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Sample records for space cambridge university

  1. International Commercial Contracts, by Giuditta Cordero Moss. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Review of: Giuditta Cordero Moss, International Commercial Contracts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. XV + 329 pages. ISBN: 9781107684713......Review of: Giuditta Cordero Moss, International Commercial Contracts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. XV + 329 pages. ISBN: 9781107684713...

  2. Trial access to Cambridge University Press ebooks

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    From 1 August till 31 October, CERN users are invited to enjoy a trial access to all Cambridge University Press electronic books: http://ebooks.cambridge.org/. Please don't hesitate to send feedback to library.desk@cern.ch.

  3. 8th Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, Jonathan; Heylighen, Ann; Dong, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the 8th Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology (CWUAAT '14), incorporating the 11th Cambridge Workshop on Rehabilitation Robotics, held in Cambridge, England in March 2016. It presents novel and state-of-the-art research from an international group of leaders in the fields of universal access and assistive technology. It explores various issues including the reconciliation of usability, accessibility and inclusive design, the design of inclusive assistive and rehabilitation systems, measuring product demand and human capabilities, data mining and visualizing inclusion, legislation in inclusive design, and situational inclusive interfaces (automotive and aerospace). This book provides an invaluable resource to researchers, postgraduates, design practitioners, therapists and clinical practitioners, as well as design teachers.

  4. The Cambridge encyclopedia of space (revised edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Allest, Frederic; Arets, Jean; Baker, Phillip J.; Balmino, Georges; Barth, Hans; Benson, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive and intensively illustrated development history is presented for spaceflight, ranging over its basic concepts' speculative and fictional origins, the historical roots of rocket-related technologies, and the scientific accomplishments of earth orbit and interplanetary missions to date. Attention is given to propulsion systems, spaceflight launch centers, satellite systems, and solar system exploration by the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Current space-related activities encompass the meteorology, remote sensing, telecommunications and direct broadcasting, and navigation functions of unmanned satellites, as well as such manned spacecraft roles as medical and materials science research. The military uses of space, and increasingly important space industrialization concepts, are discussed as well.

  5. University of Cambridge deploys Procket Networks' PRO/8801

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Procket Networks, a provider of high performance Internet Protocol (IP) technology and products has announced that the University of Cambridge has deployed the PRO/8801(TM) router into its research network to develop industry-leading deep packet inspection applications. The major application for this deployment is to identify and understand new traffic patterns created by large scale scientific computations and downloads such as the GRID (1 page).

  6. Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Baruchello

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

  7. 7th Cambridge Workshops on Universal Access and Assistive Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, J; Heylighen, A; Dong, H; Inclusive Designing : Joining Usability, Accessibility, and Inclusion

    2014-01-01

    ‘Inclusive Designing’ presents the proceedings of the seventh Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology (CWUAAT '14). It represents a unique multi-disciplinary workshop for the Inclusive Design Research community where designers, computer scientists, engineers, architects, ergonomists, policymakers and user communities can exchange ideas. The research presented at CWUAAT '14 develops methods, technologies, tools and guidance that support product designers and architects to design for the widest possible population for a given range of capabilities, within a contemporary social and economic context. In the context of developing demographic changes leading to greater numbers of older people and people with disabilities, the general field of Inclusive Design Research strives to relate the capabilities of the population to the design of products. Inclusive populations of older people contain a greater variation in sensory, cognitive and physical user capabilities. These variations may be...

  8. Cambridge Illustrated History of Archaeology, edited by Paul G. Bahn, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1996

    OpenAIRE

    Givens, Douglas R.

    1997-01-01

    The Cambridge Illustrated History of Archaeology is another in a series of volumes devoted to the history of archaeology that have appeared in recent time. Paul Bahn, the editor of the volume, has broken down his coverage of the history of worldwide archaeology into the following arrangement 'The Archaeology of Archaeology", "Old Worlds and New, 1500-1760", "Antiquarians and Explorers, 1760-1820", "Science and Romantic...

  9. Assessing the Impact of Arts and Humanities Research at the University of Cambridge. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Ruth; Celia, Claire; Diepeveen, Stephanie; Chonaill, Siobhan Ni; Rabinovich, Lila; Tiessen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This project for the University of Cambridge and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) assesses the impacts of arts and humanities research at the University of Cambridge. Evidence from interviews, a survey of research staff and detailed case studies indicates that these disciplines already have a broad range of impacts. Many of these…

  10. Cambridge Illustrated History of Archaeology, edited by Paul G. Bahn, Cambridge University Press, New York, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Givens

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cambridge Illustrated History of Archaeology is another in a series of volumes devoted to the history of archaeology that have appeared in recent time. Paul Bahn, the editor of the volume, has broken down his coverage of the history of worldwide archaeology into the following arrangement 'The Archaeology of Archaeology", "Old Worlds and New, 1500-1760", "Antiquarians and Explorers, 1760-1820", "Science and Romanticism, 1820-1860", "The Search for Human Origins, 1860-1920", "Archaeology Comes of Age, 1920-1960", "New Techniques and Competing Philosophies, 1960-1990",and "Current Controversies and Future Trends". Bahn's volume explores many of the major developments in archaeological practice from both in the classical world and was as from the practice of archaeology in the Americas. The volume even gives the reader a glimpse into the origins and growth of archaeology in New Zealand. Of particular interest is coverage of the history of early archaeological efforts having to do with early studies of human origins.

  11. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball L

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1 the approach to medical nutrition education, 2 evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3 areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the

  12. The Target of the Question: A Taxonomy of Textual Features for Cambridge University "O" Levels English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Shanti Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the typical textual features that are most frequently targeted in short-answer reading comprehension questions of the Cambridge University "O" Level English Paper 2. Test writers' awareness of how textual features impact on understanding of meanings in text decisions will determine to great extent their decisions…

  13. Cambridge observations at 38-115 MHz and their implications for space astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, R.

    1987-01-01

    The design and performance of the Cambridge LF telescopes are reviewed. Consideration is given to the 151-MHz 6C telescope, the 38-MHz and 151-MHz LF synthesis telescopes, 81.5-MHz interplanetary scintillation observations with the 3.6-hectare array, long-baseline interferometry at 81.5 MHz, and the use of the Jodrell Bank MERLIN for 151-MHz closure-phase observations of bright sources. The strict limitation on the field mappable at a given resolution in ground-based observations at these frequencies is pointed out, and some outstanding astronomical problems requiring 0.3-30-MHz space observations are listed. 7 references

  14. Mime, Music and Drama on the Eighteenth-Century Stage. The Ballet d'Action. Edward Nye, Cambridge-New York, Cambridge University Press, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Onesti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mime, Music and Drama on the Eighteenth-Century Stage by Edward Nye (Cambridge University Press, 2011 has the merit of inspiring a strong reflection on ballet d'action, connected with cultural, literaturary and philosophic environment of Eighteenth century. The author, with brilliant insight and careful historical research, explores the most debated issues of the new genre, providing an unusual interpretation. The review traces the focal points and the structure of the book, developing further consideration of some of the most challenging aspects offered by the text.

  15. John Howard Marsden (1803–1891 First Disney Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge 1851–1865

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Leach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Although there were ten chairs of archaeology at universities in Germany, and one in France, by the mid-nineteenth century, in Great Britain it was the amateur societies and museums (the British Museum in particular that encouraged the study of this subject. In 1851 John Disney established the first university chair in Great Britain at Cambridge University. His proposal was initially received with considerable caution by the governing body of the university, and was only accepted by the narrowest margin of eight votes to seven. His agreement with the University of Cambridge stipulated that six lectures a year should be given on the subject of ‘Classical, Medieval, and other Antiquities, the Fine Arts and all matters and things connected therewith’ (Clark 1904, 222–225. However university archaeology was slow to establish its academic credibility nationally, and it was more than thirty years before Oxford University established its chair of classical archaeology. The Cambridge Board of Anthropological Studies, which included instruction in prehistoric archaeology, was not created until 1915, and as late as 1945 there were still only a few university lecturers in archaeology in Great Britain. It was not until 1946 that Oxford University appointed a Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology (Wilson 2002, 153; Daniel 1976, 6–12; Smith 2004, 4–5, 53–54.

  16. BOOK REVIEW - The Experience of Face Veil Wearers in Europe and the Law (Cambridge University Press United Kingdom 2014. ISBN 978-1-107-05830-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques L Matthee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution published by Cambridge University Press provides a short overview of the book by Eva Brems "The Experience of Face Veil Wearers in Europe and the Law" published by Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, in 2014. See ISBN 978-1-107-05830-9.

  17. Minimal exposure technique in the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, J.R.; Cleaver, J.R.A.; Smith, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation damage due to the incident electron beam imposes a fundamental limitation on the information obtainable by electron microscopy about organic materials; it is desirable therefore that exposure of the specimen to the electron beam should be restricted to the actual period during which the image is being recorded. A description is given of methods employed in the observation of the organic aromatic hydrocarbons quaterrylene, ovalene and coronene with the Cambridge University 600kV high resolution electron microscope (HREM). In particular, the condenser-objective mode of operation of this microscope lends itself to the use of an area-defining aperture below the second condenser lens conjugate with the specimen. Furthermore, operation at the higher accelerating voltage of this instrument could be anticipated to reduce the rate of damage, depending on the dominant beam-specimen interaction, whilst the increased width of the first broad band of the contrast transfer function of this microscope at the optimum defocus may overcome the reported resolution limitation of current 100kV microscopes for the observation of related materials. (author)

  18. A Workshop on Environmental Technology Assessment Held at the University of Cambridge, England Held on 24-26 April, 1985,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    for Air Pollutants J J Stukel Economic Issues in the Control of Air Pollution I M Torrens Theme 2 Water Treatment Megatrends in Water Treatment...Hahn Waste Water Treatment by Fixed Films in Biological Aerated Filters J Sibony Theme 4 Hazardous and Toxic Waste Management Technologies for...TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS -c -e ne>±- a- University of Cambridge, England April 24-26, 1985 MEGATRENDS IN NATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES F’. Fiessinaer, J

  19. The International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded on the premise that any major space program in the future would require international cooperation as a necessary first step toward its successful completion. ISU is devoted to being a leading center for educating future authorities in the world space industry. ISU's background, goals, current form, and future plans are described. The results and benefits of the type of education and experience gained from ISU include technical reports describing the design projects undertaken by the students, an exposure to the many different disciplines which are a part of a large space project, an awareness of the existing activities from around the world in the space community, and an international professional network which spans all aspects of space activities and covers the globe.

  20. Cambridge Analytica

    OpenAIRE

    ANTOR Md Ahsan Habib

    2018-01-01

    10 mintures presentation slides for Cambridge Analytica...... You will get a glimpse idea about the biggest data scandal of 2018. If your are preparing for IT security presentation , I believe this would help you to understand about the basic idea & reason of the CA.

  1. Address by William J. Bennett, United States Secretary of Education. (Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William J.

    The extent to which U.S. colleges and universities contribute to the fulfillment of students' lives is discussed by Secretary of Education William Bennett in an address to Harvard University. Secretary Bennett's observations are based on his experiences as a law student, freshman proctor, and tutor at Harvard University, as well as his subsequent…

  2. Preparing future space leaders - International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Barbara A.; Van Reeth, George P.

    1992-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) concept of developing a cadre of space professionals that will lead the universities and industries into space is discussed. ISU is an innovative, permanent worldwide organization for training and academic instruction in all aspects of space studies. ISU's major goal is to provide the young professional academic instruction in technical and nontechnical areas of modern space exploration and research, and a forum to exchange ideas and develop both personal and professional ties at an international level.

  3. Neuwirth RJ, Svetlicinii A and De Castro Halis D (eds) The BRICS-Lawyers' Guide to Global Cooperation (Cambridge University Press 2017)

    OpenAIRE

    Sucker, F

    2018-01-01

    This contribution reviews the book The BRICS-Lawyers' Guide to Global Cooperation edited by Rostam J Neuwirth, Alexandr Svetlicinii and Denis De Castro Halis. It was published by Cambridge University Press in 2017, and deals with aspects of international trade and development involving the BRICS area -Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. It is described as a unique reference book for academics, governmental officials, legal professionals, business executives, researchers and students.

  4. Clark and Prehistory at Cambridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Jane Smith

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available If honours and titles give measure of a man, then Professor Sir Grahame Clark was indeed important. Faculty Assistant Lecturer in the Faculty of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University from 1935-46, University Lecturer 1946-52, Disney Professor of Archaeology 1952-74, Head of the Department of Archaeol­ogy and Anthropology 1956-61 and 1968-71, Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge 1950-73, Master of Peterhouse 1973-80, he was a visiting lecturer at diverse universities; appointed CBE in 1971, he received many awards includ­ing the prestigious Erasmus Prize for 1990, presented by Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, for his "long and inspiring devotion to prehistory" (Scarre 1991:10; and in June 1992, he was knighted. Yet well before fame and position were rewards, Clark made major contributions to the establishment of prehis­tory as an academic subject at Cambridge University. Cambridge was the first and, for many years, only British university granting an undergraduate degree which offered prehistory as a specialization. "The development of postgraduate research in prehistoric archaeology at Cambridge had to wait on the provision of undergraduate teaching;' Clark (1989b: 6 recently observed. The "faculty was the only one in Britain producing a flow of graduates in prehistoric archaeology" (Clark 1989a: 53.

  5. Study of university students' attitudes toward office space at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Eteadifard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Office space is the space where students first experience the university. In this paper, the attitude of students toward office space in the public sphere of university is discussed. This article is the result of the research conducted for the “Institute for Social and Cultural Studies” by the author. The main issues in this paper are: university students' attitudes towards quality office space at the universities and mental basis of common issues among students at the universities. Data were collected through individual and group interviews. More than eighty interviews with activists and students of University of Tehran, Shahid Beheshti University, Allameh Tabataba’i University, Sharif University of Technology and Kharazmi University were done. The main indicators of office space in this study include: students’ satisfaction of office space, students’ welfare affairs and students’ feedback about this space. Problems and obstacles relating to the office space and their solutions were also studied in this paper.

  6. An investigation into the impact of question structure on the performance of first year physics undergraduate students at the University of Cambridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie; Jardine-Wright, Lisa; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    We describe a study of the impact of exam question structure on the performance of first year Natural Sciences physics undergraduates from the University of Cambridge. The results show conclusively that a student’s performance improves when questions are scaffolded compared with university style questions. In a group of 77 female students we observe that the average exam mark increases by 13.4% for scaffolded questions, which corresponds to a 4.9 standard deviation effect. The equivalent observation for 236 male students is 9% (5.5 standard deviations). We also observe a correlation between exam performance and A2-level marks for UK students, and that students who receive their school education overseas, in a mixed gender environment, or at an independent school are more likely to receive a first class mark in the exam. These results suggest a mis-match between the problem-solving skills and assessment procedures between school and first year university and will provide key input into the future teaching and assessment of first year undergraduate physics students.

  7. Metamorphoses of Visualisation: Experiences of Interpreting Stained-Glass Artworks of Anglican Emmanuel College Chapel of Cambridge University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronova, Lidia V.; Chugunova, Tatiana G.; Khazina, Anna V.; Babayeva, Anastasiya V.; Shmeleva, Natalia V.

    2016-01-01

    This research was caused by an accidental discovery of a photo reproduction of one unknown in Russia masterpiece of British stained glass art of the Victorian age found on open spaces of the Internet: a full-height portrait of John Colet, a famous member of clergy of the pre-reform period, Erasmus' and Thomas More's friend and mentor. Exquisite…

  8. The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    2003-10-01

    The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System provides a comprehensive, funamental, and up-to-date description of the solar system. It is written in a concise, light and uniform style, without being unnecessarily weighted down with specialized materials or the variable writing of multiple authors. It is filled with vital facts and information for astronomers of all types and for anyone with a scientific interest in the Earth, our Moon, all the other planets and their satellites, and related topics such as asteroids, comets, meteorites and meteors. The language, style, ideas and profuse illustrations will attract the general reader as well as professionals. A thorough report for general readers, it includes much compact reference data. Metaphors, similes and analogies will be of immense help to the lay person or non-science student, and they add to the enjoyment of the material. Vignettes containing historical, literary and even artistic material make this book unusual and interesting, and enhance its scientific content. Kenneth Lang is professor of astronomy in the Physics and Astronomy Department at Tufts University. He is the author of several astrophysics books, including The Sun from Space (Springer Verlag, 2000), Astrophysical Formulae: Radiation, Gas Processes, and High Energy Physics (Springer Verlag, 1999), Sun, Earth and Sky (Copernicus Books, 1997), Astrophysical Data: Planets and Stars (Springer Verlag, 1993), and Wanderers in Space: Exploration and Discovery in the Solar System (Cambridge, 1991),

  9. Universal moduli space and string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, A.S.

    1989-09-01

    The construction of the universal supermoduli space is given. The super-Mumford form (the holomorphic square root from the string measure) is extended to the universal supermoduli space and expressed through the superanalog of Sato's τ-function. The hidden N=2 superconformal symmetry in the string theory is considered. (author). 13 refs

  10. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  11. Recent Developments in Cambridge College Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Wilson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Cambridge University has three tiers of libraries available to students: the University Library, departmental (subject libraries and college libraries. Over the past thirty years there has been increasing pressure on the colleges to provide more books, reader places and technical resources in their libraries, with the result that a number of new library buildings, of very different styles, have been opened. Other colleges have opted for refurbishment and extension of existing libraries. These libraries are small (30-100,000 books and intimate, often open 24 hours a day and with generous provision for lending books. Great importance is placed on keeping them at the heart of the college. Challenges for architects are the sensitive sites, restrictions on changes to listed buildings, and the limited space available. The constricted sites cause difficulties for the builders too. I will consider some solutions to these problems with reference to projects in four colleges: Pembroke, Peterhouse, Corpus Christi and Newnham. At Pembroke architects Freeland Rees Roberts have built an extension to a listed building and at Peterhouse they have adapted an adjoining room. Corpus Christi is moving its library to a Victorian building which has been internally redesigned by Wright + Wright. Newnham demolished a 1960s extension in order to develop the plot more efficiently to a design by John Miller + Partners. All the architects have shown sensitivity to the needs of their clients and ingenuity in making intensive use of limited space.

  12. Weizmann ties with Cambridge in physics contest

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegel, J

    2004-01-01

    "Scientists and students from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot and Cambridge University in England have tied for first place in a physics competition aimed at simulating the future functioning of the particle accelerator being built at the European center CERN and due to open in 2007" (1/2 page)

  13. Space Weather Studies at Istanbul Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    This presentation will introduce the Upper Atmosphere and Space Weather Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University (ITU). It has been established to support the educational needs of the Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 2011 to conduct scientific research in Space Weather, Space Environment, Space Environment-Spacecraft Interactions, Space instrumentation and Upper Atmospheric studies. Currently the laboratory has some essential infrastructure and the most instrumentation for ionospheric observations and ground induced currents from the magnetosphere. The laboratory has two subunits: SWIFT dealing with Space Weather Instrumentation and Forecasting unit and SWDPA dealing with Space Weather Data Processing and Analysis. The research area covers wide range of upper atmospheric and space science studies from ionosphere, ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling, magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms, distant magnetotail, magnetopause and bow shock studies, as well as solar and solar wind disturbances and their interaction with the Earth's space environment. We also study the spacecraft environment interaction and novel plasma instrument design. Several scientific projects have been carried out in the laboratory. Operational objectives of our laboratory will be carried out with the collaboration of NASA's Space Weather Laboratory and the facilities are in the process of integration to their prediction services. Educational and research objectives, as well as the examples from the research carried out in our laboratory will be demonstrated in this presentation.

  14. Universal design of public open spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Krajner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban open spaces are public places that must assure access for all users. They should be designed for equal use despite disabilities and special recreational needs. Their design must be functional and must meet user’s special requirements, either everyday functional or special (recreational needs. It is not just about overcoming architectural obstacles by building ramps of suitable slope and size; it is about inclusive, universal landscape design of urban space made for all citizens. For this matter, different ways of public use for each group of users is defined, functional criteria are determined, and examples of good and bad design are assembled to present the differences between technically accomplished ramps, and slope paths that include quality landscape inclusive design. To prove the unsuitability of public open spaces in Ljubljana, various analyses were made, including the measurement of steepness, lengths and wideness of certain urban elements. As an application of results, the universal designing principles are summarized in new proposal for entrance into Tivoli Park.

  15. Manned Mission Space Exploration Utilizing a Flexible Universal Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, P.; Barez, F.; Gowda, A.

    2018-02-01

    The proposed ASMS, Inc. "Flexible Universal Module" is in support of NASA's Deep Space Gateway project. The Flexible Universal Module provides a possible habitation or manufacturing environment in support of Manned Mission for Space Exploration.

  16. Reflections on Cambridge: John Maynard Keynes at King's College Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2012-01-01

    .mp4 video file The economist John Maynard Keynes spent much of his life in Cambridge, connected to King's College. Alan Macfarlane reflects on a few aspects of his life and work. Filmed by Xu Bei in 2010

  17. The universal connection and metrics on moduli spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massamba, Fortune; Thompson, George

    2003-11-01

    We introduce a class of metrics on gauge theoretic moduli spaces. These metrics are made out of the universal matrix that appears in the universal connection construction of M. S. Narasimhan and S. Ramanan. As an example we construct metrics on the c 2 = 1 SU(2) moduli space of instantons on R 4 for various universal matrices. (author)

  18. NASA universities advanced space design program, focus on nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.F. III; George, J.A.; Alred, J.W.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    In January 1985, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in affiliation with the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), inaugurated the NASA Universities Advanced Space Design Program. The purpose of the program was to encourage participating universities to utilize design projects for the senior and graduate level design courses that would focus on topics relevant to the nation's space program. The activities and projects being carried out under the NASA Universities Advanced Space Design Program are excellent experiences for the participants. This program is a well-conceived, well-planned effort to achieve the maximum benefit out of not only the university design experience but also of the subsequent summer programs. The students in the university design classes have the opportunity to investigate dramatic and new concepts, which at the same time have a place in a program of national importance. This program could serve as a very useful model for the development of university interaction with other federal agencies

  19. Cambridge IGCSE English first language

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2013-01-01

    Revised edition for the 2015 syllabus to help your students prepare for their examination and enhance their enjoyment of English. This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE First Language English (0500 and 0522) syllabuses, for first teaching from 2013. ? Develops the skills necessary to become a better reader and writer. ? Offers detailed advice and preparation for the examination. ? Teaches skills for successful writing of essays and coursework assignment. We are working with Cambridge International Examinations to gain endorsement for this title.

  20. Evolution of physics examining 1940-2000 at Cambridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A.; Brown, L. M.

    2001-07-01

    Much controversy exists about the supposed changing examination standards. Emphasis has been placed on the standards of GCSE and A-level examinations. However, many large employers recruit graduates, and so university examination standards also deserve attention. Here, Cambridge University Part II (third year undergraduate) examinations in Physics are studied since 1940. Trends in prescriptiveness, choice of questions, and other variables were found.

  1. The Cambridge encyclopaedia of astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    Astronomy has been transformed in the last two decades by a series of dramatic discoveries that have left most reference books completely out of date. The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Astronomy presents a broadly based survey of the whole of astronomy which places emphasis on these critical new findings.

  2. The Cambridge crystallography subroutine library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.J.; Matthewman, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    This manual is an amalgamation of the original Cambridge Crystallography Subroutine Library Mark II manual and its supplement No I. The original Mark II system, a set of FORTRAN Subroutines which can be used for standard crystallographic calculations, has been extended to include facilities for conventional least squares refinement. Several new routines have also been added. (U.K.)

  3. The 'Naturals' and Victorian Cambridge: Reflections on the Anatomy of an Elite, 1851-1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Roy; Moseley, Russell

    1980-01-01

    Explores how graduates of Cambridge University from 1851-1914 contributed expertise gained during their university years to British society, particularly the public sector in which they occupied many important positions. The term 'Naturals' refers to those who passed final exams in natural sciences and mathematics at Cambridge. (Author/DB)

  4. Exploring Engaged Spaces in Community-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ceri; Gant, Nick; Millican, Juliet; Wolff, David; Prosser, Bethan; Laing, Stuart; Hart, Angie

    2016-01-01

    The Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP) has been operating at the University of Brighton for the past 10 years. This article explores the different types of space we think need to exist to support a variety of partnership and engaged work. We therefore explore our understandings of shared or "engaged" spaces as a physical,…

  5. Students' Experience of University Space: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen a wave of new building across British universities, so that it would appear that despite the virtualization discourses around higher education, space still matters in learning. Yet studies of student experience of the physical space of the university are rather lacking. This paper explores the response of one group of…

  6. Universal Space IP Transparent Proxy, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communications applications are strategically moving toward Internet Protocol-based architectures and technologies. Despite IP's huge potential, (e.g. cost...

  7. Space Sciences Education and Outreach Project of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasotkin, S.

    2006-11-01

    sergekras@mail.ru The space sciences education and outreach project was initiated at Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research into the curriculum popularize the basics of space physics, and enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January 2005 the first Russian University Satellite “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex “Tatyana“, as well as the mission control and information receiving centre, was designed and developed at Moscow State University. The scientific programme of the mission includes measurements of space radiation in different energy channels and Earth UV luminosity and lightning. The current education programme consists of basic multimedia lectures “Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere” and computerized practice exercises “Space Practice” (based on the quasi-real-time data obtained from “Universitetskiy-Tatyana” satellite and other Internet resources). A multimedia lectures LIFE OF EARTH IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE containing the basic information and demonstrations of heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth’s life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there a dozen special computerized hands-on exercises were created based on the experimental quasi-real-time data obtained from our satellites. Students specializing in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work. Educational materials focus on upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. Moscow State University is now extending its space science education programme by creating multimedia lectures on remote sensing, space factors and materials study, satellite design and development, etc. The space

  8. Hamming's "open doors" and group creativity as keys to scientific excellence: the example of Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Charlton used diverse approaches to identify research institutions which provided home to outstanding scientists and work. One intriguing example of long-lasting scientific excellence is Cambridge with 19 Nobel laureates who worked at the University or at the MRC Molecular Biology Unit when they received the prize between 1947 and 2006. With specific reference to Cambridge, I would like to complement the primarily quantitative assessment and offer considerations as to why and how research achievements may have clustered in space and time. Indeed, observations voiced by the mathematician Richard Hamming as to how great research can be pursued offer explanations for the series of great science in the UK. In my view, the most important determinant of the clustering may be illustrated by Hamming's fitting picture of "open doors": working in environments with the doors open allows constant interactions with peers with various disciplinary backgrounds, and thus fast avoidance of detours or dead ends in science and, ultimately, a focus on and the solution of problems of paramount, rather than of tangential, importance. Narrative insights into a strong argumentative tradition at Cambridge provided by Drs. Watson and Magueijo between 1968 and 2003 are in line with Hamming's suggestion and the value of group creativity. In the internet age with abundant interactions beyond home institutions we should not be surprised if clusters of great science were no longer confined to the usual suspect institutions which were awarded disproportionally with Nobel prizes in the past.

  9. A universal operator on the Gurarii space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garbulińska-Węgrzyn, J.; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2015), s. 143-158 ISSN 0379-4024 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : almost isometry * Gurariî * isometrically universal operator Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.464, year: 2015 http://www.mathjournals.org/jot/2015-073-001/2015-073-001-007.html

  10. Investigating the Impact of Cambridge International Assessments on U.S. Stakeholders: Student and Teacher Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    As part of the continuing program to study the impact of its international assessments, the University of Cambridge International Examinations ("Cambridge") has undertaken a series of studies investigating the impact on a range of US stakeholders. This paper reports on research designed to respond to a series of washback and impact…

  11. Inflationary universe in deformed phase space scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, S. M. M.; Saba, Nasim; Farhoudi, Mehrdad; Marto, João; Moniz, P. V.

    2018-06-01

    We consider a noncommutative (NC) inflationary model with a homogeneous scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. The particular NC inflationary setting herein proposed, produces entirely new consequences as summarized in what follows. We first analyze the free field case and subsequently examine the situation where the scalar field is subjected to a polynomial and exponential potentials. We propose to use a canonical deformation between momenta, in a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaî tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe, and while the Friedmann equation (Hamiltonian constraint) remains unaffected the Friedmann acceleration equation (and thus the Klein-Gordon equation) is modified by an extra term linear in the NC parameter. This concrete noncommutativity on the momenta allows interesting dynamics that other NC models seem not to allow. Let us be more precise. This extra term behaves as the sole explicit pressure that under the right circumstances implies a period of accelerated expansion of the universe. We find that in the absence of the scalar field potential, and in contrast with the commutative case, in which the scale factor always decelerates, we obtain an inflationary phase for small negative values of the NC parameter. Subsequently, the period of accelerated expansion is smoothly replaced by an appropriate deceleration phase providing an interesting model regarding the graceful exit problem in inflationary models. This last property is present either in the free field case or under the influence of the scalar field potentials considered here. Moreover, in the case of the free scalar field, we show that not only the horizon problem is solved but also there is some resemblance between the evolution equation of the scale factor associated to our model and that for the R2 (Starobinsky) inflationary model. Therefore, our herein NC model not only can be taken as an appropriate scenario to get a successful kinetic inflation, but also is a convenient setting to

  12. The Invention Studio: A University Maker Space and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Craig R.; Moore, Roxanne A.; Jariwala, Amit S.; Fasse, Barbara Burks; Linsey, Julie; Newstetter, Wendy; Ngo, Peter; Quintero, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Creativity, invention, and innovation are values championed as central pillars of engineering education. However, university environments that foster open-ended design-build projects are uncommon. Fabrication and prototyping spaces at universities are typically "machine shops" where students relinquish actual fabrication activities to…

  13. The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippard, Brian

    The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

  14. Space Creation Mechanism during the Expansion of Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Dil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel mechanism related to the expansion of universe. Recently Verlinde’s proposal has been applied to the deformed bosons being a candidate for the dark energy constituents, since the negative pressure of the deformed bosons. The expansion of universe is dependent on the dark energy and implies a creation of space; we admit that the space creation mechanism is related to the deformed bosons and so is the dark energy. In order to relate the dark energy and the mechanism for creation of space, we consider Verlinde’s proposal including the Holographic principle for emergence of space, which was recently applied to the deformed bosons. To check the validity of our mechanism, we calculate the ratio of the size of universe before and after the expansion and compare the results with the observational data. We find that the results are consistent with each other and infer that the proposed mechanism works correctly.

  15. Quantum universe on extremely small space-time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmichev, V.E.; Kuzmichev, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    The semiclassical approach to the quantum geometrodynamical model is used for the description of the properties of the Universe on extremely small space-time scales. Under this approach, the matter in the Universe has two components of the quantum nature which behave as antigravitating fluids. The first component does not vanish in the limit h → 0 and can be associated with dark energy. The second component is described by an extremely rigid equation of state and goes to zero after the transition to large spacetime scales. On small space-time scales, this quantum correction turns out to be significant. It determines the geometry of the Universe near the initial cosmological singularity point. This geometry is conformal to a unit four-sphere embedded in a five-dimensional Euclidean flat space. During the consequent expansion of the Universe, when reaching the post-Planck era, the geometry of the Universe changes into that conformal to a unit four-hyperboloid in a five-dimensional Lorentzsignatured flat space. This agrees with the hypothesis about the possible change of geometry after the origin of the expanding Universe from the region near the initial singularity point. The origin of the Universe can be interpreted as a quantum transition of the system from a region in the phase space forbidden for the classical motion, but where a trajectory in imaginary time exists, into a region, where the equations of motion have the solution which describes the evolution of the Universe in real time. Near the boundary between two regions, from the side of real time, the Universe undergoes almost an exponential expansion which passes smoothly into the expansion under the action of radiation dominating over matter which is described by the standard cosmological model.

  16. The Cambridge Behavioural Inventory revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Helen J; Wedderburn, Catherine J; Mioshi, Eneida; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Mason, Sarah L; Barker, Roger A; Hodges, John R

    2008-01-01

    Neurobehavioural and psychiatric symptoms are common in a range of neurodegenerative disorders with distinct profiles which are helpful in the diagnosis and monitoring of these disorders. The Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI) has been shown to distinguish frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is lengthy. To develop a shorter version of the 81 item CBI. CBI data from 450 participants with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD) (64), AD (96), PD (215) and HD (75) were analysed using Principal Components Analysis and measures of internal consistency (Cronbach alpha). A reduced 45-item questionnaire was developed. The instrument identified distinct behavioural profiles and performed as well as the original version. A shorter (45 item) version of the CBI is capable of differentiating bv-FTD and AD from PD and HD. It may be useful in delineating the type and extent of problems in these disorders as well as monitoring therapeutic interventions.

  17. The role of the International Space University in building capacity in emerging space nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robert

    The International Space University provides graduate-level training to the future leaders of the emerging global space community at its Central Campus in Strasbourg, France, and at locations around the world. In its two-month Summer Session and one-year Masters program, ISU offers its students a unique Core Curriculum covering all disciplines related to space programs and enterprises - space science, space engineering, systems engineering, space policy and law, business and management, and space and society. Both programs also involve an intense student research Team Project providing international graduate students and young space professionals the opportunity to solve complex problems by working together in an intercultural environment. Since its founding in 1987, ISU has graduated more than 2500 students from 96 countries. Together with hundreds of ISU faculty and lecturers from around the world, ISU alumni comprise an extremely effective network of space professionals and leaders that actively facilitates individual career growth, professional activities and international space cooperation.

  18. Quasi-Banach spaces of almost universal disposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sánchez, C. F.; Garbulińska, J.; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 267, č. 3 (2014), s. 744-771 ISSN 0022-1236 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : p-Gurarii space * space of universal disposition * isometry Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.322, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022123614002043

  19. Universality in level spacing fluctuations of a chaotic optical billiard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprise, J.F.; Hosseinizadeh, A.; Lamy-Poirier, J. [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Zomorrodi, R. [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert Giffard, Quebec, Quebec G1J 2G3 (Canada); Kroeger, J. [Physics Department and Center for Physics of Materials, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Kroeger, H., E-mail: hkroger@phy.ulaval.c [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)] [Functional Neurobiology, University of Utrecht, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-19

    We study chaotic behavior of a classical optical stadium billiard model. We construct a matrix of time-of-travel along trajectories corresponding to a set of boundary points. We carry out a level spacing fluctuation analysis and compute the Dyson-Mehta spectral rigidity. The distribution of time-of-travel is approximately described by a Gaussian. The results for level spacing distribution and spectral rigidity show universal behavior.

  20. How quantum physics came to Cambridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, William

    1985-01-01

    The paper traces the early stages of quantum physics, in Cambridge, in the 1920's. The mathematicians who inspired a generation of quantum physicists are briefly described, as well as the work of Dirac on quantum mechanics. The author's own contribution to quantum mechanics is outlined, along with other work in physics carried out at that time in Cambridge. (U.K.)

  1. The Second Annual International Space University Alumni Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les (Compiler); Robinson, Paul A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The papers presented at the conference reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the International Space University (ISU) and its alumni. The first papers presented hold special relevance to the design projects, and cover such topics as lunar-based astronomical instrumentation, solar lunar power generation, habitation on the moon, and the legal issues governing multinational astronauts conducting research in space. The next set of papers cover various technical issues such as project success assessment, satellite networks and space station dynamics, thus reflecting the diverse backgrounds of the ISU alumni.

  2. Public and private space curvature in Robertson-Walker universes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, W.

    1981-05-01

    The question is asked: what space curvature would a fundamental observer in an ideal Robertson-Walker universe obtain by direct local spatial measurements, i.e., without reference to the motion pattern of the other galaxies? The answer is that he obtains the curvatureK of his “private” space generated by all the geodesics orthogonal to his world line at the moment in question, and that ˜K is related to the usual curvatureK=k/R 2 of the “public” space of galaxies byK=K+H 2/c2, whereH is Hubble's parameter.

  3. Shared Space, Liminal Space: Five Years into a Community-University Place-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Heidi Lasley; Martin, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article explores shared space at the University of Minnesota's Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach Engagement Center (UROC), located four miles off campus in a community strong in assets, but facing inequality, disinvestment and racism. UROC's mission promotes university-community collaboration to solve critical urban challenges. We…

  4. Universal Birkhoff intergrabIility in dual Banach spaces | Rodr& ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We show that some classical results on universal Pettis integrability in dual Banach spaces can be formulated in terms of the Birkhoff integral, thanks to the link between Birkhoff integrability and the Bourgain property. Keywords: Birkhoff integral; Pettis integral; Bourgain property. Quaestiones Mathematicae 28(2005), 525– ...

  5. Vision 2040: Evolving the Successful International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary; Marti, Izan Peris; Tlustos, Reinhard; Lorente, Arnau Pons; Panerati, Jocopo; Mensink, Wendy; Sorkhabi, Elbruz; Garcia, Oriol Gasquez; Musilova, Michaela; Pearson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Space exploration has always been full of inspiration, innovation, and creativity, with the promise of expanding human civilization beyond Earth. The space sector is currently experiencing rapid change as disruptive technologies, grassroots programs, and new commercial initiatives have reshaped long-standing methods of operation. Throughout the last 28 years, the International Space University (ISU) has been a leading institution for space education, forming international partnerships, and encouraging entrepreneurship in its over 4,000 alumni. In this report, our Vision 2040 team projected the next 25 years of space exploration and analyzed how ISU could remain a leading institution in the rapidly changing industry. Vision 2040 considered five important future scenarios for the space sector: real-time Earth applications, orbital stations, lunar bases, lunar and asteroid mining, and a human presence on Mars. We identified the signals of disruptive change within these scenarios, including underlying driving forces and potential challenges, and derived a set of skills that will be required in the future space industry. Using these skills as a starting point, we proposed strategies in five areas of focus for ISU: the future of the Space Studies Program (SSP), analog missions, outreach, alumni, and startups. We concluded that ISU could become not just an increasingly innovative educational institution, but one that acts as an international organization that drives space commercialization, exploration, innovation, and cooperation.

  6. Cambridge community Optometry Glaucoma Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Jonathan; Shahid, Humma; Bourne, Rupert R; White, Andrew J; Martin, Keith R

    2015-04-01

    With a higher life expectancy, there is an increased demand for hospital glaucoma services in the United Kingdom. The Cambridge community Optometry Glaucoma Scheme (COGS) was initiated in 2010, where new referrals for suspected glaucoma are evaluated by community optometrists with a special interest in glaucoma, with virtual electronic review and validation by a consultant ophthalmologist with special interest in glaucoma. 1733 patients were evaluated by this scheme between 2010 and 2013. Clinical assessment is performed by the optometrist at a remote site. Goldmann applanation tonometry, pachymetry, monoscopic colour optic disc photographs and automated Humphrey visual field testing are performed. A clinical decision is made as to whether a patient has glaucoma or is a suspect, and referred on or discharged as a false positive referral. The clinical findings, optic disc photographs and visual field test results are transmitted electronically for virtual review by a consultant ophthalmologist. The number of false positive referrals from initial referral into the scheme. Of the patients, 46.6% were discharged at assessment and a further 5.7% were discharged following virtual review. Of the patients initially discharged, 2.8% were recalled following virtual review. Following assessment at the hospital, a further 10.5% were discharged after a single visit. The COGS community-based glaucoma screening programme is a safe and effective way of evaluating glaucoma referrals in the community and reducing false-positive referrals for glaucoma into the hospital system. © 2014 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  7. Cambridge Bay: Six years later

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edworthy, J.

    1992-01-01

    The story of a wind energy project in Cambridge Bay, Northwest Territories, is presented from the perspective of the company that supplied the equipment and supported the project through its life. The project was intended to demonstrate the technical, economic, institutional, and operational issues and barriers to the use of wind power in remote communities. The system, involving four Carter Model 25 units each rated at 25 kW, was installed in 1987 and commissioned in January 1988. Shortly thereafter, the Northern Canada Power Commission (which requested the project in the first place) was taken over by the territorial administration, and employee continuity was disrupted. At about the same time, Federal support for the project decreased. Technical problems included a transformer failure, a generator failure, and a failed yaw tube which turned out to be lightly designed and poorly made. The Carter turbine company also went out of business, making spare parts difficult to obtain. The utility organization changed abruptly in summer 1991 with the arrival of a new area superintendent who did not support the project. The wind farm was shut down in 1992. The project generated a total of 160,982 kWh with over 71% availability. The positive and negative results from the project are summarized and recommendations are made for future Arctic wind power projects. 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Dynamical 3-Space: Black Holes in an Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothall D. P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Black holes are usually studied without including effects of the expanding universe. However in some recent studies black holes have been embedded in an expanding universe, in order to determine the interplay, if any, of these two dynamical processes. Dynamical 3-space theory contains time independent solutions for black holes, which are spatial in-flows, and separately the time dependent Hubble expansion. This theory has explained numerous puzzles in observational astrophysics and contains 3 constants; G, - which from experimental data turns out to be the fine structure constant, and - which is a small but nonzero distance, possibly a Planck-type length. The Hubble expansion in the dynamical 3-space theory cannot be “switched o”, forcing the study, first, of isolated black holes coexisting with the expanding universe. It is shown that a time dependent black hole and expanding universe solution exists. The nature and implications of these solutions are discussed as they evolve over time. A dynamical network of black holes and induced linking cosmic filaments forming bubble structures is discussed, as a consequence of dynamical 3-space undergoing a dynamical breakdown of homogeneity and isotropy, even in the absence of baryonic matter.

  9. Initial value problem of space dynamics in universal Stumpff anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, M. A.; Dwidar, H. R.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the initial value problem of space dynamics in universal Stumpff anomaly ψ is set up and developed in analytical and computational approach. For the analytical expansions, the linear independence of the functions U_{j} (ψ;σ); {j=0,1,2,3} are proved. The differential and recurrence equations satisfied by them and their relations with the elementary functions are given. The universal Kepler equation and its validations for different conic orbits are established together with the Lagrangian coefficients. Efficient representations of these functions are developed in terms of the continued fractions. For the computational developments we consider the following items: 1. Top-down algorithm for continued fraction evaluation. 2. One-point iteration formulae. 3. Determination of the coefficients of Kepler's equation. 4. Derivatives of Kepler's equation of any integer order. 5. Determination of the initial guess for the solution of the universal Kepler equation. Finally we give summary on the computational design for the initial value problem of space dynamics in universal Stumpff anomaly. This design based on the solution of the universal Kepler's equation by an iterative schemes of quadratic up to any desired order ℓ.

  10. BUSEFL: The Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contos, A.R.; Sanchez, L.A.; Jorgensen, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    BUSEFL (Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory) is a comprehensive, integrated project to address the issues and implications of space weather forecasting. An important goal of the BUSEFL mission is to serve as a testing ground for space weather algorithms and operational procedures. One such algorithm is the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSFM), which may be implemented in possible future space weather prediction centers. Boston University Student-satellite for Applications and Training (BUSAT), the satellite component of BUSEFL, will incorporate four experiments designed to measure (1) the earth close-quote s magnetic field, (2) distribution of energetic electrons trapped in the earth close-quote s radiation belts, (3) the mass and charge composition of the ion fluxes along the magnetic field lines and (4) the auroral forms at the foot of the field line in the auroral zones. Data from these experiments will be integrated into a ground system to evaluate space weather prediction codes. Data from the BUSEFL mission will be available to the scientific community and the public through media such as the World Wide Web (WWW). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. OUTDOOR SPACE QUALITY: CASE STUDY OF A UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PLAZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Aydin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studied the concept of campus plaza, i.e. the outdoor space of the Selcuk University located in Konya, Turkey. The objective of the study in which the survey, observation and photographic methods were used, was to examine the plaza as an outdoor space providing individual and social benefits to campus people and to determine the principles regarding the establishment of this space. Two hundred forty-three students participating in the survey were asked about the outdoor spaces they use in the campus area, the qualities of the plaza, their purposes and the frequency of plaza use, and a descriptive analysis was performed to determine the plaza’s quality. Additionally, a correlation analysis was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the landscape accessory and the manner in which the users’ senses were affected by the experienced space (profiles of the space. At the end of this study, two main components determining the campus plaza’s quality were found: (i qualities of the physical environment (climatic features, location of plaza, its relation with the surrounding structuring, pedestrian / vehicle relation in terms of accessibility, fixed elements / equipment in the area, quality of open space area, quality of landscape accessory and area’s being in good repair (ii user characteristics. User characteristics also comprised two quality criteria: (i the behavioural and functional quality, (ii the visual quality.

  12. Phase space analysis for anisotropic universe with nonlinear bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss phase space analysis of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model by taking a noninteracting mixture of dust like and viscous radiation like fluid whose viscous pressure satisfies a nonlinear version of the Israel-Stewart transport equation. An autonomous system of equations is established by defining normalized dimensionless variables. In order to investigate stability of the system, we evaluate corresponding critical points for different values of the parameters. We also compute power-law scale factor whose behavior indicates different phases of the universe model. It is found that our analysis does not provide a complete immune from fine-tuning because the exponentially expanding solution occurs only for a particular range of parameters. We conclude that stable solutions exist in the presence of nonlinear model for bulk viscosity with different choices of the constant parameter m for anisotropic universe.

  13. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95, while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2 spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of

  14. Exploring the living universe: A strategy for space life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The status and goals of NASA's life sciences programs are examined. Ways and mean for attaining these goals are suggested. The report emphasizes that a stronger life sciences program is imperative if the U.S. space policy is to construct a permanently manned space station and achieve its stated goal of expanding the human presence beyond earth orbit into the solar system. The same considerations apply in regard to the other major goal of life sciences: to study the biological processes and life in the universe. A principal recommendation of the report is for NASA to expand its program of ground- and space-based research contributing to resolving questions about physiological deconditioning, radiation exposure, potential psychological difficulties, and life support requirements that may limit stay times for personnel on the Space Station and complicate missions of more extended duration. Other key recommendations call for strengthening programs of biological systems research in: controlled ecological life support systems for humans in space, earth systems central to understanding the effects on the earth's environment of both natural and human activities, and exobiology.

  15. From Living Space to Cultural Space: How a Modern University Academy System Is Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingqiang; Fang, Hualiang

    2018-01-01

    The reforms on the modern university academy system that preserve certain elements of China's ancient traditional academies have currently encountered a series of difficulties. The crux of the problem is that living and educational spaces were integrated in the traditional academy, while modern school education institution has separated the two.…

  16. Space science public outreach at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, T.; Babin, E.; Cooney, W.; Giammanco, J.; Hartman, D.; McNeil, R.; Slovak, M.; Stacy, J.

    Over the last seven years the Astronomy / Astrophysics group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Louisiana State University has developed an exten- sive Space Science education and public outreach program. This program includes the local park district (the Recreation and Park Commission for the Parish of East Baton Rouge, BREC), the local amateur astronomer group (the Baton Rouge As- tronomical Society, BRAS), the Louisiana Arts and Science Museum (LASM), and Southern University (SU, part of the largest HBCU system in the nation). Our effort has directly led to the development of the Highland Road Park Observatory (HRPO, http://www.bro.lsu.edu/hrpo) that supports student astronomy training at LSU and SU, amateur observations and a public program for adults and children, establishment of a series of teacher professional development workshops in astronomy and physics, and the "Robots for Internet Experiences (ROBIE)" project (http://www.bro.lsu.edu/) where we have several instruments (e.g. HAM radio, radio telescope, optical tele- scopes) that can be controlled over the internet by students and teachers in the class- room along with associated lessons developed by a teacher group. In addition, this year the LASM, will be opening a new planetarium / space theater in downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We are currently working to bring live views of the heavens from the HRPO telescope to audiences attending planetarium shows and will be working closely with planetarium staff to develop shows that highlight LSU astronomy / space science research. During the presentation we will provide some details about our in- dividual projects, the overall structure of our program, establishing community links and some of the lessons we learned along the way. Finally, we would like to acknowl- edge NASA, Louisiana State University, the Louisiana Systemic Initiatives Program and the Louisiana Technology Innovation Fund for their support.

  17. Space Surveillance Tech Area Benefits From University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K.; Voss, D.; Pietruszewski, A.; King, L.; Hohnstadt, P.; Feirstine, K.; Crassidis, J.; D'Angelo, M.; Linares, R.

    2011-09-01

    The University Nanosat Program (UNP) is a two year small satellite competition held among leading universities across the nation. In the past 12 years UNP has involved 27 universities and over 5000 students in a variety of engineering fields and other disciplines, in the process of designing and managing the development of a satellite. The UNP is a partnership between the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The program’s primary purpose is to help train engineering students in satellite design, fabrication, and testing by requiring them to build the satellite themselves through the mentorship of their Principle Investigator, industry mentors, and a series of six program reviews managed by the AFRL Program Office. Each university-built satellite attempts to further a specific technology or perform a scientific mission. Technologies advanced through the program include all aspects of small satellite designs including structures, propulsion, imaging, navigation and have helped further science payloads such as energetic particle detectors, plasma probes, photometers, and many others. This paper will discuss the educational impact on students involved in a hands-on, hardware focused program, with emphasis given to two UNP satellites relevant to Space Surveillance Technologies. The most recent winner of the UNP competition, Michigan Technological University’s Oculus-ASR, is a calibration instrument for AMOS’ telescopic non-resolved object characterization program. Another example is the University of Buffalo, which is calibrating with the AFRL MESSA program in the current competition cycle. The University of Buffalo’s nanosatellite is being designed to collect multi-band photometric data of glinting geostationary space objects. Both these satellites are excellent examples of the relevance and quality of innovation and technology that can be

  18. Crystal manyfold universes in /AdS space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloper, N.

    2000-02-01

    We derive crystal braneworld solutions, comprising of intersecting families of parallel /n+2-branes in a /4+n-dimensional /AdS space. Each family consists of alternating positive and negative tension branes. In the simplest case of exactly orthogonal families, there arise different crystals with unbroken /4D Poincaré invariance on the intersections, where our world can reside. A crystal can be finite along some direction, either because that direction is compact, or because it ends on a segment of /AdS bulk, or infinite, where the branes continue forever. If the crystal is interlaced by connected /3-branes directed both along the intersections and orthogonal to them, it can be viewed as an example of a Manyfold universe proposed recently by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali and the author. There are new ways for generating hierarchies, since the bulk volume of the crystal and the lattice spacing affect the /4D Planck mass. The low energy physics is sensitive to the boundary conditions in the bulk, and has to satisfy the same constraints discussed in the Manyfold universe. Phenomenological considerations favor either finite crystals, or crystals which are infinite but have broken translational invariance in the bulk. The most distinctive signature of the bulk structure is that the bulk gravitons are Bloch waves, with a band spectrum, which we explicitly construct in the case of a /5-dimensional theory.

  19. Cambridge IGCSE mathematics core and extended

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, Ric

    2013-01-01

    The most cost effective and straightforward way to teach the revised syllabus, with all the core and extended content covered by a single book and accompanying free digital resources.  . This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus, for first teaching from 2013.  . ·         Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of questions. ·         Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every Student's Book.  . We are working with Cambridge International Examinations to gain

  20. Factors Affecting Applications to Oxford and Cambridge--Repeat Survey. Executive Summary with Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Kate; White, Kerensa; Styles, Ben; Morrison, Jo

    2005-01-01

    This research follows up a study conducted in 1998 by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) to investigate teachers' and students' views on the factors affecting students' choices of whether or not to apply to Oxford and Cambridge universities. It identifies what has changed since 1998 and areas in which the universities could…

  1. The MSSM Parameter Space with Non-Universal Higgs Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Santoso, Y; Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Santoso, Yudi

    2002-01-01

    Without assuming that Higgs masses have the same values as other scalar masses at the input GUT scale, we combine constraints on the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) coming from the cold dark matter density with the limits from direct searches at accelerators such as LEP, indirect measurements such as b to s gamma decay and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. The requirement that Higgs masses-squared be positive at the GUT scale imposes important restrictions on the MSSM parameter space, as does the requirement that the LSP be neutral. We analyze the interplay of these constraints in the (mu, m_A), (mu, m_{1/2}), (m_{1/2}, m_0) and (m_A, tan beta) planes. These exhibit new features not seen in the corresponding planes in the constrained MSSM in which universality is extended to Higgs masses.

  2. Human Space Exploration and Human Space Flight: Latency and the Cognitive Scale of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Dan; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    The role of telerobotics in space exploration as placing human cognition on other worlds is limited almost entirely by the speed of light, and the consequent communications latency that results from large distances. This latency is the time delay between the human brain at one end, and the telerobotic effector and sensor at the other end. While telerobotics and virtual presence is a technology that is rapidly becoming more sophisticated, with strong commercial interest on the Earth, this time delay, along with the neurological timescale of a human being, quantitatively defines the cognitive horizon for any locale in space. That is, how distant can an operator be from a robot and not be significantly impacted by latency? We explore that cognitive timescale of the universe, and consider the implications for telerobotics, human space flight, and participation by larger numbers of people in space exploration. We conclude that, with advanced telepresence, sophisticated robots could be operated with high cognition throughout a lunar hemisphere by astronauts within a station at an Earth-Moon Ll or L2 venue. Likewise, complex telerobotic servicing of satellites in geosynchronous orbit can be carried out from suitable terrestrial stations.

  3. Mathematics, Science and the Cambridge Tradition

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Ornelas Martins

    2012-01-01

    Copyright © 2012 World Economics Association. In this paper the use of mathematics in economics will be discussed, by comparing two approaches to mathematics, a Cartesian approach, and a Newtonian approach. I will argue that while mainstream economics is underpinned by a Cartesian approach which led to a divorce between mathematics and reality, the contributions of key authors of the Cambridge tradition, like Marshall, Keynes and Sraffa, are characterised by a Newtonian approach to mathema...

  4. (Review of) Reno, William. 2011. Warfare in Independent Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Warfare in Independent Africa is Reno’s bold attempt to analyze the modern history of African insurgencies. The book tackles this task through the prism of five generations of rebel, which left their mark on the continent; anti-colonial rebels, majority rule rebels, reform rebels, warlord rebels ...... and parochial rebels....

  5. 76 FR 13665 - Cambridge Tool & Die, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action Total Staffing, Cambridge, OH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,605] Cambridge Tool & Die... Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974... of Cambridge Tool & Die, Cambridge, Ohio. The workers are engaged in the production of plastic...

  6. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  7. University of Central Florida / Deep Space Industries Asteroid Regolith Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Daniel; Covey, Steven D.; Schultz, Cody

    2017-10-01

    Introduction: The University of Central Florida (UCF), in partnership with Deep Space Industries (DSI) are working under a NASA Phase 2 SBIR contract to develop and produce a family of asteroid regolith simulants for use in research, engineering, and mission operations testing. We base simulant formulas on the mineralogy, particle size, and physical characteristics of CI, CR, CM, C2, CV, and L-Chondrite meteorites. The advantage in simulating meteorites is that the vast majority of meteoritic materials are common rock forming minerals that are available in commercial quantities. While formulas are guided by the meteorites our approach is one of constrained maximization under the limitations of safety, cost, source materials, and ease of handling. In all cases our goal is to deliver a safe, high fidelity analog at moderate cost.Source Materials, Safety, and Biohazards: A critical factor in any useful simulant is to minimize handling risks for biohazards or toxicity. All the terrestrial materials proposed for these simulants were reviewed for potential toxicity. Of particular interest is the organic component of volatile rich carbonaceous chondrites which contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are known carcinogens and mutagens. Our research suggests that we can maintain rough chemical fidelity by substituting much safer sub-bituminous coal as our organic analog. A second safety consideration is the choice of serpentine group materials. While most serpentine polymorphs are quite safe we avoid fibrous chrysotile because of its asbestos content. Terrestrial materials identified as inputs for our simulants are common rock forming minerals that are available in commercial quantities. These include olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar, smectite, serpentine, saponite, pyrite, and magnetite in amounts that are appropriate for each type. For CI's and CR’s, their olivines tend to be Fo100 which is rare on Earth. We have substituted Fo90 olivine

  8. [Geometry Through Symmetry, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bernard

    These materials were written for the use of a class of eighth grade high ability students in a four week course sponsored by Educational Services Incorporated on the Stanford campus. They represent a practical response to the proposal by the Cambridge Conference of 1963 that geometry be taught by vector space methods. Instead of using vector…

  9. The Worldly Space: The Digital University in Network Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This article considers the effect of information technology upon teaching, learning and research in the "digital university". In less than a generation the university has become a business like any other. It does so in the determining context of neoliberal globalisation and the computer revolution. The university develops through what we…

  10. Cambridge IGCSE english as a second language

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, John

    2014-01-01

    Revised edition for the 2015 syllabus offering the easiest and most cost effective way to teach both the speaking and listening components with one set of books covering two years and free digital material. This title has been written for the revised Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language (0510 and 0511) syllabuses, for first teaching from 2013. ? Prepares students for their exams with a focus on assessed language features, such as inference, opinion and attitude. ? Develops language abilities at an appropriate pace with extra interactive tests on a free CD-ROM. We are working with Cambr

  11. The new Cambridge English course student 1

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The New Cambridge English Course is a course teachers and students can rely on to cover the complete range and depth of language and skills needed from beginner to upper-intermediate level. Each level is designed to provide at least 72 hours of class work using the Student's Book, with additional self-study material provided in the Practice Book. The course has a proven multi-syllabus approach which integrates work on all the vital aspects of language study: grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, skills, notions and functions.

  12. Creating a "Third Space" in Student Teaching: Implications for the University Supervisor's Status as Outsider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alexander; Schmeichel, Mardi; Butler, Brandon M.; Dinkelman, Todd; Nichols, Joseph R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The work of teacher education during student teaching typically takes place in two distinct "spaces": placement sites and college/university settings. The program featured in this article is structured in ways that clearly mark out those two spaces. Yet this configuration led our university supervisors, whose work primarily took place in the…

  13. Connecting Physical University Spaces with Research-Based Education Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, Brent

    2017-01-01

    This paper looks at the link between enhancing education and ensuring an innovative fit-for-purpose estate. It argues that a nuanced approach and joined-up dialogue is needed between university staff whose remit covers these areas. Drawing from fifteen semi-structured interviews with students and staff at a research-intensive university in London,…

  14. A Part but Apart: Discursive Explorations of the University as Contested Space in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ane Turner; Singleton, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in education and conflict in sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about how universities and their constituents experience and make meaning of violence. This paper sought to capture university participants' sense of belongingness and attachment to the university space resulting from experiences with ethnic conflict in…

  15. Cambridge English First 2 audio CDs : authentic examination papers

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Four authentic Cambridge English Language Assessment examination papers for the Cambridge English: First (FCE) exam. These examination papers for the Cambridge English: First (FCE) exam provide the most authentic exam preparation available, allowing candidates to familiarise themselves with the content and format of the exam and to practise useful exam techniques. The Audio CDs contain the recorded material to allow thorough preparation for the Listening paper and are designed to be used with the Student's Book. A Student's Book with or without answers and a Student's Book with answers and downloadable Audio are available separately. These tests are also available as Cambridge English: First Tests 5-8 on Testbank.org.uk

  16. Cambridge English First 2 with answers : authentic examination papers

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Four authentic Cambridge English Language Assessment examination papers for the Cambridge English: First (FCE) exam. These examination papers for the Cambridge English: First (FCE) exam provide the most authentic exam preparation available, allowing candidates to familiarise themselves with the content and format of the exam and to practise useful exam techniques. The Student's Book is also available in a 'without answers' edition. Audio CDs (2) containing the exam Listening material and a Student's Book with answers and downloadable Audio are available separately. These tests are also available as Cambridge English: First Tests 5-8 on Testbank.org.uk

  17. The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Michael

    Expertly written and lavishly illustrated, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Astronomy offers a unique account of astronomical theory and practice from antiquity to the present day. How did Moslems of the Middle Ages use astronomy to calculate the direction of Mecca from far-flung corners of the Islamic world? Who was the only ancient Greek to suspect that the earth might revolve around the sun? How did Christopher Columbus abuse his knowledge of a lunar eclipse predicted by an astronomical almanac? Packed with anecdotes and intriguing detail, this book describes how we observed the sky and interpreted what we saw at different periods of history; how this influenced our beliefs and mythology; and how great astronomers contributed to what we now know. The result is a lively and highly visual history of astronomy - a compelling read for specialists and non-specialists alike.

  18. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated..., Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue...

  19. Quantum field theory of the universe in the Kantowski-Sachs space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.; Tan, Z.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the quantum field theory of the universe in the Kantowski-Sachs space-time is studied. An analogue of proceedings in quantum field theory is applied in curved space-time to the Kantowski-Sachs space-time, obtaining the wave function of the universe satisfied the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. Regarding the wave function as a universe field in the minisuperspace, the authors can not only overcome the difficulty of the probabilistic interpretation in quantum cosmology, but also come to the conclusion that there is multiple production of universes. The average number of the produced universes from nothing is calculated. The distribution of created universe is given. It is the Planckian distribution

  20. Space Related Education at the University of Aalborg, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens F. Dalsgaard; Bisgaard, Morten; Alminde, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Based Learning concept used at Aalborg University is given and advantages of applying it to these projects are discussed. The benefits of student satellite projects are also discussed. Finally the specific management methods for the two projects are described and leassons learned from each project...

  1. Shifting governance arrangements and protected spaces in universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leisyte, Liudvika

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, scholars have observed that the transnational and local competition in higher education, as well as the expansion of higher education, have led to unprecedented transformation of universities and have affected its core processes and core staff - academics - in manifold ways

  2. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  3. Joint Services Electronics Program (Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-30

    34Band Structures of Semimagnetic Compounds," Acta Physica Polonica bf A73 (6), 933-941 (1988). (Partially supported by N00014-86-K-0760). c. Books...Journals K.L. Babcock and R.M. Westervelt, "Dynamics of Simple Electronic neural Net- works," Physica 28D, 305 (1987). C.M. Marcus and R.M. Westervelt

  4. University Space Management Exemplified by Selected European Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymarzak Małgorzata

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid changes taking place in the environment of academic institutions (market rules in tertiary education, the greater availability of university education, globalization and internationalization, emergence of knowledge-based societies force them to adjust to the new environment and to adopt a new approach to management, (Friga, Berris, Sullivan 2003; Jajszczyk 2009; Clarysse, Mosey, Lambrecht 2009; Law, Ho 2009; Amthor, Metzger 2011; Leja 2013, as well as to competition and value creation.

  5. Universal Sample Preparation Module for Molecular Analysis in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lynntech proposes to develop and demonstrate the ability of a compact, light-weight, and automated universal sample preparation module (USPM) to process samples from...

  6. Towards University 2.0: A Space where Academic Education Meets Corporate Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolov, Roumen

    2009-01-01

    Nikolov, R. (2009). Towards University 2.0: A Space where Academic Education Meets Corporate Training. IPROF-09: ICT Professionalism: a Global Challenge. February, 12-15, 2009, Arnhem, The Netherlands.

  7. Extension and reconstruction theorems for the Urysohn universal metric space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubiś, Wieslaw; Rubin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-29 ISSN 0011-4642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Urysohn space * bilipschitz homeomorphism * modulus of continuity * reconstruction theorem * extension theorem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.265, year: 2010 http://dml.cz/handle/10338.dmlcz/140544

  8. How to Run a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Lambert Review of Business-University Collaboration proposed a business model for universities in 2003. Pressure to change university governance to make it match the business model remains strong, and it is being most actively applied to Oxford and Cambridge. The Oxford and Cambridge governance debates (which began in the 1990s) open up the…

  9. University-Preschool Partnership and Workplace-Based Learning: A Collaborative "Third Space" or No Space at All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsdóttir, Arna H.

    2015-01-01

    The article examines the aims of the workplace-based learning of prospective preschool teachers in Iceland and associated cooperative practices between the University of Iceland and preschools. A "third space" of collaboration between these two sites is considered necessary if the education of preschool student teachers is to be…

  10. Large micro-mirror arrays: key components in future space instruments for Universe and Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamkotsian Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In future space missions for Universe and Earth Observation, scientific return could be optimized using MOEMS devices. Micro-mirror arrays are used for designing new generation of instruments, multi-object spectrographs in Universe Observation and programmable wide field spectrographs in Earth Observation. Mock-ups have been designed and built for both applications and they show very promising results.

  11. The Enjoyment of Space: The University Campus in Students' Narratives and Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voela, Angie

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I discuss how students use narratives and photography in order to represent their everyday engagement with the university space. I draw on the Lacanian notions of the Real and the drive, and suggest ways in which these notions can be used to develop a different approach to educational spaces, especially when photographic material is…

  12. The Expanding Universe: Time, Space and Spirit--Keys to Scientific Literacy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonebarger, Bill

    Nearly every culture has made important discoveries about the universe. Most cultures have searched for a better understanding of the cosmos and how the earth and human life relate. The discussion in this booklet considers time, space, and spirit. Time refers to a sense of history; space refers to geography; and spirit refers to life and thought.…

  13. Space-time foam as the universal regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, L.; Smolin, L.

    1985-01-01

    A distribution of virtual black holes in the vacuum will induce modifications in the density of states for small perturbations of gravitational and matter fields. If the virtual black holes fill the volume of a typical spacelike surface then perturbation theory becomes more convergent and may even be finite, depending on how fast the number of virtual black holes increases as their size decreases. For distributions of virtual black holes which are scale invariant the effective dimension of space-time is lowered to a noninteger value less than 4, leading to an interpretation in terms of fractal geometry. In this case general relativity is renormalizable in the 1/N expansion without higher derivative terms. As the Hamiltonian is not modified the theory is stable. (author)

  14. Lost in space: design of experiments and scientific exploration in a Hogarth Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendrem, Dennis W; Lendrem, B Clare; Woods, David; Rowland-Jones, Ruth; Burke, Matthew; Chatfield, Marion; Isaacs, John D; Owen, Martin R

    2015-11-01

    A Hogarth, or 'wicked', universe is an irregular environment generating data to support erroneous beliefs. Here, we argue that development scientists often work in such a universe. We demonstrate that exploring these multidimensional spaces using small experiments guided by scientific intuition alone, gives rise to an illusion of validity and a misplaced confidence in that scientific intuition. By contrast, design of experiments (DOE) permits the efficient mapping of such complex, multidimensional spaces. We describe simulation tools that enable research scientists to explore these spaces in relative safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [A NASA / University Joint Venture in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Donald C.

    1996-01-01

    MILAGRO is a water-Cherenkov detector for observing cosmic gamma rays over a broad energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV. MILAGRO will be the first detector that has sensitivity overlapping both air-Cherenkov and air-shower detectors. With this detector scientists in the collaboration will study previously observed celestial sources at their known emission energies, extend these observations into a new energy regime, and search for new sources at unexplored energies. The diffuse gamma-radiation component in our galaxy, which originates from interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and photons, provides important information about the density, distribution, and spectrum of the cosmic rays that pervade the interstellar medium. Events in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) are being observed up to about 30 GeV, differing by slightly more than order of magnitude from the low energy threshold of MILAGRO. By looking in coincidence at sources, correlated observations will greatly extend the astrophysics potential of MILAGRO and NASA's GRO. A survey of cosmic-ray observatories is being prepared for scientists and others to provide a resource and reference which describes high energy cosmic-ray research activities around the world. This summary presents information about each research group, such as names of principal investigators, number of persons in the collaboration, energy range, sensitivity, angular resolution, and surface area of detector. Similarly, a survey of gamma-ray telescopes is being prepared to provide a resource and reference which describes gamma-ray telescopes for investigating galactic diffuse gamma-ray flux currently observed in the GeV energy range, but is expected to extend into the TeV range. Two undergraduate students are compiling information about gamma-ray telescopes and high energy cosmic-ray observatories for these surveys. Funding for this project was provided by the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium. Also enclosed Appendix A, B, C, D

  16. State University of New York, University of Stoney Brook, University and Clinical Practice Management Plan Space Leasing Practices. Report 96-S-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report assesses the propriety and economy of space leasing practices of the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SUNY-SB) for the period July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1996, specifically those related to a health center that includes five professional schools, a 536-bed teaching hospital, and a 350-bed veterans' home. Some of…

  17. 75 FR 33328 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service..., Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard [[Page 33329

  18. Protein space: a natural method for realizing the nature of protein universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chenglong; Deng, Mo; Cheng, Shiu-Yuen; Yau, Shek-Chung; He, Rong L; Yau, Stephen S-T

    2013-02-07

    Current methods cannot tell us what the nature of the protein universe is concretely. They are based on different models of amino acid substitution and multiple sequence alignment which is an NP-hard problem and requires manual intervention. Protein structural analysis also gives a direction for mapping the protein universe. Unfortunately, now only a minuscule fraction of proteins' 3-dimensional structures are known. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree representations are not unique for any existing tree construction methods. Here we develop a novel method to realize the nature of protein universe. We show the protein universe can be realized as a protein space in 60-dimensional Euclidean space using a distance based on a normalized distribution of amino acids. Every protein is in one-to-one correspondence with a point in protein space, where proteins with similar properties stay close together. Thus the distance between two points in protein space represents the biological distance of the corresponding two proteins. We also propose a natural graphical representation for inferring phylogenies. The representation is natural and unique based on the biological distances of proteins in protein space. This will solve the fundamental question of how proteins are distributed in the protein universe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cambridge Marketing College - interview about e-commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Paa-Kerner, Greta; Cambridge Marketing College

    2015-01-01

    Interview about e-commerce.\\ud \\ud The Cambridge Marketing College interviews Greta Paa-Kerner to learn about the dynamic world of e-commerce. She discusses online retail trends and shopping influencers.

  20. THE PREPARATION OF A SPECIALIST IN NETWORKING CULTURAL-EDUCATIONAL SPACE OF UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida Kekeeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with specialist preparation problems in networking cultural-educational space of the University. The authors consider the role of networking technologies in quality improvement of educational services in the conditions of the international cooperation. They also substantiate the process of entering the future experts in the working environment, the formation of their professional and personal competencies. The article reveals priority areas of training new generation specialists in the cultural and educational space of the university taking into account modern educational trends in the world.

  1. Creating a "third space" in student teaching: Implications for the university supervisor's status as outsider

    OpenAIRE

    Cuenca, Alexander; Schmeichel, Mardi; Butler, Brandon; Dinkelman, Todd; Nichols, Joseph R,

    2011-01-01

    The work of teacher education during student teaching typically takes place in two distinct “spaces”: placement sites and college/university settings. The program featured in this article is structured in ways that clearly mark out those two spaces. Yet this configuration led our university supervisors, whose work primarily took place in the field, to feel like “outsiders.” To redress this concern, a third learning space was incorporated into our student teaching seminar. We suggest that “thi...

  2. Cultivating social learning spaces at an urban Johannesburg university student residence

    OpenAIRE

    Agherdien, Najma

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. (Education) This case study investigated the conceptualisation and implementation of social learning spaces (SLS) in a University of Johannesburg student residence. The literature base I drew on included ideas, concepts and constructs associated with learning communities [where the terms ‘SLS’ and ‘learning communities’ (LCs) are often used interchangeably], Wenger’s communities of practice, the First Year Experience (FYE), university student residence life and transformation in high...

  3. A separable Fréchet space of almost universal disposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bargetz, Ch.; Kąkol, Jerzy; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 272, č. 5 (2017), s. 1876-1891 ISSN 0022-1236 R&D Projects: GA ČR GF16-34860L Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : graded Fréchet space * the Gurarii space * universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.254, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022123616302981

  4. Integration of the Belarusian Space Research Potential Into International University Nanosatellite Programm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir; Ablameyko, Sergey; Ponariadov, Vladimir

    Belarus has inherited a significant space research potential created back in the Soviet era. It is one of the countries in the world capable of research, engineering and production across a wide range of space technologies, such as remote sensing systems, satellite telecommunication systems and positioning systems etc. Despite these strengths, the participation of Belarusian space organizations in the UN space activity and International research programs is very low. Belarusian State University (BSU) is the leading research and high school education organization of Belarus in several fields of research and development. It was deeply involved into various space research projects, including Soviet Lunar Program, Space Station “Mir”, Space Shuttle “Buran”. From 2004, when the national space programs were restarted, branches of BSU like Institute of Physics and Aerospace Technologies (IPAT), Center for aerospace education, Research laboratory of applied space technologies are leading the research and development works in the field of space communication systems, Earth observation tools and technologies, electronic and optic sensors, etc. The mail fields of activity are: • Hard and software development for small satellites and university satellites in particular. • Development of sensor satellite systems. • Small satellite research experiments (biological and medical in particular). • Earth, airplane and satellite remote monitoring systems including hard and software. • Early warning ecological and industrial Systems. • Geographic information systems of several natural and industrial areas. • Climate change investigation. We have partners from several universities and research institutes from Russian Federation, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Germany etc. We have a ground station to receive satellite data in RF L and X bands and are very interested to be incorporated into international remote monitoring network. This activity can be combined with

  5. Discretization of space and time: mass-energy relation, accelerating expansion of the Universe, Hubble constant

    OpenAIRE

    Roatta , Luca

    2017-01-01

    Assuming that space and time can only have discrete values, we obtain the expression of the gravitational potential energy that at large distance coincides with the Newtonian. In very precise circumstances it coincides with the relativistic mass-energy relation: this shows that the Universe is a black hole in which all bodies are subjected to an acceleration toward the border of the Universe itself. Since the Universe is a black hole with a fixed radius, we can obtain the density of the Unive...

  6. Restricted Freedom: Negotiating Same-Sex Identifications in the Residential Spaces of a South African University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msibi, Thabo; Jagessar, Valenshia

    2015-01-01

    International higher education research focused on students who claim same-sex identifications in university residential spaces has tended to prioritise the "gay as victim" discourse, often leading to the pathologising of same-sex identification. While there is emerging research seeking to challenge this dimension of scholarship by…

  7. Navigating the Terrain of Third Space: Tensions with/in Relationships in School-University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susan D.; Snow, Jennifer L.; Franklin Torrez, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Using theoretical conceptions of third space and hybrid teacher education, the authors engaged in a collaborative self-study of their practices as university-based teacher educators working in student teaching partnership settings. The authors sought to understand ways in which hybrid teacher educators foster and mediate relationships to work…

  8. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Education, Aeronautics, Space, Autonomy, Earth and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M. (Editor); Lumia, R. (Editor); Tunstel, E., Jr. (Editor); White, B. (Editor); Malone, J. (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first volume of the Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE) Center Press Series on NASA University Research Center's (URC's) Advanced Technologies on Space Exploration and National Service constitute a report on the research papers and presentations delivered by NASA Installations and industry and Report of the NASA's fourteen URC's held at the First National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico from February 16-19, 1997.

  9. The JOVE initiative - A NASA/university Joint Venture in space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, F.; Chappell, R.

    1990-01-01

    The JOVE (NASA/university Joint Venture in space science) initiative is a point program between NASA and institutions of higher education whose aim is to bring about an extensive merger between these two communities. The project is discussed with emphasis on suggested contributions of partnership members, JOVE process timeline, and project schedules and costs. It is suggested that NASA provide a summer resident research associateship (one ten week stipend); scientific on-line data from space missions; an electronic network and work station, providing a link to the data base and to other scientists; matching student support, both undergraduate and graduate; matching summer salary for up to three faculty participants; and travel funds. The universities will be asked to provide research time for faculty participants, matching student support, matching summer salary for faculty participants, an instructional unit in space science, and an outreach program to pre-college students.

  10. A space standards application to university-class microsatellites: The UNISAT experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Filippo; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    Hands-on education is recognized as an invaluable tool to improve students' skills, to stimulate their enthusiasm and to educate them to teamwork. University class satellite programs should be developed keeping in mind that education is the main goal and that university satellites are a unique opportunity to make involved students familiar with all the phases of space missions. Moreover university budgets for education programs are much lower than for industrial satellites programs. Therefore two main constraints must be respected: a time schedule fitting with the student course duration and a low economic budget. These have an impact on the standard which can be followed in university class satellite programs. In this paper university-class satellite standardization is discussed on the basis of UNISAT program experience, reporting successful project achievements and lessons learned through unsuccessful experiences. The UNISAT program was established at the Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale by the Group of Astrodynamics of the University of Rome "La Sapienza" (GAUSS) as a research and education program in which Ph.D. and graduate students have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience on small space missions. Four university satellites (UNISAT, UNISAT-2, UNISAT-3, UNISAT-4), weighing about 10 kg, have been designed, manufactured, tested and launched every two years since 2000 in the framework of this program In the paper, after a brief overview of new GAUSS programs, an analysis of the UNISAT satellites ground test campaign is carried out, identifying the most critical procedures and requirements to be fulfilled. Moreover a device for low earth orbit low-cost satellite end-of-life disposal is presented; this system (SIRDARIA) complies with the international guidelines on space debris.

  11. The educational blogosphere: new university spaces of innovation and teacher training within the european context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Aguaded Gómez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The social software for university teacher training has become a key factor in the experiences of pedagogical innovation at universities within the context of the new challenges in the European Space. This study offers up an experience for didactic use of the blogs of 136 students from the 2008/09 year from a socio-constructive and investigative perspective. Using the blogs covering various university subjects, the conclusion drawn under this paradigm is that blogs are easy-to-use telematic tools in university teaching that greatly encourage students to take an active role, as well as being invaluable tools in assessing that the practical results of that teaching. In sum, blogs are an emerging resource in the educational field.

  12. Lyra’s cosmology of hybrid universe in Bianchi-V space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anil Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vinod Kumar

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we have searched for the existence of Lyra’s cosmology in a hybrid universe with minimal interaction between dark energy and normal matter using Bianchi-V space-time. To derive the exact solution, the average scale factor is taken as a={({t}n{e}kt)}\\frac{1{m}} which describes the hybrid nature of the scale factor and generates a model of the transitioning universe from the early deceleration phase to the present acceleration phase. The quintessence model makes the matter content of the derived universe remarkably able to satisfy the null, dominant and strong energy condition. It has been found that the time varying displacement β(t) co-relates with the nature of cosmological constant Λ(t). We also discuss some physical and geometrical features of the universe.

  13. How the universe got its spots diary of a finite time in a finite space

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Janna

    2002-01-01

    Is the universe infinite, or is it just really big? Does nature abhor infinity? In startling and beautiful prose, Janna Levin's diary of unsent letters to her mother describes what we know about the shape and extent of the universe, about its beginning and its end. She grants the uninitiated access to the astounding findings of contemporary theoretical physics and makes tangible the contours of space and time--those very real curves along which apples fall and planets orbit. Levin guides the reader through the observations and thought-experiments that have enabled physicists to begin charting the universe. She introduces the cosmic archaeology that makes sense of the pattern of hot spots left over from the big bang, a pursuit on the verge of discovering the shape of space itself. And she explains the topology and the geometry of the universe now coming into focus--a strange map of space full of black holes, chaotic flows, time warps, and invisible strings. Levin advances the controversial idea that this map ...

  14. Learning in third spaces: community art studio as storefront university classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm-Bottos, Janis; Reilly, Rosemary C

    2015-03-01

    Third spaces are in-between places where teacher-student scripts intersect, creating the potential for authentic interaction and a shift in what counts as knowledge. This paper describes a unique community-university initiative: a third space storefront classroom for postsecondary students in professional education programs, which also functions as a community art studio for the surrounding neighborhood. This approach to professional education requires an innovative combination of theory, methods, and materials as enacted by the professionals involved and performed by the students. This storefront classroom utilizes collaborative and inclusive instructional practices that promote human and community development. It facilitates the use of innovative instructional strategies including art making and participatory dialogue to create a liminal learning space that reconfigures professional education. In researching the effectiveness of this storefront classroom, we share the voices of students who have participated in this third space as part of their coursework to underscore these principles and practices.

  15. Exploring Chemical Space for Drug Discovery Using the Chemical Universe Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Herein we review our recent efforts in searching for bioactive ligands by enumeration and virtual screening of the unknown chemical space of small molecules. Enumeration from first principles shows that almost all small molecules (>99.9%) have never been synthesized and are still available to be prepared and tested. We discuss open access sources of molecules, the classification and representation of chemical space using molecular quantum numbers (MQN), its exhaustive enumeration in form of the chemical universe generated databases (GDB), and examples of using these databases for prospective drug discovery. MQN-searchable GDB, PubChem, and DrugBank are freely accessible at www.gdb.unibe.ch. PMID:23019491

  16. Dynamical 3-Space: Supernovae and the Hubble Expansion — the Older Universe without Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply the new dynamics of 3-space to cosmology by deriving a Hubble expansion solution. This dynamics involves two constants; G and — the fine structure constant. This solution gives an excellent parameter-free fit to the recent supernova and gamma- ray burst redshift data without the need for “dark energy” or “dark matter”. The data and theory together imply an older age for the universe of some 14.7Gyrs. The 3-space dynamics has explained the bore hole anomaly, spiral galaxy flat rotation speeds, the masses of black holes in spherical galaxies, gravitational light bending and lensing, all without invoking “dark matter” or “dark energy”. These developments imply that a new understanding of the universe is now available.

  17. Stephanie Lynn Budin: The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity. Cambridge u.a.: Cambridge University Press 2008. Stephanie Lynn Budin: The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity. Cambridge u.a.: Cambridge University Press 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Herbert Köck

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Lynn Budin liefert mit vorliegender Studie einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Debatte um die Existenz von Tempelprostitution im Altertum. Systematisch untersucht sie die Quellen zur Tempelprostitution und kann weitgehend überzeugend darlegen, dass die betreffenden Stellen nicht für die Existenz von Tempelprostitution im Altertum sprechen, sondern nur aufgrund von tendenziösen Interpretationen so verstanden wurden. Dabei greift die Studie die Ergebnisse anderer Wissenschaftler/-innen auf, bietet aber – besonders zu Herodot und Strabon – auch neue Erkenntnisse.Stephanie Lynn Budin’s study offers up an important contribution to the debate on the existence of temple prostitution during antiquity. She systematically examines the sources on temple prostitution and can demonstrate, fairly convincingly, that the passages in question do not prove the existence of temple prostitution during antiquity, but instead have been merely understood to do so based on tendentious interpretations. In so doing, the study takes up conclusions offered by other scholars, but it also provides – especially when it comes to Herodotus and Strabo – new insights.

  18. [Probability, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. They represent a practical response to a proposal by CCSM that some elements of probability be introduced in the elementary grades. These materials provide children…

  19. [Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Studies 9-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials are a part of a series of studies sponsored by the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics which reflects the ideas of CCSM regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-12. Feasibility Studies 9-13 contain a wide range of topics. The following are the titles and brief descriptions of these studies. Number…

  20. 76 FR 12729 - Cambridge Environmental Inc; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... number, [EP-W-11-020], Cambridge Environmental Inc., will review, evaluate a portion of a risk assessment... assessment, and the soundness of the conclusions. Develop and enhance risk assessment methods and tools which... recommending improvements to existing tools and methods, or investigating issues related to the risk assessment...

  1. Quantum Gravity (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, C

    2005-01-01

    mechanics, general relativity and other topics. According to the level of the reader, this part can be skipped or studied as interesting material on its own. The penetrating theme of the whole book (its leitmotiv) is background independence. In non-gravitational theories, dynamical fields are formulated on a fixed background spacetime that plays the role of an absolute structure in the theory. In general relativity, on the other hand, there is no background structure - all fields are dynamical. This was a confusing point already during the development of general relativity and led Albert Einstein in 1913 erroneously to give up general covariance before recognizing his error and presenting his final correct field equations that are of course covariant. This story is instructive, circling around the famous 'hole problem', and is told in detail in Rovelli's book. Its solution is that points on a bare manifold do not make sense in physics; everything, including the gravitational field, is dragged around by a diffeomorphism - there is just no background available, only the fields exist. In loop quantum gravity, physical space (called 'quantum geometry') itself is formed by loop-like quantum states: a suitable orthonormal basis is provided by spin-network states (a spin-network is a graph with edges and nodes, where spins are assigned to the edges), and the quantum geometry is a superposition of such states. Time and space in the usual sense have disappeared. In the second half of his book, Rovelli discusses at length the major successes of this approach. First of all, the formalism yields a unique kinematical Hilbert space for the quantum states obeying the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. Secondly, there exist two important operators that are connected, respectively, with area and volume in the classical limit. These operators have a discrete spectrum and thus provide elementary 'quanta' of area and volume. This gives a vague hint of a discrete structure at the Planck

  2. Universal Hodge bundle and Mumford isomorphisms on the abelian inductive limit of Teichmueller spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, I.; Nag, S.; Sullivan, D.

    1994-06-01

    Let M g denote the moduli space of compact Riemann surfaces of genus g. Mumford had proved, for each fixed genus g, that there are isomorphisms asserting that certain higher DET bundles over M g are certain fixed (genus-independent) tensor power of the Hodge line bundle on M g . We obtain a coherent, genus-independent description of the Mumford isomorphisms over certain infinite-dimensional ''universal'' parameter spaces of compact Riemann surfaces (with or without marked points). We work with an inductive limit of Teichmueller spaces comprising complex structures on a certain ''solenoidal Riemann surface'', H ∞,ab , which appears as the inverse limit of an inverse system of surfaces of different general connected by abelian covering maps. We construct the universal Hodge and higher DET line bundles on this direct limit of Teichmueller spaces (in the sense of Shafarevich). The main result shows how such DET line bundles on the direct limit carry coherently-glued Quillen metrics and are related by the appropriate Mumford isomorphisms. Our work can be viewed as a contribution to a non-perturbative formulation of the Polyakov measure structure in a genus-independent fashion. (author). 22 refs

  3. Butterflies Diversity in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Raisa Khairun Nisa'

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies have some roles in environmental as pollinator and bioindicator. Habitat is one of important factor to support butterflies growth. The aim of this research was to describe butterflies diversity in some green open spaces in Malang. Direct observations of butterflies diversity, vegetation structures and abiotic factors in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space were conducted on June 2012. Sampling was took place in each sites using cruising method in three times observation at 07.00, 11.00 a.m. and 3.30 p.m . Data were analyzed by statistical descriptive using Microsoft Excel 2007 and PAST. The result showed that butterflies composition in all sites dominated by Delias sp., Leptosia nina and Eurema venusta. The diversity index of all sites showed moderate rank that indicate communities equilibrium in environment was still good. In this case, Velodrom Green Open Space has the highest one of diversity index, it was about 2,199. Brawijaya University and Jakarta Green Open Space have a high similarity index based on Morisita Index. The highest abundance of butterflies was observed at 11.00-12.30 a.m. Delias sp. and Leptosia nina has temporal spread all day long, while Eurema venusta just in day light.

  4. IntlUni - The Challenges of the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space in the International University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    learning space, and to develop recommendations for how higher education institutions may implement and ensure the sustainability of quality teaching and learning in this space. IntlUni is a three-year Erasmus Academic Network (2012-2015) and has received financial support from the European Commission......IntlUni: The challenges of the multilingual and multicultural learning space in the international university The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented increase in the internationalisation of higher education. This means that more people in higher education than ever before are teaching...... and learning through the medium of a language other than their own first languages. What are the implication of this for lecturers and students? And what are the implications for this for the quality of European higher education programmes? Taking it for granted that the internationalisation of higher...

  5. The Explorer's Guide to the Universe: A Reading List for Planetary and Space Science. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Bevan M. (Compiler); McDonagh, Mark S. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    During the last decade, both scientists and the public have been engulfed by a flood of discoveries and information from outer space. Distant worlds have become familiar landscapes. Instruments in space have shown us a different Sun by the "light" of ultraviolet radiation and X-rays. Beyond the solar system, we have detected a strange universe of unsuspected violence, unexplained objects, and unimaginable energies. We are completely remarking our picture of the universe around us, and scientists and the general public alike are curious and excited about what we see. The public has participated in this period of exploration and discovery to an extent never possible before. In real time, TV screens show moonwalks, the sands of Mars, the volcanoes of Io, and the rings of Saturn. But after the initial excitement, it is hard for the curious non-scientist to learn more details or even to stay in touch with what is going on. Each space mission or new discovery is quickly skimmed over by newspapers and TV and then preserved in technical journals that are neither accessible nor easily read by the average reader. This reading list is an attempt to bridge the gap between the people who make discoveries in space and the people who would like to read about them. The aim has been to provide to many different people--teachers, students, scientists, other professionals, and curious citizens of all kinds--a list of readings where they can find out what the universe is like and what we have learned about it. We have included sections on the objects that seem to be of general interest--the Moon, the planets, the Sun, comets, and the universe beyond. We have also included material on related subjects that people are interested in--the history of space exploration, space habitats, extraterrestrial life, and U F O ' s . The list is intended to be self-contained; it includes both general references to supply background and more specific sources for new discoveries. Although the list can

  6. Introduction to Banach spaces and algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Banach spaces and algebras are a key topic of pure mathematics. Graham Allan's careful and detailed introductory account will prove essential reading for anyone wishing to specialise in functional analysis and is aimed at final year undergraduates or masters level students. Based on the author's lectures to fourth year students at Cambridge University, the book assumes knowledge typical of first degrees in mathematics, including metric spaces, analytic topology, and complexanalysis. However, readers are not expected to be familiar with the Lebesgue theory of measure and integration.The text be

  7. Bioethics of Universal Knowledge: How Space Science is Transforming Global Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kala

    A new universal culture is championing the human race; never before has immersion in the cosmological environment been so clearly presented nor invited as revolutionary a sense of participatory identity to the human race. We are delving into the awareness of a complex relatedness with the expanse of spatial architectures and life that astrophysics and cosmology are revealing. History is marked by waves of interest and inquiry into the possibilities of the existence of other worlds. Since the Renaissance, building of telescopes has been pursued in their quest; now Kepler and other space missions are leading us into direct apprehension of these worlds, scattered across the cosmological landscape. This affords a unique repertoire of dimensionalities in which to re-construe our global cultural evolution and identity. Spatial education, with related social science and humanities, are facilitating the actualization of a universal culture, redefining the collective global heritage, with infinity as our home. The potential significance of space sciences to the human cognitive environment is yet to be fully ascertained. We now understand that the entire history of the universe informs each and every particle and spin of the fabric of existence. The implications of this knowledge have the power to facilitate our overcoming many social diseases such as racism, nationalism and the ideological delusions that tolerate such activities as warfare. Space sciences may help to purge the human cognitive atmosphere of those ills and ignorance that sap global resources, challenging global sustainability, from the economic to the psychosocial. Were the full implications of our united origins and destiny as a cosmic organism to be applied to how we live as a species on the Earth, there would be adequate funds for all manner of science and education such as to transform the global human and ecological landscape in ways as yet only dreamt or fictionalized. The bioethics of universal

  8. University Satellite Consortium and Space Education in Japan Centered on Micro-Nano Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasuka, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2002-01-01

    in Japan especially centered on micro or nano class satellites. Hands-on training using micro-nano satellites provide unique opportunity of space education to university level students, by giving them a chance to experience the whole space project cycle from mission creation, satellite design, fabrication, test, launch, operation through analysis of the results. Project management and team working are other important skills that can be trained in these projects. include 1) low cost, which allows one laboratory in university to carry out a project, 2) short development period such as one or two year, which enables students to obtain the results of their projects before they graduate, and 3) small size and weight, which enables fabrication and test within usually very narrow university laboratory areas. In Japan, several projects such as CanSat, CubeSat or Whale Observation Satellite have been carried out, proving that micro-nano satellites provide very unique and valuable educational opportunity. with the objective to make a university student and staff community of these micro-nano satellite related activities in Japan. This consortium aims for many activities including facilitating information and skills exchange and collaborations between member universities, helping students to use ground test facilities of national laboratories, consulting them on political or law related matters, coordinating joint development of equipments or projects, and bridging between these university activities and the needs or interests of the people in general. This kind of outreach activity is essential because how to create missions of micro-nano satellites should be pursued in order for this field to grow larger than a merely educational enterprise. The final objectives of the consortium is to make a huge community of the users, mission creators, investors and manufactures(i.e., university students) of micro-nano satellites, and provide a unique contribution to the activation of

  9. Dispersion Distance and the Matter Distribution of the Universe in Dispersion Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Sigurdson, Kris

    2015-09-18

    We propose that "standard pings," brief broadband radio impulses, can be used to study the three-dimensional clustering of matter in the Universe even in the absence of redshift information. The dispersion of radio waves as they travel through the intervening plasma can, like redshift, be used as a cosmological distance measure. Because of inhomogeneities in the electron density along the line of sight, dispersion is an imperfect proxy for radial distance and we show that this leads to calculable dispersion-space distortions in the apparent clustering of sources. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a new class of radio transients that are the prototypical standard ping and, due to their high observed dispersion, have been interpreted as originating at cosmological distances. The rate of fast radio bursts has been estimated to be several thousand over the whole sky per day and, if cosmological, the sources of these events should trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. We calculate the dispersion-space power spectra for a simple model where electrons and FRBs are biased tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe, and we show that the clustering signal could be measured using as few as 10 000 events. Such a survey is in line with what may be achieved with upcoming wide-field radio telescopes.

  10. Insertion and professional development of starting university professors: the need for spaces for pedagogical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Maria Boessio Atrib Zanchet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper is the result of a research on twenty-eight starting university teachers in four universities in southern Brazil and seeks to understand their concern on pedagogical discussion spaces as a possible support for the development of their teaching practice. The research started from the point that starting teachers should insert themselves within higher education culture and find pedagogical support to develop their lectures. As a rule, they have recently obtained a doctoral degree, complying with the required academic title for their tenure, but with scanty or no pedagogical preparation. The subjects answered a semi-structured interview, with issues on the challenges, difficulties and possibilities of pedagogical support pointed out when they started their activities. The quantitative data form the corpus analyzed used in the analysis. The paper is based on studies by Garcia (1999, 2009b, Vaillant and Garcia (2012 and others. Results showed that pedagogical education and professional development of university professors, developed through pedagogical spaces, are essential for and welcomed by these teachers. An overall policy is required that valorizes the teaching tasks as fundamental for achieving teaching quality.

  11. Elephants in space the past, present and future of life and the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the history and future of life and the universe, written at a level that any educated lay-person can understand and enjoy. It describes our place in time and space, how we got here and where we are going. It will take you on a journey from the beginning of time to the end of the universe to uncover our origins and reveal our destiny. It will explain how mankind acquired this knowledge starting from the beginning of civilization when the ancient Greeks first began to ask questions about the nature of the world around them. Ben Moore takes us on a path of discovery that connects astrophysics with subjects as varied as biology, neuroscience and evolution; from the origin of atoms to how stars shine and die, from ants and elephants to space travel and extra-terrestrial life. But as our universe grows older and its stars fade away and stop shining, can life continue for eternity or is all life destined for complete extinction? And what is the purpose of all of this anyway?! On the German edition...

  12. Researcher’s Academic Culture in the Educational Space of the University: Linguo-Axiological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Semenog

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the nature of the concepts “classic University”, “cultural and educational space of the University”, “research activity of future professional”, “researcher’s academic culture” and approach to academic culture as the basis of research culture in a university. It is defined that the concept of academic culture is complex. We are talking in general about the culture at the university, values, traditions, norms, rules of scientific research, and the scientific language culture, the culture of spirituality and morality, the culture of communication between science tutors and students, a culture of unique pedagogical action of master and his social, moral responsibility for the studying results. The formation of academic culture and own style, is better to develop on the positions of personal-activity, competence, axiological, cultural, acmeological approaches.

  13. Philosophy at Cambridge, Newsletter of the Faculty of Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lecky-Thompson, Jenni

    2009-01-01

    Philosophy Newsletter. Articles by: Edward Craig - From the Chairman. Onora O'Neill - "It's the newspapers I can't stand. Serena Olsaretti - The 2004 Annual Royal Institute of Philosophy Conference. Mary Leng - Mathematical Knowledge Conference. Postgraduate Conference. Jane Heal - Facts, Fables and Funds. Hugh Mellor - Uses and Abuses of Probability. Amanda Boyle - Nobody Knows Anything: Philosophy, Film and Me. Jaime Whyte - Seven Years at Cambridge Alex Oliver...

  14. IntlUni - The Challenges of the Multilingual and Multicultural Learning Space in the International University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    IntlUni: The challenges of the multilingual and multicultural learning space in the international university The past decade has witnessed an unprecedented increase in the internationalisation of higher education. This means that more people in higher education than ever before are teaching...... education adds value – or has the potential to add value – to the programmes offered and the learning outcomes achieved by students, the overarching aim of IntlUni is to identify the quality criteria that characterize or should characterize teaching and learning in the multilingual and multicultural...

  15. Exploring the Extreme Universe with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.; Digel, Seth W.; Racusin, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    In ways similar to experiments in nuclear and particle physics, high-energy astrophysics usesgamma rays and energetic charged particles toprobe processes that involve large energy transfers.Since its launch in 2008, the international Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been exploringnatural particle accelerators and the interactionsof high-energy particles in the universe. Withsources ranging from thunderstorms on Earth to galaxies and exploding stars in distant parts of the cosmos, the telescopes subjects of study are almostas diverse as were those of the scientist whose name it bears.

  16. Active learning in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Lapuerta, Victoria; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    This work describes the innovative activities performed in the field of space education at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the center engaged by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations for scientific experiments on board the International Space Station (E-USOC). These activities have been integrated along the last academic year of the Aerospatiale Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where the students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite by using demonstrator satellites. With the acquired skills, the students participate in a training process centered on Project Based Learning, where the students work in groups to perform the conceptual design of a space mission, being each student responsible for the design of a subsystem of the satellite and another one responsible of the mission design. In parallel, the students perform a training using a ground station, installed at the E-USOC building, which allow them to learn how to communicate with satellites, how to download telemetry and how to process the data. This also allows students to learn how the E-USOC works. Two surveys have been conducted to evaluate the impact of these techniques in the student engineering skills and to know the degree of satisfaction of students with respect to the use of these learning methodologies.

  17. A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Leubner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluctuations are recognized in a large variety of space plasmas by increasingly high resolution, in situ observations as mirror wave mode structures. A typical requirement for the excitation of mirror modes is a dominant perpendicular pressure in a high-beta plasma environment. Contrary, we demonstrate from a realistic kinetic analysis how details of the velocity space distributions are of considerable significance for the instability threshold. Introducing the most common characteristics of observed ion and electron distributions by a mixed suprathermal-loss-cone, we derive a universal mirror instability criterion from an energy principle for collisionless plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features provides a strong source for the generation of mirror wave mode activity, reducing drastically the instability threshold. In particular, a number of space-related examples illuminate how the specific structure of the velocity space distribution dominates as a regulating excitation mechanism over the effects related to changes in the plasma parameters.

  18. The University of Arizona Nanosat Program: Making Space accessible to scientific and commercial packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, U.; Fevig, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    For the last couple of years we have been engaged in building nanosatellites within a student-mentor framework. The satellites are 10x10x10cm cubes, have a maximum mass of 1 kg, and power of a few watts. The standardized "cube-sat" form factor was suggested by Bob Twiggs of Stanford University so that a common launch platform could be utilized and more Universities could participate. We have now built four "cube-sats': a launchable Engineering model, Rincon 1 & 2, (funded by Rincon corporation), and Alcatel funded by Alcatel Espace. The costs for the four satellites are \\250,000. Launch costs using a Russian SS-18 are typically \\10,000 per kg. The payload for Rincon 1 & 2 is a sophisticated telecommunications board using only 10 mw of transmitting power. The Alcatel payload consists of three communications IC's whose radiation exposure and annealing properties will be studied over a period of years. Future nanosatellites will have considerable value in providing low cost access to space for experiments in nanotechnology, space electronics, micropropulsion, radiation experiments, astrobionics and climate change studies. For the latter area we are considering experiments to monitor the solar constant, the solar UV spectrum, the chromospheric activity through the Mg II index, the Earth's Albedo, etc. For this purpose we are developing a slightly larger satellite, 20x20x20cm and 10 kg. We have built a C-MOS camera with a 1 ms exposure time for attitude determination, and we are working with Honeywell Industries to develop micro-reaction wheels for attitude control. We are also working on micro-propulsion units with the Air Force and several aerospace companies. Preliminary calculations show that we can develop delta-V's of 5km/s which will allow us to visit 5% (about 100) of the NEA population or possibly some comets. We firmly believe a vigorous nanosatellite program will allow useful space experiments for costs of millions of Dollars instead of the present tens of

  19. The Learning Exchange: A Shared Space for the University of British Columbia and Vancouver's Downtown Eastside Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Leahy, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Learning Exchange was established by the University of British Columbia (UBC) in 1999 in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES). The challenge has been to create a shared space for learning exchanges between two very different communities: a research-intensive university and an inner city area most commonly depicted as a place of hopelessness.…

  20. Space, Scale and Languages: Identity Construction of Cross-Boundary Students in a Multilingual University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingyue Michelle; Tong, Ho Kin

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the notions of scale and space, this paper investigates identity construction among a group of mainland Chinese cross-boundary students by analysing their language choices and linguistic practices in a multilingual university in Hong Kong. The research illustrates how movement across spaces by these students produces varying index…

  1. Activating Built Pedagogy: A Genealogical Exploration of Educational Space at the University of Auckland Epsom Campus and Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by a new teaching initiative that involved a redesign of conventional classroom spaces at the University of Auckland's Epsom Campus, this article considers the relationship between architecture, the built environment and education. It characterises the teaching space of the Epsom Campus as the embodiment of educational policy following…

  2. Project for the Space Science in Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M.; Oberst, J.; Malinnikov, V.; Shingareva, K.; Grechishchev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Konopikhin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction: Based on the proposal call of the Government of Russian Federation 40 of international scientists came to Russia for developing and support-ing research capabilities of national educational institutions. Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK) and invited scientist Prof. Dr. Jurgen Oberst were awarded a grant to establish a capable research facility concerned with Planetary Geodesy, Cartography and Space Exploration. Objectives: The goals of the project are to build laboratory infrastructure, and suitable capability for MIIGAiK to participate in the planning, execution and analyses of data from future Russian planetary mis-sions and also to integrate into the international science community. Other important tasks are to develop an attractive work place and job opportunities for planetary geodesy and cartography students. For this purposes new MIIGAiK Extraterrestrial Laboratory (MExLab) was organized. We involved professors, researchers, PhD students in to the projects of Moon and planets exploration at the new level of Russian Space Science development. Main results: MExLab team prepare data for upcom-ing Russian space missions, such as LUNA-GLOB and LUNA-RESOURSE. We established cooperation with Russian and international partners (IKI, ESA, DLR, and foreign Universities) and actively participated in international conferences and workshops. Future works: For the future science development we investigated the old Soviet Archives and received the access to the telemetry data of the Moon rovers Lunokhod-1 and Lunokhod-2. That data will be used in education purposes and could be the perfect base for the analysis, development and support in new Russian and international missions and especially Moon exploration projects. MExLab is open to cooperate and make the consortiums for science projects for the Moon and planets exploration. Acknowledgement: Works are funded by the Rus-sian Government (Project name: "Geodesy, cartography and the

  3. Measuring the universe our historic quest to chart the horizons of space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, Kitty

    1999-01-01

    More than 2,000 years ago, Eratosthenes, in Alexandria, used a stick, a hole in the ground, sunllght at summer solstice, and elementary geometry to measure the circumference of the Earth with surprising accuracy, long before anyone was able to circumnavigate it. Today, scientists are attempting to measure the entire universe and to determine its origin. Although the methods have changed, the quest to chart the horizons of space and time continues to be one of the great adventures of science. Measuring the Universe is an eloquent chronicle of the men and women– from Aristarchus to Cassini, Sir Isaac Newton to Henrietta Leavitt and Stephen Hawking–who have gradually unlocked the mysteries of "how far" and in so doing have changed our ideas about the size and nature of the universe and our place in it. Kitty Ferguson reveals their methods to have been as inventive as their results were–and are–eye-opening. Advances such as Copernicus's revolutionary insights about the arrangement of the solar system, Wi...

  4. The University of Nebraska at Omaha Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandgenett, Neal

    2000-01-01

    Within the context of innovative coursework and other educational activities, we are proposing the establishment of a University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Center for the Use of Space Data in Teaching and Learning. This Center will provide an exciting and motivating process for educators at all levels to become involved in professional development and training which engages real life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The Center will facilitate innovative courses (including online and distance education formats), systematic degree programs, classroom research initiatives, new instructional methods and tools, engaging curriculum materials, and various symposiums. It will involve the active participation of several Departments and Colleges on the UNO campus and be well integrated into the campus environment. It will have a direct impact on pre-service and in-service educators, the K12 (kindergarten through 12th grade) students that they teach, and other college students of various science, mathematics, and technology related disciplines, in which they share coursework. It is our belief that there are many exciting opportunities represented by space data and imagery, as a context for engaging mathematics, science, and technology education. The UNO Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning being proposed in this document will encompass a comprehensive training and dissemination strategy that targets the improvement of K-12 education, through changes in the undergraduate and graduate preparation of teachers in science, mathematics and technology education.

  5. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  6. Thermal comfort in urban green spaces: a survey on a Dutch university campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafei; de Groot, Rudolf; Bakker, Frank; Wörtche, Heinrich; Leemans, Rik

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the influence of urban green infrastructure (UGI) on outdoor human thermal comfort, a survey and physical measurements were performed at the campus of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in spring and summer 2015. Three hundred eighty-nine respondents were interviewed in five different green spaces. We aimed to analyze people's thermal comfort perception and preference in outdoor urban green spaces, and to specify the combined effects between the thermal environmental and personal factors. The results imply that non-physical environmental and subjective factors (e.g., natural view, quiet environment, and emotional background) were more important in perceiving comfort than the actual thermal conditions. By applying a linear regression and probit analysis, the comfort temperature was found to be 22.2 °C and the preferred temperature was at a surprisingly high 35.7 °C. This can be explained by the observation that most respondents, who live in temperate regions, have a natural tendency to describe their preferred state as "warmer" even when feeling "warm" already. Using the Kruskal-Wallis H test, the four significant factors influencing thermal comfort were people's exposure time in green spaces, previous thermal environment and activity, and their thermal history. However, the effect of thermal history needs further investigation due to the unequal sample sizes of respondents from different climate regions. By providing evidence for the role of the objective and subjective factors on human thermal comfort, the relationship between UGI, microclimate, and thermal comfort can assist urban planning to make better use of green spaces for microclimate regulation.

  7. Value of H, space-time patterns, vacuum, matter, expansion of the Universe, alternative cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To the experimental uncertainties on the present value H0 of the Lundmark - Lemaître-Hubble constant, fundamental theoretical uncertainties of several kinds should also be added. In standard Cosmology, consistency problems are really serious. The cosmological constant is a source of well-known diffculties while the associated dark energy is assumed to be at the origin of the observed acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. But in alternative cosmologies, possible approaches without these problems exist. An example is the pattern based on the spinorial space-time (SST we introduced in 1996-97 where the H t = 1 relation (t = cosmic time = age of the Universe is automatically generated by a pre-existing cosmic geometry before standard matter and conventional forces, including gravitation and relativity, are introduced. We analyse present theoretical, experimental and observational uncertainties, focusing also on the possible sources of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe as well as on the structure of the physical vacuum and its potential cosmological role. Particular attention is given to alternative approaches to both Particle Physics and Cosmology including possible preonic constituents of the physical vacuum and associated pre-Big Bang patterns. A significant example is provided by the cosmic SST geometry together with the possibility that the expanding cosmological vacuum releases energy in the form of standard matter and dark matter, thus modifying the dependence of the matter energy density with respect to the age and size of our Universe. The SST naturally generates a new leading contribution to the value of H. If the matter energy density decreases more slowly than in standard patterns, it can naturally be at the origin of the observed acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. The mathematical and dynamical structure of standard Physics at very short distances can also be modified by an underlying preonic

  8. Value of H, space-time patterns, vacuum, matter, expansion of the Universe, alternative cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2017-12-01

    To the experimental uncertainties on the present value H0 of the Lundmark - Lemaître-Hubble constant, fundamental theoretical uncertainties of several kinds should also be added. In standard Cosmology, consistency problems are really serious. The cosmological constant is a source of well-known diffculties while the associated dark energy is assumed to be at the origin of the observed acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. But in alternative cosmologies, possible approaches without these problems exist. An example is the pattern based on the spinorial space-time (SST) we introduced in 1996-97 where the H t = 1 relation (t = cosmic time = age of the Universe) is automatically generated by a pre-existing cosmic geometry before standard matter and conventional forces, including gravitation and relativity, are introduced. We analyse present theoretical, experimental and observational uncertainties, focusing also on the possible sources of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe as well as on the structure of the physical vacuum and its potential cosmological role. Particular attention is given to alternative approaches to both Particle Physics and Cosmology including possible preonic constituents of the physical vacuum and associated pre-Big Bang patterns. A significant example is provided by the cosmic SST geometry together with the possibility that the expanding cosmological vacuum releases energy in the form of standard matter and dark matter, thus modifying the dependence of the matter energy density with respect to the age and size of our Universe. The SST naturally generates a new leading contribution to the value of H. If the matter energy density decreases more slowly than in standard patterns, it can naturally be at the origin of the observed acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. The mathematical and dynamical structure of standard Physics at very short distances can also be modified by an underlying preonic structure. If preons are

  9. Cambridge IGCSE and international certificate French foreign language

    CERN Document Server

    Grime, Yvette; Thacker, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This brand-new Student Book provides a grammar-led approach with extensive exam preparation that will help you develop independent, culturally aware students of French ready for the exam. The book is written to the latest Cambridge International Examinations syllabus by experienced teachers. Extensive use of French reflects the style of the exams and, with specific advice and practice, it helps students use the acquired skills to their best ability. Topics on Francophone cultures are integrated throughout to ensure students gain the cultural awareness that is at the heart of this qualification

  10. Assessing government’s fiscal space for moving towards universal health coverage in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouland Thin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In line with the global trend, it becomes clear that the Cambodian government’s policy direction is leaning toward universal health coverage, the agreed target within the newly ratified Sustainable Development Goals. Thus, the health system will need to be further reformed to achieve this target by 2030. To assess if the Cambodian government is able to increase the proportion of health budget out of the total government expenditure, this study will evaluate the government’s fiscal space and propose feasible options where and to what extent new resources can be generated for improving the health system. Design The data used for this analysis were obtained from World Bank online database and a series of Cambodia’s economic updates produced by the World Bank office in Cambodia. We observed the trends over time from 2011 to 2018 to provide insights into the extent to which fiscal space for health can be expanded. Findings By assessing the key fiscal indicators, it is unlikely that the Cambodian government is able to increase the proportion of health budget out of its total budget in the short run. Health budget is increased in absolute terms but not in real terms, which is linked tightly to the predicted 7% economic growth per annum. Conclusion The proportion of health budget from now until 2018 is expected to remain the same, and the revenues raised through pre‐payment mechanisms are still too small to address the pressing issues in the current health system. The Ministry of Health could benefit from putting a much stronger effort on improving efficiency and equity in the distribution of resources, as well as transparency and accountability, to achieve the immediate objectives for universal health coverage.

  11. Eyes on the Universe: The Legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope and Looking to the Future with the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. Most recently, the complete refurbishment of Hubble in 2009 has given new life to the telescope and the new science instruments have already produced groundbreaking science results, revealing some of the most distant galaxy candidates ever discovered. Despite the remarkable advances in astrophysics that Hubble has provided, the new questions that have arisen demand a new space telescope with new technologies and capabilities. I will present the exciting new technology development and science goals of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which is currently being built and tested and will be launched this decade.

  12. Universality and the dynamical space-time dimensionality in the Lorentzian type IIB matrix model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yuta [KEK Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nishimura, Jun [KEK Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI),1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Asato [Department of Physics, Shizuoka University,836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2017-03-27

    The type IIB matrix model is one of the most promising candidates for a nonperturbative formulation of superstring theory. In particular, its Lorentzian version was shown to exhibit an interesting real-time dynamics such as the spontaneous breaking of the 9-dimensional rotational symmetry to the 3-dimensional one. This result, however, was obtained after regularizing the original matrix integration by introducing “infrared” cutoffs on the quadratic moments of the Hermitian matrices. In this paper, we generalize the form of the cutoffs in such a way that it involves an arbitrary power (2p) of the matrices. By performing Monte Carlo simulation of a simplified model, we find that the results become independent of p and hence universal for p≳1.3. For p as large as 2.0, however, we find that large-N scaling behaviors do not show up, and we cannot take a sensible large-N limit. Thus we find that there is a certain range of p in which a universal large-N limit can be taken. Within this range of p, the dynamical space-time dimensionality turns out to be (3+1), while for p=2.0, where we cannot take a sensible large-N limit, we observe a (5+1)d structure.

  13. Reginald Crundall Punnett: first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-09-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett's career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of "partial coupling" in the sweet pea (later "linkage") and to the diagram known as Punnett's square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described.

  14. Cheminformatics Research at the Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julian E; Bender, Andreas; Glen, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    The Centre for Molecular Informatics, formerly Unilever Centre for Molecular Science Informatics (UCMSI), at the University of Cambridge is a world-leading driving force in the field of cheminformatics. Since its opening in 2000 more than 300 scientific articles have fundamentally changed the field of molecular informatics. The Centre has been a key player in promoting open chemical data and semantic access. Though mainly focussing on basic research, close collaborations with industrial partners ensured real world feedback and access to high quality molecular data. A variety of tools and standard protocols have been developed and are ubiquitous in the daily practice of cheminformatics. Here, we present a retrospective of cheminformatics research performed at the UCMSI, thereby highlighting historical and recent trends in the field as well as indicating future directions.

  15. FIREBall-2: Trailblazing observations of the space UV circumgalactic medium (Columbia University, Co-I Proposal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiminovich, David

    Columbia University is a Co-I institution in a collaborative research program with Caltech, the Lead Institution (PI: Christopher Martin). The Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2) is designed to discover and map faint emission from the circumgalactic medium of low redshift galaxies (0.3zz 0.7, conduct a targeted search of circumquasar (CQM) media for selected targets, and conduct follow up on likely tar-gets selected via GALEX and a pilot survey conducted by our group. We will also conduct a statistical search for the faint IGM via statistical stacking of our data. The FIREBall-2 team includes two female graduate students in key roles (both of whom are finishing their PhDs in 2016) and is overseen by a female Postdoctoral scholar (supported by NSF AAPF and Caltech Millikan Fellowships, in addition to a recent Roman Technology Fellowship award). Additional funding is necessary to keep this highly qualified balloon team together for a second flight. FIREBall-2 will test key technologies and science strategies for a future space mission to map emission from CGM and IGM baryons. Its flights will continue to provide important training for the next generation of space astrophysicists working in UV and other wavelength instrumentation. Most importantly, FIREBall-2 will detect emission from the CGM of nearby galaxies, providing the first census of the density and kinematics of this material for low z galaxies and open-ing a new field of CGM science.

  16. The proposed EROSpace institute, a national center operated by space grant universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul L.; Swiden, LaDell R.; Waltz, Frederick A.

    1993-01-01

    The "EROSpace Institute" is a proposed visiting scientist program in associated with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center (EDC). The Institute would be operated by a consortium of universities, possible drawn from NASA's Space Grant College and Fellowship Program consortia and the group of 17 capability-enhancement consortia, or perhaps from consortia though out the nation with a topical interest in remote sensing. The National Center for Atmospheric Research or the Goddard Institute for Space Studies provide models for the structure of such an institute. The objectives of the Institute are to provide ready access to the body of data housed at the EDC and to increase the cadre of knowledgeable and trained scientists able to deal with the increasing volume of remote sensing data to become available from the Earth Observing System. The Institute would have a staff of about 100 scientists at any one time, about half permanent staff, and half visiting scientists. The latter would include graduate and undergraduate students, as well as faculty on temporary visits, summer fellowships, or sabbatical leaves. The Institute would provide office and computing facilities, as well as Internet linkages to the home institutions so that scientists could continue to participate in the program from their home base.

  17. Mapping of the Available Chemical Space versus the Chemical Universe of Lead-Like Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Arkadii; Horvath, Dragos; Afonina, Valentina; Marcou, Gilles; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Varnek, Alexandre

    2018-03-20

    This is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive analysis to date based on generative topographic mapping (GTM) of fragment-like chemical space (40 million molecules with no more than 17 heavy atoms, both from the theoretically enumerated GDB-17 and real-world PubChem/ChEMBL databases). The challenge was to prove that a robust map of fragment-like chemical space can actually be built, in spite of a limited (≪10 5 ) maximal number of compounds ("frame set") usable for fitting the GTM manifold. An evolutionary map building strategy has been updated with a "coverage check" step, which discards manifolds failing to accommodate compounds outside the frame set. The evolved map has a good propensity to separate actives from inactives for more than 20 external structure-activity sets. It was proven to properly accommodate the entire collection of 40 m compounds. Next, it served as a library comparison tool to highlight biases of real-world molecules (PubChem and ChEMBL) versus the universe of all possible species represented by FDB-17, a fragment-like subset of GDB-17 containing 10 million molecules. Specific patterns, proper to some libraries and absent from others (diversity holes), were highlighted. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Design strategies for the International Space University's variable gravity research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    A variable gravity research facility named 'Newton' was designed by 58 students from 13 countries at the International Space University's 1989 summer session at the Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourge, France. The project was comprehensive in scope, including a political and legal foundation for international cooperation, development and financing; technical, science and engineering issues; architectural design; plausible schedules; and operations, crew issues and maintenance. Since log-term exposure to zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body, the main goal was to design a unique variable gravity research facility which would find a practical solution to this problem, permitting a manned mission to Mars. The facility would not duplicate other space-based facilities and would provide the flexibility for examining a number of gravity levels, including lunar and Martian gravities. Major design alternatives included a truss versus a tether based system which also involved the question of docking while spinning or despinning to dock. These design issues are described. The relative advantages or disadvantages are discussed, including comments on the necessary research and technology development required for each.

  19. Research on natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries in Jinan under the perspective of energy-efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zengzhang

    2017-11-01

    The natural lighting design in the reading spaces of university libraries not only influences physical and mental health of readers but also concerns the energy consumption of the libraries. The scientific and rational design of natural lighting is the key to the design of energy saving for physical environment of the reading space. The paper elaborates the present situation and existed problems of natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries across Jinan region based on characteristics of light climate of Jinan region and concrete utilization of reading spaces in university libraries, and combining field measurement, survey, research and data analysis of reading spaces in Shandong Women’s University’s library. The paper, under the perspective of energy-efficiency, puts forward proposals to improve natural lighting in the reading spaces of university libraries from five aspects, such as adjustment of interior layout, optimization of outer windows design, employment of the reflector panel, design lighting windows on inner walls and utilization of adjustable sun shading facilities.

  20. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in chemical education1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Gary M.; Ferrence, Gregory M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) is a vast and ever growing compendium of accurate three-dimensional structures that has massive chemical diversity across organic and metal–organic compounds. For these reasons, the CSD is finding significant uses in chemical education, and these applications are reviewed. As part of the teaching initiative of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a teaching subset of more than 500 CSD structures has been created that illustrate key chemical concepts, and a number of teaching modules have been devised that make use of this subset in a teaching environment. All of this material is freely available from the CCDC website, and the subset can be freely viewed and interrogated using WebCSD, an internet application for searching and displaying CSD information content. In some cases, however, the complete CSD System is required for specific educational applications, and some examples of these more extensive teaching modules are also discussed. The educational value of visualizing real three-dimensional structures, and of handling real experimental results, is stressed throughout. PMID:20877495

  1. The Cambridge Structural Database in retrospect and prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Colin R; Allen, Frank H

    2014-01-13

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) was established in 1965 to record numerical, chemical and bibliographic data relating to published organic and metal-organic crystal structures. The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now stores data for nearly 700,000 structures and is a comprehensive and fully retrospective historical archive of small-molecule crystallography. Nearly 40,000 new structures are added each year. As X-ray crystallography celebrates its centenary as a subject, and the CCDC approaches its own 50th year, this article traces the origins of the CCDC as a publicly funded organization and its onward development into a self-financing charitable institution. Principally, however, we describe the growth of the CSD and its extensive associated software system, and summarize its impact and value as a basis for research in structural chemistry, materials science and the life sciences, including drug discovery and drug development. Finally, the article considers the CCDC's funding model in relation to open access and open data paradigms. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Recombinant DNA in Cambridge: lessons for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federow, H.

    1977-09-01

    The 1976 experience of Cambridge, Massachusetts, in settling the recombinant DNA research issue is unique in recent history as the first instance of essentially lay panels judging the conduct of scientific research. Furthermore, because the panel was composed of citizens who would be affected by the research, the experience suggests a model for conflict resolution in other areas of public controversy. With one of these, nuclear energy, the controversy has two important points in common: although the primary burden of any accident would be borne by the local community, benefits of the DNA research or reactor operation accrue to a much broader range of people; and in both issues there is a need to resolve the question, ''How safe is safe enough.'' It is therefore proposed that a panel similar to the Cambridge one could be established to deal with the controversy surrounding a proposed nuclear plant. In any community where there was such controversy, a panel could be convened to assess whether the plant was acceptable to that community. Such a panel would be composed of members of the community who were not affected directly by the plant. It would also have to have a restricted range of inquiry, oriented toward the specifics of the proposed plant. Such a plant review panel, under properly designed procedures, could change the licensing process to one concerned solely with safety and provide an appropriate forum for issues concerning the acceptability of nuclear power

  3. Sediment remediation of the Hespeler Mill Pond, Cambridge, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeloni, D.; Eby, M.; Jarvis, S.; Martin, P. [Univ. of Guelph, School of Engineering, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: danielle.angeloni@earthtech.ca

    2002-06-15

    'Full text:' Low dissolved oxygen levels and large accumulated sediment remediation alternatives were examined to assemble the Hespeler Mill Pond, Cambridge (HMP) into a healthier and more desirable recreational area in the City of Cambridge. The theory that a large amount of sediment has been deposited into the HMP from the Speed River upstream over a number of years predicts the depressed oxygen levels, high nutrient-loading rates and the odour problems in the summer months. The initial phase in the remediation plan for this project involved extensive background research and investigation. The focus was on determining the characteristics of the sediment and the history of the pond, to ultimately decide if the sediment was the source of the issues. Dissolved oxygen field tests and sediment sampling were conducted to get information on the magnitude of the problem and the environmental hazards potentially present in the pond. The pond was modelled utilising the Streeter-Phelps oxygen-sag model to predict the oxygen deficit. Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD{sub 5}) testing was completed to determine the oxygen demand in the pond. These tests were conducted by using water samples obtained from various sample points at the pond. The proposed solution is a combined dredging and aeration approach. Mechanical dredging using a clamshell bucket and the installation of aerators is expected to solve the dissolved oxygen and water quality issues. (author)

  4. Learning lessons from the past: A historical exploration of a century of business education at Oxford and Cambridge (1900s-2000s)

    OpenAIRE

    Arena , Lise; Dang , Rani Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to identify a set of generative mechanisms which are shared by business schools' process of development in their search for strategic comparative advantage. We use a processual approach (Pettigrew, 1997) based on two detailed historical studies supported by unexplored archival data and interviews: the case of the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and the case of the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge (1990s - 2000s). Preliminary results indi...

  5. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  6. The universe in a mirror the saga of the Hubble Space Telescope and the visionaries who built it

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmerman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope has produced the most stunning images of the cosmos humanity has ever seen. It has transformed our understanding of the universe around us, revealing new information about its age and evolution, the life cycle of stars, and the very existence of black holes, among other startling discoveries. But it took an amazing amount of work and perseverance to get the first space telescope up and running. The Universe in a Mirror tells the story of this telescope and the visionaries responsible for its extraordinary accomplishments. Robert Zimmerman takes readers beh

  7. Unveiling the UHE Universe from space: the JEM-EUSO mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, A.; Fenu, F. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Sand 1, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ebisuzaki, T.; Shinozaki, K. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EUSO) is an international mission designed to explore the origin and nature of the of ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR), with energies E>5.5x10{sup 19} eV, aiming at an integrated exposure of {approx}10{sup 6} km{sup 2} sr yr at E>10{sup 20} eV. Consisting of a near-UV 2.65 m diameter telescope with a field of view of 60{sup o}, JEM-EUSO looks down from space, monitoring the dark side of the Earth, to detect the fluorescence and Cherenkov light emitted along the linear track generated by a cosmic particle traversing the atmosphere. The energy and the arrival direction of each particle will be measured while the all 4{pi} sky is monitored. The primary science goal of the mission is to identify the sources of the highest energy particles, and to measure their flux and spectrum, to unveil the mechanisms for the production, acceleration, and in situ propagation of these extreme particles. Other exploratory objectives of the mission include the study of the galactic and local extragalactic magnetic field; the detection of high-energy gamma rays and neutrinos, and tests of relativity and quantum gravity effects at extreme energies. Other aspects of fundamental physics that will be studied include the top-down models and the behavior of the neutrino cross sections at extreme energies. JEM-EUSO is also expected to conduct a systematic survey of the not yet well known energetic phenomena of the Earth's atmosphere. The mission is currently in the phase A study by JAXA and has been included in the ELIPS research pool of the European Space Agency. JEM-EUSO will be launched by an H2B rocket in the Japanese fiscal year 2016 and will be transferred to the ISS by an H2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). It will be attached to the external experiment platform of the Japanese 'KIBO' module of the ISS. In this paper we summarize the science case, the science objectives, the technological and

  8. Gambling with the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  9. Application of space technologies for the purpose of education at the Belarusian state university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liashkevich, Siarhey

    Application of space technologies for the purpose of education at the Aerospace Educational Center of Belarusian state university is discussed. The aim of the work is to prepare launch of small satellite. Students are expected to participate in the design of control station, systems of communication, earth observation, navigation, and positioning. Benefit of such project-based learning from economical perspective is discussed. At present our training system at the base of EyasSat classroom satellite is used for management of satellite orientation and stabilization system. Principles of video processing, communication technologies and informational security for small spacecraft are developed at the base of Wi9M-2443 developer kit. More recent equipment allows obtaining the skills in digital signal processing at the base of FPGA. Development of ground station includes setup of 2.6 meter diameter dish for L-band, and spiral rotational antennas for UHF and VHF bands. Receiver equipment from National Instruments is used for digital signal processing and signal management.

  10. Genomic potential hypothesis of evolution: a concept of biogenesis in habitable spaces of the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Christian

    2002-11-01

    The new hypothesis of evolution establishes a contiguity of life sciences with cosmology, physics, and chemistry, and provides a basis for the search for life on other planets. Chemistry is the sole driving force of the assembly of life, under the subtle guidance exerted by bonding orbital geometry. That phenomenon leads to multiple origins that function on the same principles but are different to the extent that their nucleic acid core varies. Thus, thoughts about the origins of life and the development of complexity have been transferred from the chance orientation of the past to the realm of atomic structures, which are subject to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetics. Evolution is a legitimate subject of basic science, and the complexity of life will submit to the laws of chemistry and physics as the problem is viewed from a new perspective. The paradigm connects life to the big events that formed every sphere of our living space and that keeps conditions fine-tuned for life to persist, perhaps a billion years or more. The "genomic potential" hypothesis leads to the prediction that life like ours is likely to exist in galaxies that are as distant from the origin of the universe as the Milky Way, and that the habitable zone of our galaxy harbors other living planets as well. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Galactically inertial space probes for the direct measurement of the metric expansion of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnani, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Astrometric data from the future GAIA and OBSS missions will allow a more precise calculation of the local galactic circular speed, and better measurements of galactic movements relative to the CMB will be obtained by post-WMAP missions (ie Planck). Contemporary development of high specific impulse electric propulsion systems (ie VASIMIR) will enable the development of space probes able to properly compensate the galactic circular speed as well as the resulting attraction to the centre of our galaxy. The probes would appear immobile to an ideal observer fixed at the centre of the galaxy, in contrast of every other galactic object, which would appear moving according to their local galactic circular speed and their proper motions. Arranging at least three of these galactically static probes in an extended formation and measuring reciprocal distances of the probes over time with large angle laser ranges could allow a direct measurement of the metric expansion of the universe. Free-drifting laser-ranged targets released by the spacecrafts could also be used to measure and compensate solar system's induced local perturbations. For further reducing local effects and increase the accuracy of the results, the distance between the probes should be maximized and the location of the probes should be as far as possible from the Sun and any massive object (ie Jupiter, Saturn). Gravitational waves could also induce random errors but data from GW observatories like the planned LISA could be used to correct them.

  12. Capacity building for the space sector: Microsatellite as a way forward. The example of the university of sains Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal Allaudin, Mohd; Peter, Nicolas; Azlin Md Said, Md; Nor, Khalid

    2005-07-01

    Due to the large capital investment and high risk generally associated with space activities only a limited number of countries have been able to benefit from the use of space technology. Space technology is often seen as an important tool to allow the transition from a developing country to a developed country. As Malaysia's vision is to be a developed country by 2020, it need to enhance the capability and capacity of its space technology at an accelerated pace. At this stage, Malaysia can be considered as new in space activities, since the first satellite successfully launched into orbit was only in 1997. This paper describes a microsatellite project undertaken in a university environment in Malaysia by the School of Aerospace Engineering from the University of Sains Malaysia (USM) where the students will be participating in the development and operations. Such involvement aim at forming an integral part of the students education extending the traditional way of teaching with practical classes thus providing hands-on experience and offering skills and experience needed by the future Malaysian space workforce, and to expand Malaysian space capacity building.

  13. Quantum field theory in curved space-times: with an application to the reduced model of deSitter universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, I. J.

    1995-06-01

    The work deals with space-times with fixed background metric. The topics were arranged in a straight course, the first chapter collects basic facts on Lorentzian manifolds as time-orientability, causal structure, ... Further free neutral scalar fields and spinor fields described by the Klein-Gordon equation resp. the Dirac equation are dealt with. Having in mind the construction of the Weyl algebra and the Fermi algebra in the second chapter, it was put emphasis on the structure of the spaces of solutions of these equations: In the first case the space of solutions is a symplectic vector space in a canonical manner, in the second case a Hilbert space. It was made some effort to stay as general as possible. Most of the material in the second chapter already exists for several years, but it is largely scattered over various journal articles. In the third chapter the construction of a vacuum on the special example of deSitter universe is described. A close investigation of a recent work by J. Bros and U. Moschella made it possible to refine a result concerning temperature felt by an accelerated observer in deSitter space. The last part of this thesis is concerned with vacua for spinor fields on the two-dimensional deSitter universe. A procedure introduced by R. Haag, H. Narnhofer and U. Stein for four dimensional space-times does not seem to work in two dimensions. (author)

  14. Early Opportunities Research Partnership Between Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard for Engaging Underrepresented STEM Students in Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; Venable, D. D.; Hoban, S.; Demoz, B.; Bleacher, L.; Meeson, B. W.; Farrell, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are collaborating to engage underrepresented STEM students and expose them to an early career pathway in NASA-related Earth & Space Science research. The major goal is to instill interest in Earth and Space Science to STEM majors early in their academic careers, so that they become engaged in ongoing NASA-related research, motivated to pursue STEM careers, and perhaps become part of the future NASA workforce. The collaboration builds on a program established by NASA's Dynamic Response of the Environments of Asteroids, the Moon and the moons of Mars (DREAM2) team to engage underrepresented students from Howard in summer internships. Howard leveraged this program to expand via NASA's Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) funding. The project pairs Howard students with GSFC mentors and engages them in cutting-edge Earth and Space Science research throughout their undergraduate tenure. The project takes a multi-faceted approach, with each year of the program specifically tailored to each student's strengths and addressing their weaknesses, so that they experience a wide array of enriching research and professional development activities that help them grow both academically and professionally. During the academic year, the students are at Howard taking a full load of courses towards satisfying their degree requirements and engaging in research with their GSFC mentors via regular telecons, e-mail exchanges, video chats & on an average one visit per semester to GSFC for an in-person meeting with their research mentor. The students extend their research with full-time summer internships at GSFC, culminating in a Capstone Project and Senior Thesis. As a result, these Early Opportunities Program students, who have undergone rigorous training in the Earth and Space Sciences, are expected to be well-prepared for graduate school and the NASA workforce.

  15. 75 FR 58431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service... in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge... was a project of Harvard University faculty in 1972. No known individuals were identified. No...

  16. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe. Spinorial space-time and a new approach to Friedmann-like equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2014-04-01

    Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95), while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2) spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH) expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of the standard

  17. Geometry Report; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Gabriel

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of the Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. This report deals with some seventh grade mathematical concepts taught at Cambridge Friends' School. The discovery approach was utilized by the teacher in order to…

  18. Anneli Randla kaitses doktorikraadi Cambridge'is / Anneli Randla ; interv. Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Randla, Anneli, 1970-

    1999-01-01

    5. mail kaitses Cambridge'is esimese eesti kunstiteadlasena doktorikraadi Anneli Randla. Töö teema: kerjusmungaordukloostrite arhitektuur Põhja-Euroopas. Juhendaja dr. Deborah Howard. Doktorikraadile esitatavatest nõudmistest, doktoritöö kaitsmisest, magistrikraadi kaitsnu õppimisvõimalustest Cambridge's.

  19. Laboratory and space experiments as a key to the plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1993-08-01

    Almost all of the known matter in our universe is in the state of plasma. Because of the complexity of the plasma state, a reliable understanding has to be built on empirical knowledge, since theoretical models easily become misleading unless guided by experiment or observation. Cosmical plasmas cover a vast range of densities and temperatures, but in important respects they can be classified into three main categories: high, medium, and low density plasmas. The ability of a plasma to carry electric current is very different in different kinds of plasma, varying from high density plasmas, where the ordinary Ohms law applies to low density plasmas, where no local macroscopic relation needs to exist between electric field and current density. According to classical formulas, the electrical conductivity of many plasmas should be practically infinite. But on the basis of laboratory experiments and in situ measurements in space we now know that in important cases the plasmas ability to carry electric current can be reduced by many powers of ten, and even collisionless plasmas may support significant magnetic-field aligned electric fields. A small number of processes responsible for this have been identified. They include anomalous resistivity, magnetic mirror effect and electric double layers. One of the consequences is possible violation of the frozen field condition, which greatly simplifies the analysis but can be dangerously misleading. Another is the possibility of extremely efficient release of magnetically stored energy. Cosmical plasmas have a strong tendency to form filamentary and cellular structures, which complicates their theoretical description by making homogeneous models inappropriate. In situ observations in the Earths magnetosphere have revealed completely unexpected and still not fully understood chemical separation processes that are likely to be important also in astrophysical plasmas. 108 refs

  20. University of Tennessee Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research had projects with space applications in six major areas: laser materials processing, artificial intelligence/expert systems, space transportation, computational methods, chemical propulsion, and electric propulsion. The closeout status of all these projects is addressed.

  1. University of Tennessee Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research had projects with space applications in six major areas: laser materials processing, artificial intelligence/expert systems, space transportation, computational methods, chemical propulsion, and electric propulsion. The closeout status of all these projects is addressed.

  2. Evaluation of Urban Spaces from the Perspective of Universal Design Principles: The Case of Konya/Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Filiz Alkan Meshur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During the process of accessing services provided within urban interior and outer spaces the elderly and disabled individuals encounter with a myriad of problems due to the limitations posed by structured environments. This limitation hinders elderly and disabled individuals from mobility without assistance, which in turn negatively affects their full participation to urban and social life. Rearrangement of urban spaces to meet the needs of elderly and disabled individuals would correspondingly bolster life quality of the entire range of users. Within the scope of present research, as mandated by universal design principles to stick to plans and designs approaches inclusive for all users, it is aimed to conduct evaluations on the use of urban outer spaces situated within Konya city center. In the hypothetical and theoretical part of this paper, the perception of disability throughout historical process has been examined from a sociological perspective. In addition, concept of universal design, its principles and gravity have also been elaborated. In the part dealing with the case study, outer spaces within Konya city center have been analyzed with respect to universal design principles and a range of suggestions have been developed.

  3. Cambridge Polytrauma Pathway: Are we making appropriately guided decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynell-Mayow, William; Guevel, Borna; Quansah, Benjamin; O'Leary, Ronan; Carrothers, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    Addenbrooke's Hospital, the Major Trauma Centre for the East of England Trauma Network, received 1070 major trauma patients between 1st January and 31st December 2014. In order to improve care, an audit was performed of 59 patients meeting our own selection criteria for orthopaedic polytrauma between 1st January 2013 and 31st December 2013. The Cambridge Polytrauma Pathway was devised through NCEPOD guidelines, literature review, internal and external discussion. It facilitates provision of best practice Early Appropriate Care, encompassing - multidisciplinary consultant decisions around the patient in our Neurological and Trauma Critical Care Unit, early full body trauma CT scans, serial measurements of lactate and fibrinogen levels, and out-of-hours orthopaedic theatre reserved for life-and-limb threatening injuries. Re-audit was conducted of 15 patients meeting selection criteria, admitted between 1st October 2014 and 31st March 2015. Significant improvements in recording of lactate and fibrinogen were demonstrated, both on admission (lactate - ppolytrauma patients and it is recommended that either the GOS-E, or the EQ-5D scoring systems be introduced to assess this. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The relationship between students’ perceptions of the University of Pretoria’s on-campus green spaces and attention restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Liprini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has suggested that natural green areas provide several psychological benefits to individuals. One such benefit is the restoration of attention capacities, an advantage that is of particular importance to university students. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine where students spend their free time on campus at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, how they perceive their on-campus green spaces and the extent to which they found these spaces restorative. Participants responded to a three-part questionnaire, investigating demographic characteristics, green space usage, and the Perceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine which of the green spaces contributed most significantly to overall PRS scores. All green areas made significant contributions, but the campus’s botanical garden was the greatest contributor to PRS. The findings of this study serve to encourage tertiary institutions to protect their green spaces, as the psychological well-being and attention restoration of students are affected by it.

  5. Mainstream Issues of Education and Public Awareness of Space Activities and Sciences among universities and Scientific Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir

    This paper is an effort to study and analyze several constraints and issues of space technology and education that organizations other than governmental organizations face in awareness program. In recent years, advancements in technologies have made it possible for Volunteer and Technical Communities, non-government organizations, private agencies and academic research institutions to provide increasing support to space education management and emphasis on response efforts. Important cornerstones of this effort and support are the possibility to access and take advantage of satellite imagery as well as the use of other space-based technologies such as telecommunications satellites and global navigation satellite systems included in main curriculum plus the implementation of programs for use of high class sophisticated technologies used by industries to the students and researchers of non-space faring nations. The authors recognize the importance of such new methodologies for education and public Awareness. This paper demonstrates many hurdles universities and scientific institutions face including lack of access in terms of financial and technical resources for better support. A new model for coordinated private sector partnership in response to space sciences and education has been discussed. In depth analysis and techniques need to connect these pioneering communities with the space industry as well as the space governmental agencies, with special emphasis on financial constraints. The paper mandates its role to promote the use of space-based information; its established networks bringing together national institutions responsible for these space based activities, as well as other end users, and space solution experts; and its technical foundation, particularly in the area of information technologies. To help building a tighter cooperation and further understanding among all these communities, paper delivers an intensive report and solutions for future

  6. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  7. Space-Time Uncertainty and Cosmology: a Proposed Quantum Model of the Universe [ 245Kb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosto S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a cosmological model of the quantum universe. The aim of the model is (i to identify the possible mechanism that governs the matter/antimatter ratio existing in the universe and concurrently to propose (ii a reasonable growth mechanism of the universe and (iii a possible explanation of the dark energy. The concept of timespace uncertainty, on which is based the present quantum approach, has been proven able to bridge quantum mechanics and relativity.

  8. A Space-Age University without Campus or Faculty Offers Its TV Courses Nationwide via Satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl M.

    1987-01-01

    The National Technological University, a consortium of engineering schools, offers programs based on satellite transmissions of live and videotaped graduate courses to industrial sites around the country. (MSE)

  9. Findings from the Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship, a Year-Long Longitudinal Psychiatry Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Elisa; Hirsh, David; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Griswold, Todd; Wesley Boyd, J

    2018-06-01

    The Harvard Medical School Cambridge Integrated Clerkship is a longitudinal integrated clerkship that has provided an alternative clinical model for medical education in psychiatry since its inception in 2004. This study was undertaken in an effort to better understand the student experience of the Cambridge Integrated Clerkship and how it may have impacted students' perceptions of and interest in psychiatry, as well as performance. Qualitative surveys were sent via e-mail to the first 11 student cohorts who had completed the Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (from 2004 to 2014) and for whom we had e-mail addresses (N = 100), and the free-text responses were coded thematically. All available standardized scoring data and residency match data for Cambridge Integrated Clerkship graduates were obtained. From 2006 to 2014, 12 out of 73 Cambridge Integrated Clerkship students who entered the match chose a psychiatry residency (16.4%), four times more than students in traditional clerkships at Harvard Medical School (3.8% of 1355 students) or the national average (4.1% of 146,066 US applicants). Thirty of the 100 surveyed Cambridge Integrated Clerkship graduates (30%) responded to the qualitative survey with free-text remarks on a number of themes. Cambridge Integrated Clerkship students compared positively to their classmates in terms of standardized test performance. Their fourfold higher match rate into psychiatry compared to other students raises intriguing questions as to what role a longitudinal clerkship might have played in developing interest in psychiatry as a career.

  10. Quantum space loop quantum gravity and the search for the structure of space, time, and the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2018-01-01

    Today we are blessed with two extraordinarily successful theories of physics. The first is Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which describes the large-scale behaviour of matter in a curved spacetime. This theory is the basis for the standard model of big bang cosmology. The discovery of gravitational waves at the LIGO observatory in the US (and then Virgo, in Italy) is only the most recent of this theory's many triumphs. The second is quantum mechanics. This theory describes the properties and behaviour of matter and radiation at their smallest scales. It is the basis for the standard model of particle physics, which builds up all the visible constituents of the universe out of collections of quarks, electrons and force-carrying particles such as photons. The discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN in Geneva is only the most recent of this theory's many triumphs. But, while they are both highly successful, these two structures leave a lot of important questions unanswered. They are also based on ...

  11. HELP (INFORMATION ELECTRONIC RESOURCE "CHRONICLE OF ONU: DATES, FACTS, EVENTS": HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY IN INFORMATION SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Гавриленко

    2016-03-01

    Object of research is the help information resource "The chronicle of the Odessa national university of I. I. Mechnikov: dates, facts, events". The main objective of our article – to state the main methodological bases of creation of information resource. One of advantages of information resource is possibility of continuous updating and replenishment by new information. Main objective of creation of this information resource is systematization of material on stories of the Odessa national university of I. I. Mechnikov from the date of his basis to the present, ensuring interactive access to information on the main dates, the most significant events in life of university. The base of research are sources on the history of university, chronology of historical development, formation of infrastructure, cadres and scientific researches. In information resource the main stages of development, functioning and transformation of the Odessa University are analyzed, information on its divisions is collected. For creation of this information resource in Scientific library the method of work was developed, the main selection criteria of data are allocated. This information resource have practical value for all who is interested in history of university, historians, scientists-researchers of history of science and the city of Odessa.

  12. Exploring the Birth and Evolution of the Universe: How Detectors Have Revolutionized Space Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Samuel H.

    2012-01-01

    The past century has seen tremendous advances in the capability of instruments used for astronomical imaging and spectroscopy. Capabilities of instruments have expanded in many dimensions; the scale of telescopes has grown tremendously, the wavelengths used for astronomy have grown from visible light to the full electromagnetic spectrum, extending from gamma rays to low frequency radio waves. Additional advances have been enabled by the availability of space facilities, which eliminate the effects of the earths atmosphere and magnetosphere, and allow cooling of instruments to avoid instrumental thermal radiation. Even with all these advances, the increase in capability of detection systems has produced truly revolutionary improvements in capability. Today, I will describe the advances in astronomical detection from the photographic plates of the early 20th century to the giant high efficiency focal planes being developed for modern space and ground based astronomical instrument. I will review the demanding performance requirements set by space astronomy, and show how the detector community has risen to the challenge in producing high performance detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the James Webb Space Telescope, now under development.

  13. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  14. From Physical Campus Space to a Full-view Figure: University Atlas Compiling Based on `Information Design' Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ge; Tang, Xi; Zhu, Feng

    2018-05-01

    Traditional university maps, taking campus as the principal body, mainly realize the abilities of space localization and navigation. They don't take full advantage of map, such as multi-scale representations and thematic geo-graphical information visualization. And their inherent propaganda functions have not been entirely developed. Therefore, we tried to take East China Normal University (ECNU) located in Shanghai as an example, and integrated various information related to university propaganda need (like spatial patterns, history and culture, landscape ecology, disciplinary constructions, cooperation, social services, development plans and so on). We adopted the frontier knowledge of `information design' as well as kinds of information graphics and visualization solutions. As a result, we designed and compiled a prototype atlas of `ECNU Impression' to provide a series of views of ECNU, which practiced a new model of `narrative campus map'. This innovative propaganda product serves as a supplement to typical shows with official authority, data maturity, scientificity, dimension diversity, and timing integrity. The university atlas will become a usable media for university overall figure shaping.

  15. The universe in your hand a journey through space, time and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Galfard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Imagine if The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy were a real, practical book about the mysteries of the universe...The Universe In Your Hand takes us on a wonder-filled journey to the surface of our dying Sun, shrinks us to the size of an atom and puts us in the deathly grip of distant Black Holes. Along the way you might come to understand, really understand, the mind-bending science that underpins modern life, from Quantum Mechanics to Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Through brilliant storytelling and humour rather than graphs and equations, internationally renowned astrophysicist Christophe Galfard has written an instant classic that brings the astonishing beauty of the universe to life - and takes us deep into questions about the beginning of time and the future of humanity.

  16. Late time acceleration of the 3-space in a higher dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin

    2013-01-01

    We present cosmological solutions for (1+3+n)-dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity with an arbitrary dilaton coupling constant w and exponential dilaton self-interaction potentials in the string frame. We focus particularly on the class in which the 3-space expands with a time varying deceleration parameter. We discuss the number of the internal dimensions and the value of the dilaton coupling constant to determine the cases that are consistent with the observed universe and the primordial nucleosynthesis. The 3-space starts with a decelerated expansion rate and evolves into accelerated expansion phase subject to the values of w and n, but ends with a Big Rip in all cases. We discuss the cosmological evolution in further detail for the cases w = 1 and w = ½ that permit exact solutions. We also comment on how the universe would be conceived by an observer in four dimensions who is unaware of the internal dimensions and thinks that the conventional general relativity is valid at cosmological scales

  17. Late time acceleration of the 3-space in a higher dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin

    2013-02-01

    We present cosmological solutions for (1+3+n)-dimensional steady state universe in dilaton gravity with an arbitrary dilaton coupling constant w and exponential dilaton self-interaction potentials in the string frame. We focus particularly on the class in which the 3-space expands with a time varying deceleration parameter. We discuss the number of the internal dimensions and the value of the dilaton coupling constant to determine the cases that are consistent with the observed universe and the primordial nucleosynthesis. The 3-space starts with a decelerated expansion rate and evolves into accelerated expansion phase subject to the values of w and n, but ends with a Big Rip in all cases. We discuss the cosmological evolution in further detail for the cases w = 1 and w = ½ that permit exact solutions. We also comment on how the universe would be conceived by an observer in four dimensions who is unaware of the internal dimensions and thinks that the conventional general relativity is valid at cosmological scales.

  18. Dynamical 3-Space Predicts Hotter Early Universe: Resolves CMB-BBN 7-Li and 4-He Abundance Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The observed abundances of 7-Li and 4-He are significantly inconsistent with the predictions from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN when using the $Lambda$CDM cosmological model together with the value for $Omega_B h^2 = 0.0224pm0.0009$ from WMAP CMB fluctuations, with the value from BBN required to fit observed abundances being $0.009 < Omega_B h^2 < 0.013$. The dynamical 3-space theory is shown to predict a 20% hotter universe in the radiation-dominated epoch, which then results in a remarkable parameter-free agreement between the BBN and the WMAP value for $Omega_B h^2$. The dynamical 3-space also gives a parameter-free fit to the supernova redshift data, and predicts that the flawed $Lambda$CDM model would require $Omega_Lambda = 0.73$ and $Omega_M = 0.27$ to fit the 3-space dynamics Hubble expansion, and independently of the supernova data. These results amount to the discovery of new physics for the early universe that is matched by numerous other successful observational and experimental tests.

  19. Dynamical 3-Space Predicts Hotter Early Universe: Resolves CMB-BBN 7-Li and 4-He Abundance Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The observed abundances of 7 Li and 4 He are significantly inconsistent with the pre- dictions from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN when using the CDM cosmolog- ical model together with the value for B h 2 = 0 : 0224 0 : 0009 from WMAP CMB fluctuations, with the value from BBN required to fit observed abundances being 0 : 009 < B h 2 < 0 : 013. The dynamical 3-space theory is shown to predict a 20% hot- ter universe in the radiation-dominated epoch, which then results in a remarkable parameter-free agreement between the BBN and the WMAP value for B h 2 . The dy- namical 3-space also gives a parameter-free fit to the supernova redshift data, and pre- dicts that the flawed CDM model would require = 0 : 73 and M = 0 : 27 to fit the 3-space dynamics Hubble expansion, and independently of the supernova data. These results amount to the discovery of new physics for the early universe that is matched by numerous other successful observational and experimental tests.

  20. D-branes in a big bang/big crunch universe: Misner space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikida, Yasuaki; Nayak, Rashmi R.; Panigrahi, Kamal L.

    2005-01-01

    We study D-branes in a two-dimensional lorentzian orbifold R 1,1 /Γ with a discrete boost Γ. This space is known as Misner or Milne space, and includes big crunch/big bang singularity. In this space, there are D0-branes in spiral orbits and D1-branes with or without flux on them. In particular, we observe imaginary parts of partition functions, and interpret them as the rates of open string pair creation for D0-branes and emission of winding closed strings for D1-branes. These phenomena occur due to the time-dependence of the background. Open string 2→2 scattering amplitude on a D1-brane is also computed and found to be less singular than closed string case

  1. D-branes in a big bang/big crunch universe: Misner space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikida, Yasuaki [Theory Group, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nayak, Rashmi R. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, ' Tor Vergata' , Rome 00133 (Italy); Panigrahi, Kamal L. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, ' Tor Vergata' , Rome 00133 (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    We study D-branes in a two-dimensional lorentzian orbifold R{sup 1,1}/{gamma} with a discrete boost {gamma}. This space is known as Misner or Milne space, and includes big crunch/big bang singularity. In this space, there are D0-branes in spiral orbits and D1-branes with or without flux on them. In particular, we observe imaginary parts of partition functions, and interpret them as the rates of open string pair creation for D0-branes and emission of winding closed strings for D1-branes. These phenomena occur due to the time-dependence of the background. Open string 2{yields}2 scattering amplitude on a D1-brane is also computed and found to be less singular than closed string case.

  2. Thermal comfort in urban green spaces: a survey on a Dutch university campus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yafei; Groot, de Dolf; Bakker, Frank; Wörtche, Heinrich; Leemans, Rik

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the influence of urban green infrastructure (UGI) on outdoor human thermal comfort, a survey and physical measurements were performed at the campus of the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in spring and summer 2015. Three hundred eighty-nine respondents were interviewed

  3. Universities as Spaces for Engaging the Other: A Pedagogy of Encounter for Intercultural and Interreligious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Scherto

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation of Higher Education coupled with students' mobility across the globe in the 21st century has led to universities in many countries having to deal with an unprecedented flow of human diversity. Such diversity can become a potential source of conflict due to increased "otherness", but at the same time, it also presents…

  4. A Bricolage Exploration in "Genkan" Space: "Tengu" and Adjunct TEFL in the Japanese University Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsed, Craig; Wright, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research focusing on a group of adjunct teachers of English employed in Japanese universities. Grounded in interpretive epistemology foregrounding constructionist traditions, this research employed bricolage as way of inquiring into, then representing, these teacher's experiences utilising multi-perspectival,…

  5. The aims of initiation ceremonies at universities: Comparisons in time and space1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Jansen van Rensburg

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article initiation practices at South African universities are analysed and compared with initiation ceremonies described in anthropological literature. It is argued that any initiation ceremony has at least the partial aim of preparing initiates for the roles and functions in society or specific organizations. Naturally a reasonable degree of harmony between the intent of initiation on the one hand and the values of an institution on the other hand can be expected. The intention of initiation usually is to prepare one for a position or rote by means of the expression of certain values. On the question whether this harmony between ideas and actions is found in the case of existent initiation ceremonies at South African universities, the answer is negative. These ceremonies do not aim to convey and develop attitudes and values essential to a university and in fact do not prepare first-year students for their new environment and a community of scholars. The way in which universities transcend their authority by condoning and officially allowing the demeaning initiation practices is also questioned.

  6. The Margins as "Third Space": EAP Teacher Professionalism in Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) in the Canadian university setting often experience professional marginalization in terms of lack of status, clarity of mandate, or administrative home within their institutions. Despite having broadly benefited the ESL/EAL sector in Canada, traditional trait-focused professionalization efforts have…

  7. Will Gender Equality Ever Fit In? Contested Discursive Spaces of University Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissl, Katharina; Striedinger, Angelika; Sauer, Birgit; Hofbauer, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Similar to other European countries, the introduction of non-academic, especially managerial, criteria in higher education has shaped and altered Austrian universities since over a decade. This paper presents the results of a frame analysis of Austrian higher education debates from 1993 until 2010. It outlines how reforms in higher education were…

  8. Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves: the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, T.A.; Binetruy, P.; Centrella, J.; Finn, L.; Hogan, C.; Nelemans, G.A.; Phinney, S.

    2007-01-01

    - For the LISA International Science Team: LISA is a joint NASA/ESA space mission designed to measure gravitational waves in the band from 0.1 mHz to 0.1 Hz, a band that is richly populated by strong sources of gravitational waves. Signals will come from a wider range of sources: massive black holes

  9. Anti-hierarchical evolution of the active galactic nucleus space density in a hierarchical universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations show that the space density of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) peaks at higher redshifts than that of faint AGNs. This downsizing trend in the AGN evolution seems to be contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario. In this study, we present the AGN space density evolution predicted by a semi-analytic model of galaxy and AGN formation based on the hierarchical structure formation scenario. We demonstrate that our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the AGN space density evolution. The reason for the downsizing trend in our model is a combination of the cold gas depletion as a consequence of star formation, the gas cooling suppression in massive halos, and the AGN lifetime scaling with the dynamical timescale. We assume that a major merger of galaxies causes a starburst, spheroid formation, and cold gas accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We also assume that this cold gas accretion triggers AGN activity. Since the cold gas is mainly depleted by star formation and gas cooling is suppressed in massive dark halos, the amount of cold gas accreted onto SMBHs decreases with cosmic time. Moreover, AGN lifetime increases with cosmic time. Thus, at low redshifts, major mergers do not always lead to luminous AGNs. Because the luminosity of AGNs is correlated with the mass of accreted gas onto SMBHs, the space density of luminous AGNs decreases more quickly than that of faint AGNs. We conclude that the anti-hierarchical evolution of the AGN space density is not contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario.

  10. Anti-hierarchical evolution of the active galactic nucleus space density in a hierarchical universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoki, Motohiro [Faculty of Business Administration, Tokyo Keizai University, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8502 (Japan); Ishiyama, Tomoaki [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R. [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Nagashima, Masahiro, E-mail: enokimt@tku.ac.jp [Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Recent observations show that the space density of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) peaks at higher redshifts than that of faint AGNs. This downsizing trend in the AGN evolution seems to be contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario. In this study, we present the AGN space density evolution predicted by a semi-analytic model of galaxy and AGN formation based on the hierarchical structure formation scenario. We demonstrate that our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the AGN space density evolution. The reason for the downsizing trend in our model is a combination of the cold gas depletion as a consequence of star formation, the gas cooling suppression in massive halos, and the AGN lifetime scaling with the dynamical timescale. We assume that a major merger of galaxies causes a starburst, spheroid formation, and cold gas accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We also assume that this cold gas accretion triggers AGN activity. Since the cold gas is mainly depleted by star formation and gas cooling is suppressed in massive dark halos, the amount of cold gas accreted onto SMBHs decreases with cosmic time. Moreover, AGN lifetime increases with cosmic time. Thus, at low redshifts, major mergers do not always lead to luminous AGNs. Because the luminosity of AGNs is correlated with the mass of accreted gas onto SMBHs, the space density of luminous AGNs decreases more quickly than that of faint AGNs. We conclude that the anti-hierarchical evolution of the AGN space density is not contradictory to the hierarchical structure formation scenario.

  11. NASA’s Universe of Learning: Providing a Direct Connection to NASA Science for Learners of all Ages with ViewSpace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Rhue, Timothy; Smith, Denise A.; Squires, Gordon K.; Biferno, Anya A.; Lestition, Kathleen; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Godfrey, John; Lee, Janice C.; Manning, Colleen

    2018-06-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is the result of a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University, and is one of 27 competitively-selected cooperative agreements within the NASA Science Mission Directorate STEM Activation program. The NASA's Universe of Learning team draws upon cutting-edge science and works closely with Subject Matter Experts (scientists and engineers) from across the NASA Astrophysics Physics of the Cosmos, Cosmic Origins, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. As one example, NASA’s Universe of Learning program is uniquely able to provide informal learning venues with a direct connection to the science of NASA astrophysics via the ViewSpace platform. ViewSpace is a modular multimedia exhibit where people explore the latest discoveries in our quest to understand the universe. Hours of awe-inspiring video content connect users’ lives with an understanding of our planet and the wonders of the universe. This experience is rooted in informal learning, astronomy, and earth science. Scientists and educators are intimately involved in the production of ViewSpace material. ViewSpace engages visitors of varying backgrounds and experience at museums, science centers, planetariums, and libraries across the United States. In addition to creating content, the Universe of Learning team is updating the ViewSpace platform to provide for additional functionality, including the introduction of digital interactives to make ViewSpace a multi-modal learning experience. During this presentation we will share the ViewSpace platform, explain how Subject Matter Experts are critical in creating content for ViewSpace, and how we are addressing audience

  12. Space-time structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1985-01-01

    In response to repeated requests this classic book on space-time structure by Professor Erwin Schrödinger is now available in the Cambridge Science Classics series. First published in 1950, and reprinted in 1954 and 1960, this lucid and profound exposition of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravitation still provides valuable reading for students and research workers in the field.

  13. Maps into projective spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha N Bhosle. Acknowledgements. This work was initiated during the author's visit to the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge,. UK as a visiting fellow to participate in the programme Moduli Spaces (MOS) during. June 2011. She would like to thank the Institute for hospitality and excellent working environment. References.

  14. Learning spaces in the countryside: university students and the Harper assemblage

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Using the concepts of affect and assemblage, this paper expands the boundaries of the geographies of education by shifting the student focus from the urban to the rural. Based on the findings of student interviews, it demonstrates how a multiscalar and diversely constituted network of material and non-material things (including buildings, animals and plants) coalesces with students to create affective atmospheres of learning in a specialist agri-food and land-based rural university. This lear...

  15. Small universal cellular automata in hyperbolic spaces a collection of jewels

    CERN Document Server

    Margenstern, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbolic geometry is an essential part of theoretical astrophysics and cosmology. Besides specialists of these domains, many specialists of new domains start to show a growing interest both to hyperbolic geometry and to cellular automata. This is especially the case in biology and computer science.    This book gives the reader a deep and efficient introduction to an algorithmic approach to hyperbolic geometry. It focuses the attention on the possibilities to obtain in this frame the power of computing everything a computer can compute, that is to say: universality.    The minimal ways to get universality are invistigated in a large family of tilings of the hyperbolic plane. In several cases the best results are obtained.In all cases, the results are close to the theoretical best values. This gives rise to fantastic illustrations: the results are jewels in all meanings of the word. ------------------------    Maurice MARGENSTERN is professor emeritus at the University of Lorraine, he is a member of LI...

  16. Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

  17. Space Industry Study Industrial College of the Armed Forces National Defense University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    information technologies , especially fiber, cable, and cellular communications, which forced space systems away from old market roles and denied entry to... technologies fill market niches. As technology matures, small satellites have been viewed a partial solution to this cycle, enabling faster programs...years, the largely unforeseen growth in the internet has proven a valuable new market for satellite service providers. And over the past few years

  18. Towards science educational spaces as dynamic and coauthored communities of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Koshi

    2008-04-01

    In this essay review, four studies around the themes of identity and globalization are summarized and analyzed. The researchers' perspectives are generally grounded in Brown and Campione's ideas on situated knowledge ( Classroom lessons: Integrating cognitive theory and classroom practice (pp. 229-270). Cambridge: The MIT Press/Bradford Books, 1994) and Lave and Wenger's definition of learning as an activity fostered through participation in communities of practice ( Situated learning. Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: University of Cambridge Press, 1991). Questions about the goals of science education spaces, the nature of globalization in relation to practices in schools, the role of identities-in-practice in relation to participation in communities of practice such as classrooms are explored. Recommendations for key design features in effective science educational spaces, based upon the findings presented in the collection of four studies, are offered. School, it is suggested here, functions best as a clearing house for the myriad science-related stories student participants generate in their various communities of practice (e.g., within popular culture, family, community, informal educational sites). In this way, school has the potential to construct bridges between multiple student experiences and identities-in-practice.

  19. Universities as spaces for engaging the other: A pedagogy of encounter for intercultural and interreligious education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Scherto

    2016-08-01

    Internationalisation of Higher Education coupled with students' mobility across the globe in the 21st century has led to universities in many countries having to deal with an unprecedented flow of human diversity. Such diversity can become a potential source of conflict due to increased "otherness", but at the same time, it also presents an ideal lifelong learning opportunity for engaging the other through intercultural and interreligious education. This paper begins with a literature review, exploring the challenges of international higher education and the opportunities it offers in fostering intercultural and interreligious dialogue and deeper engagement across values, beliefs, world views, habits of mind and ways of being. The review highlights that on the one hand, rich diversity and otherness within universities can easily be built up in so-called educated individuals as givens and therefore be treated with insensitivity or indifference. On the other hand, diversity can evoke the possibility for the exchange of thoughts, values and world views, sharing experiences, engaging with each other's foreignness, and making the encounter a real enrichment and transformation. Next, using the narrative of a case study about conflicts within an international students' residence, the author illustrates the necessity of encounter and engagement with otherness as decisive avenues for intercultural learning and interreligious understanding. Through a further analysis of the case study, she establishes that pedagogical strategies formulated around encounter, dialogue and engagement should be integrated into the students' life at international universities so that they serve to bridge religions, cultures, world views and other differences, thus creating a sustainable culture of dialogue and peace. The paper concludes by suggesting a few key elements which seem useful for implementing a pedagogy of encounter in both formal and informal lifelong learning settings.

  20. Wuhan University Deep-space Orbit Determination and Gravity Recovery System(WUDOGS and Its Application Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE Mao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available WUDOGS(Wuhan University deep-space orbit determination and gravity recovery system is a software system designed for deep spacecraft precise orbit determination and planetary gravity recovery, developed independently at Wuhan University. WUDOGS now has the function for Lunar and Mars spacecraft precision orbit determination. Its design pattern and main function are briefly introduced. The cross verification test(CVT between WUDOGS and state of the art planetary precise orbit determination software GEODYN-Ⅱ are elaborated. The results show that:①for orbit propagation, with all the same forces and other configuration, the predicted orbit difference in R,T,N directions are less than 0.3 mm for one month arc, 5×10-3 mm for 2 days arc, compared with GEODYN-Ⅱ;②the difference RMS of computed values of observables for two-way range and two-way range rate is at levels of 0.06 mm and 0.002 mm/s respectively;③for Chinese Chang'E-1 POD, the reconstructed orbit difference between WUDOGS and GEODYN-Ⅱ is at 2 cm level, for ESA MEX POD, the reconstructed orbit difference between WUDOGS and ESA is at 25 m level. Current developing situation of WUDOGS and comparison with international research level show that WUDOGS has a good application prospect, which will be important for meeting the demand of Chinese future planetary exploration and the development of deep space spacecraft POD software.

  1. Space-based gravitational-wave detectors can determine the thermal history of the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Saito, Shun; Suwa, Yudai; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that space-based gravitational-wave detectors such as DECIGO and/or the Big Bang Observer will provide us with invaluable information on the cosmic thermal history after inflation, and they will be able to determine the reheat temperature T R provided that it lies in the range preferred by the cosmological gravitino problem, T R ∼10 5-9 GeV. Therefore it is strongly desired that they will be put into practice as soon as possible

  2. Spaces of the possible: universal Darwinism and the wall between technological and biological innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas; Rosen, William

    2014-08-06

    Innovations in biological evolution and in technology have many common features. Some of them involve similar processes, such as trial and error and horizontal information transfer. Others describe analogous outcomes such as multiple independent origins of similar innovations. Yet others display similar temporal patterns such as episodic bursts of change separated by periods of stasis. We review nine such commonalities, and propose that the mathematical concept of a space of innovations, discoveries or designs can help explain them. This concept can also help demolish a persistent conceptual wall between technological and biological innovation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Spaces of the possible: universal Darwinism and the wall between technological and biological innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas; Rosen, William

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in biological evolution and in technology have many common features. Some of them involve similar processes, such as trial and error and horizontal information transfer. Others describe analogous outcomes such as multiple independent origins of similar innovations. Yet others display similar temporal patterns such as episodic bursts of change separated by periods of stasis. We review nine such commonalities, and propose that the mathematical concept of a space of innovations, discoveries or designs can help explain them. This concept can also help demolish a persistent conceptual wall between technological and biological innovation. PMID:24850903

  4. International Symposium on Wind Energy Systems, Held at Cambridge University, on 7-9 September 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-07

    Darrieus turbine design. B.F. Blackwell, Sandia Laboratories, USA. Some design aspects of high-speed vertical- axis wind turbines . R.J. Templin and P...Energy, Energy Conversion, Power Systems, Windmills, Wind Turbines . 20. §6PAT(Cin~hW. "" aid. it 00e096 suf id""App hr 6Řb nwe) This report of qs brief...large wind turbines ocerating in lare arrays, and the output (with and without storage) of several such arrwef awhen geographically dispersed, has yet to

  5. The Aula EspaZio Gela and the Master of Space Science and Technology in the Universidad Del País Vasco (University of the Basque Country)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Oleaga, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the Aula EspaZio Gela, a facility dedicated to teaching Space Science and Technology at the master and doctorate level at the University of the Basque Country (Spain), and to promoting the development of this field in both public and private sectors. The one-year master's degree in Space Science and Technology (60 ECTS (European Credit…

  6. Universality and correlations in individuals wandering through an online extremist space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z.; Zheng, M.; Vorobyeva, Y.; Song, C.; Johnson, N. F.

    2018-03-01

    The "out of the blue" nature of recent terror attacks and the diversity of apparent motives highlight the importance of understanding the online trajectories that individuals follow prior to developing high levels of extremist support. Here we show that the physics of stochastic walks, with and without temporal correlation, provides a unifying description of these online trajectories. Our unique data set comprising all users of a global social media site reveals universal characteristics in individuals' online lifetimes. Our accompanying theory generates analytical and numerical solutions that describe the characteristics shown by individuals that go on to develop high levels of extremist support and those that do not. Going forward, it is conceivable that a deeper understanding of these temporal and many-body correlations may eventually contribute to the important task of better countering the spread of radical propaganda online.

  7. 76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ...: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... the human remains may contact the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

  8. In Memoriam: Jules Aarons (1921-2008): Space Weather Pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Prior to the use of the phrase “space weather” to summarize all possible effects of solar-terrestrial physics upon technological systems, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) created and maintained active programs in the application aspects of space physics. The person arguably most associated with those efforts was Jules Aarons, who died on 21 November 2008 at age 87 at his home in Newton, Mass. Jules was a research professor of astronomy and space physics at Boston University from 1981 to 2005, but it was as a civilian scientist at the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (AFCRL) from 1946 to 1981 that Jules emerged as a true leader in studies of how the ionosphere can affect radio communications. He specialized in scintillations, those serious fluctuations of radio signal amplitudes and phases that cause dropouts in otherwise reliable communications links.

  9. An Improved Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology to Obtain More Accurate Water and “Tar” Values: In Situ Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh David; Jeannet Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigations by others and internal investigations at Philip Morris International (PMI) have shown that the standard trapping and extraction procedure used for conventional cigarettes, defined in the International Standard ISO 4387 (Cigarettes -- Determination of total and nicotine-free dry particulate matter using a routine analytical smoking machine), is not suitable for high-water content aerosols. Errors occur because of water losses during the opening of the Cambridge filter p...

  10. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L. Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Batson, Philip E. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices and Nanotechnology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Materials Science, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dellby, Niklas [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Krivanek, Ondrej L. [Nion Company, 11515 NE 118th Street, Kirkland, WA 98034 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper “In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday”, recently published in Ultramicroscopy. - Highlights: • We provide a brief history of the Cambridge project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction work and related research. • We summarize our corrector development work that followed the Cambridge project, and which was the first to reach higher spatial resolution than any non-corrected electron microscope.

  11. Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L. Michael; Batson, Philip E.; Dellby, Niklas; Krivanek, Ondrej L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a brief history of the project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that started in Cambridge (UK) and continued in Kirkland (WA, USA), Yorktown Heights (NY, USA), and other places. We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction research and related work, partly in response to the incomplete context presented in the paper “In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday”, recently published in Ultramicroscopy. - Highlights: • We provide a brief history of the Cambridge project to correct the spherical aberration of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). • We describe the project in the full context of other aberration correction work and related research. • We summarize our corrector development work that followed the Cambridge project, and which was the first to reach higher spatial resolution than any non-corrected electron microscope

  12. Lepton-flavor universality violation in R K and {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} from warped space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Eugenio; Quirós, Mariano; Salas, Lindber

    2017-07-01

    Some anomalies in the processes b → sℓℓ ( ℓ = μ, e) and b\\to cℓ {\\overline{ν}}_{ℓ } ( ℓ = τ, μ, e), in particular in the observables R K and {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} , have been found by the BaBar, LHCb and Belle collaborations, leading to a possible lepton flavor universality violation. If these anomalies were confirmed they would inevitably lead to physics beyond the Standard Model. In this paper we try to accommodate the present anomalies in an extra dimensional theory, solving the naturalness problem of the Standard Model by means of a warped metric with a strong conformality violation near the infra-red brane. The R K anomaly can be accommodated provided that the left-handed bottom quark and muon lepton have some degree of compositeness in the dual theory. The theory is consistent with all electroweak and flavor observables, and with all direct searches of Kaluza-Klein electroweak gauge bosons and gluons. The fermion spectrum, and fermion mixing angles, can be reproduced by mostly elementary right-handed bottom quarks, and tau and muon leptons. Moreover the {R}_{D{_{(\\ast )}}} anomaly requires a strong degree of compositeness for the left-handed tau leptons, which turns out to be in tension with experimental data on the {g}_{τ_L}^Z coupling, possibly unless some degree of fine-tuning is introduced in the fixing of the CKM matrix.

  13. Masters of Theory Cambridge and the Rise of Mathematical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Winner of the the Susan Elizabeth Abrams Prize in History of Science.When Isaac Newton published the Principia three centuries ago, only a few scholars were capable of understanding his conceptually demanding work. Yet this esoteric knowledge quickly became accessible in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when Britain produced many leading mathematical physicists. In this book, Andrew Warwick shows how the education of these "masters of theory" led them to transform our understanding of everything from the flight of a boomerang to the structure of the universe. Warwick focuses on Cam

  14. International conference on the photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy, 2nd, Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, August 10-12, 1978, Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Articles are presented on energy storage in organic photoisomers, light induced electron transfer reactions, photogalvanic cells, as well as on photoelectrochemistry and heterogeneous photocatalysis at semiconductors. Other subjects include the physics and chemistry of solar cells and synthetic molecular organizates.

  15. Universal Disorder in Organic Semiconductors Due to Fluctuations in Space Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzu-Cheng

    This thesis concerns the study of charge transport in organic semiconductors. These materials are widely used as thin-film photoconductors in copiers and laser printers, and for their electroluminescent properties in organic light-emitting diodes. Much contemporary research is directed towards improving the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices, which is limited to a large extent by the spatial and energetic disorder that hinders the charge mobility. One contribution to energetic disorder arises from the strong Coulomb interactions between injected charges with one another, but to date this has been largely ignored. We present a mean-field model for the effect of mutual interactions between injected charges hopping from site to site in an organic semiconductor. Our starting point is a modified Fröhlich Hamiltonian in which the charge is linearly coupled to the amplitudes of a wide band of dispersionless plasma modes having a Lorentzian distribution of frequencies. We show that in most applications of interest the hopping rates are fast enough while the plasma frequencies are low enough that random thermal fluctuations in the plasma density give rise to an energetically disordered landscape that is effectively stationary for many thousands of hops. Moreover, the distribution of site energies is Gaussian, and the energy-energy correlation function decays inversely with distance; as such, it can be argued that this disorder contributes to the Poole-Frenkel field dependence seen in a wide variety of experiments. Remarkably, the energetic disorder is universal; although it is caused by the fluctuations in the charge density, it is independent of the charge concentration.

  16. Probing early universe cosmology and high energy physics through space-borne interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungarelli, C.; Vecchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the impact of space-borne laser interferometric experiments operating in the low-frequency window (∼ 1 μHz - 1 Hz), with the goal of identifying the fundamental issues that regard the detection of a primordial background of GW predicted by slow-roll inflationary models, corresponding to h 100 2 Ω ∼ 10 -16 - 10 -15 . We analyse the capabilities of the planned single-instrument LISA mission and the sensitivity improvements that could be achieved by cross-correlating the data streams from a pair of detectors of the LISA-class. We show that the two-detectors configuration is extremely powerful, and leads to the detection of a stochastic background as weak as h 100 2 Ω ∼ 10 -14 . However, such instrumental sensitivity cannot be exploited to achieve a comparable performance for the detection of the primordial component of the background, due to the overwhelming power of the stochastic signal produced by short-period solar-mass binary systems of compact objects, that cannot be resolved as individual sources. We estimate that the primordial background can be detected only if its fractional energy density h 100 2 Ω is greater than a few times 10 -12 . The key conclusion of our analysis is that the typical mHz frequency band, regardless of the instrumental noise level, is the wrong observational window to probe slow-roll inflationary models. We discuss possible follow-on missions with optimal sensitivity in the ∼ μHz-regime and/or in the ∼ 0.1Hz-band specifically aimed at gravitational wave cosmology. (author)

  17. Researching transformative learning spaces through learners' stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslo, Elina

    spaces, learning to learn through languages, learners´ stories, qualitative research method Methodology or Methods/Research Instruments or Sources Used A number of semi structured qualitative interviews have been conducted with three learners of Danish as second language. The language learners...... in the paper is on the research process and methodological tools. The goal of this paper is to show, that learners´ stories have a huge potential in researching learning processes. References Benson, P. & D. Nunan (2004). Lerners´ stories. Difference and Diversity in Language Learning. Cambridge University...... to use learners´ stories as a research methodology in the field of learning in general and language learning in particular....

  18. Linguistic Turn and Gendering Language in the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimbi, Diah A.; Kwary, Deny A.

    2016-01-01

    Language constructs how humans perceive things. Since language is a human construction, it tends to be biased as it is mainly men's construction. Using gender perspectives, this paper attempts to discuss the imbalance in gender representations found in the examples given in an English learner's dictionary, that is, the "Cambridge Advanced…

  19. Probability Lessons at Hancock School, Lexington; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Lyn

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. Presented are plans for teaching 23 probability lessons in the elementary grades at Hancock School, Lexington, Massachusetts. The discovery approach was utilized by the…

  20. Inequality Lessons at Adams School, Lexington; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. Presented are plans for teaching 15 inequality lessons for above average first grade students. The discovery approach is utilized by the teacher in order to involve…

  1. Informal Geometry for Young Children; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics; Feasibility Study No. 34b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marion

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. These materials are intended to provide children with a variety of informal activities in intuitive geometry in the elementary school. Opportunities are provided…

  2. Provisional Approaches to Goals for School Mathematics; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics K-6. In view of the experiences of other curriculum groups and of the general discussions since 1963, the present report initiates the next step in evolving the "Goals".…

  3. Final Report of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, January 1962 - August 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) was an association of prominent mathematicians who had a concern for mathematics education at school level, from kindergarten through grade twelve. These mathematicians organized three main conferences in three areas of mathematics education, and have carried on activities related to the…

  4. Symmetry Motion Classes; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Lyn

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. This document details the planning and response for each of ten lessons involving symmetry motions. The problems focused on (1) combining motions in a given order,…

  5. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmand, B.; Walstra, G.; Lindeboom, J.; Teunisse, S.; Jonker, C.

    2000-01-01

    Dementia screening instruments, such as the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG), measure a variety of cognitive functions. However, memory impairment generally is the first sign of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It seems logical, therefore, to use only memory-related items for the early detection of

  6. What To Look for in ESL Admission Tests: Cambridge Certificate Exams, IELTS, and TOEFL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalhoub-Deville, Micheline; Turner, Carolyn E.

    2000-01-01

    Familiarizes test users with issues to consider when employing assessments for screening and admission purposes. Examines the purpose, content, and scoring methods of three English-as-a-Second-Language admissions tests--the Cambridge certificate exams, International English Language Teaching System, and Test of English as a Foreign…

  7. Using the Concordancer in Vocabulary Development for the Cambridge Advanced English (CAE) Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Emma

    1996-01-01

    Discusses concordancing activities tailored for use with English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in the Cambridge Advanced English course in Australia. The article focuses on students selecting appropriate vocabulary to complete gapped text. Findings indicate that these activities benefit ESL students by providing authentic examples of…

  8. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative, Year-Long Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J. Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. Method: A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements…

  9. Ross, Robert. – A Concise History of South Africa. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999, 219 p., index, bibl. (« Cambridge Concise Histories »).

    OpenAIRE

    Creusat, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Robert Ross, maître de conférence à l'université de Leiden, écrit et publie depuis vingt ans des ouvrages sur l'histoire de l'Afrique du Sud. Son dernier livre qui prend comme point de départ l'introduction de l'agriculture dans ce pays, il y a de cela 1 500 ans, et le conclut avec l'arrivée à la présidence de N. Mandela, est un bel exemple d'étude synthétique réussie sur l'histoire de ce pays. Le mérite de ce livre est de montrer clairement comment le passé explique le présent, commen...

  10. Bigger eyes in a wider universe: The American understanding of Earth in outer space, 1893--1941

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Jodicus Wayne

    picture industry relied upon establishing an accepted second space within the minds of their audiences. By the end of the study period, the universe accepted by most Americans was a "California Universe". It was not a discovery of pure science, but rather a cultural-scientific product of the Mount Wilson astronomers, the Pasadena community and the landscape and culture of Southern California.

  11. Radiation Environment at LEO in the frame of Space Monitoring Data Center at Moscow State University - recent, current and future missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagkova, Irina; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Bogomolov, Vitaly; Bogomolov, Andrey; Barinova, Vera; Barinov, Oleg; Bobrovnikov, Sergey; Dolenko, Sergey; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Shiroky, Vladimir; Shugay, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Radiation Environment of Near-Earth space is one of the most important factors of space weather. Space Monitoring Data Center of Moscow State University provides operational control of radiation conditions at Low Earth's Orbits (LEO) of the near-Earth space using data of recent (Vernov, CORONAS series), current (Meteor-M, Electro-L series) and future (Lomonosov) space missions. Internet portal of Space Monitoring Data Center of Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University (SINP MSU) http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/ provides possibilities to control and analyze the space radiation conditions in the real time mode together with the geomagnetic and solar activity including hard X-ray and gamma- emission of solar flares. Operational data obtained from space missions at L1, GEO and LEO and from the Earth's magnetic stations are used to represent radiation and geomagnetic state of near-Earth environment. The models of space environment that use space measurements from different orbits were created. Interactive analysis and operational neural network forecast services are based on these models. These systems can automatically generate alerts on particle fluxes enhancements above the threshold values, both for SEP and relativistic electrons of outer Earth's radiation belt using data from GEO and LEO as input. As an example of LEO data we consider data from Vernov mission, which was launched into solar-synchronous orbit (altitude 640 - 83 0 km, inclination 98.4°, orbital period about 100 min) on July 8, 2014 and began to receive scientific information since July 20, 2014. Vernov mission have provided studies of the Earth's radiation belt relativistic electron precipitation and its possible connection with atmosphere transient luminous events, as well as the solar hard X-ray and gamma-emission measurements. Radiation and electromagnetic environment monitoring in the near-Earth Space, which is very important for space weather study, was also realised

  12. An Improved Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology to Obtain More Accurate Water and “Tar” Values: In Situ Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations by others and internal investigations at Philip Morris International (PMI have shown that the standard trapping and extraction procedure used for conventional cigarettes, defined in the International Standard ISO 4387 (Cigarettes -- Determination of total and nicotine-free dry particulate matter using a routine analytical smoking machine, is not suitable for high-water content aerosols. Errors occur because of water losses during the opening of the Cambridge filter pad holder to remove the filter pad as well as during the manual handling of the filter pad, and because the commercially available filter pad holder, which is constructed out of plastic, may adsorb water. This results in inaccurate values for the water content, and erroneous and overestimated values for Nicotine Free Dry Particulate Matter (NFDPM. A modified 44 mm Cambridge filter pad holder and extraction equipment which supports in situ extraction methodology has been developed and tested. The principle of the in situ extraction methodology is to avoid any of the above mentioned water losses by extracting the loaded filter pad while kept in the Cambridge filter pad holder which is hermetically sealed by two caps. This is achieved by flushing the extraction solvent numerous times through the hermetically sealed Cambridge filter pad holder by means of an in situ extractor. The in situ methodology showed a significantly more complete water recovery, resulting in more accurate NFDPM values for high-water content aerosols compared to the standard ISO methodology. The work presented in this publication demonstrates that the in situ extraction methodology applies to a wider range of smoking products and smoking regimens, whereas the standard ISO methodology only applies to a limited range of smoking products and smoking regimens, e.g., conventional cigarettes smoked under ISO smoking regimen. In cases where a comparison of yields between the PMI HTP and

  13. DomSign: a top-down annotation pipeline to enlarge enzyme space in the protein universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianmin; Mori, Hiroshi; Zhang, Chong; Kurokawa, Ken; Xing, Xin-Hui; Yamada, Takuji

    2015-03-21

    Computational predictions of catalytic function are vital for in-depth understanding of enzymes. Because several novel approaches performing better than the common BLAST tool are rarely applied in research, we hypothesized that there is a large gap between the number of known annotated enzymes and the actual number in the protein universe, which significantly limits our ability to extract additional biologically relevant functional information from the available sequencing data. To reliably expand the enzyme space, we developed DomSign, a highly accurate domain signature-based enzyme functional prediction tool to assign Enzyme Commission (EC) digits. DomSign is a top-down prediction engine that yields results comparable, or superior, to those from many benchmark EC number prediction tools, including BLASTP, when a homolog with an identity >30% is not available in the database. Performance tests showed that DomSign is a highly reliable enzyme EC number annotation tool. After multiple tests, the accuracy is thought to be greater than 90%. Thus, DomSign can be applied to large-scale datasets, with the goal of expanding the enzyme space with high fidelity. Using DomSign, we successfully increased the percentage of EC-tagged enzymes from 12% to 30% in UniProt-TrEMBL. In the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes bacterial database, the percentage of EC-tagged enzymes for each bacterial genome could be increased from 26.0% to 33.2% on average. Metagenomic mining was also efficient, as exemplified by the application of DomSign to the Human Microbiome Project dataset, recovering nearly one million new EC-labeled enzymes. Our results offer preliminarily confirmation of the existence of the hypothesized huge number of "hidden enzymes" in the protein universe, the identification of which could substantially further our understanding of the metabolisms of diverse organisms and also facilitate bioengineering by providing a richer enzyme resource. Furthermore, our results

  14. Union of the potential academic science and leading specialized universities for provision of the underground space effective development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartanov Aleksandr Zarairovich

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research: providing of enabling environment through the use of underground subsurface resources for the purposes of civil construction is the main trend of the modern development of society. Large-scale development of the megacities subsoils and urban-industrial agglomerations faces significant threats caused by the risks of the consequences of techno-genic impact on the rock massif of urbanized areas, which requires the use of special construction geotechnologies and construction specialists of appropriate qualifications. Objectives: for efficient development of underground space, it is necessary to solve problems at the junction of construction and mining sciences with the formation of a modern system of scientific and methodological support for the training of personnel in this field. It is necessary to use the scientific, educational, innovative and intellectual potential of academic science and national research universities most fully and effectively. Materials and methods: proceeding from the necessity of convergence of science and education, with the goal of integrating efforts and improving the efficiency of scientific research and educational activities aimed at the Russian mining and construction industry effective development providing, the Moscow State University of Civil Engineering and the Institute for Complex Development of Mineral Resources of the Russian Academy of Sciences created the basic department “Development of Underground Spaces”. Results and conclusions: the conducted complex of organizational and management measures, taking into account the potential of leading scientific and educational schools, has made it possible to form the basis for the development of the competencies of future engineers-constructors and highly qualified personnel (masters, candidates and doctors of sciences in the field of construction geo-technologies, which will be responsible for effective and safe development of megacities

  15. When the library is located in prime real estate: a case study on the loss of space from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L

    2010-01-01

    The Duke University Medical Center Library and Archives is located in the heart of the Duke Medicine campus, surrounded by Duke Hospital, ambulatory clinics, and numerous research facilities. Its location is considered prime real estate, given its adjacency to patient care, research, and educational activities. In 2005, the Duke University Library Space Planning Committee had recommended creating a learning center in the library that would support a variety of educational activities. However, the health system needed to convert the library's top floor into office space to make way for expansion of the hospital and cancer center. The library had only five months to plan the storage and consolidation of its journal and book collections, while working with the facilities design office and architect on the replacement of key user spaces on the top floor. Library staff worked together to develop plans for storing, weeding, and consolidating the collections and provided input into renovation plans for users spaces on its mezzanine level. The library lost 15,238 square feet (29%) of its net assignable square footage and a total of 16,897 (30%) gross square feet. This included 50% of the total space allotted to collections and over 15% of user spaces. The top-floor space now houses offices for Duke Medicine oncology faculty and staff. By storing a large portion of its collection off-site, the library was able to remove more stacks on the remaining stack level and convert them to user spaces, a long-term goal for the library. Additional space on the mezzanine level had to be converted to replace lost study and conference room spaces. While this project did not match the recommended space plans for the library, it underscored the need for the library to think creatively about the future of its facility and to work toward a more cohesive master plan.

  16. Narrating Developmental Disability: Researchers, Advocates, and the Creation of an Interview Space in the Context of University-Community Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh Mulcahy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the narration of developmental disability through interviews between participants, researchers, and members of community organizations serving the disabled population, in the context of university-community collaborations. These kinds of collaborations are extremely important for researching vulnerable or hard-to-reach populations, which often face lower levels of physical, mental, and social well-being as a consequence of shame, stigma, or discrimination. Community collaboration can thus be invaluable for reaching members of marginalized populations, who may be difficult to locate or otherwise avoid contact with outsiders, because it provides members of a research team with local knowledge of a population, a means of accessing possible participants, and legitimation for the project. I suggest, however, that although the researcher's externality may initially invite skepticism toward the investigation from participants, it can also benefit them by providing a forum for catharsis. Based on a pilot study I conducted with a community advocacy organization for the disabled, I note that some participants expressed an appreciation for being able to discuss certain emotions and experiences during interviews with an outsider who was not involved as a caseworker. I conclude that the presence of a trusted community advocate and a researcher at an interview affects a participant's narrative by providing a safe space for participants to voice their stories to outsiders.

  17. The Cambridge Car Memory Test: a task matched in format to the Cambridge Face Memory Test, with norms, reliability, sex differences, dissociations from face memory, and expertise effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Hugh W; McKone, Elinor; Tavashmi, Raka; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Edwards, Mark; Duchaine, Bradley

    2012-06-01

    Many research questions require a within-class object recognition task matched for general cognitive requirements with a face recognition task. If the object task also has high internal reliability, it can improve accuracy and power in group analyses (e.g., mean inversion effects for faces vs. objects), individual-difference studies (e.g., correlations between certain perceptual abilities and face/object recognition), and case studies in neuropsychology (e.g., whether a prosopagnosic shows a face-specific or object-general deficit). Here, we present such a task. Our Cambridge Car Memory Test (CCMT) was matched in format to the established Cambridge Face Memory Test, requiring recognition of exemplars across view and lighting change. We tested 153 young adults (93 female). Results showed high reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .84) and a range of scores suitable both for normal-range individual-difference studies and, potentially, for diagnosis of impairment. The mean for males was much higher than the mean for females. We demonstrate independence between face memory and car memory (dissociation based on sex, plus a modest correlation between the two), including where participants have high relative expertise with cars. We also show that expertise with real car makes and models of the era used in the test significantly predicts CCMT performance. Surprisingly, however, regression analyses imply that there is an effect of sex per se on the CCMT that is not attributable to a stereotypical male advantage in car expertise.

  18. Construction of the Hunveyor-Husar space probe model system for planetary science education and analog studies and simulations in universities and colleges of Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérczi, Sz.; Hegyi, S.; Hudoba, Gy.; Hargitai, H.; Kokiny, A.; Drommer, B.; Gucsik, A.; Pintér, A.; Kovács, Zs.

    Several teachers and students had the possibility to visit International Space Camp in the vicinity of the MSFC NASA in Huntsville Alabama USA where they learned the success of simulators in space science education To apply these results in universities and colleges in Hungary we began a unified complex modelling in planetary geology robotics electronics and complex environmental analysis by constructing an experimental space probe model system First a university experimental lander HUNVEYOR Hungarian UNiversity surVEYOR then a rover named HUSAR Hungarian University Surface Analyser Rover has been built For Hunveyor the idea and example was the historical Surveyor program of NASA in the 1960-ies for the Husar the idea and example was the Pathfinder s rover Sojouner rover The first step was the construction of the lander a year later the rover followed The main goals are 1 to build the lander structure and basic electronics from cheap everyday PC compatible elements 2 to construct basic experiments and their instruments 3 to use the system as a space activity simulator 4 this simulator contains lander with on board computer for works on a test planetary surface and a terrestrial control computer 5 to harmonize the assemblage of the electronic system and instruments in various levels of autonomy from the power and communication circuits 6 to use the complex system in education for in situ understanding complex planetary environmental problems 7 to build various planetary environments for application of the

  19. Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students.

    OpenAIRE

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. METHODS: Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or...

  20. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment

  1. Inequality and growth in neo-Kaleckian and Cambridge growth theory

    OpenAIRE

    Palley, Thomas I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between inequality and growth in the neo-Kaleckian and Cambridge growth models. The paper explores the channels whereby functional and personal income distribution impact growth. The growth - inequality relationship can be negative or positive, depending on the economy's characteristics. Contrary to widespread claims, inequality per se does not impact growth through macroeconomic channels. Instead, both growth and inequality are impacted by changes in the ...

  2. Cambridge Homes Increases Energy Efficiency in a Mix of Housing Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, L.; Anderson, R.

    2001-01-01

    New houses designed by Cambridge Homes in Crest Hill, Illinois, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by applying the principles of ''whole-building'' design to the entire home product line. Regardless of the model chosen, home buyers can enjoy consistently high levels of comfort and performance with the added benefit of reduced operating costs

  3. Analysis of pharmacist-patient communication using the Calgary-Cambridge guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Nicola; Anderson, Claire; Avery, Anthony; Pilnick, Alison

    2011-06-01

    This study explored communication between pharmacists and patients through application of the Calgary-Cambridge guide [1] to appointment-based pharmacist-patient consultations and considers use of the guide in pharmacy education. Eighteen patients attending appointment-based consultations with five pharmacists were recruited to this qualitative study. Consultations were audio-recorded and observed. Transcripts were coded according to the use of skills within the guide and analysed thematically. The results showed good use of many skills by pharmacists, particularly signposting and closing the session. Some skills were poorly represented such as listening effectively, eliciting the patient's perspective, effective use of computers and creating patient-centred consultations. A key theme of social conversation was present in the data but this skill was not defined in the guide. The Calgary-Cambridge guide was developed for use in medical consultations but its application to pharmacist-patient consultations showed that the guide could be successfully used in pharmacy with some minor alterations. Pharmacists may need more training to improve the use of specific communication skills including how to conduct a patient-centred consultation. The Calgary-Cambridge guide is well aligned with many aspects of pharmacist-patient consultations and could help pharmacists to improve their consultation skills. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physics of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliünas, Vytenis M.

    This book, one in the Cambridge Atmospheric and Space Science Series, joins a growing list of advanced-level textbooks in a field of study and research known under a variety of names: space plasma physics, solar-terrestrial or solar-planetary relations, space weather, or (the official name of the relevant AGU section) space physics and aeronomy. On the basis of graduate courses taught by the author in various departments at the University of Michigan, complete with problems and with appendices of physical constants and mathematical identities, this is indeed a textbook, systematic and severe in its approach. The book is divided into three parts, in length ratios of roughly 6:4:5. Part I, “Theoretical Description of Gases and Plasmas,” starts by writing down Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz transformation (no nonsense about any introductory material of a descriptive or historical nature) and proceeds through particle orbit theory, kinetics, and plasma physics with fluid and MHD approximations to waves, shocks, and energetic particle transport. Part II, “The Upper Atmosphere,” features chapters on the terrestrial upper atmosphere, airglow and aurora, and the ionosphere. Part III, “Sun-Earth Connection,” deals with the Sun, the solar wind, cosmic rays, and the terrestrial magnetosphere. The book thus covers, with two exceptions, just about all the topics of interest to Space Physics and Aeronomy scientists, and then some (the chapter on the Sun, for instance, briefly discusses also topics of the solar interior: thermonuclear energy generation, equilibrium structure, energy transfer, with a page or two on each). One exception reflects a strong geocentric bias: there is not one word in the main text on magnetospheres and ionospheres of other planets and their interaction with the solar wind (they are mentioned in a few problems). The other exception: the chapter on the terrestrial magnetosphere lacks a systematic exposition of the theory of

  5. New developments at Hunveyor and Husar space probe model constructions in Hungarian Universities and Colleges: status report of 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegzi, S.; Bérczi, Sz.; Hudoba, Gy.; Magyar, I.; Lang, A.; Istenes, Z.; Weidinger, T.; Tepliczky, I.; Varga, T.; Hargitai, H.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Hunveyor and Husar space probe models are the main school robotics program in Hungary in the last decade initiated by our Cosmic Materials Space research Group (CMSRG). As a new form of planetary science education in Hungary students build their lander and rover robots and test them on test tables, carry out simulations, and go with their instruments to field works of planetary geology analog sites. Recently 10 groups work in this program and here is a status report about the new results. Planetary robot construction and simulations steps We summarized in 10 steps the main "constructional and industrial research and technology" description of planetary material studying and collecting by space probes (landers, rovers). We focused on the activity we began and teach to carry out at those steps. (Main planets considered were the Moon and Mars): 1. Reconnaissance and survey of the surface of a planet by orbital space probes (i.e. Lunar Orbiter, MGS, MRO etc.) Our studies: photogeology, geomorphology, preparations to cartography. 2. Mapping of the surface of the selected planet with geographical and stratigraphical methods. We (CMSRG) prepared thematic maps on Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus [1] and Atlas (3) in the series [2,3]. 3. Identification of various surface materials by albedo, spectroscopic [4], thermal IR, identification and selection of the target sites. (in terrestrial analog sites during field works) 4. Planning the space probe system lander and rover working together (MPF-Sojourner type assembly). Planning of the Hunveyor and Husar models. 5. Construction and manufacturing lander and rover units. All Hunveyor groups built their models [5]. 6. Launching and traveling the space probes to the planetary surface. (No rocket building, we simulate [6] some events during the voyage only). 7. Measuring the planetary surface environment on the surface of target planet [7]. (CMSRG) groups carry out test-table measurements [8] and simulations, and later they

  6. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned.

  7. Making lemonade from lemons: a case study on loss of space at the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Rajia C; Feldman, Jonquil D

    2010-01-01

    The setting for this case study is the Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a health sciences campus with medical, dental, nursing, health professions, and graduate schools. During 2008-2009, major renovations to the library building were completed including office space for a faculty development department, multipurpose classrooms, a 24/7 study area, study rooms, library staff office space, and an information commons. The impetus for changes to the library building was the decreasing need to house collections in an increasingly electronic environment, the need for office space for other departments, and growth of the student body. About 40% of the library building was remodeled or repurposed, with a loss of approximately 25% of the library's original space. Campus administration proposed changes to the library building, and librarians worked with administration, architects, and construction managers to seek renovation solutions that meshed with the library's educational mission.

  8. The complex structures on the coadjoint orbit spaces of Diff(S1) and on Bers' universal Teichmueller space are compatible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, S.; Verjovsky, A.

    1988-08-01

    Precisely two coadjoint orbit spaces of the group of string reparametrizations carry in a natural way the structure of infinite dimensional, holomorphically homogeneous complex manifolds. These are M 1 =Diff(S 1 )/Rot(S 1 ) and M 2 =Diff(S 1 )/Mo-barb(S 1 ). M 2 can be naturally considered as (embedded in) the classical univeral Teichmueller space T(Δ), simply by noting that a diffeomorphism of S 1 is a quasi-symmetric homeomorphism. T(Δ) is itself a homomorphically homogeneous complex Banach manifold. We prove that the inclusion of M 2 in T(Δ) is complex analytic. Every Teichmueller space of finite or infinite dimension is contained canonically and holomorphically in T(Δ). Our result thus appears to connect the loop space approach to bosonic string theory with the sum-over moduli (Polyakov path integral) approach. (author). 12 refs

  9. Adaptation of the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR into French-Canadian and English-Canadian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Coffin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR is the first disease-specific instrument for assessing patient-reported symptoms, functioning and quality of life (QoL in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH.

  10. BORTONI-Ricardo, Stella M. The urbanization of rural dialect speakers: a sociolinguistic study in Brazil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. 265p. BORTONI-Ricardo, Stella M. The urbanization of rural dialect speakers: a sociolinguistic study in Brazil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. 265p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jandyra Cunha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Quais são os principais fatores em ação na preservção das variedades linguisticas rurais e/ou não padrão no Brasil? Seria a sua manutenção simplesmente o resultado do analfabetismo ou da marginalização social ou geografica? Os dialetos retrocedem a medida que a população ganha acesso a educação formal? Até que ponto há uma ideologia de prestigio operando entre a chamada população marginal? Até que ponto a tendência homogeneizadora da sociedade urbana oscila entre duas forças contrarias: de um lado as pressões de uma padronização, de outro a manutengao das formas não-padrão como baluartes de identidades grupais?

  11. Constraints on the nature of inertial motion arising from the universality of free fall and the conformal causal structure of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.A.; Korte, H.

    1984-01-01

    According to the principle of the universality of free fall, the motions of all neutral monopole particles are governed by one common path structure. This principle does not, however, require the path structure to be geodesic; that is, the path structure need not be a projective structure. It is shown that any equation of motion structure (either a curve or a path structure) that has sufficient microisotropy to be compatible with the conformal causal structure of space-time must be geodesic and must be unique. Hence, the empirically well-supported principles of conformal causality and of the universality of free fall together require the existence of a unique Weyl structure on space-time

  12. Astronomers Take the Measure of Dark Matter in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation, the large-scale distribution of galaxies, and the properties of distant supernovas. The Institute of Astronomy team minimized systematic errors in their work by placing independent constraints on the masses of the clusters using data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope atop Mauna Kea, HI. The new Chandra results also show how the average X-ray luminosity and temperature of the hot gas varies with the mass of a cluster. These findings should allow astronomers to use the data from large cluster catalogues, for which only X-ray luminosities are generally available, to get even more accurate measurements of the mean mass density of the universe, and to understand further the processes by which clusters form and grow. The Chandra observations were carried out using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  13. Library as a Partner in Co-Designing Learning Spaces: A Case Study at Tampere University of Technology, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaniemi, Johanna; Poutanen, Jenni; Lähdemäki, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case of co-designed temporary learning spaces at a Finnish academic library, together with the results of a user-survey. The experimental development of the multifunctional spaces offered an opportunity for the library to collaborate with its parent organisation thus broadening the role of the library. Hence, library can be…

  14. Phase-space representation of Friedmann-Lemaitre universes containing both dust and radiation and the inevitability of a big bang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlers, J.; Rindler, W.

    1989-05-15

    We classify all non-static Friedmann-Lemaitre universes containing dust and radiation (or, as limiting cases, vacuum), and exhibit their histories as orbits in a three-dimensional (phase-) space ''S'', which faithfully reflects the topology of the set of states. As coordinates in ''S'' we take the dimensionless parameters /Omega/, /omega/ and /lambda/ representing, respectively, the energy density of the dust, the radiation and the vacuum (corresponding to the cosmological constant). Three open subspaces of ''S'' contain, respectively, the orbits representing oscillating, inflectional and bouncing universes; their boundaries and edges contain the orbits of all the other universes. We show that present-day redshift and density data exclude all models not having a big bang, without using assumptions about the origin of the microwave background radiation and without a priori assumptions about the value of the cosmological constant. (Author).

  15. A phase-space representation of Friedmann-Lemaitre universes containing both dust and radiation and the inevitability of a big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlers, J.; Rindler, W.

    1989-01-01

    We classify all non-static Friedmann-Lemaitre universes containing dust and radiation (or, as limiting cases, vacuum), and exhibit their histories as orbits in a three-dimensional (phase-) space ''S'', which faithfully reflects the topology of the set of states. As coordinates in ''S'' we take the dimensionless parameters Ω, ω and λ representing, respectively, the energy density of the dust, the radiation and the vacuum (corresponding to the cosmological constant). Three open subspaces of ''S'' contain, respectively, the orbits representing oscillating, inflectional and bouncing universes; their boundaries and edges contain the orbits of all the other universes. We show that present-day redshift and density data exclude all models not having a big bang, without using assumptions about the origin of the microwave background radiation and without a priori assumptions about the value of the cosmological constant. (Author)

  16. Cambridge Rocketry Simulator – A Stochastic Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Rocket Flight Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Eerland, Willem J.; Box, Simon; Sóbester, András

    2017-01-01

    The Cambridge Rocketry Simulator can be used to simulate the flight of unguided rockets for both design and operational applications. The software consists of three parts: The first part is a GUI that enables the user to design a rocket. The second part is a verified and peer-reviewed physics model that simulates the rocket flight. This includes a Monte Carlo wrapper to model the uncertainty in the rocket’s dynamics and the atmospheric conditions. The third part generates visualizations of th...

  17. Using the Cambridge structure database of organic and organometalic compounds in structure biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, 1a (2010), b24-b26 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /8./. Nové Hrady, 18.03.2010-20.03.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : organic chemistry * Cambridge Structure Data base * molecular structure Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://xray.cz/ms/bul2010-1a/friday2.pdf

  18. De Cambridge a Brighton: Poesia Concreta na Grã-Bretanha, uma entrevista com Stephen Bann

    OpenAIRE

    Montero - University of the Arts, Gustavo Grandal; Albertoni (trad.) - University of the Arts London, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Extensa entrevista com o historiador da arte, curador e poeta concreto Stephen Bann, realizada por Gustavo Grandal Montero, concentrando-se em seu trabalho curatorial, crítico e artístico da década de 1960, em que esteve intimamente envolvido com o desenvolvimento da poesia concreta no Reino Unido. Bann associou-se precocemente com Ian Hamilton Finlay, co-organizou a Primeira exposição internacional de poesia concreta e cinética (Cambridge, 1964) e foi o curador da Exposição de Poesia Concret...

  19. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  20. The Aula EspaZio Gela and the Master of Space Science and Technology in the Universidad del País Vasco (University of the Basque Country)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo; del Río-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Oleaga, Alberto

    2014-09-01

    We present the Aula EspaZio Gela, a facility dedicated to teaching Space Science and Technology at the master and doctorate level at the University of the Basque Country (Spain), and to promoting the development of this field in both public and private sectors. The one-year master's degree in Space Science and Technology (60 ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System)) offers a group of compulsory courses which give way afterwards to a set of elective matters in which students choose one of two tracks: the scientific, primarily oriented to basic research at the University, or the technological, leading to the space industry and space agencies. After completion of the master thesis, our students have direct access to a PhD in both curricular lines. Here we detail the main features of the master's degree and the experience acquired in three years, including a comparative opinion survey to the students. We also describe the facilities at the Faculty of Engineering consisting of a specific classroom (Aula EspaZio Gela), an Astronomical Observatory, and different laboratories.

  1. Space and Materials Reservation Software in Mobile Applications Development: The Case of Istanbul Aydin University Information Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agah Alıcı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the adoption of mobile application ICReserve (Information Center Reserve to improve the library services in terms of user satisfaction and management processes with an innovative approach. ICReserve is a kind of reservation software developed specifically for the needs of University Library by the Istanbul Aydin University IT Department and is integrated to the institution’s other information systems. This article contains technical information about mobile application development.

  2. Using Item Analysis to Assess Objectively the Quality of the Calgary-Cambridge OSCE Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrone Donnon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:  The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of item analysis to assess objectively the quality of items on the Calgary-Cambridge Communications OSCE checklist. Methods:  A total of 150 first year medical students were provided with extensive teaching on the use of the Calgary-Cambridge Guidelines for interviewing patients and participated in a final year end 20 minute communication OSCE station.  Grouped into either the upper half (50% or lower half (50% communication skills performance groups, discrimination, difficulty and point biserial values were calculated for each checklist item. Results:  The mean score on the 33 item communication checklist was 24.09 (SD = 4.46 and the internal reliability coefficient was ? = 0.77. Although most of the items were found to have moderate (k = 12, 36% or excellent (k = 10, 30% discrimination values, there were 6 (18% identified as ‘fair’ and 3 (9% as ‘poor’. A post-examination review focused on item analysis findings resulted in an increase in checklist reliability (? = 0.80. Conclusions:  Item analysis has been used with MCQ exams extensively. In this study, it was also found to be an objective and practical approach to use in evaluating the quality of a standardized OSCE checklist.

  3. Singular perturbations with boundary conditions and the Casimir effect in the half space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albeverio, S.; Cognola, G.; Spreafico, M.; Zerbini, S.

    2010-06-01

    We study the self-adjoint extensions of a class of nonmaximal multiplication operators with boundary conditions. We show that these extensions correspond to singular rank 1 perturbations (in the sense of Albeverio and Kurasov [Singular Perturbations of Differential Operaters (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000)]) of the Laplace operator, namely, the formal Laplacian with a singular delta potential, on the half space. This construction is the appropriate setting to describe the Casimir effect related to a massless scalar field in the flat space-time with an infinite conducting plate and in the presence of a pointlike "impurity." We use the relative zeta determinant (as defined in the works of Müller ["Relative zeta functions, relative determinants and scattering theory," Commun. Math. Phys. 192, 309 (1998)] and Spreafico and Zerbini ["Finite temperature quantum field theory on noncompact domains and application to delta interactions," Rep. Math. Phys. 63, 163 (2009)]) in order to regularize the partition function of this model. We study the analytic extension of the associated relative zeta function, and we present explicit results for the partition function and for the Casimir force.

  4. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  5. Creation of a Unified Educational Space within a SLA University Classroom Using Cloud Storage and On-Line Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabayeva, Kamilya Zhumartovna

    2016-01-01

    In the present article the author gives evidence of effective application of cloud storage and on-line applications in the educational process of the higher education institution, as well as considers the problems and prospects of using cloud technologies in the educational process, when creating a unified educational space in the foreign language…

  6. A trajectory planning scheme for spacecraft in the space station environment. M.S. Thesis - University of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Jeffrey Alan; Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    Simulated annealing is used to solve a minimum fuel trajectory problem in the space station environment. The environment is special because the space station will define a multivehicle environment in space. The optimization surface is a complex nonlinear function of the initial conditions of the chase and target crafts. Small permutations in the input conditions can result in abrupt changes to the optimization surface. Since no prior knowledge about the number or location of local minima on the surface is available, the optimization must be capable of functioning on a multimodal surface. It was reported in the literature that the simulated annealing algorithm is more effective on such surfaces than descent techniques using random starting points. The simulated annealing optimization was found to be capable of identifying a minimum fuel, two-burn trajectory subject to four constraints which are integrated into the optimization using a barrier method. The computations required to solve the optimization are fast enough that missions could be planned on board the space station. Potential applications for on board planning of missions are numerous. Future research topics may include optimal planning of multi-waypoint maneuvers using a knowledge base to guide the optimization, and a study aimed at developing robust annealing schedules for potential on board missions.

  7. Factors Affecting Academic Dishonesty in the Space of Social Science Education (A Case Study of Public Universities in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Qarakhani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic Dishonesty is one of the important issues in the higher education system of Iran, and reducing or preventing it requires identifying the factors which have an impact on it. The present study has analyzed the perceptions and understandings of PhD students in social science fields, who have a wider experience of scientific socialization in the process of education, with the aim of identifying the factors influencing academic dishonesty in the space of social science in Iran. The findings of this research show that the factors influencing academic dishonesty in the space of social science education can be detected at two individual and structural levels. At the structural level, sources and rules, and at the individual level, academic dishonesty among three groups of actors in educational space, i.e. professors, students and managers (heads of departments and faculties, with reference to their individual and personality characteristics, have paved the way for academic dishonesty, or have resulted in its occurrence. In the framework of a combination of actor/structure in explaining social phenomena, the factors influencing academic dishonesty and non-conformity to the norms of the ethics of science in the educational space can be reduced neither to the role of the structure nor that of the actor. Dishonesty in the ethics of science in social science education and the factors affecting them can be explained in the light of a combination of structure and actor.

  8. Assertion, Regulation and Consent: Gay Students, Straight Flatmates, and the (Hetero)Sexualisation of University Accommodation Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulke-Johnson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Building upon conceptualisations of the sexualisation of space, this paper interrogates the ways in which heterosexual discourses are produced, enforced, legitimised and maintained as dominant within student accommodation. Analysis is derived from interviews with 17 gay male undergraduates attending a UK institution. I detail the micro-level…

  9. GEO Satellites as Space Weather Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0161 GEO Satellites as Space Weather Sensors Kerri Cahoy MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 77 MASSACHUSETTS AVE CAMBRIDGE ... Cambridge , MA 02139 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AF Office of Scientific...Lohmeyer  and  Cahoy,  2013;   Lohmeyer,  et  al.,  2015].  From  the   statistical  analysis,  we  identified  that

  10. Rehabilitating a landfill site of lowland tropical landscape into an urban green space: A case study from the Open University of Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    B.D. Madurapperuma; K.A.J.M. Kuruppuarachchi

    2016-01-01

    This study examines vegetation, carbon sequestration, and spatial and temporal changes of green space at the premises of the Open University of Sri Lanka (OUSL). The primary objective of this study is to examine floral diversity of the OUSL premises that was rehabilitated from a landfill site and to determine suitable trees for landfill sites based on growth performance and biomass carbon stocks. The girth and height of plants ⩾5 cm dbh were measured to estimate biomass carbon stocks of each ...

  11. Two new species of the genus Paramitraceras Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 (Opiliones: Laniatores: Stygnopsidae) from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-López, Jesús A; Francke, Oscar F

    2013-01-01

    Parainitraceras pickardcanibridgei sp. nov. and Paramitraceras tzotzil sp. nov. from Chiapas, Mexico are described based on specimens previously determined as Paramitraceras granulatum Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 by Goodnight and Goodnight. The male genitalia of the new species and P. granulatum are illustrated with scanning electronic micrographs (SEMs) or drawings derived from them. The importance of the ocular tubercle, cheliceral dentition and sexual dimorphism, pedipalpal armature and male genitalia as taxonomic characters within the genus is discussed as well as differences and similarities between Paramitraceras Pickard-Cambridge, 1905 and its most similar genus, Sbordonia Šilhavý, 1977.

  12. Cambridge Rocketry Simulator – A Stochastic Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Rocket Flight Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J. Eerland

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cambridge Rocketry Simulator can be used to simulate the flight of unguided rockets for both design and operational applications. The software consists of three parts: The first part is a GUI that enables the user to design a rocket. The second part is a verified and peer-reviewed physics model that simulates the rocket flight. This includes a Monte Carlo wrapper to model the uncertainty in the rocket’s dynamics and the atmospheric conditions. The third part generates visualizations of the resulting trajectories, including nominal performance and uncertainty analysis, e.g. a splash-down region with confidence bounds. The project is available on SourceForge, and is written in Java (GUI, C++ (simulation core, and Python (visualization. While all parts can be executed from the GUI, the three components share information via XML, accommodating modifications, and re-use of individual components.

  13. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Cambridge Structural Database and Thirty Years of Its Use in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić-Prodić B.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the memory of Dr. F. H. Allen and the 50th anniversary of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC; the world-renowned centre for deposition and control of crystallographic data including atomic coordinates that define the three-dimensional structures of organic molecules and metal complexes containing organic ligands. The mission exposed at the web site (http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk is clearly stated: “The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC is dedicated to the advancement of chemistry and crystallography for the public benefit through providing high quality information, software and services.” The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, one among the first established electronic databases, nowadays is one of the most significant crystallographic databases in the world. In the International Year of Crystallography 2014, the CSD announced in December over 750,000 deposited structures. The use of the extensive and rapidly growing database needs support of sophisticated and efficient software for checking, searching, analysing, and visualising structural data. The seminal role of the CSD in researches related to crystallography, chemistry, materials science, solid state physics and chemistry, (biotechnology, life sciences, and pharmacology is widely known. The important issues of the CCDC are the accuracy of deposited data and development of software for checking the data. Therefore, the Crystallographic Information File (CIF is introduced as the standard text file format for representing crystallographic information. Among the most important software for users is ConQuest, which enables searching all the CSD information fields, and the web implementation WebCSD software. Mercury is available for visualisation of crystal structures and crystal morphology including intra- and intermolecular interactions with graph-set notations of hydrogen bonds, and analysis of geometrical parameters. The CCDC gives even

  14. Psychiatry in the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship: an innovative, year-long program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Todd; Bullock, Christopher; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Albanese, Mark; Bonilla, Pedro; Dvorak, Ramona; Epelbaum, Claudia; Givon, Lior; Kueppenbender, Karsten; Joseph, Robert; Boyd, J Wesley; Shtasel, Derri

    2012-09-01

    The authors present what is to their knowledge the first description of a model for longitudinal third-year medical student psychiatry education. A longitudinal, integrated psychiatric curriculum was developed, implemented, and sustained within the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship. Curriculum elements include longitudinal mentoring by attending physicians in an outpatient psychiatry clinic, exposure to the major psychotherapies, psychopharmacology training, acute psychiatry "immersion" experiences, and a variety of clinical and didactic teaching sessions. The longitudinal psychiatry curriculum has been sustained for 8 years to-date, providing effective learning as demonstrated by OSCE scores, NBME shelf exam scores, written work, and observed clinical work. The percentage of students in this clerkship choosing psychiatry as a residency specialty is significantly greater than those in traditional clerkships at Harvard Medical School and greater than the U.S. average. Longitudinal integrated clerkship experiences are effective and sustainable; they offer particular strengths and opportunities for psychiatry education, and may influence student choice of specialty.

  15. Floodplain management: Land acquisition versus preservation of historic buildings in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Wendy J.; Mitchell, Bruce

    1983-07-01

    Non-structural adjustments in floodplain management are often avoided because they are seen to infringe on personal rights, adversely affect property values and restrict local tax bases. Land acquisition programs in urban areas encounter a further problem when they lead to demolition of buildings and other structures considered to have historical or architectural value. An experience in Cambridge, Ontario demonstrates that the potential conflict between flood damage reduction and historical preservation objectives can be exacerbated as a result of uncoordinated planning efforts, inflexibility in interpreting mandates, unclear roles for participating agencies, and lack of cooperation Many of these dilemmas can be resolved through consultation and discussion early in the planning process as well as through a willingness to be flexible and to search for a compromise

  16. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race: Performance, Pacing and Tactics Between 1890 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M; Guy, Joshua H; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-10-01

    Currently no studies have examined the historical performances of Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race crews in the context of performance, pacing and tactics which is surprising as the event has routinely taken place annually for over 150 years on the same course. The purpose of this study was twofold, to firstly examine the historical development of performances and physical characteristics of crews over 124 years of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race between 1890 and 2014 and secondly to investigate the pacing and tactics employed by crews over that period. Linear regression modelling was applied to investigate the development of performance and body size for crews of eight male individuals over time from Boat Race archive data. Performance change over time was further assessed in 10-year clusters while four intra-race checkpoints were used to examine pacing and tactics. Significant correlations were observed between performance and time (1890-2014) for both Oxford (r = -0.67; p tactical advantage from commencing on either the Surrey or Middlesex station beyond chance alone; however, all crews (n = 228) adopted a fast-start strategy, with 81 % of victories achieved by the crew leading the race at the first intra-race checkpoint (24 % of total distance). Crews leading the race at the final checkpoint (83 % of total distance; 1143 m) achieved victory on 94 % of occasions. Performances and physical characteristics of the crews have changed markedly since 1890, with faster heavier crews now common. Tactically, gaining the early lead position with a fast-start strategy seems particularly meaningful to success in the Boat Race throughout the years, and has been of greater importance to race outcome than factors such as the starting station.

  17. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2008-09-01

    It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW) at MIT and the LIGO Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the place where this workshop series started in 1996. This time the conference was held at the conference facilities of the Royal Sonesta Hotel in Cambridge from 13 16 December, 2007. This 12th GWDAW found us with the ground interferometers having just completed their most sensitive search for gravitational waves and as they were starting their preparation to bring online and/or propose more sensitive instruments. Resonant mass detectors continued to observe the gravitational wave sky with instruments that have been operating now for many years. LISA, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, was recently reviewed by NASA's Beyond Einstein Program Assessment Committee (BEPAC) convened by the National Research Council (NRC) and found that 'on purely scientific grounds LISA is the mission that is the most promising and least scientifically risky…thus, the committee gave LISA its highest scientific ranking'. Even so, JDEM, the Joint Dark Energy Mission, was identified to go first, with LISA following a few years after. New methods, analysis ideas, results from the analysis of data collected by the instruments, as well as Mock Data Challenges for LISA were reported in this conference. While data from the most recent runs of the instruments are still being analyzed, the first upper limit results show how even non-detection statements can be interesting astrophysics. Beyond these traditional aspects of GWDAW though, for the first time in this workshop we tried to bring the non-gravitational wave physics and astronomy community on board in order to present, discuss and propose ways to work together as we pursue the first detection of gravitational waves and as we hope to transition to gravitational wave astronomy in the near future. Overview talks by colleagues leading observations in the electromagnetic

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics) Structures in the Universe by Exact Methods: Formation, Evolutions, Interactions (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In this book the use of inhomogeneous models in cosmology, both in modelling structure formation and interpreting cosmological observations, is discussed. The authors concentrate on exact solutions, and particularly the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) and Szekeres models (the important topic of averaging is not discussed). The book serves to demonstrate that inhomogeneous metrics can generate realistic models of cosmic structure formation and nonlinear evolution and shows that general relativity has a lot more to offer to cosmology than just the standard spatially homogeneous FLRW model. I would recommend this book to people working in theoretical cosmology. In the introduction (and in the concluding chapter and throughout the book) a reasonable discussion of the potential problems with the standard FLRW cosmology is presented, and a list of examples illustrating the limitations of standard FLRW cosmology are discussed (including potential problems with perturbation methods). In particular, the authors argue that the assumptions of isotropy and spatial homogeneity (and consequently the Copernican principle) must be properly challenged and revisited. Indeed, it is possible for `good old general relativity' to be used to explain cosmological observations without introducing speculative elements. In part I of the book the necessary background is presented (readers need a background in general relativity theory at an advanced undergraduate or graduate level). There is a good (and easy to read) review of the exact spherically symmetric dust Lemaitre-Tolman model (LT) (often denoted the LTB model) and the Lemaitre and Szekeres models. Light propogation (i.e. null geodesics, for both central and off-center observers) in exact inhomogeneous (LT) models is reviewed. In part II a number of applications of exact inhomogeneous models are presented (taken mainly from the authors' own work). In chapter 4, the evolution of exact inhomogeneous models (primarily the LT model, but also the Szekeres model) is studied regarding structure formation. I thought that the authors describe the advantages and drawbacks of the idealized exact solutions used in the physical modelling in a reasonable manner (although more concise conclusions might have been useful). The authors also address the formation of a galaxy with a central black hole, the formation and evolution of rich galactic clusters and voids and other structures, and the effects of radiation in the models. The most interesting application is presented in chapter 5; namely, the effects of inhomogeneities on observations such as the luminosity distance relation and the explanation of the observed dimming of distant SN Ia (which is usually interpreted within the standard FLRW model in terms of the existence of dark energy). The main conclusion of this work is that data can be reproduced within the LT model (via inhomogeneities in general relativity, but without introducing dark energy). In particular, a number of exact LT solutions were surveyed, and a full discussion of various models in the literature (and a critique of the various assumptions) is presented. In the next chapter the possible resolution of the horizon problem without inflation, in terms of shell crossing in a LT model, is discussed. This is perhaps the most controversial chapter of the book. In the final chapter 7, the influence of inhomogeneous structures in the path of a light ray (for both center and off-center observers in a special Szekeres Swiss cheese model) on the observed temperature distribution of the CMB is discussed. This is a very important topic, but only a heuristic and qualitative study is presented here; more work on the multipole moments of higher order would be necessary for a more comprehensive analysis.

  19. Bericht uber den 2. Internationalen Kongress fur Angewandte Linguistik. Cambridge 8.-12. IX. 1969. [Report on the Second International Congress for Applied Linguistics, Cambridge, Dec. 8-12, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Peter

    This paper is a summary report on the Second International Congress of Applied Linguistics held in Cambridge, England in September 1969. Because of the large number of papers delivered, only a selection of the papers delivered in any one section of the Congress are considered, and the author attempts to identify current interests and trends in…

  20. The Holographic Electron Density Theorem, de-quantization, re-quantization, and nuclear charge space extrapolations of the Universal Molecule Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2017-11-01

    Two strongly related theorems on non-degenerate ground state electron densities serve as the basis of "Molecular Informatics". The Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is a statement on global molecular information, ensuring that the complete electron density contains the complete molecular information. However, the Holographic Electron Density Theorem states more: the local information present in each and every positive volume density fragment is already complete: the information in the fragment is equivalent to the complete molecular information. In other words, the complete molecular information provided by the Hohenberg-Kohn Theorem is already provided, in full, by any positive volume, otherwise arbitrarily small electron density fragment. In this contribution some of the consequences of the Holographic Electron Density Theorem are discussed within the framework of the "Nuclear Charge Space" and the Universal Molecule Model. In the Nuclear Charge Space" the nuclear charges are regarded as continuous variables, and in the more general Universal Molecule Model some other quantized parameteres are also allowed to become "de-quantized and then re-quantized, leading to interrelations among real molecules through abstract molecules. Here the specific role of the Holographic Electron Density Theorem is discussed within the above context.

  1. On the universal stellar law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Alexander

    stars. In this connection, comparison with estimations of temperatures using of the regression dependences for multi-planet extrasolar systems [8] testifies the obtained results entirely. References 1. Krot, A.M.:2009, A statistical approach to investigate the formation of the solar system. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals41(3), 1481-1500. 2. Krot, A.M.:2012, A models of forming planets and distribution of planetary distances and orbits in the solar system based on the statistical theory of spheroidal bodies. In:Solar System: Structure, Formation and Exploration, ch.9 (Ed. by Matteo de Rossi). New York, Nova Science Publishers, pp. 201-264. - ISBN: 978-1-62100-057-0. 3. Krot, A. M.:2012, A statistical theory of formation of gravitating cosmogonicbodies. Minsk,Bel. Navuka, 4. 448 p. - ISBN 978-985-08-1442-5 [monograph in Russian]. 5. Eddington, A.S.: 1916,On the radiative equilibrium of the stars.Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc.84 (7), 525-528. 6. Jeans, J.: 1929, Astronomy and cosmogony. Cambridge, University Press. 7. Chandrasekhar, S.:1939, An introduction to the study of stellar structure.Cambridge, University Press. 8. Pintr, P., Peřinová, V., Lukš, A., Pathak, A.:2013, Statistical and regression analyses of detected extrasolar systems. Planetary and Space Science, 75(1), 37-45.

  2. Final Report from The University of Texas at Austin for DEGAS: Dynamic Global Address Space programming environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erez, Mattan

    2018-02-21

    The Dynamic, Exascale Global Address Space programming environment (DEGAS) project will develop the next generation of programming models and runtime systems to meet the challenges of Exascale computing. Our approach is to provide an efficient and scalable programming model that can be adapted to application needs through the use of dynamic runtime features and domain-specific languages for computational kernels. We address the following technical challenges: Programmability: Rich set of programming constructs based on a Hierarchical Partitioned Global Address Space (HPGAS) model, demonstrated in UPC++. Scalability: Hierarchical locality control, lightweight communication (extended GASNet), and ef- ficient synchronization mechanisms (Phasers). Performance Portability: Just-in-time specialization (SEJITS) for generating hardware-specific code and scheduling libraries for domain-specific adaptive runtimes (Habanero). Energy Efficiency: Communication-optimal code generation to optimize energy efficiency by re- ducing data movement. Resilience: Containment Domains for flexible, domain-specific resilience, using state capture mechanisms and lightweight, asynchronous recovery mechanisms. Interoperability: Runtime and language interoperability with MPI and OpenMP to encourage broad adoption.

  3. The Stellar Imager (SI) project: a deep space UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) to observe the Universe at 0.1 milli-arcsec angular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2009-04-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI’s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes, such as accretion, in the Universe. The ultra-sharp images of SI will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI is a “Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission” in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap and a potential implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Science Program for NASA’s Astronomy and Physics Division. We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this mission. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/

  4. The Stellar Imager (SI) Project: A Deep Space UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) to Observe the Universe at 0.1 Milli-Arcsec Angular Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/ Optical Interferometer (UVOI) designed to enable 0.1 milliarcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and of the Universe in general. It will also probe via asteroseismology flows and structures in stellar interiors. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe and will revolutionize our understanding, of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes, such as accretion, in the Universe. The ultra-sharp images of SI will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI is a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap and a potential implementation of the UVOI in the 2006 Science Program for NASA's Astronomy and Physics Division. We present here the science goals of the SI Mission, a mission architecture that could meet those goals, and the technology development needed to enable this missin. Additional information on SI can be found at: http://hires.gsfc.nasa.gov/si/.

  5. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  6. First record of Centromerus arcanus (O. P.-Cambridge, 1873) from Greenland (Araneae, Linyphiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissner, Jørgen; Gravesen, Eigil Vestergaard

    2017-01-01

    The linyphiid spider Centromerus arcanus (O. P.-Cambridge, 1873) is reported new to Greenland. A single female was pitfall trapped in South-West Greenland at Kobbefjord in the summer of 2016 constituting the first record of this species in the Nearctic ecozone. The habitat in which the Greenland...

  7. A FIRST STEP TOWARDS THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM IN A K-12 UNGRADED SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOSTER, GARRETT R.

    A SERIES OF THREE CONFERENCES WAS HELD TO EXPLORE THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING A LONG-RANGE CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR AN UNGRADED, K-12 SCHOOL, BASED ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CAMBRIDGE CONFERENCE ON SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. OVER 50 MATHEMATICIANS, MATHEMATICS EDUCATORS, AND PERSONS INVOLVED IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL…

  8. Inequalities and Real Numbers as a Basis for School Mathematics, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomon, Earle

    These materials were developed as a practical response to some of the recommendations of the 1963 Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM). Experimental sessions are described in detail in this report. In the Estabrook Elementary School, Lexington, Massachusetts, first grade children (1964-65 Academic Year) concentrated on material…

  9. An Experimental Text in Transformational Geometry, Student Text; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 43a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    This is part of a student text which was written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for mathematics. The instructional materials were developed for teaching geometry in the secondary schools. This document is chapter six and titled Motions and…

  10. Goals for Mathematical Education of Elementary School Teachers: A Report of the Cambridge Conference on Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    This report is intended to provide attention to issues that the Cambridge Conference feels are related to the mathematical training of elementary school teachers. The document is divided into three parts. Part I, titled "The Problems and Proposals Towards the Solution," contains the following chapters: (1) Introduction to the Report; (2)…

  11. Tartu Ülikooli teadur kaitses Cambridgeì Ülikoolis doktorikraadi / Krõõt Nõges

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nõges, Krõõt

    2006-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli filosoofia osakonna teadur ja eetikakeskuse stipendiaat Eva Piirimäe kaitses Cambridgeì Ülikoolis doktorikraadi ideede ajaloo erialal doktoritööga "Thomas Abbt (1738-1766) and the Philosophical Genesis of German Nationalism"

  12. Collaborative Academic Library Digital Collections Post-Cambridge University Press, HathiTrust and Google Decisions on Fair Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M. Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic libraries face numerous stressors as they seek to meet the needs of their users through technological advances while adhering to copyright laws. This paper seeks to explore one specific proposal to balance these interests, the impact of recent decisions on its viability, and the copyright challenges that remain after these decisions

  13. Book Review - V Pogoretskyy, Freedom of Transit and Access to Gas Pipeline Networks Under WTO Law (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marhold, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In Freedom of Transit and Access to Pipeline Networks under WTO Law, the author appropriately introduces the topic by stating that energy is featuring increasingly prominently as a topic in international trade law. Indeed, while being a dormant issue in the World Trade Organization (“WTO” forum for

  14. Joint Services Electronics Program: Annual Progress Report Number 103, 1 October 1988 - 31 July 1989 (Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-31

    tion energy. We therefore attempted to perform femtosecond time-resolved Raman * spectroscopy on Si, and other homopolar semiconductors, to probe in real...have started examining integrated sensor/neural network circuitry for use in sensori- motor control systems. In these systems the sig- nals from an...array of sensors (typically tactile or optical sensors) are processed to provide a set of motor commands which execute a sensory-data-dependent action

  15. Time and space: undergraduate Mexican physics in motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Antonia

    2010-09-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the trajectories and itineraries of undergraduate physics students at a Mexican university. In this work learning is understood as being able to move oneself and, other things (cultural tools), through the space-time networks of a discipline (Nespor in Knowledge in motion: space, time and curriculum in undergraduate physics and management. Routledge Farmer, London, 1994). The potential of this socio-cultural perspective allows an analysis of how students are connected through extended spaces and times with an international core discipline as well as with cultural features related to local networks of power and construction. Through an example, I show that, from an actor-network-theory (Latour in Science in action. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1987), that in order to understand the complexities of undergraduate physics processes of learning you have to break classroom walls and take into account students' movements through complex spatial and temporal traces of the discipline of physics. Mexican professors do not give classes following one textbook but in a moment-to-moment open dynamism tending to include undergraduate students as actors in classroom events extending the teaching space-time of the classroom to the disciplinary research work of physics. I also find that Mexican undergraduate students show initiative and display some autonomy and power in the construction of their itineraries as they are encouraged to examine a variety of sources including contemporary research articles, unsolved physics problems, and even to participate in several physicists' spaces, as for example being speakers at the national congresses of physics. Their itineraries also open up new spaces of cultural and social practices, creating more extensive networks beyond those associated with a discipline. Some economic, historical and cultural contextual features of this school of sciences are analyzed in order to help understanding the particular

  16. Diagnosing prosopagnosia in East Asian individuals: Norms for the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKone, Elinor; Wan, Lulu; Robbins, Rachel; Crookes, Kate; Liu, Jia

    2017-07-01

    The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) is widely accepted as providing a valid and reliable tool in diagnosing prosopagnosia (inability to recognize people's faces). Previously, large-sample norms have been available only for Caucasian-face versions, suitable for diagnosis in Caucasian observers. These are invalid for observers of different races due to potentially severe other-race effects. Here, we provide large-sample norms (N = 306) for East Asian observers on an Asian-face version (CFMT-Chinese). We also demonstrate methodological suitability of the CFMT-Chinese for prosopagnosia diagnosis (high internal reliability, approximately normal distribution, norm-score range sufficiently far above chance). Additional findings were a female advantage on mean performance, plus a difference between participants living in the East (China) or the West (international students, second-generation children of immigrants), which we suggest might reflect personality differences associated with willingness to emigrate. Finally, we demonstrate suitability of the CFMT-Chinese for individual differences studies that use correlations within the normal range.

  17. Hydrocephalus shunt technology: 20 years of experience from the Cambridge Shunt Evaluation Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Czosnyka, Marek; Richards, Hugh K; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Zofia H

    2014-03-01

    The Cambridge Shunt Evaluation Laboratory was established 20 years ago. This paper summarizes the findings of that laboratory for the clinician. Twenty-six models of valves have been tested long-term in the shunt laboratory according to the expanded International Organization for Standardization 7197 standard protocol. The majority of the valves had a nonphysiologically low hydrodynamic resistance (from 1.5 to 3 mm Hg/[ml/min]), which may result in overdrainage related to posture and during nocturnal cerebral vasogenic waves. A long distal catheter increases the resistance of these valves by 100%-200%. Drainage through valves without a siphon-preventing mechanism is very sensitive to body posture, which may result in grossly negative intracranial pressure. Siphon-preventing accessories offer a reasonable resistance to negative outlet pressure; however, accessories with membrane devices may be blocked by raised subcutaneous pressure. In adjustable valves, the settings may be changed by external magnetic fields of intensity above 40 mT (exceptions: ProGAV, Polaris, and Certas). Most of the magnetically adjustable valves produce large distortions on MRI studies. The behavior of a valve revealed during testing is of relevance to the surgeon and may not be adequately described in the manufacturer's product information. The results of shunt testing are helpful in many circumstances, such as the initial choice of shunt and the evaluation of the shunt when its dysfunction is suspected.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-12-06

    The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or ceiling effects. The construct validity was investigated using exploratory factor analysis. Intra-rater reliability was measured in an interval of 3 months, inter-rater reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The score distribution of the items showed no ceiling or floor effects. Four of the five factors extracted from the factor analysis represented important constructs of doctor-patient communication The ratings for the first and second round of assessing the videos correlated at 0.75 (p<0.0001). Intraclass correlation coefficients for each item ranged were moderate and ranged from 0.05 to 0.57. Reasonable score distributions of most items without ceiling or floor effects as well as a good test-retest reliability and construct validity recommend the C-CG as an instrument for assessing communication skills in undergraduate medical students. Some deficiencies in inter-rater reliability are a clear indication that raters need a thorough instruction before using the C-CG.

  19. Characteristic conformation of Mosher's amide elucidated using the cambridge structural database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Akio; Ono, Hiroshi; Mikata, Yuji

    2015-07-16

    Conformations of the crystalline 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-methoxy-2-phenylpropanamide derivatives (MTPA amides) deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) were examined statistically as Racid-enantiomers. The majority of dihedral angles (48/58, ca. 83%) of the amide carbonyl groups and the trifluoromethyl groups ranged from -30° to 0° with an average angle θ1 of -13°. The other conformational properties were also clarified: (1) one of the fluorine atoms was antiperiplanar (ap) to the amide carbonyl group, forming a staggered conformation; (2) the MTPA amides prepared from primary amines showed a Z form in amide moieties; (3) in the case of the MTPA amide prepared from a primary amine possessing secondary alkyl groups (i.e., Mosher-type MTPA amide), the dihedral angles between the methine groups and the carbonyl groups were syn and indicative of a moderate conformational flexibility; (4) the phenyl plane was inclined from the O-Cchiral bond of the methoxy moiety with an average dihedral angle θ2 of +21°; (5) the methyl group of the methoxy moiety was ap to the ipso-carbon atom of the phenyl group.

  20. Item Response Theory Analyses of the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Wilmer, Jeremy; Herzmann, Grit; McGugin, Rankin; Fiset, Daniel; Van Gulick, Ana E.; Ryan, Katie; Gauthier, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Cambridge face memory test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). First, we assessed the dimensionality of the test with a bi-factor exploratory factor analysis (EFA). This EFA analysis revealed a general factor and three specific factors clustered by targets of CFMT. However, the three specific factors appeared to be minor factors that can be ignored. Second, we fit a unidimensional item response model. This item response model showed that the CFMT items could discriminate individuals at different ability levels and covered a wide range of the ability continuum. We found the CFMT to be particularly precise for a wide range of ability levels. Third, we implemented item response theory (IRT) differential item functioning (DIF) analyses for each gender group and two age groups (Age ≤ 20 versus Age > 21). This DIF analysis suggested little evidence of consequential differential functioning on the CFMT for these groups, supporting the use of the test to compare older to younger, or male to female, individuals. Fourth, we tested for a gender difference on the latent facial recognition ability with an explanatory item response model. We found a significant but small gender difference on the latent ability for face recognition, which was higher for women than men by 0.184, at age mean 23.2, controlling for linear and quadratic age effects. Finally, we discuss the practical considerations of the use of total scores versus IRT scale scores in applications of the CFMT. PMID:25642930

  1. ICRS1, Proceedings of the First Radiation Shielding Symposium, Cambridge, UK 1958

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebelbecker, Hans-Juergen

    2008-01-01

    Description: The papers of the European Atomic Energy Society Symposium VI-58 on radiation shielding (ICRS1) held at Caius College, Cambridge England from 26 to 29 August 1958 are collected here for the first time in electronic form. This symposium was organised in connection with the Second Atoms for Peace Conference held in Geneva Held in Geneva from 1 to 13 September 1958. The Topics discussed covered gamma rays and neutron radiation; the Methods discussed were analytical approaches, semi-empirical Methods, simple computer codes, Monte Carlo method. Little quality nuclear data for shielding calculations was available and the presentations would concentrate on removal cross-sections and build-up factors. Experimental techniques in support to estimate the effective shielding properties of materials were discussed such as general experimental shielding techniques and experiments on neutron attenuation in different materials and on concrete as shield. Foil detectors for spectra measurements and determination of dose rates were mainly used. The typical issues addressed were gamma-heating, gamma spectra, neutron induced gammas, fission products gamma spectra, skyshine radiation and neutron ducts - streaming. Most participants were researchers from the naval and aeronautics sector

  2. Face recognition performance of individuals with Asperger syndrome on the Cambridge Face Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Darren; Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn

    2011-12-01

    Although face recognition deficits in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome (AS), are widely acknowledged, the empirical evidence is mixed. This in part reflects the failure to use standardized and psychometrically sound tests. We contrasted standardized face recognition scores on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) for 34 individuals with AS with those for 42, IQ-matched non-ASD individuals, and age-standardized scores from a large Australian cohort. We also examined the influence of IQ, autistic traits, and negative affect on face recognition performance. Overall, participants with AS performed significantly worse on the CFMT than the non-ASD participants and when evaluated against standardized test norms. However, while 24% of participants with AS presented with severe face recognition impairment (>2 SDs below the mean), many individuals performed at or above the typical level for their age: 53% scored within +/- 1 SD of the mean and 9% demonstrated superior performance (>1 SD above the mean). Regression analysis provided no evidence that IQ, autistic traits, or negative affect significantly influenced face recognition: diagnostic group membership was the only significant predictor of face recognition performance. In sum, face recognition performance in ASD is on a continuum, but with average levels significantly below non-ASD levels of performance. Copyright © 2011, International Society for Autism Research, Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. III: probing the expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamanini, Nicola; Caprini, Chiara [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA-Saclay, CNRS UMR 3681, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barausse, Enrico [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 6, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis Bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Sesana, Alberto [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Klein, Antoine [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Petiteau, Antoine, E-mail: nicola.tamanini@cea.fr, E-mail: chiara.caprini@cea.fr, E-mail: barausse@iap.fr, E-mail: asesana@star.sr.bham.ac.uk, E-mail: aklein@physics.montana.edu, E-mail: antoine.petiteau@apc.univ-paris7.fr [APC, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the capability of various configurations of the space interferometer eLISA to probe the late-time background expansion of the universe using gravitational wave standard sirens. We simulate catalogues of standard sirens composed by massive black hole binaries whose gravitational radiation is detectable by eLISA, and which are likely to produce an electromagnetic counterpart observable by future surveys. The main issue for the identification of a counterpart resides in the capability of obtaining an accurate enough sky localisation with eLISA. This seriously challenges the capability of four-link (2 arm) configurations to successfully constrain the cosmological parameters. Conversely, six-link (3 arm) configurations have the potential to provide a test of the expansion of the universe up to z ∼ 8 which is complementary to other cosmological probes based on electromagnetic observations only. In particular, in the most favourable scenarios, they can provide a significant constraint on H{sub 0} at the level of 0.5%. Furthermore, (Ω{sub M}, Ω{sub Λ}) can be constrained to a level competitive with present SNIa results. On the other hand, the lack of massive black hole binary standard sirens at low redshift allows to constrain dark energy only at the level of few percent.

  4. Universe in the theoretical model «Evolving matter»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazaluk Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article critically examines modern model of the Universe evolution constructed by efforts of a group of scientists (mathematicians, physicists and cosmologists from the world's leading universities (Oxford and Cambridge Universities, Yale, Columbia, New York, Rutgers and the UC Santa Cruz. The author notes its strengths, but also points to shortcomings. Author believes that this model does not take into account the most important achievements in the field of biochemistry and biology (molecular, physical, developmental, etc., as well as neuroscience and psychology. Author believes that in the construction of model of the Universe evolution, scientists must take into account (with great reservations the impact of living and intelligent matter on space processes. As an example, the author gives his theoretical model "Evolving matter". In this model, he shows not only the general dependence of the interaction of cosmic processes with inert, living and intelligent matter, but also he attempts to show the direct influence of systems of living and intelligent matter on the acceleration of the Universe's expansion.

  5. Advanced Problems in Mathematics : Preparing for University

    OpenAIRE

    Siklos, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    " This book is intended to help candidates prepare for entrance examinations in mathematics and scientific subjects, including STEP (Sixth Term Examination Paper). STEP is an examination used by Cambridge colleges as the basis for conditional offers. They are also used by Warwick University, and many other mathematics departments recommend that their applicants practice on the past papers even if they do not take the examination. Advanced Problems in Mathematics is recommended as preparati...

  6. Potential reductions of street solids and phosphorus in urban watersheds from street cleaning, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2009-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    Material accumulating and washing off urban street surfaces and ultimately into stormwater drainage systems represents a substantial nonpoint source of solids, phosphorus, and other constituent loading to waterways in urban areas. Cost and lack of usable space limit the type and number of structural stormwater source controls available to municipalities and other public managers. Non-structural source controls such as street cleaning are commonly used by cities and towns for construction, maintenance and aesthetics, and may reduce contaminant loading to waterways. Effectiveness of street cleaning is highly variable and potential improvements to water quality are not fully understood. In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and initiated a study to better understand the physical and chemical nature of the organic and inorganic solid material on street surfaces, evaluate the performance of a street cleaner at removing street solids, and make use of the Source Loading and Management Model (SLAMM) to estimate potential reductions in solid and phosphorus loading to the lower Charles River from various street-cleaning technologies and frequencies. Average yield of material on streets collected between May and December 2010, was determined to be about 740 pounds per curb-mile on streets in multifamily land use and about 522 pounds per curb-mile on commercial land-use streets. At the end-of-winter in March 2011, about 2,609 and 4,788 pounds per curb-mile on average were collected from streets in multifamily and commercial land-use types, respectively. About 86 percent of the total street-solid yield from multifamily and commercial land-use streets was greater than or equal to 0.125 millimeters in diameter (or very fine sand). Observations of street-solid distribution across the entire street width indicated that as

  7. Hindi translation and validation of Cambridge-Hopkins Diagnostic Questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Allan, Richard P; Pundeer, Ashwini; Das, Sourav; Dhyani, Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome also known as Willis-Ekbom's Disease (RLS/WED) is a common illness. Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq) is a good diagnostic tool and can be used in the epidemiological studies. However, its Hindi version is not available. Thus, this study was conducted to translate and validate it in the Hindi speaking population. After obtaining the permission from the author of the CHRLSq, it was translated into Hindi language by two independent translators. After a series of forward and back translations, the finalized Hindi version was administered to two groups by one of the authors, who were blinded to the clinical diagnosis. First group consisted of RLS/WED patients, where diagnosis was made upon face to face interview and the other group - the control group included subjects with somatic symptoms disorders or exertional myalgia or chronic insomnia. Each group had 30 subjects. Diagnosis made on CHRLSq was compared with the clinical diagnosis. Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) v 21.0. Descriptive statistics was calculated. Proportions were compared using chi-square test; whereas, categorical variables were compared using independent sample t-test. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the translated version of questionnaire were calculated. Average age was comparable between the cases and control group (RLS/WED = 39.1 ± 10.1 years vs 36.2 ± 11.4 years in controls; P = 0.29). Women outnumbered men in the RLS/WED group (87% in RLS/WED group vs 57% among controls; χ(2) = 6.64; P = 0.01). Both the sensitivity and specificity of the translated version was 83.3%. It had the positive predictive value of 86.6%. Hindi version of CHRLSq has positive predictive value of 87% and it can be used to diagnose RLS in Hindi speaking population.

  8. Hindi translation and validation of Cambridge-Hopkins Diagnostic Questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restless legs syndrome also known as Willis-Ekbom′s Disease (RLS/WED is a common illness. Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CHRLSq is a good diagnostic tool and can be used in the epidemiological studies. However, its Hindi version is not available. Thus, this study was conducted to translate and validate it in the Hindi speaking population. Materials and Methods: After obtaining the permission from the author of the CHRLSq, it was translated into Hindi language by two independent translators. After a series of forward and back translations, the finalized Hindi version was administered to two groups by one of the authors, who were blinded to the clinical diagnosis. First group consisted of RLS/WED patients, where diagnosis was made upon face to face interview and the other group - the control group included subjects with somatic symptoms disorders or exertional myalgia or chronic insomnia. Each group had 30 subjects. Diagnosis made on CHRLSq was compared with the clinical diagnosis. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS v 21.0. Descriptive statistics was calculated. Proportions were compared using chi-square test; whereas, categorical variables were compared using independent sample t-test. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the translated version of questionnaire were calculated. Results: Average age was comparable between the cases and control group (RLS/WED = 39.1 ± 10.1 years vs 36.2 ± 11.4 years in controls; P = 0.29. Women outnumbered men in the RLS/WED group (87% in RLS/WED group vs 57% among controls; χ2 = 6.64; P = 0.01. Both the sensitivity and specificity of the translated version was 83.3%. It had the positive predictive value of 86.6%. Conclusion: Hindi version of CHRLSq has positive predictive value of 87% and it can be used to diagnose RLS in Hindi speaking population.

  9. Evaluation of a brief anti-stigma campaign in Cambridge: do short-term campaigns work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson Claire

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the high costs of mass-media campaigns, it is important to understand whether it is possible for a media campaign to have significant population effects over a short period of time. This paper explores this question specifically in reference to stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems using the Time to Change Cambridge anti-stigma campaign as an example. Methods 410 face-to-face interviews were performed pre, during and post campaign activity to assess campaign awareness and mental health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Results Although campaign awareness was not sustained following campaign activity, significant and sustained shifts occurred for mental health-related knowledge items. Specifically, there was a 24% (p If a friend had a mental health problem, I know what advice to give them to get professional help, following the campaign. Additionally, for the statement: Medication can be an effective treatment for people with mental health problems, there was a 10% rise (p = 0.05 in the proportion of interviewees responding 'agree' or 'strongly agree' following the campaign. These changes, however, were not evident for attitudinal or behaviour related questions. Conclusions Although these results only reflect the impact of one small scale campaign, these preliminary findings suggest several considerations for mass-media campaign development and evaluation strategies such as: (1 Aiming to influence outcomes pertaining to knowledge in the short term; (2 Planning realistic and targeted outcomes over the short, medium and long term during sustained campaigns; and (3 Monitoring indirect campaign effects such as social discourse or other social networking/contact in the evaluation.

  10. Depersonalization: An exploratory factor analysis of the Italian version of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagioli, F; Telesforo, L; Dell'Erba, A; Consolazione, M; Migliorini, V; Patanè, M; Boldrini, T; Graziani, R; Nicoletti, F; Fiori-Nastro, P

    2015-07-01

    "Depersonalization" (DP) is a common symptom in the general population and psychiatric patients (Michal et al., 2011 [1]). DP is characterized by an alteration in the experience of the self, so that one feels detached from his or her own mental processes or body (or from the world), feeling as being an outside observer of his or her own self, and loosing the experience of unity and identity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013 [2]). We performed an exploratory factor analysis of the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale Italian version (CDS-IV). We enrolled 149 inpatients and outpatients of psychiatric services located in two Italian regions, Lazio and Campania. Patients were aged between 15 and 65 and diagnosed with schizophrenic, depressive or anxiety disorders. Four factors accounted for 97.4% of the variance. Factor 1 (10, 24, 26, 1, 13, 23, 9, 2, 5, and 11), called "Detachment from the Self", captures experiences of detachment from actions and thoughts. Factor 2 (19, 20, 27, 3, 12, 23, 22, and 11), called "Anomalous bodily experiences", refers to unusual bodily experiences. Factor 3 (7, 28, 25, 6, 9, and 2), named "Numbing", describes the dampening of affects. Factor 4 (14, 17, and 16), named "Temporal blunting", refers to the subjective experience of time. We did not find any specific factor that refers to derealization; this suggests that the constructs of depersonalization/derealization (DP/DR) were strongly related to each other. Our results show that the constructs of DP/DR subsume several psychopathological dimensions; moreover, the above mentioned factors were broadly consistent with prior literature. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Evaluation of a brief anti-stigma campaign in Cambridge: do short-term campaigns work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; London, Jillian; Little, Kirsty; Henderson, Claire; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-06-14

    In view of the high costs of mass-media campaigns, it is important to understand whether it is possible for a media campaign to have significant population effects over a short period of time. This paper explores this question specifically in reference to stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems using the Time to Change Cambridge anti-stigma campaign as an example. 410 face-to-face interviews were performed pre, during and post campaign activity to assess campaign awareness and mental health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Although campaign awareness was not sustained following campaign activity, significant and sustained shifts occurred for mental health-related knowledge items. Specifically, there was a 24% (p mental health problem, I know what advice to give them to get professional help, following the campaign. Additionally, for the statement: Medication can be an effective treatment for people with mental health problems, there was a 10% rise (p = 0.05) in the proportion of interviewees responding 'agree' or 'strongly agree' following the campaign. These changes, however, were not evident for attitudinal or behaviour related questions. Although these results only reflect the impact of one small scale campaign, these preliminary findings suggest several considerations for mass-media campaign development and evaluation strategies such as: (1) Aiming to influence outcomes pertaining to knowledge in the short term; (2) Planning realistic and targeted outcomes over the short, medium and long term during sustained campaigns; and (3) Monitoring indirect campaign effects such as social discourse or other social networking/contact in the evaluation.

  12. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  13. Space Sciences and Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M.

    Erwin Schrodinger suggested that " Scientific knowledge forms part of the idealistic background of human life", which exalted man from a nude and savage state to true humanity [Science and Humanism, Cambridge, 1961, p9]. Modern space sciences an space exploration are a brilliant demonstration of the validity of Schrodinger's thesis on Idealism. Moreover, Schrodingers thesis could be considered also as a basic principle for the New Educational Space Philosophical Project "TIMAEUS"."TIMAEUS" is not only an attempt to to start a new dialogue between Science, the Humanities and Religion; but also it is an origin of the cultural innovations of our so strange of globilisation. TIMAEUS, thus, can reveal Idealism as something more fundamental , more refined, more developed than is now accepted by the scientific community and the piblic. TIMAEUS has a significant cultural agenda, connected with the high orbital performance of the synthetic arts, combining a knowledge of the truly spiritual as well as the universal. In particular, classical ballet as a synthetic art can be a new and powerful perfector and re-creator of the real human, real idealistic, real complex culture in orbit. As is well known, Carlo Blasis, the most important dance theorist of the 19t h .century, made probably the first attempts to use the scientific ideas of Leonardo da Vinci and Isaac Newton for the understanding of the gravitational nature of balance and allegro in ballet. In particular Blasis's idea of the limited use of the legs in classical dance realised by the gifted pupils of Enrico Cecchetti - M.Fokine, A.Pavlova and V.Nijinsky, with thinkable purity and elegance of style. V.Nijinsky in his remarkable animation of the dance of two dimensional creatures of a Euclidean flat world (L'Apres Midi d'un Faune,1912) discovered that true classical dance has some gravitational limits. For example, Nijinsky's Faunes and Nymphs mut use running on the heels (In accordance with "Partitura" 1916); they

  14. Newton's Metaphysics of Space as God's Emanative Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquette, Dale

    2014-09-01

    In several of his writings, Isaac Newton proposed that physical space is God's "emanative effect" or "sensorium," revealing something interesting about the metaphysics underlying his mathematical physics. Newton's conjectures depart from Plato and Aristotle's metaphysics of space and from classical and Cambridge Neoplatonism. Present-day philosophical concepts of supervenience clarify Newton's ideas about space and offer a portrait of Newton not only as a mathematical physicist but an independent-minded rationalist philosopher.

  15. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  16. Carnegie Mellon University Space Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2016-01-01

    A traditional architecture studio focusing on a "post-pioneering" settlement (a first step research station with an emphasis on material, resources, closed-loop systems, as well as programmatic network and spatial considerations) for the surface of Mars or for Earth-Mars transit.

  17. Crawford, Elisabeth: "Arrhenius: From Ionic Theory to the Greenhouse Effect" (Canton 1996); and Diana Barkan: "Walther Nernst and the Transition to Modern Physical Science" (Cambridge 1999) (book review)

    OpenAIRE

    Peter J. Ramberg

    2000-01-01

    book review of Crawford, Elisabeth: "Arrhenius: From Ionic Theory to the Greenhouse Effect" (Canton 1996); and Diana Barkan: "Walther Nernst and the Transition to Modern Physical Science" (Cambridge 1999)

  18. Mental health workshops delivered by medical students in Cambridge secondary schools: an evaluation of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Chloe; Daunt, Anna; Taylor, Stephanie; Simmons, Meinou

    2013-09-01

    For a group of medical students to design and deliver a mental health workshop in Cambridge secondary schools. Subsequently, to evaluate any improvements in pupils' knowledge of mental health issues, including knowledge of common mental illnesses, stigma and where to access help with mental health problems. A group of three medical students undertook a five week Student Selected Component to develop a mental health workshop in Spring 2013. The workshop was designed to include interactive components, such as role play, models and video. It was delivered to eight classes of 12-13 year old pupils across two local secondary schools, a total of 230 students. Questionnaires were completed before and after each workshop to test knowledge acquisition of mental health issues, stigma and where pupils could get help with mental health problems. Comparisons between data from the pre- and post-workshop questionnaires were made to assess learning. The responses from the questionnaires showed a global improvement in knowledge of mental health. This is highlighted by the increase in awareness of the prevalence of mental health problems amongst young people from 47.0% before the workshops to 97.8% after the workshops. The ability to identify symptoms of anxiety rose from 21.7% to 44.8% and the ability to identify depression rose from 29.0% to 53.5% respectively. Whilst only 15.2% pupils disagreed with a stigmatising statement about mental illness before the workshops, 61.3% pupils disagreed afterwards. The students were also better informed about how to access help and identified areas that they found useful to learn about. Comparison of the pre- and post-workshop questionnaires indicate that medical student-led workshops are an effective method for improving knowledge of mental health topics amongst 12-13 year old school pupils, as well as encouraging positive attitudes towards mental health. The project highlights a demand for mental health education in schools and brings to

  19. Hadron jets in deep inelastic ν-bar N interactions and universality of the jet properties in relative four-velocity space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Didenko, L.A.; Grishin, V.G.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Maneva, G.M.; Temnikov, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    A new definition of the jets as clusters in the four-velocity space has been used to make an invariant analysis of the jet production processes in ν-barN collisions for the three energy intervals of the hadron system: W=3.5; 4.9; 8.0 GeV. The obtained results are compared with the characteristics of the four-dimensional jets in various types of interactions: pp, p-barp, π - p, π - C, pC and pTa at energies from 6 to 205 GeV. The characteristics of the four-dimensional jets in soft and hard interactions are shown to be universal, i.e., independent of neither the type of the fragmenting system (p, p-bar, π - , C, q), nor the collision energy for P lab ≥ 22 GeV/c (√S=W > 6 GeV). The obtained result means that the hadronization of the colour charges is determined by the dynamics of their interaction with vacuum

  20. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2008-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2006 (October 2005 through September 2006). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir contents for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent of capacity during water year 2006, while monthly reservoir contents for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir was maintained at greater than 83 and 94 percent of capacity, respectively. If water demand is assumed to be 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2006 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 127 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area was about 16 percent greater for the 2006 water year than for the previous water year and was between 12 and 73 percent greater than for any recorded amount since water year 2002. The monthly mean specific-conductance values for all continuously monitored stations within the drinking-water source area were generally within the range of historical data collected since water year 1997, and in many cases were less than the historical medians. The annual mean specific conductance of 738 uS/cm (microsiemens per centimeter) for water discharged from the Cambridge Reservoir was nearly identical to the annual

  1. Dark Energy Found Stifling Growth in Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    WASHINGTON -- For the first time, astronomers have clearly seen the effects of "dark energy" on the most massive collapsed objects in the universe using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By tracking how dark energy has stifled the growth of galaxy clusters and combining this with previous studies, scientists have obtained the best clues yet about what dark energy is and what the destiny of the universe could be. This work, which took years to complete, is separate from other methods of dark energy research such as supernovas. These new X-ray results provide a crucial independent test of dark energy, long sought by scientists, which depends on how gravity competes with accelerated expansion in the growth of cosmic structures. Techniques based on distance measurements, such as supernova work, do not have this special sensitivity. Scientists think dark energy is a form of repulsive gravity that now dominates the universe, although they have no clear picture of what it actually is. Understanding the nature of dark energy is one of the biggest problems in science. Possibilities include the cosmological constant, which is equivalent to the energy of empty space. Other possibilities include a modification in general relativity on the largest scales, or a more general physical field. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters Powerful Nearby Supernova Caught By Web Cassiopeia A Comes Alive Across Time and Space To help decide between these options, a new way of looking at dark energy is required. It is accomplished by observing how cosmic acceleration affects the growth of galaxy clusters over time. "This result could be described as 'arrested development of the universe'," said Alexey Vikhlinin of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., who led the research. "Whatever is forcing the expansion of the universe to speed up is also forcing its

  2. Book Review: Unifying scientific theories: physical concepts and mathematical structures. Margaret Morrison, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000, pp. 280, US 65.00, ISBN 0-521-65216-2 hardback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, Talel A.

    In addition to being a thorough and timely treatment of unity in science, Morrison's book is particularly noteworthy for the kind of inquiry it represents. In the context of current debates in the history and philosophy of science, Morrison has managed to chart a very persuasive middle path through potentially contentious extreme positions. Also, by taking an approach that is at once conceptual and historical, she has produced a book that truly addresses both the history and philosophy of modern science; it allows the reader to interact with key philosophical questions in addition to well researched and well documented historical accounts. These accounts, which function as case studies, are provided in Chapters 3-6. They are valuable both in-and-of themselves, and as examples which illustrate Morrison's main philosophical thesis.

  3. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  4. Analysis of the Thermo-Elastic Response of Space Reflectors to Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, G.; Ivagnes, M. M.; Marchetti, M.; Poscente, F.

    2002-01-01

    high pressure Xenon lamps to simulate the direct solar irradiation and a cryogenic heat exchanger to reproduce the earth shadowing of sunlight. The temperature of the thermal cycles ranges from -80°C up to 100°C: the thermo-elastic response of the antenna has been surveyed by employing strain gauges place on the structures at several different locations. The structure has been subjected to 100 thermal cycles, each of which lasting two hours: the total duration of the exposition to the vacuum environment has been equal to 300 hours. Finally the antenna has been disassembled and its elements have been examined to evaluate the effects of the simulated exposition on each of them: the total mass loss and the final thermo-mechanical properties of the polymeric based materials which constitute the structural core of the antenna have been surveyed. The experimental results have been compared to numerical simulation performed by the NASTRAN code: the basic FEM model, developed for the unexposed antenna, has been updated to take into account the thermo-mechanical degradation of the structural elements and materials. This has allowed to obtain, by extrapolation, a FEM based prevision of the antenna thermo-elastic response for long-term operative conditions. References. [1] D. Hastings, H. Garret "Spacecraft environment interactions", Cambridge University Press, Atmospheric Series, Cambridge, 1996. [2] IAF-01-I.6.05 "On the Reliability of Honeycomb Core Bonding Joint in Sandwich Composite Materials for Space Applications" G. Allegri, U. Lecci, M. Marchetti, F. Poscente, 52° IAF Congress, 2001. [3] Meguro A. and alii, "Technology status of the 13 m aperture deployment antenna reflectors for Engineering Test Satellite VIII", Acta Astronautica, Volume: 47, Issue: 2-9, July - November, 2000, pp. 147-152. [4] Novikov L. S. "Contemporary state of spacecraft/environment interaction research" Radiation Measurements, Volume: 30, Issue: 5, October, 1999, pp. 661-667. [5] IAF-01-I.1

  5. Diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge classification): comparative study using secretin injection-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin-Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2008-02-28

    To investigate the usefulness of secretin injection-MRCP for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis. Sixteen patients having mild chronic pancreatitis according to the Cambridge classification and 12 control subjects with no abnormal findings on the pancreatogram were examined for the diagnostic accuracy of secretin injection-MRCP regarding abnormal branch pancreatic ducts associated with mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge Classification), using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for comparison. The sensitivity and specificity for abnormal branch pancreatic ducts determined by two reviewers were respectively 55%-63% and 75%-83% in the head, 57%-64% and 82%-83% in the body, and 44%-44% and 72%-76% in the tail of the pancreas. The sensitivity and specificity for mild chronic pancreatitis were 56%-63% and 92%-92%, respectively. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) concerning the diagnosis of an abnormal branch pancreatic duct and of mild chronic pancreatitis was good to excellent. Secretin injection-MRCP might be useful for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis.

  6. The Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): a new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croydon, Abigail; Pimperton, Hannah; Ewing, Louise; Duchaine, Brad C; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    Face recognition ability follows a lengthy developmental course, not reaching maturity until well into adulthood. Valid and reliable assessments of face recognition memory ability are necessary to examine patterns of ability and disability in face processing, yet there is a dearth of such assessments for children. We modified a well-known test of face memory in adults, the Cambridge Face Memory Test (Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006, Neuropsychologia, 44, 576-585), to make it developmentally appropriate for children. To establish its utility, we administered either the upright or inverted versions of the computerised Cambridge Face Memory Test - Children (CFMT-C) to 401 children aged between 5 and 12 years. Our results show that the CFMT-C is sufficiently sensitive to demonstrate age-related gains in the recognition of unfamiliar upright and inverted faces, does not suffer from ceiling or floor effects, generates robust inversion effects, and is capable of detecting difficulties in face memory in children diagnosed with autism. Together, these findings indicate that the CFMT-C constitutes a new valid assessment tool for children's face recognition skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Experimental Course in Elementary Number Theory, Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Mary Jacqueline

    In the winter of 1965, an experimental course in Elementary Number Theory was presented to a 6th grade class in the Hosmer School, Watertown, Massachusetts. Prior to the introduction of the present material, students had been exposed in class to such topics from the University of Illinois Arithmetic Project as lattices, number lines, frame…

  8. How Do Different Types of Schools Prepare Students for Life at Cambridge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Adamson, Clara; Mercer, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Twenty students from different educational backgrounds within the UK were interviewed to investigate how well they considered their secondary school education had prepared them for the educational and social demands of an "elite" university and life within its most traditional colleges. The study asked them how they perceived students…

  9. Budgeting Academic Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Watson

    2011-01-01

    There are many articles about space management, including those that discuss space calculations, metrics, and categories. Fewer articles discuss the space budgeting processes used by administrators to allocate space. The author attempts to fill this void by discussing her administrative experiences with Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU)…

  10. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, and Meteorological Data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, Drinking-Water Source Area, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2007-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and four subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water year 2005 (October 2004 through September 2005). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the subbasins of the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for selected elements, organic constituents, suspended sediment, and Escherichia coli bacteria. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply. Monthly reservoir capacities for the Cambridge Reservoir varied from about 59 to 98 percent during water year 2005, while monthly reservoir capacities for the Stony Brook Reservoir and the Fresh Pond Reservoir were maintained at capacities greater than 84 and 96 percent, respectively. Assuming a water demand of 15 million gallons per day by the city of Cambridge, the volume of water released from the Stony Brook Reservoir to the Charles River during the 2005 water year is equivalent to an annual water surplus of about 119 percent. Recorded precipitation in the source area for the 2005 water year was within 2 inches of the total annual precipitation for the previous 2 water years. The monthly mean specific conductances for the outflow of the Cambridge Reservoir were similar to historical monthly mean values. However, monthly mean specific conductances for Stony Brook near Route 20, in Waltham (U.S. Geological Survey station 01104460), which is the principal tributary feeding the Stony Brook Reservoir, were generally higher than the medians of the monthly mean specific conductances for the period of record. Similarly, monthly mean specific conductances for a small tributary to Stony Brook (U.S. Geological Survey

  11. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  12. Creating a "Third Space" in the Context of a University-School Partnership: Supporting Teacher Action Research and the Research Preparation of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhar, Joanne; Niesz, Tricia; Brossmann, Jeanette; Koebley, Sarah; O'Brien, Katherine; Loe, David; Black, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the Education Works Personalization Project was to facilitate teams of teacher action researchers whose goal was to personalize their teaching with the support of university partners including doctoral students in education. The subsequent apprentice-like research experience within this university-school partnership provided an…

  13. Healthy travel and the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK: a mixed-methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Anna; Guell, Cornelia; Panter, Jenna; Jones, Natalia R; Ogilvie, David

    2012-06-01

    Car use is associated with substantial health and environmental costs but research in deprived populations indicates that car access may also promote psychosocial well-being within car-oriented environments. This mixed-method (quantitative and qualitative) study examined this issue in a more affluent setting, investigating the socio-economic structure of car commuting in Cambridge, UK. Our analyses involved integrating self-reported questionnaire data from 1142 participants in the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (collected in 2009) and in-depth interviews with 50 participants (collected 2009-2010). Even in Britain's leading 'cycling city', cars were a key resource in bridging the gap between individuals' desires and their circumstances. This applied both to long-term life goals such as home ownership and to shorter-term challenges such as illness. Yet car commuting was also subject to constraints, with rush hour traffic pushing drivers to start work earlier and with restrictions on, or charges for, workplace parking pushing drivers towards multimodal journeys (e.g. driving to a 'park-and-ride' site then walking). These patterns of car commuting were socio-economically structured in several ways. First, the gradient of housing costs made living near Cambridge more expensive, affecting who could 'afford' to cycle and perhaps making cycling the more salient local marker of Bourdieu's class distinction. Nevertheless, cars were generally affordable in this relatively affluent, highly-educated population, reducing the barrier which distance posed to labour-force participation. Finally, having the option of starting work early required flexible hours, a form of job control which in Britain is more common among higher occupational classes. Following a social model of disability, we conclude that socio-economic advantage can make car-oriented environments less disabling via both greater affluence and greater job control, and in ways manifested across the full socio

  14. A Comparison of Keyword Subject Searching on Six British University OPACs Online Public Access Catalogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanonson, John

    1987-01-01

    Compares features of online public access catalogs (OPACs) at six British universities: (1) Cambridge; (2) Hull; (3) Newcastle; (4) Surrey; (5) Sussex; and (6) York. Results of keyword subject searches on two topics performed on each of the OPACs are reported and compared. Six references are listed. (MES)

  15. Superpartner Mass Measurement Technique using 1D Orthogonal Decompositions of the Cambridge Transverse Mass Variable MT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2010-07-01

    We propose a new model-independent technique for mass measurements in missing energy events at hadron colliders. We illustrate our method with the most challenging case of a single-step decay chain. We consider inclusive same-sign chargino pair production in supersymmetry, followed by leptonic decays to sneutrinos χ+χ+→ℓ+ℓ'+ν˜ℓν˜ℓ' and invisible decays ν˜ℓ→νℓχ˜10. We introduce two one-dimensional decompositions of the Cambridge MT2 variable: MT2∥ and MT2⊥, on the direction of the upstream transverse momentum P→T and the direction orthogonal to it, respectively. We show that the sneutrino mass Mc can be measured directly by minimizing the number of events N(M˜c) in which MT2 exceeds a certain threshold, conveniently measured from the end point MT2⊥max⁡(M˜c).

  16. A teaching skills assessment tool inspired by the Calgary-Cambridge model and the patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Johanna; Lanier, Cédric; Perron, Noelle Junod; Nendaz, Mathieu; Clavet, Diane; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a descriptive tool for peer review of clinical teaching skills. Two analogies framed our research: (1) between the patient-centered and the learner-centered approach; (2) between the structures of clinical encounters (Calgary-Cambridge communication model) and teaching sessions. During the course of one year, each step of the action research was carried out in collaboration with twelve clinical teachers from an outpatient general internal medicine clinic and with three experts in medical education. The content validation consisted of a literature review, expert opinion and the participatory research process. Interrater reliability was evaluated by three clinical teachers coding thirty audiotaped standardized learner-teacher interactions. This tool contains sixteen items covering the process and content of clinical supervisions. Descriptors define the expected teaching behaviors for three levels of competence. Interrater reliability was significant for eleven items (Kendall's coefficient pteaching skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation of 0.67um scatter with local stress in Ge impacted with the modified Cambridge liquid jet device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael; Price, D.; Strohecker, Steve

    1994-09-01

    Germanium witness samples were impacted with the NAWCADWAR modified Cambridge liquid jet device introducing varying levels of damage about the center of each sample. Surface damage statistics were collected, scatter measurements were made at 0.67 micrometers and the samples were failed in tension using a bi-axial flexure test setup. The level and character of the damage was correlated with the reflected scatter measurements as a function of local stress and flaw size distribution. Bi-axial flexure data was analyzed to predict fracture stress and the probability of failure of the germanium samples. The mechanical data were then correlated with the scatter data in order to correlate the BRDF with the material failure. The BRDF measurements were taken in several different orientations in order to study the differences in scatter character for the in-plane and out-of-plane conditions.

  18. Money Now, Money Later: Linking Time Discounting and Criminal Convictions in the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquero, Alex R; Farrington, David P; Jennings, Wesley G

    2018-04-01

    Two prominent criminological theories offer time discounting, or the preference for an immediate reward over a later one, as a central part of understanding involvement in criminal activity. Yet, there exist only a few studies investigating this issue, and they are limited in a few respects. The current study extends prior work in this area by using multiple measures of time discounting collected at three different periods of the life course to examine the link to criminal offending into late middle adulthood in the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development. Results show that greater time discounting is positively related to a higher number of criminal convictions by late middle adulthood, and this effect remains after controlling for early life-course individual and environmental risk in a multivariate framework. Study limitations and implications are also discussed.

  19. International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and Cambridge Filter Test (CFT) Smoking Regimen Data Comparisons in Tobacco Product Marketing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Changyu; Walters, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew R

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the differences in TNCO (tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide) smoke yields generated under the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Cambridge Filter Test (CFT) smoking regimens. Twenty-nine commercial cigarette products from the US marketplace were acquired in 2015 and tested by measuring the TNCO smoke yields generated under these 2 nonintense smoking regimens. Data obtained demonstrated a linear relationship between the TNCO yields produced under the 2 smoking regimens (R 2 > 0.99). TNCO yields produced by each product were higher under the CFT smoking regimen than the ISO smoking regimen. We found that tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yields were consistently 10% to 13% higher under the CFT smoking regimen than under the ISO smoking regimen. This strong correlation indicates that the 2 smoking regimens can be used to apply a correlation correction to CFT TNCO data and allow its comparison to ISO TNCO data in tobacco product marketing applications.

  20. The intelligent Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, F.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the 'primordial soup'); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe. (U.K.)

  1. The ASLOTS concept: An interactive, adaptive decision support concept for Final Approach Spacing of Aircraft (FASA). FAA-NASA Joint University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines a concept for an adaptive, interactive decision support system to assist controllers at a busy airport in achieving efficient use of multiple runways. The concept is being implemented as a computer code called FASA (Final Approach Spacing for Aircraft), and will be tested and demonstrated in ATCSIM, a high fidelity simulation of terminal area airspace and airport surface operations. Objectives are: (1) to provide automated cues to assist controllers in the sequencing and spacing of landing and takeoff aircraft; (2) to provide the controller with a limited ability to modify the sequence and spacings between aircraft, and to insert takeoffs and missed approach aircraft in the landing flows; (3) to increase spacing accuracy using more complex and precise separation criteria while reducing controller workload; and (4) achieve higher operational takeoff and landing rates on multiple runways in poor visibility.

  2. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology

  3. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-09-15

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology.

  4. Residencia del colegio de Cristo, en Cambridge - Gran Bretaña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Lasdun & Partners, Arquitectos

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available This structure rises by successive terraces, extending from within the existing college onto King's Street but keeping the traditional tone of university isolation from the rest of the city. The main floor contains utility rooms, shops, porter's lodging, sitting rooms, lecture halls, conference rooms, bar, and parking access. The upper floors house the living quarters, i.e. rooms with bath. A reinforced concrete base supports the upper, prefabricated floors.El edificio se levanta —por medio de terrazas sucesivas— desde el colegio existente hasta volar sobre la calle King, recogiendo el tradicional concepto de apertura hacia dentro y aislamiento respecto de la ciudad. La planta baja alberga: - las zonas de instalaciones; - tiendas; - vivienda del conserje; - estancias nobles, tales como salas de lectura, coloquios y bar; - acceso al aparcamiento. En las plantas altas están situadas las habitaciones con baño. La estructura de la planta baja es de hormigón armado y soporta las plantas elevadas, construidas a base de elementos prefabricados.

  5. Goals for the Correlation of Elementary Science and Mathematics; The Report of the Cambridge Conference on the Correlation of Science and Mathematics in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics, Newton, MA.

    This is The Report of the 1967 Cambridge Conference on the Correlation of Science and Mathematics in the Schools. It is addressed to professionals in education, and is designed to stimulate dialogue among them concerning the mathematics-science curriculum. The report is organized in five chapters, each dealing respectively with (1) educational…

  6. Learning Space Service Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Much progress has been made in creating informal learning spaces that incorporate technology and flexibly support a variety of activities. This progress has been principally in designing the right combination of furniture, technology, and space. However, colleges and universities do not design services within learning spaces with nearly the same…

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  8. Miniature JPL Universal Instrument Bus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a Universal Digital Processor Bus architecture using state of the art commercial packaging technologies. This work will transition commercial advanced- yet...

  9. Network University of the CIS as a tool for development of academic mobility within a single (unified educational space of the CIS member states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Гульнара Амангельдиновна Краснова

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the project «Establishment of a network University of the CIS (2008-2010 years» realization, aimed to establish a joint master's programs in the commonwealth, to strengthen international cooperation in the training of highly qualified specialists, specified tasks to further its implementation in 2010.

  10. Religious Experience and Lay Society in T’ang China: A Reading of Tai Fu’s Kuang-i chi, by Glen Dudbridge. Cambridge Studies in Chinese History, Literature and Institutions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. ix+256 pp. Maps. ISBN: 0521482232

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ying Qin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon his knowledge and understanding of literature, book culture, and vernacular culture of pre-modern China, Glen Dudbridge offers, in his unique reading of Kuang-i chi 廣異記 (The great book of marvels, insights into the religious experiences of lay society individuals of eighth century China. However, an inquisitive reader must ask the following questions: Can Kuang-i chi, a medieval collection of tales of encounters with the other world by the minor T’ang Dynasty official Tai Fu 戴孚 (fl. 760-780, chin-shih 757, be used for the purpose of the study of religious culture? How? and to what extent? What approaches would be effective in inquiring such a text and what kinds of conclusions can be drawn? Though not explicitly setting forth these questions, Dudbridge’s work serves as answers to them through explicitly defining the nature of Kuang-i chi to his study, discarding conventional categories and establishing new ones in his analysis, and associating Kuang-i chi to the “vernacular,” instead of official, or “centralized,” religious culture (p.63-4. Using a sharp historical focus on the collection, Dudbridge concentrates on the dynamics of change in religious practices of T’ang Dynasty that is rooted and reflected in such a vernacular religious culture....

  11. Particle Size Distribution of E-Cigarette Aerosols and the Relationship to Cambridge Filter Pad Collection Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alderman Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relatively volatile nature of the particulate matter fraction of e-cigarette aerosols presents an experimental challenge with regard to particle size distribution measure-ments. This is particularly true for instruments requiring a high degree of aerosol dilution. This was illustrated in a previous study, where average particle diameters in the 10-50 nm range were determined by a high-dilution, electrical mobility method. Total particulate matter (TPM masses calculated based on those diameters were orders of magnitude smaller than gravimetrically determined TPM. This discrepancy was believed to result from almost complete particle evaporation at the dilution levels of the electrical mobility analysis. The same study described a spectral transmission measurement of e-cigarette particle size in an undiluted state, and reported particles from 210-380 nm count median diameter. Observed particle number concentrations were in the 109 particles/cm3 range. Additional particle size measurements described here also found e-cigarette particle size to be in the 260-320 nm count median diameter range. Cambridge filter pads have been used for decades to determine TPM yields of tobacco burning cigarettes, and collection of e-cigarette TPM by fibrous filters is predicted to be a highly efficient process over a wide range of filtration flow rates. The results presented in this work provide support for this hypothesis.

  12. Compactness in quasi-Banach function spaces and applications to compact embeddings of Besov-type spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caetano, A.M.; Gogatishvili, Amiran; Opic, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 5 (2016), s. 905-927 ISSN 0308-2105 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14743S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : quasi-Banach function space * compactness * compact embedding Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.158, year: 2016 http:// journals .cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=10379393&fileId=S0308210515000761

  13. "Universe" event at AIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  14. The future of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, AJ

    2007-01-01

    Many books have described how the universe became the way it is today. But what about the future of the universe? How long might the universe as we recognize it survive? The Future of the Universe takes the reader on a journey through space and time, beginning with a long look at the Earth and solar system, voyaging to the outermost galaxies, and finishing with speculations about the life and fate of the entire universe.

  15. Hukum Lingkungan dan Pertanggungjawaban Strict Liability dalam Sistem Hukum Common Law (Studi Kasus Cambridge Water Co. Ltd v. Eastern Countries Leather Plc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Mahfud

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The possibilities for pollution control still offered today Blackburn J.’s celebrated rule of strict liability, now almost 130 years old, has ensured its continuing popularity. There can be few tort lawyers, however, who have not increasingly wondered how much time should be devoted to a case which has received little judicial attention in recent years, and which was last subjected to detailed consideration by the House of Lords nearly 50 years ago, until, that is, the much-published decision of the House of Lords in Cambridge Water Co. Ltd v. Eastern Countries Leather Plc.   (Environmental Law and The Strict Liability Application In the Common Law System (The Case Study of Cambridge Water Co. Ltd V. Eastern Countries Leather Plc

  16. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. “Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny” in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, K.W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), and Ernst Ruska Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Rose, H. [Materialwissenschaftliche Elektronenmikroskopie, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. - Highlights: • We scrutinize assertions made on the evolution of Cambridge Cs corrector project. • References [22-24] do not demonstrate improvement of resolution by Cs correction. • According to literature such improvement is only shown in reference [10] in 2001. • Corresponding evidence was published by Heidelberg project already in 1998. • The Heidelberg Cs corrector project antedates the Cambridge project by 3 years.

  17. Reply to L.M. Brown et al. “Brief history of the Cambridge STEM aberration correction project and its progeny” in Ultramicroscopy 157, 88 (2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, K.W.; Rose, H.

    2016-01-01

    We comment on a Short Communication recently published in Ultramicroscopy in which Brown et al. criticize our description of the time sequence of events in the development of aberration correction systems in electron optics during the 1990s put forward in the introduction to the Ultramicroscopy April 2015 Special Issue. We present an analysis of the published literature furnishing evidence that our description is correct. - Highlights: • We scrutinize assertions made on the evolution of Cambridge Cs corrector project. • References [22-24] do not demonstrate improvement of resolution by Cs correction. • According to literature such improvement is only shown in reference [10] in 2001. • Corresponding evidence was published by Heidelberg project already in 1998. • The Heidelberg Cs corrector project antedates the Cambridge project by 3 years.

  18. Surface-water, water-quality, and meteorological data for the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area, water years 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Records of water quantity, water quality, and meteorological parameters were continuously collected from three reservoirs, two primary streams, and five subbasin tributaries in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area during water years 2007-08 (October 2006 through September 2008). Water samples were collected during base-flow conditions and storms in the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir drainage areas and analyzed for dissolved calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate; total nitrogen and phosphorus; and polar pesticides and metabolites. Composite samples of stormwater also were analyzed for concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons and suspended sediment in one subbasin in the Stony Brook Reservoir drainage basin. These data were collected to assist watershed administrators in managing the drinking-water source area and to identify potential sources of contaminants and trends in contaminant loading to the water supply.

  19. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  20. Educational outcomes of the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge integrated clerkship: a way forward for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, David; Gaufberg, Elizabeth; Ogur, Barbara; Cohen, Pieter; Krupat, Edward; Cox, Malcolm; Pelletier, Stephen; Bor, David

    2012-05-01

    The authors report data from the Harvard Medical School-Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (CIC), a model of medical education in which students' entire third year consists of a longitudinal, integrated curriculum. The authors compare the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of students completing the CIC with those of students completing traditional third-year clerkships. The authors compared 27 students completing the first three years of the CIC (2004-2007) with 45 students completing clerkships at other Harvard teaching hospitals during the same period. At baseline, no significant between-group differences existed (Medical College Admission Test and Step 1 scores, second-year objective structured clinical examination [OSCE] performance, attitudes toward patient-centered care, and plans for future practice) in any year. The authors compared students' National Board of Medical Examiners Subject and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores, OSCE performance, perceptions of the learning environment, and attitudes toward patient-centeredness. CIC students performed as well as or better than their traditionally trained peers on measures of content knowledge and clinical skills. CIC students expressed higher satisfaction with the learning environment, more confidence in dealing with numerous domains of patient care, and a stronger sense of patient-centeredness. CIC students are at least as well as and in several ways better prepared than their peers. CIC students also demonstrate richer perspectives on the course of illness, more insight into social determinants of illness and recovery, and increased commitment to patients. These data suggest that longitudinal integrated clerkships offer students important intellectual, professional, and personal benefits.

  1. Risk factors for dating violence versus cohabiting violence: Results from the third generation of the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Delphine; Farrington, David P; Ttofi, Maria M; Crago, Rebecca V

    2016-10-01

    Dating violence is an important problem. Evidence suggests that women are more likely to perpetrate dating violence. The present study investigates the prevalence of dating violence compared with cohabiting violence in a community sample of men and women and assesses to what extent child and adolescent explanatory factors predict this behaviour. A secondary aim is to construct a risk score for dating violence based on the strongest risk factors. The Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development is a prospective longitudinal survey of 411 men (generation 2) born in the 1950s in an inner London area. Most recently, their sons and daughters [generation 3 (G3)] have been interviewed regarding their perpetration of dating and cohabiting violence, utilising the Conflict Tactics Scale. Risk factors were measured in four domains (family, parental, socio-economic and individual). A larger proportion of women than men perpetrated at least one act of violence towards their dating partner (36.4 vs 21.7%). There was a similar pattern for cohabiting violence (39.6 vs 21.4%). A number of risk factors were significantly associated with the perpetration of dating violence. For G3 women, these included a convicted father, parental conflict, large family size and poor housing. For G3 men, these included having a young father or mother, separation from the father before age 16, early school leaving, frequent truancy and having a criminal conviction. A risk score for both men and women, based on 10 risk factors, significantly predicted dating violence. Risk factors from four domains were important in predicting dating violence, but they were different for G3 men and women. It may be important to consider different risk factors and different risk assessments for male compared with female perpetration of dating violence. Early identification and interventions are recommended. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Book Review: Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace rev. and enlarged ed. by Edward N. Luttwak Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Wirtz, James J.

    2003-01-01

    In the 1980s scholars in the ªelds of history and political science rediscovered the work of Carl von Clausewitz, the Prussian philosopher of war. This renewed interest sparked a brief revival of the study of war and strategy (the latter of which encompasses efforts to exploit war’s dialectic to achieve military and political victory). After relying for decades on operations research to minimize the likelihood of nuclear war by bolstering deterrence—an approach that largely eli...

  3. Review of Andrés Solimano, International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalisation. Historical and Recent Experiences, Cambridge University Press, 2010. 223 Pp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirina Claudiu – Ciprian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available “International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization. Historical and Recent Experiences” represents a work of major interest in the field of migration and globalization. Apparently two concepts that relate one to another, on a background of major population dynamics, the two notions are the two important pillars in what might perfectly be described as a complex analysis of migration, starting from the elements that have initiated it, and culminating with a fine comparison of positive and negative aspects of this phenomenon.

  4. Rediscovering Antiquity: Karl Weber and the Excavation of Herculaneum, Pompeii, and Stabiae, by C.C. Parslow. Cambridge University Press, 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Snead

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Rediscovering Antiquity is an example of the genre of historical writing which seeks to recast the careers of little-known figures who have fallen into obscurity. This is typically intended to move them and their work into the proper "lineage," that is, the select group of ancestral figures from which modern practices are derived. Parslow is interested in the 18th century excavations of the Vesuvian cities, which, he argues, have been misunderstood by historians of archaeology. Indeed, common sources, such as Daniel (1981:55, describe the initial explorations of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae, sponsored by the Bourbon kings of Naples as "...treasure hunts and not serious excavations." While the Roman artifacts removed from the sites are credited with spurring interest in antiquity in Enlightenment Europe, modern scholars have until now devoted little attention to the means through which they were recovered.

  5. Modernity and Loss [in:] Flatey John. 2008. Affective mapping. Melancholia and the politics of modernizm, Cambridge, Massachusetts – London Harvard University Press.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnatan Flatley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The following text is a translation of fragment of Jonathan Flatley’s book Affective Mapping Melancholia and the Politics of Modernism. The suprising claim of Affective Mapping is that dwelling on loss and melancholia is not necessarily depressing. Flatley argues that melancholy can lead people and writers to productively re-map their relationship to the world. Modernism is an accurate portrait of these processes and related consequences.

  6. A Review: R. Baldwin, “The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization” (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Montagna

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the introduction of his book, Richard Baldwin ambitiously says that its reading will “change our way to look at globalisation”. While the aim may sound too pretentious and in some respect misplaced, The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization is certainly timely. While it is hard to say whether or not globalisation has entered a terminal crisis, it is true that we are witnessing to processes of de-globalisation and relative attempts of national governments to regain some sovreignty. Against the view that globalisation has reached its terminus, this book states that on the contary it is entering a new phase. Its central assertion is that the radical changes in communication technology around 1990s have transformed the nature of globalization, reducing the costs of production and transferring massive north-to-south flows of know-how. What Baldwin calls “New Globalisation” not only has produced a great convergence of profit shares between the most industrialized and some industrializing countries as a consequence of shifting production to the latter, but it also set the basis for a “Third Wave” of globalisation.

  7. Pedagogia: o espaço da educação na universidade Pedagogy: the space for education at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermeval Saviani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo destaca a importância da pedagogia como o espaço específico da universidade para o desenvolvimento de estudos educacionais e de formação profissional de educadores abordando, a partir daí, as diretrizes curriculares nacionais recentemente definidas pelo Conselho Nacional de Educação para o Curso de Pedagogia. Para tanto, após considerar a emergência histórico-teórica do conceito de pedagogia, identifica a relação teoria-prática como o problema fundamental do qual derivam as duas grandes correntes pedagógicas que desembocam num dilema e que alimentam o caráter polêmico da pedagogia. Sobre esse pano de fundo é analisado o espaço da educação na universidade brasileira no interior do qual ocupa lugar central o Curso de Pedagogia. Por fim, procede a um exame sucinto das diretrizes curriculares nacionais, revelando uma situação paradoxal: o documento é, ao mesmo tempo, extremamente restrito e demasiadamente extensivo; é muito restrito no essencial e muito extensivo no acessório. À vista dessa constatação, o trabalho se encerra indicando um possível caminho para se contornar o paradoxo.This article points out the importance of pedagogy as the specific realm within the university for the development of educational studies and educators´ professional training. From then on, it addresses the national curricular guidelines which have been lately defined by the National Council of Education for the Pedagogy Course. To that end, after considering the historical and theoretical emergence of the pedagogy concept, it identifies the theory-practice relationship as the fundamental problem from which the two main pedagogical currents arise ending up in a dilemma and feeding the polemic character of pedagogy. Against this background, the paper analyzes the place education occupies within the Brazilian university, where Pedagogy plays a major role. Finally, it briefly examines the national curricular guidelines revealing a

  8. Space Movie Reveals Shocking Secrets Of The Crab Pulsa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    particles and magnetic field. "The jet looks like steam from a high pressure boiler," said David Burrows of Penn State, another coauthor of the paper. "Except when you realize you are looking at a stream of matter and anti-matter electrons moving at half the speed of light!" Time-Lapse Movie Of Crab Pulsar Wind Time-Lapse Movie Of Crab Pulsar Wind The inner region of the Crab Nebula around the pulsar was observed with Hubble on 24 occasions between August 2000 and April 2001 at 11-day intervals, and with Chandra on eight occasions between November 2000 and April 2001. The Crab was observed with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and Hubble's Wide-Field Planetary Camera. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  9. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE UV LEGACY SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. VII. IMPLICATIONS FROM THE NEARLY UNIVERSAL NATURE OF HORIZONTAL BRANCH DISCONTINUITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T. M.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Via Mentore Maggini s.n.c., I-64100 Teramo (Italy); D’Antona, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Salaris, M. [Astrophysics Research Institute,Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, IC2 Building, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Milone, A. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Piotto, G.; Ortolani, S.; Nardiello, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei,”Università di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Renzini, A.; Bedin, L. R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Sweigart, A. V. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Aparicio, A., E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: jayander@stsci, E-mail: bellini@stsci.edu, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it, E-mail: pietrinferni@oa-teramo.inaf.it, E-mail: dantona@oa-roma.inaf.it, E-mail: M.Salaris@ljmu.ac.uk, E-mail: milone@mso.anu.edu.au [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Calle Vía Láctea s/n. E38200 — La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2016-05-01

    The UV-initiative Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey of Galactic globular clusters provides a new window into the phenomena that shape the morphological features of the horizontal branch (HB). Using this large and homogeneous catalog of UV and blue photometry, we demonstrate that the HB exhibits discontinuities that are remarkably consistent in color (effective temperature). This consistency is apparent even among some of the most massive clusters hosting multiple distinct sub-populations (such as NGC 2808, ω Cen, and NGC 6715), demonstrating that these phenomena are primarily driven by atmospheric physics that is independent of the underlying population properties. However, inconsistencies arise in the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the discontinuity within the blue HB (BHB) distribution shifts ∼1000–2000 K hotter. We demonstrate that this shift is likely due to a large helium enhancement in the BHB stars of these clusters, which in turn affects the surface convection and evolution of such stars. Our survey also increases the number of Galactic globular clusters known to host blue-hook stars (also known as late hot flashers) from 6 to 23 clusters. These clusters are biased toward the bright end of the globular cluster luminosity function, confirming that blue-hook stars tend to form in the most massive clusters with significant self-enrichment.

  10. Energy scripts and spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, Tineke

    2016-01-01

    Demand Conference Lancaster 2016 Workshop 9. Space, site and scale in the making of energy demand Abstract: Energy scripts and spaces Tineke van der Schoor, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen Technology is infused with scripts that indicate how we as users should behave around, live in

  11. Space for Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mariane Ellen; Folmer, Mette Blicher; Mullins, Michael

    SPACE FOR INTERACTION QUALIFYING GROUP TREATMENT FOR PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN THROUGH OPTIMIZATION(?) OF SPACE. A RANDOMIZED PILOT STUDY. In a Ph-D. Mariane Ellen Jørgensen / Nurse + psykoterapist / maej@rn.dk / Pain Center / Aalborg University Hospital / Denmark / Mette Blicher Folmer / Archit...

  12. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 Å) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 Å wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D 2 ), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient κ, spreading exponent β, and maximum expansion velocities v max ) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)∝L –3 , N(A)∝A –2 , N(V)∝V –5/3 , N(T)∝T –2 , and D 2 = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation κ∝L 0.94±0.01 and the three-parameter scaling law L∝κ T 0.1 , which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients κ than confined flares (without CMEs)

  13. Review of central power magnetohydrodynamics at the University of Tennessee Space Institute and its relation to the world effort in MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicks, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    The first generation of electrical plants powered by MHD generators performs at 50 to 55 percent thermal efficiencies, while later versions of these plants perform at efficiencies up to 75 percent. There are three types of MHD energy conversion: (1) the open-cycle system utilizes the fossil fuel as its heat source, the resulting combustion gas being the working fluid; (2) the closed-cycle generator usually refers to the closed-cycle plasma generator which requires an external heating source to heat a noble gas as the working fluid; and (3) there is the liquid-metal generator which is also closed-cycle, but utilizes a two-phase mixture. The open-cycle system is the most promising, the most advanced, and is emphasized in this paper; the Univ. of Tennessee Space Institute has focused its attention on directly coal-fired MHD generators and has succeeded in demonstrating successful operation. A review of MHD research in the USSR indicates that all three types of generators are being tested, but emphasis is also placed there on the open-cycle system. Its most important facility is the U-25 at the Institute of High Temperatures; this generator was expected to be delivering 20 MW by the end of 1975. The cost savings to the U. S. through the development of MHD power generation is discussed. It is concluded that from its development, the sulfur dioxide pollution in high-sulfur coals is reduced by 120 times, nitrogen oxides by many times, particulate matter by 10 times and finally, thermal pollution is reduced by more than 50 percent even without the use of cooling towers. The cost of this development is placed at $410 million in 10 years

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  15. The Artful Universe Expanded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B A

    2005-01-01

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great beauty. (book review)

  16. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, B A [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-29

    The cosmos is an awfully big place and there is no better guide to its vast expanse and fascinating nooks and crannies than John Barrow. A professor of mathematical sciences at Cambridge University, Barrow embodies that rare combination of highly polished writer and expert scientist. His deft touch brings together the disparate threads of human knowledge and weaves them into a tapestry as rich and interesting for the expert as it is for the layperson. The Artful Universe Expanded is an updated edition of this popular book first published in 1995. It explores the deeply profound manner in which natural law and the nature of the cosmos have moulded and shaped us, our cultures and the very form of our arts and music-a new type of 'cosmic' anthropology. The main themes Barrow chooses for revealing this new anthropology are the subjects of evolution, the size of things, the heavens and the nature of music. The book is a large, eclectic repository of knowledge often unavailable to the layperson, hidden in esoteric libraries around the world. It rivals The Da Vinci Code for entertainment value and insights, but this time it is Nature's code that is revealed. It is rare indeed to find common threads drawn through topics as diverse as The Beetles, Bach and Beethoven or between Jackson Pollock, the Aztecs, Kant, Picasso, Byzantine mosaics, uranium-235 and the helix nebula. Barrow unerringly binds them together, presenting them in a stimulating, conversational style that belies the amount of time that must have gone into researching this book. Dip into it at random, or read it from cover to cover, but do read it. The Artful Universe Expanded is an entertaining antidote to the oft-lamented pressures to know more and more about less and less and the apparently inexorable march of specialization. On reading this book one can, for a short time at least, hold in one's mind a vision that unifies science, art and culture and glimpse a universal tapestry of great

  17. THE INTEGRATION OF THE EDUCATIONAL SPACE IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITIES AS A PRE-REQUISITE FOR THE FORMATION OF HISTORICAL THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila V. Shukshina

    2017-03-01

    determines the policies and main lines, alternation and combination of mental operations, and using the various methodological and epistemological ideas. Socio-historical thinking is a mental activity aimed at the reconstruction of the past, understanding the past, present and projected future. It has ontological, epistemological, praxiologic, system, logic, religious, cultural, and aesthetic grounds. Knowledge must be structured according to a certain principle for effective thinking. The practical significance of the research lies in effective using of modern methods, forms and means in the teaching of history in the university.

  18. Hubble space telescope grism spectroscopy of extreme starbursts across cosmic time: The role of dwarf galaxies in the star formation history of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, EPFL, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Pacifici, Camilla [Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Malkan, Matthew; Ross, Nathaniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Charlot, Stephane; Lehnert, Matthew [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Lee, Janice [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bedregal, Alejandro [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bunker, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, OX13RH (United Kingdom); Colbert, James W.; Rafelski, Marc [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Hathi, Nimish [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Siana, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high redshift (z ∼ 1-2). While most high-z surveys are biased toward massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass (M{sub *}) relation for about 1000 emission line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 2.3. We use the Hα emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to M{sub *} ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 Å. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-M{sub *} sequence with much higher specific SFRs (>10 Gyr{sup –1}). While on-sequence galaxies follow continuous star formation processes, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in a period of less than 100 Myr. The contribution of the starburst population to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range 8.2 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) <10 and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (10 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) at z ∼ 1 (z ∼ 2), we find that starbursts having EW{sub rest}(Hα) > 300, 200, and 100 Å contribute up to ∼13%, 18%, and 34%, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line-selected sample at z ∼ 1-2. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts toward lower masses.

  19. Information as the Fifth Dimension of the Universe which Fundamental Particles (strings), Dark Matter/Energy and Space-time are Floating in it While they are Listening to its Whispering for Getting Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan; Gholibeigian, Ghasem; Amirshahkarami, Azim; Gholibeigian, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Four animated sub-particles (sub-strings) as origin of the life and generator of momentum (vibration) of elementary particles (strings) are communicated for transferring information for processing and preparing fundamental particles for the next step. It means that information may be a ``dimension'' of the nature which fundamental particles, dark matter/energy and space-time are floating in it and listening to its whispering and getting quantum information packages about their conditions and laws. So, communication of information which began before the spark to B.B. (Convection Bang), may be a ``Fundamental symmetry'' in the nature because leads other symmetries and supersymmetry as well as other phenomena. The processed information are always carried by fundamental particles as the preserved history and entropy of Universe. So, information wouldn't be destroyed, lost or released by black hole. But the involved fundamental particles of thermal radiation, electromagnetic and gravitational fields carry processed information during emitting from black hole, while they are communicated from fifth dimension for their new movement. AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

  20. NewSpace: The Emerging Commercial Space Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary

    2016-01-01

    A lecture to students at the International Space University. Topics include: - We are at a turning point in the history of space exploration and development the cusp of a revolution, new industries are being born that use space in many non-traditional ways - The established military industrial space sector is no longer the only game in town - Increased competition and new capabilities will change the marketplace forever - Everyone interested in working in the space sector will be affected.

  1. [What can be done and by who in Public Health? Professional competencies as a base for the design of University degrees curricula in the European Space for Higher Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, Mari Carmen; Gil-González, Diana; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ronda, Elena; Ortiz-Moncada, Rocío; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2009-01-01

    To conform a frame of reference for the organization of the public health teaching in university degrees in Spain, in agreement with the directives of the European Space for Higher Education. Specific professional competencies in public health have been extracted from the Libros blancos published by the ANECA (National Agency of Quality Evaluation) for the degrees on medicine, pharmacy, nursing, human nutrition and dietetics, optics and optometry, veterinary, social work, occupational relations, teacher training, and environmental sciences. Following the framework proposed by the Working Group on professional competencies in public health in Spain, we have selected those competences that enable future professionals to participate in the development of the public health from their field of activity. We have also identified and correlated the specific competences of each degree with the corresponding activities and functions. All the studied degrees have competences in public health functions. The majority has also defined activities in community health analysis, design and implementation of health interventions and programmes, promotion of social participation and citizen's control of their own health. There is academic space for the multidisciplinary development of the public health in Spain beyond the health professions. The identification of the specific competencies of each degree related with activities on public health reveal what are the contents to be in included in each syllabus.

  2. An Evaluation of Two Different Methods of Assessing Independent Investigations in an Operational Pre-University Level Examination in Biology in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Explored aspects of assessment of extended investigation ("project") practiced in the operational examinations of The University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES) for the perspective of construct validity. Samples of the 1993 (n=333) and 1996 (n=259) biology test results reveal two methods of assessing the project. (MAK)

  3. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  4. Nitroxide stable radicals interacting as Lewis bases in hydrogen bonds: A search in the Cambridge structural data base for intermolecular contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Elguero, Eric

    2017-11-01

    1125 X-ray structures of nitroxide free radicals presenting intermolecular hydrogen bonds have been reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. We will report in this paper a qualitative and quantitative analysis of these bonds. The observation in some plots of an excluded region was statistically analyzed using convex hull and kernel smooting methodologies. A theoretical study at the MP2 level with different basis has been carried out indicating that the nitronyl nitroxide radicals (five electrons) lie just in between nitroso compounds (four electrons) and amine N-oxides (six electrons) as far as hydrogen-bond basicity is concerned.

  5. Loads and yields of deicing compounds and total phosphorus in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, Massachusetts, water years 2009–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2017-09-12

    The source water area for the drinking-water supply of the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, encompasses major transportation corridors, as well as large areas of light industrial, commercial, and residential land use. Because of the large amount of roadway in the drinking-water source area, the Cambridge water supply is affected by the usage of deicing compounds and by other constituents that are flushed from such impervious areas. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored surface-water quality in the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir Basins, which compose the drinking-water source area, since 1997 (water year 1998) through continuous monitoring and the collection of stream-flow samples.In a study conducted by the USGS, in cooperation with the City of Cambridge Water Department, concentrations and loads of calcium (Ca), chloride (Cl), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4) were estimated from continuous records of specific conductance and streamflow for streams and tributaries at 10 continuous water-quality monitoring stations. These data were used to characterize current (2015) water-quality conditions, estimate loads and yields, and describe trends in Cl and Na in the tributaries and main-stem streams in the Cambridge Reservoir and Stony Brook Reservoir Basins. These data also were used to describe how stream-water quality is related to various basin characteristics and provide information to guide future management of the drinking-water source area.Water samples from 2009–15 were analyzed for physical properties and concentrations of Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, potassium (K), SO4, and total phosphorus (TP). Values of physical properties and constituent concentrations varied widely, particularly in composite samples of stormflow from tributaries that have high percentages of constructed impervious areas. Median concentrations of Ca, Cl, Mg, Na, and K in samples collected from the tributaries in the Cambridge Reservoir Basin (27.2, 273, 4.7, 154

  6. Studying Space: Improving Space Planning with User Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Cindy; Lee, Norice

    2011-01-01

    How can libraries best assess and improve user space, even if they are not in a position to undertake new construction or a major renovation? Staff at New Mexico State University used a variety of ethnographic methods to learn how our spaces were being used as well as what our users considered to be ideal library space. Our findings helped us make…

  7. The holographic universe

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  8. Learning Space Service Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Felix

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in creating informal learning spaces that incorporate technology and flexibly support a variety of activities. This progress has been principally in designing the right combination of furniture, technology, and space. However, colleges and universities do not design services within learning spaces with nearly the same level of sophistication or integration. Nor do they adequately assess their services. This paper calls for a focus on designing services to facilitate better learning experiences. It describes the fundamentals of service design practice, a selection of exemplary spaces, and the implications for design, budgeting, and staffing.

  9. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  10. Universe opacity and EBL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 2 (2017), s. 1532-1542 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : cosmic background radiation * dust, extinction * early Universe * galaxies: high redshift * galaxies: ISM * intergalactic medium Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  11. Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    New range Passage Tomb may be the first structure with known astronomical significance. It was built around 3,200 B.C. in Ireland. It's central passage allows light end-to-end for about 2 weeks around winter solstice. The Sun, Moon, Planets, and Stars held significance in early times due to the seasons, significance for food crops, and mythology. Citation: Corel Photography and Windows to the Universe The Greek may be among the first to pursue analytical interpretations of what they saw in the sky. In about 280 B.C. Aristarchus suggested Earth revolves around the Sun and estimated the distance between. Around 130 B.C. Hipparchus developed the first accurate star map. Today still seek to understand how the universe formed and how we came to be and are we alone. Understanding the causes and consequences of climate change using advanced space missions with major Earth science and applications research. center dotFire the public imagination and inspire students to pursue STEM fields. Train college and graduate students to create a U.S. technical workforce with employees that embody the values of competence, innovation, and service. center dotDrive the technical innovations that enable exploration and become the engine of National economic growth. center dotPartner domestically and internationally to leverage resources to extend the reach of research.

  12. Chandra Sees Shape of Universe During Formative, Adolescent Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have taken a snapshot of the adolescent universe from about five billion years ago when the familiar web-like structure of galaxy chains and voids first emerged. The observation reveals distant and massive galaxies dotting the sky, clustered together under the gravitational attraction of deep, unseen pockets of dark matter. This provides important clues of how the universe matured from its chaotic beginnings to its elegant structure we see today. These results are presented today in a press conference at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society at Mt. Tremblant, Quebec. "Piece by piece, we are assembling a photo album of the universe through the ages," said Yuxuan Yang, a doctorate candidate at the University of Maryland, College Park, who conducted the analysis. "Last month we saw a picture of the infant universe taken with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Now we can add a snapshot of its adolescence." The Chandra observation traced a patch of sky known as the Lockman Hole in the constellation Ursa Major (containing the Big Dipper). Chandra saw a rich density of active galaxies, seven times denser than what has been detected in previous optical and radio surveys at similar distances. This provides the clearest picture yet at the large-scale structure of the universe at such distances (and age), according to Dr. Richard Mushotzky of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who led the observation. Lockman Hole JPEG, TIFF, PS An image that has been "blurred" to allow better view of the structures outlined by the X-ray sources. The color represents the spectra of the AGN. The red color indicates the sources on average radiates at longer wavelength while green and blue colors indicates the sources radiates at shorter wavelength. The Green and blue regions appear to form a wall, or shows more lumpiness than the "red" sources. If one could capture the

  13. The University as learning space and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lozano Estivalis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La universidad española es un espacio privilegiado para los mestizajes teórico-prácticos tan necesarios en las llamadas sociedades del conocimiento. Sin embargo, los procesos de adaptación al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior la alejan de las dinámicas críticas para instalarla en la reproducción de un saber rentable. La esclerosis del pensamiento universitario libre, creativo y utópico está marcado por el triunfo de la racionalidad instrumental al servicio del Mercado. Reivindicar la universidad como espacio y práctica de aprendizaje real exige hacer frente a las servidumbres voluntarias que sostienen un sistema cultural desigual, jerárquico y excluyente.

  14. EDITORIAL: Interrelationship between plasma phenomena in the laboratory and in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Mark

    2008-07-01

    favor of theory-paper counterparts and, thus, the scientific support that laboratory results can provide to the development of space-relevant theoretical models is often under-recognized. It is unrealistic to expect the dimensional parameters corresponding to space plasma to be matchable in the laboratory. However, a laboratory experiment is considered well designed if the subset of parameters relevant to a specific process shares the same phenomenological regime as the subset of analogous space parameters, even if less important parameters are mismatched. Regime boundaries are assigned by normalizing a dimensional parameter to an appropriate reference or scale value to make it dimensionless and noting the values at which transitions occur in the physical behavior or approximations. An example of matching regimes for cold-plasma waves is finding a 45° diagonal line on the log--log CMA diagram along which lie both a laboratory-observed wave and a space-observed wave. In such a circumstance, a space plasma and a lab plasma will support the same kind of modes if the dimensionless parameters are scaled properly (Bellan 2006 Fundamentals of Plasma Physics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p 227). The plasma source, configuration geometry, and boundary conditions associated with a specific laboratory experiment are characteristic elements that affect the plasma and plasma processes that are being investigated. Space plasma is not exempt from an analogous set of constraining factors that likewise influence the phenomena that occur. Typically, each morphologically distinct region of space has associated with it plasma that is unique by virtue of the various mechanisms responsible for the plasma's presence there, as if the plasma were produced by a unique source. Boundary effects that typically constrain the possible parameter values to lie within one or more restricted ranges are inescapable in laboratory plasma. The goal of a laboratory experiment is to examine the

  15. Space biology research development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is to conduct and promote research related activities regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, particularly intelligent life. Such research encompasses the broad discipline of 'Life in the Universe', including all scientific and technological aspects of astronomy and the planetary sciences, chemical evolution, the origin of life, biological evolution, and cultural evolution. The primary purpose was to provide funding for the Principal Investigator to collaborate with the personnel of the SETI Institute and the NASA-Ames Research center in order to plan and develop space biology research on and in connection with Space Station Freedom; to promote cooperation with the international partners in the space station; to conduct a study on the use of biosensors in space biology research and life support system operation; and to promote space biology research through the initiation of an annual publication 'Advances in Space Biology and Medicine'.

  16. The Cambridge Otology Quality of Life Questionnaire: an otology-specific patient-recorded outcome measure. A paper describing the instrument design and a report of preliminary reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T P C; Moualed, D; Paul, A; Ronan, N; Tysome, J R; Donnelly, N P; Cook, R; Axon, P R

    2015-04-01

    The Cambridge Otology Quality of Life Questionnaire (COQOL) is a patient-recorded outcome measurement (PROM) designed to quantify the quality of life of patients attending otology clinics. Item-reduction model. A systematically designed long-form version (74 items) was tested with patient focus groups before being presented to adult otology patients (n. 137). Preliminary item analysis tested reliability, reducing the COQOL to 24 questions. This was then presented in conjunction with the SF-36 (V1) questionnaire to a total of 203 patients. Subsequently, these were re-presented at T + 3 months, and patients recorded whether they felt their condition had improved, deteriorated or remained the same. Non-responders were contacted by post. A correlation between COQOL scores and patient perception of change was examined to analyse content validity. Teaching hospital and university psychology department. Adult patients attending otology clinics with a wide range of otological conditions. Item reliability measured by item–total correlation, internal consistency and test– retest reliability. Validity measured by correlation between COQOL scores and patient-reported symptom change. Reliability: the COQOL showed excellent internal consistency at both initial presentation (a = 0.90) and 3 months later (a = 0.93). Validity: One-way analysis of variance showed a significant difference between groups reporting change and those reporting no change in quality of life (F(2, 80) = 5.866, P < 0.01). The COQOL is the first otology-specific PROM. Initial studies demonstrate excellent reliability and encouraging preliminary criterion validity: further studies will allow a deeper validation of the instrument.

  17. Color in interior spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Demirörs, Müge Bozbeyli

    1992-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and the Institute of Fine Arts of Bilkent University, 1992. Thesis (Master's) -- -Bilkent University, 1992. Includes bibliographical references leaves 95-99. Color can be approached from different perspectives and disciplines such as, biology, theory, technology, and psychology. This thesis discusses color, from the stand point of interior spaces, which to some extent involves most of these discipli...

  18. Space stations systems and utilization

    CERN Document Server

    Messerschmid, Ernst

    1999-01-01

    The design of space stations like the recently launched ISS is a highly complex and interdisciplinary task. This book describes component technologies, system integration, and the potential usage of space stations in general and of the ISS in particular. It so adresses students and engineers in space technology. Ernst Messerschmid holds the chair of space systems at the University of Stuttgart and was one of the first German astronauts.

  19. News Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

  20. Is our Universe typical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurzadyan, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of typicalness of the Universe - as a dynamical system possessing both regular and chaotic regions of positive measure of phase space, is raised and discussed. Two dynamical systems are considered: 1) The observed Universe as a hierarchy of systems of N graviting bodies; 2) (3+1)-manifold with matter evolving to Wheeler-DeWitt equation in superspace with Hawking boundary condition of compact metrics. It is shown that the observed Universe is typical. There is no unambiguous answer for the second system yet. If it is typical too then the same present state of the Universe could have been originated from an infinite number of different initial conditions the restoration of which is practically impossible at present. 35 refs.; 2 refs

  1. Live From Space Station Outreach Payload, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Live from Space Station? Outreach Payload (LFSSOP) is a technologically challenging, exciting opportunity for university students to conduct significant research...

  2. The ADDITION-Cambridge trial protocol: a cluster – randomised controlled trial of screening for type 2 diabetes and intensive treatment for screen-detected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinmonth Ann

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, the benefits of such a strategy remain uncertain. Methods and design The ADDITION-Cambridge study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of (i a stepwise screening strategy for type 2 diabetes; and (ii intensive multifactorial treatment for people with screen-detected diabetes in primary care. 63 practices in the East Anglia region participated. Three undertook the pilot study, 33 were allocated to three groups: no screening (control, screening followed by intensive treatment (IT and screening plus routine care (RC in an unbalanced (1:3:3 randomisation. The remaining 27 practices were randomly allocated to IT and RC. A risk score incorporating routine practice data was used to identify people aged 40–69 years at high-risk of undiagnosed diabetes. In the screening practices, high-risk individuals were invited to take part in a stepwise screening programme. In the IT group, diabetes treatment is optimised through guidelines, target-led multifactorial treatment, audit, feedback, and academic detailing for practice teams, alongside provision of educational materials for newly diagnosed participants. Primary endpoints are modelled cardiovascular risk at one year, and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity at five years after diagnosis of diabetes. Secondary endpoints include all-cause mortality, development of renal and visual impairment, peripheral neuropathy, health service costs, self-reported quality of life, functional status and health utility. Impact of the screening programme at the population level is also assessed through measures of mortality, cardiovascular morbidity, health status and health service use among high-risk individuals. Discussion ADDITION-Cambridge is conducted in a defined high-risk group

  3. 40-Godišnjica institucije Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre posvećene pohranjivanju podataka o molekularnim i kristalnim strukturama -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molčanov, K.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to 40th anniversary of The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC, the world-known centre (http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk responsible for deposition and control of crystallographic data, including atomic coordinates that define the three-dimensional structures of organic molecules and metal complexes containing organic ligands. Cambride Structural Database (CSD, one among the first established electronic databases, nowadays is the most significant crystallographic database in the world. CSD has about 400,000 deposited structures. The use of the extensive database, which is growing rapidly, needs support of efficient and sophisticated software for searching, analysing and visualising structural data. The seminal role of CSD in the research related to crystallography, chemistry, material sciences, solid state physics and chemistry, life sciences, pharmacology, and in particular in drug design, has been documented in more than 1300 scientific papers. The important issues of CCDC are the accuracy of deposited data and development of software that enables a wide variety of applications. Such demanding project requires higly competent team of experts; thus the article brings into focus the scientific approach of the team based on the long tradition in crystallography, modelling and informatics. The article is not dedicated to 40th anniversary of the centre only, but it also reveals how Cambridge Structural Database can be used in the research and teaching. The use of electronic media and computer graphics makes “data mining" very efficient and useful but also esthetically appealing due to the molecular architecture. At the Rudjer Bošković Institute, Zagreb, Croatia there is The National Affiliated Centre of Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre responsible for communication and dissemination of CSD in Croatia, Slovenia and Macedonia. The use of CSD is illustrated by two examples performed and published by the presenting

  4. INFORMATION SPACE– EDUCATIONAL SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica LIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper has set the objective of researching how education is influenced by the information society. The first step was to define more precisely the information space. The second step was to identify how information space intersects with the family space and institutional space educational levels represented by pre-school / school and pre-university (kindergarten, at elementary / middle school / high school. Interrelationship between the above mentioned areas was another objective of the research. All these elements have been investigated through the original intention to identify how the information space can become an educational tool to support the family space, education and institutional space. Also, the aim of this research is to offer some solutions in this regard. Often the educational efforts appear to be blocked by the existence of this space. But this paper demonstrates that Informational space can be an enemy of the educational system or can support systems if we knew the internal structure and mechanisms. We can make the Informational Space to work in order to accomplish the educational scope.

  5. Space plasma simulation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Scientific results of experiments and tests of instruments performed with the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber and its facility are reviewed in the following six categories. 1. Tests of instruments on board rockets, satellites and balloons. 2. Plasma wave experiments. 3. Measurements of plasma particles. 4. Optical measurements. 5. Plasma production. 6. Space plasms simulations. This facility has been managed under Laboratory Space Plasma Comittee since 1969 and used by scientists in cooperative programs with universities and institutes all over country. A list of publications is attached. (author)

  6. The plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faelthammar, C.G.

    1989-12-01

    The term 'Plasma Universe', coined by Hannes Alfven, emphasices the fact that plasma phenomena discovered in the laboratory and in accessible regions of space. must be important also in the rest of the universe, which consists almost entirely of matter in the plasma state. Relevant aspect of this concept will be discussed. They include the response of the plasma to electric currents, the support of magnetic-field aligned electric fields, violation of the frozen-field condition, rapid release of magnetically stored energy, acceleration of charged particles, chemical separation, and filamentary and cellular structures. (authors)

  7. Attractors, universality, and inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Sean; Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver

    2012-11-01

    Studies of the initial conditions for inflation have conflicting predictions from exponential suppression to inevitability. At the level of phase space, this conflict arises from the competing intuitions of CPT invariance and thermodynamics. After reviewing this conflict, we enlarge the ensemble beyond phase space to include scalar potential data. We show how this leads to an important contribution from inflection point inflation, enhancing the likelihood of inflation to a power law, 1/Ne3. In the process, we emphasize the attractor dynamics of the gravity-scalar system and the existence of universality classes from inflection point inflation. Finally, we comment on the predictivity of inflation in light of these results.

  8. Factors affecting reservoir and stream-water quality in the Cambridge, Massachusetts, drinking-water source area and implications for source-water protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Marcus C.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, Water Department, to assess reservoir and tributary-stream quality in the Cambridge drinking-water source area, and to use the information gained to help guide the design of a comprehensive water-quality monitoring program for the source area. Assessments of the quality and trophic state of the three primary storage reservoirs, Hobbs Brook Reservoir, Stony Brook Reservoir, and Fresh Pond, were conducted (September 1997-November 1998) to provide baseline information on the state of these resources and to determine the vulnerability of the reservoirs to increased loads of nutrients and other contaminants. The effects of land use, land cover, and other drainage-basin characteristics on sources, transport, and fate of fecal-indicator bacteria, highway deicing chemicals, nutrients, selected metals, and naturally occurring organic compounds in 11 subbasins that contribute water to the reservoirs also was investigated, and the data used to select sampling stations for incorporation into a water-quality monitoring network for the source area. All three reservoirs exhibited thermal and chemical stratification, despite artificial mixing by air hoses in Stony Brook Reservoir and Fresh Pond. The stratification produced anoxic or hypoxic conditions in the deepest parts of the reservoirs and these conditions resulted in the release of ammonia nitrogen orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved iron and manganese from the reservoir bed sediments. Concentrations of sodium and chloride in the reservoirs usually were higher than the amounts recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection agency for drinking-water sources (20 milligrams per liter for sodium and 250 milligrams per liter for chloride). Maximum measured sodium concentrations were highest in Hobbs Brook Reservoir (113 milligrams per liter), intermediate in Stony Brook Reservoir (62

  9. Avaliação de projeto político-pedagógico pelos funcionários: espaços e representatividade Evaluation of a political-pedagogical project by the university staff: spaces and representativeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luís Moreira Alberto

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos, de diferentes vertentes e enfoques, afirmam que o processo de educação escolarizada não se reduz à sala de aula e se viabiliza pela ação articulada entre todos os agentes educativos. Preocupando-nos com o baixo protagonismo dos funcionários (corpo técnico-administrativo na construção do projeto político-pedagógico e levando em conta o fato de que os debates não têm enfocado regiões periféricas do processo pedagógico, o presente texto é parte de uma pesquisa mais ampla, de natureza quali-quantitativa, no campo da avaliação institucional, e tem como objeto de reflexão o espaço do Projeto Político-Pedagógico de uma Universidade e suas Unidades Acadêmicas, a partir da representatividade e avaliação desse Projeto pelos funcionários.Research based on different purposes and focuses suggest that the formal education process cannot be reduced to the classroom environment and must also take place through articulated action between all educational participants. Concerned with the low level of participation of staff members in the elaboration of a political-pedagogical project and taking into account the fact that discussions have not focused on peripheral aspects of the pedagogical process, this paper was originated from a broader quali-quantitative research in the field of institutional evaluation and aims at reflecting about the space of the Political-Pedagogical Project in a University and its Academic Units, based on the representation and evaluation of this Project by the staff.

  10. Space Experiment Module (SEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodell, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Experiment Module (SEM) Program is an education initiative sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Shuttle Small Payloads Project. The program provides nationwide educational access to space for Kindergarten through University level students. The SEM program focuses on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Within the program, NASA provides small containers or "modules" for students to fly experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments are created, designed, built, and implemented by students with teacher and/or mentor guidance. Student experiment modules are flown in a "carrier" which resides in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The carrier supplies power to, and the means to control and collect data from each experiment.

  11. SpaceTech—Postgraduate space education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Ferdi J.; Ashford, Edward W.; Larson, Wiley J.

    2008-07-01

    SpaceTech is a postgraduate program geared primarily for mid-career space professionals seeking to gain or improve their expertise in space systems engineering and in business engineering. SpaceTech provides a lifelong impact on its participants by broadening their capabilities, encouraging systematic "end-to-end" thinking and preparing them for any technical or business-related engineering challenges they may encounter. This flexible 1-year program offers high competency gain and increased business skills. It is held in attractive locations in a flexible, multi-cultural environment. SpaceTech is a highly effective master's program certified by the esteemed Technical University of Delft (TUD), Netherlands. SpaceTech provides expert instructors who place no barriers between themselves and participants. The program combines innovative and flexible new approaches with time-tested methods to give participants the skills required for future missions and new business, while allowing participants to meet their work commitments at the same time as they study for their master's degree. The SpaceTech program is conducted in separate sessions, generally each of 2-week duration, separated by periods of some 6-8 weeks, during which time participants may return to their normal jobs. It also includes introductory online course material that the participants can study at their leisure. The first session is held at the TUD, with subsequent sessions held at strategic space agency locations. By participating at two or more of these sessions, attendees can earn certificates of satisfactory completion from TU Delft. By participating in all of the sessions, as well as taking part in the companion Central Case Project (CCP), participants earn an accredited and highly respected master's degree in Space Systems Engineering from the TUD. Seven distinct SpaceTech modules are provided during these sessions: Space Mission Analysis and Design, Systems Engineering, Business Engineering

  12. Space life sciences: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The scientific research and supporting technology development conducted in the Space Life Sciences Program is described. Accomplishments of the past year are highlighted. Plans for future activities are outlined. Some specific areas of study include the following: Crew health and safety; What happens to humans in space; Gravity, life, and space; Sustenance in space; Life and planet Earth; Life in the Universe; Promoting good science and good will; Building a future for the space life sciences; and Benefits of space life sciences research.

  13. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  14. Neighborhood spaces

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Kent; Won Keun Min

    2002-01-01

    Neighborhood spaces, pretopological spaces, and closure spaces are topological space generalizations which can be characterized by means of their associated interior (or closure) operators. The category NBD of neighborhood spaces and continuous maps contains PRTOP as a bicoreflective subcategory and CLS as a bireflective subcategory, whereas TOP is bireflectively embedded in PRTOP and bicoreflectively embedded in CLS. Initial and final structures are described in these categories, and it is s...

  15. European astronomers' successes with the Hubble Space Telescope*

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    American opposite number, John Bahcall, prefers to stress those quasar hosts that look like undisturbed galaxies. But the important thing is that we have wonderfully clear pictures to argue about. Quasar theories were mostly pure speculation before we had Hubble." The history of the elements Astronomers at the Hamburger Sternwarte use the Faint Object Spectrograph to analyse ultraviolet light from distant quasars, which they also examine by visible light from the ground. They trace the origin, through cosmic time, of elements like carbon, silicon and iron, from which planets and living things can be built. On its way to Hubble, the quasar light passes through various intervening galaxies and gas clouds, like the skewer of a kebab. Each object visited absorbs some of the quasar light, depending on the local abundances of the elements. As they detect more and more objects, Dieter Reimers and his colleagues form an impression of galaxies building up their stocks of elements progressively through time, by the alchemy of successive generations of stars. Apart from primordial hydrogen the second lightest element, helium, has also been abundant since the origin of the Universe. The first major discovery after Hubble's last refurbishment came from Peter Jakobsen of ESA's Space Science Department at Noordwijk, who detected ionized helium in the remote Universe, by the light of a very distant quasar, 0302-003. That was in January 1994, and since then Jakobsen has looked for the ionized helium using other quasars. He now suspects that this helium is nearly all gathered in clumps, rather than scattered freely through intergalactic space. If so, it greatly increases the estimates of the total mass of ordinary matter in the Universe. Through a lens to the early Universe Natural lenses scattered through the cosmos reveal distant galaxies, and make an astronomical tool for Richard Ellis of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge (UK). The strong gravity of an intervening cluster of galaxies

  16. Baby universe theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Ninomiya, Masao

    1989-12-01

    We give an elementary review of the so called 'the theory of baby universes' which is a series of ideas or speculations about some effects in quantum gravity, viz. the effect of a certain type of wormholes, representing the exchange of small 3-space universes called baby universes. We consider this 'theory' as being physically and scientifically a very promising candidate for a theory of everything. It is, however, mathematically lacking any strong foundation at all. It solves several fine-tuning problems: First of all the cosmological constant problem, and also the strong CP-problem and the hierarchy problem. We also speculate that it might predict the possibility of influencing the probability distributions of the outcome of quantum mechanical measurements at one time by acts at a later time. (orig.)

  17. An eternal universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.; Heintzmann, H.

    1983-01-01

    A new generalized solution of Maxwell-Einstein equations (which are non-minimally coupled) which leads to some fascinating aspects of the Universe is presented. The Cosmos has no singularity due to the coupling of longitudinal electromagnetism with space-time. It contains the Milne-Schucking cosmos as a limiting case. This model contains a free parameter (the longitudinal electromagnetic field) which allows one to fix the density of highest compression of the Cosmos. Alternativelly the parameter allows one to adjust our cosmos to the presently observed Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter. The model seems to be a viable candidate for our real cosmos as it allows one to extend the time scale of the Universe to arbitrarily large values i.e., it is able to provide the necessary time scale for the origin of life. It is speculated that the entropy is finite but intelligence in the Universe may be infinite. (Author) [pt

  18. Outer space structure and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeldovich, J.; Novikov, I.

    1975-01-01

    A brief account is presented answering the question of what in fact the outer space we observe consists of. The principle of spatial homogeneity of the universe and the idea of non-stationary cosmology are discussed. The origin and the future development of the universe are explained using the two above mentioned and some other hypotheses. (J.K.)

  19. Outer space structure and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeldovich, J; Novikov, I

    1975-10-01

    A brief account is presented answering the question of what in fact the outer space we observe consists of. The principle of spatial homogeneity of the universe and the idea of non-stationary cosmology are discussed. The origin and the future development of the universe are explained using the two above mentioned and some other hypotheses.

  20. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  1. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  2. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  3. The Universe's First Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster VersionFigure 1Figure 2 This is an image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of stars and galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation. This infrared image covers a region of space so large that light would take up to 100 million years to travel across it. Figure 1 is the same image after stars, galaxies and other sources were masked out. The remaining background light is from a period of time when the universe was less than one billion years old, and most likely originated from the universe's very first groups of objects -- either huge stars or voracious black holes. Darker shades in the image on the left correspond to dimmer parts of the background glow, while yellow and white show the brightest light. Brief History of the Universe In figure 2, the artist's timeline chronicles the history of the universe, from its explosive beginning to its mature, present-day state. Our universe began in a tremendous explosion known as the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago (left side of strip). Observations by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer and Wilkinson Anisotropy Microwave Probe revealed microwave light from this very early epoch, about 400,000 years after the Big Bang, providing strong evidence that our universe did blast into existence. Results from the Cosmic Background Explorer were honored with the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics. A period of darkness ensued, until about a few hundred million years later, when the first objects flooded the universe with light. This first light is believed to have been captured in data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The light detected by Spitzer would have originated as visible and ultraviolet light, then stretched, or redshifted, to lower-energy infrared wavelengths during its long voyage to reach us across expanding space. The light detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer and the

  4. Sacred Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    A space can be sacred, providing those who inhabit a particular space with sense of transcendence-being connected to something greater than oneself. The sacredness may be inherent in the space, as for a religious institution or a serene place outdoors. Alternatively, a space may be made sacred by the people within it and events that occur there. As medical providers, we have the opportunity to create sacred space in our examination rooms and with our patient interactions. This sacred space can be healing to our patients and can bring us providers opportunities for increased connection, joy, and gratitude in our daily work.

  5. Sobolev spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Sobolev Spaces presents an introduction to the theory of Sobolev Spaces and other related spaces of function, also to the imbedding characteristics of these spaces. This theory is widely used in pure and Applied Mathematics and in the Physical Sciences.This second edition of Adam''s ''classic'' reference text contains many additions and much modernizing and refining of material. The basic premise of the book remains unchanged: Sobolev Spaces is intended to provide a solid foundation in these spaces for graduate students and researchers alike.* Self-contained and accessible for readers in other disciplines.* Written at elementary level making it accessible to graduate students.

  6. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  7. Deepest X-Rays Ever Reveal universe Teeming With Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    -ray wavelengths. Both Chandra Deep Fields are comparable in observation time to the Hubble Deep Fields, but cover a much larger area of the sky. "In essence, it is like seeing galaxies similar to our own Milky Way at much earlier times in their lives," Hornschemeier added. "These data will help scientists better understand star formation and how stellar-sized black holes evolve." Combining infrared and X-ray observations, the Penn State team also found veils of dust and gas are common around young black holes. Another discovery to emerge from the Chandra Deep Field South is the detection of an extremely distant X-ray quasar, shrouded in gas and dust. "The discovery of this object, some 12 billion light years away, is key to understanding how dense clouds of gas form galaxies, with massive black holes at their centers," said Colin Norman of Johns Hopkins University. The Chandra Deep Field South results were complemented by the extensive use of deep optical observations supplied by the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany. The Penn State team obtained optical spectroscopy and imaging using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope in Ft. Davis, TX, and the Keck Observatory atop Mauna Kea, HI. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer was developed for NASA by Penn State and Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the leadership of Penn State Professor Gordon Garmire. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. More information is available on the Internet at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  8. Double universe and the arrow of time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfinito, Eleonora [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universitta di Lecce, 73100 Lecce and CNISM-Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per le Scienze Fisiche della Materia. Universita di Lecce (Italy); Vitiello, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, 84100 Salerno (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    The canonical quantum field theory formalism for the expanding geometry universe leads to the 'Double Universe' scenario envisaged by quantum loop gravity. Thermal properties of inflating universe and the classicality of the time-evolution trajectories in the space of the representations of the canonical commutation relations are also discussed.

  9. Sheet universes and the shapes of Friedmann universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Redmount, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    Unless Ω>1,the Big Bang did not start from a point. Consideration shows sheet universes in which matter is confined to a homogeneous universe. Sheet universes and the corresponding embeddings of FRW universes into Minkowski space are drawn. Their initial singularities are shown to be point-like for the 'closed' case, line-like for the 'flat' (Ω=1) case and surface-like for the 'open' case. In contrast to the cross-sections at constant comoving proper time, typical spacelike cross-sections of the 'flat' universes are closed and encounter their extensive singularities. All cross-sections of the 'closed' universe are closed and only very special cross-sections encounter the point singularities at the Big Bang or the Big Crunch. (author)

  10. Europe - space for transcultural existence?

    OpenAIRE

    Tamcke, Martin; Janny, de Jong; Klein, Lars; Waal, Margriet

    2013-01-01

    Europe - Space for Transcultural Existence? is the first volume of the new series, Studies in Euroculture, published by Göttingen University Press. The series derives its name from the Erasmus Mundus Master of Excellence Euroculture: Europe in the Wider World, a two year programme offered by a consortium of eight European universities in collaboration with four partner universities outside Europe. This master highlights regional, national and supranational dimensions of the European democrati...

  11. Social Foundations of Human Space Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Dator, James A

    2012-01-01

    Social Foundations of Human Space Exploration presents a uniquely human perspective on the quest to explore space and to understand the universe through the lens of the arts, humanities, and social sciences. It considers early stories about the universe in various cultures; recent space fiction; the origins and cultural rationale for the space age; experiences of humans in space and their emerging interactions with robots and artificial intelligence; how humans should treat environments and alien life; and the alternative futures of space exploration and settlement.

  12. Which Space? Whose Space? An Experience in Involving Students and Teachers in Space Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Diogo; Di Napoli, Roberto; Leijon, Marie

    2018-01-01

    To date, learning spaces in higher education have been designed with little engagement on the part of their most important users: students and teachers. In this paper, we present the results of research carried out in a UK university. The research aimed to understand how students and teachers conceptualise learning spaces when they are given the…

  13. The Convergent Learning Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    networks are still more prominently expected by students. Against this backdrop, an action research project has worked with the definition and testing of the hypothesized constituents of the Convergent Learning Space and how it challenges our traditional conceptions of learning spaces. The article...... describes this pilot study involving teachers in conscious, documented reflection on methods, approaches, and procedures conducive to learning processes in this new learning space. As a perspective, the article briefly outlines an intervention study aimed at investigating how students benefit from......The concept of the Convergent Learning Space has been hypothesized and explored in an ongoing action research project carried out at undergraduate level in select bachelor programs at a Danish University College, where classrooms are technology rich and students bring their own devices. The changes...

  14. What's space to learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Rie

    As “space […] works on its occupants” (Pouler cited in Scheer & Preiser 1994, p. 175), both students and teachers are influenced by the physical contexts in which learning occurs. However, so far focus on the furnishing of classrooms (and built environment as a whole) in universities as being of ...... and practices for technology supported physical learning spaces (JELS). Learning Sciences Research Institute at Nottingham University. Temple, P. (2008). Learning spaces in higher education: an under-researched topic. London Review of Education, 6(3), 229-41......As “space […] works on its occupants” (Pouler cited in Scheer & Preiser 1994, p. 175), both students and teachers are influenced by the physical contexts in which learning occurs. However, so far focus on the furnishing of classrooms (and built environment as a whole) in universities as being...... of importance to the student learning experience has not been overwhelming (Temple 2008). In this paper preliminary findings from a small-scale research project are presented aiming at investigating the influence of spatial conditions on teachers’ views on teaching and learning. Not to evaluate if any given...

  15. Oscillating universe with quintom matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Huahui; Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Piao Yunsong; Zhang Xinmin

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, we study the possibility of building a model of the oscillating universe with quintom matter in the framework of 4-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. Taking the two-scalar-field quintom model as an example, we find in the model parameter space there are five different types of solutions which correspond to: (I) a cyclic universe with the minimal and maximal values of the scale factor remaining the same in every cycle, (II) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor increasing cycle by cycle, (III) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always increasing, (IV) an oscillating universe with its minimal and maximal values of the scale factor decreasing cycle by cycle, and (V) an oscillating universe with its scale factor always decreasing

  16. Correlates of time spent walking and cycling to and from work: baseline results from the commuting and health in Cambridge study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panter Jenna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Environmental perceptions and psychological measures appear to be associated with walking and cycling behaviour; however, their influence is still unclear. We assessed these associations using baseline data from a quasi-experimental cohort study of the effects of major transport infrastructural developments in Cambridge, UK. Methods Postal surveys were sent to adults who travel to work in Cambridge (n = 1582. Questions asked about travel modes and time spent travelling to and from work in the last week, perceptions of the route, psychological measures regarding car use and socio-demographic characteristics. Participants were classified into one of two categories according to time spent walking for commuting ('no walking' or 'some walking' and one of three categories for cycling ('no cycling', '1-149 min/wk' and ' ≥ 150 min/wk'. Results Of the 1164 respondents (68% female, mean (SD age: 42.3 (11.4 years 30% reported any walking and 53% reported any cycling to or from work. In multiple regression models, short distance to work and not having access to a car showed strong positive associations with both walking and cycling. Furthermore, those who reported that it was pleasant to walk were more likely to walk to or from work (OR = 4.18, 95% CI 3.02 to 5.78 and those who reported that it was convenient to cycle on the route between home and work were more likely to do so (1-149 min/wk: OR = 4.60, 95% CI 2.88 to 7.34; ≥ 150 min/wk: OR = 3.14, 95% CI 2.11 to 4.66. Positive attitudes in favour of car use were positively associated with time spent walking to or from work but negatively associated with cycling to or from work. Strong perceived behavioural control for car use was negatively associated with walking. Conclusions In this relatively affluent sample of commuters, a range of individual and household characteristics, perceptions of the route environment and psychological measures relating to car use were associated with

  17. Screening for type 2 diabetes and population mortality over 10 years (ADDITION-Cambridge): a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Sharp, Stephen J; Sargeant, Lincoln A; Williams, Kate M; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2012-11-17

    cardiovascular (HR 1·02, 95% CI 0·75-1·38), cancer (1·08, 0·90-1·30), or diabetes-related mortality (1·26, 0·75-2·10) associated with invitation to screening. In this large UK sample, screening for type 2 diabetes in patients at increased risk was not associated with a reduction in all-cause, cardiovascular, or diabetes-related mortality within 10 years. The benefits of screening might be smaller than expected and restricted to individuals with detectable disease. Wellcome Trust; UK Medical Research Council; National Health Service research and development support; UK National Institute for Health Research; University of Aarhus, Denmark; Bio-Rad. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Digital technologies and media are becoming increasingly embodied and entangled in the spaces and places at work and at home. However, our material environment is more than a geometric abstractions of space: it contains familiar places, social arenas for human action. For designers, the integration...... of digital technology with space poses new challenges that call for new approaches. Creative alternatives to traditional systems methodologies are called for when designers use digital media to create new possibilities for action in space. Design Spaces explores how design and media art can provide creative...... alternatives for integrating digital technology with space. Connecting practical design work with conceptual development and theorizing, art with technology, and usesr-centered methods with social sciences, Design Spaces provides a useful research paradigm for designing ubiquitous computing. This book...

  19. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  20. Space 2000 Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  1. “In my end is my beginning”. Una discussione sul caso trascurato dei Cambridge Ritualists fra antropologia comparativa, filosofia e pensiero scientifico - “In my end is my beginning”. An argument on the Cambridge Ritualists’ neglected case, on the wave of comparative anthropology, philosophy and scientific thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Cinellu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Somehow rounding off an intellectual season in which humanities strongly lament the loss of Darwinian incitements, while exploiting both Wilson’s biophilia hypothesis and Rappaport’s engaged anthropology as springboards, this article wants to cast light on how two anthropologically undervalued manifestos of the Cambridge School – Harrison’s Themis (1912 and Cornford’s From Religion to Philosophy (1912 – laid the foundation of post-modern science. It highlights, in other words, how within evolutionary anthropology, to which we owe the birth of the comparative study of religions, were surreptitiously raised significant issues against eco-systemic disfunctionalities due to the scientific pattern rooted in Atomism and modern Cartesianism itself. In order to counteract the conventional belief that evolutionary anthropology was entirely shaped by the kind of Positivism of Illuministic inspiration, the association between the “mystic” and the “savage” will be once more taken into consideration. In this regard, a quite unreleased focus on Lévi-Strauss’ paradigm “le totémism du dedans” is deemed also essential. As a consequence, the unfairly forgotten Cambridge Ritualists, Harrison and Cornford, will be especially rehearsed in the light of their adoption of the philosophical Bergsonian concept of durée as a means of probing into the monist vision enshrined in the mysteric religion of Ancient Greece. It is basically the special attention allotted to the mystic’s incorporation of a limitless cyclic time which helps us to detect the extent to which both Harrison and Cornford aimed at propounding an ethical anthropology eager to denounce the forward end because of the obdurate human projection outside the sphere of Life itself. What this essay thus propounds is not a rehearsal of the Cambridge School for the sake of it. While advocating cumulative knowledge around the very same foundation of the “scientific study of

  2. The Cambridge Prognostic Groups for improved prediction of disease mortality at diagnosis in primary non-metastatic prostate cancer: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanapragasam, V J; Bratt, O; Muir, K; Lee, L S; Huang, H H; Stattin, P; Lophatananon, A

    2018-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to validate a new five-tiered prognostic classification system to better discriminate cancer-specific mortality in men diagnosed with primary non-metastatic prostate cancer. We applied a recently described five-strata model, the Cambridge Prognostic Groups (CPGs 1-5), in two international cohorts and tested prognostic performance against the current standard three-strata classification of low-, intermediate- or high-risk disease. Diagnostic clinico-pathological data for men obtained from the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) and the Singapore Health Study were used. The main outcome measure was prostate cancer mortality (PCM) stratified by age group and treatment modality. The PCBaSe cohort included 72,337 men, of whom 7162 died of prostate cancer. The CPG model successfully classified men with different risks of PCM with competing risk regression confirming significant intergroup distinction (p study of nearly 75,000 men confirms that the CPG five-tiered prognostic model has superior discrimination compared to the three-tiered model in predicting prostate cancer death across different age and treatment groups. Crucially, it identifies distinct sub-groups of men within the old intermediate-risk and high-risk criteria who have very different prognostic outcomes. We therefore propose adoption of the CPG model as a simple-to-use but more accurate prognostic stratification tool to help guide management for men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

  3. Italian normative data and validation of two neuropsychological tests of face recognition: Benton Facial Recognition Test and Cambridge Face Memory Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albonico, Andrea; Malaspina, Manuela; Daini, Roberta

    2017-09-01

    The Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) and Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) are two of the most common tests used to assess face discrimination and recognition abilities and to identify individuals with prosopagnosia. However, recent studies highlighted that participant-stimulus match ethnicity, as much as gender, has to be taken into account in interpreting results from these tests. Here, in order to obtain more appropriate normative data for an Italian sample, the CFMT and BFRT were administered to a large cohort of young adults. We found that scores from the BFRT are not affected by participants' gender and are only slightly affected by participant-stimulus ethnicity match, whereas both these factors seem to influence the scores of the CFMT. Moreover, the inclusion of a sample of individuals with suspected face recognition impairment allowed us to show that the use of more appropriate normative data can increase the BFRT efficacy in identifying individuals with face discrimination impairments; by contrast, the efficacy of the CFMT in classifying individuals with a face recognition deficit was confirmed. Finally, our data show that the lack of inversion effect (the difference between the total score of the upright and inverted versions of the CFMT) could be used as further index to assess congenital prosopagnosia. Overall, our results confirm the importance of having norms derived from controls with a similar experience of faces as the "potential" prosopagnosic individuals when assessing face recognition abilities.

  4. Face ethnicity and measurement reliability affect face recognition performance in developmental prosopagnosia: evidence from the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Australian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKone, Elinor; Hall, Ashleigh; Pidcock, Madeleine; Palermo, Romina; Wilkinson, Ross B; Rivolta, Davide; Yovel, Galit; Davis, Joshua M; O'Connor, Kirsty B

    2011-03-01

    The Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT, Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006) provides a validated format for testing novel face learning and has been a crucial instrument in the diagnosis of developmental prosopagnosia. Yet, some individuals who report everyday face recognition symptoms consistent with prosopagnosia, and are impaired on famous face tasks, perform normally on the CFMT. Possible reasons include measurement error, CFMT assessment of memory only at short delays, and a face set whose ethnicity is matched to only some Caucasian groups. We develop the "CFMT-Australian" (CFMT-Aus), which complements the CFMT-original by using ethnicity better matched to a different European subpopulation. Results confirm reliability (.88) and validity (convergent, divergent using cars, inversion effects). We show that face ethnicity within a race has subtle but clear effects on face processing even in normal participants (includes cross-over interaction for face ethnicity by perceiver country of origin in distinctiveness ratings). We show that CFMT-Aus clarifies diagnosis of prosopagnosia in 6 previously ambiguous cases. In 3 cases, this appears due to the better ethnic match to prosopagnosics. We also show that face memory at short (<3-min), 20-min, and 24-hr delays taps overlapping processes in normal participants. There is some suggestion that a form of prosopagnosia may exist that is long delay only and/or reflects failure to benefit from face repetition. © 2011 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business

  5. Decision-making deficits in patients diagnosed with disordered gambling using the Cambridge Gambling task: the effects of substance use disorder comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zois, Evangelos; Kortlang, Noreen; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Lemenager, Tagrid; Beutel, Martin; Mann, Karl; Fauth-Bühler, Mira

    2014-07-01

    Disordered gambling (DG) has often been associated with impaired decision-making abilities, suggesting a dysfunction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). To our knowledge, no previous study has accurately considered the effect of substance use disorder (SUD) comorbidity (including nicotine dependence) on decision-making impairments in DG. We employed the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) to assess a big cohort of patients diagnosed with DG (N = 80) against matched healthy controls (HCs) (N = 108). The cohort included DG patients with nicotine and alcohol dependence, alcohol dependence only and 12 "pure" nonsmokers with only DG diagnosis. Pure nonsmoking, nicotine dependent as well as alcoholic DGs with current nicotine dependence, demonstrated a decision making profile, characterized by poor decision-making abilities and failure to make right choices (rational), closely resembling that of patients with vmPFC damage. This suggests that DGs with and without SUD comorbidity are equally affected in that domain of decision making abilities. Additionally, gambling diagnosis combined with alcohol and nicotine dependence involves a group of gambling patients with a relatively riskier decision making profile, showing that these patients apart from making irrational decisions take also more risks. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for SUD comorbidities with useful implications for future research and therapy. Limitations of the current investigation are discussed.

  6. Construct and concurrent validity of the Cambridge neuropsychological automated tests in Portuguese older adults without neuropsychiatric diagnoses and with Alzheimer's disease dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos Gonçalves, Marta; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Simões, Mário R

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the construct and concurrent validity of the Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP), Paired Associates Learning (PAL), Reaction Time (RTI), and Spatial Working Memory (SWM) tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB®). Inclusion criteria were checked in a first session. The CANTAB and additional pencil-and-paper tests were administered within 1 week. The participants (aged 69-96 years) were 137 Portuguese adults without neuropsychiatric diagnoses and 37 adults with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease dementia. Comparisons were made between the CANTAB tests and between these tests and the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT), Verbal Fluency (VF) test, and some Wechsler Memory Scale-III and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III subtests. Most intra-test correlations were stronger than the CANTAB inter-test correlations. The RVP correlated more with VF animals (.44), the PAL with RCFT immediate recall (-.52), the RTI with RVP mean latency (.42), and the SWM with Spatial Span backward (-.39).

  7. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  8. Countable Fuzzy Topological Space and Countable Fuzzy Topological Vector Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apu Kumar Saha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with countable fuzzy topological spaces, a generalization of the notion of fuzzy topological spaces. A collection of fuzzy sets F on a universe X forms a countable fuzzy topology if in the definition of a fuzzy topology, the condition of arbitrary supremum is relaxed to countable supremum. In this generalized fuzzy structure, the continuity of fuzzy functions and some other related properties are studied. Also the class of countable fuzzy topological vector spaces as a generalization of the class of fuzzy topological vector spaces has been introduced and investigated.

  9. Thresholds for Color Discrimination in English and Korean Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Debi; Hanley, J. Richard; Pak, Hyensou

    2009-01-01

    Categorical perception (CP) is said to occur when a continuum of equally spaced physical changes is perceived as unequally spaced as a function of category membership (Harnad, S. (Ed.) (1987). Psychophysical and cognitive aspects of categorical perception: A critical overview. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). A common suggestion is that CP…

  10. Cosmology in the plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1987-05-01

    Space observations have opened the spectral regions of X-rays and γ-rays, which are produced by plasma processes. The Plasma Universe derived from observations in these regions is drastically different from the now generally accepted 'Visual Light Universe' based on visual light observations alone. Historically this transitions can be compared only to the transition from the geocentric to the heliocentric cosmology. The purpose of this paper is to discuss what criteria a cosmological theory must satisfy in order to be acceptable in the Plasma Universe. (author)

  11. Learning Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Falmagne, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    Learning spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for practical systems of educational technology. Learning spaces generalize partially ordered sets and are special cases of knowledge spaces. The various structures are investigated from the standpoints of combinatorial properties and stochastic processes. Leaning spaces have become the essential structures to be used in assessing students' competence of various topics. A practical example is offered by ALEKS, a Web-based, artificially intelligent assessment and learning system in mathematics and other scholarly fields. At the heart of A

  12. Most Powerful Eruption in the Universe Discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    emission within the cavities shows that jets from the black hole erupted to create the cavities. Gas is being pushed away from the black hole at supersonic speeds over a distance of about a million light years. The mass of the displaced gas equals about a trillion Suns, more than the mass of all the stars in the Milky Way. LA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 VLA Radio & Chandra X-ray Composite of MS 0735.6+7421 The rapid growth of supermassive black holes is usually detected by observing very bright radiation from the centers of galaxies in the optical and X-ray wavebands, or luminous radio jets. In MS 0735 no bright central radiation is found and the radio jets are faint. Therefore, the true nature of MS 0735 is only revealed through X-ray observations of the hot cluster gas. "Until now we had no idea that this black hole was gorging itself", said co-author Michael Wise of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "The discovery of this eruption shows that X-ray telescopes are necessary to understand some of the most violent events in the Universe." The astronomers estimated how much energy was needed to create the cavities by calculating the density, temperature and pressure of the hot gas. By making a standard assumption, that 10% of the gravitational energy goes into launching the jets, they estimated how much material the black hole swallowed. Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Size Comparison of MS 0735.6+7421 & Perseus Cluster Besides generating the cavities, some of the energy from this eruption should keep the hot gas around the black hole from cooling, and some of it may also generate large-scale magnetic fields in the galaxy cluster. Chandra observers have discovered other cavities in galaxy clusters, but this one is easily the largest and the most powerful. For example, the energy content here exceeds that of the Perseus cavities by 250 times, and dwarfs the cavities in M87 by a factor of 10,000. NASA's Marshall Space Flight

  13. Designing informal learning spaces using student perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew David Riddle; Kay Souter

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the design of informal learning spaces at an Australian university that support students in the generation of knowledge. Recent learning space design projects at La Trobe have been informed by a number of pre-existing projects, including a small research project on student use of technologies, a national project on learning space design, and a significant curriculum renewal process at the university. It demonstrates the ways in which evidence based on student perspectiv...

  14. NASA X-Ray Observatory Completes Tests Under Harsh Simulated Space Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    NASA's most powerful X-ray observatory has successfully completed a month-long series of tests in the extreme heat, cold, and airless conditions it will encounter in space during its five-year mission to shed new light on some of the darkest mysteries of the universe. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was put through the rigorous testing as it was alternately heated and cooled in a special vacuum chamber at TRW Space and Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif., NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. "Successful completion of thermal vacuum testing marks a significant step in readying the observatory for launch aboard the Space Shuttle in January," said Fred Wojtalik, manager of the Observatory Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "The observatory is a complex, highly sophisticated, precision instrument," explained Wojtalik. "We are pleased with the outcome of the testing, and are very proud of the tremendous team of NASA and contractor technicians, engineers and scientists that came together and worked hard to meet this challenging task." Testing began in May after the observatory was raised into the 60-foot thermal vacuum chamber at TRW. Testing was completed on June 20. During the tests the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility was exposed to 232 degree heat and 195 degree below zero Fahrenheit cold. During four temperature cycles, all elements of the observatory - the spacecraft, telescope, and science instruments - were checked out. Computer commands directing the observatory to perform certain functions were sent from test consoles at TRW to all Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility components. A team of contractor and NASA engineers and scientists monitored and evaluated the results. Commands were also sent from, and test data monitored at, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Mass., as part of the test series. The observatory will be managed and controlled from

  15. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  16. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  17. Tools to probe the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagage, P.O.; Augueres, J.L.; Amiaux, J.; Cara, Ch.; Fontignie, J.; Rio, Y.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; De Vismes, A.; Cordier, B.; Fesquet, M.; Ferrando, Ph.; Authier, M.; Pantin, E.; Glicenstein, J.F.; Boulade, O.; Refregier, A.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Agnese, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Agnese, P.; Pigot, C.; Duband, L.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Carton, P.H.; Starck, J.L.; Bournaud, F.; Teyssier, R.; Audit, E.; Brun, A.S.; Leca, P.; Menache, Ch.; Pomarede, D.; Thooris, B.; Meis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This special issue of Clefs CEA journal is entirely devoted to astrophysics and to the exploration and probing of the Universe. The second part of this dossier, described here, makes a status of the tools used to probe the universe: telescopes, imaging spectrometers, data processing and simulation. Content: A - Telescopes of the future: 1. Seeing further out: JWST: looking back on a past 13 billion years old, Space specifics: the learning curve to know-how, Fabricating a corona-graph mask, SVOM, a satellite to detect the explosions of the first stars to be formed in the Universe; 2. Seeing more precisely: SIMBOL-X, pioneering formation flying, ELT/METIS, a 42-meter giant, One hundred telescopes for the CTA arrays; 3. Seeing wider: Euclid, mapping the extragalactic sky, ANTARES: the neutrino, another cosmic messenger; B - The new generation of imaging spectrometers: Observing the Universe in the submillimeter spectral region, The X-ray Universe, Space cryo-coolers, Out in the extreme, tumultuous Universe, Probing the Sun with GOLF-NG, Focus: From light to imagery; C - Data analysis in astrophysics; D - Numerical simulation in astrophysics: Information technology and theoretical predictions in astrophysics, Supercomputers for a better understanding of the Universe, The visualization of astrophysical simulations, Godunov, a numerical platform for education and research

  18. The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge Companions to Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Molly

    2010-01-01

    John Dewey (1859-1952) was a major figure of the American cultural and intellectual landscape in the first half of the twentieth century. While not the originator of American pragmatism, he was instrumental to its articulation as a philosophy and the spread of its influence beyond philosophy to other disciplines. His prolific writings encompass…

  19. Chaotic universe model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2018-01-15

    In this study, we consider nonlinear interactions between components such as dark energy, dark matter, matter and radiation in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker space-time and propose a simple interaction model based on the time evolution of the densities of these components. By using this model we show that these interactions can be given by Lotka-Volterra type equations. We numerically solve these coupling equations and show that interaction dynamics between dark energy-dark matter-matter or dark energy-dark matter-matter-radiation has a strange attractor for 0 > w de  >-1, w dm  ≥ 0, w m  ≥ 0 and w r  ≥ 0 values. These strange attractors with the positive Lyapunov exponent clearly show that chaotic dynamics appears in the time evolution of the densities. These results provide that the time evolution of the universe is chaotic. The present model may have potential to solve some of the cosmological problems such as the singularity, cosmic coincidence, big crunch, big rip, horizon, oscillation, the emergence of the galaxies, matter distribution and large-scale organization of the universe. The model also connects between dynamics of the competing species in biological systems and dynamics of the time evolution of the universe and offers a new perspective and a new different scenario for the universe evolution.

  20. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi