WorldWideScience

Sample records for space place calendar

  1. Calendars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Grönvall, Erik

    2013-01-01

    boundary-crossing capacities and the holding back of information for fragmented exchange. Based on two cases, in which we have worked with sharing and coordination of time-resources in families on the one hand, and external parties such as external caregivers, employers and municipal authorities......This paper discusses how calendars and time coordination can be used across social and organizational borders, bridging between work and non-work, and between family coordination and external collaborators. The paper moves beyond family on-line calendars towards coordination and collaboration...... with professional caregivers and public authorities, and discusses how such shared calendars revitalize some of the very basic discussions of CSCW: The notion of shared goals in cooperative activities, the understanding of time and time-granularity in cooperation, common information spaces, and in particular...

  2. Ceque System of Cuzco: A Yearly Calendar-Almanac in Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, R. Tom

    The Incas used for the administration of Cuzco, the capital of their empire, and its valley a system of 41 directions, called ceque, as viewed from their central temple of the Sun. This system registered their concerns with space, including ritual space, hierarchy, and time, the latter in the form of a detailed calendar-almanac of weekly, monthly, seasonal, and yearly activities. From Inca times are also preserved some textiles that represent different regular calendars concerning the sun, moon, and stars. Detailed ethnohistoric evidence allows the reconstruction of the Ceque calendar-almanac.

  3. Transforming spaces into lively public open places

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilliers, E.J.; Timmermans, W.

    2016-01-01

    Urban public open spaces are an important part of the urban environment, creating the framework for public life. The transformation of open space into successful public places is crucial in this regard. In the context of target-driven performance it is essential to identify the value of

  4. Spaces of interaction, places for experience

    CERN Document Server

    Benyon, David

    2014-01-01

    Spaces of Interaction, Places for Experience is a book about Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), interaction design (ID) and user experience (UX) in the age of ubiquitous computing. The book explores interaction and experience through the different spaces that contribute to interaction until it arrives at an understanding of the rich and complex places for experience that will be the focus of the next period for interaction design. The book begins by looking at the multilayered nature of interaction and UX-not just with new technologies, but with technologies that are embedded in the world. Peop

  5. City spaces - tourist places : urban tourism precincts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigolon, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Urban tourism precincts can be defined as ‘an area in which various attractions such as bars, restaurants, places of entertainment or education, accommodation, amenities and other facilities that are clustered in freely accessible public spaces. Tourism precincts by their nature enhance certain

  6. Spaces and Places of News Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    to the news. This chapter outlines the importance of space and place when it comes to audiences/users of journalism and the gradual recognition of this in digital journalism studies, with an eye to highlighting pertinent research trajectories. It first explores how the everyday digital geographies...

  7. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SPACES AND PLACES OF SUCCESSFUL AGEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor ILLÉS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ageing is both a curse and blessing for human beings. After the introductory section, the contribution gives a quasi-empirical picture on one of the consequences of the heterogeneity of ageing in Hungary. The contribution tries to foresee through the lens of university and college students in order to explore the spaces and places of successful ageing for individuals. Moreover, hypothesises are formulated about he effect of ageing on the internal and international processes in the near future.

  9. Making space for an archaeology of place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wheatley

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Rather than attempt to write a balanced or complete overview of the application of GIS to archaeology (which would inevitably end up being didactic and uncritical this article sets out to present a discursive and contentious position with the deliberate aim of stimulating further debate about the future role of GIS within our discipline. To this end, existing applications of GIS to archaeology are reviewed, concentrating on two areas of application, predictive modelling and visibility analyses, and on their wider disciplinary context. It is argued that GIS cannot be simplistically held to have been a 'good thing' or a 'bad thing' for archaeology, but rather that these different application areas may be analysed separately and found to have quite different qualities. Although they are in no sense alternatives to one another, the areas of predictive modelling and visibility analysis can be seen to represent quite different agendas for the development of an archaeology of space and/or place. The development of correlative predictive models is considered first, both from the perspective of explanation and of cultural resource management. The arguments against predictive modelling as a means of explanation are rehearsed and it is found to be over-generalising, deterministic and de-humanised. As a consequence, it is argued that predictive modelling is now essentially detached from contemporary theoretical archaeological concerns. Moreover, it is argued to be an area with significant unresolved methodological problems and, far more seriously, that it presents very real dangers for the future representativity of archaeological records. Second, the development of GIS-based visibility analysis is reviewed. This is also found to be methodologically problematic and incomplete. However, it is argued that visibility studies — in direct contrast to predictive modelling — have remained firmly situated within contemporary theoretical debates, notably about

  10. Space, Place and Desistance from Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hunter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As centres of human existence, places and spaces are vital for individuals’ understanding of themselves and who they might become. We explore these aspects of existence through a longitudinal study of 43 current and former drug users. First, we identify the differences between those who have desisted from drug use and those who continued. These differences manifested themselves in the routines that frequently governed desisters’ lives. Persisters had very little in the way of routines that served to structure their time and where they did these were more likely to be seen as a burden. Further, the places our respondents occupied served as indications of their own understandings of their self and their efforts to desist. Second, we investigate in detail one individual’s desistance from drug use and the accompanying change in his existential geography. As Peter desisted his goals and aspirations changed, becoming less focused on avoiding drug use and directed to more positive desires. We discuss the implications of this work for desistance research. Como centros de la existencia humana, los lugares y los espacios son vitales para que los individuos se conozcan a sí mismos, y sepan en quién podrían convertirse. Estos aspectos de la existencia se analizan a través de un estudio longitudinal de 43 personas que consumen o han consumido drogas. En primer lugar, se identifican las diferencias entre los que han abandonado el consumo de drogas, y los que siguen consumiéndolas. Estas diferencias se manifestaron en las rutinas que a menudo regían en las vidas de los que habían abandonado el consumo. Los que seguían consumiendo tenían pocas rutinas que sirvieran para estructurar su tiempo, y si las tenían, se percibían como una carga. Además, los lugares que los encuestados ocupaban servían como indicaciones de su propia autocomprensión y sus esfuerzos para dejar el consumo. En segundo lugar, se investigó en detalle el abandono del

  11. Defining Commercial Space's Place in the Battlespace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeMello, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    ... (to include ALLIED FORCE, ENDURING FREEDOM and IRAQI FREEDOM), the U.S. has needed to extend beyond the capabilities of dedicated DoD and national space assets, relying on the commercial space sector to provide...

  12. Media Spaces, Places and Palpable Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten

    2006-01-01

    of these prototypes form what can be termed as media spaces - but rise questions to the traditional understanding of the media space concept - since the emergency response media spaces are not ‘set up' in predefined physical settings, do allow use of a range of (not necessarily predefined) media, and the people...

  13. Space and Place: Recognizing Ties that Bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Gary T.

    1980-01-01

    Suggests methods to test whether students have acquired a sense of place or spatial understanding. Knowledge of the concepts of map representation, the region, man/land notations, spatial relations, location, and scale are vital to geographic understanding. Concludes that geographic ideas should relate to particular maps. (Author/KC)

  14. Contested Spaces. Meaningful Places. Contemporary Performances of Place and Belonging in Spain and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. C. Krom

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims to contribute to current anthropological debate on space and place, analysing in two instances of festival performance how, on the one hand the politics of appropriation of space contributes to the configuration of power relations, and how on the other hand, participants in these festivals engage individually and collectively with physical space(s to create places which they experience as meaningful in terms of identity and belonging.

  15. Structuring virtual spaces as television places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    As all major American broadcast and cable networks now provide some form and amount of online distribution of their television programming, we are beginning to see more interactive features being attached to this distribution to remediate the conditions of television consumption in the physical...... world.  Attaching such interactivity to their online distribution creates cyberspaces of consumption that become places for virtual audiences to congregate as they view the program.  To illustrate how the virtual environments and worlds are constructed to become places for virtual audiences, four case...... considering how these Internet-based interactive television examples demonstrate the remediation of conventional conceptualizations of television distribution structures and consumption practices, which then indicate the power dynamics of the producer-consumer relationship.  The form in which...

  16. The Space Place: Multifarious Merchandise for Omnifarious Folks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, N. J.; Fisher, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    "The Space Place" is a coordinated NASA educational outreach program that seeks to reach a diverse and under-served audience, including minorities, girls, inner city children, and those living in rural areas. This audience also includes the more than 27 million Americans who, according to the 2000 census, speak Spanish as their first language. The Space Place began in 1998 with a child-oriented Web site (http://spaceplace.nasa.gov) presenting simple "make and do" activities and fun facts related to the technology validation space missions of NASA's New Millennium Program. The Web site is now sponsored by over 30 space science and Earth observing missions. And it is now also available in Spanish. Having materials available on the internet, however, does not guarantee that everyone in the target audience will have access to them. So, The Space Place went on to create a suite of products and a network of partnerships that would allow more direct and diverse ways to communicate. Thus was invented Club Space Place. Club Space Place works through two different types of partnerships: national and local. The products provided: quarterly guides for original Club Space Place group activities, plus NASA space and Earth science and technology bulletin board display materials. The first of the national organizations participating in Club Space Place was Boys and Girls Clubs of America. With 3100 chapters and 3.3 million members ages 6-18, 67% of whom are minorities, BGCA has been able to distribute the quarterly Space Place activity guides electronically via its Web sites to all chapters that have internet access and by hardcopy to those that don't. Other national organizations that receive the activity guides include YWCA, 21st Century Learning Centers, and Civil Air Patrol. Local community partners include about 240 museums, libraries, planetariums, zoos, and aquariums, largely in small cities, towns, and rural areas, with a combined annual visitorship of 26 million. These

  17. Place attachment of the public space in Krueng Cunda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novianti, Yenny; Ginting, Nurlisa; Marpaung, B. O. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Attachment to place will have an impact on the design a city, especially the public space. Part of important from place attachment can the great benefit in from a city. One of the result is influence to quality of life from urban society. That is not only, but forming of identity a city, dependence and sense of place. That is all measureable when the people have activity to place. Place attachment is connection human to place involve a psychological process. As for the issue in reservoir area and the river of Krueng Cunda. The main purpose in this study is find interaction individuals or urban society to public space. This study have use mixed method are combination with quantitave and qualitative. The quantitative method make use of questionnaires and qualitative with observations. The results of this study indicate that psychological process is more dominant than attachment to the place or human. At finally is this research show attachment to the psychological process feel better than to community because can fulfill a sense, comfortable, safety, lifestyle and goal needs of life to the public space.

  18. Space, place and ecology: Doing ecofeminist urban theology in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalet van Schalkwyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic motivation for this article is to explore the critical, yet hopeful vision which urban theologians – and specifically ecofeminist urban theologians – have for justice, reconciliation and abundance of life in urban Gauteng. This requires that urban spatiality, with its conflicting sides in a rampantly capitalist Gauteng, needs to be understood. It also requires an understanding of how urbanity and ecology may – yet so often do not – overlap. According to ecofeminist theologian Anne Primavesi, space and place needs to be understood in relation to the earth as the body of God – a web of interrelated and interconnected subjects and living beings which constitute the earth with its various ecosystems. This belies the established understanding that space and place is created mostly through the anthropocentric activity and mastery of people. Such an ecological understanding of space, place and urbanity leads to my exploration of a missiology of space as the manifestation of the presence of God in the spaces of nature and human civilisation. I conclude by proposing the practice of urban mission as making the liturgical and sacramental links between ecology, space, and the reclamation of urban space as sacred by Christian and other agents of urban activism.

  19. Co-constructing space and place in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2018-01-01

    throughout their learning period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of place for the encounters between students and supervisors in clinical nursing. The paper at hand shows how different spaces such as a hallway, an office and being by the patients’ bedside prompts different...... interactional strategies. Through the use of video ethnography and nexus analysis, we show how the participants’ who orient to them in their interaction treat details in the settings – like a missing chair – or documents, as semiotic fields. Thus we find that the students, nurses and patients co......-construct the space at hand into a place for different daily nursing activities....

  20. Inca Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowski, Mariusz

    The ritual, central Inca calendar, adapted to the ecological, cultural, and ethnic realities of the Cuzco valley, was the basis of the imperial calendar, used for the administration of the Inca Empire. According to the main historical sources, it was composed of 12 synodic months calculated from new moon to new moon. The correlation of this cycle with the tropical year was achieved by the intercalation of an additional 13th month, every 2 or 3 years. Tom Zuidema's thesis about the existence of the "stellar lunar calendar" or "quipu-calendar" is also analyzed.

  1. "Letter-Space": Typographic Translations of Urban Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Jacqueline; O'Sullivan, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a Bachelor of Design honours year typography project in the medium of letterpress. The "Letter-space" project positioned letterpress as a textual, spatial and structural visual language, through which the experiences and meanings of a local urban place were translated, mapped and given form through typographic design. We…

  2. Introduction : The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This special issue on the places and spaces of news audiences presents an initial attempt to do this; to see how the everyday digital geographies of contemporary media, communication, and information flows intersect with the everywhere “lived” geographies of individuals, and how this impacts

  3. Space and place in Outdoor Education in New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2010-01-01

    on a qualitative approach using case study design with interviews and observations. For the analysis, ethnological cultural analysis was employed combined with configuration analysis to conceptualise the data. Theories and concepts of space and place in outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed. Results from...

  4. Space, place and body: temporary coalitions, nodes in a network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerith Power

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The articles in this collection share a concern for place, space and bodies as frameworks for thinking about and conducting educational research. The authors range in experience from senior academics, independent educators, beginning and emerging new researchers spanning a range of educational sectors. The articles originate from connections forged within and between Australia and northern countries with visits back and forth between 2004 and 2010. Some of the writers have met each other in these travels and others have not. All have encountered and participated in some way in the work of the space place and body research group, which originated in 2007 as a named research ‘node’ at Monash University.   The space place and body group formed as a result of a process designed to re-imagine research in the Faculty of Education at Monash University in order to address ‘the big questions of our time’. As a leading global university with campuses in Asia and Europe as well as several in Australia, the Dean of the Faculty cited recent evidence that the field of educational research had become too narrowly focused and that new approaches were needed to enliven the field and move it forward. Individualistic research was no longer supported and groups were formed organically around coalitions of interest. The purpose of the space place and body group was to come together to generate new conceptual, theoretical and methodological resources within the core concepts of space, place and body by collaborating across our differences. In the early phase of our development we focused on linked identity (ontological and knowledge (epistemological work, at the intersection of postcolonial and poststructural approaches to place in educational research. A specific interest in alternative and creative methodologies emerged from these onto-epistemological activities.   As part of our process we initiated temporary definitions of space, place and body, to

  5. From location and (non-)place to place attachment and sense of place. An exploration of imagination as the key to transform spaces into places

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Avest, I.

    2017-01-01

    In our research1 we focus on the architectural characteristics of a location, seen as a precondition to appeal to the imaginative power of learners that plays a part in satisfying their (presupposed) spiritual hunger and longings for a better world. The concepts space, nonplace, and place, in their

  6. Hippocampal place cells construct reward related sequences through unexplored space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, H Freyja; Barry, Caswell; Saleem, Aman B; Hassabis, Demis; Spiers, Hugo J

    2015-06-26

    Dominant theories of hippocampal function propose that place cell representations are formed during an animal's first encounter with a novel environment and are subsequently replayed during off-line states to support consolidation and future behaviour. Here we report that viewing the delivery of food to an unvisited portion of an environment leads to off-line pre-activation of place cells sequences corresponding to that space. Such 'preplay' was not observed for an unrewarded but otherwise similar portion of the environment. These results suggest that a hippocampal representation of a visible, yet unexplored environment can be formed if the environment is of motivational relevance to the animal. We hypothesise such goal-biased preplay may support preparation for future experiences in novel environments.

  7. Teaching students in place: the languages of third space learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Cynthia M.

    2017-09-01

    With a perceptive eye cast on geoscience pedagogy for students labeled as disabled, Martinez-Álvarez makes important contributions to the existing conversation on placed-based learning. It is in our local backyards, from the corner basketball court, to the mud bank of a city lake, to the adjacent field where rocky outcrops spill down to a forgotten farmer's field, that we find rich working material for connecting self and community, moving students' out-of-school experiences that feature their cultural and linguistic knowledge, from misconceptions to "alternative conceptions." Informed by her insights regarding the learning of students whose literacy does not match conventional classroom practice, geoscience learning in the place of third space can act as a model of meaning making across the entire curriculum. In the pages that follow, I transact, both aesthetically and efferently, with Martinez-Álvarez's text as she presents her research on special ways of learning in placed-based geoscience explorations with bilingual children experiencing disabilities.

  8. PLACE OF RESIDENCE: THE SPACE OF SOCIO-PEDAGOGICAL TRANSFORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Guriyanova

    2017-01-01

    efficiency of Social Care teachers of different specializations was carried out on the basis of questioning among parents.Results and scientific novelty. Modern forms of collective participation of citizens in education of younger generation are revealed, studied, and generalized. It is shown that the task of transformation of the place of residence into education space in a city and rural settlements can be successfully solved by means of creation of territorial communities – new social structures of modern civil society.The characteristic of such territorial communities is given; the need for its deve-lopment is proved. It is evident that similar communities promote expansion of purposeful social and educational work with children and families at their places of residence.Practical significance. The results and experience of creation of territorial communities obtained in the course of the investigation can support the development of municipal models for organization of socio-pedagogical and socio-cultural work with children and members of their families.

  9. PLACES OF WORSHIP. Space and religion in Lisbon suburban configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Guarda, I.; Guerreiro, R.; Heitor, T.

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of new religious movements is a global phenomenon. Although becoming subject of inquiry by recent academic works concerned with new spiritual content and practices, the places of worship persist an overlooked subject. The aim of this research is to understand the implications of spatiality in the constitution of the new places of worship within Lisbon suburbs after the 1970’s. It analyses the relationship between place centralities and new spatial cultures and urbanities in subu...

  10. Exploring Hybrid Third Spaces in the Place Mappings of Malawian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on a study of Malawian youths' understandings of place in .... The JFFLS initiative was initially developed in 2003 by the Food and Agricultural ... At the beginning of the first focus group discussion, we mutually agreed on ... reflected the socio-cultural realities that influence their understanding of place.

  11. Placing outer space an earthly ethnography of other worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Messeri, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Lisa Messeri traces how planetary scientists-whether working in the Utah desert, a Chilean observatory, or the labs of MIT-transform celestial bodies into places in order to understand the universe as densely inhabited by planets, in turn telling us more about Earth, ourselves, and our place in the cosmos.

  12. The Place of Solar Thermal Rockets in Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selph, C

    1981-01-01

    The harnessing of sunlight for propulsive energy is a recurring theme in space propulsion, particularly for applications requiring large velocity increments, such as planetary exploration or comet rendezvous...

  13. Exploring Hybrid Third Spaces in the Place Mappings of Malawian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on a study of Malawian youths' understandings of place ... was evident in the social relationships associated with the activities ...... are influenced by global media and ideologies, they are also grounded by their social and.

  14. OLEM Calendar Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes the Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Calendar Information, which comprises three OLEM Calendars: the OLEM Calendar, the OLEM...

  15. Travels in Space and Place: Identity and Rural Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This analysis draws on interview data from a three-year study of educational decision making of youth living in a coastal community in Atlantic Canada. Students whose educational and mobility aspirations extend outside the known spaces of the community develop the ability to negotiate multiple social spaces in and out of school. The school- …

  16. Green Place-making in practice: from temporary spaces to permanent place

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilliers, E.J.; Timmermans, W.; Goorbergh, van den F.; Slijkhuis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Current spatial planning and sustainability approaches attempt to create competitive, lively and sustainable cities. This paper argues that place-making approaches and green-planning approaches can assist in this regard as these approaches focus on creating qualitative, socially viable and

  17. Place, networks, space: theorising the geographies of social movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicholls, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines how geography affects the different types of networks underlying social movements. The principal argument of the paper is that networks forged in particular places and at great distances play distinctive yet complementary functions in broad-based social movements. Not only does

  18. Teaching Students in Place: The Languages of Third Space Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Cynthia M.

    2017-01-01

    With a perceptive eye cast on geoscience pedagogy for students labeled as disabled, Martinez-Álvarez makes important contributions to the existing conversation on placed-based learning. It is in our local backyards, from the corner basketball court, to the mud bank of a city lake, to the adjacent field where rocky outcrops spill down to a…

  19. Fractal systems of central places based on intermittency of space-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The idea of intermittency is introduced into central place model. → The revised central place model suggests incomplete space filling. → New central place fractals are presented for urban analysis. → The average nearest distance is proposed to estimate the fractal dimension. → The concept of distance-based space is replaced by that of dimension-based space. - Abstract: The central place models are fundamentally important in theoretical geography and city planning theory. The texture and structure of central place networks have been demonstrated to be self-similar in both theoretical and empirical studies. However, the underlying rationale of central place fractals in the real world has not yet been revealed so far. This paper is devoted to illustrating the mechanisms by which the fractal patterns can be generated from central place systems. The structural dimension of the traditional central place models is d = 2 indicating no intermittency in the spatial distribution of human settlements. This dimension value is inconsistent with empirical observations. Substituting the complete space filling with the incomplete space filling, we can obtain central place models with fractional dimension D < d = 2 indicative of spatial intermittency. Thus the conventional central place models are converted into fractal central place models. If we further integrate the chance factors into the improved central place fractals, the theory will be able to explain the real patterns of urban places very well. As empirical analyses, the US cities and towns are employed to verify the fractal-based models of central places.

  20. Building Place: Students' Negotiation of Spaces and Citizenship in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, Jennifer A.; Carson, Terry; Johnson, Ingrid; Mangat, Jyoti

    2008-01-01

    This study explored how high school students negotiate school spaces beyond the classroom within a broader context of citizenship education and identity construction. Using visual hermeneutics, researchers worked over three years with students and staff in a large, diverse, urban, public high school. Through student-produced photographs of school…

  1. Agriculture for Space: People and Places Paving the Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler Raymond M.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural systems for space have been discussed since the works of Tsiolkovsky in the early 20th century. Central to the concept is the use of photosynthetic organisms and light to generate oxygen and food. Research in the area started in 1950s and 60s through the works of Jack Myers and others, who studied algae for O2 production and CO2 removal for the US Air Force and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA. Studies on algal production and controlled environment agriculture were also carried out by Russian researchers in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia beginning in 1960s including tests with human crews whose air, water, and much of their food were provided by wheat and other crops. NASA initiated its Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS Program ca. 1980 with testing focused on controlled environment production of wheat, soybean, potato, lettuce, and sweetpotato. Findings from these studies were then used to conduct tests in a 20 m2, atmospherically closed chamber located at Kennedy Space Center. Related tests with humans and crops were conducted at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in the 1990s. About this same time, Japanese researchers developed a Controlled Ecological Experiment Facility (CEEF in Aomori Prefecture to conduct closed system studies with plants, humans, animals, and waste recycling systems. CEEF had 150 m2 of plant growth area, which provided a near-complete diet along with air and water regeneration for two humans and two goats. The European Space Agency MELiSSA Project began in the late 1980s and pursued ecological approaches for providing gas, water and materials recycling for space life support, and later expanded to include plant testing. A Canadian research team at the University of Guelph developed a research facility ca. 1994 for space crop research. The Canadian team eventually developed sophisticated canopy-scale hypobaric plant production chambers ca. 2000 for testing crops for space, and have

  2. Finding New Space in Old Places: Repurposing Auxiliary Gyms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Some parts of a school building do not age gracefully. At many elementary and middle schools--particularly those built in the 1960s or 1970s--old gyms are as useful (and attractive) as a worn-out pair of sneakers. To save money 20 years ago, school districts often used one space as a combination gym/lunch room/auditorium. Old gymnasiums offer…

  3. A place and space for a critical geography of precarity?

    OpenAIRE

    Waite, L

    2009-01-01

    This article explores growing interest in the term ‘precarity’ within the social sciences and asks whether there is a place for a ‘critical geography of precarity’ amid this emerging field. Referring to life worlds characterised by uncertainty and insecurity, the term precarity is double-edged as it implies both a condition and a possible rallying point for resistance. Such areas should be of concern and interest to human geography yet engagement with the concept in the discipline thus far ha...

  4. URBAN RECONFIGURATIONS OF SPACE AND PLACE WITHIN TOWNSHIP TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Craciunescu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays global economic and cultural constellation determined urban communities to find a solution in order to preserve local identity and at the same time to attract capital into the area. Tourism represents in our opinion one of the greatest solutions ever exploited in mankind’s history which erases boundaries of nations and economic policies, creating glocalized encounters. In the case of a city, tourism or township tourism becomes an economical, political and cultural vector that unifies urban space which develops a network of genuine and artificial urban inter-relations between the principal stakeholders. The city as a destination must be a ‘safe’ construct that meets the expectations of various kinds of travellers and of their different travelling motivations. We believe that to a certain extent, the (rebranding of cities consists in the creation of a harmonized space that would reiterate the home-facilities of the traveller. A matter of life-style and life-quality, this issue will be analysed through the lens of travelling as a leisure activity, or as a way of escaping monotone routine of daily living, eventually a way of reinvesting income and creating economic equilibrium.

  5. Spatial Polygamy and Contextual Exposures (SPACEs): Promoting Activity Space Approaches in Research on Place and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Stephen A.; Yang, Tse-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure science has developed rapidly and there is an increasing call for greater precision in the measurement of individual exposures across space and time. Social science interest in an individual’s environmental exposure, broadly conceived, has arguably been quite limited conceptually and methodologically. Indeed, we appear to lag behind our exposure science colleagues in our theories, data, and methods. In this paper we discuss a framework based on the concept of spatial polygamy to demonstrate the need to collect new forms of data on human spatial behavior and contextual exposures across time and space. Adopting new data and methods will be essential if we want to better understand social inequality in terms of exposure to health risks and access to health resources. We discuss the opportunities and challenges focusing on the potential seemingly offered by focusing on human mobility, and specifically the utilization of activity space concepts and data. A goal of the paper is to spatialize social and health science concepts and research practice vis-a-vis the complexity of exposure. The paper concludes with some recommendations for future research focusing on theoretical and conceptual development, promoting research on new types of places and human movement, the dynamic nature of contexts, and on training. “When we elect wittingly or unwittingly, to work within a level … we tend to discern or construct – whichever emphasis you prefer – only those kinds of systems whose elements are confined to that level.”Otis Dudley Duncan (1961, p. 141). “…despite the new ranges created by improved transportation, local government units have tended to remain medieval in size.”Torsten Hägerstrand (1970, p.18) “A detective investigating a crime needs both tools and understanding. If he has no fingerprint powder, he will fail to find fingerprints on most surfaces. If he does not understand where the criminal is likely to have put his fingers, he will not

  6. An Exploration of Hybrid Spaces for Place-Based Geomorphology with Latino Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, Patricia; Bannan, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Latino bilingual children hold rich understandings, which are underexplored and underutilized in the geoscience classroom. Oftentimes, young Latinos possess unique cultural land experiences shaping their place identities. We consider science as language and culture, and propose place-based geoscience hybrid space explorations that are culturally…

  7. "A Really Nice Spot": Evaluating Place, Space, and Technology in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Michael J.; Rozaklis, Lily; Hall, Catherine; Kusunoki, Diana

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative mixed-method study of students' perceptions of place and space in an academic library. The approach is informed by Scott Bennett's model of library design, which posits a shift from a "book-centered" to a technology supported "learning centered" paradigm of library space. Two surveys…

  8. Conceptualising space and place : Lessons from geography for the debate on privacy in public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Bert-Jaap; Galic, Masa; Timan, Tjerk; Newell, Bryce; Koops, Bert-Jaap

    2017-01-01

    This contribution aims to open up the rich literature on the conceptualisation of space and place, primarily from the field of geography, for scholars in other disciplines, in particular legal and governance scholars engaged in the debate on (the right to) privacy in public spaces. Although there is

  9. Transforming Conceptual Space into a Creative Learning Place: Crossing a Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Kirstine; McKim, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article describes, discusses and reflects on a teaching and learning experiment in a first year BA course. Students were led out of the lecture room to a different space, the New Place Theatre. While this move out of the usual teaching space was appropriate for the text being studied, William Shakespeare's "The Tempest", the…

  10. Models of Learning Space: Integrating Research on Space, Place and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R. A.; Goodyear, P.

    2016-01-01

    Learning space research is a relatively new field of study that seeks to inform the design, evaluation and management of learning spaces. This paper reviews a dispersed and fragmented literature relevant to understanding connections between university learning spaces and student learning activities. From this review, the paper distils a number of…

  11. The Characters and Meaning of Third Place in Historical Urban Space of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Nejad Ebrahimi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Third place is the interface between work and life and due to the direct connection with urban development. It is a valuable space for attending the community in which one attends voluntarily, informally, and regularly or irregularly. There are such places in urban areas of Iran where people are able to attend in order to do social and religious activities and it seems like that the architectural nature of such spaces has some similarities and differences with the definition of third place. The research question is, “what are the features of third place in pre-modern cities of Iran and are the features in accordance with the definition of third place?”. This is a developmental research conducted via the interpretive-historical method. The findings indicate that third place is commonplace in Iranian Cities and some architecture types like public, religious and residential spaces have fundamental similarities with the definitions of third place In Iranian Historical cities, but there are also some differences due to culture, religion, and climate in each region. Third places have widely exited in most applications and religious relations, rituals, and beliefs which demonstrate that brotherhood and communion have significantly influenced the formation of this place. The main issue in this regard is the firm presence of religion and strong ethnocultural ties which have affected the constituents of third place as components like the constant presence of water, creation of special, simple, and defined spaces, respect to adults and providing special furniture for them, and focusing on geometry and aesthetic proportions.

  12. Ancient Greek Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Robert

    Greek festival calendars were in origin lunar, eventually being aligned with the sun through various lunisolar intercalary cycles. Each city-state had its own calendar, whose month names have some, little, or no similarity with those of other city-states. These names often reflect gods or festivals held in their honor in a given month, so there is an explicitly sacred character to the calendar. New Year's Day could also differ from one state to another, but generally began with the sighting of the first new moon after one of the four tropical points. Even the introduction of the Roman Julian calendar brought little uniformity to the eastern Greek calendars. The calendar is one of the elements which can assist in understanding the siting of Greek sacred structures.

  13. Identity as "knowing your place": the narrative construction of space in a healthcare profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, Mark; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2015-03-01

    The construction of space in which a story takes place can have important consequences for the evaluation of health interventions. In this article, we explore the ways professionals narratively position themselves in a situation, treating identity literally as "knowing one's place." More specifically, we explore the spatial language health professionals use to describe their work. Using descriptions of professionals in a drug habilitation organization, we illustrate how they use route (i.e., an active tour through the space), survey (i.e., a stationary viewpoint from above), and gaze perspectives (i.e. a stable viewpoint onto a place) to explain the work situations they encounter. Each of these perspectives facilitates a different mode of evaluation in terms of distance, emotion, and identity. We propose opportunities for research and implications of the ways in which spaces and spatial perspectives set the scene in the narratives of healthcare professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. A Theoretical Model for Digital Reverberations of City Spaces and Public Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmerman, Chris; Hansen, Kjeld; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    to locations, which transforms the space for other people who use the same services. Such locations acquire relevance and reshape social and spatial interactions through increased use on social media as people ‘check-in’ to places, photograph or ‘like’ them. Collectively the authors are marking-up the city...... for the evaluation of city places: affinity spectrum of social endorsements. The authors conclude with a discussion of the new opportunities for governments to better understand socially emergent ‘urban qualities’ and how citizens construct and appreciate them in order better convert city places into public spaces.......The increasing pervasiveness of Internet connected devices and services is altering the perception and practice of public spaces through the provisioning of location-specific digital information. Location-aware technologies allow people to access, annotate, address and attach information...

  15. Erasing Space from Places Brandscapes, Art and the (devalorisation of the Olympic Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pavoni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Beyond use, exchange and sign value, current marketing practices have consistently turned on notions of contextual fruition, experience, performativity, affective spaces, atmospheres. The logic of the experience economy has quickly spilled over other realms: architecture and design, security and control, urban planning and law. As the language of brand overflows the marketing jargon to apply to urban events1 and renewal projects, the notion of brandscape becomes increasingly relevant to indicate the institutional engineering of material and immaterial, visible and invisible spaces. Brandscaping is a “more or less successful institutional attempt to inscribe spaces and their inhabitants in their own terms” (Ball and Wood, 2008, in other words, to freeze space, to capture and tame its multiplicity, to make it static, organised, predictable, not in the cumbersome, panoptical way, but rather through affective strategies, by producing, managing and securing “atmospherically enriched experiences” (Klingmann, 2007: 6.

  16. Greek and roman calendars

    CERN Document Server

    Hannah, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The smooth functioning of an ordered society depends on the possession of a means of regularising its activities over time. That means is a calendar, and its regularity is a function of how well it models the more or less regular movements of the celestial bodies - of the moon, the sun or the stars. Greek and Roman Calendars examines the ancient calendar as just such a time-piece, whose elements are readily described in astronomical and mathematical terms. The story of these calendars is one of a continuous struggle to maintain a correspondence with the regularity of the seasons and the sun, d

  17. Space and place in researching male early high school leaving in Orange Farm Township

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vangile Bingma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I reflect on the methodological processes underpinning a dissertation that investigated male learners' reasons for leaving high school early and the strategies they employed to negotiate everyday life. A qualitative case study was conducted with nine male early high school leavers between the ages of 18 and 25, as well as 12 stakeholders involved in the Orange Farm Township, south of Johannesburg. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used. Data were collected through in-depth interviews, document reviews, and observations. Narrative analysis revealed complications related to the notions of space and place of the potential participants and the researcher. In the first place, the difficulty was not in identifying participants, but in establishing rapport to the extent that they agreed to participate in the research. Assumptions about space and place gave rise to expectations that had to be managed, and consequently the researcher had to rethink the methodological choices. In particular, participants' perceived real social positions and their relation to different social spaces had to be negotiated. It is suggested that relatively novice researchers, researching male early high school leaving in familiar spaces, can mitigate complications of space, place and stigma during fieldwork by using multiple sources of data and strategic, flexible interviewing techniques.

  18. The role of public spaces in creating place attachment (example of Zacisze, Warsaw housing estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantey Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article raises the question of place attachment in the context of an increasingly important factor, that is the use of gathering and leisure places. The author publishes findings of a survey conducted among the residents of Zacisze, Warsaw, a detached housing estate with a very poor range of public places for gathering and leisure. The study has proved that the use of local public spaces, as a specific category of place, reinforces attachment to the whole housing estate. The study also confirms the important role that social factors have in building place attachment. Conditions already exist for considering social factors more important than physical ones in building a positive relationship with a territory.

  19. Politics, religion and space. About places of mediation and sacred space among the Gurage of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALMISANO, Antonio Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main faiths among the Gurage of Ethiopia – Orthodox Christianity, Islam and autochthonous polytheism – provide a constellation of integrative principles for territorial and descent segmentation. Religious leaders and ritual specialists of the three confessions have always represented the unity of Gurage tribes facing the outside world and still receive tributes of cattle, sheep, goats, honey, ensete, money etc. The ethnic court of justice of the Gurage, the yejoka, has re-dimensioned its office, in order to prevent the rise of central instances within the process of political mediation between juxtaposed lineages and territorial segments. The article focuses on the identification and institutionalisation of sacred places among these tribes, the places where the personae, the lineages and residential groups interact within the self-representation processes of Gurage society. The theological and liturgical pluralism, practised by the three faiths, confirms the Gurage’s capacity to answer to the many and contradictory stimuli of modern society, of market economy, of political, administrative and territorial transformation which takes place in the world. This religious plurality in a single family, in a single person, unveils religion as an answer, or rather as a structure of satisfactory answers.

  20. Shared Space, Liminal Space: Five Years into a Community-University Place-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Heidi Lasley; Martin, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article explores shared space at the University of Minnesota's Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach Engagement Center (UROC), located four miles off campus in a community strong in assets, but facing inequality, disinvestment and racism. UROC's mission promotes university-community collaboration to solve critical urban challenges. We…

  1. Changing Places, Changing Spaces? Towards Understanding Teacher Education through Space-Time Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This article draws together theoretical ideas from studies of space/spatiality and the history of teacher education. These ideas form a theoretical framework through which to analyse the findings from a small-scale ethnographic study of the geographical relocations made by two university schools of education in England. Data collection instruments…

  2. Shared Places, Separate Spaces: Constructing Cultural Spaces through Two National Languages in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    From, Tuuli; Sahlström, Fritjof

    2017-01-01

    Finland is a bilingual country with 2 national languages, Finnish and Swedish. The Swedish-speaking school institution aims to protect the minority language by maintaining a monolingual school space. In this article, the construction of linguistic and ethnic difference in educational discourse and practice related to the national languages in…

  3. Music, Policy, and Place-Centered Education: Finding Space for Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    As a volatile educative space, musical education must be interwoven with other concerns and other more encompassing constructs if it is to build robust, meaningful, and complex learning outcomes. This paper attempts to do this by placing music education and a complex understanding of policy side by side, and outlining what people can learn from…

  4. Space and place in researching male early high school leaving in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Space and place in researching male early high school leaving in Orange Farm Township. ... South African Journal of Education ... I reflect on the methodological processes underpinning a dissertation that investigated male learners' reasons for leaving high school early and the strategies they employed to negotiate ...

  5. Conscious Thought is for facilitating the work places as learning spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dellen, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Conscious Thought is for facilitating the work places as learning spaces Theo van Dellen In the workplace learning and development of work identity can be assumed in at least three ways. First, the processes are managed by the organizational context, which promotes a particular model of workers as

  6. Space, Place, and Social Justice: Developing a Rhythmanalysis of Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Pam

    2013-01-01

    This article develops a methodological approach based on the spatial theory of Henri Lefebvre to address relationships between space, place, and social justice in education. In understanding the contradictory effects of globalization on local education policies and the continuing effects of historical geographies in education, Lefebvre's theory…

  7. Introduction: Place, space and organization : economic geography and the multinational enterprise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beugelsdijk, S.; Mudambi, R.; McCann, P.

    This article discusses the current links between international trade theory, economic geography and strategy and international business. We offer a way forward for building further links between these literatures that focusses on the notions of place, space and organization, and we document how the

  8. Space of Transit, Place of Memory: Ma’abarah and Literary Landscapes of Arab Jews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Rossetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Sifrut ha-ma’abarah (transit camp literature represents a narrative space where contemporary Israeli authors of Middle Eastern origin tell the stories forgotten, considered insignificant, and often repressed of the “oriental Jews” (Mizraḥim, who emigrated to Israel from North Africa and the Middle East during the 1950’s and the 1960’s.After a brief historical introduction on the ma’abarot (transit camps, I aim to unravel the experience of the ma’abarah as a “place of memory” and a “narrative place.” My reflections are based on the concept of “space/place” as conveyed from a human geography perspective. In this framework, I suggest different “literary declensions” through which ma’abarah might be interpreted, and in particular as a narrative place of defiance, resistance, and exile.

  9. The Rhythm of Non-Places: Marooning the Embodied Self in Depthless Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Roberts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking as its starting point the spatiotemporal rhythms of landscapes of hyper-mobility and transit, this paper explores how the process of “marooning” the self in a radically placeless (and depthless space—in this instance a motorway traffic island on the M53 in the northwest of England—can inform critical understandings and practices of “deep mapping”. Conceived of as an autoethnographic experiment—a performative expression of “islandness” as an embodied spatial praxis—the research on which this paper draws revisits ideas set out in JG Ballard’s 1974 novel Concrete Island, although, unlike Ballard’s island Crusoe (and sans person Friday, the author’s residency was restricted to one day and night. The fieldwork, which combines methods of “digital capture” (audio soundscapes, video, stills photography, and GPS tracking, takes the form of a rhythmanalytical mapping of territory that can unequivocally be defined as “negative space”. Offering an oblique engagement with debates on “non-places” and spaces of mobility, the paper examines the capacity of non-places/negative spaces to play host to the conditions whereby affects of place and dwelling can be harnessed and performatively transacted. The embodied rhythmicity of non-places is thus interrogated from the vantage point of a constitutive negation of the negation of place. In this vein, the paper offers a reflexive examination of the spatial anthropology of negative space.

  10. Making Space, Making Place: Digital Togetherness and the Redefinition of Migrant Identities Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Marino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Immigrants have played a fundamental role in shaping the life and form of urban public spaces for generations. Their efforts, as many scholars have observed, mostly aimed at creating places of comfort in new and sometimes hostile receiving countries. In recent years, the combined contribution of the built environment and screen-based experiences have shaped migrants’ sense of community and belonging, thus making the concept of online community central to ideas about space and public life. Drawing upon a 3-year online ethnography, the article discusses to what extent new media constitute spaces of digital togetherness , where diasporic experiences and transnational identities are constructed and negotiated. It presents a transnational model of creative media consumption, which helps give insight as to how diasporas and ethnic minorities contribute to the transformation of public space in the Digital Age.

  11. The long-term prospects of citizens managing urban green space: From place making to place-keeping? : Special feature:TURFGRASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattijssen, T.J.M.; van der Jagt, A.P.N.; Buijs, A.E.; Elands, B.H.M.; Erlwein, S.; Lafortezza, R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper discusses the long-term management or ‘place-keeping’ of urban green space by citizens and highlights enabling and constraining factors that play a crucial role in this continuity. While authorities have historically been in charge of managing public green spaces, there is an

  12. The NASA Space Place: A Plethora of Games, Projects, and Fun Facts for Celebrating Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, N. J.; Fisher, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    The Space Place is a unique NASA education and public outreach program. It includes a NASA website (spaceplace.nasa.gov) in English and Spanish that targets elementary age children with appealing, content- rich STEM material on space science, Earth science, and technology. The site features science and/or technology content related to, so far, over 40 NASA missions. This overall program, as well as special efforts planned for IYA2009, strongly support many of the objectives of IYA. Some of these are: 1. Stimulate interest in astronomy and science, especially among young people and in audiences not normally reached. 2. Increase scientific awareness. 3. Support and improve formal and informal science education. 4. Provide a contemporary image of science and scientists. 5. Facilitate new astronomy education networks and strengthen existing ones. 6. Improve the gender-balanced representation of scientists at all levels and promote greater involvement of underrepresented groups. The Space Place program has cultivated a large network of community partners (Obj. 5), including museums, libraries, and planetariums, as well as a large network of avocational astronomy societies. We send the community partners monthly mailings of the latest NASA materials for their "NASA Space Place" display boards (Obj. 1, 2, 3, 5). The astronomy societies receive original articles with the latest "insider" news on NASA missions for publication in their newsletters or on their websites (Obj. 2, 5). Through these leveraged partnerships, we reach a large audience of children; parents; formal and informal educators; rural, minority, and otherwise underserved audiences (Obj. 1, 6); and avocational astronomers, many of whom work with children and the general public in the classroom or at special events (Obj. 2, 3). Supporting Obj. 4, are the "Space Place Live" cartoon "talk show" episodes, spaceplace.nasa.gov/en/kids/live. For IYA 2009, we will specifically prepare our partners to plan and carry

  13. National Calendar-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedrovici, Vera; Svet, Maria; Matvei, Valeria; Madan, Ion; Perju, Elena; Sargun, Maria; Netida, Maria

    The calendar represents a few hundreds of biographies of scientists, artists and writers from everywhere, printed in chronological order and adjusted to their birthdays. A number of international and national holydays, including some refering to science are included in the Calendar. A great defect of the calendar is the introduction of the "International day of astrology" in the list of holydays. Another defect is the absence of the indication on the membership to the Communist Party for persons cited from the former Soviet Union. The following Physicists, mathematicians, chemists and astronomers had biographies in this issue: Ilie I. Lupu (math),Lev D. Landau,

  14. Differential effects of massed and spaced training on place and response learning: A memory systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Jeffrey C; Goodman, Jarid; Leong, Kah-Chung; Packard, Mark G

    2015-09-01

    Studies employing brain lesion or intracerebral drug infusions in rats have demonstrated a double dissociation between the roles of the hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum in place and response learning. The hippocampus mediates a rapid cognitive learning process underlying place learning, whereas the dorsolateral striatum mediates a relatively slower learning process in which stimulus-response habits underlying response learning are acquired in an incremental fashion. One potential implication of these findings is that hippocampus-dependent learning may benefit from a relative massing of training trials, whereas dorsal striatum-dependent learning may benefit from a relative distribution of training trials. In order to examine this hypothesis, the present study compared the effects of massed (30s inter-trial interval; ITI) or spaced (30min ITI) training on acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent place learning task, and a dorsolateral striatum-dependent response task in a plus-maze. In the place task rats swam from varying start points (N or S) to a hidden escape platform located in a consistent spatial location (W). In the response task rats swam from varying start points (N or S) to a hidden escape platform located in the maze arm consistent with a body-turn response (left). In the place task, rats trained with the massed trial schedule acquired the task quicker than rats trained with the spaced trial schedule. In the response task, rats trained with the spaced trial schedule acquired the task quicker than rats trained with the massed trial schedule. The double dissociation observed suggests that the reinforcement parameters most conducive to effective learning in hippocampus-dependent and dorsolateral striatum-dependent learning may have differential temporal characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Life Course, Green Space and Health: Incorporating Place into Life Course Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Pearce

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers interested in the relationships between place and health have been slow to incorporate a life course perspective, probably due to the lack of readily available historical environmental data. This hinders the identification of causal relationships. It also restricts our understanding as to whether there are accumulative effects over the life course and if there are critical periods in people’s lives when places are particularly pertinent. This study considers the feasibility of constructing longitudinal data on the availability of urban green space. The suitability of various historical and contemporary data sources is considered, including paper maps, aerial photographs and tabular land use data. Measures of urban green space are created for all neighbourhoods across the Edinburgh region of Scotland at various points during the past 100 years. We demonstrate that it is feasible to develop such measures, but there are complex issues involved in doing so. We also test the utility of the measures via an analysis of how accessibility to green space might alter over the life course of both people, and their residential neighbourhoods. The findings emphasise the potential for utilising historical data to significantly enhance understanding of the relationships between nature and health, and between health and place more generally. We encourage researchers to use data from other locations to consider including a longitudinal perspective to examine relationships between people’s health and their environment.

  16. Danish TV Christmas calendars: Folklore, myth and cultural history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2013-01-01

    in which this traditional genre has succeeded in renewing itself. The so-called Pyrus series, TV 2’s Christmas calendars during the mid-1990s, exhibited folklore, myth and cultural history in a combination of entertainment and information. They were succeeded by calendars such as Jul i Valhal......This article aims at characterizing the Danish Christmas calendar as a TV institution and a meeting place for the traditions of the almanac, folklore and the history of culture. Against the background of a brief outline of the history of Danish Christmas calendars, the article explores ways...

  17. British degrees made in Hong Kong: an inquiry into the role of space and place in transnational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, W.H.M.; Waters, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    The fundamental logic of transnational education programmes is a one-to-one transfer of institutional capital across space and an unimportance of place. This article interrogates these presumptions and argues that space and place play an important role in transnational education. Drawing on

  18. Space and place for WHO health development dialogues in the African Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Nabyonga-Orem, Juliet; Dovlo, Delanyo Yao Tsidi

    2016-07-18

    Majority of the countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) African Region are not on track to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals, yet even more ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including SDG 3 on heath, have been adopted. This paper highlights the challenges - amplified by the recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa - that require WHO and other partners' dialogue in support of the countries, and debate on how WHO can leverage the existing space and place to foster health development dialogues in the Region. To realise SDG 3 on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, the African Region needs to tackle the persistent weaknesses in its health systems, systems that address the social determinants of health and national health research systems. The performance of the third item is crucial for the development and innovation of systems, products and tools for promoting, maintaining and restoring health in an equitable manner. Under its new leadership, the WHO Regional Office for Africa is transforming itself to galvanise existing partnerships, as well as forging new ones, with a view to accelerating the provision of timely and quality support to the countries in pursuit of SDG 3. WHO in the African Region engages in dialogues with various stakeholders in the process of health development. The EVD outbreak in West Africa accentuated the necessity for optimally exploiting currently available space and place for health development discourse. There is urgent need for the WHO Regional Office for Africa to fully leverage the space and place arenas of the World Health Assembly, WHO Regional Committee for Africa, African Union, Regional economic communities, Harmonization for Health in Africa, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, African Development Bank, professional associations, and WHO African Health Forum, when it is created, for dialogues to mobilise the required resources to

  19. Race Has Always Mattered: An Intergeneration Look at Race, Space, Place, and Educational Experiences of Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise G. Yull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within school settings race continues to be one of the most formidable obstacles for Black children in the United States (US school system. This paper expands the discussions of race in education by exploring how the social links among race, space, and place provide a lens for understanding the persistence of racism in the educational experiences of Black children. This paper examines how differences in a rural versus urban geographical location influence a student’s experience with race, racism, and racial identity across four generations of Black people in the context of school and community. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  20. National Calendar-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedrovici, Vera; Svet, Maria; Matvei, Valeria; Perju, Elena; Sargun, Maria; Netida, Maria

    2009-10-01

    The calendar represents a few hundreds of biographies of scientists, artists and writers from everywhere, printed in chronological order and adjusted to their birthdays. A number of international and national holydays, including some refering to science are included in the Calendar. A great deffect of the Calendar is the introduction in the list of holydays of the "international day of astrology". Another defect is the absence of the indication of the membership to Communist Parties for persons cited from the former USSR and former Communist Countries. The following physicists, astronomers and mathematicians had biographies in the actual issue: Kon, Lia Z., Arnautov, Vladimir I. (math), Tsukerblat, B., Kapitza, P., Donici (Donitch), N.N., Sklodowska-Curie, Maria, da Vinci, Leonardo, Birkhof, George David, Galilei, Galileo, Pisarzhveskij, Lev (chemist), Mossbauer, Rudolf Ludwig, Clochisner (Klokishner), Sofia I., Miscoi (Mishkoy), Gh. (Math), Mendel, Gregor Lohan (genet.), Glavan, Vasile (math), Chetrus (Ketrush), P. (chem), Bostan, Ion (mech. eng.), Boltzmann, Ludwig Ed.

  1. A safe place with space for learning: Experiences from an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin; Kiessling, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional learning in a real ward context effectively increases collaborative and professional competence among students. However, less is known on the processes behind this. The aim of this study was to explore medical, nurse, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy students' perspectives on the process of their own learning at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). We performed a qualitative content analysis on free-text answers of 333 student questionnaires from the years 2004 to 2011. Two main themes emerged: first, students found that the IPTW provided an enriching learning environment--a safe place with space. It included authentic and relevant patients, well-composed and functioning student teams, competent and supportive supervisors, and adjusted ward structures to support learning. Second, they developed an awareness of their own development with faith in the future--from chaos to clarity. It included personal, professional, and interprofessional development towards a comprehensive view of practice and a faith in their ability to work as professionals in the future. Our findings are discussed with a social constructivist perspective. This study suggests that when an IPTW provides a supportive and permissive learning environment with possibilities to interact with one another--a safe place with space--it enables students to move from insecurity to faith in their abilities--from chaos to clarity. However, if the learning environment is impaired, the students' development could be halted.

  2. Space and place concepts analysis based on semiology approach in residential architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Parsaee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Space and place are among the fundamental concepts in architecture about which many discussions have been held and the complexity and importance of these concepts were focused on. This research has introduced an approach to better cognition of the architectural concepts based on theory and method of semiology in linguistics. Hence, at first the research investigates the concepts of space and place and explains their characteristics in architecture. Then, it reviews the semiology theory and explores its concepts and ideas. After obtaining the principles of theory and also the method of semiology, they are redefined in an architectural system based on an adaptive method. Finally, the research offers a conceptual model which is called the semiology approach by considering the architectural system as a system of signs. The approach can be used to decode the content of meanings and forms and analyses of the architectural mechanism in order to obtain its meanings and concepts. In this way and based on this approach, the residential architecture of the traditional city of Bushehr – Iran was analyzed as a case of study and its concepts were extracted. The results of this research demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach in structure detection and identification of an architectural system. Besides, this approach has the capability to be used in processes of sustainable development and also be a basis for deconstruction of architectural texts. The research methods of this study are qualitative based on comparative and descriptive analyses.

  3. Race, space, place: notes on the racialisation and spatialisation of commercial sex work in Dubai, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Pardis

    2010-11-01

    This paper focuses on the perceived racialisation and resultant spatialisation of commercial sex in Dubai. In recent years, the sex industry in Dubai has grown to include women from the Middle East, Eastern Europe, East Asia and Africa. With the increase in sex workers of different nationalities has come a form of localised racism that is embedded in structures and desires seen within specific locations. The physical spatialisation of sex work hinges on perceived race and produces distinct income generating potential for women engaged in the sex industry in Dubai. The social and physical topography of Dubai is important in marginalising or privileging these various groups of sex workers, which correlates race, space and place with rights and assistance. I begin with a description of the multidirectional flows of causality between race, space, place and demand. I then discuss how these various groups are inversely spatialised within the discourse on assistance, protection and rights. The findings presented here are based on ethnographic research conducted with transnational migrants in the UAE in 2004, 2008 and 2009.

  4. Racialized Spaces in Teacher Discourse: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Place-Based Identities in Roche Bois, Mauritius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehe, Elsa M.

    2013-01-01

    This eleven-month ethnographic study puts critical discourse analysis in dialogue with postmodern conceptualizations of space and place to explore how eight educators talk about space and in the process, produce racialized spaces in Roche Bois, Mauritius. The macro-historical context of racialization of this urban marginalized community informs…

  5. Space, place and atmosphere. Emotion and peripherical perception in architectural experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhani Pallasmaa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural experiences are essentially multi-sensory and simultaneous, and a complex entity is usually grasped as an atmosphere, ambience or feeling. In fact, the judgement concerning the character of a space or place calls for categories of sensing that extend beyond the five Aristotelian senses, such as the embodied existential sense, and, as a result, the entity is perceived in a diffuse, peripheral and unconscious manner. Paradoxically, we grasp an atmosphere before we have consciously identified its constituent factors and ingredients. «We perceive atmospheres through our emotional sensibility – a form of perception that works incredibly quickly, and which we humans evidently need to help us survive», Peter Zumthor suggests. We are mentally and emotionally affected by works of art before we understand them, or we may not understand them intellectually at all. Sensitive artists and architects intuit experiential and emotive qualities of spaces, places and images. This capacity calls for a specific kind of imagination, an emphatic imagination. Atmospheres are percieved peripherally through diffuse vision interacting with other sense modalities, and they are experienced emotionally rather than intellectually. The studies on the differentiation of the two brain hemispheres suggest that atmospheres are perceived through the right hemisphere. Somewhat surprisingly, atmospheres are more conscious objectives in literature, cinema, theater, painting and music than in architecture, which has been traditionally approached formally and perceived primarily through focused vision. Yet, when we see a thing in focus, we are outsiders to it, whereas the experience of being in a space calls for peripheral and unfocused perception. One of the reasons for the experiential poverty of contemporary settings could be in the poverty of their peripheral stimuli.

  6. How does justice smell? Reflections on space and place, justice and the body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Meiring

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Flowing from a joint consultation on Spatial Justice and Reconciliation on 21–22 September 2015, hosted by the Centre for Contextual Ministry and the Ubuntu Research Project of the University of Pretoria, this article reflects on the notions of space and justice from the perspective of a contemporary theological anthropology as ‘embodied sensing’, where the making of meaning is sensed in the body. The argument is put forward that spatial justice is an embodied endeavour and that it cannot be achieved disconnected from the bodies of the persons in the concrete context where justice is strived for and where bodies can flourish. The relation between spatial justice, sense of place, human flourishing and the embodied sensing of meaning is explored.

  7. National Calendar-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvei, Valeria; Svet, Natalia-Maria; Puscasu, Madlena; Ciobanu, Maria; Netida, Xenia; Pohila, Vlad

    2014-02-01

    The following biographies of scientists were included in the calendar: Fermi Enrico (1901-1954), Gagarin Iury (1934-1938), Kirchhoff Gustav Robert (1824-2009), Kot Mihail V.(1914-1967), Lalescu Traian (1882-1929), Laplace Pierre Simon Marchiz de (1749-1827), Loumiere Louis, Pavlov Mihail (1884-1961), Steklov Vladimir(1864-1926), Ulugbek Mahhomed Taragai (1394-1449). A short presentation of the Harvard University, founded in 1639, has been given also.

  8. Korean Astronomical Calendar, Chiljeongsan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Hee

    In fifteenth century Korea, there was a grand project for the astronomical calendar and instrument making by the order of King Sejong 世宗 (1418-1450). During this period, many astronomical and calendrical books including Islamic sources in Chinese versions were imported from Ming 明 China, and corrected and researched by the court astronomers of Joseon 朝鮮 (1392-1910). Moreover, the astronomers and technicians of Korea frequently visited China to study astronomy and instrument making, and they brought back useful information in the form of new published books or specifications of instruments. As a result, a royal observatory equipped with 15 types of instrument was completed in 1438. Two types of calendar, Chiljeongsan Naepyeon 七政算內篇 and Chiljeongsan Oepyeon 七政算外篇, based on the Chinese and Islamic calendar systems, respectively, were published in 1444 with a number of calendrical editions such as corrections and example supplements (假令) including calculation methods and results for solar and lunar eclipses.

  9. Café as third place and the creation of a unique space of interaction in UI Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurliani Lukito, Yulia; Puspita Xenia, Anneli

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of modern cafés is an interesting phenomenon in the city and it is related to globalization and the creation of urban public space. This paper explores the idea of café as third place and social interaction occurs in the café with Starbucks café as the focus of discussion. We argue that modern café like Starbucks offers a comforting and neutral ground for social interaction but some other characteristic of social interaction come up as the result of modern technology. Oldenburg distinguishes third places as public places on neutral ground where people can gather and interact (Oldenburg, 1991). In contrast to first places (home) and second places (work), third places serve as places for creative and social interaction and often considered anchors of community life. The characteristic of cafés as third space relates to the social interaction occurs at the neighborhood that in terms may enhances quality of life and provide social bounding. With the development of information technology, some characteristics of third places are changed although third places still become an important medium for social interaction as well as in increasing the ability of the city to be more adaptable to changes. Conversation is still the main activity at third place but many people use their electronic devices alongside face-to-face conversations. As a method, this study uses direct observations and qualitative analyses of UI Starbucks in as case studies.

  10. The Story Behind the Place: Creating Urban Spaces That Enhance Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilliers, E.J.; Timmermans, W.; Goorbergh, van den F.; Slijkhuis, J.S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stories play an exceptionally important role in how people assign value to a place. Taken together, all those stories essentially give a place an identity. The aim of placemaking is to ensure that the people using a place can appreciate that place. Placemaking approaches are focussed on strategic

  11. Paradise regained: older adult rock climbers turning space into place in the natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hickman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the time of writing there are over 10 million people aged over 65 living in the UK, and by 2050 the number is predicted to rise to 19 million. This expansion of the ageing population is mirrored worldwide, and over the past ten years has stimulated a growth in age-related studies. However, the idea of a social gerontology of the outdoors is yet to take root. Yet, with the maturing of those born between the years 1946 and 1964, and increased participation in adventurous activities, we suggest that the time is right for scholarship in this specific direction. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to discover how older adult rock climbers perceived their relationship with the natural environment to have changed over the period of their involvement with rock climbing. The investigation used a purposive sample of rock climbers in the north-west of England (n=10 aged between 65 and 74 years (av=69.6 identifying them as ‘young-old’ adults. Oral testimony was collected over two phases, the first with interview-questionnaires, and the second with targeted semi-structured interviews. In order to give a clear voice to participants, manual data handling using was used to establish raw data that were then sorted into themes and verified against internal and external checkers. These were then organized around Peace, Wahl, Mollenkopf and Oswald’s (2014 concept of an ‘environment’ considered within three dimensions: the physical/material, including the natural landscape; the psychological, and the meaning attributed to the place, its evolution across the life course, and how it makes people feel about themselves; and the social/cultural, involving the engagement of people to places, including how the space is used and remembered.

  12. Sacred spaces in public places: religious and spiritual plurality in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Sharma, Sonya; Pesut, Barb; Sawatzky, Richard; Meyerhoff, Heather; Cochrane, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Several intriguing developments mark the role and expression of religion and spirituality in society in recent years. In what were deemed secular societies, flows of increased sacralization (variously referred to as 'new', 'alternative', 'emergent' and 'progressive' spiritualities) and resurgent globalizing religions (sometimes with fundamentalist expressions) are resulting in unprecedented plurality. These shifts are occurring in conjunction with increasing ethnic diversity associated with global migration, as well as other axes of difference within contemporary society. Democratic secular nations such as Canada are challenged to achieve social cohesion in the face of growing religious, spiritual and ethnic diversity. These challenges are evident in the high-paced, demanding arena of Health care. Here, religious and spiritual plurality enter in, sometimes resulting in conflict between medical services and patients' beliefs, other times provoking uncertainties on the part of healthcare professionals about what to do with their own religiously or spiritually grounded values and beliefs. In this paper, we present selected findings from a 3-year study that examined the negotiation of religious and spiritual pluralism in Health care. Our focus is on the themes of 'sacred' and 'place', exploring how the sacred - that which is attributed as special and set apart as it pertains to the divine, transcendence, God or higher power - takes form in social and material spaces in hospitals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Geographies of energy transition: Space, place and the low-carbon economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gavin; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Bradshaw, Michael; Eyre, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This paper makes a case for examining energy transition as a geographical process, involving the reconfiguration of current patterns and scales of economic and social activity. The paper draws on a seminar series on the ‘Geographies of Energy Transition: security, climate, governance' hosted by the authors between 2009 and 2011, which initiated a dialogue between energy studies and the discipline of human geography. Focussing on the UK Government's policy for a low carbon transition, the paper provides a conceptual language with which to describe and assess the geographical implications of a transition towards low carbon energy. Six concepts are introduced and explained: location, landscape, territoriality, spatial differentiation, scaling, and spatial embeddedness. Examples illustrate how the geographies of a future low-carbon economy are not yet determined and that a range of divergent – and contending – potential geographical futures are in play. More attention to the spaces and places that transition to a low-carbon economy will produce can help better understand what living in a low-carbon economy will be like. It also provides a way to help evaluate the choices and pathways available. - Highlights: ► Examines transition as a geographical process, reconfiguring patterns and scales of activity. ► Provides concepts for assessing geographical implications of transition to a low-carbon economy. ► Outlines location, landscape, territoriality, uneven development, scaling, and embeddedness.

  14. Esprit de Place: Maintaining and Designing Library Buildings To Provide Transcendent Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, Sam; Scherer, Jeffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses library buildings and their role in building community. Reviews current design trends, including reading and study spaces; collaborative workspaces; technology-free zones; archives and special collections; cultural events spaces; age-specific spaces; shared spaces; natural light and landscapes; and interior design trends. (LRW)

  15. Using Calendars to Teach Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Kincanon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the use of calendar construction as an activity for 5th through 8th graders to reinforce science and mathematics concepts. The fundamental cyclic nature of many processes makes it possible to posit alternatives to the modern calendar. Students, in constructing their own calendars, will better appreciate the scientific basis of the modern calendar as well as the cyclic nature of the processes considered in the construction of alternatives. This enhances STEM skills by requiring the students to apply creative mathematical and scientific solutions to a real world problem: tracking cyclic time.

  16. Ancient Persian Skywatching and Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz

    The peoples of Iran used lunisolar calendars until the early fifth century BCE when the 365-day calendar with 30 months and 5 epagomenal days was introduced. This calendar was not corrected to the actual length of the tropical year, and therefore, seasonal festivals gradually moved away from their seasons. Finally, around the turn of the fifth century CE, a partially successful calendar reform was undertaken, and the feasts were restored to their original seasons. In that time, Sasanian kings were interested in astrology, and some Greek and Hindu astrological texts were translated into Persian, but there is no evidence of indigenous contributions to skywatching.

  17. Exploring Earth and the Solar System: Educational Outreach Through NASA's Space Place, SciJinks, and Climate Kids Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Joseph Chistopher

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Place team publishes engaging content and creates an effective environment to inspire a young audience to dare mighty things. NASA uses the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks websites to cultivate interest among elementary-school-aged children in both science and technology. During my summer internship at Jet Propulsion Laboratory I used Adobe Flash and ActionScript 3 to develop content for the Space Place, Climate Kids, and SciJinks sites. In addition, I was involved in the development process for ongoing and new projects during my internship. My involvement allowed me to follow a project from concept to design, implementation, and release. I personally worked on three projects this summer, two of which are currently in deployment. The first is a scrambled letter-tile guessing game titled Solar System Scramble. The second, Butterfrog Mix-Up, is a rotating-tile puzzle game. The third project is a unfinished prototype for a maze game.

  18. Older people and their social spaces: a study of well-being and attachment to place in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Janine L; Allen, Ruth E S; Palmer, Anthea J; Hayman, Karen J; Keeling, Sally; Kerse, Ngaire

    2009-02-01

    A sense of belonging or attachment to place is believed to help maintain a sense of identity and well-being, and to facilitate successful adjustments in old age. Older people in particular have been shown to draw meaning and security from the places in which they live. Qualitative data from multiple conversational interviews held over the period of a year with each of 83 community-dwelling older people in Auckland within the context of a study conducted from 2006 to 2008 are interpreted to explore how older people relate to their social and physical environments, with a specific focus on attachment to place and the meaning of home. The concept of 'social space' is proposed, to capture the elastic physical, imaginative, emotional and symbolic experiences of and connections to people and place across time and in scope. Talking with older people themselves gave a rich account of attachment to place, social spaces, and well-being. Our participants had strong attachments to their homes and neighbourhoods, extensive participation in 'beyond spaces', and shrinking social worlds. They did not, however necessarily view changes as negative; instead there was a delicate negotiation of positive and negative aspects, and complex engagement with 'social space' as a profoundly meaningful construct.

  19. "Third Spaces" Are Interesting Places: Applying "Third Space Theory" to Nursery-Aged Children's Constructions of Themselves as Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Rachael

    2008-01-01

    Based on Moje et al.'s (2004) conceptions of "third space theory", this article describes how five nursery-aged children created a "third space" between home and school, in order to find continuity between home and school constructions of reading. This article describes how the children used various aspects of their home…

  20. Memory Space / Time Lived in Representation to Mental Maps: The Case of School Project "our neighborhood, our place"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinei Pereira da Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The representations and memory of living space are essential to developing mental maps and cartographic documents. In this regard this investigation as a primary objective to understand how mind maps can contribute pedagogically classes in Geography and History as well, breaking the dichotomy space / time. From the point of view of theoretical and methodological the research relied on the analysis of the school project “Our Neighborhood, Our Place” developed at the Municipal School “Vereador Hamilton Teodoro” in Governador Valadares (MG, along with a group of 7th grades from elementary school and the articulation of authors who discuss the concepts of representation, memory, space and place.

  1. Headache diaries and calendars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torelli, Paola; Jensen, Rigmor

    2010-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common types of pain and, in the absence of biological markers, headache diagnosis depends only on information obtained from clinical interviews and physical and neurological examinations. Headache diaries make it possible to record prospectively the characteristics...... of every attack and the use of headache calendars is indicated for evaluating the time pattern of headache, identifying aggravating factors, and evaluating the efficacy of preventive treatment. This may reduce the recall bias and increase accuracy in the description. The use of diagnostic headache diaries...... practice for diagnosis and follow-up of treatments; and (2) describe the tools that have been developed for research and their main applications in the headache field. In addition, we include information on diaries available online and proposals for future areas of research....

  2. Beyond a lesbian space? An investigation on the intergenerational discourse surrounding lesbian public social places in Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobear, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates intergenerational discourse on public lesbian social spaces within Amsterdam, Netherlands. The author seeks to address how lesbian women from different generations talk about lesbian social spaces in Amsterdam through anthropological ethnographic research and semistructured interviews with 20 lesbian women who have or currently are attending these places. The author also addresses the gradual decline of lesbian specific spaces in the city and the current belief that lesbian women are beyond having a public social space that services only the lesbian community. The rise in popularity of mixed gay- and lesbian-friendly bars and girl circuit parties will be identified as a key area where generational tensions and discourse are being played out. Issues pertaining to generational disagreements over lesbian identity, visibility, and space will be addressed.

  3. The place of space technology in economic development: Reflections on present and future aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeau, A.; Reuter, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the development of satellite applications on the orientation of the space effort were examined. The gap between available and exploited technology, the impact of the current economic climate and future trends are discussed. Europe's low level of public funding for its space effort, in comparison to other space powers, and the dangers of complacency regarding Europe's competitiveness in the space market are illustrated. A proposal for the general direction which Europe's future strategy must take if European independence in this field is to be preserved is presented.

  4. Space and place in researching male early high school leaving in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    question the school systems' organisational components (Coleman, 1988), curriculum .... 2001:379) because of the value placed on a high-school certificate. Early school ..... Male early high school leaving in Orange Farm Township: A hidden.

  5. Using and Experiencing the Academic Library: A Multisite Observational Study of Space and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Francine; Swabey, Alice

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how students are using academic library spaces and the role these spaces are playing in the campus community. Data were collected on five campuses (two community colleges, two undergraduate universities, and one technical institute) via observational seating sweeps and questionnaires. The study found remarkably similar usage…

  6. Connecting physical and social dimensions of place attachment: What can we learn from attachment to urban recreational spaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madgin, Rebecca; Bradley, Lisa; Hastings, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the ways in which people form attachments to recreational spaces. More specifically it examines the relationship between recreational spaces associated with sporting activity in urban neighbourhoods and place attachment. The focus is on the ways in which changes to these spaces exposes the affective bonds between people and their surroundings. The paper applies a qualitative methodology, namely focus groups and photo elicitation, to the case study of Parkhead, a neighbourhood in the East End of Glasgow. Parkhead has historically been subjected to successive waves of redevelopment as a result of deindustrialization in the late twentieth century. More recently redevelopment associated with the 2014 Commonwealth Games involved further changes to neighbourhood recreational spaces, including refurbishing of existing sports facilities and building new ones. This paper reflects on the cumulative impacts of this redevelopment to conclude (a) that recreational sports spaces provoke multi-layered and complex attachments that are inextricably connected to both temporal and spatial narratives and (b) that research on neighbourhood recreational spaces can develop our understanding of the intricate relationship between the social and physical dimensions of place attachment.

  7. The Beginning of Protohaykian Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutian, G. H.

    2017-07-01

    From its foundation, studies in the field of history of Armenian astronomy and Armenian calendars were integral to astrophysical researches of the Byurakan Observatory. It is important to note the monographs and articles of H. Badalian and B. Toumanian in this field. As the result of our work in this field, beginning of the Haykian calendar (BC 2341) and the concept of Protohaykian calendar were established. In the present work an attempt is made to determine the beginning of the oldest Armenian calendar-the Protohaykian calendar. It is shown that Protohaykian calendar was originated when the heliacal rising of the star Spica (α Virgo) was observable from Armenia 8 days before summer solstice. Calculations made on this basis provide date of the beginning of this calendar as BC 9000 with an error not to exceed 80 years. This date is in correspondence with the date of observations of the Pleiades from Metsamor (about BC 9000), that was found a few years ago. Meanwhile, it also corresponds to the geological data, which prove, that the oldest lake (Araratian Sea) in the territory of modern Araratian valley was dried out at the same time. There is also good correlation with the time of cultivation of crops that was done in the territory of historical Armenia about 12000 years ago.

  8. Meeting at the Edges: Spaces, Places and Grassroots Governance Activism in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Through ethnography of activist organisations promoting transparency, accountability and active citizenship, and comprising coalitions of the city’s middle classes and urban poor, this article explores the spaces in which activists from different social backgrounds meet and carry out their work. By locating the positions of meeting rooms, offices and activists’ homes in urban space, I open up a view of the everyday practices of grassroots governance initiatives aimed at producing shared citiz...

  9. After-School Spaces: Looking for Learning in All the Right Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittka, Christine G.; Evans, Michael A.; Won, Samantha G. L.; Drape, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    After-school settings provide youth with homework support, social outlets and fun activities, and help build self-confidence. They are safe places for forming relationships with caring adults. More after-school settings are starting to integrate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) topics. What science skills and concepts might…

  10. Embedding Local Places in Global Spaces: Geographical Indications as a Territorial Development Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Geographical indications (GIs) are place-based names that convey the geographical origin, as well as the cultural and historical identity, of agricultural products. GIs are unique, in that they provide a means of ensuring that control over production and sales of a product stays within a local area, but at the same time they make use of extralocal…

  11. Negotiating Sociolinguistic Borderlands--Native Youth Language Practices in Space, Time, and Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Philip Deloria (2004) and recent explorations of "American Indian languages in unexpected places" (Webster & Peterson, 2011a), this article challenges received expectations of Native American languages and language users as "rural" and physically distant and of "urban" Indigenous language…

  12. Revitalising the public open spaces in the CDB of Pietermaritzburg to immortalize a great place

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndaba, DN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available , social and economic node with a rich cultural heritage and a CBD that is the administrative central authority of the province. It’s internationally acclaimed competitions and sports give it global appeal. Great cities are also made by great public places...

  13. "A Perverse Kind of Sense": Urban Spaces, Ghetto Places and the Discourse of School Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, Abraham P.

    2012-01-01

    School shootings loom large in the collective imagination and young, White males commit a majority of these horrific crimes. Although many of the descriptions of school shooters in the media and scholarly studies attribute their actions to psychological problems and/or personal/social failings, these events are also often placed in a comparative…

  14. CORPORATE BRANDING COWORKING PLACE IN BANDUNG (CORPORATE BRANDING COWORKING SPACE DI BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Damayanti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The title of this research is “Corporate Branding Coworking Space in Bandung” with the subtitle is “Descriptive Study of Corporate Branding Coworking Space in Bandung to Create Product Differentiation”. The high demand for economical workspace makes business coworking space growing. The growth happen in Bandung and make the level of competition coworking space in Bandung is quite high, especially with the uniformity of the product offered each coworking space. Seeing these growth, researchers interested in conducting research on how corporate branding coworking space in Bandung to create product differentiation.The purpose of this study is to discover how company create the vision, implemented vision to their corporate culture, and the compability between their vision and image of Bandung Digital Valley, Freenovation, and Ruang Reka that stakeholder created. The method used in this research is descriptive method with qualitative data and Hatch & Schultz’s concept of corporate branding. The data collection techniques used in interviews, observation, and documentation study.The result of this study indicate that Bandung Digital Valley, Freenovation, and Ruang Reka focus to introduce the company to their target market. Started from create the vision of the company by founder based on their experiences and business opportunity. Then, the application of corporate vision to corporate culture. Non of Bandung Digital Valley, Freenovation, or Ruang Reka implement the vision into corporate culture. Last, Bandung Digital Valley, Freenovation, and Ruang Reka think it is not a right time to create corporate image because they need to improve the quality of their facility first.   Keywords : corporate branding, product differentiation, Bandung Digital Valley, Freenovation, Ruang Reka Judul penelitian yang diangkat adalah “Corporate Branding Coworking Space di Bandung” dengan sub judul Studi Deskriptif mengenai Corporate Branding Coworking

  15. Ghettos and enclaves in the cross-place realm: mapping socially bounded spaces across cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Alesia F

    2011-01-01

    Since the early Chicago School, urban researchers have used residential proximity to assess contacts within and between racial and ethnic groups. This approach is increasingly limited. Diverse groups use email, social networking sites, instant messaging and mobile phones to communicate across urban zones and distant cities. These practices enable mutual support among far-flung family members and co-ethnics as they engage with an array of institutions throughout their day. Through interviews and observations that include women and men of diverse occupations, races and national origins, the author explores how and why cross-place enclosures of sociality and resources develop. Rather than framing the residential area as the locus of racial/ethnic concentration, the author focuses on cross-place concentrations in the technologically mediated workspace. This study enhances theorization of the structural negotiations, interpersonal pressures and group preferences that produce separate lifeworlds in globalizing cities.

  16. Understanding Relationships between Health, Ethnicity, Place and the Role of Urban Green Space in Deprived Urban Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Jenny; Aspinall, Peter A; Ward Thompson, Catharine

    2016-07-05

    Very little is known about how differences in use and perceptions of urban green space impact on the general health of black and minority ethnic (BME) groups. BME groups in the UK suffer from poorer health and a wide range of environmental inequalities that include poorer access to urban green space and poorer quality of green space provision. This study used a household questionnaire (n = 523) to explore the relationship between general health and a range of individual, social and physical environmental predictors in deprived white British and BME groups living in ethnically diverse cities in England. Results from Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID) segmentation analyses identified three distinct general health segments in our sample ranging from "very good" health (people of Indian origin), to "good" health (white British), and "poor" health (people of African-Caribbean, Bangladeshi, Pakistani origin and other BME groups), labelled "Mixed BME" in the analyses. Correlated Component Regression analyses explored predictors of general health for each group. Common predictors of general health across all groups were age, disability, and levels of physical activity. However, social and environmental predictors of general health-including use and perceptions of urban green space-varied among the three groups. For white British people, social characteristics of place (i.e., place belonging, levels of neighbourhood trust, loneliness) ranked most highly as predictors of general health, whilst the quality of, access to and the use of urban green space was a significant predictor of general health for the poorest health group only, i.e., in "Mixed BME". Results are discussed from the perspective of differences in use and perceptions of urban green space amongst ethnic groups. We conclude that health and recreation policy in the UK needs to give greater attention to the provision of local green space amongst poor BME communities since this can play an

  17. The Spaces and Places That Women Casual Academics (Often Fail To) Inhabit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Gail

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project that aims to address the binary/irony of the central physical and teaching space that women casual academics inhabit within Australian universities, against their lack of presence in the existing discourses around higher education. The invisibility of women casual academics within the discourses around…

  18. Feel the Fear: Learning Graphic Design in Affective Places and Online Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Anitra

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the idea of pedagogic affect in both onsite and online graphic design learning spaces, and speculates on the role that this affect plays in the formation of the design student. I argue that embodied design knowledge is built by interactions with design professionals, activities that mimic the daily work of designers, and…

  19. Timing Childhoods: An Alternative Reading of Children's Development through Philosophy of Time, Temporality, Place and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This article argues that the denial of development can be a productive space and a liberating time for children in the current outcomes-driven times. The author offers an alternative reading of childhood, considering children's development differently through various philosophical theorizations of events, which emerge through utilizing philosophy…

  20. Researching Students across Spaces and Places: Capturing Digital Data "On the Go"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falloon, Garry

    2018-01-01

    Criticisms have been levelled at e-research that limited knowledge has been produced helpful for guiding educators in using digital tools more effectively for teaching and learning. This issue has become more acute with the emergence of mobile devices that enable learners to transition across different learning spaces and times. Traditional data…

  1. Battle Mound: Exploring space, place, and history of a Red River Caddo community in southwest Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Duncan Paul

    This research is a synthesis of archaeogeophysical and archaeohistorical data collected from the Battle Mound site (3LA1). Using these data, this research seeks to understand how the site is organized in terms of architectural variability and how differential use areas, such as domestic or community space, can be compared to ethnographic and archaeological data concerning Caddo community structure and landscape use. The research is formulated around three research questions related to spatial organization and settlement patterning, intrasite behavioral practices, and Caddo culture history. Results show that an examination at multiple scales of resolution can inform about the spatial organization and settlement patterning of Caddo communities and how these underlying principles that define space have endured or been modified over time. It also proposes a new intrasite model that can be productively tested with geophysical methods and the mapping of the distribution of features within large village areas.

  2. Pubs in Public Life: A Place for Liquor Spaces in the City of Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Vancouver liquor licensing bylaws has been described by members of the media, industry, government and general public as overly restrictive, especially in the areas of hours ofservice, geographical distribution and the cultural diversity ofpublic liquor spaces. According to the City of Vancouver, the objective of city stewardship is to provide for the social, economic and physical well-being of citizens. A consultation of both academic research and the Vancouver community suggests that public...

  3. Your place or mine: shared sensory experiences elicit a remapping of peripersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maister, Lara; Cardini, Flavia; Zamariola, Giorgia; Serino, Andrea; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-04-01

    Our perceptual systems integrate multisensory information about objects that are close to our bodies, which allow us to respond quickly and appropriately to potential threats, as well as act upon and manipulate useful tools. Intriguingly, the representation of this area close to our body, known as the multisensory 'peripersonal space' (PPS), can expand or contract during social interactions. However, it is not yet known how different social interactions can alter the representation of PPS. In particular, shared sensory experiences, such as those elicited by bodily illusions such as the enfacement illusion, can induce feelings of ownership over the other's body which has also been shown to increase the remapping of the other's sensory experiences onto our own bodies. The current study investigated whether such shared sensory experiences between two people induced by the enfacement illusion could alter the way PPS was represented, and whether this alteration could be best described as an expansion of one's own PPS towards the other or a remapping of the other's PPS onto one's own. An audio-tactile integration task allowed us to measure the extent of the PPS before and after a shared sensory experience with a confederate. Our results showed a clear increase in audio-tactile integration in the space close to the confederate's body after the shared experience. Importantly, this increase did not extend across the space between participant and confederate, as would be expected if the participant's PPS had expanded. Thus, the pattern of results is more consistent with a partial remapping of the confederate's PPS onto the participant's own PPS. These results have important consequences for our understanding of interpersonal space during different kinds of social interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Ethics of Rural Place-Making: Public Space, Poetics, and the Ontologies of Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Potter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The small settlement of Hopetoun in the Victoria’s north-east – Mallee country – is oriented physically, economically and socially around Lake Laschelle. Large signs map the way for the tourist to its edge, where boat ramps and picnic sites await. And yet there is no water here and has been none for years. The presence of water in its absence is palpable. Over three years I followed water around the drought-ridden Mallee, a participant in a creative research project that sought to poetically recollect and assemble stories from this country as an experiment in place-making. Via collaborative practice between artists, with local community, and with the material environment of the Mallee itself, this still ongoing project brings poetic practice to bear on questions of political urgency – drought, climate change, community distress – usually the province of the techno and social sciences. In a land cultivated to take note of water’s absence, the project began to assemble its presence. This paper discusses this project as a methodological experiment that raises unsettling questions about the ethics of place-making in a context of post-colonial environmental change.

  5. Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 journée) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction ...

  6. Philosophies and Space and Place connected - A piece of Jewellery and a War Monument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elias Melvin; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    to as: Deep Structure; through which he attempts to explore the notion of visual syntax. It is from within this Space that we reconsider another architectural form; Eisenman’s jewellery. What is behind, what are the language of his jewellery, which Eisenman refers to as archetypal symbols...... of the decentered man and his unconsciousness? Do these objects propose a new relationship with the one who wear them? They are not emulating human body or proportions, neither decorative nor figurative. They have their own life, but are they part of a continuum? We follow Eisenman through an elaboration...

  7. The school youth. Of the Training places to the Construction spaces senses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Fredy Vergara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This text comes from an epistemological concerns and in turn guiding question on the role of the contemporary school and its importance in the development of training processes that go beyond the transmission of knowledge. The conception of the school as a meeting place where dialogue can collectively share life experiences, raises reflections on the role of individuals in the construction of knowledge and ways of life, while education takes on its own meaning and authentic to the extent that a school has to conceive that transcends institutional frameworks and regulatory regimes; it is a gamble to consider the condition of young individuals in habitats conducive intersubjective construction conversations to share life experiences and cotidianidades, turns out to be an exercise in collective construction of knowledge and affections.

  8. Law and Space: Juridical Organisation and Central Places in Banat, Western Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COSMIN FLAVIUS COSTAŞ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the relationship between the juridical system and the hierarchy of settlements in Banat, Romania. The historical development of the law institutions is presented, highlighting the peculiarities of the region. The present juridical organisation is also thoroughly analysed. Emphasis is laid on the importance of the Appellate Court in Timişoara, the county courts and the trial courts, and their magistrates. The number and territorial distribution of the auxiliaries of justice, the lawyers and notaries public, sheds light on the significance of certain settlements for the law system. The hierarchy of central places in Banat is studied from the perspective of the juridical organisation. In conclusion, the established hierarchy is uncontested for the first four levels, including the cities of Timişoara, Arad, Reşiţa, Lugoj and Caransebeş. Nevertheless, there are significant differences between the smaller towns of the lower levels.

  9. The place of polish in the multilingual space of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Neprytska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the position of the Polish language in the multilingual space of the European Union and determines the key factors which facilitate its gaining popularity and spreading in Europe. A large territory and population determine the significant presence of Polish in the European Union. Intense economic development facilitates popularization of learning and using Polish in the business medium, however, English was and still remains the dominating language of business. Active work of the state on improving the reputation of the country abroad, civilizational (value­based unity with other nations of the EU, favorable geographical position, common Indo­European roots of Germanic, Romanic and Slavonic  languages as well as usage of the Latin type create favorable conditions for the development and popularization of Polish on the territory of the EU. The article also mentions a number of concerns, which are rooted in the historical past of a dependent or semi­dependent existence of the Polish people, namely, the existence of the Polish and culture in the shade of German and Russian culture space, the negative international image of modern Poland, which was formed at the beginning of the 1990­s, the low level of Europeans’ familiarization with the Polish culture, absence of popularity and economic necessity of learning Polish abroad.

  10. An overview of the program to place advanced automation and robotics on the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    The preliminary design phase of the Space Station has uncovered a large number of potential uses of automation and robotics, most of which deal with the assembly and operation of the Station. If NASA were to vigorously push automation and robotics concepts in the design, the Station crew would probably be free to spend a substantial portion of time on payload activities. However, at this point NASA has taken a conservative attitude toward automation and robotics. For example, the belief is that robotics should evolve through telerobotics and that uses of artificial intelligence should be initially used in an advisory capacity. This conservativeness is in part due to the new and untested nature of automation and robotics; but, it is also due to emphases plased on designing the Station to the so-called upfront cost without thoroughly understanding the life cycle cost. Presumably automation and robotics has a tendency to increase the initial cost of the Space Station but could substantially reduce the life cycle cost. To insure that NASA will include some form of robotic capability, Congress directed to set aside funding. While this stimulates the development of robotics, it does not necessarily stimulate uses of artificial intelligence. However, since the initial development costs of some forms of artificial intelligence, such as expert systems, are in general lower than they are for robotics one is likely to see several expert systems being used on the Station.

  11. Subverting the pastoral: the transcendence of space and place in J.M. Coetzee’s Disgrace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Smit-Marais

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how J.M. Coetzee’s “Disgrace” (1999 – portrayed as a postcolonial and postmodern fictional event – embodies, problematises and subverts the vision of the pastoral farm novel tradition by transcending traditional configurations of space and place. The novel offers a rather bleak apocalyptic vision of gender roles, racial relationships and family relations in post-apartheid South Africa and expresses the socio-political tensions pertaining to the South African landscape in terms of personal relationships. As a fictional reworking of the farm novel, “Disgrace” draws on the tradition’s anxieties about the rights of (white ownership, but within a post-apartheid context. As such, “Disgrace” challenges the pastoral farm novel’s “dream topography” (Coetzee, 1988:6 of the family farm ruled by the patriarch – a topography inscribed – with the help of the invisible labour of black hands – as a legacy of power and ownership to be inherited and cultivated in perpetuity. Accordingly, the concept “farm” is portrayed as a contested and liminal space inscribed with a history of violence and dispossession – a dystopia. This article therefore conceptualises “Disgrace” as an antipastoral farm novel that reconfigures the concept “farm” – within the context of the South African reality – by subverting, inverting and parodying the structures of space and place postulated by the pastoral farm novel.

  12. REFLECTING ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE OF LIVED SPACE: THE PLACE IN CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE GEOGRAPHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenize Carlos de Macêdo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of geography in schools of elementary education has as objective the citizenship training, that is, provide the spatial reading, understanding the socio-spatial relations derives from history and its implications in today's world, so that students have a critical view about their reality and to intervene on it. However, for the teaching of Geography reach your goals, it is necessary that teachers seek to incorporate methodologies that favor the construction of knowledge and suited to the reality of students. In this sense, the study of Geography from the place it seems appropriate, in order to approximate the daily knowledge and school knowledge, contributing to a significant learning. Thus, this paper discusses the importance of the study of place in Geography lessons, and relate an experience lived in the classroom with students of the 6th year of the Municipal School of Basic Education Severino Marinheiro, Juazeirinho - PB. Was used as methodology, literature review and analysis of the texts produced by the students. The results were satisfactory and demonstrated the importance of the study of the place, the experiences of students in the construction of geographical knowledge and on the theme environmental problems. O ensino de Geografia nas escolas da educação básica tem como objetivo a formação para a cidadania, ou seja, proporcionar a leitura espacial, entendendo as relações socioespaciais no decorrer da história e suas implicações no mundo atual, de forma que os discentes tenham uma visão crítica sobre sua realidade e possam intervir sobre ela. Porém, para que o ensino da Geografia alcance os seus objetivos, se faz necessário que os professores busquem incorporar metodologias que privilegiem a construção de conhecimentos, e que estes privilegiem a realidade dos alunos. Nesse sentido, o estudo da Geografia a partir do lugar se mostra oportuno, tendo em vista aproximar os saberes cotidianos e os saberes

  13. After-School Spaces: Looking for Learning in All the Right Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittka, Christine G.; Evans, Michael A.; Won, Samantha G. L.; Drape, Tiffany A.

    2016-06-01

    After-school settings provide youth with homework support, social outlets and fun activities, and help build self-confidence. They are safe places for forming relationships with caring adults. More after-school settings are starting to integrate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) topics. What science skills and concepts might youth learn in engineering design-based after-school settings? Traditional assessments often fail to capture the ways youth learn in informal settings, and deep science understandings are notoriously difficult to measure. In this study, we examined three after-school settings where 65 youth were learning science through engineering design challenges. In this informal setting, we examined storyboards, social networking forum (SNF) chat logs, videos of whole-class interactions, interviews with groups and single participants, and traditional multiple-choice pre- and posttest results. As we looked for evidence of learning, we found that the social networking forum was rich with data. Interviews were even more informative, much more so than traditional pencil and paper multiple-choice tests. We found that different kinds of elicitation strategies adopted by site leaders and facilitators played an important role in the ways youth constructed knowledge. These elicitation strategies also helped us find evidence of learning. Based on findings, future iterations of the curricula will involve tighter integration of social networking forums, continued use of videotaped interviews for data collection, an increased focus on training site leaders and facilitators in elicitation strategies, and more open-ended pencil and paper assessments in order to facilitate the process of looking for learning.

  14. Understanding Relationships between Health, Ethnicity, Place and the Role of Urban Green Space in Deprived Urban Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Roe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Very little is known about how differences in use and perceptions of urban green space impact on the general health of black and minority ethnic (BME groups. BME groups in the UK suffer from poorer health and a wide range of environmental inequalities that include poorer access to urban green space and poorer quality of green space provision. This study used a household questionnaire (n = 523 to explore the relationship between general health and a range of individual, social and physical environmental predictors in deprived white British and BME groups living in ethnically diverse cities in England. Results from Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID segmentation analyses identified three distinct general health segments in our sample ranging from “very good” health (people of Indian origin, to ”good” health (white British, and ”poor” health (people of African-Caribbean, Bangladeshi, Pakistani origin and other BME groups, labelled ”Mixed BME” in the analyses. Correlated Component Regression analyses explored predictors of general health for each group. Common predictors of general health across all groups were age, disability, and levels of physical activity. However, social and environmental predictors of general health-including use and perceptions of urban green space-varied among the three groups. For white British people, social characteristics of place (i.e., place belonging, levels of neighbourhood trust, loneliness ranked most highly as predictors of general health, whilst the quality of, access to and the use of urban green space was a significant predictor of general health for the poorest health group only, i.e., in ”Mixed BME”. Results are discussed from the perspective of differences in use and perceptions of urban green space amongst ethnic groups. We conclude that health and recreation policy in the UK needs to give greater attention to the provision of local green space amongst poor BME

  15. Understanding Relationships between Health, Ethnicity, Place and the Role of Urban Green Space in Deprived Urban Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Jenny; Aspinall, Peter A.; Ward Thompson, Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Very little is known about how differences in use and perceptions of urban green space impact on the general health of black and minority ethnic (BME) groups. BME groups in the UK suffer from poorer health and a wide range of environmental inequalities that include poorer access to urban green space and poorer quality of green space provision. This study used a household questionnaire (n = 523) to explore the relationship between general health and a range of individual, social and physical environmental predictors in deprived white British and BME groups living in ethnically diverse cities in England. Results from Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detection (CHAID) segmentation analyses identified three distinct general health segments in our sample ranging from “very good” health (people of Indian origin), to ”good” health (white British), and ”poor” health (people of African-Caribbean, Bangladeshi, Pakistani origin and other BME groups), labelled ”Mixed BME” in the analyses. Correlated Component Regression analyses explored predictors of general health for each group. Common predictors of general health across all groups were age, disability, and levels of physical activity. However, social and environmental predictors of general health-including use and perceptions of urban green space-varied among the three groups. For white British people, social characteristics of place (i.e., place belonging, levels of neighbourhood trust, loneliness) ranked most highly as predictors of general health, whilst the quality of, access to and the use of urban green space was a significant predictor of general health for the poorest health group only, i.e., in ”Mixed BME”. Results are discussed from the perspective of differences in use and perceptions of urban green space amongst ethnic groups. We conclude that health and recreation policy in the UK needs to give greater attention to the provision of local green space amongst poor BME communities since this

  16. Constructing a celestial calendar wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Sarah M.

    1999-11-01

    When we are asked to consider astronomical monuments of historical significance, we often think of Stonehenge, Mayan cities, or Aztec calendars. Few of us in the United States are prompted to look in our own backyard, where Native Americans spent centuries monitoring the rhythmic motions of the skies.

  17. Multireligious, Multicultural, and Multiethnic Calendar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korra, Herb, Comp.

    This guide features materials concerning ethnic and religious groups and the annual dates important to those groups. Specifically, the guide contains an index of religious holidays; a list of the historical dates important to Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism; and a calendar that lists, by month, cultural and…

  18. Fermilab Friends for Science Education | Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermilab Friends for Science Education FFSE Home About Us Join Us Support Us Contact Us Calendar Directors Board Tools Calendar Join Us Donate Now Get FermiGear! Education Office Search Programs Calendar Join Us/Renew Membership Forms: Online - Print Support Us Donation Forms: Online - Print Tree of

  19. The place of receptionists in access to primary care: Challenges in the space between community and consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwelt, Pat M; Kearns, Robin A; Browne, Annette J

    2015-05-01

    At the point of entry to the health care system sit general practice receptionists (GPRs), a seldom studied employment group. The place of the receptionist involves both a location within the internal geography of the clinic and a position within the primary care team. Receptionists literally 'receive' those who phone or enter the clinic, and are a critical influence in their transformation from a 'person' to a 'patient'. This process occurs in a particular space: the 'waiting room'. We explore the waiting room and its dynamics in terms of 'acceptability', an under-examined aspect of access to primary care. We ask 'How do GPRs see their role with regard to patients with complex health and social needs, in light of the spatio-temporal constraints of their working environments?' We engaged receptionists as participants to explore perceptions of their roles and their workspaces, deriving narrative data from three focus groups involving 14 GPRs from 11 practices in the Northland region of New Zealand. The study employed an adapted form of grounded theory. Our findings indicate that GPRs are on the edge of the practice team, yet carry a complex role at the frontline, in the waiting space. They are de facto managers of this space; however, they have limited agency within general practice settings, due to the constraints imposed upon them by physical and organisational structures. The agency of GPRs is most evident in their ability to shape the social dynamics of the waiting space, and to frame the health care experience as positive for people whose usual experience is marginalisation. We conclude that, if well supported, receptionists have the potential to positively influence health care acceptability, and patients' access to care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space vs. Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmerman, Chris; Madsen, Rene; Hammer Eliassen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies urban informatics methods and techniques on big data generated from the concentrated environment of the second largest music festival in the world, Roskilde Festival. First, we explain how to utilize relevant dimensions from human geography theories towards mapping a ‘Geography...

  1. Our Place in Space: Exploring the Earth-Moon System and Beyond with NASA's CINDI E/PO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Where does space begin? How far is the Moon? How far is Mars? How does our dynamic star, the Sun, affect its family of planets? All of these questions relate to exploration of our Solar System, and are also part of the Education/Public Outreach (E/PO) Program for NASA’s CINDI project, a space weather mission of opportunity. The Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation has been flying aboard the US Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite in the upper atmosphere of the Earth since April 2008. The Earth’s ionosphere, the part of the atmosphere CINDI studies, is also in space. The CINDI E/PO program uses this fact in lessons designed to help students in middle schools and introductory astronomy classes develop a sense of their place in space. In the activity "How High is Space?" students’ start by building an 8-page scale model of the Earth’s atmosphere with 100 km/page. The peak of Mount Everest, commercial airplanes, and the tops of thunderheads all appear at the bottom of the first page of the model, with astronaut altitude -where space begins- at the top of the same sheet of paper. In "Where Would CINDI Be?" the idea of scale is further developed by modeling the Earth-Moon system to scale first in size, then in distance, using half of standard containers of play dough. With a lowest altitude of about 400 km, similar to that of the International Space Station and orbiting Space Shuttle, CINDI is close to the Earth when compared with the nearly thousand times greater distance to the Moon. Comparing and combining the atmosphere and Earth-Moon system models help reinforce ideas of scale and build student understanding of how far away the Moon actually is. These scale models have also been adapted for use in Family Science Nights, and to include the planet Mars. In this presentation, we will show how we use CINDI’s scale modeling activities and others from our broader space sciences E/PO program in formal and informal

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detailed calendar will be published shortly for this series of sessions which will start on 15.10.2001. Registration is already open AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days)...

  3. Time and the French revolution the Republican calendar, 1789-year XIV

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The French Republican Calendar was perhaps the boldest of all the reforms undertaken in Revolutionary France. Introduced in 1793 and used until 1806, the Calendar not only reformed the weeks and months of the year, but decimalised the hours of the day and dated the year from the beginning of the French Republic. This book not only provides a history of the calendar, but places it in the context of eighteenth-century time-consciousness, arguing that the French were adept at working within several systems of time-keeping, whether that of the Church, civil society, or the rhythms of the seasons.

  4. Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    JULY 2004 2nd World Congress of the Game Theory Society, Faculty of Luminy, Marseille, France 5-9 July 2004 Europa Organisation (europa@europa-organisation.com), +33 5 34 45 26 45, www.gts2004.org Budapest Workshop on Behavioral Economics, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary 5-10 July 2004 Eva Dotzi (behavecon@ceu.hu), www.iza.org/en/calls_conferences/CallCEU_04.pdf FDA'04. 1st IFAC Workshop on Fractional Differentiation and its Applications, Bordeaux, France 19-20 July 2004 IFAC secretariat (fda04@lap.u-bordeaux1.fr), www.lap.u-bordeaux.fr/fda04/ Bachelier Finance Society Third World Congress, InterContinental Hotel, Chicago, IL, USA 21-24 July 2004 bfs2004@uic.edu, www.uic.edu/orgs/bachelier/ BS/IMS 2004. 6th World Congress of the Bernoulli Society for Mathematical Statistics and Probability, Barcelona, Spain 26-31 July 2004 wc2004@pacifico-meetings.com, +34 93 402 13 85, www.imub.ub.es/events/wc2004 AUGUST 2004 Summer School in Econometrics. The Cointegrated VAR Model: Econometric Methodology and Macroeconomic Applications, Institute of Economics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 2-22 August 2004 Summerschool@econ.ku.dk, www.econ.ku.dk/summerschool SEPTEMBER 2004 First Bonzenfreies Colloquium on Market Dynamics and Quantitative Economics, Alessandria, Palazzo Borsalino, Italy 9-10 September 2004 colloquium@unipmn.it, www.mfn.unipmn.it/~colloqui/ Risk Analysis 2004. 4th International Conference on Computer Simulation in Risk Analysis and Hazard Mitigation, Aldemar Paradise Royal Mare Hotel, Rhodes, Greece 27-29 September 2004 enquiries@wessex.ac.uk, +44 (0)238 029 3223, www.wessex.ac.uk/conferences/2004/risk04/ OCTOBER 2004 IRC Hedge 2004, InterContinental Hotel, London, UK 10, 11 October 2004 enquiries@irc-conferences.com, www.irc-conferences.com/show_conference.php?id=10 NOVEMBER 2004 IRC DICE 2004, InterContinental Hotel, London, UK 22, 23 November 2004 enquiries@irc-conferences.com, www.irc-conferences.com/show_conference.php?id=13 DECEMBER 2004 Quantitative Methods in Finance 2004, Sydney, Australia 15-18 December 2004 Andrea Schnaufer (qmf@uts.edu.au), +61 2 9514 7737, www.business.uts.edu.au/finance/resources/qmf2004/ JANUARY 2005 Developments in Quantitative Finance, Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, UK 24 January-22 July 2005 www.newton.cam.ac.uk/programmes/DQF/index.html

  5. Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    MAY 2004 GARP's 3rd Credit & Counterparty Risk Summit, London, UK 21-23 May 2004 Andreas Simou (andreas.simou@garp.com), +44 (0)20 7626 9301, www.garp.com/events/3rdcred IMA Workshop 9: Financial Data Analysis and Applications, University of Minnesota, MN, USA 24-28 May 2004 www.ima.umn.edu/complex/spring/c9.html Global Derivatives & Risk Management 2004, NH Eurobuilding, Madrid, Spain 25-28 May 2004 Aden Watkins, ICBI (awatkins@iirltd.co.uk), +44 (0)20 7915 5198, www.icbi-uk.com/globalderivatives/ WEHIA'04 9th Workshop on Economics and Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, Kyodai-Kaikan, Kyoto, Japan 27-29 May 2004 www.nda.ac.jp/cs/AI/wehia04/ JUNE 2004 Semimartingale Theory and Practice in Finance, Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada 5-10 June 2004 www.pims.math.ca/birs/workshops/2004/04w5032/ MC2QMC 2004 International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods, Juan-les-Pins, Côte d'Azur, France 7-10 June 2004 Monique Simonetti (Monique.Simonetti@sophia.inria.fr), +33 4 92 38 78 64, www-sop.inria.fr/omega/MC2QMC2004/ GAIM'04 10th Annual Global Alternative Investment Management Forum, The Beaulieu Centre, Lausanne, Switzerland 8-11 June 2004 +44 (0)20 7915 5103, www.icbi-uk.com/gaim/ 3rd Annual Conference Ri$k Management 2004, Fairmont Hotel, Dubai, United Arab Emirates 12-15 June 2004 www.iirme.com/risk/ 10th Annual Risk USA Congress, Boston, MA, USA 21-24 June 2004 Aristotle Liu (aliu@riskwaters.com), +44 (0)207 484 9700, www.riskusa.com Mannheim Empirical Research Summer School, Mannheim University, Germany 22 June-2 July 2004 oliver@kirchkamp.de, www.sfb504.uni-mannheim.de/merss 9th Annual Conference on Econometric Modelling for Africa, Cape Town, South Africa 30 June-2 July 2004 aesinfo@commerce.uct.ac.za, www.commerce.uct.ac.za/economics/AES2004Conference/ 4th Congress of Nonlinear Analysts. Special Session on Mathematical Methods in Theoretical Finance, Hyatt Grand Cypress Resort, Orlando, FL, USA 30 June-7 July 2004 dkermani@fit.edu, +1 321 674 7412, http://kermani.math.fit.edu/ JULY 2004 2nd World Congress of the Game Theory Society, Faculty of Luminy, Marseille, France 5-9 July 2004 Europa Organisation (europa@europa-organisation.com), +33 5 34 45 26 45, www.gts2004.org Budapest Workshop on Behavioral Economics, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary 5-10 July 2004 Eva Dotzi (behavecon@ceu.hu), www.iza.org/en/calls_conferences/CallCEU_04.pdf FDA'04 1st IFAC Workshop on Fractional Differentiation and its Applications, Bordeaux, France 19-20 July 2004 IFAC secretariat (fda04@lap.u-bordeaux1.fr), www.lap.u-bordeaux.fr/fda04/ Bachelier Finance Society Third World Congress, InterContinental Hotel, Chicago, IL, USA 21-24 July 2004 bfs2004@uic.edu, www.uic.edu/orgs/bachelier/ BS/IMS 2004 6th World Congress of the Bernoulli Society for Mathematical Statistics and Probability, Barcelona, Spain 26-31 July 2004 wc2004@pacifico-meetings.com, +34 93 402 13 85, www.imub.ub.es/events/wc2004 AUGUST 2004 Summer School in Econometrics. The Cointegrated VAR Model: Econometric Methodology and Macroeconomic Applications, Institute of Economics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark 2-22 August 2004 Summerschool@econ.ku.dk, www.econ.ku.dk/summerschool SEPTEMBER 2004 First Bonzenfreies Colloquium on Market Dynamics and Quantitative Economics, Alessandria, Palazzo Borsalino, Italy 9-10 September 2004 colloquium@unipmn.it, www.mfn.unipmn.it/~colloqui/ Risk Analysis 2004. 4th International Conference on Computer Simulation in Risk Analysis and Hazard Mitigation, Aldemar Paradise Royal Mare Hotel, Rhodes, Greece 27-29 September 2004 enquiries@wessex.ac.uk, +44 (0)238 029 3223, www.wessex.ac.uk/conferences/2004/risk04/ OCTOBER 2004 IRC Hedge 2004, InterContinental Hotel, London, UK 10, 11 October 2004 enquiries@irc-conferences.com, www.irc-conferences.com/show_conference.php?id=10 NOVEMBER 2004 IRC DICE 2004, InterContinental Hotel, London, UK 22, 23 November 2004 enquiries@irc-conferences.com, www.irc-conferences.com/show_conference.php?id=13 DECEMBER 2004 Quantitative Methods in Finance 2004, Sydney, Australia 15-18 December 2004 Andrea Schnaufer (qmf@uts.edu.au), +61 2 9514 7737, www.business.uts.edu.au/finance/resources/qmf2004/

  6. Food insufficiency, housing and health-related quality of life: results from the Positive Spaces, Healthy Places study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie K Y; Fielden, Sarah; Globerman, Jason; Koornstra, J J Jay; Hambly, Keith; Walker, Glen; Sobota, Michael; O'Brien-Teengs, Doe; Watson, James; Bekele, Tsegaye; Greene, Saara; Tucker, Ruthann; Hwang, Stephen W; Rourke, Sean B; Healthy Places Team, The Positive Spaces

    2015-01-01

    Studies of people living with HIV who are homeless or unstably housed show a high prevalence of food insufficiency (>50%) and associated poor health outcomes; however, most evidence is in the form of cross-sectional studies. To better understand this issue, we conducted a longitudinal study to examine the impact of food insufficiency and housing instability on overall physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among people living with HIV in Ontario. Six hundred and two adults living with HIV were enrolled in the Positive Spaces, Healthy Places study and followed from 2006 to 2009. Interviewer-administered questionnaires were used, and generalized linear mixed-effects models constructed to examine longitudinal associations between food insufficiency, housing instability and physical and mental HRQoL. At baseline, 57% of participants were classified as food insufficient. After adjusting for potential confounders, longitudinal analyses revealed a significant, negative association between food insufficiency and physical and mental HRQoL outcomes, respectively [effect size (ES) with 95% confidence interval (CI): (ES = -2.1, CI = -3.9,-0.3); (ES = -3.5, CI = -6.1,-1.5)]. Furthermore, difficulties meeting housing costs were shown to have additional negative impacts on mental HRQoL. Food insufficiency is highly prevalent among people living with HIV in Ontario, particularly for those with unstable housing. This vulnerable group of individuals is in urgent need of changes to current housing programmes, services and policies, as well as careful consideration of their unmet nutritional needs.

  7. Disengagement as Withdrawal From Public Space: Rethinking the Relation Between Place Attachment, Place Appropriation, and Identity-Building Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanka, Anna

    2018-01-18

    Empirical research indicates that engagement with public space decreases with age. Why do some older adults withdraw from the public, and which role does the (urban) environment play in spatial (dis-)engagement? Environmental gerontology's model of person-environment (PE) fit suggests an interrelation between agency and belonging and their causal effects on identity and wellbeing in later life. However, there is little research on how these dimensions are actually related. This study sets out to investigate this relationship and how PE can be better adapted for deprived neighborhoods. The study follows a qualitative case studies approach, focusing on a deprived neighborhood in Vienna, Austria. Nonparticipant observations were conducted at this site and complemented by 13 episodic interviews with older residents. The results challenge PE's model of interrelation between agency and belonging and their causal effects on identity, wellbeing, and autonomy in later life. Spatial agency in the deprived neighborhood was intense but so was spatial alienation and distancing oneself from one's neighborhood. Drawing on notions of territorial stigma, this might be a coping strategy to prevent one's self-identity from being "stained". Which strategy is being adopted by whom depends on the position and the trajectory in social and physical space. PE can be complemented with intersubjective measures of environmental conditions (e.g., stigma) and spatial engagement. Gerontology should proceed to consider not only the poor, disadvantaged, disengaged elderly, but also the rebellious, resisting, provocative new generation of older adults. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Media places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Per; Messeter, Jörn

    The impact that ubiquitous wireless network technologies and mobile phones have on our experience of the modern cityscape, has been a driving force in many research projects in recent years. The agendas differ in relation to perspectives, but it seems safe to claim that such technologies are no l......The impact that ubiquitous wireless network technologies and mobile phones have on our experience of the modern cityscape, has been a driving force in many research projects in recent years. The agendas differ in relation to perspectives, but it seems safe to claim that such technologies...... construction of place in the urban setting. The concept of Hertzian space, put forth by Anthony Dunne and others (Dunne, 1999) also carries a dimension of how spaces of wireless communication may be problematized, and how we can criticize cultural phenomena taken for granted through innovative technology. From...... this perspective wireless technology can also be a way of temporarily appropriating places within the city space for a variety of different groups, at times questioning hierarchical structures of ownership of public spaces. These spaces can be said to be hybrid spaces, bringing forth the fundamental question...

  9. A wooden calendar from southeastern Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vesselina; Georgiev, Iliya

    Wooden calendars are a specific tool for preserving the church calendar in medieval Europe. The Christian symbols are skillfully interwoven with traditional signs, which mark the days of importance for the economic and ritual life in a year. The archaic method of time reckoning has turned into a tool for disseminating and establishing the Christian festival system, and is one of the proofs of the syncretism between the pagan tradition and the new religious ritualism. Bulgarian Christians used such objects until the beginning of the 20th century. The earliest date fixed on a wooden calendar is 1783. These calendars are also called rabosh in Bulgaria. The calendar presented here is based on the Julian (solar) calendar containing the major fixed feasts of the Orthodox Church. It has not been published so far and is kept in a private collection.

  10. Folk Astronomy and Calendars in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisco, Daniel Martin

    A rich folk tradition of star lore evolved in the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, especially during the Islamic era. Some of this lore was recorded in Yemeni Arabic texts, especially during the 13th and 14th centuries. Among the calendars in use are solar, lunar, and stellar varieties. The most significant folk calendars are the system of agricultural marker stars, often correlated with the 28 lunar stations, and the Pleiades conjunction calendar.

  11. Wooden Calendar Sticks in Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vesselina; Koleva, Svetlana

    Wooden calendar sticks have preserved an archaic time-keeping tradition, which, during the Middle Ages, was one of the tools for establishing and disseminating Christian chronology and the liturgical calendars of the Western and Eastern Churches. The calendars vary in size and shape, type of signs, and structure of the record. Christian symbols interwoven with signs and pictograms mark days of importance in the ritual and economic year cycle. The wooden calendars are considered one of the proofs of the syncretism between the pagan tradition and Christian rites in folk cultures.

  12. Public space, place and landscape: proximities and distances to urban anthropology / Espacio público, lugar y paisaje: proximidades y distancias para una antropología urbana

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro José Peimbert Duarte

    2014-01-01

    The text presents some precisions about the concepts of space, place and landscape. When these concepts are given in urban planning, urban design, architecture or ethnography, it is possible to find significant distances from the city versus urban. Also, the tour of these notions, could evidence certain proximities that allude to which lens is observed one of the key objects for studying the territory: the public space. This, in turn, explains the different positions of social actors in it: t...

  13. Templo Mayor, Tenochtitlan - Calendar and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo Trejo, Jesús

    The Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan was the principal symbol of political power and religious control of the Mexicas. Its orientation was chosen according to ancestral calendrical traditions that considered the Mesoamerican calendar as a sacred concern. The solar alignments incorporated into this emblematic building symbolized moments that divided the solar year according to basic properties of the Mesoamerican calendar.

  14. Calendar motifs on Getashen hydria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtanesyan, Garegin

    2015-07-01

    Getashen hydria was found in the tombs of the middle bronze age (the first third of the second Millennium B.C.) in Armenia (Lake Sevan). It shows a scene consisting of three friezes. On the lower frieze depicts six zoomorphic figures, on an average six frieze waterfowl, and on top, is the graphic signs. Calendar motives of this composition have a numeric expression, six zoomorphic figures on the lower and middle friezes. Division of the annual cycle into two parts is known in the calendars of the ancient Indo-Iranian ("great summer" and "the great winter"). Animals on the lower frieze of the second mark, "winter" road of the Sun, because in this period are the most important events, ensuring the reproduction of the economy of the society. This rut ungulates - wild (deer) and domestic (goats). Moreover, the gon goats end in December, almost coinciding with the onset of the winter solstice. A couple of dogs on the lower frieze marks the version of the myth, imprisoned in the rock hero - the Sun (Mihr - Artavazd), to which his dogs have to chew the chains, anticipating his exit at the winter solstice. This is indicated by the direction of their movement, the Sun moves from left to right for an observer, only when located on the South side of the sky (i.e., beginning with the autumnal equinox). The most important event of the period of "summer road" of the Sun is the vernal equinox, which coincide with the arrival of waterfowl (ducks, geese). Their direction on the second frieze (left to right) corresponds to the position of the observer, facing North.

  15. Henry S. Turner, The English Renaissance Stage. Geometry, Poetics, and the Practical Spatial Arts 1580-1630 - Tim Fitzpatrick, Playwright, Space and Place in Early Modern Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Giuliani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Review of Henry S. Turner, The English Renaissance Stage. Geometry, Poetics, and the Practical Spatial Arts 1580-1630, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006, reimpr. 2010, 326 pp. ISBN: 978-0-19-959545-7 y Tim Fitzpatrick, Playwright, Space and Place in Early Modern Performance, Ashgate, Franham, 2011, 314 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4094-2827-5.

  16. Designated Places

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Census 2000 Place Names provides a seamless statewide GIS layer of places, including census designated places (CDP), consolidated cities, and incorporated places,...

  17. Taking place, screening place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft; Waade, Anne Marit

    2019-01-01

    We introduce location studies as a new empirical approach to screen studies. Location studies represent an interdisciplinary perspective, including media, aesthetics and geography, and reflect a growing interest in places in a global media and consumption culture. The chapter analyses two recent......) with one being traditional and the other being commercial; both dramas include discussions of localities and social heritage, and both use local sports as a common metaphor for social cohesion; and both series have been partly funded by a local film Danish commissioner. However, The Legacy is shot...... to a large extent in studios, while Norskov is shot entirely on location. The study is based on interviews with producers, broadcasters, location scouts, production designers and writers, as well as quantitative and qualitative textual analyses of television drama series, the geographical places, and related...

  18. Astronomy and Calendars at Qumran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dov, Jonathan

    A corpus of ca. 20 calendrical texts dated mostly to the first century BCE was found among the Dead Sea scrolls. These documents attest to a year of 364 days, which was adopted from earlier Jewish Pseudepigrapha like the Books of Enoch and Jubilees. The 364-day year was the main time frame used by the sectarian community represented in the scrolls. It is not a solar year, as often stated, but rather a schematic-sabbatical year. Its main characteristic in the DSS is the absorption of many various calendrical frameworks. The 364-day calendar tradition is strongly based on the calculation of full creational weeks and of weeks of years (Shemitah). It incorporates the service cycles of the 24 priestly families in the temple, while in addition, it encompasses an additional cycle of lunar phenomena. This cycle is related to the Mesopotamian concept of "the Lunar Three". Finally, an awareness of the cycle of the Jubilee (49 years) produced a megacycle of 294 years. It remains unknown how and whether at all the 364-day year was intercalated to fit the tropical year of 365.25 days approximately.

  19. Suggestion of a conventional Islamic calendar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Rashed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a complexity of the problem concerning the first sighting of the new lunar crescent, which is attributed to various astronomical, astrophysical and geographical factors. Therefore, Astronomers adopted various criteria for the new crescent visibility. Muslims around the world differ in the beginning of the Hijric months. In fact the differences are not due to different methodology of astronomical calculations, which in turn the variations of the calendar at different countries gives. Farewell Hajj of Prophet Mohamed was on Friday, the ninth of Thul'hejja of the tenth year of immigration (Biography of the Prophet Mohamed. Therefor; the beginning of the month of Thul'hejja 10 A.H is on Thursday. Our suggested calendar takes Farewell Hajj of the Prophet Mohammad to be the base of this calendar. The advantage of our suggested calendar far away from any criteria; where the adoption of criteria for the new crescent visibility is often misleading.

  20. Integrating multiple calendars using tau ZAMAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Urgun, B; Dyreson, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Programmers world-wide are interested in developing applications that can be used internationally. Part of the internationalization effort is the ability to engineer applications to use dates and times that conform to local calendars yet can inter-operate with dates and times in other calendars, ....... Literals can be input and output in XML or plain text, using user-defined formats, and in different languages and character sets. Finally, tZAMAN is a client/server system, enabling shared access to calendar servers spread throughout the web. This paper describes the architecture of t......ZAMAN and experimentally quantifies the cost of using a calendar server to translate and manipulate dates....

  1. Suggestion of a conventional Islamic calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, M. G.; Moklof, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    There is a complexity of the problem concerning the first sighting of the new lunar crescent, which is attributed to various astronomical, astrophysical and geographical factors. Therefore, Astronomers adopted various criteria for the new crescent visibility. Muslims around the world differ in the beginning of the Hijric months. In fact the differences are not due to different methodology of astronomical calculations, which in turn the variations of the calendar at different countries gives. Farewell Hajj of Prophet Mohamed was on Friday, the ninth of Thul'hejja of the tenth year of immigration (Biography of the Prophet Mohamed). Therefor; the beginning of the month of Thul'hejja 10 A.H is on Thursday. Our suggested calendar takes Farewell Hajj of the Prophet Mohammad to be the base of this calendar. The advantage of our suggested calendar far away from any criteria; where the adoption of criteria for the new crescent visibility is often misleading.

  2. Medieval Karelian Calendar Names: A Cognitive Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Kyurshunova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on calendar personal names recorded in the 15–17th centuries Russian and Swedish manuscripts written in Karelia. Revealing the cognitive potential of this historical stratum of names, the author analyzes the frequency of full (official and modified forms of calendar names, the regional peculiarities of their linguistic adaptation, their ethnolinguisitic and social status, as well as the functioning of calendar names in the regional onomastic system. The analysis shows that the calendar onomasticon holds the leading positions, which reflects important axiological and mental shifts in the people’s culture. The list of most frequent Christian names of the region generally coincides with the onomastic data related to other Russian territories of the same period. The conservation of the name nomenclature is due to family traditions, namely, to familial practices of naming. However, the adaptation and distribution of names display some regional features, particularly in the frequency of different groups of anthroponyms. The peripheral situation of the region and the presence of Balto-Fennic population which adapted the Russian calendar athroponymicon determined the “conservatism” of the calendar names nomenclature: for naming, they selected the names which were better adapted and more extensively used among Russians. The formation of modified names depended mostly on the morphemic structure of the Russian language, regional features being relatively insignificant. The frequency of modified forms of names correlates with the genre of the manuscript and the scribe’s arbitrariness.

  3. New faces in new spaces in new places: Residential attainment among newly legalized immigrants in established, new, and minor destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Reanne; Akresh, Ilana Redstone

    2016-05-01

    Immigrants at the beginning of the twenty-first century are located in a more diverse set of metropolitan areas than at any point in U.S. Whether immigrants' residential prospects are helped or hindered in new versus established immigrant-receiving areas has been the subject of debate. Using multilevel models and data from the New Immigrant Survey (NIS), a nationally representative sample of newly legalized immigrants to the U.S., we move beyond aggregate-level analyses of residential segregation to specify the influence of destination type on individual-level immigrant residential outcomes. The findings indicate that immigrants in new and minor destinations are significantly more likely to live in tracts with relatively more non-Hispanic whites and relatively fewer immigrants and poor residents. These residential advantages persist net of individual-level controls but are largely accounted for by place-to-place differences in metropolitan composition and structure. Our exclusive focus on newly legalized immigrants means that our findings do not necessarily contradict the possibility of worse residential prospects in new areas of settlement, but rather qualifies it as not extending to the newly authorized population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Liminal spaces and imaginary places in The bone people by Keri Hulme and The folly by Ivan Vladislavic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wenzel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the transcendent power of the imagination represented by literature and novels in particular, has played a major role in aiding societies to confront and deal with specific social and political realities in a multicultural global society. The fact that novels represent the development of fictional characters in time and space, enables the reader to experience the lives of the protagonists in a vicarious fashion. In fact, the concept of liminality (with regard to the different stages of separation, transition and re-integration into society is emulated in the reading process. The interstitial space provided by liminality is especially pertinent to postcolonial novels such as “The bone people” by Keri Hulme. In this novel Hulme illustrates how fictional characters, in an individual and social sense, have to experience “rites of passage” in order to come to terms with traumatic changes in their lives and cultures. In a different way and with the bigoted South African apartheid society (including the reader as target, Vladislavic exploits the power of the imagination to launch a subtle, yet stringent critique on people who lack imagination and consequently fail to use it constructively in order to transcend their narrow-minded reality – similar to Patrick White in his condemnation of restrictive social conventions in Australian society in his novel “Voss”.

  5. CUSTOMER-ORIENTED MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES IN SPORTS PLACES AND SPACES AS AN EFFECTIVE STEP TO PROVIDE PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH OF CITIZENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Honari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the factors affecting productivity of sport places and spacesin the city of Tehran in the field of customer-orientation. The methodology of the study wasdescriptive-survey that was conducted as a field-study. The research population included expertsand managers of sports places and spaces in Tehran; and the sample consisted of 40 managersand experts. The sampling method was non-random. The measure was a researcher-madequestionnaire with 45 items and 7-point Likert scale that its validity was approved by 13 experts.Cronbach's Alpha was used to determine its reliability which was α = 0.87. The descriptivestatistics was used to describe the examinees status in terms of education; age; and sex. FriedmanTest was applied to prioritize the factors affecting productivity of the sports areas in the field ofcustomer-orientation. The results showed that in customer orientation field; cross-relation andinteraction of managers with the community places highest priority (5/80 and type ofapplication (athletic; educational and entertaining has the lowest priority (4/80. The findingscould play an important role in satisfying users of sporting spaces (as a most-user field in thecity.

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la Réfri...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual) : 10.10.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual)  10.10.02 (après-midi /afternoon) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):  21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) HREF-2002: Techniques de la...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS/Introduction to ANSYS (langue à définir suivant demande/ Language to be chosen according to demand):...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans:  18 - 20.9.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 26, 27.9.02  (4 jours) LabView Base 1 :  23 - 25.9.02  (3 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design using UML:  25 - 27.9.02  (3 days) LabView DAQ (E):  26 - 27.9.02  (2 days) Introduction to Oracle 8i : SQL and PL/SQL:  7 - 11.10.02  (5 days) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge):  10.10.02  (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  14 - 15.10.02  (2 jours) Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) Introduction to DesignSpace:  17.10.02  (1 day) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  17, 18, 24, 25.10.02  (4 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11....

  10. Round the World in Sixty Minutes: approaches to the evocation of space, place and location in recent multichannel works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonty Harrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article discusses some of the preoccupations of my recent acousmatic music: the evocation of place, the potential for the recognition of sources (even down to their specific locations, in some cases and the associated concern with ‘space’, in terms of both geography and musical thinking. It is prompted by the release of my latest CD, Voyages (HARRISON, 2016. But this album did not emerge from nothing; it is the product of over 40 years of working in the studio (and performing with loudspeakers. It may therefore be useful to offer some historical perspective. RESUMO Este artigo aborda algumas das preocupações da minha música acusmática recente: a evocação de lugar, o potencial para o reconhecimento das fontes (até mesmo em relação aos seus locais específicos, em alguns casos e a preocupação associada com o 'espaço', tanto em termos da geografia quanto do pensamento musical. É motivado pelo lançamento do meu último CD, Voyages (HARRISON, 2016. Mas este álbum não surgiu do nada; é o produto de mais de 40 anos de trabalho no estúdio (e de performances com altofalantes. O artigo pode, portanto, ser útil para oferecer alguma perspectiva histórica.

  11. New models to support the professional education of health visitors: A qualitative study of the role of space and place in creating 'community of learning hubs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetto, Sara; Malone, Mary; Sayer, Lynn; Robert, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    In response to a policy-driven workforce expansion in England new models of preparing health visitors for practice have been implemented. 'Community of Learning hubs' (COLHs) are one such model, involving different possible approaches to student support in clinical practice placements (for example, 'long arm mentoring' or 'action learning set' sessions). Such models present opportunities for studying the possible effects of spatiality on the learning experiences of students and newly qualified health visitors, and on team relationships more broadly. To explore a 'community of learning hub' model in health visitor education and reflect on the role of space and place in the learning experience and professional identity development of student health visitors. Qualitative research conducted during first year of implementation. Three 'community of learning hub' projects based in two NHS community Trusts in London during the period 2013-2015. Managers and leads (n=7), practice teachers and mentors (n=6) and newly qualified and student health visitors (n=16). Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews analysed thematically. Participants had differing views as to what constituted a 'hub' in their projects. Two themes emerged around the spaces that shape the learning experience of student and newly qualified health visitors. Firstly, a generalised need for a 'quiet place' which allows pause for reflection but also for sharing experiences and relieving common anxieties. Secondly, the role of physical arrangements in open-plan spaces to promote access to support from more experienced practitioners. Attention to spatiality can shed light on important aspects of teaching and learning practices, and on the professional identities these practices shape and support. New configurations of time and space as part of educational initiatives can surface new insights into existing practices and learning models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Public Relations - 2003 Energy and Environment Calendar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Valcic, I.

    2003-01-01

    Ministry of Economy in co-operation with the Ministry of Education and Sport, Croatian Electric Utility and Enconet International during the year 2002 realized the project of preparing the calendar for 2003 containing primary school pupils' paintings about energy and environment and additional information about preparedness in the Republic of Croatia in the case of nuclear accident and recommendations for acting. The calendar is primarily created for families living in the circle 25 km from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko and will be distributed to all pupils of primary schools on that territory. Therefore the collecting of paintings was carried out between pupils from fifth to eight grades in those schools. Expert commission chose twelve best paintings from fifty-two collected and ceremonial promotion of the calendar was held in the Technical museum in Zagreb. This kind of project is only one example of public relations with the purpose of knowledge building about successful living together with energy technologies. In this text the course of the project of realizing the calendar will be presented with the special accent on content and purpose of the text about preparedness in the Republic of Croatia in the case of nuclear accident and recommendations for acting. (author)

  13. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  14. Calendar Year 2016 Stationary Source Emissions Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque (COA) Environmental Health Department Air Quality Program has issued stationary source permits and registrations the Department of Energy/Sandia Field Office for operations at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. This emission inventory report meets the annual reporting compliance requirements for calendar year (CY) 2016 as required by the COA.

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à DesignSpace :  16.10.02  (1 journée) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) :  21, 22, 23.10 et 4, 5, 6.11.02  (6 jours) Introduction à ANSYS 21 - 25.10.02  (5 jours/days) HREF-2002: Helium Refrigeration Techniques (English-French, bilingual) :  21 - 25.10.2002  (7 half days) LabVIEW Basics 1 (English):  21 - 23.10.02  (3 days) LabVIEW Basics 2 (English):  24 & 25.10.02  (2 days) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced (English) :  18 - 20.11.2002  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  19, 20, 25, 26.11.02 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Designer: First Class:&...

  16. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil

  18. On lunisolar calendars and intercalation schemes in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislén, Lars

    2018-04-01

    This is a survey of different calendar intercalation schemes, mainly in Southeast Asia. The Thai and Burmese Calendars, superficially very similar, are shown to have quite different and interesting intercalation schemes. We also investigate similarities between the original Burmese Calendar and the Romakasiddhânta from India.

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 19.7.2006 (August-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 1.09.06 E/F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 1.09.06 E/F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 11-13.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae 3 15.09.06 E/F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long docu...

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    DAvide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 25.7.2006 (August-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F EXCEL 2003 - niveau 1 : ECDL 16 30-31.08.06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 1.09.06 E/F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 1.09.06 E/F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 15.09.06 E/F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Wor...

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 7.2.2006 (February-May course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 16-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 16-02-06 E-F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 21.02.06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation 3 27-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27-02-06 E-F JAVA: Level 2 32 28-02-06 to 03-03-06 E Manipulation des images 4 28.02.06 F ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 02 to 03-03-06 E-F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 16 02 to 03-03-06 F C++ for Particle Physicists 20 06 to 10-03-06 E FileMaker - niv...

  2. Children's Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Using a cross-cultural approach the book investigates children's places in different societies. "Children's Places" examines the ways in which children and adults, from their different vantage-points in society, negotiate proper places of children in both social and spatial terms. It looks at some...

  3. In summary: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roush, D.; Mitchell, R.G.; Peterson, D.

    1996-08-01

    Every human is exposed to natural radiation. This exposure comes from many sources, including cosmic radiation from outer space, naturally-occurring radon, and radioactivity from substances in our bodies. In addition to natural sources of radiation, humans can also be exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Examples of man-made sources include nuclear medicine, X-rays, nuclear weapons testing, and accidents at nuclear power plants. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research facility that deals, in part, with studying nuclear reactors and storing radioactive materials. Careful handling and rigorous procedures do not completely eliminate the risk of releasing radioactivity. So, there is a remote possibility for a member of the public near the INEL to be exposed to radioactivity from the INEL. Extensive monitoring of the environment takes place on and around the INEL. These programs search for radionuclides and other contaminants. The results of these programs are presented each year in a site environmental report. This document summarizes the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995

  4. Calendar anomalies in the Russian stock market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Maria Caporale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research note investigates whether or not calendar anomalies (such as the January, day-of-the-week and turn-of-the-month effects characterize the Russian stock market, which could be interpreted as evidence against market efficiency. Specifically, OLS, GARCH, EGARCH and TGARCH models are estimated using daily data for the MICEX market index over the period Sept. 1997–Apr. 2016. The empirical results show the importance of taking into account transactions costs (proxied by the bid-ask spreads: once these are incorporated into the analysis, calendar anomalies disappear, and therefore, there is no evidence of exploitable profit opportunities based on them that would be inconsistent with market efficiency.

  5. The Case for Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2012-01-01

    Bookstores, record stores, libraries, Facebook: these places--both physical and virtual--demonstrate an established and essential purpose as centers of community, expertise, convenience, immediacy, and respect. Yet as digital, mobile, and social shifts continue to transform culture and interactions, these spaces and places transform, too.…

  6. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made

  7. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-07-31

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  8. Modeling lunar calendar effects in taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Lung Lin; Tian- Syh Liu

    2003-01-01

    The three most important Chinese holidays, Chinese New Year, the Dragon- boat Festival, and Mid-Autumn Holiday have dates determined by a lunar calendar and move between two solar months. Consumption, production, and other economic behavior in countries with large Chinese population including Taiwan are strongly affected by these holidays. For example, production accelerates before lunar new year, almost completely stops during the holidays and gradually rises to an average level after the ho...

  9. The Calendar of the Greek Orthodox Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.; Theodossiou, E.

    2002-01-01

    At the Orthodox Church Council in 1923 in Constantinople a proposal concerning the reform of the calendar, elaborated by the Serbian astronomer Milutin Milankovic´ together with professor Maksim Trpkovic´, was submitted, providing for a more exact calendar than the Gregorian one. Instead of three days in 4 centuries one should omit 7 days in 9 centuries or 0.0077 days per year. This means that only 2 years out of 9 ending the centuries would be leap years. The rule is that those years whose ordinal number ends with two zeros are leap years only provided that the number of centuries they belong to, divided by 9, yields the remainder 2 or 6. For instance the year 2000, ending the 20th century, is a leap year since 20 divided by 9 equals to 2 plus the remainder 2. Milankovic´'s proposal implies a much smaller difference, with respect to the true tropical year, than the Gregorian calendar. Further improvements concerning the approach to the duration of the tropical year are not necessary since that duration itself undergoes changes over longer periods.

  10. Place Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medway, Dominic; Swanson, Kathryn; Neirotti, Lisa Delpy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: – The purpose of this paper is to report on a special session entitled “Place branding: Are we wasting our time?”, held at the American Marketing Association’s Summer Marketing Educators’ conference in 2014. Design/methodology/approach: – The report details the outcome of an Oxford......: – The outcome of the debate points towards a need for place brands to develop as more inclusive and organic entities, in which case it may be best for place practitioners to avoid creating and imposing a place brand and instead help shape it from the views of stakeholder constituencies. This shifts the notion...... of place branding towards an activity centred on “curation”. Originality/value: – The use of a competitive debating format as a means for exploring academic ideas and concepts in the place management field....

  11. Thin Places

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Sandra Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This inquiry into the three great quests of the twentieth century–the South Pole, Mount Everest, and the Moon–examines our motivations to venture into these sublime, yet life-taking places. The Thin Place was once the destination of the religious pilgrim seeking transcendence in an extreme environment. In our age, the Thin Place quest has morphed into a challenge to evolve beyond the confines of our own physiology; through human ingenuity and invention, we reach places not meant to accommod...

  12. Place, Non-Place, Multi-Place and the (Non)Possibilities of Identity: Philosophical, Social, and Communicational Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Basia Nikiforova

    2016-01-01

    Michel Foucault in the text “Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias” wrote that “the present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space”. Space, place, and territories are social productions. Territory is a polysemic concept. Place is “events” created by territories, fluid areas of control produced by territorial negotiation (horizontal dynamics) and negotiations between places (vertical dynamics). Space produces places and is produced by places. Moreover, space, place and territor...

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Introduction à Outlook : Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (short course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur ...

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 jour) Outlook (Short Course I): E-mail: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (Short Course II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications: 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (Short Course III): Meetings and Delegation: 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) I...

  15. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Introduction à Outlook : 19.8.2004 (1 jour) Outlook (Short Course I): E-mail: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (Short Course II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications: 7.9.20...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 30 to 31-01-06 F DIAdem : base 24 01 to 03-02-06 F ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 06-02-06 F Manipulation des images 4 08-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 09-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14 to 16-02-06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes 3 16-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents 3 16-02-06 E-F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 23 to 24-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation 3 27-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document 3 27-02-06 E-F ...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 19 to 20-01-06 E-F AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 19 to 25-01-06 F C++ Programming Advanced - Traps and Pitfalls 32 24 to 27-01-06 E STEP7 : Level 1 32 24 to 27-01-06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 26 to 27-01-06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 30 to 31-01-06 F DIAdem : base 24 01 to 03-02-06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 02 to 03-02-06 F ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 06-02-06 F Manipulation des images 4 08-02-06 F OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course I) - E-mail 3 09-02-06 E-F WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge 3 09-02-06 E-F ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL M5 16 13 to 14-02-06 E-F JCOP: Control System Integration using JCOP Tools 24 14 to 16-02-06 E OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Note...

  18. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 4 - 6.7.2005 (3 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2: 7 - 8.7.2005 (2 days) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.7.2005 (1 jour) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 6-7.7.2005 (2 jours) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with repetitive tasks /AutoText, AutoFormat, AutoCorrect, Find/Replace) : 4.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 5.7.2005 (afternoon) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 6.7.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 6.7.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 7.7.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 8.7.2005 (morning) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae: 7.7.2005 (afternoon) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format y...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with AutoTasks: 26.10.2005 (afternoon) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 21 - 25.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11....

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 :  20 - 21.10.2005 (2 jours) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 21 - 25.11.2005 (5 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : ...

  1. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 1 - 2.9.2005 (2 jours) Utilisation des fichiers PDF avec ACROBAT 7.0 : 5.9.2005 (1 jour) LabVIEW Basics 1:  5 â€" 7.9.2005 (3 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 12.9.2005 (1 demi-journée) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.9.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2005 - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 28, 29.9.2005 (4 jours) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework:  26 - 28.9.2005 (3 days) MAGNE-05 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 27 - 29.9.2005 (3 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 3 - 7.10.2005 (5 days) ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) OU...

  2. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 9 - 13.8.2004 (5 days) Outlook (I): E-mail : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (II): Calendar, Tasks and Notes : 31.8.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 1 - 3.9.2004 (3 days - free course) Instructor-led WBTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 7.9.2004 (morning) Outlook (III): Meetings and Delegation : 7.9.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE : 7 & 8.9.2004 (2 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 13 - 17.9.2004 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 13, 14, 23, 24.9.2004 (4 jours) Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14 - 17.9.2004 (4 jours) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.9.2004 (2 jours) ANSYS: Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) ANSYS: Advanced Topics : 27.9...

  3. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Programmation STEP7 niveau 1 : 14-17.9.2004 (4 jours) ANSYS : Thermal Analysis : 22 - 24.9.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW Migration 6 à 7 : 23.9.2004 (one day) ANSYS : Advanced Topics : 27.9 - 1.10.2004 (5 days) Word 2003 - niveau 2 : 27 & 28.9.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 27 - 29.9.2004 (3 days) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 28 - 30.9.2004 (3 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 30.9 & 1.10.2004 (2 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 4.10.2004 (matin) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 7 & 8.10.04 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Introduction à ANSYS : 23 - 26.11.2004 (4 jours) ENSEIGNEMENT TECHNIQUE TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval 74924...

  4. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: ACCESS 2003 - Level 1 - ECDL M5: 24 - 25.10.2005 (2 days) Finite State Machines in the JCOP Framework : 25 - 27.10.2005 (3 days) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Pivot tables: 26.10.2005 (morning) Introduction to the CERN EDMS: 2.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 8.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: ...

  5. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 6.10.2004 (1 day) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 18 & 19.10.2004 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions...

  6. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 30.9 & 1.10.2004 (2 days) Introduction à Windows XP au CERN : 4.10.2004 (matin) The EDMS MTF in practice : 4.10.2004 (afternoon) The CERN EDMS for Engineers : 6.10.2004 (1 day) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 : 7 & 8.10.04 (2 jours) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 12.11.2004 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 18 & 19.10.2004 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11...

  7. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: FileMaker - niveau 1 : 18 & 19.10.2004 (2 jours) Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 18 &a...

  8. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Outlook (short course I) : E-mail : 22.10.2004 (2 hours, morning) Outlook (short course II) : Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 22.10.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) Excel 2003 - niveau 1 : 4 & 5.11.2004 (2 jours) LabVIEW Intermediate I : 8 - 10.11.2004 (3 days) Instructor-led WTechT Study or Follow-up for Microsoft Applications : 9.11.2004 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 9 - 11.11.2004 (3 days) Outlook (Short Course III) : Meetings and Delegation : 9.11.2004 (2 hours, afternoon) LabVIEW Intermediate II : 11 & 12.11.2004 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 11, 12, 18, 19.11.2004 (4 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 15 - 19.11.2004 (6 X 3 hours sessions) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 18 & 19.11.2004 (2 jours) Word 2003 - niveau 1 : 22 &a...

  9. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: ELEC-2005 Autumn Term - Electronics applications in HEP experiments: 8.11 - 8.12.2005 (10 x 2h lectures) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 17.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.11.2005 (3 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 30.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 : 5 - 6.12.2005 (2 jours) LabVIEW Application Development (Intermediate 1): 5 - 7.12.2005 (3 d...

  10. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) ELEC-2005 Autumn Term - Electronics applications in HEP experiments: 8.11 - 8.12.2005 (10 x 2h lectures) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 17.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 28 - 30.11.2005 (3 days) OUTLOOK (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation: 30.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course III) - HowTo... Work with long documents : 30.11.2005 (afternoon) Fron...

  11. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Introduction to the CERN EDMS: 2.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course I) - E-mail: 2.11.2005 (morning) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge: 2.11.2005 (afternoon) FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 :  3 - 4.11.2005 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 : 3, 4, 9, 10.11.2005 (4 jours) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework : 7 - 11.11.2005 (5 days) The CERN EDMS for Engineers: 8.11.2005 (1 day, free of charge) The EDMS-MTF in practice: 9.11.2005 (morning, free of charge) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators: 15-16.11.2005 (2 days, free of charge) OUTLOOK (Short Course II) - Calendar, Tasks and Notes: 16.11.2005 (morning) Hands-On Object Oriented Design and Programming with C++ : 16 - 18.11.2005 (3 days) The Java Programming Language Level 1: 21 - 23.11.2005 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Prog...

  12. Better Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Bakke, Nikolas; Lindhøj, Jan

    Better Place is trying to reshape the automotive industry by shifting transportation from a dependency on oil to a reliance on environmentally friendly renewable energy. Better Place is developing an extensive infrastructure system that will utilise overcapacity in the production of wind power...... among others and that will drive the global transportation industry to becoming driven by electric vehicles (EVs). Better Place does this by selling its customers 'mileage' and a car without a battery. The case highlights the internationalisation process of Better Place from an international business...... perspective in order to encourage a discussion and debate about how Better Place can make their grand vision a reality in the future by overcoming the obstacles that historically have been challenging the rise of the EV industry. The case includes a historical background of the EV industry by using Denmark...

  13. ‘Ekhaya: Human displacement and the yearning for familial homecoming. From Throne (Cathedra to Home (Oikos in a grassroots ecclesiology of place and space: Fides Quaerens Domum et Locum [Faith Seeking Home and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Louw

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The classical definition of theology is ‘faith-seeking understanding’ (fides quaerens intellectum. The focus is on the understanding/interpretation of the object of Christian faith: God. There is another root for the quest for understanding, namely the praxis situation of faith. People live in particular historical contexts that have their own distinctive problems and possibilities; thus, the focus on place and space in a theology of home. A praxis approach is to learn life and the gospel from below, thus the emphasis on a grassroots ecclesiology that is structured like an oikos, a familial dwelling place. This understanding of the dynamics of the fellowship of believers as  oikodomein is captured by the Zulu notion for the yearning for home (home sickness: Ekhaya. It is argued that Ekhaya thinking is an alternative route for an operative ecclesiology that caters for the need of marginalised, oppressed, displaced and homeless people. Practical theology is thus described as fides  quaerens domum et locum [faith-seeking home and place], namely to inhabit. An Ekhaya approach to practical theological ecclesiology is about critical reflection through the eyes of those who are weak and who don’t count for much by the standards of successful people and institutions.

  14. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Kayser

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2005. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2005, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled accordingly to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. The most recent RCRA inspection was conducted by EPA Region VII in January 1999. The Laboratory received a notice of violation (NOV) which included five citations. There have been no inspections since then. The citations were minor and were corrected by the Laboratory within the time allocated by the EPA. See correspondence in Appendix D. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2005. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2005. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs were implemented in 1990 and updated in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, CRTs, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-CH, through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative

  15. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.

  16. Place (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This map layer includes cities and towns in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands (NTAD). A city or town is a place with a recorded population,...

  17. Public space, place and landscape: proximities and distances to urban anthropology / Espacio público, lugar y paisaje: proximidades y distancias para una antropología urbana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro José Peimbert Duarte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The text presents some precisions about the concepts of space, place and landscape. When these concepts are given in urban planning, urban design, architecture or ethnography, it is possible to find significant distances from the city versus urban. Also, the tour of these notions, could evidence certain proximities that allude to which lens is observed one of the key objects for studying the territory: the public space. This, in turn, explains the different positions of social actors in it: the decision maker, planner, designer or architect, and –moreover– the passer or the ordinary user. The recurrent use of the term “landscape” to talk about the open spaces of our cities implies a review of the term, since its heyday at the study of everyday life until its appearance at the emergent Landscape Urbanism. Finally, focusing on Latin American cases, in this text are addressed the possibilities and challenges of undertaking a research framed in sociocultural studies and from urban anthropology in a city at the northwestern border of Mexico. El texto expone algunas precisiones en torno a los conceptos de espacio, lugar y paisaje. Cuando estos conceptos son administrados tanto en la planificación, el diseño, la arquitectura o la etnografía, es posible encontrar distancias importantes respecto a “la ciudad” frente a “lo urbano”. Asimismo, el recorrido por estas acotaciones evidencia ciertas proximidades que aluden al lente con que es apreciado uno de los objetos de estudio clave para el estudio del territorio: el espacio público. Esto, a su vez, explica la diversidad de posicionamientos de los actores sociales en él, ya sea –por un lado– el tomador de decisiones; el planificador, el diseñador o el arquitecto; y –por otra parte– el transeúnte o el usuario ordinario. El recurrente uso del término “paisaje” para hablar de los espacios abiertos de nuestras ciudades implica hacer una revisión del vocablo, desde su auge

  18. Brazilian energy balance 1999: calendar year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1998. It is divided into nine sections: a summary from 1983 to 1998; energy supply and demand by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation centers balances; energy resources and reserves; energy and socio-economy; regional parameters, and appendices including installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  19. Brazilian energy balance 1995: calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1998. It is divided into nine sections: a summary from 1979 to 1994; energy supply and demand by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation centers balances; energy resources and reserves; energy and socio-economy; regional parameters, and appendices including installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  20. Brazilian energy balance 1997: calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1998. It is divided into nine sections: a summary from 1981 to 1996; energy supply and demand by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation centers balances; energy resources and reserves; energy and socio-economy; regional parameters, and appendices including installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  1. Brazilian energy balance 2000: calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1999. It is divided into nine sections: a summary from 1984 to 1999; energy supply and demand by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation centers balances; energy resources and reserves; energy and socio-economy; regional parameters, and appendices including installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  2. Brazilian energy balance 1996: calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in every sector of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1995. It's divided into nine sections, as follows: summary; energy supply and consumption by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation center balances ;energy resources and reserves; energy and socio economy; regional parameters; and appendices - installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  3. Brazilian energy balance 1998: calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in every sector of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 1995. It's divided into nine sections, as follows: summary; energy supply and consumption by source; energy consumption by sector; energy foreign trading; transformation center balances ;energy resources and reserves; energy and socio economy; regional parameters; and appendices - installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances

  4. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made

  5. Underground Test Area Calendar Year 2015 Annual Sampling Analysis Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro Nevada Environmental Services (NNES), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rehfeldt, Ken [Navarro Nevada Environmental Services (NNES), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report presents the analytical data for the 2015 calendar year (CY) (January 1 through December 31, 2015) and an evaluation of the data to ensure that the Sampling Plan’s objectives are met. Special investigations that took place in 2015 that are relevant to the Sampling Plan are also presented.

  6. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  7. Site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1996 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. WASTREN-Grand Junction, the Facility Operations and Support contractor for the GJO, prepared this report in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and supplemental guidance from DOE Headquarters. This report applies specifically to the GJO facility; the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Environmental Summary for Calendar Year 1996 was prepared as a separate document. Primary GJO activities involve laboratory analysis of environmental samples from GJO and other DOE sites and site remediation of contamination caused by previous uranium mill operations. Activities at the GJO are conducted in compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations and requirements and as directed by applicable DOE orders. Environmental monitoring is performed on air emissions, sewer effluent, surface water and groundwater, and wetlands restoration. Wastes are generated from the Analytical Laboratory, site remediation, and facility operation

  8. Generating crop calendars with Web search data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Velde, Marijn; See, Linda; Fritz, Steffen; Khabarov, Nikolay; Obersteiner, Michael; Verheijen, Frank G A

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of using Web search volumes for generating crop specific planting and harvesting dates in the USA integrating climatic, social and technological factors affecting crop calendars. Using Google Insights for Search, clear peaks in volume occur at times of planting and harvest at the national level, which were used to derive corn specific planting and harvesting dates at a weekly resolution. Disaggregated to state level, search volumes for corn planting generally are in agreement with planting dates from a global crop calendar dataset. However, harvest dates were less discriminatory at the state level, indicating that peaks in search volume may be blurred by broader searches on harvest as a time of cultural events. The timing of other agricultural activities such as purchase of seed and response to weed and pest infestation was also investigated. These results highlight the future potential of using Web search data to derive planting dates in countries where the data are sparse or unreliable, once sufficient search volumes are realized, as well as the potential for monitoring in real time the response of farmers to climate change over the coming decades. Other potential applications of search volume data of relevance to agronomy are also discussed. (letter)

  9. Designed Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    The 2008 financial crisis has left traces in the built environment of Copenhagen like many other places: Building projects are left unfinished or their function or finish is changed due to new economic circumstances. An ethnographic exploration of these traces exposes central aspects of what is a......, and when the ceilings leak water, the residents suspect it to be a consequence of the crisis. The paper discusses how market forces interact with the material surroundings we inhabit and explores the relationship between controlled and uncontrollable in the design of places....

  10. Secret Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Kerry

    1997-01-01

    Argues that children are as deep as the ocean, with secret places inside of them waiting to be opened. Notes that it is powerful for students to learn they can make sense of the world through words, and describes inviting them into poetry as they read poetry, create poetry packets, and write and revise poems. (SR)

  11. Envisioning place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi; Glick Schiller, Nina

    2016-01-01

    together, the articles contribute to an emerging relational social science by approaching urban sociabilities through four interrelated parameters: (1) a concept of place-making situated within trajectories of differential and multiscalar power; (2) a discursive analysis of narratives and silences...

  12. Review Essay: Zur Relevanz des ethnografischen Blicks bei der sozial- und kulturwissenschaftlichen Erforschung von Orten und Räumen [Researching Place and Space in the Social Sciences and Cultural Studies: The Relevance of the Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Siebeck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the so-called "spatial turn" in the social sciences and cultural studies, social geographers have rightfully been cautioning against positivist notions of space and place: We cannot simply deduce the social from spatial reality—on the contrary, this reality is in every respect itself socially constituted and mediated. In her highly recommended study on the esthetical and socio-political reshaping of Alexanderplatz in Berlin after 1990, Gisa WESZKALNYS has shown how a radical constructivist concept of place and space can be transformed into practical research. This review essay argues that an ethnographic research perspective is of particular relevance both epistemologically as well as methodologically if the aim is to reconstruct places and spaces beyond their perceived "actuality" in terms of a fundamentally contingent social and essentially political practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1103203

  13. Parks, People and Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Julie Frøik

    This thesis suggests, by applying a ‘place’ perspective, that involving users in operational management of green spaces holds potentials for enhancing ‘place attachment’ of urban inhabitants. As this can also build their commitment to decision making on their local living environment, green space...... maintenance becomes a potentially important setting for governance processes. Through a number of qualitative case studies, based on semi-structured interviews with municipal and community actors in Denmark and England, this dissertation explores the status and potentials of applying a place-based governance...... approach to green space maintenance. To guide the exploration a theoretical framework was developed inductively, structured around concepts of environmental governance in combination with strategic approaches to green space management. The framework is operationalised by analyses of the governance...

  14. Places Connected:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    This paper argues that development assistance contributed to the globalization of the 20th century by financing truly global networks of people. By focusing on the networks financed by development assistance bound by the national histories of Denmark and Japan, I illustrate how the people who...... experiences of place, however, when it is often the same people who experience many different places? Along with many other so-called donors in the 1950s, Denmark and Japan chose to invest in the education of own and other nationals involved in development and thereby financed personal connections between...... individuals throughout the world. Development assistance , where there are two or three links only between a Bangladeshi farmer, a street child in Sao Paolo and the President of the United States, the Queen of Denmark, or a suburban house wife in Japan, who has never left the Osaka area, but mothered a United...

  15. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 17 – 21.11.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2 : 18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & ...

  16. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its

  17. 46 CFR 280.6 - Calendar year accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calendar year accounting. 280.6 Section 280.6 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND... Calendar year accounting. Except as provided in § 280.9 (relating to the final year of an ODS agreement...

  18. The Category of Time in Fairy Tales: Searching for Folk Calendar Time in the Estonian Fairy Tale Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairi Kaasik

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines how folk calendar holidays are represented in Estonian fairy tales. It introduces some views presented in folklore studies about the concept of time in fairy tales and finds parallels with them in the Estonian context. The analysis relies on the digital corpus of Estonian fairy tales (5400 variants, created from the texts found in the Estonian Folklore Archives by the Fairy Tale Project of the Department of Estonian and Comparative Folklore, University of Tartu. Folk calendar holidays occur in Estonian fairy tales relatively seldom; most often these are holidays that occupy a significant place in the Estonian folk calendar (Christmas, St. John’s Day, Easter, St. George’s Day. Calendar holidays are notably mentioned more often in tale types which remain on the borderline between the fairy tale and the legend or the fairy tale and the religious tale. In Estonian fairy tales, calendar holidays are used on three levels of meaning: (1 the holiday is organically associated with the tale type; it has an essential role in the plot of the tale; (2 to a certain extent, the holiday could be replaced by another holiday having an analogous meaning; (3 the holiday forms an unimportant or occasional addition to the tale.

  19. Places disponibles*/Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following course : Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 20 - 22.1.03 (3 days) Introduction to PVSS : 27.1.03 (Afternoon) free course but registration necessary Basic PVSS : 28 - 30.1.03 (3 days) MAGNE-03 - Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 28 - 30.1.03 (3 jours) MAGNE-03 - Magnetism for Technical Electronics : 11 - 13.2.03 (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 et 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3 hour lectures) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) * Etant donné le délai d'impression du Bulletin, ces places peuvent ne plus être disponibles au moment de sa parution. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour avoir la dernière mise à jour. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Si vous désirez ...

  20. Brazilian energy balance 2006: calendar year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 2006. It is divided into nine chapters: energy analysis and aggregated data; energy supply and consumption by source 1990/2005; energy consumption by sector 1990/2005; energy import and export 1990/2005; transformation center balances 1990/2005; Brazilian energy resources and reserves 1974/2005; energy and socio-economic 1990/2005; federal states data and appendices including installed capacity; world energy data; general structure of the Brazilian Energy Balance; treatment of information; conversion units and consolidated Energy Balance 1970-2005

  1. Long-term changes in climatological calendar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaagus, J.

    1997-01-01

    Trends in time series of climatic seasons in Tartu, Estonia, during 1891-1995 are analysed using regression analysis. Two intermediate seasons between autumn and winter (late autumn, early winter), and two ones between winter and spring (late winter and early spring) are determined. The climatic seasons correspond quite well to individual stages of annual cycling of nature. Results of linear regression analysis demonstrate changes in climatological calendar reflecting the influence of global warming. Climatic seasons of spring period have moved to earlier time, and seasons of autumn period to later time. Statistically significant trends were observed for beginning date of early spring (12 days earlier), summer (11 days earlier) and late autumn (8 days later). Beginning date of winter has shifted 12 days later. Duration of summer season has increased by two weeks and duration of winter season has decreased by the same time. (author)

  2. Brazilian energy balance 2004: calendar year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report shows the energy flows of different primary and secondary sources, from the production to the final consumption in all the sectors of the Brazilian economy, for the calendar year 2003. It is divided into nine sections: a summary from 1970 to 2003; energy supply and demand by source, from 1988 to 2003; energy consumption by sector from 1988 to 2003; energy foreign trading also from 1988 to 2003; transformation centers balances in the same period; energy resources and reserves from 1973 to 2003; energy and socio-economy from 1988 to 2003; regional parameters, and appendices including installed capacity, international data, general structure of the balance, information processing, conversion units and consolidated energy balances. It also presents analytical texts on the main energy numbers for 2003 and also energy evolution in Brazil and energy expansion all over the world

  3. Environmental releases for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-07-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report. The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the entire Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance of the Hanford Site with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public about the impact of Hanford operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1994 from these facilities

  4. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    This document provides Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) a schedule of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) program during calendar year (CY) 1995. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near-Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995

  5. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003 (3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availabili...

  6. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming: 11-13.08.2003(3 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 26.08.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers: 27.08.2003 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.09.2003 (une demi-journée) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1: 4, 5, 15, 16.09.2003 (2 x 2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack : 17, 18, 25, 26.09.2003 et 2, 3.10.2003 (3 x 2 journées, français) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 23, 24, 30.09.2003 et 1.10.2003 (2 x 2 journées) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS): 23.09.2003 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators: 24-25.09.2003 (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 8 et 10.10.2003 (2 journées) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom: 23.10.2003 (half day, p.m.) ** The number of places available may vary. Please ch...

  7. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) : 2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & 12.12.03 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language - l...

  8. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: MATLAB Fundamentals and Programming Techniques (ML01) :2 & 3.12.03 (2 days) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) The EDMS MTF in practice : 5.12.03 (afternoon, free of charge) Modeling Dynamic Systems with Simulink (SL01) : 8 & 9.12.03 (2 days) Signal Processing with MATLAB (SG01) : 11 & ...

  9. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 : 9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) LabVIEW base 1 : 25 - 27.2.2004 (3 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions) LabVIEW Basics 1 : 22 - 24.3.20...

  10. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The JAVA Programming Language Level 1 :9 & 10.1.2004 (2 days) The JAVA Programming Language Level 2 : 11 to 13.1.2004 (3 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 10.3.2004 (afternoon - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004...

  11. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval Tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1 : WEB Applications : 20 & 21.11.03(2 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) Oracle 8i : SQL : 3 - 5.12.03 (3 days) Oracle 8i : Programming with PL/SQL : 8 - 10.12.03 (3 days) The JAVA Programming Language - leve...

  12. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: Project Planning with MS-Project : 15 & 22.1.2004 (2 days) Joint PVSS JCOP Framework Course : 2 sessions : 2 - 6.2.2004 and 16 - 20-2-2004 (5 days) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming : 16 - 18.2.2004 (3 days - free of charge) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.3.2004 ( 6 X 4-hour sessions)

  13. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : WorldFIP 2003 pour utilisateurs : 11-14.2.03 (4 jours) DISP-2003 ? Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24-28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 ? 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) MAGNE-03 - Magnetism for Technical Ele...

  14. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/Language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (...

  15. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring I Term : Introduction to Digital Signal Processing : 20, 27.2, 6, 13, 20, 27.3, 3.4.03 (7 X 2-hour lectures) AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Accelerators : 24 - 28.2.03 (10 X 1-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 24, 25.2 & 3, 4.3.03 (4 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 25.2.03 (1/2 journée) LabView base 2/LabView Basics 2 : 10 & 11.3.03 (2 jours/2 days) langue à définir/Language to be decided C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) LabView avancé /LabView Advanced : 12 - 14.3.03 (3 jours/3days) Langue à définir/language to be decided AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 17, 18, 24 & 25.3.03 (6 jours) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, regis...

  16. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses : C++ for Particle Physicists : 10 - 14.3.03 (6 X 3-hour lectures) Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half day, afternoon) Basic PVSS : 11 - 13.3.03 (3 days) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 14.3.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) Langue à définir/language to be decided DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 11 & 12.3.03 / 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16...

  17. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 2ème niveau : 24 - 27.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation des fonctions spécialisées d'un automate TSX Premium Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. If you wish to participate in one of these courses, pl...

  18. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) The EDMS-MTF in practice (free of charge) :  28 -  30.10.03 (6 half-day sessions) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) LabVIEW TestStand ver. 3 : 4 & 5.11.03 (2 days) Introduction to Pspice : 4.11.03 p.m. (half-day) Hands-on Introduction to Python Programm...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places available Places are available in the following courses:   LabView hands-on 13.11.00 4 hours LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.00 3 days Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.00 2 jours ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 2 jours Advanced aspects of the C language 2 - 3.11.00 2 days Introduction to Oracle SQL and PL/SQL 13 - 17.11.00 5 days C++ for Particle Physicists 20 - 24.11.00 6 lectures Develop PL/SQL Program Units 20 - 22.11.00 3 days Oracle Application Server Develop Web-Based Applications with PL/SQL 27 - 28.11.00 2 days Programmation TSX Premium 1 28.11 - 1.12.00 4 jours Programmation TSX Premium 2 12 - 15.12.00 4 jours If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an “application for training” form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Offi...

  20. Place identity and place scale: the impact of place salience.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo, Fátima; Palma-Oliveira, José-Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Research about place, place identity and attachment supports the idea that bonds with places may differ depending on the place scale. Based on the view that identity is context-dependent, this paper brings to the table the impact of manipulating the salience of place on the intensity of place identity and place attachment reported. A study was designed to examine place identity and place attachment in two groups of residents (permanent and temporary) at three different scales (nei...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) The JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to Perl 5 : 2 - 3.7.01 (2 days) Introduction to Databases :  3 - 4.7.01 (2 days) JAVA programming language Level 2 : 4 - 6.7.01 (3 days) Enterprise JavaBeans :  9 - 11.7.01 (3 days) Design Patterns :  10 - 12.7.01 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists :  23 - 27.7.01 (6 3-hour lectures) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) Introduction to the CERN Enginnering Data Management System :  27.8.02  (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced Users :  28.8.02  (1 day) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch    

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps & Pitfalls:  16 - 19.7.02 (4 days) Frontpage 2000 - level 1 :  22 - 23.7.02  (2 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 24.7.02 (après-midi) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (cours gratuit) : 13.08.2002 (matin) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  5. Placing knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Valentin, Karen; Nielsen, Gritt B.

    ; on the other hand, the rationale for strengthening mobility through internationalisation is based on an imagination of the potentials of particular locations (academic institutions). Intrigued by this tension between universality and particularity in academic knowledge production, this paper presents...... preliminary findings from a project that study internationalisation of higher education as an agent in the interrelated processes of place-making and knowledge-making. The project is based on three case-studies. In this paper, focus is on PhD students’ change of research environment. This is used as a case......Internationalisation of higher education is premised by a seeming paradox: On the one hand, academic knowledge strives to be universal in the sense that it claims to produce generalizable, valid and reliable knowledge that can be used, critiqued, and redeveloped by academics from all over the world...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: December 2002   PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) Introduction à la CAO Cadence (cours gratuit) :  10 & 11.12.02  (2 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training Monique Duval Tel.74924 monique.duval@cern.ch

  7. Ambiente Urbano: lugar de restrição espacial e descoberta de novos espaços Urban Environment: a place of space restriction and discovery of new spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Góes Cruz

    2011-09-01

    restriction of space for their social activities. The approach that was used was qualitative research with the content analysis technique. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 20 mothers and guardians of children aged 6-10 years, and an operative group was also held with them. The results of this study indicated that, in an environment with restricted space and social vulnerability, children grow up experiencing constant physical or psychosocial risks. On the other hand, these children develop collective negotiation skills and a plasticity of social use of space in a significant way. Therefore, we conclude that in spite of the dense context marked by social and environmental vulnerability that is experienced on a daily basis at those places by the children, they incorporate, cognitively and affectionately, experiences that allow them to learn how to deal with the adversities they find everyday.

  8. Orientations of the Villas at Tylissos on Crete and their Relationships to the Minoan Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Göran; Blomberg, Mary

    2015-05-01

    The two Late Minoan I villas at Tylissos and an unknown earlier building at the site show similar relationships to the celestial bodies that we have encountered at all of the Minoan buildings that we have studied. They had orientations to celestial events relevant to the calendar, such as sunrise or sunset at the equinoxes and the solstices, and the heliacal risings and settings of bright stars. We also re-encountered the phenomenon that different places marked the beginning of one or more solar months, which suggests that certain months had special relevance for specific places, as if to honor a god or goddess or some other special event for that particular place. In addition, the orientations of the two Late Minoan I villas at Tylissos share the same complexity that we have met at two other sites, where diagonal lines were used to create shadows when marking the parts of the calendar that were specific for Tylissos. It now seems clear that an element of Minoan cosmology insisted on a close connection between their places on earth and the celestial sphere. It was the custom for the Mycenaeans and the Greeks, who later inhabited the island, to honor their deities in special months, and we may find the roots of this custom among the Minoans.

  9. There is no place like home – the house as confinement, character and idealized space in the movie Pride and Prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gomes Barbosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes three ways in which the figure of the house is represented in the 2005's film version of  the book Pride and Prejudice: as a space of confinement, as a character and as idealized space of affection. To serve as a support for the analysis of this adaptation of one of Jane Austen's books, we use the theories of film and mass culture and feminist theories. To look on the cinematic language of the audiovisual work allows us to show how, far from being an idealized and pacified space as the film tries to present, the figure of the house is usurped of all other meanings in the narrative and especially in the story of the female characters, to offer a fictional strengthening of the patriarchal view of the house as the only space allowed to heroin, which is allowed to move in very different spaces from those covered by the male hero.

  10. The calendar for CERN's 50th anniversary has arrived!

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Fifty years of scientific and technical adventure are outlined along the months of the calendar 2004. For CERN's jubilee year, a very special calendar has been created: it shows some of the greatest events that have marked CERN's history - and relates them to the present or the future. The calendar will be sold for 5 CHF from 1st December at the CERN boutique, at the reception in building 33. A special sale will be organised on 15, 16, and 17 December in the hall of the main building, in front of Restaurant 1.

  11. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du Sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 26.8.03 (stage pratique) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Engineers : 27.8.03 (1 day, free of charge) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée, séminaire gratuit) The CERN Engineering Data Management System (EDMS) for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Programmation STEP7 - niveau 1 : 29 - 2.10.03 (4 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Programmation STEP7 - niveau 2 : 13 - 17.10.03 (5 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août Réseau Simatic Net : 22 & 23.10.03 (2 jours) - ouverture des inscriptions fin août CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.20.03 (half day, free of charge) These courses will be given in French or Englis...

  12. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1: 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches: 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence: de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E): 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1: 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1: 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS: 16.6.03 (half-day, pm) Basic PVSS: 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence: 17.6.03 (matin) LabView DSC (language to be defined): 19 & 20.6.03 PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial: 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2: 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7: 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming: 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network: 26 & 27.6.03 (2 days) These courses will be given...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (a.m.) LabView DAQ Hands-on (bilingue/bilingual - gratuit/free of charge) : 13.9.02 (p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 19, 20, 26, 27.9.02 (4 jours) LabView Base 1 : 23 - 25.9.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 26 - 27.9.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 30.9, 1, 2, 9, 10, 11.10.02 (6 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 10.10.02 (half-day, p.m.) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 14 - 15.10.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 17, 18, 24, 25.10.02 (4 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Of...

  14. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6...

  15. Places available**

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03 (une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours)...

  16. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days, free of charge) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom : 23.10.03 (half day, free of charge) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1 : 3, 4, 12, 13.11.03 (4 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 17, 18, 24, 25.11 & 1, 2.12.03 (6 days) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.11.03 (2 jours) MAGNE-03 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 25 - 27.11.03 (3 jours) ...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN:  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1:  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  14, 15, 21, 22.11.2002  (4 days) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Auto...

  18. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PIPES-2003 - Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches :26.8.03(stage pratique) The CERN EDMS for Engineers (free of charge) : 27.8.03 (1 day) CLEAN-2002 : Travailler en salle blanche (séminaire gratuit) : 4.9.03(une demi-journée) The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2...

  19. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN EDMS for Local Administrators (free of charge) : 24 & 25.9.03 (2 days) HeREF-2003 : Techniques de la réfrigération Hélium (cours en français avec support en anglais) : 6 - 10.10.2003 (7 demi-journées) The Java Programming Language Level 1 : 6 - 7.10.2003 (2 days) Java 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2 : Enterprise JavaBeans : 8 - 10.10.2003 (3 days) FileMaker - niveau 1 : 9 & 10.10.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 22.10.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 20, 21, 27, 28.10.03 (4 jours) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a Cleanroom (free of charge) : 23.10.03 (half day) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (E) : 23, 24, 30, 31.10 & 12, 13.11.03 (6 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 10 & 11.11.03 (2 jours) ACCESS 2000 - niveau 1 : 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20...

  20. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: October 2002   Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System (free of charge):  29.10.2002  (1 day) The CERN EDMS for Advanced users (free of charge):  30.10.2002  (1 day) November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java:  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 jours) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free ...

  1. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ (E) : 7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java : 11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists : 11 - 15.3.2002 (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO ...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Premiers pas avec votre PC 12 - 15.9.00 (4 demi-journées) WORD 20, 21 et 26, 27.9.2000 (4 jours) JAVA programming level 1 25 - 26.9.2000 (2 days) Gaz inflammables 1 26.9.2000 (1 journée) Advanced aspects of PERL 5 6.10.2000 (1 day) Initiation au WWW 10 - 12.10.00 (3 demi-journées) WORD : importer et manipuler des images 16.10.2000 (1 journée) FileMaker 17, 18 et 24, 25.10.00 (4 jours) Nouveautés de WORD 19 et 20.10.2000 (2 jours) ACCESS 1er niveau 30 - 31.10.00 (2 jours)Introduction à PowerPoint 6.11.00 (1 journée)Nouveautés d’EXCEL 7.11.2000(4 demi-journées)Excel 13, 14 et 20, 21.11.00 (4 jours) LabView hands-on 13.11.2000(4 hours)LabView Basics 1 14 - 16.11.2000 (3 days) MS-Project 1er niveau 14-17.11.00 (4 demi-journées) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply elec...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    TECHNICAL TRAINING; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 1er niveau : 20 - 23.2.01 (4 matins) Architecture d'automatisme : 20 - 21.2.01 (2 jours) Introduction à PowerPoint : 26.2.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 (Schneider) : 26.2 - 2.3.01 (5 jours) Premiers pas avec votre PC : 27.2 - 2.3.01 (4 matins) C++ for Particle Physicists : 5 - 9.3.01 (6*3 hour lectures) EXCEL : 6, 7 et 13, 14.3.01 (4 jours) The JAVA programming language level 2 :  12 - 14.3.01 (3 days) Nouveautés de FileMaker :  20 - 23.03.01 (4 matins) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 22, 24 & 25.01.02 (3 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :  11 - 13.02.02 (3 days) PVSS basics :  11 - 15.2.02 (5 days) Introduction à Windows 2000 : 18.2.02 (1 demi-journée) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  20.2.02 (1 day) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users :  21.2.02  (1 day) C++ for Particle Physicists :  11 - 15.3.2002  (6 * 3 hour lectures) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD : AutoCAD : Mise à...

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW - Basics 1 :  10 - 12.12.01 (3 days) Introduction to XML :  12 & 13.12.01 (2 days) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 : 12 & 14.12.01 (2 jours) LabVIEW - Basics 2 :  13 - 14.12.01 (2 days) Habilitation électrique : superviseurs : 17.12.2001 (1/2 journée) MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 -...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 : 10 & 11.01.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 15 - 16.1.02 (2 jours) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques: 15-17.1.2002 (2 demi-journées) C++ Programming Level 2 - Traps and Pitfalls :  15 - 18.1.2002  (4 days) ELEC-2002 Winter Term: Readout and system electronics for Physics  15.1.2002 - 7.2.2002 (8 half- days) Nouveautés de WORD 2000 : 18.1.02 (1/2 journée) LabView hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) LabView DAQ hands-on : 21.01.02 (1/2 journée) FileMaker Pro : 22 - 25.1.02 (4 jours) MS-Project 2000 : 24 & 25.01.02 (2 jours) Introduction au PC et à Windows 2000 au CERN : 29 - 30.1.02 (2 jours) LabView Base 1 : 4 - 6.2.02 (3 jours) LabView DAQ  (E) :  7 & 8.02.02 (2 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design & Programming with Java :&nbs...

  7. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required) : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView base 1/LabView Basics 1 (Langue à définir/ language to be decided) : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 jours/3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25...

  8. Places available **

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6....

  9. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 (sessions of 2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (session de 3 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description ...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Habilitation électrique : recyclage HT/BT : 11 - 15.3.2002  (2 * 2 heures) PVSS Basics :  8 - 12.4.02  (5 days) ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) Cours sur la migration AutoCAD :   AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical PowerPack 6 basé sur AutoCAD 2002 (5 jours) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applica...

  11. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, ) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6...

  12. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) Programmation de pilotes périphériques : 5 - 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) LabView DAQ (language to be defined) : 8 & 9.5.03 AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.0 (6 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 ...

  13. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom (free course, registration required): 11.4.03 (half-day, afternoon) LabView Basics 2 : 10 - 11.4.03 (3 days) DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) Oracle iDS Reports : Build Internet Reports : 5 - 9.5.03 (5 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03(6 jours) Formation Siemens SIMATIC /Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction à STEP7 /Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) Programmation STEP7/STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Réseau Simatic Net /Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité : Etre TSO au CERN : Prochaines sessions : 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7....

  14. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : Introduction to PVSS : 10.3.03 (half-day, afternoon) CLEAN-2002 : Working in a cleanroom : 2.4.03 (half-day, afternoon, free course, registration required) LabView Basics 1 : 9 - 11.4.03 (3 days) Language to be decided. DISP-2003 - Spring II Term : Advanced Digital Signal Processing : 30.4, 7, 14, 21.5.03 (4 X 2-hour lectures). AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 : 29, 30.4 et 7, 8.5.03 (4 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 5 & 6.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 12, 13, 20, 21, 27 & 28.5.03 (6 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 31.3 - 4.4.03 / 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic Net Network : 15 & 16.4.03 / 26 & 27.6.03 These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Cours de sécurité: Etre TSO au CERN : 3 sessions sont programmées pour 2003 : 25, 26 & 28.3.03 - 24, 25 & 27.6.03 - 4, 5 & 7.11.03 (sessions de 3 jours) ** The number o...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisiona...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Java Programming Language level 1 :  28 & 29.11.02  (2 days) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.12.02  (3 jours) FrontPage 2000 - level 1:  9 & 10.12.02  (2 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at : Technical Training or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Technical Training M...

  17. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   Introduction to PVSS (free of charge): 11.11.02  (afternoon) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++:  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 :  25 & 26.11.02  (2 jours) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 :  27 & 28.11.02  (2 jours) December 2002   LabVIEW - DSC (English) :  2 - 3.12.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 :  2 & 3.12.02  (2 jours) FileMaker (Français) :  2 - 5.12.02  (4 jours) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.12.02 ...

  18. PLACES AVAILABLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  19. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: November 2002   LabView hands-on (bilingue/bilingual): 5.11.02 (matin/morning) LabView DAQ hands-on (bilingue/bilingual):  5.11.02  (après-midi afternoon) PCAD Schémas - Débutants :  5 & 6.11.02  (2 jours) PCAD PCB - Débutants :  9 - 11.11.02  (3 jours) Introduction au PC et Windows 2000 au CERN :  6 & 7.11.02  (2 jours) Oracle 8i : Access the Database with Java :  7 & 8.11.02  (2 days) Introduction to PVSS (free of charge):  11.11.2002 pm  (1/2 day) Basic PVSS:  12 - 14.11.02  (3 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 :  12 & 13.11.02  (2 jours) CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom (English, free of charge):  13.11.2002  (afternoon) LabView Base 1 :  13 - 15.11.02  (3 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 1 :  14, 15, 21, 22.11.02  (4 jours) LabVIEW - Advanced:  18 - 20.11.02  (3 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  19 - 21.11.02  (3 days)  LabVIEW - Basics 2:  21 - 22.11.02 ...

  20. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) Introduction to PVSS : 16.6.03 (p.m.) Basic PVSS : 17 - 19.6.03 (3 days) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) PVSS - JCOP Framework Tutorial : 20.6.03 (1 day) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training : Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 jours/5 days) Simatic Net Network : 26 & 27.6.03 (2 jours/2 days) These courses will be given in French or English following the requests. Programmation automate Schneider : Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium - 1er niveau : 10 - 13.6.03 (4 jours) - audience : toute personne qui veux maitriser la msie en uvre et la programmation d'un automate TSX Premium - objectifs : maitriser la mise en uvre et la programmation d'un autom...

  1. Places available**

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses : FrontPage 2000 - niveau 1 : 20 & 21.5.03 (2 jours) PIPES-2003 : Pratique du sertissage de tubes métalliques et multicouches : 21.5.03 (1 jour) Introduction à la CAO Cadence : de la saisie de schéma Concept-HDL au PCB : 20 & 22.5.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD 2002 - niveau 2 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 jours) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 5, 6, 12, 13, 26, 27.6.03 (6 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 10 & 11.6.03 (2 jours) Conception de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 11.6.03 (matin) EXCEL 2000 - level 1 : 12 & 13.6.03 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 (F) : 17 & 18.6.03 (2 jours) Réalisation de PCB rapides dans le flot Cadence : 17.6.03 (matin) FrontPage 2000 - niveau 2 : 19 & 20.6.03 (2 jours) LabView DSC (langue à décider/language to be defined) : 19 & 20.6.03 EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 24 & 25.6.03 (2 jours) Siemens SIMATIC Training: Introduction to STEP7 : 3 & 4.6.03 (2 days) STEP7 Programming : 16 - 20.6.03 (5 days) Simatic...

  2. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: PVSS Basics : 20 - 24.8.01 (5 days) PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) Programming TSX Premium 1: 15 - 19.10.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) Programming TSX Premium 2: 19 - 23.11.01 (5 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) The following LabView courses will be given in either English or French according to demand LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 10 - 12.9.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 13 - 14.9.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 15 - 17.10.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - Base 2 / LabVIEW - Basics 2 : 18 - 19.10.01 (2 jours / 2 days) LabVIEW - Base 1 / LabVIEW - Basics 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours / 3 days) LabVIEW - DAQ / LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours / 2...

  3. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) PowerPoint 2000 : 1 et 2.10.01 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) PCAD Schémas - débutants : 4 - 5.10.01 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) PCAD PCB - débutants : 8 - 10.10.01 (3 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 3-hour lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Basics 1 :  15 - 17.10.01  (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01...

  4. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 :  3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) :  30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (...

  5. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 2 sessions de _ journée les 24 et 25.9.01 PROFIBUS : 25 - 26.9.01 (2 jours) PROFIBUS : 27 - 28.9.01 (2 days) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) Frontpage 2000 - niveau 1 : 8 et 9.10.01 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 15 - 19.10.01 (5 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Programmation TSX Premium 1 : 22 - 26.10.01 (5 jours) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2...

  6. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: EXCEL 2000 - niveau 1 : 3 et 4.10.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 3 - 4.10.2001 (2 jours) Introduction à Outlook : 5.10.01 (1 journée) C++ for Particle Physicists : 8 - 12.10.01 (6 lectures) Cadence Board Design tools : Upgrading to release 14 : 3 1-day sessions on 9, 10 & 11.10.01 MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introd...

  7. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: MS-Project 2000 - niveau 1 : 15 - 18.10.01 (4 demi-journées) LabView Base 2 : 18 & 19.10.01 (2 jours) WORD 2000 : importer et manipuler des images : 19.10.01 (1 journée) Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 ...

  8. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Sécurité dans les installations cryogéniques : 21 - 22.11.2001 (2 demi-journées) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System :  30.11.2001 (1 day) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC): Introduction (bilingual) :  3.12.01 (half-day) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System : 07.12.2001...

  9. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Programming TSX Premium 1 :  19 - 23.11.01  (5 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) The Java programming language Level 2:  26 - 28.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Autocad Migration support courses: a detail...

  10. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Contract Follow-up (F) : 30.10.01 (1/2 journée) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Electronics Design :  30.10.01 (1 day) Nouveautés d'Excel 2000 : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) LabView Base 1 : 12 - 14.11.01 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.11.01 (2 jours) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) LabVIEW - DAQ : 15 - 16.11.01 (2 jours) Introduction to XML :  19 - 20.11.01 (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001 (4 days) Hands...

  11. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Nouveautés d'EXCEL : 5.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction a Windows 2000 au CERN : 6.11.01 (1/2 journée) UNIX pour non-programmeurs : 5 - 7.11.01 (3 jours) Design Patterns :  7 - 8.11.01 (2 days) The Java programming language Level 1: 8 - 9.11.01 (2 days) Automates et réseaux de terrain : 13 & 14.11.01 (3 jours) Introduction à Windows 2000 au CERN : 12 - 14.11.01 (1/2 journée) Introduction to Windows 2000 at CERN :  14.11.01  (half-day) Introduction to PERL 5 :  15 - 16.11.01  (2 days) Introduction to C Programming :  21- 23.11.01 (3 days) Programmation TSX Premium 2 : 26 - 30.11.01 (5 jours) Contract Follow-up (F) : 26.11.01 (1/2 journée) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design :  27 - 30.11.2001  (4 days) Hands-on Object-Oriented Design and Programming with C++ :  11 - 13.12.2...

  12. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: ELEC-2002 : Spring Term :  9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, 30.4.02 (7 * 2.5 hours) Object-Oriented Analysis & Design: 16 - 19.4.02  (4 days) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2 : 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-...

  13. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - ...

  14. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users : 16.4.02  (1 day) Migration from AutoCAD 14 towards AutoCAD Mechanical6 PowerPack:  17 - 19.4 and 2 &3.5.02  (5 days) AutoCAD - niveau 1 : 22, 23, 29, 30.4 et 6, 7.5.02 (6 jours) LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec Micr...

  15. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours) The CERN Engineering Data Management System for Advanced users:  30.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 1:  3 - 5.6.02  (3 days) AutoCAD 2002 - condensé : 4 - 6.6.02 (3 jours) LabVIEW DAQ (E):  6 & 7.6.02  (2 days) AutoCAD 2002 - Level 1:  10 - 12 and 24 - 26.6.02  (6 days) If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the c...

  16. PLACES AVAILABLE

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2002-01-01

    Places are available in the following courses: LabVIEW base 1 : 22 - 24.4.02 (3 jours) CLEAN 2002 : working in a cleanroom:  24.4.02  (half-day, pm) LabVIEW DSC (F) 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) AutoCAD : Mise à jour AutoCAD r-14 vers 2002 : 25 & 26.4.02 (2 jours) Cotations selon les normes GPS de l'ISO : 29 - 30.4.02 (2 jours) Introduction to the CERN Engineering Data Management System:  7.5.02  (1 day) LabVIEW Basics 2: 13 & 14.5.02 (2 days) AutoCAD Mechanical 6 PowerPack (F) : 13-14, 17, 21, 27-28.5.02 (6 jours) WorldFIP - Généralités : 14.5.2002 (1/2 journée) WorldFIP - Développer avec MicroFIP HANDLER : 14.5 - après-midi, 15.5.02 - matin (1 jour) WorldFIP - FullFIP FDM : FIP Device Manager (F) : 15.5 - après-midi, 16.5.02 - matin (1 jour) LabVIEW DAQ (F) : 15 & 16.5.02 (2 jours) EXCEL 2000 - niveau 2 : 22 & 23.5.02 (2 jours)...

  17. Pawukon: from incest, calendar, to horoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan Admiranto, Agustinus

    2016-01-01

    Javanese calendar has several cycles, i.e. 5 days (pasaran), 6 days (paringkelan), 7 days (week), 8 days (padangon and padewan), 30 days (month), and 365 days (year). There is another 210- day cycle caled pawukon which divided into 30 part caled wuku. This cycle originated from an incest tale about a king named Prabu Watugunung which married his mother named Dewi Sinta and his aunt named Dewi Landep. In this marriage they had 27 sons and all of them are called wukus. In this tale it was told that this incestuous relationship caused some havoc in the world and the gods decided to kill this family. After some struggle, all of them are killed and then the gods brought them up to paradise one by one starting from Dewi Sinta and ended with Prabu Watugunung. This ascencion needs 30 weeks (210 days) because to be ascended one wuku had to wait for 7 days, and after one cycle is finished the cycle starts all over again. The establishment of a cycle of pawukon is regarded as an effort to create a cosmos out of chaos (incestuous relationship), and furthermore pawukon is used as a kind of horoscope to determine one's fate in the future. It is because the cosmos is regarded as a clockwork in which each element of this clockwork works in a predetermined fashion. (paper)

  18. Annual environmental monitoring report: calendar year 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, B.M.; Robinson, B.; Carfagno, D.G.

    1977-01-01

    The local environment surrounding Mound Laboratory was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238 released by Mound Laboratory. The results are reported for calendar year 1976. The environmental parameters analyzed included air, water, foodstuffs, and silt. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the stringent standards for radioactive species adopted by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. Data concerning nonradioactive species in air and water are also presented and compared to federal, state, and local standards, where applicable. Although there are no specific standards (RCG) for plutonium-238 and tritium in foodstuffs, the concentrations found, if compared to the water standard, are also a small fraction of the RCG. In addition, there is no evidence of other than minimal reentrainment of radioactive species from silt. Mound Laboratory has undertaken a comprehensive program to bring water supplies into compliance with new U.S. EPA drinking water standards which will be effective June 24, 1977. Mound Laboratory has been granted a National Pollutant Discharge Ellimination System permit. Analyses during 1976 indicate compliance with permit conditions. All results indicated that Mound effluent streams have no significant effect on the Great Miami River and certainly do not cause Ohio Stream Standards to be exceeded. These data demonstrate compliance with various current regulatory agency standards and that the operation of Mound Laboratory has a negligible effect on the environment

  19. Pawukon: from incest, calendar, to horoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan Admiranto, Agustinus

    2016-11-01

    Javanese calendar has several cycles, i.e. 5 days (pasaran), 6 days (paringkelan), 7 days (week), 8 days (padangon and padewan), 30 days (month), and 365 days (year). There is another 210- day cycle caled pawukon which divided into 30 part caled wuku. This cycle originated from an incest tale about a king named Prabu Watugunung which married his mother named Dewi Sinta and his aunt named Dewi Landep. In this marriage they had 27 sons and all of them are called wukus. In this tale it was told that this incestuous relationship caused some havoc in the world and the gods decided to kill this family. After some struggle, all of them are killed and then the gods brought them up to paradise one by one starting from Dewi Sinta and ended with Prabu Watugunung. This ascencion needs 30 weeks (210 days) because to be ascended one wuku had to wait for 7 days, and after one cycle is finished the cycle starts all over again. The establishment of a cycle of pawukon is regarded as an effort to create a cosmos out of chaos (incestuous relationship), and furthermore pawukon is used as a kind of horoscope to determine one"s fate in the future. It is because the cosmos is regarded as a clockwork in which each element of this clockwork works in a predetermined fashion.

  20. Strangers in Familiar Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise

    2012-01-01

    Employees working across multiple cultures are exposed to a vast number of different norms and values, and consequentially work is often a struggle to retain a coherent sense of self. However, when international workers travel, they also encounter more bland spaces where familiarity and similarity...... are important. These spaces appear culturally generic to the Western traveler, but are highly Westernized to bring comfort to Western employees traveling in foreign cultures. This paper argues that these spaces are important in cross-cultural identity work in the sense that international workers – professional...... strangers – need these places to belong and relate to familiarity and to regain a sense of identity. Drawing on an illustrative empirical vignette of an international consultant, I demonstrate how culturally generic spaces can be used in identity work of an international relations consultant....

  1. Engineering Research Division publication report, calendar year 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.K.; Livingston, P.L.; Rae, D.C.

    1980-06-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has issued an internal report listing all formal publications produced by the Division during the calendar year. Abstracts of 1980 reports are presented

  2. Signs in Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting, however it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can also influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below....

  3. Signs In Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamid, Salmiah Binti Abdul; Jensen, Ole B.; Silva, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Travelling in unfamiliar areas is usually very interesting; however, it can also be stressful. People travel or move around in an urban space according to their needs, and the environment can influence the way people move about from one place to another. If a person gets lost, a map or GPS can...... and geosemiotic studies with regards to the road traffic signs used in urban spaces. The paper ends with a discussion on how people choreograph their movement in their everyday life from two different perspectives: above vs. below...

  4. Places disponibles/Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Si vous désirez participer à l'un des cours suivants, veuillez en discuter avec votre superviseur et vous inscrire électroniquement en direct depuis les pages de description des cours dans le Web que vous trouvez à l'adresse : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ ou remplissez une « demande de formation » disponible auprès du Secrétariat de votre Division ou de votre DTO (Délégué divisionnaire à la formation). Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Off...

  5. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markes, B.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-10

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor.(PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance` and BHI- EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Near-Field Monitoring (NFM) program during calendar year (CY) 1997. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near- Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1998. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy. Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Near-Field Monitoring. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Near-Field Monitoring. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine

  6. Environmental releases for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (PNNL-11795). The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public concerning the impact of Hanford Site operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (FDH), and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1997. Comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1997 are displayed in Tables ES-1 through ES-5. These tables represent the following: Table ES-1--Radionuclide air emissions data (detailed data on emissions are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-2--Data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-3--Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-4--Nonradioactive air emissions data (detailed data are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-5--Total Volumes and Flow Rates of 200/600 Area Radioactive Liquid Effluents (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0)

  7. Environmental report for calendar year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Turrin, R.P.

    1991-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for Calendar Year 1989 (CY89). The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations. The objective of the environmental report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. During CY89, there were no accidents, incidents, or occurrences that had a significant impact on PPPL facilities or program operations. The accidental overfilling of an underground storage tank (UST) during 1988, along with the discovery of residual hydrocarbons in the soil of an area used for unloading fuel oil trucks over the last 30 years, has the potential for a minor environmental impact and has resulted in a costly clean up in this area. Surface water analyses for both radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants have shown nothing above normally expected background values. Ambient tritium levels at less than 100 pCi/liter (3.7 Bq/liter) were measured in D-site well water. New groundwater monitoring wells were added in 1989 as a requirement for the groundwater part of our New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) permit. Initial sampling of these wells indicated the presence of lead in two shallow wells next to the detention basin. Radiation exposure via airborne effluents into the environment is still at insignificant levels; however, a stack monitor for tritium is planned for 1990 to ensure compliance with new EPA regulations. Off-site surface water, soils, and biota continued to be analyzed for radioactive baselines in CY89. 51 refs., 27 figs., 40 tabs

  8. From the curve of the snake, and the scene of the crocodile: musings on learning and losing space, place and body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Gannon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Where else can educational research begin and end, if not with the body of the researcher, if not with the particular material/ corporeal/ affective assemblages that this body is and has been part of? This paper traces the mutual constitution of bodies, identities and landscapes through memory as the body of this educator travels through multiple scenes of geo-spatial-temporal movement, and down the east coast of Australia. This movement parallels the movement from being a school teacher to becoming an academic. Throughout the paper landscape is foregrounded, and the body in landscape is evoked through poetic and literary modes of writing around the themes of learning and losing. The body in landscape is not merely the body of the writer. Other bodies in the landscape include ‘the curve of the snake’ - the row of protective hills that were said to protect her tropical home from cyclones – and the ‘scene of the crocodile’ – the rock that hung over the valley she passed on her way to school that she had learned of from Indigenous teachers. The political and ethical consequences of memory work, of body and place writing, and of genres of writing in educational research, are also considered. The paper argues for an embodied and reflexive literacy of place that incorporates multiple modes of knowing, being and writing.

  9. Forecasting Inflow and Outflow of Money Currency in East Java Using a Hybrid Exponential Smoothing and Calendar Variation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Ana; Suhartono; Jati Setyadi, Hario; Taruk, Medi; Haviluddin; Pamilih Widagdo, Putut

    2018-03-01

    Money currency availability in Bank Indonesia can be examined by inflow and outflow of money currency. The objective of this research is to forecast the inflow and outflow of money currency in each Representative Office (RO) of BI in East Java by using a hybrid exponential smoothing based on state space approach and calendar variation model. Hybrid model is expected to generate more accurate forecast. There are two studies that will be discussed in this research. The first studies about hybrid model using simulation data that contain pattern of trends, seasonal and calendar variation. The second studies about the application of a hybrid model for forecasting the inflow and outflow of money currency in each RO of BI in East Java. The first of results indicate that exponential smoothing model can not capture the pattern calendar variation. It results RMSE values 10 times standard deviation of error. The second of results indicate that hybrid model can capture the pattern of trends, seasonal and calendar variation. It results RMSE values approaching the standard deviation of error. In the applied study, the hybrid model give more accurate forecast for five variables : the inflow of money currency in Surabaya, Malang, Jember and outflow of money currency in Surabaya and Kediri. Otherwise, the time series regression model yields better for three variables : outflow of money currency in Malang, Jember and inflow of money currency in Kediri.

  10. Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997

  11. Mishmarot Calendars from Qumran Cave 4: Congruence and Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, George, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    This study examines the calendar observed by the sect whose writings have been found in the caves of the Judean desert. Chapter I introduces the Qumran calendar as an outgrowth of the 364-day pseudo-solar year described in the astronomical chapters of 1 Enoch and defended in the Book of Jubilees. The Temple Scroll completes a calendric foundation by making canonical several summer harvest festivals not found in the Hebrew Scriptures. Chapters II through VII detail the eight mishmarot manuscripts, providing text, translation, and analysis toward understanding the fully developed calendric structure. These investigations manifest arguments that establish the beginning of the sect's lunar month at the full moon, present coordination methodologies that balance the 364-day solar year with the 354-day lunar one, and reveal two different arrangements of the festival cycle. The Conclusion gathers under the heads of Enoch and Jubilees evidence to propose two sectarian calendar traditions and brings forward other texts which could be similarly categorized. Three appendices and a glossary support the discussion from non-mishmarot calendars and presenting an eclectic six-year calendar in full detail.

  12. Housing characteristics and their influence on health-related quality of life in persons living with HIV in Ontario, Canada: results from the positive spaces, healthy places study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Sean B; Bekele, Tsegaye; Tucker, Ruthann; Greene, Saara; Sobota, Michael; Koornstra, Jay; Monette, LaVerne; Bacon, Jean; Bhuiyan, Shafi; Rueda, Sergio; Watson, James; Hwang, Stephen W; Dunn, James; Hambly, Keith

    2012-11-01

    Although lack of housing is linked with adverse health outcomes, little is known about the impacts of the qualitative aspects of housing on health. This study examined the association between structural elements of housing, housing affordability, housing satisfaction and health-related quality of life over a 1-year period. Participants were 509 individuals living with HIV in Ontario, Canada. Regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between housing variables and physical and mental health-related quality of life. We found significant cross-sectional associations between housing and neighborhood variables-including place of residence, housing affordability, housing stability, and satisfaction with material, meaningful and spatial dimensions of housing-and both physical and mental health-related quality of life. Our analyses also revealed longitudinal associations between housing and neighborhood variables and health-related quality of life. Interventions that enhance housing affordability and housing satisfaction may help improve health-related quality of life of people living with HIV.

  13. How to Transform a ‘Place of Violence’ into a ‘Space of Collective Remembering’: Italy and its Traumatic Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Tota

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyse cultural trauma theories and their consequences as well as their potential applicability to cases of collective trauma where access to the legal arena in the rehabilitation process is not possible. When ‘state terror’ occurs, such as in Latin America, or, more arguably Italy, access to the legal arena is systematically denied through a variety of criminal strategies. In these cases, the cultural working through of trauma takes place on the aesthetic level. What are the consequences of this process both for the inscription of the crucial event in public discourse and for its relationship with justice? Moreover, how do aesthetic codes affect the public definition of justice and a collective understanding of what happened?

  14. Six calendar systems in the European history from 18^{th} to 20^{th} Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Manimanis, Vassilios N.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.

    The following calendar systems, introduced in Europe from 18^{th} to 20^{th} century, which were in use for a shorter or longer period by a larger or smaller community, were reviewed and discussed: The French Revolutionary Calendar, the Theosebic calendar invented by Theophilos Kairis, the Revolutionary Calendar of the Soviet Union (or 'Bolshevik calendar'), the Fascist calendar in Italy and the calendar of the Metaxas dictatorship in Greece before World War II. Also the unique of them, which is still in use, the New Rectified Julian calendar of the Orthodox Church, adopted according to proposition of Milutin Milanković on the Congress of Orthodox Churches in 1923 in Constantinople, is presented and discussed. At the end, difficulties to introduce a new calendar are discussed as well.

  15. THE PLACES FOR PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Carson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The current upsurge of interest in street art with its direct approach to the city emphasizes the need to readdress public arts’ role within the wider social and cultural context. As it becomes routine to incorporate art works into city planning and city life, art has become both ‘safe’ and ‘user‐friendly’. On the one hand, art is subsumed and immersed into the wider culture through leisure and entertainment policies, socially engaged public art projects, community art and urban design. On the other hand, there are those works which deliberately intend to unsettle or confront the viewer. In recent years the term intervention has been ascribed to unorthodox art works in the public sphere which are often illicit, or at least non‐complicit in the prevailing hegemony. These practices are disruptive due to their enactment outside traditional art spaces, often in the streets. By occupying the streets, places of democracy and disjunction, these interventions transform public space back into a place of overt cultural and political expression. They also deliberately involve the inhabitants of the city by utilizing everyday spaces in ways which offer an unmediated sense of the artwork.

  16. Environmental data for calendar year 1992: Surface and Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1992 describes the Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1992 by PNL's Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from raw surface and river monitoring data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. Ground-water monitoring data are available in a separate volume (Hanford Site Environmental Data for Calendar Year 1992--Ground Water)

  17. Environmental data for calendar year 1992: Surface and Columbia River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1992 describes the Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1992 by PNL`s Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from raw surface and river monitoring data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. Ground-water monitoring data are available in a separate volume (Hanford Site Environmental Data for Calendar Year 1992--Ground Water).

  18. Calendar Pluralism and the Cultural Heritage of Domination and Resistance (Tuareg and Other Saharans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxby, Clare

    This article is about Saharan calendars from precolonial times to the present. It shows that multiple calendar use has been a constant feature throughout the centuries, that the distinction between indigenous and imported has little meaning in this region of long-standing cultural exchange, and that many Saharan communities still simultaneously use differing official state, literate specialist, and local popular calendars. Social and political explanations of calendar pluralism are presented, contrasting the center view whereby calendars constitute a means of social control and the periphery view whereby communities may affirm their cultural autonomy through particular calendar choices.

  19. Queer Calendars: Art-Activist Project of Contemporary Transition Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kosmogina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This text is about an art-activist project in the context of transition art: Queer Calendars, a project by the 3a3or Group. These calendars are a reaction to the necropolitics of post-socialism, as the setting of different, critical, activist platforms and procedures in every homogeneous field of identification and control in neoliberal capitalism. As in the time of the global project of totalizing, it is necessary to use queer tactics for the politicization of art, which work as political strategies of subversion of every stable structure of power, including governing in micro- or macro- cultures and societies.

  20. Marking time the epic quest to invent the perfect calendar

    CERN Document Server

    Steel, Duncan

    2001-01-01

    ""If you lie awake worrying about the overnight transition from December 31, 1 b.c., to January 1, a.d. 1 (there is no year zero), then you will enjoy Duncan Steel's Marking Time.""--American Scientist ""No book could serve as a better guide to the cumulative invention that defines the imaginary threshold to the new millennium.""--Booklist A Fascinating March through History and the Evolution of the Modern-Day Calendar . . . In this vivid, fast-moving narrative, you'll discover the surprising story of how our modern calendar came about and how it has changed dramatically through the years.

  1. Improving Sexual Risk Communication with Adolescents Using Event History Calendars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn, Kristy K.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L.; Felicetti, Irene L.; Saftner, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately…

  2. 77 FR 33470 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given that the Director of Indian Health Service (IHS), under the authority of sections 321(a) and 322(b) of the Public...

  3. 75 FR 34147 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2010 AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given that the Director of Indian Health Service (IHS), under the authority of sections 321(a) and 322(b) of the Public...

  4. 77 FR 37421 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2012 Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Indian Health Service published a document in the Federal Register on June 6, 2012, concerning rates for...

  5. 76 FR 24496 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2011 AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given that the Director of Indian Health Service (IHS), under the authority of sections 321(a) and 322(b) of the Public...

  6. 78 FR 22890 - Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Reimbursement Rates for Calendar Year 2013 AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is given that the Director of the Indian Health Service (IHS), under the authority of sections 321(a) and 322(b) of the...

  7. Applications of Calendar Instruments in Social Surveys: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, T.J.; Vaart, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Retrospective reports in survey interviews and questionnaires are subject to many types of recall error, which affect completeness, consistency, and dating accuracy. Concerns about this problem have led to the development of so-called calendar instruments, or timeline techniques. These aided recall

  8. Pregnancy Calendar: A Week-by-Week Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español A Week-by-Week Pregnancy Calendar KidsHealth / For Parents / A Week-by-Week ...

  9. Colorado's Alternative School Calendar Program and the Four Day Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Roy G.; Stiverson, C. L.

    Taking advantage of legislation permitting modified school calendars, the four-day work week has been implemented by 23 small, rural Colorado school districts representing 5,200 children. Thirteen districts implemented the four-day program in the 1980-81 school year. Ten additional districts applied as first year pilot programs in the 1981-82…

  10. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992

  11. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  12. The Path Is Place: Skateboarding, Graffiti and Performances of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on two performances of place involving graffiti and skateboarding: the first looks at a graffiti intervention by SKL0, an urban artist in Singapore, and the second examines the "Long Live Southbank" ("LLSB") campaign to resist the relocation of Southbank's Undercroft, an appropriated skate space in London.…

  13. Rural entrepreneurship: Between place and space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Müller, Sabine; Tanvig, Hanne Wittorff

    for a better use of rural resource-bases as well as for sustainable economic development. On the basis of an exploration of the spatial dynamics of rural entrepreneurship we develop propositions concerning rural entrepreneurship as a distinct form of entrepreneurial activity, emphasising bricolage, mixed......This paper proposes a distinction between rural entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship in the rural. While the latter is incidentally located in a rural area, the former engages with the localised resources of the rural area. We argue that rural entrepreneurship in this form holds promise...

  14. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Historically, or so we would like to believe, the story of everyday life for many people included regular, definitive moments of news consumption. Journalism, in fact, was distributed around these routines: papers were delivered before breakfast, the evening news on TV buttressed the transition...

  15. Transforming Children's Health Spaces into Learning Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisselle, Amy; Green, Julie; Scrimshaw, Chantel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic health conditions can cause children extended school absences, creating significant barriers for continued education. Out-of-school learning environments, such as hospitals, provide opportunities to maintain children's learning identities during school absences. This paper seeks to present an example of hospital-based teaching and…

  16. Hanford Site environmental surveillance data report for calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site collects data that provides a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River Water and Sediment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995 describes the Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1995 by PNNL's Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from raw surface, river monitoring data, and chemical air data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. The data volume also includes Hanford Site drinking water radiological data

  17. Estimating a population cumulative incidence under calendar time trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stefan N; Overgaard, Morten; Andersen, Per K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of a disease or psychiatric disorder is frequently measured by the age-specific cumulative incidence. Cumulative incidence estimates are often derived in cohort studies with individuals recruited over calendar time and with the end of follow-up governed by a specific date...... by calendar time trends, the total sample Kaplan-Meier and Aalen-Johansen estimators do not provide useful estimates of the general risk in the target population. We present some alternatives to this type of analysis. RESULTS: We show how a proportional hazards model may be used to extrapolate disease risk...... estimates if proportionality is a reasonable assumption. If not reasonable, we instead advocate that a more useful description of the disease risk lies in the age-specific cumulative incidence curves across strata given by time of entry or perhaps just the end of follow-up estimates across all strata...

  18. Engineering Research Division report on reports calendar year 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorton, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    Each year the Engineering Research Division of the Electronics Engineering Department has issued an internal report listing of all formal publications produced by the division during the calendar year. The report for 1978 is being issued in two sections (the second section has been expanded from the former format due to a change in collection of information implemented during the calendar year 1978). The first section (covering January 1978 through June 1978) lists the titles, report numbers, authors, dates, an author index, and, when applicable, conferences or journals to which the paper was submitted. The second section (covering July 1978 through December 1978) provides, in addition to the above information, abstracts for each paper, and an appendix with keywords. Future publication reports will include abstracts and a keyword appendix for all reports. It is expected that the new format will make the publication report a more useful document

  19. Astronomy in Inca Empire: a Ceque Based Calendar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Nathalia Silva Gomes; de Nader, R. V.

    2007-08-01

    This work is a brief report about different kinds of arrangements and organization of the Inca astronomical calendar, approaching archaeological vestiges in Cuzco, such as observatories aligned to celestial objects which were observed for the computation of the time. We also analyze the ceques lines that can be associated to these techniques of Inca astronomical observation, according to the chroniclers and the researches in archaeoastronomy.

  20. Calendar methods of fertility regulation: a rule of thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, B; Scarpa, B

    1996-01-01

    "[Many] illiterate women, particularly in the third world, find [it] difficult to apply usual calendar methods for the regulation of fertility. Some of them are even unable to make simple subtractions. In this paper we are therefore trying to evaluate the applicability and the efficiency of an extremely simple rule which entails only [the ability to count] a number of days, and always the same way." (SUMMARY IN ITA) excerpt

  1. [Asperger syndrome with highly exceptional calendar memory: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Ali Emre; Cengel Kültür, Ebru; Demirel, Hilal; Karlı Oğuz, Kader; Akça, Onur; Lay Ergün, Eser; Demir, Başaran

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with pervasive developmental disorders develop unusual talents, which are characterized as savant syndrome. Herein we present neuropsychological examination and brain imaging (fMRI and brain SPECT) findings of an 18-year-old male with Asperger syndrome and highly unusual calendar memory. Neuropsychological evaluation of the case indicated mild attention, memory, and problem solving deficits, and severe executive function deficits that included conceptualization, category formation, and abstraction. Functional MRI findings showed activation above the baseline level (Psavant syndrome.

  2. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    provides summary information regarding the prevalence of hearing injury experienced by U.S. Army Soldiers in 2016. Soldiers who completed a DD Form...2215 (Reference Audiogram) or DD Form 2216 ( Hearing Conservation Data) during Calendar Year 2016 (CY16) were included in the analysis. Information is...broken out by Service component and will be updated annually. TOTAL ARMY STATISTICS FOR CY16 24% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing

  3. Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2005-09-29

    This report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary analytical data that (1) provide an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during calendar year 2003; (2) demonstrate the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) policies and directives; (3) characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance; and (4) highlight significant environmental programs.

  4. Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

    2006-09-28

    This report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary analytical data that (1) provide an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during calendar year 2005; (2) demonstrate the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) policies and directives; (3) characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance; and (4) highlight significant environmental programs.

  5. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    OpenAIRE

    Jablan Branka; Stanimirov Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children...

  6. Place Branding in Systems of Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenker, Sebastian; Andéhn, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    , this presents a challenge, since the role of a place in this system of geographical abstractions constitutes a piece of information more vital than any other in defining the place. Our understanding of places cannot be separated from their scale, and any effort at managing the reputation and meaning.......g. the European Union or Africa). Using the example of nation branding for Sudan and Slovenia, one can identify supranational places such as “sub-Saharan Africa” or “Eastern Europe”, carrying their own highly salient and often negative meaning in much of the Western world. We explore how association to a system...

  7. The dance of time the origins of the calendar

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Did you know that the ancient Romans left sixty days of winter out of their calendar, considering these two months a dead time of lurking terror and therefore better left unnamed? That they had a horror of even numbers, hence the tendency for months with an odd number of days? That robed and bearded druids from the Celts stand behind our New Year's figure of Father Time? That if Thursday is Thor's day, then Friday belongs to his faithful wife, Freya, queen of the Norse gods? That the name Easter may derive from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring, Eostre, whose consort was a hare, our Easter Bunny?  Three streams of history created the Western calendar—first from the Sumerians, then from the Celtic and Germanic peoples in the North, and finally from Palestine with the rise of Christianity. Michael Judge teases out the contributions of each stream to the shape of the calendar, to the days and holidays, and to associated lore. In them, he finds glimpses of a way of seeing before the mechanical time of clocks, w...

  8. CHRISTIAN SYMBOLS AND CALENDAR IN YEVGENY BORATYNSKY'S POEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Vasil’yevna Stebeneva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The calendar symbolism is always a component of the artistic message of the author (usually by fi lling in dates of the Orthodox calendar. Although the time in Boratynsky’s poem Eda is poetically clichéd, some folklore meanings still can be traced in the dates atmosphere of the “magical” spring. In all three poems the author demonstrates the destructiveness of love passion in the destiny of the heroines. In the romantic poems Eda and The Ball the theme of love temptations is developed by contrasting motifs of darkness of the night and glowing “light” of the romance. At a decisive moment for the heroines the artifact of the Orthodox culture presents a certain barrier from the fatal step, a reference point in attesting the Truth. As the logic plot of the examined poems indicates, the possibility of happiness in the life tainted by the sin is negated in Boratynsky’s artistic world. The poetics of night determines the dynamics of the poems Eda and The Ball. A calendar way of thought characterizes the large epic genres and organizes the plot of Tsyganka (The Gypsy (Easter, July, the Christmastide fun and the Eve of Lent, which is a kind of attempt to the author’s “eclectic” novel in prose. Boratynsky diverges from literary and cultural traditions not only in the development perspective of a romantic plot, but also in the semantics of winter and blizzard.

  9. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  10. The Library as a Preferred Place for Studying: Observation of Students’ Use of Physical Spaces. A Review of: Applegate, R. (2009. The library is for studying: Student preferences for study space. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 35(4, 341-346.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Hughes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine students’ utilization of physical spaces in the library, excluding computer labs or stacks.Design – Observational research, unobtrusive method.Setting – Areas of space in the University Library, as well as within adjoining areas at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, such as carrels, tables, soft chairs, and study rooms.Subjects – Students using the library’s space.Methods – The researcher chose to collect data via observation of individuals and groups in a particular space in the library, noting the gender of the individuals using the space and whether or not they were using laptops. Areas of space examined were carrels, group study rooms, chairs and sofas, tables and chairs in the Academic Commons, and benches and chairs within corridors. The unit of analysis used was equal to an individual seat. The research excluded stack space as well as any space with fixed computer stations. The time periods chosen to study the spaces were selected based on the author’s previous research. Due to higher daytime usage than evening, data was collected at two time periods during the day: 12-1 p.m. and 3-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The researcher recorded the time of the semester as well, choosing weeks 14-17 in Fall 2007 and weeks 10-17 in Spring 2008. Space diagrams for collecting data were created, and each area had different collection times. All data was entered into a database in which each area was recorded with the number and type of users. Each area had a different capacity as to how many individuals it could hold. If the percentage of capacity was higher than 50%, the usage was considered to be notable.Main Results – The researchers observed a few patterns from their data collection. Gender analysis provided information regarding the use of laptops; men were more likely to use them than women. While men were a smaller part of the overall university demographic while this research took place

  11. Continuing bonds and place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Annika; Walter, Tony

    2017-08-01

    Where do people feel closest to those they have lost? This article explores how continuing bonds with a deceased person can be rooted in a particular place or places. Some conceptual resources are sketched, namely continuing bonds, place attachment, ancestral places, home, reminder theory, and loss of place. The authors use these concepts to analyze interview material with seven Swedes and five Britons who often thought warmly of the deceased as residing in a particular place and often performing characteristic actions. The destruction of such a place, by contrast, could create a troubling, haunting absence, complicating the deceased's absent-presence.

  12. The revised edition of korean calendar for allergenic pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Won; Lee, Ha-Baik; Kang, Im-Joo; Kim, Seong-Won; Park, Kang-Seo; Kook, Myung-Hee; Kim, Bong-Seong; Baek, Hey-Sung; Kim, Joo-Hwa; Kim, Ja-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Jin; Kim, Kyu-Rang; Choi, Young-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The old calendar of pollens did not reflect current pollen distribution and concentrations that can be influenced by changes of weather and environment of each region in South Korea. A new pollen calendar of allergenic pollens was made based on the data on pollen concentrations obtained in eight regions nationwide between 1997 and 2009. The distribution of pollen was assessed every day at 8 areas (Seoul, Guri, Busan, Daegu, Jeonju, Kwangju, Kangneung, and Jeju) for 12 years between July 1, 1997 and June 30, 2009. Pollens were collected by using Burkard 7-day sampler (Burkard Manufacturing Co Ltd, UK). Pollens which were stained with Calberla's fuchsin staining solution were identified and counted. Pine became the highest pollen in May, and the pollen concentrations of oak and birch also became high. Ragweed appeared in the middle of August and showed the highest pollen concentration in the middles of September. Japanese hop showed a high concentration between the middle of August and the end of September, and mugwort appeared in the middles of August and its concentration increased up until early September. In Kangneung, birch appeared earlier, pine showed a higher pollen concentration than in the other areas. In Daegu, Oriental thuja and alder produced a large concentration of pollens. Pine produced a large concentration of pollens between the middle of April and the end of May. Weeds showed higher concentrations in September and mugwort appeared earlier than ragweed. In Busan the time of flowering is relatively early, and alder and Oriental thuja appeared earliest among all areas. In Kwangju, Oriental thuja and hazelnut appeared in early February. Japanese cedar showed the highest pollen concentration in March in Jeju. In conclusion, update information on pollen calendar in South Korea should be provided for allergic patients through the website to manage and prevent the pollinosis.

  13. Place, Non-Place, Multi-Place and the (NonPossibilities of Identity: Philosophical, Social, and Communicational Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basia Nikiforova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michel Foucault in the text “Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias” wrote that “the present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space”. Space, place, and territories are social productions. Territory is a polysemic concept. Place is “events” created by territories, fluid areas of control produced by territorial negotiation (horizontal dynamics and negotiations between places (vertical dynamics. Space produces places and is produced by places. Moreover, space, place and territories can be seen as the waves of territorialization and deterritorialization in an endless process. It is a form of seizure in the world, an a priori for Immanuel Kant, an ontological need for Martin Heidegger. Territory is a space, governed by a set of rules, named “code”. Territorialization is then synonymous of a certain codification, or the symbolical organization of space. Places are created by territorializational dynamics. They are the sum of “events”. The place and its territory is not “natural”, but it is a cultural artifact, a social product linked to desire, power and identity. The changes of the functions of places (what Foucault called heterotopy are an important subject of contemporary studies. There are also many new temporary uses of these spaces and different emerging functions, including new forms of control, access, surveillance, new forms of openness and closeness (passwords, access profiles, etc.. Informational territory creates new heterotopias, new functions for places and a redefinition of social and communicational practices. It is not the end of a concrete place and its territory, but rather, a new meaning, sense, and a function for these spaces. The contemporary meaning of place and space has a visible tendency in creating ambivalence of sacrum and profanum, which means the secularization of the sacred and the sacralization of the secular. One of the sides of this tendency is sacralizing market and marketing

  14. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2006-09-28

    This data report contains the actual raw data used to create the tables and summaries in the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005. In addition to providing raw data collected during routine sampling efforts in 2005, this data report also includes Columbia River shoreline spring data collected by the PNNL Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, and data from collaborative studies performed by the PNNL during 2005 under partial support by the SESP. Some analytical results were not received in time to include in this report or changes may have occurred to the data following publication.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  16. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance

  17. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  18. Estimating a population cumulative incidence under calendar time trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stefan N; Overgaard, Morten; Andersen, Per K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of a disease or psychiatric disorder is frequently measured by the age-specific cumulative incidence. Cumulative incidence estimates are often derived in cohort studies with individuals recruited over calendar time and with the end of follow-up governed by a specific date....... It is common practice to apply the Kaplan-Meier or Aalen-Johansen estimator to the total sample and report either the estimated cumulative incidence curve or just a single point on the curve as a description of the disease risk. METHODS: We argue that, whenever the disease or disorder of interest is influenced...

  19. Passover in the calendars of the Old Testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwester Jędrzejewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jewish feast of Pesah was born in the circle of the shepherds’ culture, more precisely in the Semitic seminomadic groups. It was being celebrated during the spring, at the beginning of a new year. During the time of Josiah’s reforms, it became a pilgrimage feast. Historical experience of the exodus from Egypt and its theological interpretation and several reinterpretations coming afterwards, changed that nomadic and shepherds’ feast, connected with agricultural feast of Unleavened Bread, into the most important national feast of Israel. Calendars coming from biblical texts are showing a multistage development of actual feast of Passover.

  20. Violation of the Child Vaccination Calendar: the Attitudes of Doctors and Parents

    OpenAIRE

    T. V. Kulichenko; M. N. Dymshits; M. A. Lazareva; A. R. Babayan; E. G. Bokuchava

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this publication is a comparative analysis of the attitudes of paediatricians and parents towards vaccination and the vaccination calendar.Methods. An online poll among mothers of children under the age of was carried out. 315 women at the age of 20–45 took part in the poll. They were all questioned about their attitude towards vaccination and the adherence to the vaccination calendar. 42 paediatricians contributed their opinion on the subject of vaccination calendar violations, un...

  1. My Place Is Not Your Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenker, Sebastian; Beckmann, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Cities increasingly compete with each other for attracting tourists, investors, companies, or residents. Marketers therefore focus on establishing the city as a brand, disregarding that the perception and knowledge of a city differ dramatically between the target audiences. Hence, place...... branding should emphasize much more the perceptions of the different target groups and develop strategies for advanced place brand management. The aim of this paper is to assess the important discrepancies between the city brand perceptions of different target groups with the help of network analysis......-ended-question survey with 334 participants. Findings – Structural differences for the city brand perceptions of two different target groups and the differences between perceptions of an external and internal target group are highlighted. The results and the managerial implications for place marketers are discussed...

  2. Populated Places of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This coverage contains points that represent populated places, ie. cities, towns, villages or any other named place where people live. The coverage was developed...

  3. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED)

  5. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2003-09-17

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2002 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 2002 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2002 (DOE Memorandum EH-41: Natoli:6-1336, April 4, 2003). These Orders and the guidance document require that DOE facilities submit an annual site environmental report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health; and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  7. Public awareness - calendar with information about emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhraski Benkovic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2009-01-01

    State Office for Nuclear Safety in co-operation with the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (in Slovenia) and Agency for Education during the years 2002 till now realized the project of preparing the calendar for families living in the circle 25 km from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (Slovenia) and in the circle of 100 km from Nuclear Power Plant Paks (Hungary). The calendars are containing primary school pupils' paintings about energy, environment, nuclear technology and additional information about preparedness in the Republic of Croatia in the case of nuclear accident and recommendation for acting. Collecting of paintings is carried out each year between pupils from second to eight grades in the schools near Nuclear Power Plant Krsko and Nuclear Power Plant Paks. Expert commission chose twelve best paintings for the following year. This kind of project is only one way of public relations and awareness which helps in expanding knowledge about successful living close to nuclear and other energy technologies. In this poster presentation more about this project will be presented.(author)

  8. Public awareness - calendar with information about emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podhraski Benkovic, S; Novosel, N [State Office for Nuclear Safety, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-07-01

    State Office for Nuclear Safety in co-operation with the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (in Slovenia) and Agency for Education during the years 2002 till now realized the project of preparing the calendar for families living in the circle 25 km from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (Slovenia) and in the circle of 100 km from Nuclear Power Plant Paks (Hungary). The calendars are containing primary school pupils' paintings about energy, environment, nuclear technology and additional information about preparedness in the Republic of Croatia in the case of nuclear accident and recommendation for acting. Collecting of paintings is carried out each year between pupils from second to eight grades in the schools near Nuclear Power Plant Krsko and Nuclear Power Plant Paks. Expert commission chose twelve best paintings for the following year. This kind of project is only one way of public relations and awareness which helps in expanding knowledge about successful living close to nuclear and other energy technologies. In this poster presentation more about this project will be presented.(author)

  9. Solar and lunar calendars of the mountain sanctuary Kokino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanovska, Olgica; Stankovski, Jovica; Apostolovska, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    The mountain sanctuary Kokino is located in the northeast part of Macedonia, on the summit of a hill of volcanic origin. The archeological research that has been performed for more than a decade confirmed its use as a large extra-urban religious site during the whole period of the Bronze Age. Additional astronomical analyses showed that it has the characteristics of a megalithic observatory, with some of its religious cults related with the motion of the sun, moon and some of the brightest stars. For that purpose the periodic motion of these celestial objects was observed and their position on specific calendar dates marked by stone notches cut in the surrounding rocks. In this paper, we present the results of the astronomical investigation of a group of stone markers aligned toward the specific positions of the full moon and analyze their purpose in creating a simple solar and lunar calendar which was used in planning the everyday life of the Bronze Age people in the region.

  10. Deriving crop calendar using NDVI time-series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J. H.; Oza, M. P.

    2014-11-01

    Agricultural intensification is defined in terms as cropping intensity, which is the numbers of crops (single, double and triple) per year in a unit cropland area. Information about crop calendar (i.e. number of crops in a parcel of land and their planting & harvesting dates and date of peak vegetative stage) is essential for proper management of agriculture. Remote sensing sensors provide a regular, consistent and reliable measurement of vegetation response at various growth stages of crop. Therefore it is ideally suited for monitoring purpose. The spectral response of vegetation, as measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and its profiles, can provide a new dimension for describing vegetation growth cycle. The analysis based on values of NDVI at regular time interval provides useful information about various crop growth stages and performance of crop in a season. However, the NDVI data series has considerable amount of local fluctuation in time domain and needs to be smoothed so that dominant seasonal behavior is enhanced. Based on temporal analysis of smoothed NDVI series, it is possible to extract number of crop cycles per year and their crop calendar. In the present study, a methodology is developed to extract key elements of crop growth cycle (i.e. number of crops per year and their planting - peak - harvesting dates). This is illustrated by analysing MODIS-NDVI data series of one agricultural year (from June 2012 to May 2013) over Gujarat. Such an analysis is very useful for analysing dynamics of kharif and rabi crops.

  11. Public Awareness - Calendar with Information about Emergency Preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhraski Benkovic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2008-01-01

    State Office for Nuclear Safety in co-operation with the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport, Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (in Slovenia) and Agency for Education during the years 2002 till now realized the project of preparing the calendar for families living in the circle 25 km from the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (Slovenia) and in the circle of 100 km from Nuclear Power Plant Paks (Hungary). The calendars are containing primary school pupils' paintings about energy, environment, nuclear technology and additional information about preparedness in the Republic of Croatia in the case of nuclear accident and recommendation for acting. Collecting of paintings is carried out each year between pupils from second to eight grades in the schools near Nuclear Power Plant Krsko and Nuclear Power Plant Paks. Expert commission chose twelve best paintings for the following year. This kind of project is only one way of public relations and awareness which helps in expanding knowledge about successful living close to nuclear and other energy technologies. In this poster presentation more about this project will be presented.(author)

  12. Hanford Site environmental surveillance data report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site collects data that provides a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River Water and Sediment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995 describes the Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1995 by PNNL`s Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from raw surface, river monitoring data, and chemical air data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. The data volume also includes Hanford Site drinking water radiological data.

  13. The importance of places and place branding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovács, Z.; Musterd, S.; Musterd, S.; Kovács, Z.

    2013-01-01

    In the analytical part of this study, we highlight that, despite globalisation and growing uniformity, there is still an important role for place itself in the location decisions of economic players. Part III of this volume deals with this. Even though city-regions across the world have become

  14. Place in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jacob Bjerre; Lange, Ida Sofie Gøtzsche

    from the 'Everyday World'. Within mobilities studies, research has focused on different aspects and consequences of the post-oil society (see Dennis & Urry 2009, Urry 2013). This paper discusses the conception of place within the enclosed 'Oil World' with point of departure in relocation...... and redefinition of oil rigs from an urban design perspective. The paper constitutes a theoretical basis for future design scenarios - exemplified through visionary urban design proposals for a specific site in the city of Esbjerg, Denmark. Relocating rigs to an urban context initiates discussions of conception...... of 'Place' questioning the fixity of 'Place' (Jensen 2010). Scoped through a relational sense of place (Massey 1993) and the potential of exploring new relations between places (Burns & Kahn 2005), the paper challenges the notion of 'Place as God' (Hvattum 2010). These places in transition contest...

  15. Territorialidades, lived and senses of place in advance of the productive frontier times spaces Territorialidades, espacios vividos y sentidos de lugar en tiempos de avance de la frontera productiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Comerci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In full process redshift the productive border and pop-up dispute over the use and appropriation of resources, the intervention of different social subjects in the West of La Pampa is redefining productivas-reproductivas practices crianceros farmers and, consequently, the social construction of space. Since the end of the military campaigns against agents, different indigenous societies through the exercise of power, built certain territorial representations and put into action practices tending to articulate the pampean West with the national economy. However little appreciation of this space made possible the development of certain forms of organizing socio-productive and symbolic autonomy. Before the expansion of the livestock border, the imposed hydrocarbon region and increasing presence of new territorial logics grow confrontations by unequal access to natural resources, the appropriation of space and the construction of territorialidades. In this context, article focused on the internal organisation of rural settlements and social uses of spaces of time, in two areas of the West "end" look: La Humada and Chos Malal. This mode is intended to establish how organized spaces home, peridomestic and mount and what senses expressed subjects into life and places spaces in times of expansion of the production frontier. The new social field generated product of capitalism on the peasant drives progress is expressed, not only changes in forms of livestock, management organization of production and social construction of space, but also in forms of sociability and collective resistance strategies. This process, which is brewing in the region, has a similar development in other spaces where productive progress has occurred before or at a faster pace. Different qualitative methodology strategies that combine the study case with life stories, in-depth interviews and analysis of documentary sources are articulated for the conduct of research.En pleno

  16. Place-Specific Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messeter, Jörn

    2009-01-01

    An increased interest in the notion of place has evolved in interaction design based on the proliferation of wireless infrastructures, developments in digital media, and a ‘spatial turn’ in computing. In this article, place-specific computing is suggested as a genre of interaction design that add......An increased interest in the notion of place has evolved in interaction design based on the proliferation of wireless infrastructures, developments in digital media, and a ‘spatial turn’ in computing. In this article, place-specific computing is suggested as a genre of interaction design...... that addresses the shaping of interactions among people, place-specific resources and global socio-technical networks, mediated by digital technology, and influenced by the structuring conditions of place. The theoretical grounding for place-specific computing is located in the meeting between conceptions...... of place in human geography and recent research in interaction design focusing on embodied interaction. Central themes in this grounding revolve around place and its relation to embodiment and practice, as well as the social, cultural and material aspects conditioning the enactment of place. Selected...

  17. Sacred Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    A space can be sacred, providing those who inhabit a particular space with sense of transcendence-being connected to something greater than oneself. The sacredness may be inherent in the space, as for a religious institution or a serene place outdoors. Alternatively, a space may be made sacred by the people within it and events that occur there. As medical providers, we have the opportunity to create sacred space in our examination rooms and with our patient interactions. This sacred space can be healing to our patients and can bring us providers opportunities for increased connection, joy, and gratitude in our daily work.

  18. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Environmental Services LLC (WVES) and URS - Washington Division

    2008-12-17

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2007. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2007 environmental protection program at the WVDP. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment.

  19. 42 CFR 419.30 - Base expenditure target for calendar year 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Base expenditure target for calendar year 1999. 419.30 Section 419.30 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Services § 419.30 Base expenditure target for calendar year 1999. (a) CMS estimates the aggregate amount...

  20. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2006. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2006 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs that protect public health and safety and the environment

  1. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2007. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2007 environmental protection program at the WVDP. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment

  2. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company WVNSCO and URS Group, Inc.

    2006-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2005. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2005 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs

  3. 75 FR 81138 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... [CMS-1510-CN2] RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for... ``Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in... Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification Requirements for Home...

  4. 76 FR 68525 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No... 0938-AQ30 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012... sets forth updates to the home health prospective payment system (HH PPS) rates, including: the...

  5. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2007-09-27

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2006. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2006 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP’s environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs that protect public health and safety and the environment.

  6. Design spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Digital technologies and media are becoming increasingly embodied and entangled in the spaces and places at work and at home. However, our material environment is more than a geometric abstractions of space: it contains familiar places, social arenas for human action. For designers, the integration...... of digital technology with space poses new challenges that call for new approaches. Creative alternatives to traditional systems methodologies are called for when designers use digital media to create new possibilities for action in space. Design Spaces explores how design and media art can provide creative...... alternatives for integrating digital technology with space. Connecting practical design work with conceptual development and theorizing, art with technology, and usesr-centered methods with social sciences, Design Spaces provides a useful research paradigm for designing ubiquitous computing. This book...

  7. Calendar of courses for March to June 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 31 March, 1 April (Full) Introduction to Leadership 9, 10, 11 April (3 places available) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (partie 2) 24, 25 avril (complet) Quality Management 6, 7 May (10 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 13, 14, 15 May (full) Managing Teams 21, 22, 23 May (8 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 28, 29 May (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 2, 3, 4 June (3 places available) Dealing with Conflict 6 and 13 June (8 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up 9, 10 June (5 places available) Communicating to Convince 16, 17 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Making Presentations 1, 2 April + 14 May (2 places available) Managing Time 1...

  8. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  9. The Chamonix workshop: a key point in the CERN calendar

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Last week I attended the annual LHC performance workshop in Chamonix. This meeting is an essential part of the CERN calendar, allowing colleagues from the accelerator community, along with representatives of the experiments and of other sectors and departments, to take stock of the accelerators’ performance in the year gone by, and set the direction for the year to come.   This year’s discussions were as lively, constructive and stimulating as I remember them to have been from the period of Run 1, when I attended several Chamonix workshops as ATLAS Spokesperson. Sessions covered everything from lessons learned in 2015, to operational improvements and plans for 2016, along with the status of the LHC injectors upgrade (LIU) and High Luminosity LHC projects. The broad conclusions are that in 2015 a large number of complex problems and subtle issues were successfully addressed, and 2016 will be a year of luminosity production: delivering large quantities of data to the ex...

  10. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2009-08-11

    Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

  11. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction annual report for calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Calendar year 1997 was the third full year of work on the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction. Activities are summarized on the following individual project tasks: Task 1 -- Investigation of radioiodine releases from X-10 radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2 -- Investigation of mercury releases from Y-12 lithium enrichment; Task 3 -- Investigation of PCBs in the environment near Oak Ridge; Task 4 -- Investigation of radionuclides released from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5 -- Systematic searching of records repositories; Task 6 -- Evaluation of the quality of uranium monitoring data and a screening evaluation of potential off-site health risks; and Task 7 -- Performance of screening for additional materials not evaluated in the feasibility study.

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  13. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2008-10-13

    Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007" (PNNL-17603), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Chalasani, S.S.; Morganelli, D.; Naidu, J.R.

    1990-12-01

    The environmental monitoring program is conducted by the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Environmental Protection (S ampersand EP) Division to determine whether operation of BNL facilities have met the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements. This program includes monitoring for both radiological and nonradiological parameters. This report summarizes the data for the external radiation levels; radioactivity in air, rain, potable water, surface water, ground water, soil, vegetation, and aquatic biota; water quality, metals, organics and petroleum products in ground water, surface water and potable water. Analytical results are reviewed by the S ampersand EP staff and when required by permit conditions are transmitted to the appropriate regulatory agencies. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. Detailed data for the calendar year 1989 are presented. 27 figs

  15. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations

  16. Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction annual report for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Calendar year 1997 was the third full year of work on the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction. Activities are summarized on the following individual project tasks: Task 1 -- Investigation of radioiodine releases from X-10 radioactive lanthanum processing; Task 2 -- Investigation of mercury releases from Y-12 lithium enrichment; Task 3 -- Investigation of PCBs in the environment near Oak Ridge; Task 4 -- Investigation of radionuclides released from White Oak Creek to the Clinch River; Task 5 -- Systematic searching of records repositories; Task 6 -- Evaluation of the quality of uranium monitoring data and a screening evaluation of potential off-site health risks; and Task 7 -- Performance of screening for additional materials not evaluated in the feasibility study

  17. From sense of place to visualization of place: examining people-place relationships for insight on developing geovisualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Robert; Canessa, Rosaline

    2018-02-01

    Effective resource planning incorporates people-place relationships, allowing these efforts to be inclusive of the different local beliefs, interests, activities and needs. 'Geovisualizations' can serve as potentially powerful tools for facilitating 'place-conscious' resource planning, as they can be developed with high degrees of realism and accuracy, allowing people to recognize and relate to them as 'real places'. However, little research has been done on this potential, and the place-based applications of these visual tools are poorly understood. This study takes steps toward addressing this gap by exploring the relationship between sense of place and 'visualization of place'. Residents of the Capital Regional District of BC, Canada, were surveyed about their relationship with local coastal places, concerns for the coast, and how they mentally visualize these places. Factor analysis identified four sense of place dimensions - nature protection values, community and economic well-being values, place identity and place dependence, and four coastal concerns dimensions - ecological, private opportunities, public space and boating impacts. Visualization data were coded and treated as dependent variables in a series of logistic regressions that used sense of place and coastal concerns dimensions as predictors. Results indicated that different aspects of sense of place and (to a lesser degree) concerns for places influence the types of elements people include in their mental visualization of place. In addition, sense of place influenced the position and perspective people assume in these visualizations. These findings suggest that key visual elements and perspectives speak to different place relationships, which has implications for developing and using geovisualizations in terms of what elements should be included in tools and (if appropriate) depicted as affected by potential management or development scenarios.

  18. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2003-01-01

    This data report contains the actual raw data used in the annual Hanford Site environmental report (PNNL--14295). In addition to providing raw data collected during routine sampling in 2002, this report also includes data from special sampling studies performed by PNNL during 2002. Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The data collected provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water and sediment. For more information regarding the 2002 sampling schedule for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project, refer to L. E. Bisping, Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule (PNNL--13418, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington). PNNL publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002 describes the site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. Sections of the annual environmental report include tables and summaries of offsite and onsite environmental surveillance data collected by PNNL during 2002. This data report contains the actual raw data used to create those tables and summaries. In addition to providing raw data collected during routine sampling efforts in 2002, this data report also includes data from special sampling studies performed by PNNL during 2002

  19. The value of place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-03-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate environment is clear, and we are presented with examples of how they strive to make connections between the content and what they are familiar with—namely their surroundings. "Place" is identified as a term with complex meanings and interpretations, even in the scope of place-based science education, and understanding how the term is used in any given scenario is essential to understanding the implications of place-based education. Is place used as a location, locale or a sense of place? To understand "place" is to acknowledge that for the individual, it is highly situational, cultural and personal. It is just such attributes that make place-based education appealing, and potentially powerful, pedagogically on one hand, yet complex for implementation on the other. The argument is posed that place is particularly important in the context of education about the environment, which in its simplest manifestation, connects formal science curriculum to resources that are local and tangible to students. The incorporation of place in such a framework seeks to bridge the gap between formal school science subjects and students' lived experiences, yet acknowledges the tensions that can arise between accommodating place meanings and the desire to acculturate students into the language of the scientific community. The disconnect between guiding policy frameworks and the reality of the Next Generation Science Standards is addressed opening an avenue for further discussion of the importance of socio-cultural frameworks of science learning in an ever increasing era of accountability.

  20. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    CERN Technical Training: Open Courses (April - June 2007) The following course sessions are currently scheduled in the framework of the CERN Technical Training Programme 2007:   AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 (course in French): 25.4.- 26.4.2007 & 2.5. - 3.5.2007 (4 days in 2 modules, 5 places available) AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 (course in French): 27.6.- 28.6.2007 & 3.7. - 4.7.2007 (4 days in 2 modules, 5 places available) AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 (course in French) 21.6.-22.6.2007 (2 days, 8 places available) * NEW COURSE* Automate de securite S7 (course in French) 14.5.-16.5.2007 (3 days, 4 places available) * NEW COURSE* Automate de securite S7 (course in French): 9.5.-11.5.2007 (3 days, 4 places available) JCOP - Joint PVSS-JCOP Frameswork (course in English): 21.5.-25.5.2007 (5 days, 12 places available) JCOP - Finite State Machines in the JCOP Frameswork (course in English): 12.6.-14.6.2007 (3 days, 12 places available) LabVIEW Basics 1 (in English): 2.-4.5.2007 (3 days, 7 places ...

  1. A Sense of Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Black

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available People increasingly want to know where their food and wine comes from and who produces it. This is part of developing a taste of place, or what the French call terroir. The academic and industry debates surrounding the concept of terroir are explored, and the efforts of Massachusetts wine producers to define their sense of place are discussed.

  2. Place in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jacob Bjerre; Lange, Ida Sofie Gøtzsche

    2017-01-01

    World. This paper discusses the conception of place in the Oil World, with the relocation and transformation of oil rigs from an urban design perspective as its point of departure, using Esbjerg, Denmark, as a case study. Combining a theoretical understanding of places as relational with a design...

  3. Connecting people to place

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a process of preparing a research design on place-shaping, as outcome of a process of co-design between academic actors and non-academic actors in Brazil, South Africa and The Netherlands, taking place in the context of the project TRANSPLACE. The joint research design

  4. Non-Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    formulation. The anthology contains 17 articles engaged directly in the application, retrofitting and broadening of the concept of the non-place to a range of literary and media texts, as well as the merging of this concept to other theoretical concepts by e.g. Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Alain Badiou......We spend more and more of our everyday lives in what Marc Augé calls non-places – homogenous, but bland places of transit. This anthology addresses the representations of non-places in literature, culture and media, and critiques and re-actualizes Augé’s work twenty years after its initial...... Jutland, and many others. This anthology is the seventh publication in the IRGiC series and it springs from a research seminar held at Aalborg University in May 2013: “Non-Place in Literature, Media and Culture”....

  5. Place-Specific Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messeter, Jörn; Johansson, Michael

    project place- specific computing is explored through design oriented research. This article reports six pilot studies where design students have designed concepts for place-specific computing in Berlin (Germany), Cape Town (South Africa), Rome (Italy) and Malmö (Sweden). Background and arguments...... for place-specific computing as a genre of interaction design are described. A total number of 36 design concepts designed for 16 designated zones in the four cities are presented. An analysis of the design concepts is presented indicating potentials, possibilities and problems as directions for future......An increased interest in the notion of place has evolved in interaction design. Proliferation of wireless infrastructure, developments in digital media, and a ‘spatial turn’ in computing provides the base for place-specific computing as a suggested new genre of interaction design. In the REcult...

  6. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department »Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 3 places available Foundations of Electromagnetism and Magnet Design (EMAG) 14-Nov-12 to 27-Nov-12 6 days English 20 places available Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 15 places available Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 7 places available LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places available »Mechanical design Next Se...

  7. Defining Place Attachment in Asian Urban Places through Opportunities for Social Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsidah Ujang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the high intensity of urban dwellers and the growing needs for socialization outdoor, the opportunity for interaction is limited due to the lack of public open spaces. This paper discusses the use of public open spaces in a city of Kuala Lumpur and how it shapes users’ attachment. Field observations and face to face interviews were conducted to examine the opportunities for social activities and pattern of users’ engagement. The findings indicate the incapability of the places to provide multifunctional spaces for diverse interactions while the social attachment to the places is strongly defined by interaction with familiar people in place.

  8. Where is 'place' in Aging in place?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    2015-01-01

    is influenced by universalism, aiming at equality in terms of access to health services and care. However, these welfare provisions seem to be deeply embedded in methodological nationalism, since only citizens with residence within the borders of Denmark have the right to live in public nursing homes or receive......The aim of this article is to contribute a transnational perspective to the field of environmental gerontology and the concept of aging in place. Seniors from the northern hemisphere, among them Danish citizens, are increasingly adapting to transnational lives as they move to warmer climates...... in-home help. It is argued that we should consider public solutions to the problems faced by frail Danish citizens in transnational settings, enhancing their opportunities to live abroad....

  9. Designing for Active Place Presence at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylirisku, Salu; Jylhä, Antti; Lehtiö, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Technological support for augmenting the relationship that people establish with remote places has been studied fairly little as the primary focus in telepresence studies is the connection between people. This paper addresses the design challenge for supporting ‘active place presence’ at home...... to be considered when designing for active place presence at home........ A prototype, Hole in Space, was created to explore the design challenge. A longitudinal study of how an urban couple appropriated the prototype was conducted over the duration of seven months. The paper elaborates on how the Web-mediated design influenced place presence and outlines several aspects that need...

  10. Determining the Climate Calendar of Tourism in Sistan-Baluchestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAHIMEH SHAHRAKI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sistan and Baluchestan Province spans five degrees latitude, with variations in natural phenomena, with cultural and historical resources and beautiful beaches in the south that have a great potential in attracting tourists. To investigate the relationship between climate and tourism, the climate index has been developed so that data are presented showing the individuals’ reactions to climate. The current study chose the tourist major cities of Iran and meteorological data was used to calculate the 20-year period up to 2012. In order to calculate the three climate indices (Predict Mean Vote - PMV, the Physiological Equivalent Temperature - PET and the Standard Effective Temperature - SET, RayMan software was used. These indices were then discussed and the spatial distribution of climatic comfort was represented in GIS environment. The most important national, religious, historical, and natural places in the province were presented and the climate calendar of tourism was identified. The results showed that tourism is concentrated in two periods, hot and cold. The cold period in southern cities such as Chabahar, Konarak and Sarbaz makes them tourist destinations, while the cities of Zahedan, Khash, Zabol, located at higher latitudes, are chosen tourist destination in spring and autumn. Summer has the highest thermal stress in the province.

  11. Calendar aging of a graphite/LiFePO4 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M.; Bernard, J.; Revel, R.; Pélissier, S.; Duclaud, F.; Delacourt, C.

    2012-06-01

    Graphite/LFP commercial cells are stored under 3 different conditions of temperature (30 °C, 45 °C, and 60 °C) and SOC (30%, 65%, and 100%) during up to 8 months. Several non-destructive electrochemical tests are performed at different storage times in order to understand calendar aging phenomena. After storage, all the cells except those stored at 30 °C exhibited capacity fade. The extent of capacity fade strongly increases with storage temperature and to a lesser extent with the state of charge. From in-depth data analysis, cyclable lithium loss was identified as the main source of capacity fade. This loss arises from side reactions taking place at the anode, e.g. solvent decomposition leading to the growth of the solid electrolyte interphase. However, the existence of reversible capacity loss also suggests the presence of side reactions occurring at the cathode, which are less prominent than those at the anode. The analyses do not show any evidence about active-material loss in the electrodes. The cells do not suffer substantial change in internal resistance. According to EIS analysis, the overall impedance increase is 70% or less.

  12. Context in place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie

    specifically argue for a more grounded approach to the conception of context - a topographic approach - in which the physical setting - i.e. 'the place' becomes an inevitable part of analyses of guidance practices in order to understand participants' sense-making processes. In the paper we draw on two case...... studies on interdisciplinary clinical supervision and work place guidance in which there appears to be a mismatch between intended outcomes and actual events. The analyses demonstrate and support that 'the place' seems - to influence partipants' responses in the guidance sessions and, therefore, must...

  13. Astronomical Calendar and Restoration Design of Clepsydra in the Silla era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sam Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We study on the astronomical calendars that was used in the Silla era. The calendars are deduced from the records in Samguksagi. They were influenced from calendaric system of Tang Dynasty, which are Lin duk calendar(?, Ta yen calendar(? and Sun myung calendar(?. We analyse them in detail according to the time and duration of use. Water clock system of Unified Silla was used four water vessels for supplying water. We found the model from documents on ancient water clock that are appeared in the old Korean, Chinese and Japanese historical records. We have assumed the model of Unified Silla clepsydra is similar type with Chinese records during Tang dynasty and with Japanese reconstructed water clock in Temple Asoka. After fluid dynamic experiment, we decide the suitable diameter of supplying pipe and volume of the vessels used in the clepsydra. We introduce the experimental instruments and methods for accomplishing the clock. We designed and reconstructed the water clock of Unified Silla and float rods for measuring time, that is based on the Silla's calendaric system.

  14. Astronomy and calendar reform at the curia of Pope Clement VI: a new source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothaft, C Philipp E

    2017-01-01

    The article introduces a previously unknown fourteenth-century treatise on computus and calendrical astronomy entitled Expositio kalendarii novi, whose author proposed elaborate solutions to the technical flaws inherent in the calendar used by the Roman Church. An analysis of verbal parallels to other contemporary works on the same topic makes it possible to establish that the Expositio was produced in the context of a calendar reform initiative led by Pope Clement VI in 1344/45 and that this anonymous text is probably identical to a 'great and laborious work' on the calendar that the monk Johannes de Termis prepared for the pope around this time. Its author strove to make an original contribution by extracting new astronomical parameters from both ancient and contemporary data, which made him arrive at an estimate of the length of the tropical year that was independent of the then-current Alfonsine Tables. With its suggestion to remove eleven days from the Julian calendar and to correct the calendar through modified leap-year rhythms and periodically adjusted sequences of lunar epacts, the proposal enshrined in the Expositio exhibits some remarkable similarities to the Gregorian reform of the calendar promulgated in 1582. Although its influence on the latter must remain a matter of speculation, the newly discovered text sheds a revealing light on the history of medieval calendar reform debates and on the mathematical sciences practiced at the Avignon court of Clement VI.

  15. Astronomical Calendar and Restoration Design of Clepsydra in the Silla era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sam; Jeong, Jang Hae; Sang, Hyuk Kim; Lee, Yong Bok

    2008-09-01

    We study on the astronomical calendars that was used in the Silla era. The calendars are deduced from the records in Samguksagi. They were influenced from calendaric system of Tang Dynasty, which are Lin duk calendar(?), Ta yen calendar(?) and Sun myung calendar(?). We analyse them in detail according to the time and duration of use. Water clock system of Unified Silla was used four water vessels for supplying water. We found the model from documents on ancient water clock that are appeared in the old Korean, Chinese and Japanese historical records. We have assumed the model of Unified Silla clepsydra is similar type with Chinese records during Tang dynasty and with Japanese reconstructed water clock in Temple Asoka. After fluid dynamic experiment, we decide the suitable diameter of supplying pipe and volume of the vessels used in the clepsydra. We introduce the experimental instruments and methods for accomplishing the clock. We designed and reconstructed the water clock of Unified Silla and float rods for measuring time, that is based on the Silla's calendaric system.

  16. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924)   Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) 06-Dec-12 to 06-Dec-12 1 hour English One more place available Compatibilité électromagnetique (CEM): Applications 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3.5 hours English 3 places available Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM): Introduction 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3 hours English 43 places available Effets des Radiations sur les composants et systèmes électroniques 11-Dec-12 to 12-Dec-12 1 day 4 hours French 9 places available LabVIEW for beginners ...

  17. Planned place of birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Charlotte; Coxon, Kirstie; Stewart, Mary

    Title Planned place of birth: issues of choice, access and equity. Outline In Northern European countries, giving birth is generally safe for healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies, and their babies. However, place of birth can affect women’s outcomes and experiences of birth. Whilst tertiary...... countries, maternity care is provided free to women, through public financing of health care; universal access to care is therefore secured. Nevertheless, different models of care exist, and debates about the appropriateness of providing maternity care in different settings take place in both countries...... in Denmark Coxon K et al: Planned place of birth in England: perceptions of accessing obstetric units, midwife led units and home birth amongst women and their partners. How these papers interrelate These papers draw upon recent research in maternity care, undertaken in Denmark and in England. In both...

  18. History, Criticism and Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinds, Mat; Carter, Adrian; Malpas, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Rory Spence and Richard Leplastrier shared a conversation and friendship that lasted 20years until Spence's death in 2004. The discussions focused largely upon issues of place, distilled through the practice of Leplastrier....

  19. Marine Place Names

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the geographic place names for features in the U.S territorial waters and outer continental shelf. These names can be used to find or define a...

  20. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  1. 'A Place to Sit'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvejsel, Marie Frier; Klok, Julie Skovgaard; Bøhnke, Mia Marker

    Published in 2014 on the occasion of the third 'A Place to Sit' exhibition as a reflection upon three years of teaching tectonic method in architecture using the furniture scale as a learning basis.......Published in 2014 on the occasion of the third 'A Place to Sit' exhibition as a reflection upon three years of teaching tectonic method in architecture using the furniture scale as a learning basis....

  2. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department Electronic Design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 4 places Electrostatique / Protection ESD 28-Sep-12 to 28-Sep-12 3 hours French 25 places Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 14 places Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 9 places LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places LabVIEW for Experts 24-Sep-12 to 28-Sep-12 5 days English 6 places LabVIEW for beginners 15-Oct-12 to 17-...

  3. Calendars and years astronomy and time in the ancient near east

    CERN Document Server

    Steele, John M

    2007-01-01

    Dates form the backbone of written history. But where do these dates come from? Many different calendars were used in the ancient world. Some of these calendars were based upon observations or calculations of regular astronomical phenomena, such as the first sighting of the new moon crescent that defined the beginning of the month in many calendars, while others incorporated schematic simplifications of these phenomena, such as the 360-day year used in early Mesopotamian administrative practices in order to simplify accounting procedures. Historians frequently use handbooks and tables for conv

  4. Get all the official CERN holidays automatically added to your CERN mailbox calendar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Mail Services

    2013-01-01

    A new tool has been created that makes it easy to check the official CERN holidays. These holidays will appear automatically in your calendar. Currently, to check the official CERN holidays, you had to consult either the CERN website or EDH. Now you can see these holidays in your CERN calendar together with absences, meetings and other events. To take advantage of this feature: add yourself as member of the e-group “holidays-to-calendar” here. You can also use this link. Your calendar will be updated the very next day.

  5. ISLAMIC IDENTITY VERSUS CITY/PLACE BRANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alaa Mandour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Is a brand a product, a service, or a company? Is it a logo, a marketing strategy or an attitude? As globalization intensifies, places increasingly compete with other places for attention, influence, markets, investments, businesses, visitors, residents, talent and events. And competition is no longer restricted to the well-known places down the road, over the hill or across the water. Places now compete with cities, regions and countries halfway around the world. Places are increasingly getting caught off guard by unpredicted and apparently rapid shifts in competition and abruptly lose their historic purpose or their competitive edge, be it economic, social or cultural. Culture fills our cities, regions, nations and even our rural landscapes with spiritual content. Our places are an expression of who we are and what we value and they are ruthless in projecting the bad alongside the good. In its widest sense culture includes art, design, education, science, religion and sport. In the context of place branding it is the manifestation of our beliefs, values, customs and behaviors. Merging culture to brand within our city tissue is an essential part of the morphology within its spaces. This paper is trying to discuss the contribution of Islamic culture to a place brand; Relationship between culture and identity, image, visual identity etc. in the context of place branding; Impact of culture on brand equity; Developing cultural brand assets to brand places and how should we value and evaluate culture in the context of place branding?  Also will try to find answers to the following: Do we have a precise understanding of how Islamic culture adds value to or devalues a place? Do we have a methodology for capturing the value of our Islamic culture to places? And, can this culture be developed with the intent to create better places and place brands?   

  6. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-12-31

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its

  7. CERN Technical Training: Open Places for September 2007 Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The following course sessions are scheduled in the framework of the CERN Technical Training Programme 2007. You may find the full Technical Training course program in our web-catalogue (http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300 ) or in next weeks paper bulletin. OFFICE SOFTWARE Introduction to Dreamweaver MX (French): 3.9.-4.9.2007 (2 days, places available) CERN EDMS MTF en pratique (French): 4.9.2007 – 9:00-12:30 (1/2 day, places available) Word 2007 (Short Course III) – How to work with long documents (Bilangue): 14.9.2007 – 14:00-17:30 (1/2 day, places available) Word 2007 Niveau 1 (French): 20.9.-21-9.2007 (2 days, places available) ACCESS 2007 – Level 1: ECDL (English): 20.9.-21.9.2007 – 9:00-17:30 (2 days, places available) Excel 2007 (Short Course I) – How to work with formulae (Bilangue): 21.9.2007 – 14:00-17:30 (1/2 day, places available) CERN EDMS Introduction (English): 24.09.2007 (1 day, places available) Outlook 2007 (Short Course II) – Calendar, Task...

  8. Information system of rice planting calendar based on ten-day (Dasarian) rainfall prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susandi, Armi; Tamamadin, Mamad; Djamal, Erizal; Las, Irsal

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes information system of rice planting calendar to help farmers in determining the time for rice planting. The information includes rainfall prediction in ten days (dasarian) scale overlaid to map of rice field to produce map of rice planting in village level. The rainfall prediction was produced by stochastic modeling using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Non-Linier Least Squares methods to fit the curve of function to the rainfall data. In this research, the Fourier series has been modified become non-linear function to follow the recent characteristics of rainfall that is non stationary. The results have been also validated in 4 steps, including R-Square, RMSE, R-Skill, and comparison with field data. The development of information system (cyber extension) provides information such as rainfall prediction, prediction of the planting time, and interactive space for farmers to respond to the information submitted. Interfaces for interactive response will be critical to the improvement of prediction accuracy of information, both rainfall and planting time. The method used to get this information system includes mapping on rice planting prediction, converting the format file, developing database system, developing website, and posting website. Because of this map was overlaid with the Google map, the map files must be converted to the .kml file format

  9. Information system of rice planting calendar based on ten-day (Dasarian) rainfall prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susandi, Armi, E-mail: armi@meteo.itb.ac.id [Department of Meteorology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Labtek XI Building floor 1, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Tamamadin, Mamad, E-mail: mamadtama@meteo.itb.ac.id [Laboratory of Applied Meteorology, Institut Teknologi Bandung Ged. Labtek XI lt. 1, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Djamal, Erizal, E-mail: erizal-jamal@yahoo.com [Center for Agricultural Technology Transfer Management, Ministry of Agriculture Jl. Salak No. 22 Bogor (Indonesia); Las, Irsal, E-mail: irsallas@yahoo.com [Indonesian Agroclimate and Hydrology Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture Jl. Tentara Pelajar 1a Bogor 16111 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes information system of rice planting calendar to help farmers in determining the time for rice planting. The information includes rainfall prediction in ten days (dasarian) scale overlaid to map of rice field to produce map of rice planting in village level. The rainfall prediction was produced by stochastic modeling using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Non-Linier Least Squares methods to fit the curve of function to the rainfall data. In this research, the Fourier series has been modified become non-linear function to follow the recent characteristics of rainfall that is non stationary. The results have been also validated in 4 steps, including R-Square, RMSE, R-Skill, and comparison with field data. The development of information system (cyber extension) provides information such as rainfall prediction, prediction of the planting time, and interactive space for farmers to respond to the information submitted. Interfaces for interactive response will be critical to the improvement of prediction accuracy of information, both rainfall and planting time. The method used to get this information system includes mapping on rice planting prediction, converting the format file, developing database system, developing website, and posting website. Because of this map was overlaid with the Google map, the map files must be converted to the .kml file format.

  10. Underground Test Area Calendar Year 2014 Annual Sampling Analysis Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents the analytical data for the 2014 fiscal year (FY) and calendar year (CY) (October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014), and an evaluation of the data to ensure that the Sampling Plan’s objectives are met. In addition to samples collected and analyzed for the Sampling Plan, some NNSS wells are monitored by NNSA/NFO to demonstrate compliance with State-issued water discharge permits; with protection of groundwater from ongoing radiological waste disposal activities (compliance wells); and to demonstrate that the onsite drinking water supply is below SDWA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) (public water system [PWS] wells). While not all sampled locations are required by the Sampling Plan, these samples are relevant to its objectives and are therefore presented herein for completeness purposes. Special investigations that took place in 2014 that are relevant to the Sampling Plan are also presented. This is the first annual report released to support Sampling Plan implementation.

  11. Underground Test Area Calendar Year 2014 Annual Sampling Analysis Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnham, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the analytical data for the 2014 fiscal year (FY) and calendar year (CY) (October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014), and an evaluation of the data to ensure that the Sampling Plan's objectives are met. In addition to samples collected and analyzed for the Sampling Plan, some NNSS wells are monitored by NNSA/NFO to demonstrate compliance with State-issued water discharge permits; with protection of groundwater from ongoing radiological waste disposal activities (compliance wells); and to demonstrate that the onsite drinking water supply is below SDWA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) (public water system [PWS] wells). While not all sampled locations are required by the Sampling Plan, these samples are relevant to its objectives and are therefore presented herein for completeness purposes. Special investigations that took place in 2014 that are relevant to the Sampling Plan are also presented. This is the first annual report released to support Sampling Plan implementation.

  12. THE HÑAHÑU CALENDAR. AN EPISTEMIC AND SEMANTIC ANALYSIS TO ESTABLISH ITS STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dämixi Geraldine Patrick-Encina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been carried out within the framework of a larger, deeper study in course, regarding the conception of time-space order of two cultures of otomangue linguistic filiation: the Maya and the Hñahñu-Otomi. Two premises have been considered: first, that both civilizations participated in the structuring of the 260 and the 365-day cycles, and that they perpetuated the cycle of 260 days in a synchronic manner, in spite of their geographic separation; second, that the Nahua culture may have introduced certain changes to the Hñahñu calendar in order to give it a character of its own, and that such changes may have been the slight out-phase of the cycle and the selection of another date for the beginning of the year, which was previous to the Hñahñu start of the year. Then a comparative study between Mexica and Hñahñu year-bearers has been done, using as a calendric support the 260-maya cycle Tzolk’in identified throughout the author‟s research (Patrick, Manuscripts 1-4. Thus, the following aspects have been elucidated: the Hñahñu-otomi year is structured to follow-up the Moon within the time-frame of an oriented solar year; the cycle of 365 days begins on 29th March (Gregorian date; the day that names the year (or year bearer is number 359, that is, the penultimate day of the eighteenth twenty-day-month, called Ambuoendaxi in Huichapan Codex, which corresponds to 22nd March, the Spring Equinox; the tradition to celebrate Hñahñu „New Year‟ on 19th March in Mexico State may be explained in terms of the transcendence of the Julian calendar date; and the closing of 100 Anuixuii (52-year-cycles represented in a 100-bead necklace called thebe, most probably occurred in 2006-2007, in the year 1 Anqua or 1-Rabbit.

  13. Solar buildings program contract summary, calendar year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-07

    The mission of the US Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Program is to advance the development and widespread deployment of competitive solar thermal technologies for use in buildings. The long-term goal of the Program is to combine solar energy technologies with energy-efficient construction techniques and create cost-effective buildings that have a zero net need for fossil fuel energy on an annual basis. The Solar Buildings Program conducts research and development on solar technologies that can deliver heat, light, and hot water to residential and commercial buildings. By working closely with manufacturers in both the buildings and solar energy industries and by supporting research at universities and national laboratories, the Solar Buildings Program brings together the diverse players developing reliable and affordable solar technologies for building applications. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, jointly participate in the Solar Buildings Program. These two national laboratories work closely with industry researching new concepts, developing technology improvements, reducing manufacturing costs, monitoring system performance, promoting quality assurance, and identifying potential new markets. In calendar year 1999, the Solar Buildings Program focused primarily on solar hot water system research and development (R and D), US industry manufacturing assistance, and US market assistance. The Program also completed a number of other projects that were begun in earlier years. This Contract Summary describes the Program's contracted activities that were active during 1999.

  14. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report Calendar Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year (CY) 2007. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (number NEV HW0021), and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO

  15. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report, Calendar Year 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year 2008. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (No. NEV HW0021), and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by NNSA/NSO activities and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO

  16. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report, Calendar Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during calendar year 2009. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit (No. NEV HW0021), and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by NNSA/NSO activities and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by NNSA/NSO.

  17. Improving sexual risk communication with adolescents using event history calendars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn, Kristy K; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L; Felicetti, Irene L; Saftner, Melissa A

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately pre- and post-visit, and at 1 and 3 months, adolescents reported sexual risk behaviors and perceptions about EHC communication on questionnaires and by interview. NPs reported their perceptions of EHCs by questionnaire after the visit and poststudy interview. The EHC approach facilitated communication and adolescent awareness of their risk behaviors. Scores increased on Amount of Communication, t(29) = 8.174, p Communication, t(29) = 3.112, p = .004; Client Involvement in Decision Making, t(29) = 3.901, p = .001, and Client Satisfaction with Interpersonal Style, t(29) = 3.763, p = .001. Adolescents reported decreased sexual intercourse at 1 month, p = .031. School nurses could use the EHC approach to facilitate adolescent communication and tailoring of interventions.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  19. Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FR-EEMAN, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gomez, J. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moos, L. P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  1. Sequim Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Gervais, Todd L.

    2013-04-01

    This report is prepared to document compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and ashington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. This report meets the calendar year 2012 Sequim Site annual reporting requirement for its operations as a privately-owned facility as well as its federally-contracted status that began in October 2012. Compliance is indicated by comparing the estimated dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) with the 10 mrem/yr Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard. The MSL contains only sources classified as fugitive emissions. Despite the fact that the regulations are intended for application to point source emissions, fugitive emissions are included with regard to complying with the EPA standard. The dose to the Sequim Site MEI due to routine operations in 2012 was 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv). No non-routine emissions occurred in 2012. The MSL is in compliance with the federal and state 10 mrem/yr standard.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH/QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  6. Issues Using the Life History Calendar in Disability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tiffany N.; Harrison, Tracie

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall, there is a dearth of research reporting mixed-method data collection procedures using the LHC within disability research. Objective This report provides practical knowledge on use of the life history calendar (LHC) from the perspective of a mixed-method life history study of mobility impairment situated within a qualitative paradigm. Methods In this paper the method related literature referring to the LHC was reviewed along with its epistemological underpinnings. Further, the uses of the LHC in disability research were illustrated using preliminary data from reports of disablement in Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White women with permanent mobility impairment. Results From our perspective, the LHC was most useful when approached from an interpretive paradigm when gathering data from women of varied ethnic and socioeconomic strata. While we found the LHC the most useful tool currently available for studying disablement over the life course, there were challenges associated with its use. The LHC required extensive interviewer training. In addition, large segments of time were needed for completion depending on the type of participant responses. Conclusions Researchers planning to conduct a disability study may find our experience using the LHC valuable for anticipating issues that may arise when the LHC is used in mixed-method research. PMID:22014674

  7. (Re)tasting places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    What does geographical origin mean? It is an expression that associates food and wine with a specific place, an association embedded in the concept ‘terroir’ that refers to the complex interaction between a physical environment and local craftsmanship. It is a claim protected through labelling......-schemes and a claim that adds value to the place-related foods. However, viewing the connection between food and place as a question of proving a relationship or as a matter of protecting commercial claims does not seem to provide a satisfactory account for the status of geographically designated foods as being...... particularly attractive Central to the interest of this paper is to approach an understanding of geographical origin as a point of reference for taste. In terms of being sensory experience, taste is subjective. It is difficult to describe verbally and yet at the same time it is a trigger of the memory of past...

  8. Brand new authentic places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    the relation and interplay between the two. This study strives to fill this gap by ethnographically tracing the process from design to occupancy including the role of branding as a means to create authenticity. The concept of authenticity is often associated with old houses and neighbourhoods, but also in new......How are places and material surroundings ascribed with meaning when new residential neighbourhoods are designed, branded and taken into use? Existing research on housing, neighbourhoods and urban design tends to take the perspective of either the architect or the user rather than to explore...... neighbourhoods stories of authenticity seems to be of great importance giving value and identity to place and people. By way of design and branding new places are implied with notions of the real, the original and the unique referring to e.g. its historical past, architectural uniqueness, sustainability or sense...

  9. Stress at Work Place

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad A. Shahrour

    2010-01-01

    One of hardest forms of stresses to avoid is that work place or job stress Job stress refers to stress experienced by an individual at or because of issues at their work place The term work related stress has many meanings and it causes different levels of anxiety. Not all challenges at work can be called stress as some of these challenges drive employees upward, and empower them to learn new skills or push them to work harder to achieve a certain goal. So, this type of challenges cannot be c...

  10. Ageing in communal place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke; Grönvall, Erik

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we adopt the position that design of social media for the elderly and virtual senior communities may be informed by studying `real´senior communities. Since current research efforts target the role of social media and virtual communities for supporting seniors ageing in place, i.......e. in their homes, housing communities seems a natural place to begin this enquiry. We conducted observations and informal interviews in six different senior dwellings. In this paper we present the key findings from these visits related to social interaction and the formation of communities and explicate how...

  11. Tactile modulation of hippocampal place fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gener, Thomas; Perez-Mendez, Lorena; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V

    2013-12-01

    Neural correlates of spatial representation can be found in the activity of the hippocampal place cells. These neurons are characterized by firing whenever the animal is located in a particular area of the space, the place field. Place fields are modulated by sensory cues, such as visual, auditory, or olfactory cues, being the influence of visual inputs the most thoroughly studied. Tactile information gathered by the whiskers has a prominent representation in the rat cerebral cortex. However, the influence of whisker-detected tactile cues on place fields remains an open question. Here we studied place fields in an enriched tactile environment where the remaining sensory cues were occluded. First, place cells were recorded before and after blockade of tactile transmission by means of lidocaine applied on the whisker pad. Following tactile deprivation, the majority of place cells decreased their firing rate and their place fields expanded. We next rotated the tactile cues and 90% of place fields rotated with them. Our results demonstrate that tactile information is integrated into place cells at least in a tactile-enriched arena and when other sensory cues are not available. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Use of board games, historical calendars, and trading cards in a history of psychology class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Charles I; Burke-Bergmann, Amanda L; Nolf, Sondra L; Swift, Kristen

    2009-04-01

    This article describes three activities for students created for a history of psychology course: various board games, trading cards, and calendars. Data are provided on their effectiveness. Suggestions for incorporating the activities are described.

  13. Head of all years astronomy and calendars at Qumran in their ancient context

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Dov, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Covering a wide array of sources from ancient Mesopotamia to the Dead Sea Scrolls, this volume offers a different perspective on Jewish apocalyptic time-reckoning during the Second Temple period, based on a calendar year of 364 days.

  14. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-04-01

    This post-closure inspection report provides documentation of the semiannual inspection activities, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for calendar year 2003 for eight corrective action units located on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

  15. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-01

    This post-closure inspection report includes the results of inspections, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for Calendar Year 2005 for nine Corrective Action Units located on the Tonopah Test Range , Nevada.

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project for CY 2004

  17. Google Calendar Enhances Prospective Memory in Alzheimer's Disease: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Gallouj, Karim; Antoine, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether an external memory aid (i.e., Google Calendar) would alleviate prospective memory compromise in a patient with mild Alzheimer's disease. The patient was asked in the baseline phase to perform three prospective targeted events (e.g., attending her weekly bridge game at the community club) and three prospective control events (e.g., buying her weekly magazine). The same six prospective events were assessed in the intervention phase but the targeted-events were cued by Google Calendar while the control-events were not. Results showed less omission of the targeted events in the training phase than in the baseline phase, suggesting a positive effect of Google Calendar. This case report offers a unique view into how smartphone calendars may alleviate prospective memory compromise in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

    2006-09-28

    This small booklet provides highlights of the environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during 2005. It is a summary of the information contained in the larger report: Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring for Calendar Year 2005.

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2005-09-30

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project for CY 2004.

  20. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Tilden, Harold T.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Stegen, Amanda; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Moon, Thomas W.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Opitz, Brian E.

    2012-09-01

    The PNNL Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting" to provide a synopsis of calendar year 2011 information related to environmental management performance and compliance efforts. It summarizes site compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, policies, directives, permits, and orders and environmental management performance.

  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Fritz, Brad G.; Tilden, Harold T.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Stegen, Amanda; Moon, Thomas W.; Becker, James M.; Raney, Elizabeth A.; Chamness, Michele A.; Mendez, Keith M.

    2013-09-01

    The PNNL Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012 was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting" to provide a synopsis of calendar year 2012 information related to environmental management performance and compliance efforts. It summarizes site compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, policies, directives, permits, and orders and environmental management performance.

  2. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 16.5.2006 (May-November course sessions) Technical Training: Places available The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 8.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls 32 30.05-2.06.06 E ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 24 7-9.06.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 13-14.06.06 F CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 13-14.06.06 E LabVIEW Base 2 32 27.06-5.07.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-...

  3. The Value of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate…

  4. The power of place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Lin R; Gibb, Heather J

    2003-06-01

    to describe the power that 'place' holds over the postnatal-care experiences of women. a study informed by phenomenology within a feminist framework was undertaken to examine the experiences of women electing early postnatal discharge. Three extended conversations with each woman participating in the study were audiotaped and transcribed. Journal notes made by the researcher added to the audiotaped data. Thematic analysis revealed major structures of experience. data were obtained from conversations with women in their respective homes. five women, parity 1-3, living in the Sydney metropolitan area and birthing in their local hospitals participated in the study. four major constructs of experience were revealed through analysis and include spatiality, corporeality, temporality and relationality. In this paper, components of spatiality expressed through the power place exerts in matters of physical environment,control, confidence, safety, time, talk and the heart of the matter are presented. the experiences of women entering the foreign place of hospital to birth their children were those of alienation and disempowerment while the familiar territory of home offered stronger feelings of security and support. failing to recognise the impact of place on the experiences of postnatal women reduces the likelihood that midwives will be able to offer sensitive and appropriate care.

  5. Ageing in Communal Place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke; Grönvall, Erik

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we adopt the position that design of social media for the elderly and virtual senior communities may be informed by studying ‘real’ senior communities. Since current research efforts target the role of social media and virtual communities for supporting seniors ageing in place, i...

  6. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    * Etant donné le délai d'impression du Bulletin, ces places peuvent ne plus être disponibles au moment de sa parution. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour avoir la dernière mise à jour. ** The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Des places sont disponibles dans les cours suivants : Places are available in the following courses: Hands-on Introduction to Python Programming 12 – 14.11.03 (3 days) ACCESS 2000 – niveau 1 13 & 14.11.03 (2 jours) C++ for Particle Physicists 17 – 21.11.03 (6 x 3-hour lectures) Programmation automate Schneider TSX Premium – niveau 2  18 – 21.11.03 (4 jours) Planification de projet avec MS-Project/Project Planning with MS-Project (gratuit/free of charge – langue à définir/language to be defined) : 18 & 25.11.03 (2 jours/2 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition – Part 1 : WEB...

  7. GSTAR-SUR Modeling With Calendar Variations And Intervention To Forecast Outflow Of Currencies In Java Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M. S.; Setiawan; Suhartono; Ruchjana, B. N.; Riyadi, M. A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) is general method to estimates Generalized Space Time Autoregressive (GSTAR) parameters. But in some cases, the residuals of GSTAR are correlated between location. If OLS is applied to this case, then the estimators are inefficient. Generalized Least Squares (GLS) is a method used in Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR) model. This method estimated parameters of some models with residuals between equations are correlated. Simulation study shows that GSTAR with GLS method for estimating parameters (GSTAR-SUR) is more efficient than GSTAR-OLS method. The purpose of this research is to apply GSTAR-SUR with calendar variation and intervention as exogenous variable (GSTARX-SUR) for forecast outflow of currency in Java, Indonesia. As a result, GSTARX-SUR provides better performance than GSTARX-OLS.

  8. The Characters of Leap Years in Qing Calendars (1644-1911)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dalong

    In Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) three different calendars had been put into use which titles are Xiyang Xinfa Lishu (Treatise on Astronomy and Calendrical Science according to the New Method in West 1645-1666) Yuzhi Lixiang Kaocheng (Compendium of Calendrical Science and Astronomy compiled by Imperial Order 1725-1742) and Yuzhi Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian (Sequel Compendium of Calendrical Science and Astronomy compiled by Imperial Order 1742-1911). The characters of leap years in the three calendars are different for the last one which is selected the year of 1723 as it epoch and named as Guimao Yuan Li. This calendar is based on the 33-year pattern of leap years (there is a rather exact accord between days and years over this interval with eight days being intercalated per 33 years) and is slightly different from the former two calendars. Therefore the calendars of Qing Dynasty complied by Western Jesuits and Chinese astronomers can be regarded as the remarkable achievements in the history of calendar in the world.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA Report for Calendar Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, S.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1993 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes information regarding whole-body exposures to radiation, and skin contaminations. The collective whole-body radiation dose to employees during 1993 was 0.58 person-sievert (58 person-rem). This dose was 11 percent lower than the projected dose of 0.65 person-sievert (65 person-rem). The Radiation Protection Section's Field Dosimetry Services group projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 0.02 sievert (2 rem) based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the limit by the end of CY 1993. There were 15 reported cases of skin contamination for PNL employees during 1993. This number of 60 percent of the projected total of 25 cases. There were an additional 21 cases of personal-effects contamination to PNL staff: Nine of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building, nine occurred at the 325 Building, one occurred in the 327 Building, one occurred in the 3720 Building, and one occurred in the 326 Building. Line management set numerous challenging and production ALARA goals for their facilities. Appendix A describes the final status of the 1993 ALARA goals. Appendix B describes the radiological ALARA goals for 1994. The Radiation Protection Section of the Laboratory Safety Dept. routinely perform audits of radiological ALARA requirements for specific facilities with significant potential for exposure. These ALARA audits are part of a comprehensive safety audit of the facility, designed to evaluate and improve total safety performance

  10. Weldon Spring Site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations from environmental monitoring program. In 1993, the maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the chemical plant site perimeter was 0.03 mrem (0.0003 mSv). The maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the boundary of the Weldon Spring Quarry was 1.9 mrem (0.019 mSv). These scenarios assume an individual walking along the perimeter of the site-once a day at the chemical plant/raffinate pits and twice a day at the quarry-250 days per year. This hypothetical individual also consumes fish, sediment, and water from lakes and other bodies of water in the area. The collective dose, based on an effected population of 112,000 was 0.12 person-rem (0.0012 person-Sv). This calculation is based on recreational use of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and the Missouri Department of Conservation recreational trail (the Katy Trail) near the quarry. These estimates are below the U.S. Department of Energy requirement of 100 mrem (I mSv) annual committed effective dose equivalent for all exposure pathways. Results from air monitoring for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) program indicated that the estimated dose was 0.38 mrem, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 mrem per year

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory ALARA report for Calendar Year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, S.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides summary results of the Calendar Year (CY) 1994 As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) Program performance at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report includes data regarding performance in the area of personnel exposures to radiation, skin contaminations, control of contaminated areas, minimization of radioactive waste, and control of radioactive releases. In CY 1994: (1) The collective total effective dose equivalent to PNL employees during 1994 was 55 person-rem. The Field Dosimetry Services of the Radiological Control Department, Technical Support Section, projected that no PNL employee's dose would exceed 2 rem based on dosimeters processed during the year; no worker actually exceeded the projection-by the end of CY 1994. The maximum dose to any individual was 1.11 rem. (2) There were 34 instances of skin and personal-clothing contamination events for PNL employees during 1994. Eighteen of these contamination events occurred at the 324 Building; eleven occurred at the 325 Building; two occurred in the 327 Building; one occurred in the 326 Building; one occurred in the 3708 Building; and one occurred in the RTL Building. (3) PNL facilities contained 12 Airborne Radioactivity Areas, and 60 Contamination Areas and High Contamination Areas. The area of the Airborne Radioactivity Areas was 383 m 2 (4125 ft 2 ). The area of the Contamination Areas was 5290 m 2 (56,947 ft 2 ). The area of the High Contamination Areas was 266 m 2 (2863 ft 2 ). (4) PNL disposed of 10.5 m 3 (371 ft 3 ) of compacted low level waste. Also disposed was 423 m 3 (14,949 ft 3 ) of noncompacted low level and mixed waste that was not subject to volume reduction. The total radioactivity of the disposed waste was 1217 Ci. (5) PNL facilities released 165.2 Ci of noble gas, 3.0E-5 Ci of airborne particulate radioactive material, and 12.2 Ci of tritium to the environment

  12. Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This report for Calendar Year 1994 has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The chemical plant, raffinate pits, and quarry are located on Missouri State Route 94, southwest of US Route 40/61. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site, estimates of effluent releases, and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Additionally, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1994 to support environmental protection programs are discussed. Dose estimates presented in this report are based on hypothetical exposure scenarios of public use of areas near the site. In addition, release estimates have been calculated on the basis of 1994 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and air monitoring data. Effluent discharges from the site under routine NPDES and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) monitoring were below permitted levels

  13. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available in the following courses: The Joint PVSS JCOP Framework: 14 - 18.6.2004 (5 days) EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : 17 & 18.6.2004 (2 jours) MAGNE-04 : Magnétisme pour l'électrotechnique : 6 au 8.7.2004 (3 jours) Technical Training Monique Duval - Tel.74924 technical.training@cern.ch

  14. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 30.5.2006 (June-November course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 6.06.06 F Introduction à InDesign 16 7-8.06.06 F Python: Hands-on Introduction 24 7-9.06.06 E LabVIEW Base 2 16 22-23.06.06 F FileMaker - niveau 1 16 26-27.06.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-30.06.06 F Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E Introduction à Dreamweaver MX 16 ...

  15. Technical training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 13.6.2006 (June-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue LabVIEW Base 2 16 22-23.06.06 F FileMaker - niveau 1 16 26-27.06.06 F C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (Standard Template Library) 16 27-28.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 4 - Exceptions 8 29.06.06 E FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 29-30.06.06 F Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E Introduction à Dreamweaver MX 16 26-27.07.06 F ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 20...

  16. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 9.5.2006 (May-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: find out the curren Hours Date Language LabVIEW Application Development 24 15-17.05.06 E LabVIEW Advanced Programming 16 18-19.05.06 E PERL 5: Advanced Aspects 8 18.05.06 E Technique du vide 16 18-19.05.06 F FileMaker - niveau 2 16 11-12.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 F Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE 16 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls 32 30.05-2.06.06 E Python: Hands-on Introduction 24 7-9.06.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 13-14.06.06 F CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 13-14.06.06...

  17. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 27.6.2006 (July-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue Manipulation des images 4 6.07.06 F Introduction to Databases and Database Design 16 11-12.07.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 1: ECDL 16 13-14.07.06 E-F Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F CERN EDMS - Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 12-13.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 14-21.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 2 ...

  18. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 11.7.2006 (July-December course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Titre Heure Date Langue Design Patterns 16 25-26.07.06 E CERN EDMS for Local Administrators 16 1-2.08.06 E ANSYS DesignModeler 16 29-30.08.06 F CERN EDMS – Introduction 8 5.09.06 E CERN EDMS MTF en pratique 4 6.09.06 F LabVIEW Basics 1 24 4-6.09.06 E ANSYS Workbench 32 12-15.09.06 F AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 12-13.09.06 F CERN EDMS for Engineers 8 12.09.06 E Software Engineering in the Small and the Large 16 12-13.09.06 E LabVIEW Basics 2 16 14-15.09.06 E LabVIEW: Working efficiently with LabWIEW 8 8 18.09.06 E PCAD Schémas ? Introduction 16 21-22.09.06 F PCAD PCB - Introduction  24 27-29.09.06 F C++ for Particle Physicists ...

  19. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 21.3.2006 (March-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: find out the curren Hours Date Language ACROBAT 7.0 : Utilisation de fichiers PDF 8 8.05.06 F Project Planning with MS-Project 16 9.05-6.06.06 E STEP7: niveau 1 32 9-12.05.06 E-F Oracle: Programming with PL/SQL 24 10-12.05.06 E FileMaker - niveau 2 16 11-12.05.06 F LabVIEW Application Development 24 15-17.05.06 E LabVIEW Advanced Programming 16 18-19.05.06 E PERL 5: Advanced Aspects 8 18.05.06 E Technique du vide 16 18-19.05.06 F WORD 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL 16 22-23.05.06 F Introduction au VHDL et utilisation du simulateur NCVHDL de CADENCE 16 23-24.05.06 F Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 40 29.05-2.06.06 E C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its T...

  20. Technical Training: Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2006-01-01

    Places available as of 21.3.2006 (March-October course sessions) The number of places available may vary. Please check our Web site to find out the current availability. Places are available on the following courses: Title Hours Date Language FrontPage 2003 - niveau 1 16 27-28.03.06 F Oracle Forms Developer 10g: Move to the Web 16 27-28.03.06 E ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL AM5 16 3-4.03.06 E-F JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications 16 3-4.04.06 E JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans 24 5-7.04.06 E AutoCAD Mechanical 2006 16 11-12.04.06 F FrontPage 2003 - niveau 2 16 24-25.04.06 F C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming 24 25-27.04.06 E AutoCAD 2006 - niveau 1 32 27.04-4.05.06 F Oracle: SQL 24 3-5.05.06 E EXCEL 2003 (Short Course I) - HowTo... Work with formulae 3 4.05.06 (am) E-F EXCEL 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Format your worksheet for printing 3 4...