol moiety at the C-2 position, different from many other flavonoids. The UV–vis spectrum of morin in neat water reveals two major absorption bands with maxima at 265 and 387 nm. The substance is stable in acidic solution and neat water. However, its absorption maximum at 387 nm continuously shifts to longer wavelengths and new peaks appeared at wavelengths of 312 nm with increasing pH of the solution. The shape of the absorption spectrum of morin depends on the storage time at a given pH, indicating the occurrence of other successive chemical reactions. The fluorescence spectroscopic results also prove that new conjugated double bonds are formed in the deaerated basic solution at the initial state and decompose with time. This behavior indicates that morin is very unstable, and therefore its decomposition occurs by a sequence of multistep reactions in basic solution. Probable reaction pathways for the reaction are suggested based on the spectroscopic results.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies on Complex Formation of U(VI)-thiosalicylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Cho, Hye Ryun; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic interaction between radionuclides and organic ligands is largely dependent on the composition of functional groups in a ligand chemical structure. Therefore, the structural mimics of natural ligands possessing specific functional groups, such as hydroxy, phenol, carboxyl, thiol and amine groups, have been studied to understand their influence on the migration of radionuclides including actinide species under geological groundwater conditions. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the fraction of hydrolyzed U(VI) species occurring in weak acidic solutions (pH {approx}4.5) is significantly influenced by the presence of salicylate (Sal) ligand due to the simultaneous participation of both phenol and carboxyl groups in the formation of U(VI)-complexes. Thiosalicylic acid (TSalH{sub 2}) is a good model compound for studying the effects of both carboxyl and thiol (-SH) groups. The fraction of di-anionic ligand form (TSal{sup 2-}) is higher at near neutral pH due to the lower pKa ({approx} 8) of the thiol group than the case of salicylic acid (pKa, {approx}13 for salicylic -OH), despite the structural similarity. In addition, the redox capability of the thiol group is expected to influence the reducible radiouclides and the chemical structures of natural ligands by creating cross-linkage (-S-S-) upon oxidation. The goal of the present study is to investigate aqueous U(VI)-TSal complexation equilibrium via laser-based spectroscopic techniques including time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In this preliminary work, we report the results of spectroscopic studies using conventional UVVis absorbance and fluorescence (FL) measurement methods. The photo-stability of U(VI)-TSal complex or ligand itself upon exposure to a series of laser pulses is estimated by monitoring the change in their absorption bands. Additionally, TSal FL-quenching effect by U(VI) ions is discussed in comparison with that of Sal FL-quenching

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  14. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  15. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  16. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  17. pH-dependent fluorescence property of methyl red isomers in silver colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jian-How; Lee, Szetsen

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of silver (Ag) colloids in the spectroscopic differentiation of methyl red (MR) isomers (o-MR, m-MR, p-MR) by fluorescence techniques. Under different pH conditions, the formation of MR-Ag complex has an impact on the fluorescence band shapes and peak position shift, which are distinctive between MR isomers. The fluorescence quenching between 400 and 414 nm accompanied by simultaneous enhancement between 510 and 541 nm changes with pH are closely related to energy transfer efficiency and the interaction between the MR isomers and the Ag surface.

  18. Fluorescent Bisphosphonate and Carboxyphosphonate Probes: A Versatile Imaging Toolkit for Applications in Bone Biology and Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuting; Błażewska, Katarzyna M; Kadina, Anastasia P; Kashemirov, Boris A; Duan, Xuchen; Triffitt, James T; Dunford, James E; Russell, R Graham G; Ebetino, Frank H; Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Lundy, Mark W; McKenna, Charles E

    2016-02-17

    A bone imaging toolkit of 21 fluorescent probes with variable spectroscopic properties, bone mineral binding affinities, and antiprenylation activities has been created, including a novel linking strategy. The linking chemistry allows attachment of a diverse selection of dyes fluorescent in the visible to near-infrared range to any of the three clinically important heterocyclic bisphosphonate bone drugs (risedronate, zoledronate, and minodronate or their analogues). The resultant suite of conjugates offers multiple options to "mix and match" parent drug structure, fluorescence emission wavelength, relative bone affinity, and presence or absence of antiprenylation activity, for bone-related imaging applications.

  19. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Yanbo; Wen Lei; Wu Botao; Ren Jinjun; Chen Danping; Qiu Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses have been prepared by sintering nanoporous glasses. The absorption, fluorescent spectra and fluorescent lifetimes have been measured and the emission cross-section and minimum pump intensities were calculated. Codoping aluminum ions enhanced the fluorescence intensity of Yb-doped high silica glass obviously. The emission cross-sections of Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses were 0.65 and 0.82 pm 2 , respectively. The results show that Yb-Al-codoped high silica glass has better spectroscopic properties for a laser material. The study of high silica glass doped with ytterbium is helpful for its application in Yb laser systems, especially for high-power and high-repetition lasers

  20. Edge and Core Impurity Transport Study with Spectroscopic Instruments in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Muto, Sadatsugu; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Chunfeng, Dong; Hangyu, Zhou; Zhengying, Cui; Fujii, Keisuke; Hasuo, Masahiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Sakurai, Ikuya; Tawara, Yuzuru; Yinxian, Jie; Baonian, Wan; Zhenwei, Wu; Koubiti, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Impurity transport was investigated at both edge and core regions in large helical device (LHD) with developed spectroscopic instruments which can measure one- and two-dimensional distributions of impurities. The edge impurity behavior was studied recently using four carbon resonant transitions in different ionization stages of CIII (977A), CIV (1548A), CV (40.3A) and CVI (33.7A). When the line-averaged electron density, n e , is increased from 1 to 6 x 10 13 cm -3 , the ratio of (CIII+CIV)/n e increases while the ratio of (CV+CVI)/n e decreases. Here, CIII+CIV (CV+CVI) expresses the sum of CIII (CV) and CIV (CVI) intensities. The CIII+CIV indicates the carbon influx and the CV+CVI indicates the emissions through the transport in the ergodic layer. The result thus gives experimental evidence on the impurity screening by the ergodic layer in LHD, which is also supported by a three-dimensional edge particle simulation. The core impurity behavior is also studied in high-density discharges (n e ≤ 1x 10 15 cm -3 ) with multi H 2 -pellets injection. It is found that the ratio of V/D (V: convection velocity, D: diffusion coefficient) decreases after pellet injection and Z eff profile shows a flat one at values of 1.1-1.2. These results confirm no impurity accumulation occurs in high-density discharges. As a result, the iron density, n Fe , is analyzed to be 6 x 10 -7 ( = n Fe /n e ) of which the amount can be negligible as radiation source even in such high-density discharges. One- and two-dimensional impurity distributions from space-resolved VUV and EUV spectrometers newly developed for further impurity transport study are also presented with their preliminary results. (magnetically confined plasma)

  1. Spectroscopy and nonclassical fluorescence properties of single trapped Ba+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, J.

    1998-06-01

    This thesis reports on the setup and application of an experimental apparatus for spectroscopic and quantum optical investigations of a single Barium ion in a Paul trap. The realization of the apparatus, which consists of the ion trap in ultra high vacuum, two laser systems, and a photon counting detection system, is described in detail, with particular consideration of the noise sources like stray light and laser frequency instabilities. The two lasers at 493 nm and 650 nm needed to continuously excite resonance fluorescence from the Barium ion have been realized using diode lasers only. The preparation of a single localized Barium ion is described, in particular its optical cooling with the laser light and the minimization of induced vibration in the trapping potential. The purely quantum mechanical property of antibunching is observed by measuring the intensity correlation function of resonance fluorescence from the trapped and cooled ion. Interference properties of the single ion resonance fluorescence are investigated with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From the measured high-contrast interference signal it is proven that each individual fluorescence photon interferes with itself. The fluorescence excitation spectrum, on varying one laser frequency, is also measured and exhibits dark resonances. These measurements are compared to calculations based on optical Bloch equations for the 8 atomic levels involved. Future experiments, in particular the detection of reduced quantum fluctuations (squeezing) in one quadrature component of the resonance fluorescence, are discussed. (author)

  2. Laser-induced fluorescence in the detection of esophageal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kenneth K.; Gutta, Kumar; Laukka, Mark A.; Densmore, John

    1995-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a technique which can perform an 'optical biopsy' of gastrointestinal mucosa. LIF was performed in resected specimens using a pulsed N2-laser coupled fiberoptically to a probe. Fluorescence was measured using a 0.2 meter spectroscope with an intensified photodiode array. Measurements were made on fresh (esophagus, and adenocarcinoma. Each tissue section was examined using an optical probe consisting of a central fiber for delivering the excitation energy and a 6 fiber bundle surrounding the central fiber for detection of the fluorescence. An excitation wavelength of 337 nm was used which generated 3-ns pulses while fluorescence intensities were acquired from 300-800 nm. Spectra were obtained from each section in a standardized fashion and background spectra subtracted. Fluorescence readings were taken from 54 normal esophageal sections and 32 sections of adenocarcinoma. A fluorescence index obtained from the tumor sections was 0.68+/- 0.01 compared with 0.51+/- 0.01 for the normal sections (pesophagus with good accuracy.

  3. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  4. A dual-response BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for the discrimination of glutathione from cystein and homocystein† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis, spectroscopic properties, NMR and mass spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc00216h Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feiyi; Zhou, Li; Wang, Rui; Fei, Qiang; Luo, Sihang; Guo, Zhiqian; Tian, He

    2015-01-01

    In situ monitoring of intracellular thiol activity in cell growth and function is highly desirable. However, the discriminative detection of glutathione (GSH) from cysteine (Cys) and homocystein (Hcy) and from common amino acids still remains a challenge due to the similar reactivity of the thiol groups in these amino acids. Here we report a novel strategy for selectively sensing GSH by a dual-response mechanism. Integrating two independent reaction sites with a disulfide linker and a thioether function into a fluorescent BODIPY-based chemsensor can guarantee the synergetic dual-response in an elegant fashion to address the discrimination of GSH. In the first synergetic reaction process, the thiol group in GSH, Cys and Hcy induces disulfide cleavage and subsequent intramolecular cyclization to release the unmasked phenol-based BODIPY (discriminating thiol amino acids from other amino acids). In the second synergetic process, upon the substitution of the thioether with the nucleophilic thiolate to form a sulfenyl-BODIPY, only the amino groups of Cys and Hcy, but not that of GSH, undergo a further intramolecular displacement to yield an amino-substituted BODIPY. In this way, we make full use of the kinetically favorable cyclic transition state in the intramolecular rearrangement, and enable photophysical distinction between sulfenyl- and amino-substituted BODIPY for allowing the discriminative detection of GSH over Cys and Hcy and thiol-lacking amino acids under physiological conditions. Moreover, this probe exhibits a distinguishable ratiometric fluorescence pattern generated from the orange imaging channel to the red channel, which proves the differentiation of GSH from Cys and Hcy in living cells. PMID:29560246

  5. Spectroscopic observations of AG Dra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Chun, H.

    1982-01-01

    During summer 1981, spectroscopic observations of AG Dra were performed at the Haute-Provence Observatory using the Marly spectrograph with a dispersion of 80 A mm -1 at the 120 cm telescope and using the Coude spectrograph of the 193 cm telescope with a dispersion of 40 A mm -1 . The actual outlook of the spectrum of AG Dra is very different from what it was in 1966 in the sense that only a few intense absorption lines remain, the heavy emission continuum masking the absorption spectrum, while on the 1966 plate, about 140 absorption lines have been measured. Numerous emission lines have been measured, most of them, present in 1981, could also be detected in 1966. They are due to H, HeI and HeII. (Auth.)

  6. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  7. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahal, Tamar; Gilat, Noa; Michaeli, Yael; Redy-Keisar, Orit; Shabat, Doron; Ebenstein, Yuval

    2014-08-19

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a modified form of the DNA base cytosine, is an important epigenetic mark linked to regulation of gene expression in development, and tumorigenesis. We have developed a spectroscopic method for a global quantification of 5hmC in genomic DNA. The assay is performed within a multiwell plate, which allows simultaneous recording of up to 350 samples. Our quantification procedure of 5hmC is direct, simple, and rapid. It relies on a two-step protocol that consists of enzymatic glucosylation of 5hmC with an azide-modified glucose, followed by a "click reaction" with an alkyne-fluorescent tag. The fluorescence intensity recorded from the DNA sample is proportional to its 5hmC content and can be quantified by a simple plate reader measurement. This labeling technique is specific and highly sensitive, allowing detection of 5hmC down to 0.002% of the total nucleotides. Our results reveal significant variations in the 5hmC content obtained from different mouse tissues, in agreement with previously reported data.

  8. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Detection of hepatocarcinoma in rats by integration of the fluorescence spectrum: Experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcassa, J. C.; Ferreira, J.; Zucoloto, S.; Castro E Silva, O., Jr.; Marcassa, L. G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    The incorporation of spectroscopic techniques into diagnostic procedures may greatly improve the chances for precise diagnostics. One promising technique is fluorescence spectroscopy, which has recently been used to detect many different types of diseases. In this work, we use laser-induced tissue fluorescence to detect hepatocarcinoma in rats using excitation light at wavelengths of 443 and 532 nm. Hepatocarcinoma was induced chemically in Wistar rats. The collected fluorescence spectrum ranges from the excitation wavelength up to 850 nm. A mathematical procedure carried out on the spectrum determines a figure of merit value, which allows the detection of hepatocarcinoma. The figure of merit involves a procedure which evaluates the ratio between the backscattered excitation wavelength and the broad emission fluorescence band. We demonstrate that a normalization allowed by integration of the fluorescence spectra is a simple operation that may allow the detection of hepatocarcinoma.

  11. X-ray structure determination, Hirshfeld surface analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis, fluorescence), non-linear optical properties, Fukui function and chemical activity of 4‧-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioğlu, Zeynep; Yeşil, Ahmet Emin; Altun, Mehmet; Bal-Demirci, Tülay; Özdemir, Namık

    2018-06-01

    The compound 4‧-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine (Mtpyr) was synthesized and investigated using X-ray single crystal structure determination, combined with Hirshfeld topology analysis of the molecular packing. In addition, Mtpyr was characterized by experimental and theoretical FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and fluorescence emission spectra. The optimized molecular geometry (bond length, bond angle, torsion angle), the complete vibrational frequency and all other theoretical computations were calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with the help of 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. From the recorded UV-Vis spectrum, the electronic properties such as excitation energies, wavelength and oscillator strength are evaluated by TD-DFT in chloroform solution. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. The calculated HOMO-LUMO band gap energies confirmed that charge transfer and chemical stability within the molecule. The hyperconjugative interaction energy E(2) and electron densities of donor (i) and acceptor (j) bonds were calculated using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Besides Mulliken and natural population charges (NPA), non-linear optic properties (NLO), Fukui Function analysis, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were also computed which helps to identifying the electrophilic/nucleophilic nature.

  12. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  13. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  14. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescence Image Segmentation by using Digitally Reconstructed Fluorescence Images

    OpenAIRE

    Blumer, Clemens; Vivien, Cyprien; Oertner, Thomas G; Vetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In biological experiments fluorescence imaging is used to image living and stimulated neurons. But the analysis of fluorescence images is a difficult task. It is not possible to conclude the shape of an object from fluorescence images alone. Therefore, it is not feasible to get good manual segmented nor ground truth data from fluorescence images. Supervised learning approaches are not possible without training data. To overcome this issues we propose to synthesize fluorescence images and call...

  16. Spectroscopic diagnostics of industrial plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    Plasmas play key role in modern industry and are being used for processing micro electronic circuits to the destruction of toxic waste. Characterization of industrial plasmas which includes both 'thermal plasmas' and non-equilibrium plasmas or 'cold plasmas' in industrial environment offers quite a challenge. Numerous diagnostic techniques have been developed for the measurement of these partially ionized plasma and/or particulate parameters. The 'simple' non-invasive spectroscopic methods for characterization of industrial plasmas will be discussed in detail in this paper. The excitation temperature in thermal (DC/RF) plasma jets has been determined using atomic Boltzmann technique. The central axis temperature of thermal plasma jets in a spray torch can be determined using modified atomic Boltzmann technique with out using Abel inversion. The Stark broadening of H β and Ar-I (430 nm) lines have been used to determine the electron number density in thermal plasma jets. In low-pressure non-equilibrium argon plasma, electron temperature has been measured using the Corona model from the ratio of line intensities of atomic and ionic transitions. (author)

  17. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  18. Raman spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid and its potential application in forensic body fluid identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-03-10

    Traces of human body fluids, such as blood, saliva, sweat, semen and vaginal fluid, play an increasingly important role in forensic investigations. However, a nondestructive, easy and rapid identification of body fluid traces at the scene of a crime has not yet been developed. The obstacles have recently been addressed in our studies, which demonstrated the considerable potential of Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we continued to build a full library of body fluid spectroscopic signatures. The problems concerning vaginal fluid stain identification were addressed using Raman spectroscopy coupled with advanced statistical analysis. Calculated characteristic Raman and fluorescent spectral components were used to build a multidimensional spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid, which demonstrated good specificity and was able to handle heterogeneous samples from different donors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-spectroscopic techniques to evaluate the toxicity of alloyed CdSeS quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Hongju; Zhou Peijiang; Ding Ling; He Zhenyu; Ma Rong

    2012-01-01

    Alloyed CdSeS quantum dots (QDs) were successfully synthesized in aqueous phase using microwave irradiation. UV–vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques proved that the prepared alloyed QDs are composed of a CdSe-rich core and thick CdS shell with homogeneous size distributions. In order to study its biological toxicity, multi-spectroscopic techniques were adopted to investigate their conjugation with BSA. Fluorescence quenching methods indicated the prepared CdSeS QDs strongly quenched the fluorescence of BSA due to the formation of non-fluorescence ground-state complex. UV–vis absorbance spectra, synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra further confirmed the alloyed CdSeS QDs binded with BSA and destroyed their hydrogen bonding networks, which induced the conformation changes of this macromolecule. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of alloyed CdSeS QDs in aqueous phase via microwave irradiation. ► Characterization of alloyed QDs by PL, UV–vis, XRD and TEM techniques. ► Evidence of static quenching between alloyed QDs and BSA. ► Evidence of the conformation change of BSA molecules induced by alloyed QDs.

  20. Analysis of the spectroscopic characteristics on the binding interaction between tosufloxacin and bovine lactoferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ming; Zhang Luying; Lue Weijun; Cao Huaru

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between tosufloxacin (TELX) and bovine lactoferrin (BLF) in aqueous solution was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and absorbance spectra. The binding parameters and energy-transfer efficiency parameters were determined and the mechanism of interaction was discussed. The effect of tosufloxacin acting on the BLF's conformation was detected and the unfolding procedure of BLF induced by tosufloxacin was explored by 'fluorescence phase diagram'. Following experimental data of fluorescence polarization values P and r, the saturation characteristic of such kind of binding reaction was observed for the first time. The interaction between tosufloxacin and BLF influenced by Ni 2+ and Co 2+ were also preliminarily explored in this work. - Research Highlights: →In this paper, a new saturation spectroscopic characteristic of non-covalent binding reaction is proposed. The saturated character of interaction of tosufloxacin binding with bovine lactoferrin is firstly observed by fluorescence polarization spectroscopy. →The unfolding procedure of bovine lactoferrin induced by drug ligand is analyzed by 'fluorescence phase diagram', and it is quantitatively characterized. →The binding parameters and energy-transfer efficiency parameters of bovine lactoferrin-tosufloxacin/tosufloxacin-Co 2+ (Ni 2+ ) system are determined and the mechanism of interaction is discussed.

  1. Interaction between serum albumins and sonochemically synthesized cadmium sulphide nanoparticles: a spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveenraj, Selvaraj; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide nanoparticles approximately 5–10 nm in size range were synthesized by sonochemical technique, which follows acoustic cavitation phenomenon and generates nanoparticles with a smaller size range and higher surface area. The in vitro binding interaction of these sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles with serum albumins (SA) were investigated using UV–Vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques since CdS nanoparticles has biological applications such as cellular labelling and deep-tissue imaging. UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence studies confirm that CdS nanoparticles bind with SA through ground state complex formation (static quenching mechanism). The results suggest that sonochemically synthesized CdS nanoparticles interact with HSA more than that of BSA and these nanoparticles can be easily transported and rapidly released to the targets by serum albumins. CD studies confirmed the conformational change of serum albumins on the interaction of CdS nanoparticles.Graphical AbstractThis paper investigates the in vitro binding interaction of Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles with serum albumins (HSA and BSA) using the UV-vis, steady-state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectral techniques.

  2. Study on the interaction between gold nanoparticles and papain by spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gongke; Chen, Ye; Yan, Changling; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between gold nanoparticles and papain was studied by fluorescence, UV–vis absorption and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under the physiological conditions. The results showed that the binding of gold nanoparticles to papain was a spontaneous binding process. The fluorescence of papain was strongly quenched by gold nanoparticles. The quenching mechanism was probably a static quenching type with the formation of a ground state complex. The Stern–Volmer quenching constants, the binding constants and the number of binding sites in different temperatures were calculated. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH,ΔS and ΔG indicated that hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals forces played a key role in the interaction process. Additionally, the conformational change of papain induced by gold nanoparticles was analyzed by UV–vis absorption and synchronous fluorescence spectra. - Highlights: • Spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles are synthesized. • The fluorescence of papain is quenched by gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions. • Hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals forces may play an essential role in the binding of gold nanoparticles with papain. • This binding interaction is predominantly enthalpy driven

  3. Liquid nitrogen-assisted synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots from Blueberry and their performance in Fe3+ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslandaş, Ayşe Merve; Balcı, Neslihan; Arık, Mustafa; Şakiroğlu, Halis; Onganer, Yavuz; Meral, Kadem

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) were synthesized by a facile method containing liquid N2 treatment and centrifuge processes. The photophysical properties of the C-dots in an aqueous solution were examined at various conditions such as concentration, temperature, pH and excitation wavelength by using UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. The C-dots emitted a broad fluorescence between approximately 350-550 nm and their fluorescence was tuned by changing excitation wavelength. The as-prepared C-dots were applied to Fe3+ detection from aqueous solution. Spectroscopic data revealed that the as-prepared C-dots were used to detect Fe3+ in the range of 12.5 μM to 100 μM as a fluorescence sensor.

  4. Quantum chemical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of given uranyl complexes in aqueous solutions with possible environmental and industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Višňak Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief introduction into computational methodology and preliminary results for spectroscopic (excitation energies, vibrational frequencies in ground and excited electronic states and thermodynamic (stability constants, standard enthalpies and entropies of complexation reactions properties of some 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 uranyl sulphato- and selenato- complexes in aqueos solutions will be given. The relativistic effects are included via Effective Core Potential (ECP, electron correlation via (TDDFT/B3LYP (dispersion interaction corrected and solvation is described via explicit inclusion of one hydration sphere beyond the coordinated water molecules. We acknowledge limits of this approximate description – more accurate calculations (ranging from semi-phenomenological two-component spin-orbit coupling up to four-component Dirac-Coulomb-Breit hamiltonian and Molecular Dynamics simulations are in preparation. The computational results are compared with the experimental results from Time-resolved Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS and UV-VIS spectroscopic studies (including our original experimental research on this topic. In case of the TRLFS and UV-VIS speciation studies, the problem of complex solution spectra decomposition into individual components is ill-conditioned and hints from theoretical chemistry could be very important. Qualitative agreement between our quantum chemical calculations of the spectroscopic properties and experimental data was achieved. Possible applications for geochemical modelling (e.g. safety studies of nuclear waste repositories, modelling of a future mining site and analytical chemical studies (including natural samples are discussed.

  5. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachón, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Física Atómica y Molecular, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Andrew H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oregon Center for Optics, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Aspuru-Guzik, Alán [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  6. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed

  7. Spectroscopic techniques for measuring ion diode space-charge distributions and ion source properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filuk, A B; Bailey, J E; Adams, R G [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    The authors are using time- and space-resolved visible spectroscopy to measure applied-B ion diode dynamics on the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. Doppler broadening of fast Li atoms, as viewed parallel to the anode, is used in a charge-exchange model to obtain the Li{sup +} ion divergence within 100 {mu}m of the anode surface. The characteristic Stark/Zeeman shifts in spectra of alkali neutrals or singly-ionized alkaline-earths are used to measure the strong electric (10{sup 9} V/m) an magnetic ({approx} 6 T) fields in the diode gap. Large Stark shifts within 0.5 mm of the anode indicate the LiF emits with a finite field threshold rather than with Child-Langmuir-type emission, and the small slope in the electric field indicates an unexpected build-up of electrons near the anode. In the diode gap, the authors aim to unfold fields to quantify the time-dependent ion and electron space-charge distributions that determine the ion beam properties. Observed electric field non-uniformities give local beam deflections that can be comparable to the total beam microdivergence. The authors are implementing active laser absorption and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on low-density Na atoms injected into the diode gap prior to the power pulse. The small Doppler broadening in the Na spectra should allow simultaneous electric and magnetic field mapping with improved spatial resolution. (author). 4 figs., 13 refs.

  8. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments. (topical review)

  9. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  10. Multidimensional Raman spectroscopic signature of sweat and its potential application to forensic body fluid identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-03-09

    This proof-of-concept study demonstrated the potential of Raman microspectroscopy for nondestructive identification of traces of sweat for forensic purposes. Advanced statistical analysis of Raman spectra revealed that dry sweat was intrinsically heterogeneous, and its biochemical composition varies significantly with the donor. As a result, no single Raman spectrum could adequately represent sweat traces. Instead, a multidimensional spectroscopic signature of sweat was built that allowed for the presentation of any single experimental spectrum as a linear combination of two fluorescent backgrounds and three Raman spectral components dominated by the contribution from lactate, lactic acid, urea and single amino acids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Suk, Song Kyoo; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  12. A spectroscopic screening of the chemical speciation of europium(III) in gastrointestinal tract. The intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the health risks of lanthanides (Ln) and radiotoxic actinides (An), investigations into the chemical reactions of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. In order to identify the dominant binding partners (i.e. counter ions and/or ligands) of An/Ln in the gastrointestinal tract, a spectroscopic screening was performed by Time-Resolved Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) using artificial digestive juices containing Eu(III), a representative of Ln(III) and An(III). In the intestine, Eu(III) show a strong complexation especially with organic substances of the pancreatic and bile juice like the protein mucin.

  13. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology -Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyung Kee; Song Kyoo Suk; Kim, Duk Hyun; Hong, Suk Kyung; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Hoon; Yang, Kee Hoh

    1995-07-01

    For the resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment, erbium and samarium were chosen as test elements and their optimum photoionization schemes for trace analysis have been investigated by using multiphoton spectroscopic techniques. With the optimum scheme, the detection limit of various atoms were measured. For the test of laser induced fluorescence system, calibration curves obtained from lead and cadmium standard solutions were made and Pb concentrations of various unknown solutions were determined. By using the developed differential absorption lidar system, backscattering signals from aerosol and ozone have been measured. Error source, error calibration and data interpretation techniques have been also studied. 60 figs, 8 pix, 28 tabs, 30 refs. (Author)

  14. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  15. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  16. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  17. Ultrafast spectroscopic investigation of a fullerene poly(3-hexylthiophene) dyad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Natalie; Seifter, Jason; Wang, Mingfeng; Vauthey, Eric; Wudl, Fred; Heeger, Alan J.

    2011-08-01

    We present the femtosecond spectroscopic investigation of a covalently linked dyad, PCB-P3HT, formed by a segment of the conjugated polymer P3HT (regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)) that is end capped with the fullerene derivative PCB ([6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid ester), adapted from PCBM. The fluorescence of the P3HT segment in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution is reduced by 64% in the dyad compared to a control compound without attached fullerene (P3HT-OH). Fluorescence upconversion measurements reveal that the partial fluorescence quenching of PCB-P3HT in THF is multiphasic and occurs on an average time scale of 100 ps, in parallel to excited-state relaxation processes. Judging from ultrafast transient absorption experiments, the origin of the quenching is excitation energy transfer from the P3HT donor to the PCB acceptor. Due to the much higher solubility of P3HT compared to PCB in THF, the PCB-P3HT dyad molecules self-assemble into micelles. When pure C60 is added to the solution, it is incorporated into the fullerene-rich center of the micelles. This dramatically increases the solubility of C60 but does not lead to significant additional quenching of the P3HT fluorescence by the C60 contained in the micelles. In PCB-P3HT thin films drop-cast from THF, the micelle structure is conserved. In contrast to solution, quantitative and ultrafast (microscopy images. Ultrafast charge separation occurs also for the fibrous morphology, but the transient absorption experiments show fast loss of part of the charge carriers due to intensity-induced recombination and annihilation processes and monomolecular interfacial trap-mediated or geminate recombination. The yield of the long-lived charge carriers in the highly organized fibers is however comparable to that obtained with annealed P3HT:PCBM blends. PCB-P3HT can therefore be considered as an active material in organic photovoltaic devices.

  18. sick: The Spectroscopic Inference Crank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-03-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  19. SICK: THE SPECTROSCOPIC INFERENCE CRANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Andrew R., E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambdridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  20. SICK: THE SPECTROSCOPIC INFERENCE CRANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    There exists an inordinate amount of spectral data in both public and private astronomical archives that remain severely under-utilized. The lack of reliable open-source tools for analyzing large volumes of spectra contributes to this situation, which is poised to worsen as large surveys successively release orders of magnitude more spectra. In this article I introduce sick, the spectroscopic inference crank, a flexible and fast Bayesian tool for inferring astrophysical parameters from spectra. sick is agnostic to the wavelength coverage, resolving power, or general data format, allowing any user to easily construct a generative model for their data, regardless of its source. sick can be used to provide a nearest-neighbor estimate of model parameters, a numerically optimized point estimate, or full Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the posterior probability distributions. This generality empowers any astronomer to capitalize on the plethora of published synthetic and observed spectra, and make precise inferences for a host of astrophysical (and nuisance) quantities. Model intensities can be reliably approximated from existing grids of synthetic or observed spectra using linear multi-dimensional interpolation, or a Cannon-based model. Additional phenomena that transform the data (e.g., redshift, rotational broadening, continuum, spectral resolution) are incorporated as free parameters and can be marginalized away. Outlier pixels (e.g., cosmic rays or poorly modeled regimes) can be treated with a Gaussian mixture model, and a noise model is included to account for systematically underestimated variance. Combining these phenomena into a scalar-justified, quantitative model permits precise inferences with credible uncertainties on noisy data. I describe the common model features, the implementation details, and the default behavior, which is balanced to be suitable for most astronomical applications. Using a forward model on low-resolution, high signal

  1. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of 10-phenyl-isoalloxazine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirdel, J.; Penzkofer, A.; Prochazka, R.; Daub, J.; Hochmuth, E.; Deutzmann, R.

    2006-01-01

    The flavoquinone dyes 10-phenyl-isoalloxazine-3-acetic acid ethyl ester (1) and 10-(4-bromo-phenyl)-3-methyl-isoalloxazine (2) in dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and methanol are characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. Absorption cross-section spectra, stimulated emission cross-section spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, quantum yields, lifetimes, and degrees of fluorescence polarization are determined. The blue-light photo-degradation of the dyes is studied. Mass spectroscopic measurements reveal the formation of phenyl-benzo-pteridine (isoalloxazine) derivatives, tetraaza-benzo-aceanthrylene derivatives, dihydro-quinooxaline derivatives, and pyrazino-carbazole derivatives. An enhancement of photo-degradation is observed by the formed photo-fragments

  2. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology -Development of atomic spectroscopy technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyung Ki; Song, Ky Seok; Rhee, Young Joo; Baik, Dae Hyun; Shin, Jang Soo; Kim, Duck Hyun; Yang, Ki Ho; Yi, Jong Hoon

    1994-07-01

    In this project, three principal techniques are developed. The laser photoionization spectrometry (LAPIS) is used for the ultrasensitive detection for heavy metals such as Pb and Cd. The Laser atomic fluorescence spectrometry is applied to the quantitative analysis of the lanthanide and actinide elements. And the DIAL remote sensing system is used for monitoring the ozone concentration and the atmospheric pollution. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high efficient atomic beam generator were designed and manufactured. Various spectroscopic parameters and optimum analytical condition were investigated. By using the laser fluorescence technique, U, Eu and Sm in solution were quantitatively analyzed. The basic researches for the direct analytical method of solid samples were also carried out. The DIAL system for ozone remote sensing was developed and ozone concentration above Taejon were obtained. (Author)

  3. Monitoring by fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Gifford, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric detector is described in which the fluorescence excitation source may be 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 147 Pm or 63 Ni. Such a detector can be adapted for use with flowing liquid systems especially liquid chromatography systems. (U.K.)

  4. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  5. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    not be cited for purposes of advertisement. DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: Destroy this document when no longer needed. Do not return to the... recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  6. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  7. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  8. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by calixarene-based fluorescent molecular sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Faye, Djibril; Zhang, Han; Lefevre, Jean-Pierre; Delaire, J. A.; Leray, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and complexing properties of calixarene-based fluorescent sensors are reported. The calixarene bearing four dansyl fluorophores (Calix-DANS4) exhibits a very high affinity for the detection of lead. A fluorimetric micro-device based on the use of a Y-shape microchannel was developed and allows lead detection with a 5 ppb detection limit. For mercury detection, a fluorescent molecular sensor containing a calixarene anchored with four 8-quinolinoloxy groups (Calix-Q) has been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this sensor are sensitive to the presence of metal cations. An efficient fluorescence quenching is observed upon mercury complexation because of a photoinduced electron transfer from the fluorophore to the bound mercury. Calix-Q shows a high selectivity towards Hg2+ over interfering cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+) and a 70 ppb sensitivity.

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of neodymium cyclotriphosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouini, A.; Gacon, J.C.; Brenier, A.; Ferid, M.; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M

    2002-11-15

    In the framework of systematic investigations in the properties of rare-earth cyclotriphosphates, polycristalline samples of La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}P{sub 3}O{sub 9}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O have been synthesized with x=5x10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2}, 5x10{sup -2}, 10{sup -1} and 1. Absorbance spectra were measured at 300 K in the 300-1000 nm region. Fluorescent emissions from the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} multiplet were observed at 300 and 6 K under pulsed laser excitations in either the {sup 4}F{sub 7/2} or {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} multiplet and the decays of these emissions were measured. These decays are exponential with decay-times on the order of 100 ns for all values of x. No important lengthening is observed as either the Nd concentration is decreased from 100 to 0.5 at% or the temperature is lowered from 300 to 6 K. These results are in contradiction with those obtained for the anhydrous La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} compounds prepared by progressively heating the corresponding La{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}P{sub 3}O{sub 9}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O powder materials, a fact which shows the predominant role played by the water molecules in the Nd{sup 3+} luminescence in the considered hydrated compounds.

  10. Characterizing the interaction between oridonin and bovine serum albumin by a hybrid spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China); Chen, Junhui, E-mail: chenjupush@126.com [Interventional Oncology and Minimally Invasive Therapies Department, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen 518036 (China); Wang, Shaobin [The Fourth People' s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518033 (China); Chen, Zhanguang, E-mail: kqlu@stu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Oridonin is an effective anticancer drug which has high potency and low systemic toxicity. In this study, the interaction between oridonin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by several spectroscopic approaches for the first time. The binding characteristics of oridonin and BSA were determined by fluorescence emission spectra and resonance light scattering spectra. It is showed that the oridonin quenches the fluorescence of BSA and the static quenching constant K{sub SV} is 1.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} at 298 K. Moreover, oridonin and BSA form a 1:1 complex with a binding constant of 0.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. On the other hand, the thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which hydrophobic forces played a major role. The structure analysis indicates that oridonin binding results in an increased hydrophobicity around the tryptophan residues of BSA. Additionally, as shown by the UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence results, oridonin could lead to conformational and some microenvironmental changes of BSA. The work provides accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanism of oridonin with BSA in vitro and is helpful for understanding its effect on protein function during its transportation and distribution in blood. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between oridonin and BSA was evaluated by multi-spectroscopic methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding constant, number of binding sites and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin binds to Subdomain II site in BSA and form a 1:1 complex with it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin-BSA complex is stabilized mainly by hydrophobic force. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oridonin binding induces conformational and microenvironmental changes in BSA.

  11. Photophysics of α-furil at room temperature and 77 K: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Pronab; Chattopadhyay, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-06-21

    Steady state and time resolved spectroscopic measurements have been exploited to assign the emissions from different conformations of α-furil (2, 2′-furil) in solution phase at room temperature as well as cryogen (liquid nitrogen, LN{sub 2}) frozen matrices of ethanol and methylcyclohexane. Room temperature studies reveal a single fluorescence from the trans-planar conformer of the fluorophore or two fluorescence bands coming from the trans-planar and the relaxed skew forms depending on excitation at the nπ{sup ∗} or the ππ{sup ∗} absorption band, respectively. Together with the fluorescence bands, the LN{sub 2} studies in both the solvents unambiguously ascertain two phosphorescence emissions with lifetimes 5 ± 0.3 ms (trans-planar triplet) and 81 ± 3 ms (relaxed skew triplet). Quantum chemical calculations have been performed using density functional theory at CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G{sup ∗∗} level to prop up the spectroscopic surveillance. The simulated potential energy curves (PECs) illustrate that α-furil is capable of giving two emissions from each of the S{sub 1} and the T{sub 1} states—one corresponding to the trans-planar and the other to the relaxed skew conformation. Contrary to the other 1,2-dicarbonyl molecular systems like benzil and α-naphthil, α-furil does not exhibit any fluorescence from its second excited singlet (S{sub 2}) state. This is ascribed to the proximity of the minimum of the PEC of the S{sub 2} state and the hill-top of the PEC of the S{sub 1} state.

  12. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated

  13. Spectroscopic databases - A tool for structure elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksch, P [Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe, Gesellschaft fuer Wissenschaftlich-Technische Information mbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    1990-05-01

    Spectroscopic databases have developed to useful tools in the process of structure elucidation. Besides the conventional library searches, new intelligent programs have been added, that are able to predict structural features from measured spectra or to simulate for a given structure. The example of the C13NMR/IR database developed at BASF and available on STN is used to illustrate the present capabilities of online database. New developments in the field of spectrum simulation and methods for the prediction of complete structures from spectroscopic information are reviewed. (author). 10 refs, 5 figs.

  14. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  15. Spectroscopic profiling and computational study of the binding of tschimgine: A natural monoterpene derivative, with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Masoumeh Ashrafi; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Shaghaghi, Masoomeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2018-03-01

    DNA is a major target for a number of anticancer substances. Interaction studies between small molecules and DNA are essential for rational drug designing to influence main biological processes and also introducing new probes for the assay of DNA. Tschimgine (TMG) is a monoterpene derivative with anticancer properties. In the present study we tried to elucidate the interaction of TMG with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) using different spectroscopic methods. UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies as well as molecular docking study revealed formation of complex between TMG and CT-DNA. Binding constant (Kb) between TMG and DNA was 2.27 × 104 M- 1, that is comparable to groove binding agents. The fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of TMG by CT-DNA is static quenching. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH TMG with CT-DNA. Competitive binding assay with methylene blue (MB) and Hoechst 33258 using fluorescence spectroscopy displayed that TMG possibly binds to the minor groove of CT-DNA. These observations were further confirmed by CD spectral analysis, viscosity measurements and molecular docking.

  16. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G: concentration and solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehentbauer, Florian M; Moretto, Claudia; Stephen, Ryan; Thevar, Thangavel; Gilchrist, John R; Pokrajac, Dubravka; Richard, Katherine L; Kiefer, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Rhodamine 6G (R6G), also known as Rhodamine 590, is one of the most frequently used dyes for application in dye lasers and as a fluorescence tracer, e.g., in the area of environmental hydraulics. Knowing the spectroscopic characteristics of the optical emission is key to obtaining high conversion efficiency and measurement accuracy, respectively. In this work, solvent and concentration effects are studied. A series of eight different organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, n-pentanol, acetone, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) are investigated at constant dye concentration. Relatively small changes of the fluorescence spectrum are observed for the different solvents; the highest fluorescence intensity is observed for methanol and lowest for DMSO. The shortest peak wavelength is found in methanol (568 nm) and the longest in DMSO (579 nm). Concentration effects in aqueous R6G solutions are studied over the full concentration range from the solubility limit to highly dilute states. Changing the dye concentration provides tunability between ∼550 nm in the dilute case and ∼620 nm at high concentration, at which point the fluorescence spectrum indicates the formation of R6G aggregates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using near-infrared contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, R; Sarder, P; Bloch, S; Culver, J; Achilefu, S

    2012-08-01

    Although single-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is widely used to image molecular processes using a wide range of excitation wavelengths, the captured emission of this technique is confined to the visible spectrum. Here, we explore the feasibility of utilizing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes with emission >700 nm for FLIM of live cells. The confocal microscope is equipped with a 785 nm laser diode, a red-enhanced photomultiplier tube, and a time-correlated single photon counting card. We demonstrate that our system reports the lifetime distributions of NIR fluorescent dyes, cypate and DTTCI, in cells. In cells labelled separately or jointly with these dyes, NIR FLIM successfully distinguishes their lifetimes, providing a method to sort different cell populations. In addition, lifetime distributions of cells co-incubated with these dyes allow estimate of the dyes' relative concentrations in complex cellular microenvironments. With the heightened interest in fluorescence lifetime-based small animal imaging using NIR fluorophores, this technique further serves as a bridge between in vitro spectroscopic characterization of new fluorophore lifetimes and in vivo tissue imaging. © 2012 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  20. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  1. The sensitivity and selectivity properties of a fluorescence sensor based on quinoline-Bodipy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuri Kursunlu, Ahmed, E-mail: ankursunlu@gmail.com; Guler, Ersin

    2014-01-15

    A novel florescence sensor (Q-BODIPY) based on quinoline-Bodipy (quinoline-boradiazaindacene) was prepared by ‘click chemistry’ in several stages. The sensing actions of Q-BODIPY were confirmed by UV–vis titration, emission and excitation spectroscopic studies in presence of Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Sn{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, La{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions in methanol:H{sub 2}O (1:1) medium. Whereas some metal ions can only cause quenching effect on the fluorescence intensity of Q-BODIPY, some of them show an increase in fluorescence intensity. The stoichiometry of host–guest complexes formed was determined by Job′s plot method. The binding constants were calculated by Stern–Volmer method. As a fluorescence sensor, Q-BODIPY shows the best selectivity performance against Zn{sup 2+} ions in according to all spectroscopic data. -- Highlights: • Q-BODIPY prepared by several techniques shows a fluorescent behavior toward p, d and f block metal ions. • Q-BODIPY has both a more sensitivity and more effective ability for the detection of Zn(II) ion. • The synthesis strategies to produce Bodipy′s with metal coordinating offer a new approach for the design of novel fluorescence sensors.

  2. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of coumarin 120 with CdS nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Murat; Bozkurt, Ebru; Meral, Kadem; Arık, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz, E-mail: yonganer@atauni.edu.tr

    2015-01-15

    The interaction of coumarin 120 (C120) with CdS nanoparticles (CdS NPs) in aqueous suspension was examined by using UV–vis absorption, steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence intensity of C120 was quenched with increasing the amount of CdS NPs in the aqueous suspension. The spectroscopic data revealed that the C120 molecules adsorbed on CdS NPs via electrostatic interactions. The apparent association constant (K{sub app}) and the degree of association (α) for C120/CdS NPs were determined as 130.3 M{sup −1} and 0.51 for 4 nm CdS NPs and 624.3 M{sup −1} and 0.71 for 8 nm CdS NPs, respectively. The photoinduced EPR studies exhibited that no electron transfers between CdS and C120 taking place. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of C120 with different CdS NPs is due to the formation of a non-fluorescent complex. - Highlights: • Interaction of C120 with CdS NPs in aqueous solution was spectroscopically examined. • Nonfluorescent C120–CdS NPs complexes in aqueous solution were formed. • In the system, CdS NPs in aqueous solution acted as a fluorescence quencher.

  3. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of coumarin 120 with CdS nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, Murat; Bozkurt, Ebru; Meral, Kadem; Arık, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of coumarin 120 (C120) with CdS nanoparticles (CdS NPs) in aqueous suspension was examined by using UV–vis absorption, steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy techniques. The fluorescence intensity of C120 was quenched with increasing the amount of CdS NPs in the aqueous suspension. The spectroscopic data revealed that the C120 molecules adsorbed on CdS NPs via electrostatic interactions. The apparent association constant (K app ) and the degree of association (α) for C120/CdS NPs were determined as 130.3 M −1 and 0.51 for 4 nm CdS NPs and 624.3 M −1 and 0.71 for 8 nm CdS NPs, respectively. The photoinduced EPR studies exhibited that no electron transfers between CdS and C120 taking place. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of C120 with different CdS NPs is due to the formation of a non-fluorescent complex. - Highlights: • Interaction of C120 with CdS NPs in aqueous solution was spectroscopically examined. • Nonfluorescent C120–CdS NPs complexes in aqueous solution were formed. • In the system, CdS NPs in aqueous solution acted as a fluorescence quencher

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  6. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  7. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  8. Spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics of pulsed laser deposition laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thareja, Raj K.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of laser spectroscopic techniques used in the diagnostics of laser ablated plumes used for thin film deposition is given. An emerging laser spectroscopic imaging technique for the laser ablation material processing is discussed. (author)

  9. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  10. Interaction of Lysozyme with Rhodamine B: A combined analysis of spectroscopic & molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Sabera; Satish, Lakkoji; Kesh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Yatendra S; Sahoo, Harekrushna

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of Rhodamine B (RB) with Lysozyme (Lys) was investigated by different optical spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, fluorescence, and circular-dichroism (CD), along with molecular docking studies. The fluorescence results (including steady-state and time-resolved mode) revealed that the addition of RB effectively causes strong quenching of intrinsic fluorescence in Lysozyme and mostly, by the static quenching mechanism. Different binding and thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures and the binding constant value was found to be 2963.54Lmol(-1) at 25°C. The average distance (r0) was found to be 3.31nm according to Förster's theory of non-radiative energy transfer between Lysozyme and RB. The conformational change in Lysozyme during interaction with RB was confirmed from absorbance, synchronous fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements. Finally, molecular docking studies were done to confirm that the dye binds with Lysozyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The investigation of the interaction between edaravone and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xianyong; Yang Ying; Liu Ronghua; Huang Haowen; Chen Jian; Ji Danhong; Li Xiaofang; Yang Fengxian; Yi Pinggui

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence and ultraviolet spectroscopies were explored to study the interaction between edaravone (EDA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under imitated physiological condition. The experimental results show that the fluorescence quenching mechanism between EDA and BSA is a combined quenching (dynamic and static quenching). The binding constants, binding sites, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) of the interaction system were calculated at different temperatures. According to Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between EDA and BSA was calculated to be 3.10 nm. The effect of EDA on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, the effects of some common metal ions Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Ni 2+ on the binding constant between EDA and BSA were examined. - Highlights: → We explored the interaction of BSA and EDA using spectroscopic methods. → The fluorescence quenching mechanism is combined quenching. → Hydrophobic interaction force plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. → The binding constants, binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. → EDA affects the conformation of tryptophan residue's microregion.

  12. The investigation of the interaction between edaravone and bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xianyong, Yu; Ying, Yang; Ronghua, Liu; Haowen, Huang; Jian, Chen; Danhong, Ji [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education, Hunan Province College Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Li Xiaofang, E-mail: fine_chem@163.co [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education, Hunan Province College Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Fengxian, Yang [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education, Hunan Province College Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Yi Pinggui, E-mail: pgyi@hnust.c [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education, Hunan Province College Key Laboratory of QSAR/QSPR, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The fluorescence and ultraviolet spectroscopies were explored to study the interaction between edaravone (EDA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under imitated physiological condition. The experimental results show that the fluorescence quenching mechanism between EDA and BSA is a combined quenching (dynamic and static quenching). The binding constants, binding sites, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}G, {Delta}H, and {Delta}S) of the interaction system were calculated at different temperatures. According to Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between EDA and BSA was calculated to be 3.10 nm. The effect of EDA on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, the effects of some common metal ions Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} on the binding constant between EDA and BSA were examined. - Highlights: {yields} We explored the interaction of BSA and EDA using spectroscopic methods. {yields} The fluorescence quenching mechanism is combined quenching. {yields} Hydrophobic interaction force plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. {yields} The binding constants, binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. {yields} EDA affects the conformation of tryptophan residue's microregion.

  13. Urea-induced binding between diclofenac sodium and bovine serum albumin: a spectroscopic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohare, Neeraj; Khan, Abbul Bashar; Athar, Fareeda; Thakur, Sonu Chand; Patel, Rajan

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of diclofenac sodium (Dic.Na) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the absence and presence of urea using different spectroscopic techniques. A fluorescence quenching study revealed that the Stern-Volmer quenching constant decreases in the presence of urea, decreasing further at higher urea concentrations. The binding constant and number of binding sites were also evaluated for the BSA-Dic.Na interaction system in the absence and presence of urea using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The binding constant is greater at high urea concentrations, as shown by the fluorescence results. In addition, for the BSA-Dic.Na interaction system, a static quenching mechanism was observed, which was further confirmed using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy provided information about the formation of a complex between BSA and Dic.Na. Circular dichroism was carried out to explain the conformational changes in BSA induced by Dic.Na in the absence and presence of urea. The presence of urea reduced the α-helical content of BSA as the Dic.Na concentration varied. The distance r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (Dic.Na) was also obtained in the absence and presence of urea, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, C.; Decambox, P.; Mauchien, P.; Petit, A.

    1995-01-01

    Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) is a very sensitive and selective method that has been used for actinides and lanthanides analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle. This technique has been used in different fields such as in geology, in the Purex process, in the environment, in the medical and in waste storage assessment. Spectroscopic data, limits of detection and results obtained in previously quoted fields are presented. (author)

  15. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Chlorite Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineral chemistry of twenty chlorite samples from the United States Geological Survey (USGS spectral library and two other regions, having a wide range of Fe and Mg contents and relatively constant Al and Si contents, was studied via infrared (IR spectroscopy, near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF analysis. Five absorption features of the twenty samples near 4525, 4440, 4361, 4270, and 4182 cm−1 were observed, and two diagnostic features at 4440 and 4280 cm−1 were recognized. Assignments of the two diagnostic features were made for two combination bands (ν+δAlAlO−OH and ν+δSiAlO−OH by regression with IR fundamental absorptions. Furthermore, the determinant factors of the NIR band position were found by comparing the band positions with relative components. The results showed that Fe/(Fe + Mg values are negatively correlated with the two NIR combination bands. The findings provide an interpretation of the NIR band formation and demonstrate a simple way to use NIR spectroscopy to discriminate between chlorites with different components. More importantly, spectroscopic detection of mineral chemical variations in chlorites provides geologists with a tool with which to collect information on hydrothermal alteration zones from hyperspectral-resolution remote sensing data.

  16. Structure and linear spectroscopic properties of near IR polymethine dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, Scott; Padilha, Lazaro A.; Hu Honghua; Przhonska, Olga V.; Hagan, David J.; Van Stryland, Eric W.; Bondar, Mikhail V.; Davydenko, Iryna G.; Slominsky, Yuriy L.; Kachkovski, Alexei D.

    2008-01-01

    We performed a detailed experimental investigation and quantum-chemical analysis of a new series of near IR polymethine dyes with 5-butyl-7,8-dihydrobenzo[cd]furo[2,3-f]indolium terminal groups. We also synthesized and studied two neutral dyes, squaraine and tetraone, with the same terminal groups and performed a comparison of the spectroscopic properties of this set of 'near IR' dyes (polymethine, squaraine, and tetraone) with an analogous set of 'visible' dyes with simpler benzo[e]indolium terminal groups. From these measurements, we find that the dyes with dihydrobenzo[cd]furo[2,3-f]indolium terminal groups are characterized by a remarkably large shift ∼300 nm (∼200 nm for tetraone) of their absorption bands towards the red region. We discuss the difference in electronic structure for these molecules and show that the 'near IR' dyes are characterized by an additional weak fluorescence band from the higher lying excited states connected with the terminal groups. Absorption spectra for the longest polymethines are solvent-dependent and are characterized by a broadening of the main band in polar solvents, which is explained by ground state symmetry breaking and reduced charge delocalization within the polymethine chromophore. The results of these experiments combined with the agreement of quantum chemical calculations moves us closer to a predictive capability for structure-property relations in cyanine-like molecules

  17. Spectroscopic study on a thermoelectron-enhanced microplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Terashima, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Kyozo; Yoshikawa, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Hideaki; Sakurai, Takeki

    2004-01-01

    An Ar thermoelectron-enhanced microplasma (TEMP) jet was characterized by spectroscopic study. The 1s 5 lowest metastable densities at the core of the plasma and very close to the substrate, about 4 mm apart from the torch, were obtained successfully using laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) and laser induced evanescent-mode fluorescence spectroscopy (LIEF). For TEMP generated with 450 MHz, 5 W and 60 Torr, these densities were estimated to be about 3 x 10 12 cm -3 and about 10 10 cm -3 , by the LAS and LIEF methods, respectively. Moreover, gaseous temperature was also estimated as about 700 K by the LAS method. Depopulation of the 1s 5 metastable atoms might be caused primarily by gaseous diffusion between the torch and the substrate. Finally, we report a device with a TEMP generator at the top of a flexible fibre called the 'plasma fibre', which allows plasma processing in any location, as with laser processing using an optical fibre. This article was due to be published in issue 23 of 2003. To access this special issue, please follow this link: http://www.iop.org/EJ/toc/0022-3727/36/23

  18. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  19. Kerosene detection using laser induced fluorescence imaging for aeronautical engines application; Detection du kerozene par imagerie de fluorescence induite par laser, pour application sur foyer aeronautique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranger, Ph.

    2004-10-15

    The new concepts of aeronautical engines, developed to follow the evolution of the European standards of pollution, are generally based on an improvement of the processes of liquid fuel injection and mixture in the combustion chamber. There is currently no model mature enough to work without experimental validation. The purpose of this thesis is to assess the possibility of measuring the kerosene (Jet A1) vapour distribution by PLIF (Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence). That measurement technique must quantitatively image the instantaneous concentrations fields of the vaporized fuel in a spray. The implementation of such a technique needs an experimental spectroscopic study, which was realized on the vapour of fuel. First of all, this study allowed us to determine the properties of the kerosene fluorescence spectrum versus physical parameters such as temperature, pressure or gas mixture composition, especially in presence of oxygen molecules. Then, it was shown that the fluorescence spectrum of the fuel could be reproduce in all physical conditions by a single mixture of four aromatics. Their photophysical properties were also analyzed. Following this spectroscopic study, a phenomenological model for the fluorescence of the gaseous fuel was set up. This model led us to a protocol for an optical diagnostic on this fuel vapour. An experiment was set up to test the implementation and the limits of this technique in simple laboratory conditions. This experiment confirmed that this is indeed a promising technique for the diagnostic of the fuel vapour in aeronautical engine. (author)

  20. Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination compounds of sulfasalazine drug: Mn(II), Hg(II), Cr(III), ZrO(II), VO(II) and Y(III) transition metal ... The thermal decomposition of the complexes as well as thermodynamic parameters ( *}, *, * and *) were estimated using Coats–Redfern and ...

  1. 8th Czechoslovak spectroscopic conference. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Volume 3 of the conference proceedings contains abstracts of 17 invited papers, 101 poster presentations and 7 papers of instrument manufacturers, devoted to special spectroscopic techniques including X-ray microanalysis, X-ray spectral analysis, Moessbauer spectrometry, mass spectrometry, instrumental activation analysis and other instrumental radioanalytical methods, electron spectrometry, and techniques of environmental analysis. Sixty abstracts were inputted in INIS. (A.K.)

  2. Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XIX Additional Spectroscopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ian velocity curve that does justice to the measurements, but it cannot be expected to have much predictive power. Key words. Stars: late-type—stars: radial velocities—spectroscopic binaries—orbits. 0. Preamble. The 'Redman K stars' are a lot of seventh-magnitude K stars whose radial velocities were first observed by ...

  3. The VANDELS ESO public spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, R. J.; Pentericci, L.; Cimatti, A.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Fontana, A.; Nandra, K.; Amorin, R.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Carnall, A. C.; Castellano, M.; Cirasuolo, M.; Cucciati, O.; Cullen, F.; De Barros, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Fontanot, F.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Gargiulo, A.; Garilli, B.; Guaita, L.; Hartley, W. G.; Iovino, A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Juneau, S.; Karman, W.; Maccagni, D.; Marchi, F.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Pompei, E.; Pozzetti, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Almaini, O.; Balestra, I.; Bardelli, S.; Bell, E. F.; Bourne, N.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Brusa, M.; Buitrago, F.; Caputi, K. I.; Cassata, P.; Charlot, S.; Citro, A.; Cresci, G.; Cristiani, S.; Curtis-Lake, E.; Dickinson, M.; Fazio, G. G.; Ferguson, H. C.; Fiore, F.; Franco, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Galametz, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Jung, I.; Kim, S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Khusanova, Y.; Fèvre, O. Le; Lotz, J. M.; Mannucci, F.; Maltby, D. T.; Matsuoka, K.; McLeod, D. J.; Mendez-Hernandez, H.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Mignoli, M.; Moresco, M.; Mortlock, A.; Nonino, M.; Pannella, M.; Papovich, C.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D. P.; Salvato, M.; Santini, P.; Schaerer, D.; Schreiber, C.; Stark, D. P.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Treu, T.; Vanzella, E.; Wild, V.; Williams, C. C.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2018-05-01

    VANDELS is a uniquely-deep spectroscopic survey of high-redshift galaxies with the VIMOS spectrograph on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). The survey has obtained ultra-deep optical (0.48 studies. Using integration times calculated to produce an approximately constant signal-to-noise ratio (20 motivation, survey design and target selection.

  4. The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey has begun and will obtain high quality spectroscopy of some 100000 Milky Way stars, in the field and in open clusters, down to magnitude 19, systematically covering all the major components of the Milky Way. This survey will provide the first homogeneous o...

  5. Highlights of the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J.R.; Mészárosová, Hana; Faria, C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Karlický, Marian; de Andrade, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2009), s. 54-57 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun istrumentation * spectroscope * corona * radio radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.079, year: 2009

  6. Spectroscopic output of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd low dose rate brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher-Moga, Jacqueline; Beach, Stephen M.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Global Physics Solutions, St. Joseph, Michigan 49085 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    The spectroscopic output of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources is dependent on the physical design and construction of the source. Characterization of the emitted photons from 12 {sup 125}I and 3 {sup 103}Pd LDR brachytherapy source models is presented. Photon spectra, both along the transverse bisector and at several polar angles, were measured in air with a high-purity reverse electrode germanium (REGe) detector. Measured spectra were corrected to in vacuo conditions via Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The tabulated and plotted spectroscopic data provide a more complete understanding of each source model's output characteristics than can be obtained with other measurement techniques. The variation in fluorescence yield of the {sup 125}I sources containing silver caused greater differences in the emitted spectra and average energies among these seed models than was observed for the {sup 103}Pd sources or the {sup 125}I sources that do not contain silver. Angular spectroscopic data further highlighted the effects of source construction unique to each model, as well as the asymmetric output of many seeds. These data demonstrate the need for the incorporation of such physically measured output characteristics in the Monte Carlo modeling process.

  7. Spectroscopic study of trivalent rare earth ions in calcium nitrate hydrate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Asano, Hideki; Kimura, Takaumi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Uehara, Akihiro; Yamana, Hajimu

    2006-01-01

    Influence of the water content to chemical status of trivalent rare earth ions in calcium nitrate hydrate melt was studied by spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectrometry for Eu(III) in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .RH 2 O and electronic absorption spectrometry for Nd(III) in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .RH 2 O were performed for analyzing the changing coordination symmetries through the changes in their hypersensitive transitions. Raman spectroscopic study and EXAFS study were performed for Y(NO 3 ) 3 solutions and Y(III) in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .RH 2 O for analyzing the oxygen bonding to Y(III). Luminescence lifetime study of Eu(III) and Dy(III) in Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .RH 2 O was performed for evaluating the hydration number changes. Results of these spectroscopic studies indicated that, with the decrease of water content (R), the hydration number decreases while the interaction between trivalent rare earth ion and nitrate ion increases. It was also revealed that the symmetry of the coordination sphere gets distorted gradually by this interaction

  8. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  9. Fluorescent quantification of melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruno; Matamá, Teresa; Guimarães, Diana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is the best method for melanin quantification as it proved to be highly specific and accurate, detecting even small variations in the synthesis of melanin. This method can also be applied to the quantification of melanin in more complex biological matrices like zebrafish embryos and human hair. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Spectroscopic and structural study of the newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Sharma, Poornima; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Unnikrishnan, V K; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-02-05

    Study of copper complex of creatinine and urea is very important in life science and medicine. In this paper, spectroscopic and structural study of a newly synthesized heteroligand complex of copper with creatinine and urea has been discussed. Structural studies have been carried out using DFT calculations and spectroscopic analyses were carried out by FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence techniques. The copper complex of creatinine and the heteroligand complex were found to have much increased water solubility as compared to pure creatinine. The analysis of FT-IR and Raman spectra helps to understand the coordination properties of the two ligands and to determine the probable structure of the heteroligand complex. The LIBS spectra of the heteroligand complex reveal that the complex is free from other metal impurities. UV-visible absorption spectra and the fluorescence emission spectra of the aqueous solution of Cu-Crn-urea heteroligand complex at different solute concentrations have been analyzed and the complex is found to be rigid and stable in its monomeric form at very low concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical spectroscopic characteristics of lactate and mitochondrion as new biomarkers in cancer diagnosis: understanding Warburg effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.-H.; Ni, X. H.; Pu, Yang; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R.; Wang, W. B.; Masilamani, V.; Rizwan, A.; Alfano, R. R.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display high rates of glycolysis even under normoxia and mostly under hypoxia. Warburg proposed this effect of altered metabolism in cells more than 80 years ago. It is considered as a hallmark of cancer. Optical spectroscopy can be used to explore this effect. Pathophysiological studies indicate that mitochondria of cancer cells are enlarged and increased in number. Warburg observed that cancer cells tend to convert most glucose to lactate regardless of the presence of oxygen. Previous observations show increased lactate in breast cancer lines. The focus of this study is to investigate the relative content changes of lactate and mitochondria in human cancerous and normal breast tissue samples using optical spectroscopic techniques. The optical spectra were obtained from 30 cancerous and 25 normal breast tissue samples and five model components (Tryptophan, fat, collagen, lactate and mitochondrion) using fluorescence, Stokes shift and Raman spectroscopy. The basic biochemical component analysis model (BBCA) and a set of algorithm were used to analyze the spectra. Our analyses of fluorescence spectra showed a 14 percent increase in lactate content and 2.5 times increase in mitochondria number in cancerous breast tissue as compared with normal tissue. Our findings indicate that optical spectroscopic techniques may be used to understand Warburg effect. Lactate and mitochondrion content changes in tumors examined using optical spectroscopy may be used as a prognostic molecular marker in clinic applications.

  12. Spectroscopic study of honey from Apis mellifera from different regions in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Casillas-Peñuelas, R.; Quintanar-Stephano, JL; Macías-López, E.; Bujdud-Pérez, JM; Medina-Ramírez, I.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze by Raman and UV-Vis-NIR Spectroscopic techniques, Mexican honey from Apis Mellífera, using representative samples with different botanic origins (unifloral and multifloral) and diverse climates. Using Raman spectroscopy together with principal components analysis, the results obtained represent the possibility to use them for determination of floral origin of honey, independently of the region of sampling. For this, the effect of heat up the honey was analyzed in relation that it was possible to greatly reduce the fluorescence background in Raman spectra, which allowed the visualization of fructose and glucose peaks. Using UV-Vis-NIR, spectroscopy, a characteristic spectrum profile of transmittance was obtained for each honey type. In addition, to have an objective characterization of color, a CIE Yxy and CIE L*a*b* colorimetric register was realized for each honey type. Applying the principal component analysis and their correlation with chromaticity coordinates allowed classifying the honey samples in one plot as: cutoff wavelength, maximum transmittance, tones and lightness. The results show that it is possible to obtain a spectroscopic record of honeys with specific characteristics by reducing the effects of fluorescence.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of titanate nanotubes with bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L.Z.; Zhao, Y.S.; Teng, H.H.; Shi, S.Y.; Ren, B.X.

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the transport mechanism and evaluate the biological safety of titanate nanotubes, the interactions of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by applying spectroscopic methods under simulated physiological conditions. After taking into account the inner filter effect, the fluorescence intensity of BSA was found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of TNTs, indicating that the microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in BSA became more hydrophobic. In addition, the absorption spectra of BSA showed a hyperchromic effect around 280 nm as the concentration of TNTs increased, suggesting that TNTs changed the microenvironment of the tryptophan and tyrosine residues. This is consistent with the results from fluorescence spectroscopy studies. However, circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that no significant conformational change in BSA occurred during the interaction. We believe that Trp-213 was buried more compactly in the internal hydrophobic region, and hydrophobicity increased around Trp-134 with increasing TNTs concentration. From a spectroscopic point of view, this work elucidates the interaction mechanism of titanate nanotubes with BSA, and the methods used in this paper can also be applied to explore the molecular mechanism underlying toxicity of other nanomaterials. (authors)

  14. Glucose Oxidase Adsorption on Sequential Adsorbed Polyelectrolyte Films Studied by Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán, Ferdinando; Solís, Araceli; Palestino, Gabriela; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Pérez, Elías

    2005-04-01

    The adsorption of Glucose Oxidase (GOX) on layers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) deposited on Sequentially Adsorbed Polyelectrolyte Films (SAPFs) were studied by three different spectroscopic techniques. These techniques are: Optical Wave Light Spectroscopy (OWLS) to measure surface density; Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to verify the adsorption of GOX on the surface; and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in Attenuated Total Reflection mode (FTIR-HATR) to inspect local structure of polyelectrolytes and GOX. Two positive and two negative polyelectrolytes are used: Cationic poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and anionic poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). These spectroscopic techniques do not require any labeling for GOX or SAPFs, specifically GOX and PSS are naturally fluorescent and are used as a couple donor-acceptor for the FRET technique. The SAPFs are formed by a (PEI)-(PSS/PAH)2 film followed by (PAA/PAH)n bilayers. GOX is finally deposited on top of SAPFs at different values of n (n=1..5). Our results show that GOX is adsorbed on positive ended SAPFs forming a monolayer. Contrary, GOX adsorption is not observed on negative ended film polyelectrolyte. GOX stability was tested adding a positive and a negative polyelectrolyte after GOX adsorption. Protein is partially removed by PAH and PAA, with lesser force by PAA.

  15. Crystal growth and spectroscopic characterization of Yb3+:LiTaO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, John B.; Allik, Toomas H.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.; Yow, Raylon M.; Scripsick, Michael; Wechsler, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties are presented for Yb 3+ incorporated into single crystals of LiTaO 3 grown by the top-seeded solution growth method. From an analysis of the absorption and fluorescence spectra, we are able to determine the Stark-level components of the 2 F 7/2 (the ground-state multiplet manifold) and the 2 F 5/2 (the excited-state multiplet manifold of Yb 3+ (4f 13 )). The room-temperature fluorescence lifetime of 2 F 5/2 is 678μs as measured on a thin sample to reduce possibilities for reabsorption. Spectral comparisons of Yb 3+ -doped LiTaO 3 and LiNbO 3 are drawn. The crystal-field splitting of Yb 3+ (4f 13 ) in both crystal hosts is modeled using a set of crystal-field splitting parameters, B nm , determined from a recent spectroscopic analysis of Er 3+ (4f 11 ) in LiNbO 3 . Without adjustment of the B nm parameters, the model predicts the Stark-level energy and the symmetry label for each level in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. Less photorefractive than its niobate cousin, LiTaO 3 has potential for use in numerous integrated electro-optical circuits and devices

  16. Spectroscopic investigations of lanthanides and actinides using simultaneous LIF and photoionization techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser-induced photoionization (LIP) are powerful spectroscopic techniques individually. These techniques have been used extensively for studying the atomic spectra. The potential of these two techniques increases enormously when used simultaneously because of their complimentary nature. Among these two, the resonance ionization spectroscopy is most sensitive, but in some cases the spectra obtained using this photoionization technique can provide the incomplete atomic energy levels information. The complete energy level information can be obtained when both the LIF and LIP techniques are used simultaneously. These techniques have been developed in our laboratory. By employing together both the LIF and LIP techniques for simultaneous detection and utilization of LIF and LIP signals not only helped in developing new methodologies but also helped in getting complete spectral information apart from the measurements of atomic parameters. For the first time, laser-induced fluorescence and laser-induced photoionization techniques are used simultaneously for the spectroscopic investigations of atoms of lanthanides and actinides. The density matrix (DM) formalism is used to validate the experimental results. (author)

  17. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milos Nesladek

    2014-01-01

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  18. Fluorescent investigation of the interactions between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and serum albumin: Synchronous fluorescence determination of serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Fengling [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control Technology of Henan Province, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Hennan 453007 (China)]. E-mail: fenglingcui@hotmail.com; Wang Junli [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control Technology of Henan Province, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Hennan 453007 (China); Cui Yanrui [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control Technology of Henan Province, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Hennan 453007 (China); Li Jianping [School of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Control Technology of Henan Province, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Hennan 453007 (China)

    2006-07-07

    The interactions between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and serum albumin were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectrum under physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea should have a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of both bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin through static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force stabilizing the complex. Thermodynamic parameter enthalpy changes ({delta}H) and entropy changes ({delta}S) were calculated according to the Vant'Hoff equation. The binding distances between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and the proteins were evaluated on the basis of the theory of Foester energy transfer. In addition, the effects of other ions on the binding constants of complexes were also discussed. Synchronous fluorescence technology was successfully applied to the determination of serum albumins added to the CPNT solution.

  19. Fluorescent investigation of the interactions between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and serum albumin: Synchronous fluorescence determination of serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Fengling; Wang Junli; Cui Yanrui; Li Jianping

    2006-01-01

    The interactions between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and serum albumin were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectrum under physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea should have a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of both bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin through static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force stabilizing the complex. Thermodynamic parameter enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated according to the Vant'Hoff equation. The binding distances between N-(p-chlorophenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl) thiourea and the proteins were evaluated on the basis of the theory of Foester energy transfer. In addition, the effects of other ions on the binding constants of complexes were also discussed. Synchronous fluorescence technology was successfully applied to the determination of serum albumins added to the CPNT solution

  20. Multimodal Raman-fluorescence spectroscopy of formalin fixed samples is able to discriminate brain tumors from dysplastic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, there has been a considerable surge in the application of spectroscopy for disease diagnosis. Raman and fluorescence spectra provide characteristic spectral profile related to biochemical and morphological changes when tissues progress from normal state towards malignancy. Spectroscopic techniques offer the advantage of being minimally invasive compared to traditional histopathology, real time and quantitative. In biomedical optical diagnostics, freshly excised specimens are preferred for making ex-vivo spectroscopic measurements. With regard to fresh tissues, if the lab is located far away from the clinic it could pose a problem as spectral measurements have to be performed immediately after dissection. Tissue samples are usually placed in a fixative agent such as 4% formaldehyde to preserve the samples before processing them for routine histopathological studies. Fixation prevents the tissues from decomposition by arresting autolysis. In the present study, we intend to investigate the possibility of using formalin fixed samples for discrimination of brain tumours from dysplastic tissue using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Formalin fixed samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline for about 5 minutes in order to remove the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. In case of fluorescence spectroscopy, changes in spectral profile have been observed in the region between 550-670 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. For Raman measurements, we found significant differences in the spectral profiles between dysplasia and tumor. In conclusion, formalin fixed samples can be potentially used for the spectroscopic discrimination of tumor against dysplastic tissue in brain samples.

  1. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling.

  2. Interactions between cells and ionized dendritic biomaterials: Flow cytometry and fluorescence spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Khandare, Jayant; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are a new class of macromolecules characterized by large density of "tunable" peripheral functional groups. Therefore dendrimers can serve as a model macromolecular system to study the influence of molecular geometry and charge density on transport across biological barriers, especially cellular interfaces. The effect of size, end-functionality, surface charge (pH), and the nature of the cell surface are expected to play an important role in transport, and are investigated using flow cytometry, fluorescene microscopy and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Our results suggest that at physiological pH, cationic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers can enter the A549 cancer lung epithelial cells within 5 minutes, perhaps due to the favorable interaction between anionic surface receptors of cells and cationic PAMAM dendrimer, through adsorptive endocytosis. On the other hand, hyperbranched polyol, which is a neutral polymer at physiological pH, enters cells at a much slower rate. The entry of hyperbranched polyol may be because of fluid-phase pinocytosis. Our results also indicate that the dendritic polymers enter the cell surface much more rapidly than linear polymers, and some small drugs, suggesting that the high density of functional groups plays a key role in the interaction with the cell surface, and the subsequent transport inside.

  3. The Synthesis and Luminescence-spectroscopic Properties of Fluorescent Condensation Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, Nikolai N.

    1985-07-01

    The results of studies on the synthesis of polycondensation phosphorus-containing aliphatic and aromatic polymers as well as the products of polymer-analogue transformations with phosphorus-groups in the side chain are examined. The light absorption and luminescent properties of the polymers obtained and of model compounds having an analogous structure are discussed. The bibliography includes 108 references.

  4. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  5. Study of interaction of butyl p-hydroxybenzoate with human serum albumin by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qin, E-mail: wqing07@lzu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Yaheng, E-mail: zhangyah04@lzu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun Huijun, E-mail: sun.hui.jun-04@163.co [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen Hongli, E-mail: hlchen@lzu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen Xingguo, E-mail: chenxg@lzu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Study of the interaction between butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (butoben) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been performed by molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic method. The interaction mechanism was predicted through molecular modeling first, then the binding parameters were confirmed using a series of spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The thermodynamic parameters of the reaction, standard enthalpy {Delta}H{sup 0} and entropy {Delta}S{sup 0}, have been calculated to be -29.52 kJ mol{sup -1} and -24.23 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which suggests the van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds are the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the butoben-HSA complex. Results obtained by spectroscopic methods are consistent with that of the molecular modeling study. In addition, alteration of secondary structure of HSA in the presence of butoben was evaluated using the data obtained from UV-visible absorbance, CD and FT-IR spectroscopies. - Research highlights: The interaction between butyl p-hydroxybenzoate with HSA has been investigated for the first time. Molecular modeling study can provide theoretical direction for experimental design. Multi-spectroscopic method can provide the binding parameters and thermodynamic parameters. These results are important for food safety and human health when using parabens as a preservative.

  6. The HITRAN2016 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Hill, C.; Kochanov, R. V.; Tan, Y.; Bernath, P. F.; Birk, M.; Boudon, V.; Campargue, A.; Chance, K. V.; Drouin, B. J.; Flaud, J. -M.; Gamache, R. R.; Hodges, J. T.; Jacquemart, D.; Perevalov, V. I.; Perrin, A.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, M. -A. H.; Tennyson, J.; Toon, G. C.; Tran, H.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Barbe, A.; Császár, A. G.; Devi, V. M.; Furtenbacher, T.; Harrison, J. J.; Hartmann, J. -M.; Jolly, A.; Johnson, T. J.; Karman, T.; Kleiner, I.; Kyuberis, A. A.; Loos, J.; Lyulin, O. M.; Massie, S. T.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; Müller, H. S. P.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nikitin, A. V.; Polyansky, O. L.; Rey, M.; Rotger, M.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sung, K.; Starikova, E.; Tashkun, S. A.; Auwera, J. Vander; Wagner, G.; Wilzewski, J.; Wcisło, P.; Yu, S.; Zak, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the contents of the 2016 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic compilation. The new edition replaces the previous HITRAN edition of 2012 and its updates during the intervening years. The HITRAN molecular absorption compilation is comprised of five major components: the traditional line-by-line spectroscopic parameters required for high-resolution radiative-transfer codes, infrared absorption cross-sections for molecules not yet amenable to representation in a line-by-line form, collision-induced absorption data, aerosol indices of refraction, and general tables such as partition sums that apply globally to the data. The new HITRAN is greatly extended in terms of accuracy, spectral coverage, additional absorption phenomena, added line-shape formalisms, and validity. Moreover, molecules, isotopologues, and perturbing gases have been added that address the issues of atmospheres beyond the Earth. Of considerable note, experimental IR cross-sections for almost 200 additional significant molecules have been added to the database.

  7. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars...... and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  8. The HITRAN 2008 molecular spectroscopic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, L.S.; Gordon, I.E.; Barbe, A.; Benner, D.Chris; Bernath, P.F.; Birk, M.; Boudon, V.; Brown, L.R.; Campargue, A.; Champion, J.-P.; Chance, K.; Coudert, L.H.; Dana, V.; Devi, V.M.; Fally, S.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2008 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The new edition is the first official public release since the 2004 edition, although a number of crucial updates had been made available online since 2004. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative-transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e. spectra in which the individual lines are not resolved; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultraviolet; refractive indices of aerosols, tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 42 molecules including many of their isotopologues.

  9. Very large area multiwire spectroscopic proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; Mastropietro, M.; La Padula, C.D.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of a five year development program, a final prototype of a Very Large Area Spectroscopic Proportional Counter (VLASPC), to be employed in space borne payloads, was produced at the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale, Frascati. The instrument is the last version of a new generation of Multiwire Spectroscopic Proportional Counters (MWSPC) succesfully employed in many balloon borne flights, devoted to hard X-ray astronomy. The sensitive area of this standard unit is 2700 cm 2 with an efficiency higher than 10% in the range 15-180 keV (80% at 60 keV). The low cost and weight make this new type of VLASPC competitive with Nal arrays, phoswich and GSPC detectors in terms of achievable scientific results. (orig.)

  10. Very large area multiwire spectroscopic proportional counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; Mastropietro, M.; La Padula, C.D.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F. (Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale, Frascati (Italy))

    1981-07-01

    As a result of a five year development program, a final prototype of a Very Large Area Spectroscopic Proportional Counter (VLASPC), to be employed in space borne payloads, was produced at the Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale, Frascati. The instrument is the last version of a new generation of Multiwire Spectroscopic Proportional Counters (MWSPC) successfully employed in many balloon borne flights, devoted to hard X-ray astronomy. The sensitive area of this standard unit is 2700 cm/sup 2/ with an efficiency higher than 10% in the range 15-180 keV (80% at 60 keV). The low cost and weight make this new type of VLASPC competitive with Nal arrays, phoswich and GSPC detectors in terms of achievable scientific results.

  11. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  12. Gold and silver nanoparticles based superquenching of fluorescence: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Chattopadhyay, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.chattopadhyay@yahoo.com

    2015-04-15

    The short review highlights the recent advances on the gold and silver nanoparticles induced efficient quenching of fluorescence from various fluorophores looking at their promising use as optical rulers and chemo-/bio- sensors. The fluorescence quenching often leads to the increase in the Stern–Volmer constant (K{sub SV}~10{sup 7}–10{sup 10} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}) several orders of magnitude higher than the values observed for the normal photochemical quenching processes (~10{sup 2} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}). This amplified quenching has been termed as “super-quenching” or “hyper-quenching”. Energy transfer (ET) is established from the donor to the metal nanoparticles rationalizing these fast quenching processes. Considering the distance dependence of the ET process, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) are ascribed to take place. These sensitive distance dependent phenomena serve as the spectroscopic ruler to measure the intra- or intermolecular distances between the interacting partners. In this account focus has been laid on the size dependent energy transfer and super- and hyper- quenching of the fluorescence of the donor moieties by the nanometals and their probable applications in sensing. Rationalization has been made for the nanoparticle induced huge enhancement in the quenching efficiency. The impact of this review lies in the possible application of these amplified quenching processes in designing high sensitive chemical and biological sensors. - Highlights: • Super efficient quenching of fluorescence of probes by gold and silver nanoparticles is highlighted. • The amplified fluorescence quenching of dyes and polymers is rationalized. • Energy transfer is assigned to be responsible for the efficient quenching process. • Amplified quenching has its potential use in designing sensitive chemical/biological sensors.

  13. Gold and silver nanoparticles based superquenching of fluorescence: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The short review highlights the recent advances on the gold and silver nanoparticles induced efficient quenching of fluorescence from various fluorophores looking at their promising use as optical rulers and chemo-/bio- sensors. The fluorescence quenching often leads to the increase in the Stern–Volmer constant (K SV ~10 7 –10 10 mol −1 dm 3 ) several orders of magnitude higher than the values observed for the normal photochemical quenching processes (~10 2 mol −1 dm 3 ). This amplified quenching has been termed as “super-quenching” or “hyper-quenching”. Energy transfer (ET) is established from the donor to the metal nanoparticles rationalizing these fast quenching processes. Considering the distance dependence of the ET process, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) are ascribed to take place. These sensitive distance dependent phenomena serve as the spectroscopic ruler to measure the intra- or intermolecular distances between the interacting partners. In this account focus has been laid on the size dependent energy transfer and super- and hyper- quenching of the fluorescence of the donor moieties by the nanometals and their probable applications in sensing. Rationalization has been made for the nanoparticle induced huge enhancement in the quenching efficiency. The impact of this review lies in the possible application of these amplified quenching processes in designing high sensitive chemical and biological sensors. - Highlights: • Super efficient quenching of fluorescence of probes by gold and silver nanoparticles is highlighted. • The amplified fluorescence quenching of dyes and polymers is rationalized. • Energy transfer is assigned to be responsible for the efficient quenching process. • Amplified quenching has its potential use in designing sensitive chemical/biological sensors

  14. Spectroscopic diagnostics and measurements at Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannella, R.

    1994-01-01

    A concise review is presented of activity in the field spectroscopic diagnostic at JET during the latest few years. Together with a description of instruments, examples are given of the measurements conducted with these systems and some experimental result obtained with such activity are outlined. Emphasis is also given to the upgrading of existing apparatuses and the construction of new diagnostics ahead of the next experimental phase. 48 refs., 5 figs

  15. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  16. Spectroscopic studies of the transplutonium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnall, W.T.; Conway, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The challenging opportunity to develop insights into both atomic structure and the effects of bonding in compounds makes the study of actinide spectroscopy a particularly fruitful and exciting area of scientific endeavor. It is also the interpretation of f-element spectra that has stimulated the development of the most sophisticated theoretical modeling attempted for any elements in the periodic table. The unique nature of the spectra and the wealth of fine detail revealed make possible sensitive tests of both physical models and the results of Hartree-Fock type ab initio calculations. This paper focuses on the unique character of heavy actinide spectroscopy. It discusses how it differs from that of the lighter member of the series and what are the special properties that are manifested. Following the introduction, the paper covers the following: (1) the role of systematic studies and the relationships of heavy-actinide spectroscopy to ongoing spectroscopic investigations of the lighter members of the series; (2) atomic (free-ion) spectra which covers the present status of spectroscopic studies with transplutonium elements, and future needs and directions in atomic spectroscopy; (3) the spectra of actinide compounds which covers the present status and future directions of spectroscopic studies with compounds of the transplutonium elements; and other spectroscopies. 1 figure, 2 tables

  17. Spectroscopic methods for characterization of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have contributed immensely in the characterisation and speciation of materials relevant to a variety of applications. These techniques have time tested credentials and continue to expand into newer areas. In the field of nuclear fuel fabrication, atomic spectroscopic methods are used for monitoring the trace metallic constituents in the starting materials and end product, and for monitoring process pick up. The current status of atomic spectroscopic methods for the determination of trace metallic constituents in nuclear fuel materials will be briefly reviewed and new approaches will be described with a special emphasis on inductively coupled plasma techniques and ETV-ICP-AES hyphenated techniques. Special emphasis will also be given in highlighting the importance of chemical separation procedures for the optimum utilization of potential of ICP. The presentation will also include newer techniques like Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging. PAS results on uranium and plutonium oxides will be described with a reference to the determination of U 4+ /U 6+ concentration in U 3 O 8 . EPR imaging techniques for speciation and their spatial distribution in solids will be described and its potential use for Gd 3+ containing UO 2 pellets (used for flux flattening) will be highlighted. (author)

  18. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaki, Hanie; Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Reza Saberi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA–ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: ► We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. ► Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. ► We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. ► The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. ► The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  19. Interaction between ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with human serum albumin as binary and ternary systems by multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaki, Hanie, E-mail: hanieh.mahaki@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Memarpoor-Yazdi, Mina; Chamani, Jamshidkhan [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reza Saberi, Mohammad [Medical Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to describe the competition of ropinirole hydrochloride (RP) and aspirin (ASA) in binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in physiological buffer (pH=7.4) using multi-spectroscopic, molecular modeling and zeta-potential measurements. Fluorescence analysis was used to define the binding and quenching properties of drug-HSA complexes in binary and ternary systems. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that in the presence of RP, the binding constant of HSA-ASA was increased. Static quenching was confirmed to result in the fluorescence quenching and FRET. The effect of drugs on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD). The RLS method determined the critical aggregation concentration of drugs on HSA in binary and ternary systems that confirmed the zeta potential results. Structural modeling showed that the affinity of each of the drugs to HSA in binary and ternary systems confirms the spectroscopic results. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the interaction of ropinirole hydrochloride and aspirin with HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular modeling and zeta-potential used to describe competitive interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the critical induced aggregation concentration of both drugs on HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding mechanism of drugs as separate and simultaneous to HSA has been compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding site of both drugs as simultaneous effects on HSA has been determined.

  20. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  1. Precision scan-imaging for paperboard quality inspection utilizing X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Fröjdh, C.; Nordin, T.

    2018-01-01

    Paperboard is typically made up of a core of cellulose fibers [C6H10O5] and a coating layer of [CaCO3]. The uniformity of these layers is a critical parameter for the printing quality. Current quality control methods include chemistry based visual inspection methods as well as X-ray based methods to measure the coating thickness. In this work we combine the X-ray fluorescence signals from the Ca atoms (3.7 keV) in the coating and from a Cu target (8.0 keV) placed behind the paper to simultaneously measure both the coating and the fibers. Cu was selected as the target material since its fluorescence signal is well separated from the Ca signal while its fluorescence's still are absorbed sufficiently in the paper. A laboratory scale setup is built using stepper motors, a silicon drift detector based spectrometer and a collimated X-ray beam. The spectroscopic image is retrieved by scanning the paperboard surface and registering the fluorescence signals from Ca and Cu. The exposure time for this type of setups can be significantly improved by implementing spectroscopic imaging sensors. The material contents in the layers can then be retrieved from the absolute and relative intensities of these two signals.

  2. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of conformational changes of proteins by synthesized pyrimidine derivative and its sensitivity towards FRET application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swadesh; Singharoy, Dipti; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2018-04-01

    Interest in synthesizing and characterizing (IR, NMR and HRMS spectroscopic methods) a pyrimidine based Schiff-base ligand, 2-(2-(Anthracen-9-ylmethylene) hydrazinyl)-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine (ANHP) has been developed for its application to ascertain the conformational change of protein and sensitivity towards fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Location of ANHP in bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) proteins environment has been determined using different spectroscopic techniques. Weakly fluorescent ANHP have shown greater protein induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) in case of HSA than BSA, though in both cases energy transfer efficiency are almost same but difference in binding constant values encourages us to find the location of ANHP within the complex protein environment. From the FRET parameter and α-helicity change, it has been found that ANHP bound with Trp-214 of HSA and surface Trp-134 of BSA. Conformational changes of proteins have been observed more for HSA than BSA in presence of ANHP, which has confirmed the location of ANHP in both the protein environments. Coupled with experimental studies, molecular docking analysis has also been done to explain the locations and distance dependent FRET process of ANHP in both proteins.

  3. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of Bacillus subtilis α-amylase with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidyan, R.; Kazemi, S.H.; Bordbar, A.K.; Zaynalpour, S.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been investigated at various temperature conditions using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of α-amylase by CTAB is the result of complex formation between CTAB and α-amylase. The thermodynamic analysis on the binding interaction data shows that the interactions are strongly exothermic (ΔH o =-17.92 kJ mol -1 ) accompanied with increase in entropy (ΔS o between 109 to 135 J mol -1 K -1 ). Thus the binding of CTAB to α-amylase is both enthalpic and entropic driven, which represent the predominate role of both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in complex formation process. The values of 2.17x10 -3 M -1 and 1.30 have been obtained from associative binding constant (K a ) and stoichiometry of binding number (n), from analysis of fluorescence data, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed the substantial conformational changes in secondary structure of α-amylase due to binding of CTAB, which represents the complete destruction of both secondary and tertiary structure of α-amylase by CTAB. - Research highlights: → The Fluorescence quenching effect of α-amylase by CTAB is a consequence of formation α-amylase-CTAB complex. → The α-helical analyzing from the CD spectra in the various concentration of CTAB shows strongly deformation of α-amylase. → Thermodynamic analysis of quenching verify that the interactions are both enthalpy and entropic driven.

  4. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of Bacillus subtilis {alpha}-amylase with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omidyan, R., E-mail: r.omidyan@sci.ui.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, S.H. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, A.K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zaynalpour, S. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The interaction between {alpha}-amylase from Bacillus subtilis and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been investigated at various temperature conditions using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of {alpha}-amylase by CTAB is the result of complex formation between CTAB and {alpha}-amylase. The thermodynamic analysis on the binding interaction data shows that the interactions are strongly exothermic ({Delta}H{sup o}=-17.92 kJ mol{sup -1}) accompanied with increase in entropy ({Delta}S{sup o} between 109 to 135 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}). Thus the binding of CTAB to {alpha}-amylase is both enthalpic and entropic driven, which represent the predominate role of both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in complex formation process. The values of 2.17x10{sup -3} M{sup -1} and 1.30 have been obtained from associative binding constant (K{sub a}) and stoichiometry of binding number (n), from analysis of fluorescence data, respectively. Circular dichroism spectra showed the substantial conformational changes in secondary structure of {alpha}-amylase due to binding of CTAB, which represents the complete destruction of both secondary and tertiary structure of {alpha}-amylase by CTAB. - Research highlights: {yields} The Fluorescence quenching effect of {alpha}-amylase by CTAB is a consequence of formation {alpha}-amylase-CTAB complex. {yields} The {alpha}-helical analyzing from the CD spectra in the various concentration of CTAB shows strongly deformation of {alpha}-amylase. {yields} Thermodynamic analysis of quenching verify that the interactions are both enthalpy and entropic driven.

  5. Optical spectroscopic methods for probing the conformational stability of immobilised enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Ashok; Moore, Barry D; Kelly, Sharon M; Price, Nicholas C; Rolinski, Olaf J; Birch, David J S; Dunkin, Ian R; Halling, Peter J

    2009-07-13

    We report the development of biophysical techniques based on circular dichroism (CD), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence to investigate in situ the structure of enzymes immobilised on solid particles. Their applicability is demonstrated using subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) immobilised on silica gel and Candida antartica lipase B immobilised on Lewatit VP.OC 1600 (Novozyme 435). SC shows nearly identical secondary structure in solution and in the immobilised state as evident from far UV CD spectra and amide I vibration bands. Increased near UV CD intensity and reduced Trp fluorescence suggest a more rigid tertiary structure on the silica surface. After immobilised SC is inactivated, these techniques reveal: a) almost complete loss of near UV CD signal, suggesting loss of tertiary structure; b) a shift in the amide I vibrational band from 1658 cm(-1) to 1632 cm(-1), indicating a shift from alpha-helical structure to beta-sheet; c) a substantial blue shift and reduced dichroism in the far UV CD, supporting a shift to beta-sheet structure; d) strong increase in Trp fluorescence intensity, which reflects reduced intramolecular quenching with loss of tertiary structure; and e) major change in fluorescence lifetime distribution, confirming a substantial change in Trp environment. DRIFT measurements suggest that pressing KBr discs may perturb protein structure. With the enzyme on organic polymer it was possible to obtain near UV CD spectra free of interference by the carrier material. However, far UV CD, DRIFT and fluorescence measurements showed strong signals from the organic support. In conclusion, the spectroscopic methods described here provide structural information hitherto inaccessible, with their applicability limited by interference from, rather than the particulate nature of, the support material.

  6. Fluorescence quenching of fluorescein by Merocyanine 540 in liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprak, Mahmut; Meryem Aydin, Burcu; Arik, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of fluorescein (FL) by merociyanine 540 (MC540) was examined in L-egg lecithin phosphatidycholine (PC) liposomes using spectroscopic methods. The type of quenching mechanism (dynamic or static) was evaluated using the Stern-Volmer plots. Findings were also supported by the temperature studies and florescence decay measurements. The Stern-Volmer equation was utilized to calculate bimolecular quenching constants (K q ). Furthermore, the bimolecular quenching constant of the quencher in the liposomes (K SV ), partition coefficient (K p ), binding constant (K), and corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG were calculated. The quenching property was also used in determining quantitatively (K p ) the partition coefficient of Merociyanini 540 in PC liposome.The obtained data indicated that static quenching occurred in the system and the K SV values decreased with increasing lipid concentration. In addition, thermodynamic analysis suggested that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding were the main acting forces between fluorescein and merociyanine 540 molecules in the medium. - Highlights: → Fluorescence quenching of FL by MC540 in liposome system was analyzed. → Fluorescence quenching mechanism of FL by MC540 was consistent with the static model. → Binding FL to MC540 was spontaneous and carried out by hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces.

  7. The total antioxidant capacity and fluorescence imaging of selected plant leaves commonly consumed in Brunei Darussalam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watu, Aswani; Metussin, Nurzaidah; Yasin, Hartini M.; Usman, Anwar

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the total antioxidant capacity and fluorescence imaging of several selected plants, namely Centella asiatica, Aidia borneensis and Anacardium occidentale, which are grown and traditionally consumed in Brunei Darussalam. The total antioxidant capacities of aqueous-methanolic infusions of their leaves were measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, and microscopic fluorescence images were measured to identify the fluorescent substances bound in the leaves. We found that the total antioxidant capacity of their infusions is estimated to be 150, 25, 15 folds, respectively, lower compared with that of the standard gallic acid. Accordingly, we demonstrated that the relative antioxidant activity of young and matured leaves agrees with the intensity of red light emission of their fresh leaves upon UV excitation. Thus, this non-invasive spectroscopic method can be potentially utilized to indicate the antioxidants in plant leaves qualitatively.

  8. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  9. Time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy for study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Deng, Leimin; Fan, Lisha; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yao; Shen, Xiaokang; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-10-30

    Identification of chemical intermediates and study of chemical reaction pathways and mechanisms in laser-induced plasmas are important for laser-ablated applications. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as a promising spectroscopic technique, is efficient for elemental analyses but can only provide limited information about chemical products in laser-induced plasmas. In this work, time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy was studied as a promising tool for the study of chemical reactions in laser-induced plasmas. Resonance fluorescence excitation of diatomic aluminum monoxide (AlO) and triatomic dialuminum monoxide (Al 2 O) was used to identify these chemical intermediates. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of AlO and Al 2 O were used to observe the temporal evolution in laser-induced Al plasmas and to study their formation in the Al-O 2 chemistry in air.

  10. A library for X-ray-matter interaction cross sections for X-ray fluorescence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, A. [Istituto di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy)]. E-mail: brunetti@uniss.it; Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Golosio, B. [INFN, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Simionovici, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Sciences de la Terre, Ecole Normale Superieure, Lyon, F-69364 (France); Somogyi, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2004-10-08

    Quantitative estimate of elemental composition by spectroscopic and imaging techniques using X-ray fluorescence requires the availability of accurate data of X-ray interaction with matter. Although a wide number of computer codes and data sets are reported in literature, none of them is presented in the form of freely available library functions which can be easily included in software applications for X-ray fluorescence. This work presents a compilation of data sets from different published works and an xraylib interface in the form of callable functions. Although the target applications are on X-ray fluorescence, cross sections of interactions like photoionization, coherent scattering and Compton scattering, as well as form factors and anomalous scattering functions, are also available.

  11. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV- Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV-Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV

  12. Effective binding of perhalogenated closo-borates to serum albumins revealed by spectroscopic and ITC studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Marina V.; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu.; Bykov, Alexander Yu.; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M.; Zhizhin, Konstantin Yu.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay T.; Varzatskii, Oleg A.; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Kovalska, Vladyslava B.

    2017-08-01

    The interactions of boron cluster compounds closo-borates with biomolecules are widely studied due to their efficiency as agents for boron neutron capture therapy of cancer. In present work the binding abilities of anionic halogen closo-borates [B10Hal10]2- (Hal = Cl, Br, I) and [B12Hal12]2- (Hal = Cl, I) towards bovine and human serum albumins were investigated by spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods. The protein fluorescence quenching method and ITC studies confirmed the complex formation. The degree of protein fluorescence quenching increased from chlorine to iodine boron derivatives that is attributed to external heavy atom effect. The ITC data point on the existence in the protein structure of two types of binding sites: with higher and lower affinity to closo-borates. Albumin-closo-borate complex binding ratio, n (4-5 anions per protein molecule) is higher than for the parent hydrogen closo-borates (2 anions per protein molecule). Binding constants estimated by fluorescent and ITC methods indicate higher affinity of halogen closo-borates to albumins (K in the range of 104-106 M-1) comparing to that of the hydrogen closo-borate (K about 103 M-1). Due to their high affinity and high binding ratio to albumins halogen closo-borates are proposed for further studies as agents for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Optical spectroscopic analysis for the discrimination of extra-virgin olive-oil (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, Naomi; Auñón Garcia, Juan M.; Guengerich, Zoe; Smith, Terry K.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2017-02-01

    We present an optical spectroscopic technique, making use of both Raman signals and fluorescence spectroscopy, for the identification of five brands of commercially available extra-virgin olive-oil (EVOO). We demonstrate our technique on both a `bulk-optics' free-space system and a compact device. Using the compact device, which is capable of recording both Raman and fluorescence signals, we achieved an average sensitivity and specificity of 98.4% and 99.6% for discrimination, respectively. Our approach demonstrates that both Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for portable discrimination of EVOOs which obviates the need to use centralised laboratories and opens up the prospect of in-field testing. This technique may enable detection of EVOO that has undergone counterfeiting or adulteration. One of the main challenges facing Raman spectroscopy for use in quality control of EVOOs is that the oxidation of EVOO, which naturally occurs due to aging, causes shifts in Raman spectra with time, which implies regular retraining would be necessary. We present a potential method of analysis to minimize the effect that aging has on discrimination efficiency; we show that by discarding the first principal component, which contains information on the variations due to oxidation, we can improve discrimination efficiency thus improving the robustness of our technique.

  14. Molecular interaction of PCB153 to human serum albumin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chao; Fang, Senbiao; Cao, Huiming; Lu, Yan; Ma, Yaqiong [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wei, Dongfeng [Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100700 (China); Xie, Xiaoyun [College of Earth and Environmental Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Xiaohua [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Xin [College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China); Fei, Dongqing [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao, Chunyan, E-mail: zhaochy07@lzu.edu.cn [School of Pharmacy, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We identify the binding mode of PCB153 to human serum albumin (HSA). ► Spectroscopic and molecular modeling results reveal that PCB153 binds at the site II. ► The interaction is mainly governed by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond forces. ► The work helps to probe transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs. -- Abstract: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) possessed much potential hazard to environment because of its chemical stability and biological toxicity. Here, we identified the binding mode of a representative compound, PCB153, to human serum albumin (HSA) using fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence study showed that the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was quenched by addition of PCB153 through a static quenching mechanism. The thermodynamic analysis proved the binding behavior was mainly governed by hydrophobic force. Furthermore, as evidenced by site marker displacement experiments using two probe compounds, it revealed that PCB153 acted exactly on subdomain IIIA (site II) of HSA. On the other hand, the molecular dynamics studies as well as free energy calculations made another important contribution to understand the conformational changes of HSA and the stability of HSA-PCB153 system. Molecular docking revealed PCB153 can bind in a large hydrophobic activity of subdomain IIIA by the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond interactions between chlorine atoms and residue ASN391. The present work provided reasonable models helping us further understand the transporting, distribution and toxicity effect of PCBs when it spread into human blood serum.

  15. Substituent and solvent effects on spectroscopic properties of 2-amino-1,3-dicyano-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Józefowicz, M.; Bajorek, A.; Pietrzak, M.; Heldt, J.R.; Heldt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the photophysical properties of six, newly synthesized donor-substituted 2-amino-1,3-dicyano-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalene fluorophores. The steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic experiments have been used to investigate the substituent and solvent effects on the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) emission. We demonstrate that the spectroscopic characteristics (fluorescence quantum yields, fluorescence decay times, radiative rate constants, and ground and excited state dipole moments) of the studied D–A dyes, as well as the reorganization energies characterizing the solute–solvent interactions and intramolecular torsion motions greatly depend on different substituents and microenvironment. On the basis of the experimental results and our previous quantum-chemical calculations, it was shown that two emitting charge transfer states: non-relaxed (ICT) NR and relaxed (ICT) R exist in six biphenyl derivatives dissolved in polar solvents (e.g., THF), whereas in non-polar medium (MCH) the existence of two emissive states have been attributed to non-relaxed and relaxed, locally excited state ((LE) NR , (LE) R ). - Highlights: • Spectroscopic properties greatly depend on different substituents and microenvironment. • Investigated dyes form a typically spectrally inhomogeneous system. • Two emitting charge transfer states (ICT) NR and (ICT) R exist in polar solvents. • In non-polar medium locally excited fluorescence is possible from (LE) NR and (LE) R states

  16. A 10-A spectroscopic ruler applied to short polyprolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Roccatano, Danilo; Hennig, Andreas; Nau, Werner M

    2007-08-08

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp) as donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as acceptor in peptides of the general structure Trp-(Pro)n-Dbo-NH2 (n = 1-6) was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, CD, and NMR spectroscopy as well as by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (GROMOS96 force field). The Trp/Dbo FRET pair is characterized by a very short Förster radius (R0 ca. 9 A), which allowed distance determinations in such short peptides. Water and propylene glycol were investigated as solvents. The peptides were designed to show an early nucleation of the poly(Pro)II (PPII) secondary helix structure for n > or = 2, which was confirmed by their CD spectra. The shortest peptide (n = 1) adopts preferentially the trans conformation about the Trp-Pro bond, as confirmed by NMR spectra. The FRET efficiencies ranged 2-72% and were found to depend sensitively on the peptide length, i.e., the number of intervening proline residues. The analysis of the FRET data at different levels of theory (assuming either a fixed distance or distance distributions according to a wormlike chain or Gaussian model) afforded donor-acceptor distances between ca. 8 A (n = 1) and ca. 16 A (n = 6) in water, which were found to be similar or slightly higher in propylene glycol. The distances afforded by the Trp/Dbo FRET pair were found to be reasonable in comparison to literature data, expectations from the PPII helix structure, and the results from MD simulations. The persistence lengths for the longer peptides were found to lie at 30-70 A in water and 220 +/- 40 A in propylene glycol, suggesting a more rigid PPII helical structure in propylene glycol. A detailed comparison with literature data on FRET in polyprolines demonstrates that the donor-acceptor distances extracted by FRET are correlated with the Förster radii of the employed FRET pairs. This demonstrates the limitations of using FRET

  17. Multiple spectroscopic studies of the structural conformational changes of human serum albumin—Essential oil based nanoemulsions conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Sugumar, Saranya; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Nanoemulsions have numerous biomedical applications. For the first time, we have investigated the effects of orange and eucalyptus essential oil based nanoemulsions towards the structural aspect of human serum albumin (HSA). Quenching effect of nanoemulsion against the intrinsic fluorescence potential of tryptophan and tyrosine residues were evidenced from the fluorescence spectroscopic analysis. Static quenching mechanism was found to lead the binding of HSA–nanoemulsion systems. Synchronous and three dimensional spectroscopic studies have revealed the possible changes to the aromatic environment of HSA by the nanoemulsion. UV–Visible spectroscopic studies have confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation between HSA and the surface of nanoemulsions by exhibiting the hyper-chromic effect in a concentration dependant manner. FTIR spectroscopy revealed the slight alteration in the Amide I, II and III bands of HSA after interaction. FT-Raman spectroscopy showed the decrease in the Raman intensity of the aromatic amino acid residues and shift in the amide bands of HSA upon binding with the nanoemulsion. Dichoric band obtained from the far UV-CD spectra at 208 and 222 nm of HSA showed the corresponding decrease in the alpha-helical contents upon interaction with nanoemulsions. Near UV-CD spectra also showed the prominent changes in the aromatic positions of the amino acid residues of HSA on binding with nanoemulsions. The above study has extrapolated the side effect analysis of the nanoemulsions in pharmaceutical applications in vitro in reference to their interaction with serum proteins. - Highlights: • Orange and eucalyptus oil based nanoemulsions were formulated and characterized. • UV–Visible spectroscopy confirmed the ground state complex formation. • Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed the molecular conformational changes. • FTIR spectroscopy deep-rooted the alteration in the amide bands of HSA. • FT-Raman spectroscopy established

  18. Multi-spectroscopic studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with astilbin: Binding characteristics and structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Shuang; Peng, Xialian; Yu, Qing [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Bian, Hedong, E-mail: gxnuchem312@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Huang, Fuping [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Liang, Hong, E-mail: lianghongby@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Five spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the interaction of astilbin (ASN) with human serum albumin (HSA). UV–vis absorption measurements prove that ASN–HSA complex can be formed. The analysis of fluorescence spectra reveal that in the presence of ASN, quenching mechanism of HSA is considered as static quenching. The quenching rate constant k{sub q}, K{sub SV} and the binding constant K were estimated. According to the van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔΗ) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be −12.94 kJ mol{sup −1} and 35.92 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. These indicate that the hydrophobic interaction is the major forces between ASN and HSA, but the hydrogen bond interaction cannot be excluded. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA which was induced by ASN were determined by circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. -- Graphical abstract: In this paper, the interaction of HSA with ASN was systematically studied under simulated physiological conditions by using UV–vis absorption, CD, FT-IR, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic approaches. The quenching constant k{sub q}, K{sub SV} and the binding constant K were estimated. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA were studied by Circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The UV–visible absorption spectra of HSA in the absence and presence of different concentration of ASN (1) and fluorescence spectra of HSA in the absence and the presence of ASN (2). Highlights: ► Interaction of ASN and HSA has been studied by five spectroscopic techniques. ► Hydrophobic interaction is the major forces between ASN and HSA. ► Binding of ASN induced the changes in the secondary structure of HSA.

  19. Multiple spectroscopic studies of the structural conformational changes of human serum albumin—Essential oil based nanoemulsions conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Sugumar, Saranya; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan, E-mail: nchandra40@hotmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Nanoemulsions have numerous biomedical applications. For the first time, we have investigated the effects of orange and eucalyptus essential oil based nanoemulsions towards the structural aspect of human serum albumin (HSA). Quenching effect of nanoemulsion against the intrinsic fluorescence potential of tryptophan and tyrosine residues were evidenced from the fluorescence spectroscopic analysis. Static quenching mechanism was found to lead the binding of HSA–nanoemulsion systems. Synchronous and three dimensional spectroscopic studies have revealed the possible changes to the aromatic environment of HSA by the nanoemulsion. UV–Visible spectroscopic studies have confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation between HSA and the surface of nanoemulsions by exhibiting the hyper-chromic effect in a concentration dependant manner. FTIR spectroscopy revealed the slight alteration in the Amide I, II and III bands of HSA after interaction. FT-Raman spectroscopy showed the decrease in the Raman intensity of the aromatic amino acid residues and shift in the amide bands of HSA upon binding with the nanoemulsion. Dichoric band obtained from the far UV-CD spectra at 208 and 222 nm of HSA showed the corresponding decrease in the alpha-helical contents upon interaction with nanoemulsions. Near UV-CD spectra also showed the prominent changes in the aromatic positions of the amino acid residues of HSA on binding with nanoemulsions. The above study has extrapolated the side effect analysis of the nanoemulsions in pharmaceutical applications in vitro in reference to their interaction with serum proteins. - Highlights: • Orange and eucalyptus oil based nanoemulsions were formulated and characterized. • UV–Visible spectroscopy confirmed the ground state complex formation. • Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed the molecular conformational changes. • FTIR spectroscopy deep-rooted the alteration in the amide bands of HSA. • FT-Raman spectroscopy established

  20. Fluorescing macerals from wood precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S A; Bensley, D F

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the origin of wood-derived macerals has established the existence of autofluorescent maceral precursors in the secondary xylem of swamp-inhabiting plant species. The optical character and fluorescent properties of microtomed thin-sections of modern woods from the Florida Everglades and Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia are compared to the character and properties of their peatified equivalents from various Everglades and Okefenokee peat horizons and their lignitic equivalents from the Brandon lignite of Vermont and the Trail Ridge lignitic peat from northern Florida. The inherent fluorescence of woody cell walls is believed to be caused by lignin though other cell wall components may contribute. The fluorescence spectra for several wood and cell types had a ..gamma../sub m//sub a//sub x/ of 452 nm and Q value of 0.00. The color as observed in blue light and the spectral geometry as measured in UV light of peatified and lignitic woody cell walls (potential textinites) may change progressively during early coalification. Cell wall-derived maceral material is shown to maintain its fluorescing properties after being converted to a structureless material, perhaps a corpohuminite or humodetrinite precursor. Fluorescing xylem cell contents, such as condensed tannins or essential oils, can maintain the fluorescent character through early coalification. Xylem cell walls and xylem cell contents are shown to provide fluorescing progenitor materials which would not require subsequent infusion with 'lipid' materials to account for their fluorescence as phytoclast material or as macerals in coal. 35 references.

  1. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  3. Fluorescent silica colloids for study and visualization of skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Swaminathan; Kievsky, Yaroslav; Sokolov, Igor

    2007-08-01

    The efficacy of skin care products depends on the time and dynamics of their absorbance by the skin, and its spatial distribution on the skin. Regular scrape-based methods may depend on the operator and are destructive and invasive in nature. Here, we describe a novel method based on non-contact optical measurements to trace the location and dynamics of skin care products on the skin. We use fluorescent silica colloidal particles of micron sizes at a rather small concentration as non-invasive tracers. As an example of skin care products, we use two base materials: either glycerin or vaseline. A mixture of each product with fluorescent particles is applied on human skin. The amount of fluorescence is monitored by means of a fluorescent spectrometer. The scraping method is used to compare with the spectroscopic measurements. Fluorescent tracers make the skin care product visible under UV light. This allows obtaining an optical image of the spatial distribution of the product on the skin. The quantitative data of fluorescence are well correlated with the scrape data. Comparison of the difference in the spectral and scraped mass data reveals the details of accumulation of the skin products in skin cracks and crevices. We described an efficient non-invasive benign method to quantify dynamics and to perform mapping of emollients and humectants on the skin.

  4. Evaluation of Fluorescent Analogs of Deoxycytidine for Monitoring DNA Transitions from Duplex to Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogini P. Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Topological variants of single-strand DNA (ssDNA structures, referred to as “functional DNA,” have been detected in regulatory regions of many genes and are thought to affect gene expression. Two fluorescent analogs of deoxycytidine, Pyrrolo-dC (PdC and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC∘, can be incorporated into DNA. Here, we describe spectroscopic studies of both analogs to determine fluorescent properties that report on structural transitions from double-strand DNA (dsDNA to ssDNA, a common pathway in the transition to functional DNA structures. We obtained fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes of the fluorophores in DNA. Our results show that PdC is advantageous in fluorescence lifetime studies because of a distinct ~2 ns change between paired and unpaired bases. However, tC∘ is a better probe for FDCD experiments that report on the helical structure of DNA surrounding the fluorophore. Both fluorophores provide complementary data to measure DNA structural transitions.

  5. Assessment of the unidentified organic matter fraction in fogwater using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsaraj, K.; Birdwell, J.

    2010-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fogwaters from southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to obtain a qualitative assessment of the large fraction of fogwater organic carbon (~40 - 80% by weight) that cannot be identified in terms of specific chemical compounds. The method has the principle advantage that it can be applied at natural abundance concentrations, thus eliminating the need for large sample volumes required to isolate DOM for characterization by other spectroscopic (NMR, FTIR) and chemical (elemental) analyses. It was anticipated that the fogwater organic matter fluorescence spectra would resemble those of surface and rain waters, containing peaks indicative of both humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices had values comparable to other natural waters. Biological character (intensity of tyrosine and tryptophan peaks) was found to increase with organic carbon concentration. Fogwater organic matter appears to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived material. The fluorescence results show that most of the unidentified fogwater organic carbon can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems.

  6. Direct fit of spectroscopic data of diatomic molecules by using genetic algorithms: II. The ground state of RbCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Marcos M; Prudente, Frederico V; Fellows, Carlos E; Marques, Jorge M C; Pereira, Francisco B

    2011-01-01

    We extend our previous methodology based on genetic algorithms (Marques et al 2008 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 085103) to carry out the challenging fit of the RbCs potential curve to spectroscopic data. Specifically, we have fitted an analytic functional form to line positions of the high-resolution Fourier transform spectrum of RbCs obtained by a laser-induced fluorescence technique. The results for the ground electronic state of RbCs show that the present method provides an efficient way to obtain diatomic potentials with great accuracy.

  7. Heterogeneous structure and solvation dynamics of DME/water binary mixtures: A combined spectroscopic and simulation investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Mahanta, Debasish; Rana, Debkumar; Patra, Animesh; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Mitra, Rajib Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Water is often found in (micro)-heterogeneous environments and therefore it is necessary to understand their H-bonded network structure in such altered environments. We explore the structure and dynamics of water in its binary mixture with relatively less polar small biocompatible amphiphilic molecule 1,2-Dimethoxyethane (DME) by a combined spectroscopic and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study. Picosecond (ps) resolved fluorescence spectroscopy using coumarin 500 as the fluorophore establishes a non-monotonic behaviour of the mixture. Simulation studies also explore the various possible H-bond formations between water and DME. The relative abundance of such different water species manifests the heterogeneity in the mixture.

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  9. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  10. Enhancing forensic science with spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Camilla; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2006-09-01

    This presentation outlines the research we are developing in the area of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging with the focus on materials of forensic interest. FTIR spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a powerful tool for characterisation of heterogeneous materials. FTIR imaging relies on the ability of the military-developed infrared array detector to simultaneously measure spectra from thousands of different locations in a sample. Recently developed application of FTIR imaging using an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflection) mode has demonstrated the ability of this method to achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit of infrared light in air. Chemical visualisation with enhanced spatial resolution in micro-ATR mode broadens the range of materials studied with FTIR imaging with applications to pharmaceutical formulations or biological samples. Macro-ATR imaging has also been developed for chemical imaging analysis of large surface area samples and was applied to analyse the surface of human skin (e.g. finger), counterfeit tablets, textile materials (clothing), etc. This approach demonstrated the ability of this imaging method to detect trace materials attached to the surface of the skin. This may also prove as a valuable tool in detection of traces of explosives left or trapped on the surfaces of different materials. This FTIR imaging method is substantially superior to many of the other imaging methods due to inherent chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy and fast acquisition times of this technique. Our preliminary data demonstrated that this methodology will provide the means to non-destructive detection method that could relate evidence to its source. This will be important in a wider crime prevention programme. In summary, intrinsic chemical specificity and enhanced visualising capability of FTIR spectroscopic imaging open a window of opportunities for counter-terrorism and crime-fighting, with applications ranging

  11. Are your Spectroscopic Data Being Used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Wilzewski, Jonas

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy is an established and indispensable tool in science, industry, agriculture, medicine, surveillance, etc.. The potential user of spectral data, which is not available in HITRAN or other databases, searches the spectroscopy publications. After finding the desired publication, the user very often encounters the following problems: 1) They cannot find the data described in the paper. There can be many reasons for this: nothing is provided in the paper itself or supplementary material; the authors are not responding to any requests; the web links provided in the paper have long been broken; etc. 2) The data is presented in a reduced form, for instance through the fitted spectroscopic constants. While this is a long-standing practice among spectroscopists, there are numerous serious problems with this practice, such as users getting different energy and intensity values because of different representations of the solution to the Hamiltonian, or even just despairing of trying to generate usable line lists from the published constants. Properly providing the data benefits not only users but also the authors of the spectroscopic research. We will show that this increases citations to the spectroscopy papers and visibility of the research groups. We will also address the quite common issue when researchers obtain the data, but do not feel that they have time, interest or resources to write an article describing it. There are modern tools that would allow one to make these data available to potential users and still get credit for it. However, this is a worst case scenario recommendation, i.e., publishing the data in a peer-reviewed journal is still the preferred way. L. S. Rothman, I. E. Gordon, et al. "The HITRAN 2012 molecular spectroscopic database," JQSRT 113, 4-50 (2013).

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, H. R. H.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Kendrick, J.; Scowen, I. J.

    2009-03-01

    Fluticasone propionate is a synthetic glucocorticoid with potent anti-inflammatory activity that has been used effectively in the treatment of chronic asthma. The present work reports a vibrational spectroscopic study of fluticasone propionate and gives proposed molecular assignments on the basis of ab initio calculations using BLYP density functional theory with a 6-31G* basis set and vibrational frequencies predicted within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Several spectral features and band intensities are explained. This study generated a library of information that can be employed to aid the process monitoring of fluticasone propionate.

  13. Nuclear data for geophysical spectroscopic logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, J.S.; Hertzog, R.C.; Soran, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear geochemical analysis requires the quantitative measurement of elemental concentrations of trace elements, as well as major elements in widely varying concentrations. This requirement places extreme demands on the quality of the spectroscopic measurements, data rates, and relating observed γ-ray intensities to the original elemental concentration. The relationship between γ-ray intensities and elemental concentration is critically dependent on the specific reaction cross sections and their uncertainties. The elements of highest priority for subsurface geochemical analysis are considered with respect to the importance of competing reactions and the neutron energy regions that are most significant. (author)

  14. Laser spectroscopic analysis in atmospheric pollution research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, PBC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info ForbesP_2008.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3174 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ForbesP_2008.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Laser spectroscopic... Department and a CSIR National Laser Centre rental pool programme grant-holder, is involved in research into a novel method of monitoring atmospheric PAHs. The rental pool programme gives South African tertiary education institutions access to an array...

  15. Automated reliability assessment for spectroscopic redshift measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, S.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Vibert, D.; Schmitt, A.; Surace, C.; Copin, Y.; Garilli, B.; Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Future large-scale surveys, such as the ESA Euclid mission, will produce a large set of galaxy redshifts (≥106) that will require fully automated data-processing pipelines to analyze the data, extract crucial information and ensure that all requirements are met. A fundamental element in these pipelines is to associate to each galaxy redshift measurement a quality, or reliability, estimate. Aim. In this work, we introduce a new approach to automate the spectroscopic redshift reliability assessment based on machine learning (ML) and characteristics of the redshift probability density function. Methods: We propose to rephrase the spectroscopic redshift estimation into a Bayesian framework, in order to incorporate all sources of information and uncertainties related to the redshift estimation process and produce a redshift posterior probability density function (PDF). To automate the assessment of a reliability flag, we exploit key features in the redshift posterior PDF and machine learning algorithms. Results: As a working example, public data from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey is exploited to present and test this new methodology. We first tried to reproduce the existing reliability flags using supervised classification in order to describe different types of redshift PDFs, but due to the subjective definition of these flags (classification accuracy 58%), we soon opted for a new homogeneous partitioning of the data into distinct clusters via unsupervised classification. After assessing the accuracy of the new clusters via resubstitution and test predictions (classification accuracy 98%), we projected unlabeled data from preliminary mock simulations for the Euclid space mission into this mapping to predict their redshift reliability labels. Conclusions: Through the development of a methodology in which a system can build its own experience to assess the quality of a parameter, we are able to set a preliminary basis of an automated reliability assessment for

  16. Optical properties of metals by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, E.T.; Inagaki, T.; Williams, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    The use of spectroscopic ellipsometry for the accurate determination of the optical properties of liquid and solid metals is discussed and illustrated with previously published data for Li and Na. New data on liquid Sn and Hg from 0.6 to 3.7 eV are presented. Liquid Sn is Drude-like. The optical properties of Hg deviate from the Drude expressions, but simultaneous measurements of reflectance and ellipsometric parameters yield consistent results with no evidence for vectorial surface effects

  17. Emission spectroscopic 15N analysis 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, G.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art of emission spectroscopic 15 N analysis is demonstrated taking the NOI-6e 15 N analyzer as an example. The analyzer is equipped with a microcomputer to ensure a high operational comfort, computer control, and both data acquisition and data processing. In small amounts of nitrogen-containing substances (10 to 50 μg N 2 ) the 15 N abundance can be very quickly determined in standard discharge tubes or in aqueous ammonium salt solutions with a standard deviation less than 0.6 percent

  18. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  19. Effect of F- ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped TeO2-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guonian; Dai Shixun; Zhang Junjie; Xu Shiqing; Hu Lili; Jiang Zhonghong

    2005-01-01

    The effects of F - ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of the Yb 3+ in tellurite glass system are investigated. The results show that the glass system takes on good thermal stability with the content of ZnF 2 lower than 15 mol%, both the emission cross-section and the fluorescence lifetime of Yb 3+ ions increase evidently which indicate that such oxyfluoride tellurite glass system is a promising laser host matrix for high power generation. FT-IR spectra were used to analyze the effect of F- ions on the structure of tellurite glasses and OH - groups in this glass system. Analysis demonstrates that addition of fluoride decreases the symmetry of the structure of tellurite glasses which increases the emission cross-section and removes the OH - groups, and which improves the measured fluorescence lifetime of Yb 3+ ions

  20. Fluorescence molecular tomography in the presence of background fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubret, Antoine; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography is an emerging imaging technique that resolves the bio-distribution of engineered fluorescent probes developed for in vivo reporting of specific cellular and sub-cellular targets. The method can detect fluorochromes in picomole amounts or less, imaged through entire animals, but the detection sensitivity and imaging performance drop in the presence of background, non-specific fluorescence. In this study, we carried out a theoretical and an experimental investigation on the effect of background fluorescence on the measured signal and on the tomographic reconstruction. We further examined the performance of three subtraction methods based on physical models of photon propagation, using experimental data on phantoms and small animals. We show that the data pre-processing with subtraction schemes can improve image quality and quantification when non-specific background florescence is present

  1. Use of Spectroscopic, Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamic Techniques to Study the Interaction between Human Holo-Transferrin and Two Antagonist Drugs: Comparison of Binary and Ternary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saberi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the binding of ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP and aspirin (ASA to human holo-transferrin (hTf has been investigated by spectroscopic approaches (fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, resonance light scattering, as well as zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques, under simulated physiological conditions. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of the ROP and ASA drugs on the fluorescence of hTf as well as to define the binding and quenching properties of binary and ternary complexes. The synchronized fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated some micro-environmental and conformational changes around the Trp and Tyr residues with a faint red shift. Thermodynamic analysis displayed the van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions are the major acting forces in stabilizing the complexes. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of complexes are static mechanism. The effect of the drugs aggregating on the hTf resulted in an enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS intensity. The average binding distance between were computed according to the forster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The circular dichroism (CD spectral examinations indicated that the binding of the drugs induced a conformational change of hTf. Measurements of the zeta potential indicated that the combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between ROP, ASA and hTf formed micelle-like clusters. The molecular modeling confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of hTf with ROP and ASA to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  2. Development of laser atomic spectroscopic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Ohr, Young Gie; Cha, Hyung Ki

    1990-06-01

    Some preliminary results on the resonant ionization spectroscopy for Na and Pb atoms are presents both in theory and in experiment. A single color multiphoton ionization process is theoretically analysed in detail, for the resonant and non-resonant cases, and several parameters determining the overall ionization rate are summarized. In particular, the AC stark shift, the line width and the non-linear coefficient of ionization rate are recalculated using the perturbation theory in resolvent approach. On the other hand, the fundamental equipments for spectroscopic experiments have been designed and manufactured, which include a Nd:YAG laser, a GIM-type dye laser, a vacuum system ionization cells, a heat pipe oven, and an ion current measuring system. The characteristics of the above equipments have also been examined. Using the spectroscopic data available, several ionization schemes are considered and the relative merits for ionization have been discussed. Moreover, the effects due to the buffer gas pressure, laser intensity, vapor density and electrode voltage have been investigated in detail. The experiments will be extended to multi-color processes with several resonances, and the ultimate goal is to develop a ultrasensitive analytical method for pollutive heavy metal atoms using the resonant ionization spectroscopy. (author)

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging: The Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging seemingly matured as a technology in the mid-2000s, with commercially successful instrumentation and reports in numerous applications. Recent developments, however, have transformed our understanding of the recorded data, provided capability for new instrumentation, and greatly enhanced the ability to extract more useful information in less time. These developments are summarized here in three broad areas— data recording, interpretation of recorded data, and information extraction—and their critical review is employed to project emerging trends. Overall, the convergence of selected components from hardware, theory, algorithms, and applications is one trend. Instead of similar, general-purpose instrumentation, another trend is likely to be diverse and application-targeted designs of instrumentation driven by emerging component technologies. The recent renaissance in both fundamental science and instrumentation will likely spur investigations at the confluence of conventional spectroscopic analyses and optical physics for improved data interpretation. While chemometrics has dominated data processing, a trend will likely lie in the development of signal processing algorithms to optimally extract spectral and spatial information prior to conventional chemometric analyses. Finally, the sum of these recent advances is likely to provide unprecedented capability in measurement and scientific insight, which will present new opportunities for the applied spectroscopist. PMID:23031693

  4. EPSILON AURIGAE: AN IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, Robert P.; Torres, Guillermo; Lovegrove, Justin; Latham, David W.; Zajac, Joseph; Pera, Vivian E.; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-01-01

    A rare eclipse of the mysterious object ε Aurigae will occur in 2009-2011. We report an updated single-lined spectroscopic solution for the orbit of the primary star based on 20 years of monitoring at the CfA, combined with historical velocity observations dating back to 1897. There are 518 new CfA observations obtained between 1989 and 2009. Two solutions are presented. One uses the velocities outside the eclipse phases together with mid-times of previous eclipses, from photometry dating back to 1842, which provide the strongest constraint on the ephemeris. This yields a period of 9896.0 ± 1.6 days (27.0938 ± 0.0044 years) with a velocity semi-amplitude of 13.84 ± 0.23 km s -1 and an eccentricity of 0.227 ± 0.011. The middle of the current ongoing eclipse predicted by this combined fit is JD 2,455,413.8 ± 4.8, corresponding to 2010 August 5. If we use only the radial velocities, we find that the predicted middle of the current eclipse is nine months earlier. This would imply that the gravitating companion is not the same as the eclipsing object. Alternatively, the purely spectroscopic solution may be biased by perturbations in the velocities due to the short-period oscillations of the supergiant.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of pulsed-power plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, Y.; Arad, R.; Dadusc, G.; Davara, G.; Duvall, R.E.; Fisher, V.; Foord, M.E.; Fruchtman, A.; Gregorian, L.; Krasik, Ya.

    1993-01-01

    Recently developed spectroscopic diagnostic techniques are used to investigate the plasma behavior in a Magnetically Insulated Ion Diode, a Plasma Opening Switch, and a gas-puffed Z-pinch. Measurements with relatively high spectral, temporal, and spatial resolutions are performed. The particle velocity and density distributions within a few tens of microns from the dielectric-anode surface are observed using laser spectroscopy. Collective fluctuating electric fields in the plasma are inferred from anisotropic Stark broadening. For the Plasma Opening Switch experiment, a novel gaseous plasma source was developed which is mounted inside the high-voltage inner conductor. The properties of this source, together with spectroscopic observations of the electron density and particle velocities of the injected plasma, are described. Emission line intensities and spectral profiles give the electron kinetic energies during the switch operation and the ion velocity distributions. Secondary plasma ejection from the electrodes is also studied. In the Z-pinch experiment, spectral emission-line profiles are studied during the implosion phase. Doppler line shifts and widths yield the radial velocity distributions for various charge states in various regions of the plasma. Effects of plasma ejection from the cathode are also studied

  6. Spectroscopic enhancement in nanoparticles embedded glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahar, M. R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com; Ghoshal, S. K., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-25

    This presentation provides an overview of the recent progress in the enhancement of the spectroscopic characteristics of the glass embedded with nanoparticles (NPs). Some of our research activities with few significantly new results are highlighted and facilely analyzed. The science and technology dealing with the manipulation of the physical properties of rare earth doped inorganic glasses by embedding metallic NPs or nanoclusters produce the so-called 'nanoglass'. Meanwhile, the spectroscopic enhancement relates the intensity of the luminescence measured at certain transition. The enhancement which expectedly due to the 'plasmonics wave' (referring to the coherent coupling of photons to free electron oscillations called plasmon) occurs at the interface between a conductor and a dielectric. Plasmonics being an emerging concept in advanced optical material of nanophotonics has given this material the ability to exploit the optical response at nanoscale and opened up a new avenue in metal-based glass optics. There is a vast array of plasmonic NPs concepts yet to be explored, with applications spanning solar cells, (bio) sensing, communications, lasers, solid-state lighting, waveguides, imaging, optical data transfer, display and even bio-medicine. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the optical response of nanoglass by orders of magnitude as observed. The luminescence enhancement and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) are new paradigm of research. The enhancement of luminescence due to the influence of metallic NPs is the recurring theme of this paper.

  7. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, L.S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)]. E-mail: lrothman@cfa.harvard.edu; Jacquemart, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Barbe, A. [Universite de Reims-Champagne-Ardenne, Groupe de Spectrometrie Moleculaire et Atmospherique, 51062 Reims (France)] (and others)

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing.

  8. The HITRAN 2004 molecular spectroscopic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, L.S.; Jacquemart, D.; Barbe, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the 2004 edition of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database. The HITRAN compilation consists of several components that serve as input for radiative transfer calculation codes: individual line parameters for the microwave through visible spectra of molecules in the gas phase; absorption cross-sections for molecules having dense spectral features, i.e., spectra in which the individual lines are unresolvable; individual line parameters and absorption cross-sections for bands in the ultra-violet; refractive indices of aerosols; tables and files of general properties associated with the database; and database management software. The line-by-line portion of the database contains spectroscopic parameters for 39 molecules including many of their isotopologues. The format of the section of the database on individual line parameters of HITRAN has undergone the most extensive enhancement in almost two decades. It now lists the Einstein A-coefficients, statistical weights of the upper and lower levels of the transitions, a better system for the representation of quantum identifications, and enhanced referencing and uncertainty codes. In addition, there is a provision for making corrections to the broadening of line transitions due to line mixing

  9. Possibility of determination of the level of antioxidants in human body using spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, E; Gorbunova, E

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the processes of antioxidant defence against aggressive free radicals in human body were investigated theoretically; and the existing methods of diagnosis of oxidative stress and disturbance of antioxidant activity were reviewed. Also, the kinetics of free radical reactions in the oxidation of luminol and interaction antioxidants (such as chlorophyll in the multicomponent system of plant's leaves and ubiquinone) with the UV radiation were investigated experimentally by spectroscopic method. The results showed that this method is effective for recording the luminescence of antioxidants, free radicals, chemiluminescent reactions and fluorescence. In addition these results reveal new opportunities for the study of the antioxidant activity and antioxidant balance in a multicomponent system by allocating features of the individual components in spectral composition. A creation of quality control method for drugs, that are required for oxidative stress diagnosis, is a promising direction in the development of given work. (paper)

  10. The interaction between 4-aminoantipyrine and bovine serum albumin: Multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Yue; Liu Rutao; Li Chao; Xia Qing; Zhang Pengjun

    2011-01-01

    4-Aminoantipyrine (AAP) is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, in biochemical experiments and in environmental monitoring. AAP as an aromatic pollutant in the environment poses a great threat to human health. To evaluate the toxicity of AAP at the protein level, the effects of AAP on bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. After the inner filter effect was eliminated, the experimental results showed that AAP effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via static quenching. The number of binding sites, the binding constant, the thermodynamic parameters and binding subdomain were measured, and indicated that AAP could spontaneously bind with BSA on subdomain IIIA through electrostatic forces. Molecular docking results revealed that AAP interacted with the Glu 488 and Glu 502 residues of BSA. Furthermore, the conformation of BSA was demonstrably changed in the presence of AAP. The skeletal structure of BSA loosened, exposing internal hydrophobic aromatic ring amino acids and peptide strands to the solution.

  11. Non-invasive spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Sianoudis, IA; Zois, EN; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, AA; Dessinioti, C.; Stefanaki, E.; Stratigos, AJ; Antoniou, C.; Katsambas, A.; Christofidou, E.

    2017-11-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide and has become an important health and economic issue. Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can significantly improve patient outcome. Therefore there is an increase in the demand for proper management and effective non-invasive diagnostic modalities in order to avoid relapses or unnecessary treatments. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for non-melanoma skin cancers is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancers include high-definition optical coherence tomography, fluorescence spectroscopy, oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry among others spectroscopic techniques. Our findings establish how those spectrometric techniques can be used to more rapidly and easily diagnose skin cancer in an accurate and automated manner in the clinic.

  12. Multiprobe Spectroscopic Inverstigation of Molecular-level Behavior within Aqueous 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Tetrafluoroborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Abhra [Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi; Ali, Maroof [Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Tetin, Sergey Y. [Abbott Laboratories; Ruan, Qiaoqiao [Abbott Laboratories; Pandey, Siddharth [Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi

    2009-01-01

    In this work, an array of molecular-level solvent featuressincluding solute-solvent/solvent-solvent interactions, dipolarity, heterogeneity, dynamics, probe accessibility, and diffusionswere investigated across the entire composition of ambient mixtures containing the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4], and pH 7.0 phosphate buffer, based on results assembled for nine different molecular probes utilized in a range of spectroscopic modes. These studies uncovered interesting and unusual solvatochromic probe behavior within this benchmark mixture. Solvatochromic absorbance probessa watersoluble betaine dye (betaine dye 33), N,N-diethyl-4-nitroaniline, and 4-nitroanilineswere employed to determine ET (a blend of dipolarity/polarizability and hydrogen bond donor contributions) and the Kamlet-Taft indices * (dipolarity/polarizability), R (hydrogen bond donor acidity), and (hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) characterizing the [bmim][BF4] + phosphate buffer system. These parameters each showed a marked deviation from ideality, suggesting selective solvation of the individual probe solutes by [bmim][BF4]. Similar conclusions were derived from the responses of the fluorescent polarity-sensitive probes pyrene and pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde. Importantly, the fluorescent microfluidity probe 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane senses a microviscosity within the mixture that significantly exceeds expectations derived from simple interpolation of the behavior in the neat solvents. On the basis of results from this probe, a correlation between microviscosity and bulk viscosity was established; pronounced solvent-solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions were implicit in this behavior. The greatest deviation from ideal additive behavior for the probes studied herein was consistently observed to occur in the buffer-rich regime. Nitromethane-based fluorescence quenching of pyrene within the [bmim][BF4] + phosphate buffer system showed unusual compliance with a sphere

  13. Spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques study of the interaction between oxymetholone and human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-11-15

    In this study, the binding of oxymetholone (OXM), a doping drug, to human serum albumin (HSA) was explored at pH 7.40 by spectroscopic methods including spectrofluorimetry, three dimensional excitation–emission matrix (3D EEM), UV–vis absorption, resonance rayleigh scattering (RRS) and molecular docking. The fluorescence results showed that there was a considerable quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA upon binding to OXM by static quenching mechanism. The Stern–Volmer quenching constants (K{sub SV}) between OXM and HSA at three different temperatures 295, 303, 308 K, were obtained as 4.63×10{sup 4}, 3.05×10{sup 4} and 1.49×10{sup 4} L mol{sup −1}, respectively. Furthermore this interaction was confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometric and RRS techniques. The binding site number, n, apparent binding constant, K{sub b}, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔS, ΔH and ΔG) were measured at different temperatures. The Van der Waals and hydrogen-bond forces were found to stabilize OXM–HSA complex. The distance (r) between the donor and acceptor was obtained from Förster's theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.67 nm. The 3D EEM showed that OXM slightly changes the secondary structure of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular docking was employed for identification of drug binding sites and interaction of OXM with amino acid residues. - Highlights: • The binding of OXM as a doping drug with HSA was studied by different techniques. • The binding constant of HSA–OXM was calculated. • The binding site of OXM on HSA was characterized with molecular docking. • The thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to fluorescence technique.

  14. A comparative spectroscopic and kinetic study of photoexcitations in detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded LH2 light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Rätsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kõu

    2012-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins constitute more than third of the total number of proteins present in organisms. Solubilization with mild detergents is a common technique to study the structure, dynamics, and catalytic activity of these proteins in purified form. However beneficial the use of detergents may be for protein extraction, the membrane proteins are often denatured by detergent solubilization as a result of native lipid membrane interactions having been modified. Versatile investigations of the properties of membrane-embedded and detergent-isolated proteins are, therefore, required to evaluate the consequences of the solubilization procedure. Herein, the spectroscopic and kinetic fingerprints have been established that distinguish excitons in individual detergent-solubilized LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from them in the membrane-embedded complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. A wide arsenal of spectroscopic techniques in visible optical range that include conventional broadband absorption-fluorescence, fluorescence anisotropy excitation, spectrally selective hole burning and fluorescence line-narrowing, and transient absorption-fluorescence have been applied over broad temperature range between physiological and liquid He temperatures. Significant changes in energetics and dynamics of the antenna excitons upon self-assembly of the proteins into intracytoplasmic membranes are observed, analyzed, and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zeng, Huidan; Yang, Bin; Ye, Feng; Chen, Jianding; Chen, Guorong; Smith, Andew T; Sun, Luyi

    2017-02-28

    Yb 3+ -doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO₂ were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO₂ on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO₂ possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms), the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm²), the maximum Stark splitting manifold of ²F 7/2 level (781 cm -1 ), and the largest scalar crystal-field N J and Yb 3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO₂ promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO₂ content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29 Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO₆] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb 3+ -doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers.

  16. Spectroscopic imaging studies of nanoscale polarity and mass transport phenomena in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2017-08-02

    Synthetic organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants are now being explored for use as drug delivery vehicles. In this work, several factors important to their implementation in drug delivery are explored. All experiments are performed with the nanotubes immersed in ethanol. First, Nile Red (NR) and a hydroxylated Nile Red derivative (NR-OH) are loaded into the nanotubes and spectroscopic fluorescence imaging methods are used to determine the apparent dielectric constant of their local environment. Both are found in relatively nonpolar environments, with the NR-OH molecules preferring regions of relatively higher dielectric constant compared to NR. Unique two-color imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging FCS) measurements are then used along with the spectroscopic imaging results to deduce the dielectric properties of the environments sensed by mobile and immobile populations of probe molecules. The results reveal that mobile NR molecules pass through less polar regions, likely within the nanotube walls, while immobile NR molecules are found in more polar regions, possibly near the nanotube surfaces. In contrast, mobile and immobile NR-OH molecules are found to locate in environments of similar polarity. The imaging FCS results also provide quantitative data on the apparent diffusion coefficient for each dye. The mean diffusion coefficient for the NR dye was approximately two-fold larger than that of NR-OH. Slower diffusion by the latter could result from its additional hydrogen bonding interactions with polar triglycine, amine, and glucose moieties near the nanotube surfaces. The knowledge gained in these studies will allow for the development of nanotubes that are better engineered for applications in the controlled transport and release of uncharged, dipolar drug molecules.

  17. Application of spectroscopic techniques to the study of illuminated manuscripts: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessanha, S.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This work focused on the application of the most relevant spectroscopic techniques used for the characterization of illuminated manuscripts. The historical value of these unique and invaluable artworks, together with the increased awareness concerning the conservation of cultural heritage, prompted the application of analytical techniques to the study of these illuminations. This is essential for the understanding of the artist's working methods, which aids conservation–restoration. The characterization of the pigments may also help assign a probable date to the manuscript. For these purposes, the spectroscopic techniques used so far include those that provide information on the elemental content: X-ray fluorescence, total reflection X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Complementary techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, reveal information regarding the compounds present in the samples. The techniques, suitability, technological evolution and development of high-performance detectors, as well as the possibility of microanalysis and the higher sensitivity of the equipment, will also be discussed. Furthermore, issues such as the necessity of sampling, the portability of the equipment and the overall advantages and disadvantages of different techniques will be analyzed. - Highlights: ► The techniques used for studying illuminated manuscripts are described and compared. ► For in situ, non-destructive analysis the most suitable technique is EDXRF. ► For quantitative analysis TXRF is more appropriate. ► Raman spectroscopy is mostly used for pigments identification. ► FTIR was used for the characterization of binders and parchment.

  18. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  19. Iterative estimation of the background in noisy spectroscopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, M.H.; Liu, L.G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Dong, T.K.; You, Z.; Xu, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an iterative filtering method to estimate the background of noisy spectroscopic data. The proposed method avoids the calculation of the average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the whole spectrum and the peak regions, and it can estimate the background efficiently, especially for spectroscopic data with the Compton continuum.

  20. Optical constants of graphene measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, J.W.; Calado, V.E.; Van de Sanden, M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanically exfoliated graphene flake ( ? 150×380??m2) on a silicon wafer with 98 nm silicon dioxide on top was scanned with a spectroscopic ellipsometer with a focused spot ( ? 100×55??m2) at an angle of 55°. The spectroscopic ellipsometric data were analyzed with an optical model in which the

  1. Optical constants of graphene measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, J.W.; Calado, V.E.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanically exfoliated graphene flake ( ~ 150×380 µm2) on a silicon wafer with 98 nm silicon dioxide on top was scanned with a spectroscopic ellipsometer with a focused spot ( ~ 100×55 µm2) at an angle of 55°. The spectroscopic ellipsometric data were analyzed with an optical model in which the

  2. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  3. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  4. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  5. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  6. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Coupon, Jean; Cunha, Carlos E.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matthews, Daniel J.; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Rhodes, Jason; Ricol, Jean-Stepane; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z's): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z's will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our ''training set'' of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ∼30,000 objects over >∼15 widely-separated regions, each at least ∼20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo

  7. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.

  8. THE SPECTROSCOPIC DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondin, S.; Matheson, T.; Kirshner, R. P.; Mandel, K. S.; Challis, P.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.; Garnavich, P. M.; Jha, S. W.; Modjaz, M.; Riess, A. G.; Schmidt, B. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present 2603 spectra of 462 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), including 2065 previously unpublished spectra, obtained during 1993-2008 through the Center for Astrophysics Supernova Program. There are on average eight spectra for each of the 313 SNe Ia with at least two spectra. Most of the spectra were obtained with the FAST spectrograph at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5 m telescope and reduced in a consistent manner, making this data set well suited for studies of SN Ia spectroscopic diversity. Using additional data from the literature, we study the spectroscopic and photometric properties of SNe Ia as a function of spectroscopic class using the classification schemes of Branch et al. and Wang et al. The width-luminosity relation appears to be steeper for SNe Ia with broader lines, although the result is not statistically significant with the present sample. Based on the evolution of the characteristic Si II λ6355 line, we propose improved methods for measuring velocity gradients, revealing a larger range than previously suspected, from ∼0 to ∼400 km s −1 day −1 considering the instantaneous velocity decline rate at maximum light. We find a weaker and less significant correlation between Si II velocity and intrinsic B – V color at maximum light than reported by Foley et al., owing to a more comprehensive treatment of uncertainties and host galaxy dust. We study the extent of nuclear burning and the presence of unburnt carbon in the outermost layers of the ejecta and report new detections of C II λ6580 in 23 early-time SN Ia spectra. The frequency of C II detections is not higher in SNe Ia with bluer colors or narrower light curves, in conflict with the recent results of Thomas et al. Based on nebular spectra of 27 SNe Ia, we find no relation between the FWHM of the iron emission feature at ∼4700 Å and Δm 15 (B) after removing the two low-luminosity SN 1986G and SN 1991bg, suggesting that the peak luminosity is not strongly dependent

  9. Thirty New Low-mass Spectroscopic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Hebb, Leslie; Liu, Michael C.; Reid, I. Neill; Collier Cameron, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    As part of our search for young M dwarfs within 25 pc, we acquired high-resolution spectra of 185 low-mass stars compiled by the NStars project that have strong X-ray emission. By cross-correlating these spectra with radial velocity standard stars, we are sensitive to finding multi-lined spectroscopic binaries. We find a low-mass spectroscopic binary fraction of 16% consisting of 27 SB2s, 2 SB3s, and 1 SB4, increasing the number of known low-mass spectroscopic binaries (SBs) by 50% and proving that strong X-ray emission is an extremely efficient way to find M-dwarf SBs. WASP photometry of 23 of these systems revealed two low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBs), bringing the count of known M-dwarf EBs to 15. BD-22 5866, the ESB4, was fully described in 2008 by Shkolnik et al. and CCDM J04404+3127 B consists of two mid-M stars orbiting each other every 2.048 days. WASP also provided rotation periods for 12 systems, and in the cases where the synchronization time scales are short, we used P rot to determine the true orbital parameters. For those with no P rot, we used differential radial velocities to set upper limits on orbital periods and semimajor axes. More than half of our sample has near-equal-mass components (q > 0.8). This is expected since our sample is biased toward tight orbits where saturated X-ray emission is due to tidal spin-up rather than stellar youth. Increasing the samples of M-dwarf SBs and EBs is extremely valuable in setting constraints on current theories of stellar multiplicity and evolution scenarios for low-mass multiple systems. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and by the WASP Consortium. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The CFHT is operated by the National Research Council of Canada

  10. Spectroscopic analysis on the binding interaction between tetracycline hydrochloride and bovine proteins β-casein, α-lactalbumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Hongna; Tang, Lin; Gao, Xin; Jia, Jingjing; Lv, Henghui

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the binding interaction between tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) and bovine proteins β-casein (β-CN), α-lactalbumin (α-LA) in aqueous solution by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence showed that TCH effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine proteins via static quenching, while there was a single class of binding site on protein. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that electrostatic forces played major roles in the interaction between β-CN and TCH, whereas α-LA-TCH complex were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Moreover, circular dichroism spectra (CD spectra), ultraviolet visible absorption spectra (UV–vis absorption spectra), and fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) spectra results indicated the secondary structure of bovine proteins was changed in the presence of TCH with the α-helix percentage of protein-TCH complexes decreased. Molecular modeling analysis supported the experimental results well. In addition, the research of surface hydrophobicity further verified tertiary structure of proteins was changed in the presence of TCH and the possible changes of protein function. These results achieved from experiments may be valuable in the milk industry and food safety.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis on the binding interaction between tetracycline hydrochloride and bovine proteins β-casein, α-lactalbumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Hongna; Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@sdnu.edu.cn; Gao, Xin; Jia, Jingjing; Lv, Henghui

    2016-10-15

    We investigated the binding interaction between tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) and bovine proteins β-casein (β-CN), α-lactalbumin (α-LA) in aqueous solution by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling techniques. Fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence showed that TCH effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine proteins via static quenching, while there was a single class of binding site on protein. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that electrostatic forces played major roles in the interaction between β-CN and TCH, whereas α-LA-TCH complex were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces. Moreover, circular dichroism spectra (CD spectra), ultraviolet visible absorption spectra (UV–vis absorption spectra), and fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) spectra results indicated the secondary structure of bovine proteins was changed in the presence of TCH with the α-helix percentage of protein-TCH complexes decreased. Molecular modeling analysis supported the experimental results well. In addition, the research of surface hydrophobicity further verified tertiary structure of proteins was changed in the presence of TCH and the possible changes of protein function. These results achieved from experiments may be valuable in the milk industry and food safety.

  12. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  13. The BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Michael

    2017-08-01

    We present the Swift BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS) and discus the first four papers. The catalog represents an unprecedented census of hard-X-ray selected AGN in the local universe, with ~90% of sources at zpast studies. Consistent with previous surveys, we find an increase in the fraction of un-obscured (type 1) AGN, as measured from broad Hbeta and Halpha, with increasing 14-195 keV and 2-10 keV luminosity. We find the FWHM of the emission lines to show broad agreement with the X-ray obscuration measurements. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN in our sample with emission lines have a larger fraction of dustier galaxies suggesting these types of galaxies are missed in optical AGN surveys using emission line diagnostics.

  14. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  16. Statistical investigation of spectroscopic binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutukov, A.V.; Yungelson, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    A catalog of physical parameters of about 1000 spectroscopic binary stars (SB), based on the Batten catalog, its extensions, and newly published data has been compiled. Masses of stars' components (M 1 and M 2 ), mass ratios of components (q=M 1 /M 2 ) and orbital angular momenta are computed, wherever possible. It is probable that the initial mass function of the primaries is non-monotonic and is described only approximately by a power-law. A number of assumed 'initial' distributions of M 1 , q and the semiaxes of orbits were transformed with the aim of obtaining 'observed' distributions taking into account the observational selection due to the luminosities of the components, their radial velocities, inclinations of the orbits, and the effects of matter exchange between the components. (Auth.)

  17. Micron scale spectroscopic analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David; Finlayson, Trevor; Prawer, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this proposal is the establishment of a facility which will enable complete micron scale spectroscopic analysis of any sample which can be imaged in the optical microscope. Current applications include studies of carbon fibres, diamond thin films, ceramics (zirconia and high T c superconductors), semiconductors, wood pulp, wool fibres, mineral inclusions, proteins, plant cells, polymers, fluoride glasses, and optical fibres. The range of interests crosses traditional discipline boundaries and augurs well for a truly interdisciplinary collaboration. Developments in instrumentation such as confocal imaging are planned to achieve sub-micron resolution, and advances in computer software and hardware will enable the aforementioned spectroscopies to be used to map molecular and crystalline phases on the surfaces of materials. Coupled with existing compositional microprobes (e.g. the proton microprobe) the possibilities for the development of new, powerful, hybrid imaging technologies appear to be excellent

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of oxidized solder surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jenn-Ming; Chang-Chien, Yu-Chien; Huang, Bo-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ting; Shie, Chi-Rung; Hsu, Chuang-Yao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → UV-visible spectroscopy is successfully used to evaluate the degree of discoloring of solders. → The surface oxides of solders can also be identified by UV-visible absorption spectra. → The discoloration of solder surface can be correlated with optical characterization of oxides. → A strategy against discoloring by alloying was also suggested. - Abstract: For further understanding of the discoloration of solder surfaces due to oxidation during the assembly and operation of electronic devices, UV-vis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses were applied to evaluate the degree of discoloring and identify the surface oxides. The decrease in reflectance of the oxidized solder surface is related to SnO whose absorption band is located within the visible region. A trace of P can effectively depress the discoloration of solders under both solid and semi-solid states through the suppression of SnO.

  19. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q o and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry

  20. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  1. Molecular interaction of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) with human serum albumin (HSA): The spectroscopic, calorimetric and computational investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragna Lakshmi, T.; Mondal, Moumita; Ramadas, Krishna; Natarajan, Sakthivel

    2017-08-01

    Drug molecule interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) affects the distribution and elimination of the drug. The compound, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) has been known for its antimicrobial, antiviral, antihelminthic and anticancer properties. However, its interaction with HSA is not yet reported. In this study, the interaction between HSA and DAPG was investigated through steady-state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence (TRF), circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). Fluorescence spectroscopy results showed the strong quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of HSA due to interaction with DAPG, through dynamic quenching mechanism. The compound bound to HSA with reversible and moderate affinity which explained its easy diffusion from circulatory system to target tissue. The thermodynamic parameters from fluorescence spectroscopic data clearly revealed the contribution of hydrophobic forces but, the role of hydrogen bonds was not negligible according to the ITC studies. The interaction was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Binding with DAPG reduced the helical content of protein suggesting the unfolding of HSA. Site marker fluorescence experiments revealed the change in binding constant of DAPG in the presence of site I (warfarin) but not site II marker (ibuprofen) which confirmed that the DAPG bound to site I. ITC experiments also supported this as site I marker could not bind to HSA-DAPG complex while site II marker was accommodated in the complex. In silico studies further showed the lowest binding affinity and more stability of DAPG in site I than in site II. Thus the data presented in this study confirms the binding of DAPG to the site I of HSA which may help in further understanding of pharmacokinetic properties of DAPG.

  2. Interaction of Flavonoids from Woodwardia unigemmata with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA): Application of Spectroscopic Techniques and Molecular Modeling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Pan, Hong; Shen, Tao; Li, Peng; Chen, Yanan; Li, Zhenyu; Di, Xiaxia; Wang, Shuqi

    2017-08-09

    Phytochemical investigation on the methanol extract of Woodwardia unigemmata resulted in the isolation of seven flavonoids, including one new flavonol acylglycoside ( 1 ). The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison of literature data. The multidrug resistance (MDR) reversing activity was evaluated for the isolated compounds using doxorubicin-resistant K562/A02 cells model. Compound 6 showed comparable MDR reversing effect to verapamil. Furthermore, the interaction between compounds and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, including steady-state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and molecular docking approach. The experimental results indicated that the seven flavonoids bind to BSA by static quenching mechanisms. The negative ΔH and ΔS values indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds contributed in the binding of compounds 2 - 6 to BSA. In the case of compounds 1 and 7 systems, the hydrophobic interactions play a major role. The binding of compounds to BSA causes slight changes in the secondary structure of BSA. There are two binding sites of compound 6 on BSA and site I is the main site according to the molecular docking studies and the site marker competitive binding assay.

  3. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  4. A study of the interaction between malachite green and lysozyme by steady-state fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Ying

    2009-09-01

    The interaction of a N-methylated diaminotriphenylmethane dye, malachite green, with lysozyme was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The results revealed that malachite green caused the fluorescence quenching of lysozyme through a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamic parameters like DeltaH and DeltaS were calculated to be -15.33 kJ mol(-1) and 19.47 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to van't Hoff equation, respectively, which proves main interaction between malachite green and lysozyme is hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond contact. The distance r between donor (lysozyme) and acceptor (malachite green) was obtained to be 3.82 nm according to Frster's theory. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that binding of malachite green with lysozyme can induce conformational changes in lysozyme. In addition, the effects of common ions on the constants of lysozyme-malachite green complex were also discussed.

  5. Metallation of protoporphyrins used as fluorescent chemo sensor for imidazole recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panpae, Kornvalai; Krikrutthee, Chaiwat; Porntaweethum, Phumthan; Weerachiwcharnchai, Panya; Chenwittayayos, Aekapoj

    2008-01-01

    Metalloporphyrin Complexes play significant roles in many biological and catalytic systems. The diversity of their functions is due in part to the variety of metals that bind in the pocket of the porphyrin ring system. Two kinds of metalloporphyrin derivatives, Cu (II) and Zn (II) protoporphyrins (PP) were microscale synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods and magnetic measurements. A PP ligand bound to each metal center in a tetradentate fashion including four amine nitrogen atoms in the equatorial planes. These complexes were found to recognize imidazolyl groups of histidine and histamine derivatives as guest molecules by coordination and additional non-covalent interactions. These added analytes displace the selective fluorescent indicator, which when released to the solution displays its full fluorescence. Thus, analyte recognition is signaled by the sharp appearance of the fluorescence of the indicators. The binding affinities to histidine and histamine were investigated and accounted for different complexation properties. Moreover, we demonstrated that careful choice of a fluorescent indicator with tuned affinity toward the receptor can provide discrimination in sensing of a desired substrate and the role that the metal coordination plays on the hypochromic shift and loss of fluorescence distincted characteristics of hypsoporphyrins were also discussed. (author)

  6. Quenching of acridine orange fluorescence by salts in aqueous solutions: Effects of aggregation and charge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, A.M. [Departamento de Física, FFCLRP, USP (Brazil); Ramos, A.P. [Departamento de Química, FFCLRP, USP (Brazil); Silva, E.R. [Departamento de Física, FFCLRP, USP (Brazil); Borissevitch, I.E., E-mail: iouribor@usp.br [Departamento de Física, FFCLRP, USP (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Acridine orange (AO) is widely applied in biology and medicine as a fluorescence probe, an intracellular pH indicator, and a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy due to its adequate spectroscopic characteristics and high affinity to biological structures. Being introduced in an organism, AO is dispersed in blood plasma characterized by high ionic strength (ca. 0.36 M in humans). We have investigated the effect of ionic strength upon AO spectral characteristics and fluorescence quenching. The effect of pH on these characteristics was also tested. Salts quench AO fluorescence, the quenching constant (k{sub q}) increasing with the AO concentration. Salts stimulate AO aggregation, the process depending weakly on the salt origin. On the other hand, k{sub q} does depend on the salt anion origin, increasing as the anion oxidation potential decreases, and is virtually independent of the cation origin. This means that at least two different mechanisms of the AO fluorescence quenching by salts exist: fluorescence intensity decrease due to AO aggregation and quenching by partial electron transfer from salt anion to AO molecule in its singlet excited state (the exciplex formation).

  7. Quantitative liquid and vapor distribution measurements in evaporating fuel sprays using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fansler, Todd D; Drake, Michael C; Gajdeczko, Boguslaw; Düwel, Isabell; Koban, Wieland; Zimmermann, Frank P; Schulz, Christof

    2009-01-01

    Fully quantitative two-dimensional measurements of liquid- and vapor-phase fuel distributions (mass per unit volume) from high-pressure direct-injection gasoline injectors are reported for conditions of both slow and rapid vaporization in a heated, high-pressure spray chamber. The measurements employ the coevaporative gasoline-like fluorobenzene (FB)/diethylmethylamine (DEMA)/hexane exciplex tracer/fuel system. In contrast to most previous laser-induced exciplex-fluorescence (LIEF) experiments, the quantitative results here include regions in which liquid and vapor fuel coexist (e.g. near the injector exit). A unique aspect is evaluation of both vapor- and liquid-phase distributions at varying temperature and pressure using only in situ vapor-phase fluorescence calibration measurements at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This approach draws on recent extensive measurements of the temperature-dependent spectroscopic properties of the FB–DEMA exciplex system, in particular on knowledge of the quantum efficiencies of the vapor-phase and liquid-phase (exciplex) fluorescence. In addition to procedures necessary for quantitative measurements, we discuss corrections for liquid–vapor crosstalk (liquid fluorescence that overlaps the vapor-fluorescence bandpass), the unknown local temperature due to vaporization-induced cooling, and laser-sheet attenuation by scattering and absorption

  8. Synthesis, characterization and bioimaging of fluorescent labeled polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisberger, Georg; Gyenge, Emina Besic; Hinger, Doris; Bösiger, Peter; Maake, Caroline; Patzke, Greta R

    2013-07-21

    A fluorescent labeled Wells-Dawson type POM ({P2W17O61Fluo}) was newly synthesized and characterized by a wide range of analytical methods. {P2W17O61Fluo} was functionalized with fluorescein amine through a stable amide bond, and its long time stability was verified by UV/vis spectroscopic techniques at physiologically relevant pH values. No significant impact on the cell viability or morphology of HeLa cells was observed for POM concentrations up to 100 μg mL(-1). Cellular uptake of fluorescent {P2W17O61Fluo} was monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy. POM uptake occurs mainly after prolonged incubation times of 24 h resulting in different intracellular patterns, i.e. randomly distributed over the entire cytoplasm, or aggregated in larger clusters. This direct monitoring strategy for the interaction of POMs with cells opens up new pathways for elucidating their unknown mode of action on the way to POM-based drug development.

  9. Fluorescent and colorimetric molecular recognition probe for hydrogen bond acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Sarah J; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-11-22

    The association constants for formation of 1 : 1 complexes between a H-bond donor, 1-naphthol, and a diverse range of charged and neutral H-bond acceptors have been measured using UV/vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The performance of 1-naphthol as a dual colorimetric and fluorescent molecular recognition probe for determining the H-bond acceptor (HBA) parameters of charged and neutral solutes has been investigated in three solvents. The data were employed to establish self-consistent H-bond acceptor parameters (β) for benzoate, azide, chloride, thiocyanate anions, a series of phosphine oxides, phosphate ester, sulfoxide and a tertiary amide. The results demonstrate both the transferability of H-bond parameters between different solvents and the utility of the naphthol-based dual molecular recognition probe to exploit orthogonal spectroscopic techniques to determine the HBA properties of neutral and charged solutes. The benzoate anion is the strongest HBA studied with a β parameter of 15.4, and the neutral tertiary amide is the weakest H-bond acceptor investigated with a β parameter of 8.5. The H-bond acceptor strength of the azide anion is higher than that of chloride (12.8 and 12.2 respectively), and the thiocyanate anion has a β value of 10.8 and thus is a significantly weaker H-bond acceptor than both the azide and chloride anions.

  10. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of 3-hydroxy-3-phenyl-1-o-carboxyphenyltriazene and its copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes: a novel fluorescence sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ressalan, S.; Iyer, C.S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of 3-hydroxy-3-phenyl-1-o-carboxyphenyltriazene (HT) are studied. The mechanism of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) followed by energy transfer process of the ligand and the Cu (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) metal complexes have been investigated. The excited state photo induced intramolecular hydrogen transfer from N-OH to triazene 1-nitrogen atom is explained. The effect of pH, solvent and concentration on the absorption and fluorescence of the ligand is studied and it has been found that the absorption and fluorescence of HT is highly pH, solvent and concentration dependent. Participation of the N-OH proton of HT in the solvent assisted O to N-proton transfer has also been proposed. The fluorescence band shift and changes in intensity is modulated by protonation and complexation with metal ions. This fluorophore can thus be used as a pH dependent and M (n+1)+ /M n+ redox on/off switchable molecular sensor

  11. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  12. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  13. A subspace approach to high-resolution spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fan; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2014-04-01

    To accelerate spectroscopic imaging using sparse sampling of (k,t)-space and subspace (or low-rank) modeling to enable high-resolution metabolic imaging with good signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method, called SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, exploits a unique property known as partial separability of spectroscopic signals. This property indicates that high-dimensional spectroscopic signals reside in a very low-dimensional subspace and enables special data acquisition and image reconstruction strategies to be used to obtain high-resolution spatiospectral distributions with good signal-to-noise ratio. More specifically, a hybrid chemical shift imaging/echo-planar spectroscopic imaging pulse sequence is proposed for sparse sampling of (k,t)-space, and a low-rank model-based algorithm is proposed for subspace estimation and image reconstruction from sparse data with the capability to incorporate prior information and field inhomogeneity correction. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated using both computer simulations and phantom studies, which produced very encouraging results. For two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging experiments on a metabolite phantom, a factor of 10 acceleration was achieved with a minimal loss in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the long chemical shift imaging experiments and with a significant gain in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the accelerated echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments. The proposed method, SPectroscopic Imaging by exploiting spatiospectral CorrElation, is able to significantly accelerate spectroscopic imaging experiments, making high-resolution metabolic imaging possible. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Crystal growth, spectroscopic characterization and laser performance of Tm/Mg:LiNbO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P. X.; Yin, J. G.; Zhang, R.; Li, H. Q.; Xu, J. Q.; Hang, Y.

    2014-03-01

    A Tm, Mg co-doped LiNbO3 crystal was grown by the traditional Czochralski method. The room-temperature absorption, photo-luminescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime of Tm3+ ions in the crystal have been investigated. The experimental results show that the co-doped of MgO can lead to the lengthening of the measured fluorescence lifetime of the upper Tm3+:3F4 level. Based on the Judd-Ofelt approach, the intensity parameters Ω2,4,6 of Tm3+ were calculated to be Ω2 (6.29 × 10-20 cm2), Ω4 (0.54 × 10-20 cm2) and Ω6 (0.79 × 10-20 cm2). Other spectroscopic parameters that relate to laser performance were also obtained. Non-photorefractive continuous wave laser operation with a Tm, Mg:LiNbO3 single crystal is demonstrated at room temperature for the first time. We obtained 1.026 W output power at 1.885 μm with a slope efficiency of near 14%, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the largest output power and the highest slope efficiency obtained for this crystal thus far. The output power was observed to be stable, and the crystal showed no sign of photorefractive damage.

  15. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on ferulic acid - Alpha-2-macroglobulin interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Sarwar, Tarique; Arif, Hussain; Ali, Syed Saqib; Ahsan, Haseeb; Tabish, Mohammad; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2017-09-01

    Ferulic acid is a major phenolic acid found in numerous plant species in conjugated form. It binds to enzymes and oligomeric proteins and modifies their structure and function. This study was designed to examine the interaction of ferulic acid, an active ingredient of some important medicines, with α2M, a key serum proteinase, under physiological conditions. The mechanism of interaction was studied by spectroscopic techniques such as, UV-visible absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism along with isothermal titration calorimetry. Fluorescence quenching of α2M by ferulic acid demonstrated the formation of α2M-ferulic acid complex by static quenching mechanism. Binding parameters calculated by Stern-Volmer method showed that ferulic acid binds to α2M with moderate affinity of the order of ∼104 M-1. The thermodynamic signatures reveal that binding was enthalpy driven and hydrogen bonding played a major role in ferulic acid-α2M binding. CD spectra analysis suggests very little conformational changes in α2M on ferulic acid binding.

  16. Multi-spectroscopic characterization of bovine serum albumin upon interaction with atomoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar T. Buddanavar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quenching interaction of atomoxetine (ATX with bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied in vitro under optimal physiological condition (pH=7.4 by multi-spectroscopic techniques. The mechanism of ATX-BSA system was a dynamic quenching process and was confirmed by the fluorescence spectra and lifetime measurements. The number of binding sites, binding constants and other binding characteristics were computed. Thermodynamic parameters ∆H° and ∆S° indicated that intermolecular hydrophobic forces predominantly stabilized the drug-protein system. The average binding distance between BSA and ATX was studied by Försters theory. UV-absorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, circular dichroism (CD, synchronous spectra and three-dimensional (3D fluorescence spectral results revealed the changes in micro-environment of secondary structure of protein upon the interaction with ATX. Displacement of site probes and the effects of some common metal ions on the binding of ATX with BSA interaction were also studied.

  17. Spectroscopic Studies on the Interaction of Acid Yellow With Bovine Serum Albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xingren; Liu Rutao; Qin Pengfei; Wang Li; Zhao Xingchen

    2010-01-01

    Azo dyes, which are common in the environment, can be toxic to various organisms. In order to determine the molecular mechanism of acid yellow 11(AY) toxicity, we studied the effect of AY exposure to the common protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) by several spectroscopic techniques including fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV) and circular dichroism (CD). It could be concluded from the fluorescence spectra that the quenching effect of BSA by AY was mainly due to complex formation which was unrelated to the absorption of AY. The enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were found to be -21.94 kJ/mol and 30.04 Jmol -1 K -1 , respectively. The results confirm that electrostatic attraction was the predominant intermolecular force between BSA and AY. Furthermore, the binding distance (r) between AY and the inner tryptophan residue of BSA was determined to be 3.541 nm on the basis of Forster theory of non-radiative energy transfer. In addition, the conformational changes of BSA in the presence of AY were also analyzed by UV and CD. These results indicated that AY could interact with BSA by complex formation, which also affected the structure of BSA.

  18. Novel spectroscopic methods for determination of Cromolyn sodium and Oxymetazoline hydrochloride in binary mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; El-Kosasy, A. M.; Magdy, N.; El Zahar, N. M.

    2014-10-01

    New accurate, sensitive and selective spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods were developed and subsequently validated for determination of Cromolyn sodium (CS) and Oxymetazoline HCl (OXY) in binary mixture. These methods include ‘H-point standard addition method (HPSAM) and area under the curve (AUC)' spectrophotometric method and first derivative synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic (FDSFS) method. For spectrophotometric methods, absorbances were recorded at 241.5 nm and 274.9 nm for HPSAM and the wavelength was selected in ranges 232.0-254.0 nm and 216.0-229.0 nm for AUC method, where the concentration was obtained by applying Cramer's rule. For FDSFS method, the first-derivative synchronous fluorescence signal was measured at 290.0 nm, using Δλ = 145.0 nm. The suggested methods were validated according to International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) guidelines and the results revealed that they were precise and reproducible. All the obtained results were statistically compared with those of the reported method and there was no significant difference.

  19. Comprehensive spectroscopic studies on the interaction of biomolecules with surfactant detached multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of ten diverse biomolecules with surfactant detached Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) using multiple spectroscopic methods. Declining fluorescence intensity of biomolecules in combination with the hyperchromic effect in UV-Visible spectra confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation. Quenching mechanism remains static and non-fluorescent. 3D spectral data of biomolecules suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues arising out of CNTs interaction. Amide band Shifts corresponding to the secondary structure of biomolecules were observed in the of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. In addition, there exists an increased Raman intensity of tryptophan residues of biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Hence, the binding of the aromatic structures of CNTs with the aromatic amino acid residues, in a particular, tryptophan was evidenced. Far UV Circular spectra have showed the loss of alpha-helical contents in biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Near UV CD spectra confirmed the alterations in the tryptophan positions of the peptide backbone. Hence, our results have demonstrated that the interaction of biomolecules with OH-MWCNTs would involve binding cum structural changes and alteration to their aromatic micro-environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-spectroscopic and voltammetric evidences for binding, conformational changes of bovine serum albumin with thiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoji, Atmanand M; Gowda, Jayant I; Gokavi, Naveen M; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between thiamine hydrochloride (TA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence, FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltammetric techniques under optimised physiological condition. The fluorescence intensity of BSA is gradually decreased upon addition of TA due to the formation of a BSA-TA complex. The binding parameters were evaluated and their behaviour at different temperatures was analysed. The quenching constants (K sv ) obtained were 2.6 × 10 4 , 2.2 × 10 4 and 2.0 × 10 4  L mol -1 at 288, 298 and 308 K, respectively. The binding mechanism was static-type quenching. The values of ΔH° and ΔS° were found to be 26.87 kJ mol -1 and 21.3 J K -1  mol -1 , and indicated that electrostatic interaction was the principal intermolecular force. The changes in the secondary structure of BSA upon interaction with TA were confirmed by synchronous and 3-D spectral results. Site probe studies reveal that TA is located in site I of BSA. The effects of some common metal ions on binding of BSA-TA complex were also investigated.

  1. InP/ZnS Nanocrystals as Fluorescent Probes for the Detection of ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Massadeh, Salam; Nann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study on fluorescence adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection by InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). We present a spectroscopic analysis displaying the effect of enzymatic reactions of glucose oxidase (GOX) and hexokinase (HEX) on the InP/ZnS quantum dots at physiological pH. The InP/ZnS quantum dots act as glucose sensors in the presence of GOX, Glu and ATP, and their luminescence quenches during the release of hydrogen peroxide from the reaction. However, in the presence of...

  2. Signatures of hot electrons and fluorescence in Mo Kα emission on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Dunham, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Ouart, N.; Dasgupta, A.; Giuliani, J. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Recent experiments on the Z accelerator have produced high-energy (17 keV) inner-shell K-alpha emission from molybdenum wire array z-pinches. Extensive absolute power and spectroscopic diagnostics along with collisional-radiative modeling enable detailed investigation into the roles of thermal, hot electron, and fluorescence processes in the production of high-energy x-rays. We show that changing the dimensions of the arrays can impact the proportion of thermal and non-thermal K-shell x-rays.

  3. Ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K-Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar; Moussa, Sherif A-Abdelmottaleb

    2016-09-01

    The spectroscopic properties can indicate important features about the nature and severity of the disease. However, no earlier studies have been used the spectroscopic properties as a diagnostic tool for radiation detection. This study was aimed to use ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in rats in vivo. Adult male rats were exposed to 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray as single dose, using Cobalt-60 (Co-60) source with a dose rate of 0.883 centi Gray/sec (cGy/s). Ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy of rat's blood serum were measured. After gamma irradiation of rats in vivo, the blood serum absorbance peaks for 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray (Gy) decreased and shifted towards the ultra violet wavelength. A maximal change in fluorescence intensity of blood serum at 350 nm was obtained when exciting light at 194 nm after irradiation. The fluorescence intensity also decreased with the dose. The highest radiation gamma dose might be accompanied with the highest oxidative stress. This study suggests that at the above mentioned gamma radiation doses, the blood is highly fragmented; with low aggregation at 25 Gy and with high aggregation at 50-100 Gy.

  4. Electric Dipole Transition Moments and Solvent-Dependent Interactions of Fluorescent Boron-Nitrogen Substituted Indole Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Mari; Widom, Julia R; Xu, Senmiao; Abbey, Eric R; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Marcus, Andrew H

    2015-06-25

    Fluorescent analogues of the indole side chain of tryptophan can be useful spectroscopic probes of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Here we present linear dichroism and solvent-dependent spectroscopic studies of two fluorescent analogues of indole, in which the organic C═C unit is substituted with the isosteric inorganic B-N unit. We studied the so-called "external" BN indole, which has C2v symmetry, and the "fused" BN indole with Cs symmetry. We performed a combination of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet linear dichroism (UV-LD) in stretched poly(ethylene) (PE) films, and quantum chemical calculations on both BN indole compounds. Our measurements allowed us to characterize the degree of alignment for both molecules in stretched PE films. We thus determined the orientations and magnitudes of the two lowest energy electric dipole transition moments (EDTMs) for external BN indole, and the two lowest energy EDTMs for fused BN indole within the 30 000-45 000 cm(-1) spectral range. We compared our experimental results to those of quantum chemical calculations using standard density functional theory (DFT). Our theoretical predictions for the low-energy EDTMs are in good agreement with our experimental data. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of the external and the fused BN indoles are sensitive to solvent polarity. Our results indicate that the fused BN indole experiences much greater solvation interactions with polar solvents than does the external BN indole.

  5. A dihydrazone based fluorescent probe for selective determination of Al{sup 3+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratap Singh, Divya; Singh, Vinod P., E-mail: singvp@yahoo.co.in

    2014-11-15

    A highly selective fluorescent sensor N,N′-bis((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene) oxalohydrazide (H{sub 2}ohn) for the determination of Al{sup 3+} ions was synthesized and characterized by different physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The single crystal structure of H{sub 2}ohn receptor has also been reported. The H{sub 2}ohn shows an enhanced fluorescence in the presence of Al{sup 3+} ions in ethanol–water (2:3 v/v) solution. Other cations viz. Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} show no appreciable change in fluorescence intensity. The binding mode of H{sub 2}ohn receptor with Al{sup 3+} was studied by UV–visible, fluorescence and {sup 1}H NMR titrations. The receptor acts as a dibasic hexadentate ligand and interacts with two Al{sup 3+} ions with a high binding constant K{sub B}=2.62×10{sup 11} M{sup −2}. The lowest detection limit for Al{sup 3+} complex of H{sub 2}ohn was determined to be 8.56×10{sup −10} M. The structures of H{sub 2}ohn and its Al(III) complex were also optimized by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A dihydrazone based fluorescent sensor is synthesized. • Characterized by IR, NMR, UV−visible and mass spectral analysis. • The receptor serves as a selective fluorescent sensor for Al{sup 3+} over other cations. • The sensing property is monitored by UV−visible, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. • A high binding constant of the receptor with Al{sup 3+} is reported here.

  6. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  7. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  8. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  9. 2-d spectroscopic imaging of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, N.J.; Brotchie, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This poster illustrates the use of two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging (2-D SI) in the characterisation of brain tumours, and the monitoring of subsequent treatment. After conventional contrast-enhanced MR imaging of patients with known or suspected brain tumours, 2-D SI is performed at a single axial level. The level is chosen to include the maximum volume of abnormal enhancement, or, in non-enhancing lesions. The most extensive T2 signal abnormality. Two different MR systems have been used (Marconi Edge and GE Signa LX); at each site, a PRESS localisation sequence is employed with TE 128-144 ms. Automated software is used to generate spectral arrays, metabolite maps, and metabolite ratio maps from the spectroscopic data. Colour overlays of the maps onto anatomical images are produced using manufacturer software or the Medex imaging data analysis package. High grade gliomas showed choline levels higher than those in apparently normal brain, with decreases in NAA and creatine. Some lesions showed spectral abnormality extending into otherwise normal appearing brain. This was also seen in a case of CNS lymphoma. Lowgrade lesions showed choline levels similar to normal brain, but with decreased NAA. Only a small number of metastases have been studied, but to date no metastasis has shown spectral abnormality beyond the margins suggested by conventional imaging. Follow-up studies generally show spectral heterogeneity. Regions with choline levels higher than those in normal-appearing brain are considered to represent recurrent high-grade tumour. Some regions show choline to be the dominant metabolite, but its level is not greater than that seen in normal brain. These regions are considered suspicious for residual / recurrent tumour when the choline / creatine ratio exceeds 2 (lower ratios may represent treatment effect). 2-D SI improves the initial assessment of brain tumours, and has potential for influencing the radiotherapy treatment strategy. 2-D SI also

  10. Thermodynamics and binding mechanism of polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme elucidated by calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmeen, Shama; Riyazuddeen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of the binding of Lys with polypenone-60 were studied. • The binding was found to be exothermic. • Polyphenon-60 quenches the fluorescence of Lys through static quenching. • Polyphenon-60 binds to Lys through hydrogen binding. • Conformational changes of Lys were studied using circular dichorism. - Abstract: Protein-drug interaction offer information of the structural features that determine the therapeutic effectiveness of drug and have become an attractive research field in life science, chemistry, and clinical medicine. Interaction of pharmacologically important antioxidant drug polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme (Lys) at physiological pH 7.4 has been studied by using calorimetric and various spectroscopic techniques. UV–visible spectroscopy results indicate the complex formation between Lys and polyphenon-60. The binding constant, quenching mechanism and the number of binding sites were determined by the fluorescence quenching spectra of Lys in presence of polyphenon-60. Fluorescence data indicate that the polyphenon-60 interact with Lys through static quenching mechanism with binding affinity of 2.9 × 10 4 M −1 . The average binding distance between drug and Lys was found to be 2.89 nm on the basis of the theory of Förster's energy transfer. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data reveals the thermodynamic investigations which suggest that the interaction of Lys and polyphenon-60 through exothermic process and enthalpy driven and also explore that the polyphenon-60 binds in both sites of Lys with high and low affinity. Hydrogen bonding (high affinity) and hydrophobic interactions (low affinity) are the major forces in stabilizing the drug protein complex. Far-UV CD and FTIR results deciphere the conformational alterations in the secondary structure of Lys.

  11. Artificial neural networks for processing fluorescence spectroscopy data in skin cancer diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhardt, L; Zeković, I; Dramićanin, T; Dramićanin, M D

    2013-01-01

    Over the years various optical spectroscopic techniques have been widely used as diagnostic tools in the discrimination of many types of malignant diseases. Recently, synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) coupled with chemometrics has been applied in cancer diagnostics. The SFS method involves simultaneous scanning of both emission and excitation wavelengths while keeping the interval of wavelengths (constant-wavelength mode) or frequencies (constant-energy mode) between them constant. This method is fast, relatively inexpensive, sensitive and non-invasive. Total synchronous fluorescence spectra of normal skin, nevus and melanoma samples were used as input for training of artificial neural networks. Two different types of artificial neural networks were trained, the self-organizing map and the feed-forward neural network. Histopathology results of investigated skin samples were used as the gold standard for network output. Based on the obtained classification success rate of neural networks, we concluded that both networks provided high sensitivity with classification errors between 2 and 4%. (paper)

  12. Detection of Fluorescence for Lanthanides in LiCl-KCl Molten Salt Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Hee Jung; Kim, Tack Jin; Song, Kyu Seok; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2007-01-01

    In the electrorefining step of the pyrochemical process, actinide ions dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt are recovered as pure actinide metals at a cathode for a re-use as a nuclear fuel from the aspect of its nonproliferation of the nuclear fuel cycles. The lanthanide species dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt play an important role in an effective metal purification during the electrorefining step, so it is necessary to understand the chemical and physical behaviors of lanthanides in molten salt. The in situ spectroscopic measurement system and studies according to temperature changes are essential for better understandable information. To our knowledge, the absorption studies of lanthanides at high temperatures have been reported before, but the fluorescence studies of those at high temperature are not reported yet. We will discuss here the fluorescence behaviors of lanthanides in LiCl-KCl molten salt medium according to a changing temperature

  13. A novel Schiff-base as a Cu(II) ion fluorescent sensor in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Z. Yurtman; Gündüz, C.; Özpınar, C.; Urucu, O. Aydın

    2015-02-01

    A new fluorescent Cu(II) sensor (L) obtained from the Schiff base of 5,5‧-methylene-bis-salicylaldehyde with amidol (2,4-diaminophenol) was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR techniques. In the presence of pH 6.5 (KHPO4-Na2HPO4) buffer solutions, copper reacted with L to form a stable 2:1 complex. Fluorescence spectroscopic study showed that Schiff base is highly sensitive towards Cu(II) over other metal ions (K+, Na+, Al3+, Ni2+, Co2+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Pb2+) in DMSO/H2O (30%, v/v). The sensor L was successfully applied to the determination of copper in standard reference material. The structural properties and molecular orbitals of the complex formed between L and Cu2+ ions were also investigated using quantum chemical computations.

  14. Femtosecond two-photon laser-induced fluorescence of krypton for high-speed flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; Capps, Cade; Kulatilaka, Waruna D

    2017-02-15

    Ultrashort-pulse (femtosecond-duration) two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TPLIF) of an inert gas tracer krypton (Kr) is investigated. A detailed spectroscopic study of fluorescence channels followed by the 5p'←←4p excitation of Kr at 204.1 nm is reported. The experimental line positions in the 750-840 nm emission region agree well with the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The present work provides an accurate listing of relative line strengths in this spectral region. In the range of laser pulse energies investigated, a quadratic dependence was observed between the Kr-TPLIF signal and the laser pulse energy. The single-laser-shot 2D TPLIF images recorded in an unsteady jet demonstrate the potential of using fs excitation at 204.1 nm for mixing and flow diagnostic studies using Kr as an inert gas tracer.

  15. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements. PMID:25071950

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of some chalcopyrite-xanthate flotation products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andreev, GN

    2003-12-16

    Full Text Available of normal vibrations of the corresponding individual compounds. The latter facilitated the Raman spectroscopic elucidation of the reaction products formed on the chalcopyrite surface in real industrial flotation conditions with a sodium isopropyl xanthate...

  17. Synthesis, Spectroscopic Properties and DFT Calculation of Novel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L1) identifies its molecular structure and reveals π-π stacking. The synthetic mechanisms for L2, L3 were studied by density functional theory calculations. And a comprehensive study of spectroscopic properties involving experimental data and ...

  18. ITER perspective on fusion reactor diagnostics - A spectroscopic view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Barnsley, R.; Bassan, M.

    2016-01-01

    challenges to the development of spectroscopic (but also other) diagnostics. This contribution presents an overview of recent achievements in 4 topical areas: First mirror protection and cleaning, Nuclear confinement, Radiation mitigation strategy for optical and electronic components and Calibration...

  19. Development and validation of a spectroscopic method for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development and validation of a spectroscopic method for the simultaneous analysis of ... advanced analytical methods such as high pressure liquid ..... equipment. DECLARATIONS ... high-performance liquid chromatography. J Chromatogr.

  20. [Spectroscopic characteristics of novel Psidium meroterpenoids isolated from guava leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wen; Zhu, Xiao-ai; Liu, Xiao-juan; Yie, Shu-min; Zhao, Litchao; Su, Lei; Cao, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Recently, novel Psidium meroterpenoids were reported in the guava leaves. According to careful analysis of the spectral data of literatures, the spectroscopic characteristics and biosynthetic pathway of Psidium meroterpenoids were summarized in this paper. The results showed that Psidium meroterpenoids had distinct spectroscopic features and reasonable biosynthetic routines, however the number order of carbon atoms was not consistent in the reported literatures. It was concluded that Psidium meroterpenoids were the characteristic chemical constituents of Psidium guajava Linn.

  1. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  2. Fuel cells: spectroscopic studies in the electrocatalysis of alcohol oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasita Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Modern spectroscopic methods are useful for elucidating complex electrochemical mechanisms as those occurring during the oxidation of small organic molecules (CH3OH, HCOH, HCOOH). In the present paper it is shown the use of spectroscopic methods to study the oxidation of alcohols on platinum or Pt-based binary electrodes. These reactions are of importance in conexion with the development of anode systems for use in fuel cells. Mass spectrometry and FT infrared spectroscopy allow to establishi...

  3. EPR spectroscopic investigation of psoriatic finger nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Minakawa, Satoko; Sawamura, Daisuke

    2013-11-01

    Nail lesions are common features of psoriasis and found in almost half of the patients. However, there is no feasible spectroscopic method evaluating changes and severity of nail psoriasis. EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) might be feasible for evaluating nail conditions in the patients of psoriasis. Finger nails of five cases with nail psoriasis, (three females and two males) were examined. Nail samples were subjected to the EPR assay. The small piece of the finger nail (1.5 × 5 mm(2)) was incubated in ~50 μM 5-DSA (5-doxylstearic acid) aqueous solutions for about 60 min at 37°C. After rinsing and wiping off the excess 5-DSA solution, the nail samples were measured by EPR. EPR spectra were analyzed using the intensity ratio (Fast/Slow) of the two motions at the peaks of the lower magnetic field. We observed two distinguishable sites on the basis of the EPR results. In addition, the modern EPR calculation was performed to analyze the spectra obtained. The nail psoriasis-related region is 2~3 times higher than that of the control. The present EPR results show that there are two distinguishable sites in the nail. In the case of nail psoriasis, the fragile components are 2~3 times more than those of the control. Thus, the EPR method is thought to be a novel and reliable method of evaluating the nail psoriasis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer: Scientific Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; Ninkov, Zoran; Robberto, Massimo; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    GESE is a mission concept consisting of a 1.5-m space telescope and UV multi-object slit spectrograph designed to help understand galaxy evolution in a critical era in the history of the universe, where the rate of star-formation stopped increasing and started to decline. To isolate and identify the various processes driving the evolution of these galaxies, GESE will obtain rest-frame far-UV spectra of 100,000 galaxies at redshifts, z approximately 1-2. To obtain such a large number of spectra, multiplexing over a wide field is an absolute necessity. A slit device such as a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) or a micro-shutter array (MSA) enables spectroscopy of a hundred or more sources in a single exposure while eliminating overlapping spectra of other sources and blocking unwanted background like zodiacal light. We find that a 1.5-m space telescope with a MSA slit device combined with a custom orbit enabling long, uninterrupted exposures (approximately 10 hr) are optimal for this spectroscopic survey. GESE will not be operating alone in this endeavor. Together with x-ray telescopes and optical/near-IR telescopes like Subaru/Prime Focus Spectrograph, GESE will detect "feedback" from young massive stars and massive black holes (AGN's), and other drivers of galaxy evolution.

  5. Raman spectroscopic studies of hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-01-07

    Raman spectroscopic measurements of simple hydrogen and tetrahydrofuran+hydrogen sII clathrate hydrates have been performed. Both the roton and vibron bands illuminate interesting quantum dynamics of enclathrated H(2) molecules. The complex vibron region of the Raman spectrum has been interpreted by observing the change in population of these bands with temperature, measuring the absolute H(2) content as a function of pressure, and with D(2) isotopic substitution. Quadruple occupancy of the large sII clathrate cavity shows the highest H(2) vibrational frequency, followed by triple and double occupancies. Singly occupied small cavities display the lowest vibrational frequency. The vibrational frequencies of H(2) within all cavity environments are redshifted from the free gas phase value. At 76 K, the progression from ortho- to para-H(2) occurs over a relatively slow time period (days). The rotational degeneracy of H(2) molecules within the clathrate cavities is lifted, observed directly in splitting of the para-H(2) roton band. Raman spectra from H(2) and D(2) hydrates suggest that the occupancy patterns between the two hydrates are analogous, increasing confidence that D(2) is a suitable substitute for H(2). The measurements suggest that Raman is an effective and convenient method to determine the relative occupancy of hydrogen molecules in different clathrate cavities.

  6. Vacuum arc anode plasma. I. Spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, F.M.

    1975-01-01

    A spectroscopic investigation was made of the anode plasma of a pulsed vacuum arc with an aluminum anode and a molybdenum cathode. The arc was triggered by a third trigger electrode and was driven by a 150-A 10-μs current pulse. The average current density at the anode was sufficiently high that anode spots were formed; these spots are believed to be the source of the aluminum in the plasma investigated in this experiment. By simultaneously measuring spectral emission lines of Al I, Al II, and Al III, the plasma electron temperature was shown to decrease sequentially through the norm temperatures of Al III, Al II, and Al I as the arc was extinguished. The Boltzmann distribution temperature T/subD/ of four Al III excited levels was shown to be kT/subD//e=2.0plus-or-minus0.5 V, and the peak Al III 4D excited state density was shown to be about 5times10 17 m -3 . These data suggest a non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) model of the anode plasma when compared with the Al 3+ production in the plasma. The plasma was theoretically shown to be optically thin to the observed Al III spectral lines

  7. Theoretical predictions for alpha particle spectroscopic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    Multinucleon transfers induced in heavy-ion reactions of the type ( 6 Li,d) furnish a selective probe with which to study the interplay between rotational and clustering phenomena so characteristic of the structure of the light sd-shell nuclei. For these nuclei, theoretical predictions for inter-band as well as intra-band transfer strengths can be made using recently tabulated results for angular momentum dependent SU 3 inclusion R 3 relative spectroscopic strengths and angular momentum independent SU 6 inclusion SU 3 coefficients of fractional parentage. The pure SU 3 (oscillator)-SU 4 (supermultiplet) symmetry limit agrees well with results obtained using available eigenfunctions determined in large shell model calculations. In particular, the scalar nature of a transferred ''alpha''-cluster insures that the effect of spatial symmetry admixtures in the initial and final states of the target and residual nuclei are minimized. Sum rule quantities provide a measure of the probable effects of symmetry breaking. Strength variations within a band are expected; transfers to core excited states are often favored. Results extracted from exact finite range DWBA analyses of ( 6 Li,d) data on 16 , 18 O, 20 , 21 , 22 Ne, 24 , 25 Mg show some anomalies in our understanding of the structure and/or reaction mechanisms. (18 figures) (U.S.)

  8. IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR TRANSITING PLANET HOSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Guillermo; Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Sozzetti, Alessandro [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Winn, Joshua N., E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We report homogeneous spectroscopic determinations of the effective temperature, metallicity, and projected rotational velocity for the host stars of 56 transiting planets. Our analysis is based primarily on the stellar parameter classification (SPC) technique. We investigate systematic errors by examining subsets of the data with two other methods that have often been used in previous studies (Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME) and MOOG). The SPC and SME results, both based on comparisons between synthetic spectra and actual spectra, show strong correlations between T{sub eff}, [Fe/H], and log g when solving for all three quantities simultaneously. In contrast the MOOG results, based on a more traditional curve-of-growth approach, show no such correlations. To combat the correlations and improve the accuracy of the temperatures and metallicities, we repeat the SPC analysis with a constraint on log g based on the mean stellar density that can be derived from the analysis of the transit light curves. Previous studies that have not taken advantage of this constraint have been subject to systematic errors in the stellar masses and radii of up to 20% and 10%, respectively, which can be larger than other observational uncertainties, and which also cause systematic errors in the planetary mass and radius.

  9. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopic studies of chiral media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkin, Mikhail Alexandrovich

    2004-01-01

    Molecular chirality plays an important role in chemistry, biology, and medicine. Traditional optical techniques for probing chirality, such as circular dichroism and Raman optical activity rely on electric-dipole forbidden transitions. As a result, their intrinsic low sensitivity limits their use to probe bulk chirality rather than chiral surfaces, monolayers or thin films often important for chemical or biological systems. Contrary to the traditional chirality probes, chiral signal in sum-frequency generation (SFG) is electric-dipole allowed both on chiral surface and in chiral bulk making it a much more promising tool for probing molecular chirality. SFG from a chiral medium was first proposed in 1965, but had never been experimentally confirmed until this thesis work was performed. This thesis describes a set of experiments successfully demonstrating that chiral SFG responses from chiral monolayers and liquids are observable. It shows that, with tunable inputs, SFG can be used as a sensitive spectroscopic tool to probe chirality in both electronic and vibrational resonances of chiral molecules. The monolayer sensitivity is feasible in both cases. It also discusses the relevant theoretical models explaining the origin and the strength of the chiral signal in vibrational and electronic SFG spectroscopies

  11. Spectroscopic study of ohmically heated Tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, C.; Michelis, C. de; Mattioli, M.

    1980-07-01

    Tokamak discharges interact strongly with the wall and/or the current aperture limiter producing recycling particles, which penetrate into the discharge and which can be studied spectroscopically. Working gas (hydrogen or deuterium) is usually studied observing visible Balmer lines at several toroidal locations. Absolute measurements allow to obtain both the recycling flux and the global particle confinement time. With sufficiently high resolution the isotopic plasma composition can be obtained. The impurity elements can be divided into desorbed elements (mainly oxygen) and eroded elements (metals from both walls and limiter) according to the plasma-wall interaction processes originating them. Space-and time-resolved emission in the VUV region down to about 20 A will be reviewed for ohmically-heated discharges. The time evolution can be divided into four phases, not always clearly separated in a particular discharge: a) the initial phase, lasting less than 10 ms (the so-called burn-out phase), b) the period of increasing plasma current and electron temperature, lasting typically 10 - 100 ms, c) an eventual steady state (plateau of the plasma current with almost constant density and temperature), d) the increase of the electron density up to or just below the maximum value attainable in a given device. For all these phases the results reported from different devices will be described and compared

  12. Spectroscopic Characterization of Omeprazole and Its Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Vrbanec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During drug development, it is important to have a suitable crystalline form of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API. Mostly, the basic options originate in the form of free base, acid, or salt. Substances that are stable only within a certain pH range are a challenge for the formulation. For the prazoles, which are known to be sensitive to degradation in an acid environment, the formulation is stabilized with alkaline additives or with the application of API formulated as basic salts. Therefore, preparation and characterization of basic salts are needed to monitor any possible salinization of free molecules. We synthesized salts of omeprazole from the group of alkali metals (Li, Na, and K and alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca. The purpose of the presented work is to demonstrate the applicability of vibrational spectroscopy to discriminate between the OMP and OMP-salt molecules. For this reason, the physicochemical properties of 5 salts were probed using infrared and Raman spectroscopy, NMR, TG, DSC, and theoretical calculation of vibrational frequencies. We found out that vibrational spectroscopy serves as an applicable spectroscopic tool which enables an accurate, quick, and nondestructive way to determine the characteristic of OMP and its salts.

  13. How spectroscopic ellipsometry can aid graphene technology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria, E-mail: maria.losurdo@cnr.it; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bianco, Giuseppe V.; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2014-11-28

    We explore the effects of substrate, grain size, oxidation and cleaning on the optical properties of chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline monolayer graphene exploiting spectroscopic ellipsometry in the NIR-Vis–UV range. Both Drude–Lorentz oscillators' and point-by-point fit approaches are used to analyze the ellipsometric spectra. For monolayer graphene, since anisotropy cannot be resolved, an isotropic model is used. A prominent absorption peak at approximately 4.8 eV, which is a mixture of π–π* interband transitions at the M-point of the Brillouin zone and of the π-plasmonic excitation, is observed. We discuss the sensitivity of this peak to the structural and cleaning quality of graphene. The comparison with previous published dielectric function spectra of graphene is discussed giving a rationale for the observed differences. - Highlights: • Optical properties of graphene are determined by ellipsometry on copper and on glass. • Optical spectra reveal the cleaning quality of transferred graphene. • Sensitivity of absorption peak to graphene structural quality is proven. • Optical properties are proven to be sensitive to oxidation of graphene. • Electronic interaction with substrate affects graphene optical properties.

  14. Photoacoustic spectroscopic studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zahid H.; Kumar, Pardeep; Garg, R. K.

    1999-02-01

    Because of their involvement in environmental pollutants, in carcinogenic activity, plastics, pharmaceuticals, synthesis of some laser dyes and presence in interstellar space etc., Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important. As their structure and properties can be varied systematically, they form a beautiful class of molecules for experimental and quantum chemical investigations. These molecules are being studied for last several years by using conventional spectroscopy. In recent years, Photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy has emerged as a new non-destructive technique with unique capability and sensitivity. The PA effect is the process of generation of acoustic waves in a sample resulting from the absorption of photons. This technique not only reveals non- radiative transitions but also provides information about forbidden singlet-triplet transitions which are not observed normally by the conventional spectroscopy. The present paper deals with the spectroscopic studies of some PAH molecules by PA spectroscopy in the region 250 - 400 nm. The CNDO/S-CI method is used to calculate the electronic transitions with the optimized geometries. A good agreement is found between the experimental and calculated results.

  15. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  16. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The principle, instrument and procedure of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are described. It is a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the trace analysis of elements from sodium to uranium in powder, liquid or metal samples. (M.G.B.)

  17. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  18. Erythrocyte fluorescence and lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K G

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples from people exposed to inorganic lead were examined by fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin. With continued lead absorption, fluorescent erythrocytes appeared in the circulation of workers handling this metal or its compounds, and they progressively increased in number and brilliance. These changes ensued if the blood lead concentration was maintained above 2-42 mumol/l (50 mug/100 ml), and preceded any material fall in the haemoglobin value. At one factory, 62-5% of 81 symptomless workers showed erythrocyte fluorescence attributable to the toxic effects of lead. Excess fluorocytes were found in blood samples from a child with pica and three of her eight siblings. These four were subsequently shown to have slightly increased blood lead concentrations (2-03 to 2-32 mumol/l). Fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin is a sensitive method for the detection of chronic lead intoxication. A relatively slight increase in the blood lead is associated with demonstrabel changes in erythrocyte porphyrin content. The procedure requires little blood, and may be performed upon stored samples collected for lead estimation. The results are not readily influenced by contamination, and provide good confirmatory evidence for the absorption of biochemically active lead. PMID:963005

  19. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateu, Batirtze Prats; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L; Kainz, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  20. THE zCOSMOS 10k-BRIGHT SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Maier, Christian; Carollo, Marcella; Caputi, Karina; Le Brun, Vincent; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fevre, Olivier; De la Torre, Sylvain; De Ravel, Loic; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Mignoli, Marco; Zamorani, Gianni; Bardelli, Sandro; Bolzonella, Micol; Coppa, Graziano; Scodeggio, Marco; Contini, Thierry; Renzini, Alvio; Bongiorno, Angela; Cucciati, Olga

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of a large sample of galaxies with I AB -1 , independent of redshift. The reliability of individual redshifts is described by a Confidence Class that has been empirically calibrated through repeat spectroscopic observations of over 600 galaxies. There is very good agreement between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts for the most secure Confidence Classes. For the less secure Confidence Classes, there is a good correspondence between the fraction of objects with a consistent photometric redshift and the spectroscopic repeatability, suggesting that the photometric redshifts can be used to indicate which of the less secure spectroscopic redshifts are likely right and which are probably wrong, and to give an indication of the nature of objects for which we failed to determine a redshift. Using this approach, we can construct a spectroscopic sample that is 99% reliable and which is 88% complete in the sample as a whole, and 95% complete in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8. The luminosity and mass completeness levels of the zCOSMOS-bright sample of galaxies is also discussed.

  1. Role of xanthophylls in light harvesting in green plants: a spectroscopic investigation of mutant LHCII and Lhcb pigment-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuciman, Marcel; Enriquez, Miriam M; Polívka, Tomáš; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Frank, Harry A

    2012-03-29

    The spectroscopic properties and energy transfer dynamics of the protein-bound chlorophylls and xanthophylls in monomeric, major LHCII complexes, and minor Lhcb complexes from genetically altered Arabidopsis thaliana plants have been investigated using both steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The pigment-protein complexes that were studied contain Chl a, Chl b, and variable amounts of the xanthophylls, zeaxanthin (Z), violaxanthin (V), neoxanthin (N), and lutein (L). The complexes were derived from mutants of plants denoted npq1 (NVL), npq2lut2 (Z), aba4npq1lut2 (V), aba4npq1 (VL), npq1lut2 (NV), and npq2 (LZ). The data reveal specific singlet energy transfer routes and excited state spectra and dynamics that depend on the xanthophyll present in the complex.

  2. Spectroscopic and kinetic study of bismuth dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Robert Eugene

    1997-08-01

    The spectroscopy of high rotational levels in Bi2 X(0g+) and A(0u+) was investigated for 2/le v/prime'/le5 and 0/le v/sp/prime/le4 by observing total fluorescence from laser excitation with a scanning, continuous wave, narrow linewidth ring laser. Rotational levels with J/le211 were accessed. Dunham coefficients were derived that fit all observed rotational lines to within 0.01 cm-1. From these coefficients, Franck-Condon factors were calculated that accurately reflect a set of experimentally determined Franck-Condon factors originating from the initially populated levels 0/le v/sp/prime/le5. Vibrational energy transfer in the low-lying vibrational levels (v/sp/prime/le4) of the A(0u+) state of Bi2 was investigated using spectrally resolved, continuous wave laser induced fluorescence. Spectrally resolved emissions from collisionally populated Bi2(A) vibrational levels were observed for rare gas collision partners. Vibrational transfer promoted rapid thermalization of the excited A state molecules. Landau- Teller scaling of vibrational transfer rates was found to be an acceptable model for the scaling of transfer rates with vibrational quantum number. Fundamental transfer rate coefficients ranged from kv(1,0)=5.29/pm0.73×10-12/ [ cm]3/molec-sec for helium to kv(1,0)=2.38/pm0.36×10-12/ [ cm]3/molec-sec for krypton. Electronic quenching and multi-quantum transfer rates were found to be approximately an order of magnitude slower than the corresponding single quantum transfer rates. Rotational energy transfer in high rotational levels of the A state of Bi2 was also investigated by spectrally resolved, continuous wave laser induced fluorescence. Spectrally resolved emissions from collisionally populated Bi2(A) rotational levels were observed for collisions with helium, neon and argon after laser excitation of J/sp/prime=171,201,231. Rotational energy transfer was the most efficient kinetic process in Bi2(A) and is adequately modeled by the energy based statistical

  3. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  4. Imaging, scattering, and spectroscopic systems for biomedical optics: Tools for bench top and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, William J.

    Optical advances have had a profound impact on biology and medicine. The capabilities range from sensing biological analytes to whole animal and subcellular imaging and clinical therapies. The work presented in this thesis describes three independent and multifunctional optical systems, which explore clinical therapy at the tissue level, biological structure at the cell/organelle level, and the function of underlying fundamental cellular processes. First, we present a portable clinical instrument for delivering delta-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivered the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performed reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument was used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, and blood oxygen saturation during a clinical ALA-PDT trial on superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 632.8 nm PDT treatment laser was collected between 665 and 775 nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programmable time points, white-light reflectance spectra between 475 and 775 nm were acquired. Fluorescence spectra were corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular-value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provided information on hemoglobin oxygen saturation. We next describe the incorporation of this instrument into clinical trials at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, NY). In this trial we examined the effects of light irradiance on photodynamic efficiency and pain. The rate of singlet-oxygen production depends on the product of irradiance and photosensitizer and oxygen

  5. Structural design of intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J; Modzel, Maciej; Krishnan, Kathiresan

    2018-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized derivatives of cholesterol with many important biological functions. Trafficking of oxysterols in and between cells is not well studied, largely due to the lack of appropriate oxysterol analogs. Intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols present a new route towards direct...... observation of intracellular oxysterol trafficking by fluorescence microscopy. We characterize the fluorescence properties of the existing fluorescent 25-hydroxycholesterol analog 25-hydroxycholestatrienol, and propose a new probe with an extended conjugated system. The location of both probes inside...

  6. ZnSe quantum dots based fluorescence quenching method for determination of paeoniflorin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhi [Center of Analysis, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808 (China); School of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Jiayi; Liang, Qiaowen [School of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wu, Dudu [Center of Analysis, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808 (China); Zeng, Yuaner, E-mail: zengyuaner@126.com [School of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jiang, Bin, E-mail: gzjiangbin@hotmail.com [School of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Water soluble ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) modified by mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) were used to determinate paeoniflorin in aqueous solutions by the fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The results showed that the fluorescence of the modified ZnSe QDs could be quenched by paeoniflorin effectively in physiological buffer solution. The optimum fluorescence intensity was found to be at incubation time 10 min, pH 7.0 and temperature 25 °C. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of paeoniflorin was 7.30×10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1}. Moreover, the quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure, which was proved by quenching rate constant K{sub q} (1.02×10{sup 13} L mol{sup −1} s{sup −1}). -- Highlights: • The fluorescence intensity of ZnSe QDs could be quenched by paeoniflorin. • Foreign substance showed insignificant effect for determination of paeoniflorin. • The quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure.

  7. Deep brain two-photon NIR fluorescence imaging for study of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Congping; Liang, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Biao; Ip, Nancy Y.; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2018-02-01

    Amyloid depositions in the brain represent the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. The abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) and resulting toxic amyloid plaques are considered to be responsible for the clinical deficits including cognitive decline and memory loss. In vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of amyloid plaques in live AD mouse model through a chronic imaging window (thinned skull or craniotomy) provides a mean to greatly facilitate the study of the pathological mechanism of AD owing to its high spatial resolution and long-term continuous monitoring. However, the imaging depth for amyloid plaques is largely limited to upper cortical layers due to the short-wavelength fluorescence emission of commonly used amyloid probes. In this work, we reported that CRANAD-3, a near-infrared (NIR) probe for amyloid species with excitation wavelength at 900 nm and emission wavelength around 650 nm, has great advantages over conventionally used probes and is well suited for twophoton deep imaging of amyloid plaques in AD mouse brain. Compared with a commonly used MeO-X04 probe, the imaging depth of CRANAD-3 is largely extended for open skull cranial window. Furthermore, by using two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopic imaging, we characterized the intrinsic fluorescence of the "aging pigment" lipofuscin in vivo, which has distinct spectra from CRANAD-3 labeled plaques. This study reveals the unique potential of NIR probes for in vivo, high-resolution and deep imaging of brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Organic Alternatives to Quantum Dots for Intraoperative Near-Infrared Fluorescent Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Ohnishi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative near-infrared (NIR fluorescence imaging provides the surgeon with real-time image guidance during cancer and other surgeries. We have previously reported the use of NIR fluorescent quantum dots (QDs for sentinel lymph node (SLN mapping. However, because of concerns over potential toxicity, organic alternatives to QDs will be required for initial clinical studies. We describe a family of 800 nm organic heptamethine indocyanine-based contrast agents for SLN mapping spanning a spectrum from 775 Da small molecules to 7 MDa nanocolloids. We provide a detailed characterization of the optical and physical properties of these contrast agents and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. We present robust methods for the covalent conjugation, purification, and characterization of proteins with tetra-sulfonated heptamethine indocyanines, including mass spectroscopic site mapping of highly substituted molecules. One contrast agent, NIR fluorescent human serum albumin (HSA800, emerged as the molecule with the best overall performance with respect to entry to lymphatics, flow to the SLN, retention in the SLN, fluorescence yield and reproducibility. This preclinical study, performed on large animals approaching the size of humans, should serve as a foundation for future clinical studies.

  9. Screening of biologically important Zn2 + by a chemosensor with fluorescent turn on-off mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tanveer A.; Sheoran, Monika; Nikhil Raj M., Venkata; Jain, Surbhi; Gupta, Diksha; Naik, Sunil G.

    2018-01-01

    Reported herein the synthesis, characterization and biologically important zinc ion binding propensity of a weakly fluorescent chemosensor, 4-methyl-2,6-bis((E)-(2-(4-phenylthiazol-2-yl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (1). 1H NMR spectroscopic titration experiment reveals the binding knack of 1 to the essential Zn2 +. The photo-physical studies of 1 exhibit an enhancement in the fluorescence by several folds upon binding with the zinc ions attributed to PET-off process, with a binding constant value of 5.22 × 103 M- 1. 1 exhibits an excellent detection range for Zn2 + with lower detection limit value of 2.31 × 10- 8 M. The selectivity of 1 was studied with various mono and divalent metal cations and it was observed that most cations either quenches the fluorescence or remains unchanged except for Cd2 +, which shows a slight enhancement in fluorescence intensity of 1. The ratiometric displacement of Cd2 + ions by Zn2 + ions shows an excellent selectivity towards in-situ detection of Zn2 + ions. Photo-physical studies also support the reversible binding of 1 to Zn2 + ions having on and off mechanism in presence of EDTA. Such recognition of the biologically important zinc ions finds potential application in live cell imaging.

  10. ZnSe quantum dots based fluorescence quenching method for determination of paeoniflorin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jiayi; Liang, Qiaowen; Wu, Dudu; Zeng, Yuaner; Jiang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) modified by mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) were used to determinate paeoniflorin in aqueous solutions by the fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The results showed that the fluorescence of the modified ZnSe QDs could be quenched by paeoniflorin effectively in physiological buffer solution. The optimum fluorescence intensity was found to be at incubation time 10 min, pH 7.0 and temperature 25 °C. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of paeoniflorin was 7.30×10 −7 mol L −1 . Moreover, the quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure, which was proved by quenching rate constant K q (1.02×10 13 L mol −1 s −1 ). -- Highlights: • The fluorescence intensity of ZnSe QDs could be quenched by paeoniflorin. • Foreign substance showed insignificant effect for determination of paeoniflorin. • The quenching mechanism was discussed to be a static quenching procedure

  11. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  12. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  13. A review on syntheses, properties, characterization and bioanalytical applications of fluorescent carbon dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Pengli; Lu, Xiuhua; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Yuhan; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) are a kind of fluorescent nanoparticles that are strongly fluorescent, non-blinking, and can be easily synthesized at low cost. Their emission color can be tuned by varying the excitation wavelength. Their properties make them strong competitors to semiconductor quantum dots. Synthetic approaches for C-dots can be classified into two categories, viz. top-down and bottom-up methods. Surface passivated and functionalized C-dots can be utilized to sense pH values, metal ions and organic molecules. Owing to their low cytotoxicity, biocompatibility and impressive photostability, long-term observations become possible. C-dots also show promise as labels and for bioimaging. This review (with 142 refs.) is divided into several sections. The first covers commonly used methods for preparation of C-dots including laser ablation, arc discharge, electrochemical methods, pyrolytic processes, template based methods, microwave assisted methods, chemical oxidation methods, reverse micelle based methods, etc. The first section also covers methods for surface functionalization and passivation. We continue by discussing the spectroscopic properties and other physical and chemical properties of C-dots (fluorescence, up-conversion fluorescence, methods for enhancing photoluminescence, effects of pH value, cytotoxicity, etc.). Another section covers the characterization including TEM and XRD. Applications in biology are summarized and subdivided into in vitro imaging, in vivo imaging, chemical probe, quantitation of biomacromolecules, but also in drug delivery, photoacoustic imaging and anticancer therapy. We finally discuss current challenges and perspectives in this promising field. (author)

  14. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50 nm undercut. Furthermore, quantum-yield-dependence of lifetime reduction has been

  15. Lipid chain saturation and the cholesterol in the phospholipid membrane affect the spectroscopic properties of lipophilic dye nile red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Animesh; Saha, Baishakhi; Maity, Pabitra; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Karmakar, Sanat

    2018-02-01

    We have studied the effect of composition and the phase state of phospholipid membranes on the emission spectrum, anisotropy and lifetime of a lipophilic fluorescence probe nile red. Fluorescence spectrum of nile red in membranes containing cholesterol has also been investigated in order to get insights into the influence of cholesterol on the phospholipid membranes. Maximum emission wavelength (λem) of nile red in the fluid phase of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids was found to differ by 10 nm. The λem was also found to be independent of chain length and charge of the membrane. However, the λem is strongly dependent on the temperature in the gel phase. The λem and rotational diffusion rate decrease, whereas the anisotropy and lifetime increase markedly with increasing cholesterol concentration for saturated phosoholipids, such as, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in the liquid ordered phase. However, these spectroscopic properties do not alter significantly in case of unsaturated phospholipids, such as, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) in liquid disordered phase. Interestingly, red edge excitation shift (REES) in the presence of lipid-cholesterol membranes is the direct consequences of change in rotational diffusion due to motional restriction of lipids in the presence of cholesterol. This study provides correlations between the membrane compositions and fluorescence spectral features which can be utilized in a wide range of biophysical fields as well the cell biology.

  16. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of 125 I and 103 Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089–6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated 125 I and 103 Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 125 I and 6 103 Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 × 2.7 × 0.05 cm 3 voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the 125 I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for 103 Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were ⩽0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in 125 I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The 103 Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when calculated with the TG-43U1 rather than the NNDC(2000) initial spectrum. The measured values from three different

  17. Submillimeter Spectroscopic Study of Semiconductor Processing Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Yaser H.

    Plasmas used for manufacturing processes of semiconductor devices are complex and challenging to characterize. The development and improvement of plasma processes and models rely on feedback from experimental measurements. Current diagnostic methods are not capable of measuring absolute densities of plasma species with high resolution without altering the plasma, or without input from other measurements. At pressures below 100 mTorr, spectroscopic measurements of rotational transitions in the submillimeter/terahertz (SMM) spectral region are narrow enough in relation to the sparsity of spectral lines that absolute specificity of measurement is possible. The frequency resolution of SMM sources is such that spectral absorption features can be fully resolved. Processing plasmas are a similar pressure and temperature to the environment used to study astrophysical species in the SMM spectral region. Many of the molecular neutrals, radicals, and ions present in processing plasmas have been studied in the laboratory and their absorption spectra have been cataloged or are in the literature for the purpose of astrophysical study. Recent developments in SMM devices have made its technology commercially available for applications outside of specialized laboratories. The methods developed over several decades in the SMM spectral region for these laboratory studies are directly applicable for diagnostic measurements in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. In this work, a continuous wave, intensity calibrated SMM absorption spectrometer was developed as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. A major advantage of intensity calibrated rotational absorption spectroscopy is its ability to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species from first principles without altering the plasma environment. An important part of this work was the design of the optical components which couple 500 - 750 GHz radiation through a commercial inductively coupled plasma

  18. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W"2"4"+ - W"3"2"+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W"2"2"+ - W"3"5"+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W"2"5"+ - W"2"8"+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p"54d"n"+"1 - 4p"64d"n, of W"2"9"+ - W"3"5"+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p"54d"n4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  20. Nuclear spectroscopic studies in 162Yb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.

    1980-01-01

    The decay of the highly excited 162 Yb nuclei formed in the reaction 150 Sm( 16 O,4n) 162 Yb to the ground state was studied using different gamma detectors and an electron spectrometer, a so called mini-orange. The isotope 162 Yb was moreover produced and spectroscoped by the beta-decay of 162 Lu. For the identification of decay cascades, which were passed after the fusion, and for the determination of the multipolarity of the contributing energy transitions a series of experiments took place: The excitation functions and the angular distributions of the emitted gamma radiation was measured, the conversion coefficients of important transitions were determined, and coincidence events between two detectors occasionally were registrated and analyzed. In the beta decay measurement an assignment of gamma transitions to 162 Yb followed due to the lifetime, under which they occured. The found states of 162 Yb upto spins of 22 h/2π and excitation energies above 5 MeV belong to five rotational bands. The yrast band shows a weak backbending. Corresponding to their spins and parities the bands can be reduced to intrinsic excitation of two quasineutrons. The analysis of the beta-decay of 162 Lu, which takes place from three states in 162 Lu, leads to the lowest levels of the gamma-vibrational band and the band head of the beta band. The microscopic interpretation of the rotational bands and the description of the backbending behaviour are as the interpretation of the states involved at the beta decay in agreement with experimental and theoretical results for neighbouring ytterbium isotopes. (orig.) [de

  1. Optical spectroscopic determination of human meniscus composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Honkanen, Juuso T J; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the composition of human meniscus and its absorption spectrum in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. Meniscus samples (n = 24) were obtained from nonarthritic knees of human cadavers with no history of joint diseases. Specimens (n = 72) were obtained from three distinct sections of the meniscus, namely; anterior, center, posterior. Absorption spectra were acquired from each specimen in the VIS and NIR spectral range (400-1,100 nm). Following spectroscopic probing, the specimens were subjected to biochemical analyses to determine the matrix composition, that is water, hydroxyproline, and uronic acid contents. Multivariate analytical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, were then used to investigate the correlation between the matrix composition and it spectral response. Our results indicate that the optical absorption of meniscus matrix is related to its composition, and this relationship is optimal in the NIR spectral range (750-1,100 nm). High correlations (R(2) (uronic)  = 86.9%, R(2) (water)  = 83.8%, R(2) (hydroxyproline)  = 81.7%, p meniscus composition, thus suggesting that spectral data in the NIR range can be utilized for estimating the matrix composition of human meniscus. In conclusion, optical spectroscopy, particularly in the NIR spectral range, is a potential method for evaluating the composition of human meniscus. This presents a promising technique for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of meniscus integrity in real-time during arthroscopic surgery. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  3. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    In the present study, pure and 0.3 wt%, 0.4 wt%, as well as 0.5 wt% L-arginine doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals were grown using solution growth techniques and further subjected to infrared (IR) absorption and Raman studies for confirmation of chemical group functionalization for investigating the incorporation mechanism of the L-arginine organic material into the KDP crystal structure. Infrared spectroscopic analysis suggests that structural changes are occurring for the L-arginine molecule as a result of its interaction with the KPD crystal. Infrared spectroscopic technique confirms the disturbance of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, suggesting successful incorporation of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. Raman analysis also reveals modification of the N-H, C-H and C-N bonds of the amino acid, implying successful inclusion of L-arginine into the KDP crystals. With the help of Gaussian software, a prediction of possible incorporation mechanisms of the organic material was obtained from comparison of the simulated infrared and Raman vibrational spectra with the experimental results. Furthermore, we also studied the effect of L-arginine doping on the thermal stability of the grown KDP crystal by employing Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA suggests that increasing the level of L-arginine doping speeds the decomposition process and it weakens the KDP crystal, which indicates successful doping of the KDP crystals with L-arginine amino acid. Urinary stones are one of the oldest and most widely spread diseases in humans, animals and birds. Many remedies have been employed through the ages for the treatment of urinary stones. Recent medicinal measures reflect the modern advances, which are based on surgical removal, percutaneous techniques and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Although these procedures are valuable, they are quite expensive for most people. Furthermore, recurrence of these diseases is awfully frequent with

  4. Reduced Fluorescent Protein Switching Fatigue by Binding-Induced Emissive State Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Roebroek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs enable advanced fluorescence imaging, though the performance of this imaging crucially depends on the properties of the labels. We report on the use of an existing small binding peptide, named Enhancer, to modulate the spectroscopic properties of the recently developed rsGreen series of RSFPs. Fusion constructs of Enhancer with rsGreen1 and rsGreenF revealed an increased molecular brightness and pH stability, although expression in living E. coli or HeLa cells resulted in a decrease of the overall emission. Surprisingly, Enhancer binding also increased off-switching speed and resistance to switching fatigue. Further investigation suggested that the RSFPs can interconvert between fast- and slow-switching emissive states, with the overall protein population gradually converting to the slow-switching state through irradiation. The Enhancer modulates the spectroscopic properties of both states, but also preferentially stabilizes the fast-switching state, supporting the increased fatigue resistance. This work demonstrates how the photo-physical properties of RSFPs can be influenced by their binding to other small proteins, which opens up new horizons for applications that may require such modulation. Furthermore, we provide new insights into the photoswitching kinetics that should be of general consideration when developing new RSFPs with improved or different photochromic properties.

  5. Optical diagnostic of breast cancer using Raman, polarimetric and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Firdous, Shamaraz; Rehman, Aziz-ul; Nawaz, Muhammed

    2015-04-01

    We presented the optical diagnostic of normal and cancerous human breast tissues using Raman, polarimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Optical diagnostics of cancer offered early intervention and the greatest chance of cure. Spectroscopic data were collected from freshly excised surgical specimens of normal tissues with Raman bands at 800, 1171 and 1530 cm-1 arising mainly by lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates and amino acids. For breast cancer, Raman bands are observed at 1070, 1211, 1495, 1583 and 1650 cm-1. Results demonstrate that the spectra of normal tissue are dominated by lipids and amino acids. Polarization decomposition of the Mueller matrix and confocal microscopic fluorescence provides detailed description of cancerous tissue and distinguishes between the normal and malignant one. Based on these findings, we successfully differentiate normal and malignant breast tissues at an early stage of disease. There is a need to develop a new tool for noninvasive, real-time diagnosis of tissue abnormalities and a test procedure for detecting breast cancer at an early stage.

  6. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  7. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS); Ortsaufgeloeste Analyse von Uranspezies mittels einem Gekoppelten System aus Konfokaler Laser-Scanning Mikroskopie (CLSM) und Laser Induzierter Fluoreszenzspektroskopie (LIFS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, S. [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Ressourcenoekologie

    2014-01-15

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10{sup -6} M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  8. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  9. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  11. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  12. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  13. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  14. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  15. Influence of different water-ethanol solvent systems on the spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties of the macrocyclic compounds pheophytin and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Leonardo M.; Rodrigues, Maira R.; Oliveira, Hueder P. M. de; Lima, Adriana; Soares, Rafael R. S.; Batistela, Vagner R.; Gerola, Adriana P.; Hioka, Noboru; Severino, Divinomar; Baptista, Mauricio S.; Machado, Antonio Eduardo da Hora

    2010-01-01

    This work focus on the influence of solvent on the photophysical properties of chlorophyll a and pheophytin. Both compounds are related to the photosynthesis process and are considered prototypes of photosensitizers in Photodynamic Therapy. Fluorescence measurements were developed using water/ethanol mixtures at different compositions, since both solvents could be employed in biological applications. The spectroscopic properties of these compounds undergo profound changes depending on water content in the ethanol due to auto-aggregation processes. The major hydrophobicity and the lower dielectric constant of ethanol when compared with water precluded significantly the auto-aggregation process of these compounds. (author)

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  17. Automatic classification of fluorescence and optical diffusion spectroscopy data in neuro-oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelieva, T. A.; Loshchenov, V. B.; Goryajnov, S. A.; Potapov, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The complexity of the biological tissue spectroscopic analysis due to the overlap of biological molecules' absorption spectra, multiple scattering effect, as well as measurement geometry in vivo has caused the relevance of this work. In the neurooncology the problem of tumor boundaries delineation is especially acute and requires the development of new methods of intraoperative diagnosis. Methods of optical spectroscopy allow detecting various diagnostically significant parameters non-invasively. 5-ALA induced protoporphyrin IX is frequently used as fluorescent tumor marker in neurooncology. At the same time analysis of the concentration and the oxygenation level of haemoglobin and significant changes of light scattering in tumor tissues have a high diagnostic value. This paper presents an original method for the simultaneous registration of backward diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra, which allows defining all the parameters listed above simultaneously. The clinical studies involving 47 patients with intracranial glial tumors of II-IV Grades were carried out in N.N. Burdenko National Medical Research Center of Neurosurgery. To register the spectral dependences the spectroscopic system LESA- 01-BIOSPEC was used with specially developed w-shaped diagnostic fiber optic probe. The original algorithm of combined spectroscopic signal processing was developed. We have created a software and hardware, which allowed (as compared with the methods currently used in neurosurgical practice) to increase the sensitivity of intraoperative demarcation of intracranial tumors from 78% to 96%, specificity of 60% to 82%. The result of analysis of different techniques of automatic classification shows that in our case the most appropriate is the k Nearest Neighbors algorithm with cubic metrics.

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, J.; Bruneau, S.; Sentis, M.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma generated by the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with gas has been analyzed using time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The laser beam has been focused with a microscope objective into different gases (air, Ar, He) at pressures ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 Pa. From the analysis of spectral line emission from ions and neutral atoms, the plasma parameters and the plasma composition have been determined as a function of time and space. Furthermore, the generation of fast electrons and/or VUV radiation by the femtosecond laser interaction with the gas was brought to the fore. From the time- and space-evolution of the plasma parameters, a rough estimation of initial values of electron density and refraction index in the focal volume has been performed. These results are compared to analysis of the laser beam transmitted by the plasma. The latter show that only a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed by the plasma while the spatial distribution of the transmitted laser beam is strongly perturbed by the plasma, which acts like a defocusing lens. However, in ambient helium, the plasma defocusing is weak due to the high ionization potential of helium. The understanding of femtosecond laser-induced gas breakdown is useful for process optimization in femtosecond laser applications like micromachining or surface microanalysis, etc

  19. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  20. ON THE SPECTROSCOPIC CLASSES OF NOVAE IN M33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Darnley, M. J.; Bode, M. F.; Ciardullo, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial results from an ongoing multi-year spectroscopic survey of novae in M33. The survey resulted in the spectroscopic classification of six novae (M33N 2006-09a, 2007-09a, 2009-01a, 2010-10a, 2010-11a, and 2011-12a) and a determination of rates of decline (t 2 times) for four of them (2006-09a, 2007-09a, 2009-01a, and 2010-10a). When these data are combined with existing spectroscopic data for two additional M33 novae (2003-09a and 2008-02a), we find that five of the eight novae with available spectroscopic class appear to be members of either the He/N or Fe IIb (hybrid) classes, with only two clear members of the Fe II spectroscopic class. This initial finding is very different from what would be expected based on the results for M31 and the Galaxy where Fe II novae dominate, and the He/N and Fe IIb classes together make up only ∼20% of the total. It is plausible that the increased fraction of He/N and Fe IIb novae observed in M33 thus far may be the result of the younger stellar population that dominates this galaxy, which is expected to produce novae that harbor generally more massive white dwarfs than those typically associated with novae in M31 or the Milky Way.

  1. Hydrogen bond strengthening induces fluorescence quenching of PRODAN derivative by turning on twisted intramolecular charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggang; Li, Donglin; Li, Chaozheng; Liu, YuFang; Jiang, Kai

    2017-12-01

    Researchers have proposed different effective mechanisms of hydrogen bonding (HB) on the fluorescence of 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and its derivatives. Herein, excited state transition and dynamics analysis confirm that the fluorescence of PD (a derivative of PRODAN with ethyl replaced by 3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropan) emits from the planar intramolecular charge transfer (PICT) state rather than twist ICT (TICT) state, because the fluorescence emission and surface hopping from the TICT state to the twist ground (T-S0) state is energy forbidden. Nevertheless, the strengthening of intramolecular-HB (intra-HB) and intermolecular-HB (inter-HB) of PD-(methanol)2 smooth the pathway of surface hopping from TICT to T-S0 state and the external conversion going to planar ground state by decreasing the energy difference of the two states. This smoothing changes the fluorescence state of PD-(methanol)2 to the TICT state in which fluorescence emission does not occur but surface hopping, leading to the partial fluorescence quenching of PD in methanol solvent. This conclusion is different from previous related reports. Moreover, the inter-HB strengthening of PD-methanol in PICT state induces the cleavage of intra-HB and a fluorescence red-shift of 54 nm compared to PD. This red-shift increases to 66 nm for PD-(methanol)2 for the strengthening of the one intra-HB and two inter-HBs. The dipole moments of PD-methanol and PD-(methanol)2 respectively increase about 10.3D and 8.1D in PICT state compared to PD. The synergistic effect of intra-HB and inter-HB induces partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent by turning on the TICT state and fluorescence red-shift. This work gives a reasonable description on the fluorescence red-shift and partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent, which will bring insight into the study of spectroscopic properties of molecules owning better spectral characteristics.

  2. SPECTROSCOPIC SIGNATURES RELATED TO A SUNQUAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Green, L. M. [UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zharkov, S., E-mail: sarah.matthews@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Hull, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-10

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time–distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time–distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time–distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red

  3. Moessbauer spectroscopic characterization of ferrite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The principle of Moessbauer effect and the nature of hyperfine interactions were presented. The discovery of the Moessbauer effect was the basis of a new spectroscopic technique, called Moessbauer spectroscopy, which has already made important contribution to research in physics, chemistry, metallurgy, mineralogy and biochemistry. In the present work the selected ferrites such as spinel ferrite, NiFe 2 O 4 , and some rare earth orthoferrites and garnets were investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. The formation of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored during the thermal decomposition of mixed salt (Ni(NO 3 ) 2 +2Fe(NO 3 ) 3 )nH 2 O. The ferritization of Ni 2+ ions was observed at 500 deg. C and after heating at 1300 deg. C the stoichiometric NiFe 2 O 4 was produced. The Moessbauer parameters obtained for NiFe 2 O 4 , d Fe = 0.36 mm s -1 and HMF = 528 kOe, can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the octahedral sublattice, while parameters d Fe = 0.28 mm s -1 and HMF = 494 kOe can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the tetrahedral lattice. The effect of ball-milling of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored. The formation of oxide phases and their properties in the systems Nd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 and Er 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 were also investigated. Quantitative distributions of oxide phases, a-Fe 2 O 3 , R 2 O 3 , R 3 Fe 5 O 12 and RFeO 3 , R = Gd or Eu, were determined for the systems xGd 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 and xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 . The samples, prepared by chemical coprecipitation in the system xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 , 0≤x≤1, were completely amorphous as observed by XRD, even at the relatively high temperature of the sample preparation (600 deg. C). Similar behavior was observed during the formation of Er 3 Fe 5 O 12 . Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated that this 'amorphous' phase is actually composed of very small and/or poor

  4. Spectroscopic studies on colloid-borne uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, K.U.; Weiss, S.; Foerstendorf, H.; Brendler, V.; Zaenker, H.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Information on molecular speciation provides a basis for the reliable assessment of actinide migration in the environment. We use several methods for the separation of colloids from liquids (e.g. ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration) in combination with spectroscopic techniques (EXAFS, ATR-FTIR, Moessbauer) and modeling of surface complexation reactions. This enables us to investigate the speciation of colloid-borne uranium in waters occurring in or escaping from abandoned uranium mines during the remediation process. Mine flooding was simulated on a 100 L scale by mixing acid mine water of elevated U concentration with oxic, near-neutral groundwater until pH ∼ 5.5 was reached. The freshly formed colloids adsorbed 95% of the total uranium and consisted mainly of 2-line ferri-hydrite (Fh) besides traces of aluminum, sulfur, silica, and carbon compounds. EXAFS analysis at the U-LIII absorption edge suggested a bidentate surface complex of UO 2 2+ on FeO 6 octahedra, but two minor backscattering contributions in close vicinity to the absorber remained unexplained. Since only Al could be excluded as backscattering atom, we studied U sorption on Fh at pH 5.5 in presence and in absence of sulfate, silicate, and atmospheric CO 2 to clarify the bond structure. EXAFS showed the unknown backscattering contributions in all the sorption samples regardless of the presence or absence of the tested components. Contrary to structural models proposed in the literature, bi-dentately complexed carbonate ligands do not explain our experimental EXAFS data. But ATR-IR spectra showed that U-carbonato complexes must be involved in the sorption of uranyl on Fh. These results are not contradictory if the carbonate ligands were bound mono-dentately. Nevertheless, carbon cannot act as backscattering atom in carbonate-free samples prepared in N 2 atmosphere. We propose a new structural model including exclusively Fe, H, and O atoms in which the bi

  5. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyung Ki; Song, K S; Kim, D H; Yang, K H; Jung, E C; Jeong, D Y; Yi, Y J; Lee, S M; Hong, K H; Han, J M; Yoo, B D; Rho, S P; Yi, J H; Park, H M; Cha, B H; Nam, S M; Lee, J M

    1997-09-01

    For the development of the laser initiated high resolution, ultra sensitive analysis technology following field of researches have been performed. (1) Laser resonance ionization technology, (2) Laser-induced rare isotope detection technology, (3) Laser-induced plasma analysis technology, (4) Microparticle analysis technology by using ion trap, (5) Laser induced remote sensing technique. As a result a monitoring system for photoionized product is developed and the test of system is performed with Sm sample. The rare isotope detection system is designed and a few key elements of the system are developed. In addition a laser-induced plasma analysis system is developed and samples such as Zircaloy, Zinc-base alloy, rock samples are reasonably analyzed. The detection sensitivity is identified as good as a few ppm order. An ion trap is developed and microparticles such as SiC are trapped inside the trap by ac and dc fields. The fluorescence signals from the organic dyes as well as rare earth element which are absorbed on the microparticles are detected. Several calibration curves are also obtained. In the field of laser remote sensing a mobile Lidar system is designed and several key elements are developed. In addition the developed system is used for the detection of Ozone, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, etc. (author). 57 refs., 42 figs.

  6. Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyung Ki; Song, K. S.; Kim, D. H.; Yang, K. H.; Jung, E. C.; Jeong, D. Y.; Yi, Y. J.; Lee, S. M.; Hong, K. H.; Han, J. M.; Yoo, B. D.; Rho, S. P.; Yi, J. H.; Park, H. M.; Cha, B. H.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, J. M.

    1997-09-01

    For the development of the laser initiated high resolution, ultra sensitive analysis technology following field of researches have been performed. 1) Laser resonance ionization technology, 2) Laser-induced rare isotope detection technology, 3) Laser-induced plasma analysis technology, 4) Microparticle analysis technology by using ion trap, 5) Laser induced remote sensing technique. As a result a monitoring system for photoionized product is developed and the test of system is performed with Sm sample. The rare isotope detection system is designed and a few key elements of the system are developed. In addition a laser-induced plasma analysis system is developed and samples such as Zircaloy, Zinc-base alloy, rock samples are reasonably analyzed. The detection sensitivity is identified as good as a few ppm order. An ion trap is developed and microparticles such as SiC are trapped inside the trap by ac and dc fields. The fluorescence signals from the organic dyes as well as rare earth element which are absorbed on the microparticles are detected. Several calibration curves are also obtained. In the field of laser remote sensing a mobile Lidar system is designed and several key elements are developed. In addition the developed system is used for the detection of Ozone, NO 2 , SO 2 , etc. (author). 57 refs., 42 figs

  7. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, B.C.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  8. Chemical mapping of pharmaceutical cocrystals using terahertz spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Danielle M; Ajito, Katsuhiro; Kim, Jae-Young; Ueno, Yuko

    2013-02-19

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic imaging is a promising technique for distinguishing pharmaceuticals of similar molecular composition but differing crystal structures. Physicochemical properties, for instance bioavailability, are manipulated by altering a drug's crystal structure through methods such as cocrystallization. Cocrystals are molecular complexes having crystal structures different from those of their pure components. A technique for identifying the two-dimensional distribution of these alternate forms is required. Here we present the first demonstration of THz spectroscopic imaging of cocrystals. THz spectra of caffeine-oxalic acid cocrystal measured at low temperature exhibit sharp peaks, enabling us to visualize the cocrystal distribution in nonuniform tablets. The cocrystal distribution was clearly identified using THz spectroscopic data, and the cocrystal concentration was calculated with 0.3-1.3% w/w error from the known total concentration. From this result, THz spectroscopy allows quantitative chemical mapping of cocrystals and offers researchers and drug developers a new analytical tool.

  9. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  10. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Ken; Weck, Phil; Poineau, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  11. Comparative investigation on the spectroscopic properties of Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liaolin; Dong, Guoping; Peng, Mingying; Qiu, Jianrong

    We report on the spectroscopic properties of Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses. The stimulated absorption and emission cross sections were estimated. Only one emission at 596 nm and 605 nm is observed in Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate and boro-germo-silicate glasses, respectively, while three emissions at 605 nm, 612 nm and 645 nm are observed in Pr3+-doped tellurite glass when excited at 467 nm. The fluorescence lifetime at 600 nm in Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses is 137 μs, 73 μs and 51 μs, respectively. The emissions from Pr3+-doped boro-phosphate, boro-germo-silicate and tellurite glasses show different decay behaviors and can be well explained by multiphonon relaxation theory.

  12. A spectroscopic study of the hydrogen bonding and pi-pi stacking interactions of harmane with quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balón, M; Guardado, P; Muñoz, M A; Carmona, C

    1998-01-01

    A spectroscopic (UV-vis, Fourier transform IR, steady state, and time-resolved fluorescence) study of the interactions of the ground and excited singlet states of harmane (1-methyl-9H-pyrido/3,4-b/indole) with quinoline has been carried out in cyclohexane, toluene, and buffered pH=8.7 aqueous solutions. To analyze how the number of rings in the substrate influences these interactions, pyridine and phenanthridine have also been included in this study. In cyclohexane and toluene 1:1 stoichiometric hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed in both the ground and the excited singlet states. As the number of rings of the benzopyridines and the solvent polarity increase hydrogen-bonding interactions weaken and pi-pi van der Waals interactions become apparent.

  13. Layer-by-layer films and colloidal dispersions of graphene oxide nanosheets for efficient control of the fluorescence and aggregation properties of the cationic dye acridine orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansda, Chaitali; Chakraborty, Utsav; Hussain, Syed Arshad; Bhattacharjee, Debajyoti; Paul, Pabitra Kumar

    2016-03-15

    Chemically derived graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have received great deal of interest for technological application such as optoelectronic and biosensors. Aqueous dispersions of GO become an efficient template to induce the association of cationic dye namely Acridine Orange (AO). Interactions of AO with colloidal GO was governed by both electrostatic and π-π stacking cooperative interactions. The type of dye aggregations was found to depend on the concentration of GO in the mixed ensemble. Spectroscopic calculations revealed the formation of both H and J-type dimers, but H-type aggregations were predominant. Preparation of layer-by-layer (LbL) electrostatic self-assembled films of AO and GO onto poly (allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) coated quartz substrate is also reported in this article. UV-Vis absorption, steady state and time resolve fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic techniques have been employed to explore the detail photophysical properties of pure AO, AO/GO mixed solution and AO/GO LbL films. Scanning electron microscopy was also used for visual evidence of the synthesized nanodimensional GO sheets. The fluorescence quenching of AO in the presence of GO in aqueous solution was due to the interfacial photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from photoexcited AO to GO i.e. GO acts as an efficient quenching agent for the fluorescence emission of AO. The quenching is found to be static in nature. Raman spectroscopic results also confirmed the interaction of AO with GO and the electron transfer. The formation of AO/GO complex via very fast excited state electron transfer mechanism may be proposed as to prepare GO-based fluorescence sensor for biomolecular detection without direct labeling the biomolecules by fluorescent probe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Near-infrared Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) by WINERED: CN Red-system Band Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Yasui, Chikako; Izumi, Natsuko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Fukue, Kei; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Otsubo, Shogo; Takenaka, Keiichi; Watase, Ayaka; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya [Laboratory of Infrared High-resolution Spectroscopy, Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mizumoto, Misaki, E-mail: yoshiharu.shinnaka@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    Although high-resolution spectra of the CN red-system band are considered useful in cometary sciences, e.g., in the study of isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen in cometary volatiles, there have been few reports to date due to the lack of high-resolution ( R  ≡  λ /Δ λ  > 20,000) spectrographs in the near-infrared region around ∼1 μ m. Here, we present the high-resolution emission spectrum of the CN red-system band in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), acquired by the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph WINERED mounted on the 1.3 m Araki telescope at the Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto, Japan. We applied our fluorescence excitation models for CN, based on modern spectroscopic studies, to the observed spectrum of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) to search for CN isotopologues ({sup 13}C{sup 14}N and {sup 12}C{sup 15}N). We used a CN fluorescence excitation model involving both a “pure” fluorescence excitation model for the outer coma and a “fully collisional” fluorescence excitation model for the inner coma region. Our emission model could reproduce the observed {sup 12}C{sup 14}N red-system band of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy). The derived mixing ratio between the two excitation models was 0.94(+0.02/−0.03):0.06(+0.03/−0.02), corresponding to the radius of the collision-dominant region of ∼800–1600 km from the nucleus. No isotopologues were detected. The observed spectrum is consistent, within error, with previous estimates in comets of {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C (∼90) and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N (∼150).

  15. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 domain of phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Schiereis, T; Hegemann, P

    2005-10-03

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterisation of the combined wild-type LOV1-LOV2 domain string (abbreviated LOV1/2) of phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is carried out at pH 8. A LOV1/2-MBP fusion protein (MBP=maltose binding protein) and LOV1/2 with a His-tag at the C-terminus (LOV1/2-His) expressed in an Escherichia coli strain are investigated. Blue-light photo-excitation generates a non-fluorescent intermediate photoproduct (flavin-C(4a)-cysteinyl adduct with absorption peak at 390 nm). The photo-cycle dynamics is studied by dark-state absorption and fluorescence measurement, by following the temporal absorption and emission changes under blue and violet light exposure, and by measuring the temporal absorption and fluorescence recovery after light exposure. The fluorescence quantum yield, phi(F), of the dark adapted samples is phi(F)(LOV1/2-His) approximately 0.15 and phi(F)(LOV1/2-MBP) approximately 0.17. A bi-exponential absorption recovery after light exposure with a fast (in the several 10-s range) and a slow component (in the near 10-min range) are resolved. The quantum yield of photo-adduct formation, phi(Ad), is extracted from excitation intensity dependent absorption measurements. It decreases somewhat with rising excitation intensity. The behaviour of the combined wildtype LOV1-LOV2 double domains is compared with the behaviour of the separate LOV1 and LOV2 domains.

  16. Spectroscopic study of interaction between osthole and human serum albumin: Identification of possible binding site of the compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijari, Nooshin [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokoohinia, Yalda [Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ranjbar, Samira; Parvaneh, Shahram [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moieni-Arya, Maryam [Student Research Committee, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The studies on the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and drugs have been an interesting research field in life science, chemistry and clinical medicine. Osthole possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, anti-seizure, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-osteoporosis effects. The interaction of osthole with HSA and its binding site in HSA by spectroscopic methods is the subject of this work. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of the single Trp{sub 214} residue and performing site markers displacement measurements, the specific binding of osthole in the vicinity of Sudlow's site I of HSA has been clarified. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA after its complexation with ligand were studied with CD spectroscopy, which indicate that osthole induced only a slight decrease in the helix structural content of the protein. In addition, the mean distance between osthole and HSA fluorophores is estimated to be 4.96 nm using Föster's equation on the basis of the fluorescence energy transfer. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Osthole can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by dynamic quenching, and analysis of the thermodynamic parameters of binding showed that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in the stabilizing of the complex. Increase of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also observed upon the osthole binding. -- Highlights: • Hydrophobic interactions play an important role in osthole–HSA interaction. • Sudlow's I site is possible binding site of osthole. • Osthole inhibits esterase activity of HSA. • Osthole binding induces no gross protein structural changes.

  17. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  18. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  19. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores

  20. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  1. Spectroscopic study of low-lying 16N levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardayan, Daniel W.; O'Malley, Patrick; Blackmon, Jeff C.; Chae, K.Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J.A.; Hatarik, Robert; Jones, K.L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Peters, W.A.; Pittman, S.T.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shriner, J.F. Jr.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2008-01-01

    The magnitude of the 15N(n,gamma)16N reaction rate in asymptotic giant branch stars depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels. A new study of the 15N(d,p)16N reaction is reported populating the ground and first three excited states in 16N. The measured spectroscopic factors are near unity as expected from shell model calculations, resolving a long-standing discrepancy with earlier measurements that had never been confirmed or understood. Updated 15N(n,gamma)16N reaction rates are presented

  2. Probing superconductors. Spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a cuprate triggered developments of various spectroscopic tools which have been utilized to elucidate electronic states of this mysterious compound. Particularly, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning-tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy are improved considerably. It is now possible to map the superconducting gap in both momentum and real spaces using these two techniques. Here we review spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy which is able to explore momentum-space phase structure of the superconducting gap, as well as real-space structure. Applications of this technique to a cuprate and an iron-based superconductor are discussed. (author)

  3. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  4. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  5. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies of Nd:glass laser materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseberg, L.A.; Brecher, C.

    The increasing importance of Nd glass lasers in laser fusion technology has emphasized the inadequacy in the understanding of the optical properties of rare earth ions in glasses. Indeed, it has been difficult to generate models for the performance of these devices, and the selection of host glasses could be done by little more than a trial-and-error approach. The technique of laser-induced fluorescence line-narrowing developed within the last few years provides a new and powerful tool for the study of these systems. In this technique, a laser excites within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands a selected subgroup of the ions in the system, namely those whose absorption energy is resonant with the laser. If the excitation does not migrate among the entire collection of ions prior to fluorescence, the fluorescence that is observed is only from the group that was excited and is narrowed. This permits the selective study of classes of ion sites within the ensemble. The concept is indicated schematically. By the use of a tunable laser, such as a dye laser, it is possible to vary the class of sites, defined by energy, that is excited and thereby study the important spectroscopic properties and their variations, unclouded by the averaging that occurs under excitation of the entire system. Furthermore, it is then possible to use the spectroscopic information to infer a description of the variation of the microscopic environment, and a rationalization of the effects of compositional changes. Use of a pulsed dye laser and time-resolved detection permits the study of the dynamics, including, for example, the energy transfer among ions of different energies within the inhomogeneously-broadened spectrum. The goal of this project has been to apply such studies to glasses of interest to glass laser technology, providing information for device modeling, and establishing design criteria for glass selection

  6. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyom Lue

    Full Text Available There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS, and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm, and both high spectral resolution (2 nm and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue. Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (<5% error. Finally, studies using human breast tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a

  7. Quantization of bovine serum albumin by fluorescence enhancement effects and corresponding binding of macrocyclic host-protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Misra, Tapas; Ganguly, Tapan

    2012-01-05

    The present paper reports the investigations on the spectroscopic behavior of the binary complexes of the dye aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 18-crown 6 (CW) (ATA·BSA, ATA·CW) and the ternary complex ATA·CW·BSA by using UV-vis steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The primary aim of the work is to determine the protein (BSA) quantization by fluorescence enhancement method and investigate the 'enhancer' activity of crown ether (CW) on it to increase the resolution. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrated how fluorescence intensity of ATA could be used for the determination of the protein BSA in aqueous solution. The binding of dye (probe/fluorescent medicinal molecule) with protein and the denaturing effect in the polar environment of acetonitrile of the dye protein complex act as drug binding as well as drug release activity. Apart from its basic research point of view, the present study also possesses significant importance and applications in the field of medicinal chemistry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced glutathione content allows the in vivo synthesis of fluorescent CdTe nanoparticles by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P Monrás

    Full Text Available The vast application of fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs or quantum dots (QDs has prompted the development of new, cheap and safer methods that allow generating QDs with improved biocompatibility. In this context, green or biological QDs production represents a still unexplored area. This work reports the intracellular CdTe QDs biosynthesis in bacteria. Escherichia coli overexpressing the gshA gene, involved in glutathione (GSH biosynthesis, was used to produce CdTe QDs. Cells exhibited higher reduced thiols, GSH and Cd/Te contents that allow generating fluorescent intracellular NP-like structures when exposed to CdCl(2 and K(2TeO(3. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that QDs-producing cells accumulate defined structures of various colors, suggesting the production of differently-sized NPs. Purified fluorescent NPs exhibited structural and spectroscopic properties characteristic of CdTe QDs, as size and absorption/emission spectra. Elemental analysis confirmed that biosynthesized QDs were formed by Cd and Te with Cd/Te ratios expected for CdTe QDs. Finally, fluorescent properties of QDs-producing cells, such as color and intensity, were improved by temperature control and the use of reducing buffers.

  9. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  10. Combined fluorescence-Raman spectroscopy measurements with an optical fiber probe for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rossari, Susanna; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2012-02-01

    We have designed and developed an optical fiber-probe for spectroscopic measurements on human tissues. The experimental setup combines fluorescence spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in a multidimensional approach. Concerning fluorescence spectroscopy, the excitation is provided by two laser diodes, one emitting in the UV (378 nm) and the other emitting in the visible (445 nm). These two lasers are used to selectively excite fluorescence from NADH and FAD, which are among the brightest endogenous fluorophores in human tissues. For Raman and NIR spectroscopy, the excitation is provided by a third laser diode with 785 nm excitation wavelength. Laser light is delivered to the tissue through the central optical fiber of a fiber bundle. The surrounding 48 fibers of the bundle are used for collecting fluorescence and Raman and for delivering light to the spectrograph. Fluorescence and Raman spectra are acquired on a cooled CCD camera. The instrument has been tested on fresh human skin biopsies clinically diagnosed as malignant melanoma, melanocytic nevus, or healthy skin, finding an optimal correlation with the subsequent histological exam. In some cases our examination was not in agreement with the clinical observation, but it was with the histological exam, demonstrating that the system can potentially contribute to improve clinical diagnostic capabilities and hence reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  11. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.

  12. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Myungkoo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-12-06

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7β, 8α-dihydoxy-9α, l0α-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[α]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, (-)-trans-, (+)-cis- and (-)-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( ~25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant π-π stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G2 or G3 (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N2-dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[α]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N2-dG.

  13. Spectroscopic investigations of novel pharmaceuticals: Stability and resonant interaction with laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Adriana; Boni, Mihai; Andrei, Ionut Relu; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Staicu, Angela; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents data about photophysics of two novel thio-hydantoins that exhibit promising pharmaceutical properties in multidrug resistance control. Time stability studies are necessary to establish the proper use of these compounds in different applications. As for their administration as drugs, it is imperative to know their shelf life, as well as storage conditions. At the same time, laser induced modified properties of the two new compounds are valuable to further investigate their specific interactions with other materials, including biological targets. The two new thio-hydantoins under generic names SZ-2 and SZ-7 were prepared as solutions in dimethyl sulfoxide at different concentrations, as well as in deionised water. For the stability assay they were kept in various light/temperature conditions up to 60 days. The stability was estimates based on UV-vis absorption measurements. The samples in bulk shape were exposed different time intervals to laser radiation emitted at 266 nm as the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The resonant interaction of the studied compounds with laser beams was analysed through spectroscopic methods UV-vis and FTIR absorption, as well as laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. As for stability assay, only solutions kept in dark at 4 °C have preserved the absorption characteristics, considering the cumulated measuring errors, less than one week. The vibrational changes that occur in their FTIR and modified fluorescence spectra upon laser beam exposure are also discussed. A result of the experimental analysis is that modifications are induced in molecular structures of the investigated compounds by resonant interaction with laser radiation. This fact evidences that the molecules are photoreactive and their characteristics might be shaped through controlled laser radiation exposure using appropriate protocols. This conclusion opens many opportunities both in the biomedical field, but also in other industrial activities

  14. Spectroscopic investigation of Bovine Liver Catalase interactions with a novel phen-imidazole derivative of platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Roohollah; Divsalar, Adeleh; Harifi-Mood, Ali Reza; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2018-02-01

    Successful clinical experience of using cisplatin and its derivatives in cancer therapy has encouraged scientists to synthesize new metal complexes with the aim of interacting with special targets such as proteins In this regard, biological effects of [Pt(FIP)(Phen)](NO 3 ) 2 compound which contains a novel phen-imidazole ligand, FIP, was investigated on bovine liver catalase (BLC) structure and function. Various spectroscopic methods such as UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) were applied at two temperatures 25 and 37°C for kinetics and structural studies. As a consequence, the enzymatic activity decreased slightly with increasing the platinum compound's concentration up to 30 μM and then remained constant at near 80% after this concentration. On the other hand, the fluorescence quenching measurements revealed that despite slight changes in activity, catalase experiences notable alterations in three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure with increasing platinum complex concentration. Moreover, quenching data showed that BLC has two binding sites for Pt complex and hydrogen bonding interactions play a major role in the binding process. Furthermore, CD spectroscopy data showed that Pt(II) complex induces significant decrease in α-helix content of the secondary structure of BLC, but notable increase in random coil proportion accompanying a slight decrease in β-sheet content. All in all, hydrogen bonding interactions which are mainly involved in the binding process of the novel phen-imidazole compound to BLC significantly alter the protein structure but slightly change its function. This might be a promising outcome for chemotherapists and medicinal chemists to investigate in vivo properties of this novel metal complex with significant binding tendency to a macromolecule in the low concentrations without decreasing its intrinsic function.

  15. Extractability of water-soluble soil organic matter as monitored by spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkhili, Ezzhora; Guyot, Ghislain; Vassal, Nathalie; Richard, Claire

    2012-07-01

    Cold and hot water processes have been intensively used to recover soil organic matter, but the effect of extraction conditions on the composition of the extracts were not well investigated. Our objective was to optimize the extraction conditions (time and temperature) to increase the extracted carbon efficiency while minimizing the possible alteration of water extractable organic matter of soil (WEOM). WEOM were extracted at 20°C, 60°C, or 80°C for 24 h, 10-60 min, and 20 min, respectively. The different processes were compared in terms of pH of suspensions, yield of organic carbon, spectroscopic properties (ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence), and by chromatographic analyses. For extraction at 60°C, the time 30 min was optimal in terms of yield of organic carbon extracted and concentration of absorbing and fluorescent species. The comparison of WEOM 20°C, 24 h; 60°C, 30 min; and 80°C, 20 min highlighted significant differences. The content of total organic carbon, the value of specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)), the absorbance ratio at 254 and 365 nm (E (2)/E (3)), and the humification index varied in the order: WEOM (20°C, 24 h) < WEOM (80°C, 20 min) < WEOM (60°C, 30 min). The three WEOM contained common fluorophores associated with simple aromatic structures and/or fulvic-like and common peaks of distinct polarity as detected by ultra performance liquid chromatography. For the soil chosen, extraction at 60°C for 30 min is the best procedure for enrichment in organic chemicals and minimal alteration of the organic matter.

  16. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Myungkoo.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7β, 8α-dihydoxy-9α, l0α-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[α]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, (-)-trans-, (+)-cis- and (-)-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( ∼ 25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant π-π stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G 2 or G 3 (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N 2 -dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[α]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N 2 -dG

  17. X-Ray Beam Studies of Charge Sharing in Small Pixel, Spectroscopic, CdZnTe Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwork, Christopher; Kitou, Dimitris; Chaudhuri, Sandeep; Sellin, Paul J.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.; Tartoni, Nicola; Veeramani, Perumal

    2012-08-01

    Recent advances in the growth of CdZnTe material have allowed the development of small pixel, spectroscopic, X-ray imaging detectors. These detectors have applications in a diverse range of fields such as medical, security and industrial sectors. As the size of the pixels decreases relative to the detector thickness, the probability that charge is shared between multiple pixels increases due to the non zero width of the charge clouds drifting through the detector. These charge sharing events will result in a degradation of the spectroscopic performance of detectors and must be considered when analyzing the detector response. In this paper charge sharing and charge loss in a 250 μm pitch CdZnTe pixel detector has been investigated using a mono-chromatic X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. Using a 20 μm beam diameter the detector response has been mapped for X-ray energies both above (40 keV) and below (26 keV) the material K-shell absorption energies to study charge sharing and the role of fluorescence X-rays in these events.

  18. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Yb3+-doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO2 were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO2 on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO2 possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms, the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm2, the maximum Stark splitting manifold of 2F7/2 level (781 cm−1, and the largest scalar crystal-field NJ and Yb3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO2 promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO2 content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO6] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb3+-doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers.

  19. Structure-Dependent Spectroscopic Properties of Yb3+-Doped Phosphosilicate Glasses Modified by SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Zeng, Huidan; Yang, Bin; Ye, Feng; Chen, Jianding; Chen, Guorong; Smith, Andew T.; Sun, Luyi

    2017-01-01

    Yb3+-doped phosphate glasses containing different amounts of SiO2 were successfully synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method. The influence mechanism of SiO2 on the structural and spectroscopic properties was investigated systematically using the micro-Raman technique. It was worth noting that the glass with 26.7 mol % SiO2 possessed the longest fluorescence lifetime (1.51 ms), the highest gain coefficient (1.10 ms·pm2), the maximum Stark splitting manifold of 2F7/2 level (781 cm−1), and the largest scalar crystal-field NJ and Yb3+ asymmetry degree. Micro-Raman spectra revealed that introducing SiO2 promoted the formation of P=O linkages, but broke the P=O linkages when the SiO2 content was greater than 26.7 mol %. Based on the previous 29Si MAS NMR experimental results, these findings further demonstrated that the formation of [SiO6] may significantly affect the formation of P=O linkages, and thus influences the spectroscopic properties of the glass. These results indicate that phosphosilicate glasses may have potential applications as a Yb3+-doped gain medium for solid-state lasers and optical fiber amplifiers. PMID:28772601

  20. Infrared laser spectroscopic trace gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Chemical sensing and analyses of gas samples by laser spectroscopic methods are attractive owing to several advantages such as high sensitivity and specificity, large dynamic range, multi-component capability, and lack of pretreatment or preconcentration procedures. The preferred wavelength range comprises the fundamental molecular absorption range in the mid-infared between 3 and 15 μm, whereas the near-infrared range covers the (10-100 times weaker) higher harmonics and combination bands. The availability of near-infrared and, particularly, of broadly tunable mid-infrared sources like external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs), interband cascade lasers (ICLs), difference frequency generation (DFG), optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), recent developments of diode-pumped lead salt semiconductor lasers, of supercontinuum sources or of frequency combs have eased the implementation of laser-based sensing devices. Sensitive techniques for molecular absorption measurements include multipass absorption, various configurations of cavity-enhanced techniques such as cavity ringdown (CRD), or of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) including quartz-enhanced (QEPAS) or cantilever-enhanced (CEPAS) techniques. The application requirements finally determine the optimum selection of laser source and detection scheme. In this tutorial talk I shall discuss the basic principles, present various experimental setups and illustrate the performance of selected systems for chemical sensing of selected key atmospheric species. Applications include an early example of continuous vehicle emission measurements with a mobile CO2-laser PAS system [1]. The fast analysis of C1-C4 alkanes at sub-ppm concentrations in gas mixtures is of great interest for the petrochemical industry and was recently achieved with a new type of mid-infrared diode-pumped piezoelectrically tuned lead salt vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) [2]. Another example concerns measurements on short