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Sample records for sp1 transcription factors

  1. Targeting Sp1 transcription factors in prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankpal, Umesh T; Goodison, Steven; Abdelrahim, Maen; Basha, Riyaz

    2011-09-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences within gene promoter regions. Specificity protein (Sp) family transcription factors play a critical role in various cellular processes and have been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The Sp family consists of several members that contain a highly conserved DNA-binding domain composed of three zinc fingers at the C-terminus and serine/threonine- and glutamine-rich transactivation domains at the N-terminal. Sp1 is elevated in several cancers including prostate and is associated with the prognosis of patients. Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulate a variety of cancer associated genes that are involved in cell cycle, proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. Studies have shown that in prostate cancer, Sp1 regulates important genes like androgen receptor, TGF-β, c-Met, fatty acid synthase, matrix metalloprotein (MT1-MMP), PSA, and α-integrin. These results highlight the importance of Sp1 in prostate cancer and emphasize the potential therapeutic value of targeting Sp1. Several strategies, including the use of natural and synthetic compounds, have been used to inhibit Sp1 in prostate cancer. These include polyphenol quercetin, betulinic acid, acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, tea phenols, isothiocyanates, thiazolidinediones, arsenic trioxide, and selenium. This review will describe the association of Sp proteins in prostate cancer with a special emphasis on some of the agents tested to target Sp proteins for the treatment of this malignancy.

  2. Transcriptional activation of Mina by Sp1/3 factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shangli; Potula, Hari Hara S K; Pillai, Meenu R; Van Stry, Melanie; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chung, Linda; Watanabe, Makiko; Bix, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Mina is an epigenetic gene regulatory protein known to function in multiple physiological and pathological contexts, including pulmonary inflammation, cell proliferation, cancer and immunity. We showed previously that the level of Mina gene expression is subject to natural genetic variation linked to 21 SNPs occurring in the Mina 5' region. In order to explore the mechanisms regulating Mina gene expression, we set out to molecularly characterize the Mina promoter in the region encompassing these SNPs. We used three kinds of assays--reporter, gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation--to analyze a 2 kb genomic fragment spanning the upstream and intron 1 regions flanking exon 1. Here we discovered a pair of Mina promoters (P1 and P2) and a P1-specific enhancer element (E1). Pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA knockdown experiments suggested that Sp1/3 transcription factors trigger Mina expression through additive activity targeted to a cluster of four Sp1/3 binding sites forming the P1 promoter. These results set the stage for comprehensive analysis of Mina gene regulation from the context of tissue specificity, the impact of inherited genetic variation and the nature of upstream signaling pathways.

  3. Overexpression of transcription factor Sp1 leads to gene expression perturbations and cell cycle inhibition.

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    Emmanuelle Deniaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ubiquitous transcription factor Sp1 regulates the expression of a vast number of genes involved in many cellular functions ranging from differentiation to proliferation and apoptosis. Sp1 expression levels show a dramatic increase during transformation and this could play a critical role for tumour development or maintenance. Although Sp1 deregulation might be beneficial for tumour cells, its overexpression induces apoptosis of untransformed cells. Here we further characterised the functional and transcriptional responses of untransformed cells following Sp1 overexpression. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We made use of wild-type and DNA-binding-deficient Sp1 to demonstrate that the induction of apoptosis by Sp1 is dependent on its capacity to bind DNA. Genome-wide expression profiling identified genes involved in cancer, cell death and cell cycle as being enriched among differentially expressed genes following Sp1 overexpression. In silico search to determine the presence of Sp1 binding sites in the promoter region of modulated genes was conducted. Genes that contained Sp1 binding sites in their promoters were enriched among down-regulated genes. The endogenous sp1 gene is one of the most down-regulated suggesting a negative feedback loop induced by overexpressed Sp1. In contrast, genes containing Sp1 binding sites in their promoters were not enriched among up-regulated genes. These results suggest that the transcriptional response involves both direct Sp1-driven transcription and indirect mechanisms. Finally, we show that Sp1 overexpression led to a modified expression of G1/S transition regulatory genes such as the down-regulation of cyclin D2 and the up-regulation of cyclin G2 and cdkn2c/p18 expression. The biological significance of these modifications was confirmed by showing that the cells accumulated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle before the onset of apoptosis. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the binding to DNA

  4. Transcription factor Sp1 is essential for early embryonic development but dispensable for cell growth and differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Marin; A. Karis (Alar); P. Visser (Pim); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTranscription factor Sp1 has been implicated in the expression of many genes. Moreover, it has been suggested that Sp1 is linked to the maintenance of methylation-free CpG islands, the cell cycle, and the formation of active chromatin structures. We have inactivated the mouse Sp1 gene.

  5. Transcription Factor Sp1 Promotes the Expression of Porcine ROCK1 Gene

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    Ruirui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 gene plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, tumorigenesis and myogenesis. However, little is known about the regulatory elements governing the transcription of porcine ROCK1 gene. In the current study, the transcription start site (TSS was identified by 5’-RACE, and was found to differ from the predicted one. The region in ROCK1 promoter which is critical for promoter activity was investigated via progressive deletions. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the region from −604 to −554 bp contains responsive elements for Sp1. Subsequent experiments showed that ROCK1 promoter activity is enhanced by Sp1 in a dose-dependent manner, whereas treatment with specific siRNA repressed ROCK1 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, DNA pull down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed Sp1 can bind to this region. qRT-PCR and Western blotting research followed by overexpression or inhibition of Sp1 indicate that Sp1 can affect endogenous ROCK1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Overexpression of Sp1 can promote the expression of myogenic differentiation 1(MyoD, myogenin (MyoG, myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Taken together, we conclude that Sp1 positively regulates ROCK1 transcription by directly binding to the ROCK1 promoter region (from −604 to −532 bp and may affect the process of myogenesis.

  6. Transcription factor Sp1 prevents TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced premature senescence in human diploid fibroblasts.

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    An, Hyun Ju; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Jang, Suhwa; Jung, Yu-Jin; Choi, Sun Shim; Park, Sang Chul; Han, Jeong A

    2016-03-01

    Telomere uncapping is thought to be the fundamental cause of replicative cellular senescence, but the cellular machineries mediating this process have not been fully understood. In the present study, we present the role of Sp1 transcription factor in the state of telomere uncapping using the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence model in human diploid fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of Sp1 is down-regulated in the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence, which was mediated by ATM and p38 MAPK. In addition, overexpression of Sp1 prevented the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence. Among transcriptional targets of Sp1, expression levels of nuclear transport genes such as karyopherin α, Nup107, and Nup50 were down-regulated in the TRF2(ΔBΔM)-induced senescence, which was prevented by Sp1 overexpression. Moreover, inhibition of the nuclear transport by wheat germ agglutinin (an import inhibitor) and leptomycin B (an export inhibitor) induced premature senescence. These results suggest that Sp1 is an anti-senescence transcription factor in the telomere uncapping-induced senescence and that down-regulation of Sp1 leads to the senescence via down-regulation of the nuclear transport.

  7. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 activates the OAS-RNAse L-RIG-I pathway.

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    Valéryane Dupuis-Maurin

    Full Text Available Deregulated expression of oncogenes or transcription factors such as specificity protein 1 (Sp1 is observed in many human cancers and plays a role in tumor maintenance. Paradoxically in untransformed cells, Sp1 overexpression induces late apoptosis but the early intrinsic response is poorly characterized. In the present work, we studied increased Sp1 level consequences in untransformed cells and showed that it turns on an early innate immune transcriptome. Sp1 overexpression does not activate known cellular stress pathways such as DNA damage response or endoplasmic reticulum stress, but induces the activation of the OAS-RNase L pathway and the generation of small self-RNAs, leading to the upregulation of genes of the antiviral RIG-I pathway at the transcriptional and translational levels. Finally, Sp1-induced intrinsic innate immune response leads to the production of the chemokine CXCL4 and to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in vitro and in vivo. Altogether our results showed that increased Sp1 level in untransformed cells constitutes a novel danger signal sensed by the OAS-RNase L axis leading to the activation of the RIG-I pathway. These results suggested that the OAS-RNase L-RIG-I pathway may be activated in sterile condition in absence of pathogen.

  8. K(v)1.5 potassium channel gene regulation by Sp1 transcription factor and oxidative stress.

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    Fountain, Samuel J; Cheong, Alex; Li, Jing; Dondas, Naciye Y; Zeng, Fanning; Wood, Ian C; Beech, David J

    2007-11-01

    K(V)1.5, a voltage-gated potassium channel, has functional importance in regulating blood vessel tone and cardiac action potentials and is a target for numerous therapeutic drug development programs. Despite the importance of K(V)1.5, there is little knowledge of the mechanisms controlling expression of its underlying gene, Kcna5. We identified a 5' flanking region of the murine Kcna5 gene that drives expression of a luciferase reporter gene in primary smooth muscle cells and a smooth muscle cell line. The promoter contained CACCC nucleotide motifs, which we have shown to bind the Sp1 transcription factor in the aorta under physiological conditions in vivo. Inhibition of Sp1-Kcna5 promoter interactions using mithramycin A, a dominant-negative Sp1 mutant, or disruption of the CACCC boxes by mutagenesis inhibited promoter activity. Conversely, expression of exogenous Sp1 augmented promoter activity. Sp1 has known sensitivity to oxidative stress and, consistent with this property, Kcna5 promoter activity was suppressed by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Our results show that Kcna5 promoter activity in vascular smooth muscle is critically dependent on Sp1 regulation via CACCC box motifs and identify mechanisms that potentially influence the expression of K(V)1.5 channel expression in physiological or pathological conditions.

  9. Transcription factors ETF, E2F, and SP-1 are involved in cytokine-independent proliferation of murine hepatocytes.

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    Zellmer, Sebastian; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Godoy, Patricio; Weng, Honglei; Meyer, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Sparna, Titus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hammad, Seddik; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Thürmann, Petra A; Merfort, Irmgard; Guthke, Reinhard; Dooley, Steven; Hengstler, Jan G; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    The cellular basis of liver regeneration has been intensely investigated for many years. However, the mechanisms initiating hepatocyte "plasticity" and priming for proliferation are not yet fully clear. We investigated alterations in gene expression patterns during the first 72 hours of C57BL/6N mouse hepatocyte culture on collagen monolayers (CM), which display a high basal frequency of proliferation in the absence of cytokines. Although many metabolic genes were down-regulated, genes related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cell cycle were up-regulated. The latter genes showed an overrepresentation of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for ETF (TEA domain family member 2), E2F1 (E2F transcription factor 1), and SP-1 (Sp1 transcription factor) (P Cultivation of murine hepatocytes on CM primes cells for proliferation through cytokine-independent activation of MAPK signaling. The transcription factors ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 seem to play a pronounced role in mediating proliferation-dependent differential gene expression. Similar events, but on a shorter time-scale, occur very early after liver damage in vivo. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. REDOX-SENSITIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS EGR-1 AND SP1 IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EXPERIMENTAL GASTRIC ULCER.

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    Beregovyi, S M; Chervinska, T M; Dranitsina, A S; Szabo, S; Tolstanova, G M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in redox status of gastric mucosa cells are the main pathogenic factor of gastric erosion and gastric ulcer development. Pro-oxidants can affect cell transcription activity via changes in redox-sensitive transcription factors. Egr-1 and Sp-1 may regulate the transcription of genes that are associated with the pathogenesis of gastric ulcer (growthfactors, cell cycle regulators, etc.). The aim of the present study was to reveal the possible involvement of zinc-finger transcriptionfactors Egr-1 & Sp-1 in the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric lesions caused by aspirin administration and stress. Gastric ulcer was induced in male rats (180-220 g) by immobilization stress combined with water-immersion (IMO-WI) or aspirin gavage (10 mg/100 g). The rats were euthanized 20 min, 1 hour, or 3 hours following the ulcerogenic factor exposure. Protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR; levels of SH-groups of proteins were determined by method of Ellman et al. Development of gastric ulcer lesions was associated with twofold (P gastric mucosa. These changes were accompanied by significant (P gastric ulcer models, and the changes in IMO-WI were more profound. Increased levels of Egr-1 were associated with the decrease in SpI protein levels. We showed for the first time the competitive interaction between redox-sensitive transcription factors Egr-1 and Sp1 in the early phases of gastric ulcer development, which might facilitate inducible transcriptional activity of Egr-1 at the expense of reduction in Sp1 activity.

  11. Critical analysis of the potential for the therapeutic targeting of the Sp1 transcription factor in pancreatic cancer

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    Jutooru I

    2014-06-01

    . This review summarizes the role of Sp1 in pancreatic cancer and delineates the mechanisms of action of various drugs that downregulate expression of Sp1 and other Sp transcription factors.Keywords: Sp transcription factors, microRNAs, ZBTB repressors, ROS

  12. Increased expression of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors in human thyroid tumors: a role in NIS expression regulation?

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    Schlumberger Martin

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS is a key protein in iodide transport by thyroid cells and this activity is a prerequisite for effective radioiodide treatment of thyroid cancer. In the majority of thyroid cancers, however, iodide uptake is reduced, probably as a result of decreased NIS protein expression. Methods To identify the mechanisms that negatively affect NIS expression in thyroid tumors, we performed electrophoresis mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis of nuclear protein extracts from normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from 14 unrelated patients. Results Two proteins closely related to the transcription factors AP2 and Sp1 were identified in the nuclear extracts. Expression of both AP2 and Sp1 in nuclear extracts from thyroid tumors was significantly higher than that observed in corresponding normal tissues. Conclusion These observations raise the possibility that NIS expression, and subsequently iodide transport, are reduced in thyroid tumors at least in part owing to alterations in the binding activity of AP2 and Sp1 transcription factors to NIS promoter.

  13. Regulation of Neph3 gene in podocytes - key roles of transcription factors NF-kappaB and Sp1

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ristola, Mervi

    2009-08-24

    Abstract Background Neph3 (filtrin) is expressed in the glomerular podocytes where it localizes at the specialized cell adhesion structures of the foot processes called slit diaphragms which form the outermost layer of the glomerular filtration barrier. Neph3 protein shows homology and structural similarity to Neph1, Neph2 and nephrin, which all are crucial for maintaining the normal glomerular ultrafiltration function. The exact function of Neph3 in the kidney is not known but we have previously shown that the level of Neph3 mRNA is decreased in proteinuric diseases. This suggests that Neph3 may play a role in the pathogenesis of kidney damage, and emphasizes the need to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of Neph3 gene. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of Neph3 gene by identifying transcription factors that control Neph3 expression. Results We cloned and characterized approximately 5 kb fragment upstream of the Neph3 gene. Neph3 proximal promoter near the transcription start site was found to be devoid of TATA and CAAT boxes, but to contain a highly GC-rich area. Using promoter reporter gene constructs, we localized the main activating regulatory region of Neph3 gene in its proximal promoter region from -105 to -57. Within this region, putative transcription factor binding sites for NF-κB and Sp1 were found by computational analysis. Mutational screening indicated that NF-κB and Sp1 response elements are essential for the basal transcriptional activity of the Neph3 promoter. Co-transfection studies further showed that NF-κB and Sp1 regulate Neph3 promoter activity. In addition, overexpression of NF-κB increased endogenous Neph3 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using cultured human podocytes demonstrated that both NF-κB and Sp1 interact with the Neph3 promoter. Conclusion Our results show that NF-κB and Sp1 are key regulators of Neph3 expression at the basal level in podocytes, therefore providing new insight

  14. Unique aspects of transcriptional regulation in neurons – nuances in NFκB and Sp1-related factors

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    Chen Yuzhi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The unique physiology and function of neurons create differences in their cellular physiology, including their regulation of gene expression. We began several years ago exploring the relationships between the NFκB transcription factor, neuronal survival, and glutamate receptor activation in telencephalic neurons. These studies led us to conclude that this population of cells is nearly incapable of activating the NFκB that is nonetheless expressed at reasonable levels. A subset of the κB cis elements are instead bound by members of the Sp1 family in neurons. Also surprising was our discovery that Sp1 itself, typically described as ubiquitous, is severely restricted in expression within forebrain neurons; Sp4 seems to be substituted during neuronal differentiation. These findings and their implications for neuronal differentiation – as well as potential dedifferentiation during degenerative processes – are discussed here.

  15. Cellular Transcription Factors Sp1 and Sp3 Suppress Varicella-Zoster Virus Origin-Dependent DNA Replication▿

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    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2008-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication (oriS) contains a 46-bp AT-rich palindrome and three consensus binding sites for the VZV origin binding protein (OBP) encoded by VZV ORF51. All three OBP binding sites are upstream of the palindrome in contrast to the sequence of the herpes simplex virus oriS, which has required OBP binding sites upstream and downstream of the AT-rich region. We are investigating the roles that sequences downstream of the palindrome play in VZV oriS-dependent DNA replication. Computer analysis identified two GC boxes, GC box 1 and GC box 2, in the downstream region which were predicted to be binding sites for the cellular transcription factor Sp1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and supershift assays showed that two members of the Sp family (Sp1 and Sp3) stably bind to GC box 1, but not to GC box 2. A predicted binding site for the cellular factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) that overlaps with GC box 2 was also identified. Supershift and mutational analyses confirmed the binding of YY1 to this site. Mutation of GC box 1 resulted in loss of Sp1 and Sp3 binding and an increase in origin-dependent replication efficiency in DpnI replication assays. In contrast, mutation of the YY1 site had a statistically insignificant effect. These results suggest a model where origin-dependent DNA replication and viral transcription are coupled by the binding of Sp1 and Sp3 to the downstream region of the VZV replication origin during lytic infection. They may also have implications regarding establishment or reactivation of viral latency. PMID:18815296

  16. Molecular mechanism of monoamine oxidase A gene regulation under inflammation and ischemia-like conditions: key roles of the transcription factors GATA2, Sp1 and TBP.

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    Gupta, Vinayak; Khan, Abrar A; Sasi, Binu K; Mahapatra, Nitish R

    2015-07-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) plays important roles in the pathogenesis of several neurological and cardiovascular disorders. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of MAOA under basal and pathological conditions, however, remains incompletely understood. Here, we report systematic identification and characterization of cis elements and transcription factors that govern the expression of MAOA gene. Extensive computational analysis of MAOA promoter, followed by 5'-promoter deletion/reporter assays, revealed that the -71/-40 bp domain was sufficient for its basal transcription. Gel-shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays provided evidence of interactions of the transcription factors GATA-binding protein 2 (GATA2), Sp1 and TATA-binding protein (TBP) with this proximal promoter region. Consistently, over-expression of GATA2, Sp1 and TBP augmented MAOA promoter activity in a coordinated manner. In corroboration, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GATA2/Sp1/TBP repressed the endogenous MAOA expression as well as transfected MAOA promoter activity. Tumor necrosis factor-α and forskolin activated MAOA transcription that was reversed by Sp1 siRNA; in support, tumor necrosis factor-α- and forskolin-induced activities were enhanced by ectopic over-expression of Sp1. On the other hand, MAOA transcription was diminished upon exposure of neuroblasts or cardiac myoblasts to ischemia-like conditions because of reduced binding of GATA2/Sp1/TBP with MAOA promoter. In conclusion, this study revealed previously unknown roles of GATA2, Sp1 and TBP in modulating MAOA expression under basal as well as pathophysiological conditions such as inflammation and ischemia, thus providing new insights into the molecular basis of aberrant MAOA expression in neuronal/cardiovascular disease states. Dysregulation of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) have been implicated in several behavioral and neuronal disease states. Here, we identified three crucial transcription factors (GATA2, Sp1 and TBP

  17. The Crz1/Sp1 transcription factor of Cryptococcus neoformans is activated by calcineurin and regulates cell wall integrity.

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    Sophie Lev

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans survives host temperature and regulates cell wall integrity via a calcium-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. However, downstream effectors of C. neoformans calcineurin are largely unknown. In S. cerevisiae and other fungal species, a calcineurin-dependent transcription factor Crz1, translocates to nuclei upon activation and triggers expression of target genes. We now show that the C. neoformans Crz1 ortholog (Crz1/Sp1, previously identified as a protein kinase C target during starvation, is a bona fide target of calcineurin under non-starvation conditions, during cell wall stress and growth at high temperature. Both the calcineurin-defective mutant, Δcna1, and a CRZ1/SP1 mutant (Δcrz1 were susceptible to cell wall perturbing agents. Furthermore, expression of the chitin synthase encoding gene, CHS6, was reduced in both mutants. We tracked the subcellular localization of Crz1-GFP in WT C. neoformans and Δcna1 in response to different stimuli, in the presence and absence of the calcineurin inhibitor, FK506. Exposure to elevated temperature (30-37°C vs 25°C and extracellular calcium caused calcineurin-dependent nuclear accumulation of Crz1-GFP. Unexpectedly, 1M salt and heat shock triggered calcineurin-independent Crz1-GFP sequestration within cytosolic and nuclear puncta. To our knowledge, punctate cytosolic distribution, as opposed to nuclear targeting, is a unique feature of C. neoformans Crz1. We conclude that Crz1 is selectively activated by calcium/calcineurin-dependent and independent signals depending on the environmental conditions.

  18. Transcription factor-pathway coexpression analysis reveals cooperation between SP1 and ESR1 on dysregulating cell cycle arrest in non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.

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    Wang, X; Yan, Z; Fulciniti, M; Li, Y; Gkotzamanidou, M; Amin, S B; Shah, P K; Zhang, Y; Munshi, N C; Li, C

    2014-04-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer of plasma B cells and remains incurable. Two major subtypes of myeloma, hyperdiploid MM (HMM) and non-hyperdiploid MM (NHMM), have distinct chromosomal alterations and different survival outcomes. Transcription factors (TrFs) have been implicated in myeloma oncogenesis, but their dysregulation in myeloma subtypes are less studied. Here, we developed a TrF-pathway coexpression analysis to identify altered coexpression between two sample types. We apply the method to the two myeloma subtypes and the cell cycle arrest pathway, which is significantly differentially expressed between the two subtypes. We find that TrFs MYC, nuclear factor-κB and HOXA9 have significantly lower coexpression with cell cycle arrest in HMM, co-occurring with their overactivation in HMM. In contrast, TrFs ESR1 (estrogen receptor 1), SP1 and E2F1 have significantly lower coexpression with cell cycle arrest in NHMM. SP1 chromatin immunoprecipitation targets are enriched by cell cycle arrest genes. These results motivate a cooperation model of ESR1 and SP1 in regulating cell cycle arrest, and a hypothesis that their overactivation in NHMM disrupts proper regulation of cell cycle arrest. Cotargeting ESR1 and SP1 shows a synergistic effect on inhibiting myeloma proliferation in NHMM cell lines. Therefore, studying TrF-pathway coexpression dysregulation in human cancers facilitates forming novel hypotheses toward clinical utility.

  19. Antitumorigenic effect of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge on human colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Sp1 transcription factor

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    Han, Duksun; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Bang, Woong; Park, Kyungho; Kim, Minseok S.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il; Moon, Se Youn

    2017-02-01

    Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were exposed to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure to investigate the anticancer capacity of the plasma. The dose- and time-dependent effects of DBDP on cell viability, regulation of transcription factor Sp1, cell-cycle analysis, and colony formation were investigated by means of MTS assay, DAPI staining, propidium iodide staining, annexin V-FITC staining, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and anchorage-independent cell transformation assay. By increasing the duration of plasma dose times, significant reductions in the levels of both Sp1 protein and Sp1 mRNA were observed in both cell lines. Also, expression of negative regulators related to the cell cycle (such as p53, p21, and p27) was increased and of the positive regulator cyclin D1 was decreased, indicating that the plasma treatment led to apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In addition, the sizes and quantities of colony formation were significantly suppressed even though two cancer promoters, such as TPA and epidermal growth factor, accompanied the plasma treatment. Thus, plasma treatment inhibited cell viability and colony formation by suppressing Sp1, which induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in these two human colorectal cancer cell lines.

  20. Transcription factor-pathway co-expression analysis reveals cooperation between SP1 and ESR1 on dysregulating cell cycle arrest in non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xujun; Yan, Zhenyu; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Li, Yingxiang; Gkotzamanidou, Maria; Amin, Samir B; Shah, Parantu K; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer of plasma B-cells and remains incurable. Two major subtypes of myeloma, hyperdiploid (HMM) and non-hyperdiploid myeloma (NHMM), have distinct chromosomal alterations and different survival outcomes. Transcription factors (TrFs) have been implicated in myeloma oncogenesis but their dysregulation in myeloma subtypes are less studied. Here we develop a TrF-pathway co-expression analysis to identify altered co-expression between two sample types. We apply the method to the two myeloma subtypes and the cell cycle arrest pathway, which is significantly differentially expressed between the two subtypes. We find that TrFs MYC, NF-κB and HOXA9 have significantly lower co-expression with cell cycle arrest in HMM, co-occurring with their over-activation in HMM. In contrast, TrFs ESR1, SP1 and E2F1 have significantly lower co-expression with cell cycle arrest in NHMM. SP1 ChIP targets are enriched by cell cycle arrest genes. These results motivate a cooperation model of ESR1 and SP1 in regulating cell cycle arrest, and a hypothesis that their over-activation in NHMM disrupts proper regulation of cell cycle arrest. Co-targeting ESR1 and SP1 shows a synergistic effect on inhibiting myeloma proliferation in NHMM cell lines. Therefore, studying TrF-pathway co-expression dysregulation in human cancers facilitates forming novel hypotheses towards clinical utility. PMID:23925045

  1. Contribution of transcription factor, SP1, to the promotion of HB-EGF expression in defense mechanism against the treatment of irinotecan in ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

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    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Nam, Sung Ouk; Odawara, Takashi; Manabe, Sadao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Takada, Shuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2014-10-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a worst histological subtype than other ovarian malignant tumor. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of HB-EGF-targeted therapy for OCCC and to identify the transcription factor that contributed to the induction of HB-EGF by SN38 treatment in OCCC cells. HB-EGF was highly expressed in OCCC cells, and an increase of HB-EGF was induced by SN38 which had only antitumor effect among conventional anticancer agents on OCCC. A specific inhibitor of HB-EGF, a cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), led to a synergistic increase in the number of apoptotic OCCC cells with the treatment of SN38. The luciferase assay with 5'-deletion promoter constructs identified a GC-rich element between -125 and -178 (the distal transcription start site was denoted +1) as a cis-regulatory region, and the treatment of SN38 induced luciferase activity in this region. An in silico and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis estimated that SP1 bound to the cis-regulatory region of HB-EGF in OCCC cells. Real-time PCR and cell viability assays showed that the transfection of a small interfering RNA targeting SP1 suppressed the expression of HB-EGF induced by SN38, resulting in the enhanced sensitivity of SN38. Taken together, these results indicate that induction of HB-EGF expression contributed to defense mechanism against treatment of SN38 through the transcriptional activity of SP1 in OCCC cells. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of PP2A-A alpha is mediated by multiple factors including AP-2alpha, CREB, ETS-1, and SP-1.

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    He-Ge Chen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatases-2A (PP-2A is a major serine/threonine phosphatase and accounts for more than 50% serine/threonine phosphatase activity in eukaryotes. The holoenzyme of PP-2A consists of the scaffold A subunit, the catalytic C subunit and the regulatory B subunit. The scaffold subunits, PP2A-A alpha/beta, provide a platform for both C and B subunits to bind, thus playing a crucial role in providing specific PP-2A activity. Mutation of the two genes encoding PP2A-A alpha/beta leads to carcinogenesis and likely other human diseases. Regulation of these genes by various factors, both extracellular and intracellular, remains largely unknown. In the present study, we have conducted functional dissection of the promoter of the mouse PP2A-A alpha gene. Our results demonstrate that the proximal promoter of the mouse PP2A-A alpha gene contains numerous cis-elements for the binding of CREB, ETS-1, AP-2 alpha, SP-1 besides the putative TFIIB binding site (BRE and the downstream promoter element (DPE. Gel mobility shifting assays revealed that CREB, ETS-1, AP-2 alpha, and SP-1 all bind to PP2A-A alpha gene promoter. In vitro mutagenesis and reporter gene activity assays reveal that while SP-1 displays negative regulation, CREB, ETS-1 and AP-2A alpha all positively regulate the promoter of the PP2A-A alpha gene. ChIP assays further confirm that all the above transcription factors participate the regulation of PP2A-A alpha gene promoter. Together, our results reveal that multiple transcription factors regulate the PP2A-A alpha gene.

  3. (-)-Epicatechin rescues the As2 O3 -induced HERG K+ channel deficiency possibly through upregulating transcription factor SP1 expression.

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    Dong, Zengxiang; Shi, Yuanqi; Feng, Lifang; Shen, Zhaoqian; Fang, Li; Zheng, Sijia; Hai, Xin; Li, Baoxin

    2017-11-01

    (-)-Epicatechin (EPI) has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular disease. The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channel is crucial for repolarization of cardiac action potential. Dysfunction of the HERG channel can cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2). Arsenic trioxide (As2 O3 ) has shown efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, As2 O3 can induce the deficiency of HERG channel and cause LQT2. In this study, we examined whether EPI could rescue the As2 O3 -induced HERG channel deficiency. We found that 3 μM EPI obviously increased protein expression and current of HERG channel. EPI was able to recover the protein expression and current of HERG channel disrupted by As2 O3 . EPI was able to increase the expression of SP1 protein and recover the expression of SP1 protein disrupted by As2 O3 . In addition, EPI significantly shortened action potential duration prolonged by As2 O3 . Our data suggest that EPI rescues As2 O3 -induced HERG channel deficiency through upregulating SP1 expression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Counter regulation of ECRG4 gene expression by hypermethylation-dependent inhibition and the Sp1 transcription factor-dependent stimulation of the c2orf40 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xitong; Zeng, Xiaorong; Coimbra, Raul; Eliceiri, Brian P; Baird, Andrew

    2017-12-15

    The human cytokine precursor ECRG4 has been associated with multiple physiological, developmental and pathophysiological processes involving cell proliferation, cell migration, innate immunity, inflammation, cancer progression and metastases. Although down-regulation of ECRG4 gene expression has been largely attributed to hypermethylation of CpG islands in the 5'untranslated region of the ECRG4 promoter, the mechanisms that underlie the dynamics of its regulation have never been systematically described. Here we show that the ECRG4 gene is widely expressed in human tissues and report that its core promoter lies between the -780 to +420 base pairs relative to the ATG start codon of the ECRG4 open reading frame. This sequence, which contains several CpG islands, also includes multiple overlapping Sp1 consensus binding sequences and a putative binding site for NF-kB activation. 5'RACE of mRNA derived from human leukocytes shows that ECRG4 transcription initiates from the guanidine at -11 from the initiation ATG of the ECRG4 open reading frame. While there is no canonical TATA- or CAAT-boxes proximal to this translational initiation site, there is a distal TATA-sequence in the 5'UTR. This region was identified as the sequence targeted by hypermethylation because in vitro methylation of plasmids encoding the ECRG4 promoter abolish promoter activity and the treatment of Jurkat cells (which naturally express ECRG4) with the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC, increases endogenous ECRG4 expression. Because ChIP assays show that Sp1 binds the ECRG4 promoter, that forced Sp1 expression trans-activates the ECRG4 promoter and Sp1 inhibition with mithramycin inhibits ECRG4 expression, we conclude that the dynamic positive and negative regulatory elements controlling ECRG4 expression include a counter regulation between promoter methylation and Sp1 activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and betulinic acid act synergistically to target ERα and SP1 transcription factor dependent Pygopus expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzenov, Youlian R; Andrews, Phillip; Voisey, Kim; Gai, Luis; Carter, Beverley; Whelan, Kathryn; Popadiuk, Catherine; Kao, Kenneth R

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen and progesterone hormone receptor (ER and PR) expression in invasive breast cancer predicts response to hormone disruptive therapy. Pygopus2 (hPYGO2) encodes a chromatin remodelling protein important for breast cancer growth and cell cycle progression. The aims of this study were to determine the mechanism of expression of hPYGO2 in breast cancer and to examine how this expression is affected therapeutically. hPYGO2 and ER protein expression was examined in a breast tumour microarray by immunohistochemistry. hPYGO2 RNA and protein expression was examined in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines in the presence of selective estrogen hormone receptor modulator drugs and the specificity protein-1 (SP1) inhibitor, betulinic acid (BA). The effects of these drugs on the ability for ER and SP1 to bind the hPYGO2 promoter and affect cell cycle progression were studied using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. hPYGO2 was expressed in seven of eight lines and in nuclei of 98% of 65 breast tumours, including 3 Ductal carcinoma in situ and 62 invasive specimens representing ER-negative (22%) and ER-positive (78%) cases. Treatment with either 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) or fulvestrant reduced hPYGO2 mRNA 10-fold and protein 5-10-fold within 4 h. Promoter analysis indicated an ER/SP1 binding site at nt -225 to -531 of hPYGO2. SP1 RNA interference and BA reduced hPYGO2 protein and RNA expression by fivefold in both ER- and ER+ cells. Further attenuation was achieved by combining BA and 4-OHT resulting in eightfold reduction in cell growth. Our findings reveal a mechanistic link between hormone signalling and the growth transcriptional programme. The activation of its expression by ERα and/or SP1 suggests hPYGO2 as a theranostic target for hormone therapy responsive and refractory breast cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Sp1 and KLF15 regulate basal transcription of the human LRP5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yongxin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LRP5, a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily, regulates diverse developmental processes in embryogenesis and maintains physiological homeostasis in adult organisms. However, how the expression of human LRP5 gene is regulated remains unclear. Results In order to characterize the transcriptional regulation of human LRP5 gene, we cloned the 5' flanking region and evaluated its transcriptional activity in a luciferase reporter system. We demonstrated that both KLF15 and Sp1 binding sites between -72 bp and -53 bp contribute to the transcriptional activation of human LRP5 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the ubiquitous transcription factors KLF15 and Sp1 bind to this region. Using Drosophila SL2 cells, we showed that KLF15 and Sp1 trans-activated the LRP5 promoter in a manner dependent on the presence of Sp1-binding and KLF15-binding motifs. Conclusions Both KLF15 and Sp1 binding sites contribute to the basal activity of human LRP5 promoter. This study provides the first insight into the mechanisms by which transcription of human LRP5 gene is regulated.

  7. TGF-β regulates the expression of transcription factor KLF6 and its splice variants and promotes co-operative transactivation of common target genes through a Smad3–Sp1–KLF6 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOTELLA, Luisa M.; SANZ-RODRIGUEZ, Francisco; KOMI, Yusuke; FERNANDEZ-L, Africa; VARELA, Elisa; GARRIDO-MARTIN, Eva M.; NARLA, Goutham; FRIEDMAN, Scott L.; KOJIMA, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    KLF6 (Krüppel-like factor 6) is a transcription factor and tumour suppressor with a growing range of biological activities and transcriptional targets. Among these, KLF6 suppresses growth through transactivation of TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor-β1). KLF6 can be alternatively spliced, generating lower-molecular-mass isoforms that antagonize the full-length WT (wild-type) protein and promote growth. A key target gene of full-length KLF6 is endoglin, which is induced in vascular injury. Endoglin, a homodimeric cell membrane glycoprotein and TGF-β auxiliary receptor, has a pro-angiogenic role in endothelial cells and is also involved in malignant progression. The aim of the present work was to explore the effect of TGF-β on KLF6 expression and splicing, and to define the contribution of TGF-β on promoters regulated by co-operation between KLF6 and Sp1 (specificity protein 1). Using co-transfection, co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, our data demonstrate that KLF6 co-operates with Sp1 in transcriptionally regulating KLF6-responsive genes and that this co-operation is further enhanced by TGF-β1 through at least two mechanisms. First, in specific cell types, TGF-β1 may decrease KLF6 alternative splicing, resulting in a net increase in full-length, growth-suppressive KLF6 activity. Secondly, KLF6–Sp1 co-operation is further enhanced by the TGF-β–Smad (similar to mothers against decapentaplegic) pathway via the likely formation of a tripartite KLF6–Sp1–Smad3 complex in which KLF6 interacts indirectly with Smad3 through Sp1, which may serve as a bridging molecule to co-ordinate this interaction. These findings unveil a finely tuned network of interactions between KLF6, Sp1 and TGF-β to regulate target genes. PMID:19076057

  8. Hepatitis B virus X protein up-regulates C4b-binding protein α through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guoxing; Li, Jiong; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Liu, Yunxia; Zhang, Shuqin; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Weiying; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-05-10

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays crucial roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously showed that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of CD59. Moreover, in this study we found that HBx protected hepatoma cells from complement attack by activation of C4b-binding protein α (C4BPα), a potent inhibitor of complement system. We observed that HBx were positively correlated with those of C4BPα in clinical HCC tissues. Mechanistically, HBx activated the promoter core region of C4BPα, located at -1199/-803nt, through binding to transcription factor Sp1. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that HBx was able to bind to the promoter of C4BPα, which could be blocked by Sp1 silencing. Functionally, knockdown of C4BPα obviously increased the deposition of C5b-9, a complex of complement membrane attack, and remarkably abolished the HBx-induced resistance of hepatoma cells from complement attack in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that HBx up-regulates C4BPα through activating transcription factor Sp1 in protection of liver cancer cells from complement attack. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which HBx enhances protection of hepatoma cells from complement attack.

  9. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells.

  10. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Frizzled-1 in Human Osteoblasts by Sp1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibing Yu

    Full Text Available The wingless pathway has a powerful influence on bone metabolism and is a therapeutic target in skeletal disorders. Wingless signaling is mediated in part through the Frizzled (FZD receptor family. FZD transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. Herein we tested the hypothesis that Sp1 plays an important role in the transcriptional regulation of FZD1 expression in osteoblasts and osteoblast mineralization. To test this hypothesis, we conducted FZD1 promoter assays in Saos2 cells with and without Sp1 overexpression. We found that Sp1 significantly up-regulates FZD1 promoter activity in Saos2 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA assays identified a novel and functional Sp1 binding site at -44 to -40 from the translation start site in the FZD1 promoter. The Sp1-dependent activation of the FZD1 promoter was abolished by mithramycin A (MMA, an antibiotic affecting both Sp1 binding and Sp1 protein levels in Saos2 cells. Similarly, down-regulation of Sp1 in hFOB cells resulted in less FZD1 expression and lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Moreover, over-expression of Sp1 increased FZD1 expression and Saos2 cell mineralization while MMA decreased Sp1 and FZD1 expression and Saos2 cell mineralization. Knockdown of FZD1 prior to Sp1 overexpression partially abolished Sp1 stimulation of osteoblast differentiation markers. Taken together, our results suggest that Sp1 plays a role in human osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, which is at least partially mediated by Sp1-dependent transactivation of FZD1.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human FE65, a ligand of Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein, by Sp1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yu, Hoi-Tin

    2010-03-01

    FE65 is a neuronal-enriched adaptor protein that binds to the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). FE65 forms a transcriptionally active complex with the APP intracellular domain (AICD). The precise gene targets for this complex are unclear but several Alzheimer\\'s disease-linked genes have been proposed. Additionally, evidence suggests that FE65 influences APP metabolism. The mechanism by which FE65 expression is regulated is as yet unknown. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanism, we cloned a 1.6 kb fragment upstream of the human FE65 gene and found that it possesses particularly strong promoter activity in neurones. To delineate essential regions in the human FE65 promoter, a series of deletion mutants were generated. The minimal FE65 promoter was located between -100 and +5, which contains a functional Sp1 site. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 potentiates the FE65 promoter activity. Conversely, suppression of the FE65 promoter was observed in cells either treated with an Sp1 inhibitor or in which Sp1 was knocked down. Furthermore, reduced levels of Sp1 resulted in downregulation of endogenous FE65 mRNA and protein. These findings reveal that Sp1 plays a crucial role in transcriptional control of the human FE65 gene.

  13. Comparative integromics on FZD7 orthologs: conserved binding sites for PU.1, SP1, CCAAT-box and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors within 5'-promoter region of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    that the binding sites for PU.1, SP1/Krüppel-like, CCAAT-box, and TCF/LEF/SOX transcription factors were conserved among 5'-promoter regions of mammalian FZD7 orthologs.

  14. Transforming growth factor beta stimulation of biglycan gene expression is potentially mediated by sp1 binding factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Xie, Zhongjian; Young, Marian Frances

    2004-01-01

    Biglycan is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan which is localized in the extracellular matrix of bone and other specialized connective tissues. Both biglycan mRNA and protein are up-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and biglycan appears to influence TGF-beta(1) activity......) stimulation of human biglycan mRNA expression relies on increased transcription of the biglycan gene, and is mediated by members of the Sp1 family of transcription factors....

  15. Cocoa flavanol metabolites activate HNF-3β, Sp1, and NFY-mediated transcription of apolipoprotein AI in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleaga, Carlota; Ciudad, Carlos J; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria; Noé, Véronique

    2013-06-01

    To identify the mechanisms by which cocoa induces HDL levels and since apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI) is the major protein in HDLs, we analyzed, upon incubation with cocoa metabolites, ApoAI mRNA levels, its transcriptional regulation, and the levels of the transcription factors involved in this process. Epicatechin and cocoa metabolites caused an increase in ApoAI expression in HepG2 cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the involvement of Sites A and B of the ApoAI promoter in the induction of ApoAI mRNA upon incubation with cocoa metabolites. Using supershift assays, we demonstrated the binding of HNF-3β, HNF-4, ER-α, and RXR-α to Site A and the binding of HNF-3β, NFY, and Sp1 to Site B. Luciferase assays performed with a construct containing Site B confirmed its role in the upregulation of ApoAI by cocoa metabolites. Incubation with 3-methyl-epicatechin led to an increase in HNF-3β mRNA, HNF-3β, ER-α, Sp1, and NFY protein levels and the activation of ApoAI transcription mediated by NFY, Sp1, and ER-α. The activation of ApoAI transcription through Site B by cocoa flavanol metabolites is mainly mediated by an increase in HNF-3β, with a significant contribution of Sp1 and NFY, as a mechanism for the protective role of these compounds in cardiovascular diseases. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Sp1/Sp3 and DNA-methylation contribute to basal transcriptional activation of human podoplanin in MG63 versus Saos-2 osteoblastic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Christina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podoplanin is a membrane mucin that, among a series of tissues, is expressed on late osteoblasts and osteocytes. Since recent findings have focussed on podoplanin's potential role as a tumour progression factor, we aimed at identifying regulatory elements conferring PDPN promoter activity. Here, we characterized the molecular mechanism controlling basal PDPN transcription in human osteoblast-like MG63 versus Saos-2 cells. Results We cloned and sequenced 2056 nucleotides from the 5'-flanking region of the PDPN gene and a computational search revealed that the TATA and CAAT box-lacking promoter possesses features of a growth-related gene, such as a GC-rich 5' region and the presence of multiple putative Sp1, AP-4 and NF-1 sites. Reporter gene assays demonstrated a functional promoter in MG63 cells exhibiting 30-fold more activity than in Saos-2 cells. In vitro DNase I footprinting revealed eight protected regions flanked by DNaseI hypersensitive sites within the region bp -728 to -39 present in MG63, but not in Saos-2 cells. Among these regions, mutation and supershift electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA identified four Sp1/Sp3 binding sites and two binding sites for yet unknown transcription factors. Deletion studies demonstrated the functional importance of two Sp1/Sp3 sites for PDPN promoter activity. Overexpression of Sp1 and Sp3 independently increased the stimulatory effect of the promoter and podoplanin mRNA levels in MG63 and Saos-2 cells. In SL2 cells, Sp3 functioned as a repressor, while Sp1 and Sp3 acted positively synergistic. Weak PDPN promoter activity of Saos-2 cells correlated with low Sp1/Sp3 nuclear levels, which was confirmed by Sp1/Sp3 chromatin immunoprecipitations in vivo. Moreover, methylation-sensitive Southern blot analyses and bisulfite sequencing detected strong methylation of CpG sites upstream of bp -464 in MG63 cells, but hypomethylation of these sites in Saos-2 cells. Concomitantly

  17. The family feud: turning off Sp1 by Sp1-like KLF proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    .... However, during the last 5 years, a more extended family of Sp1-like transcription factors has been identified and characterized by the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain comprising three...

  18. The family feud: turning off Sp1 by Sp1-like KLF proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    Sp1 is one of the best characterized transcriptional activators. The biological importance of Sp1 is underscored by the fact that several hundreds of genes are thought to be regulated by this protein. However, during the last 5 years, a more extended family of Sp1-like transcription factors has been identified and characterized by the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain comprising three Krüppel-like zinc fingers. Each distinct family member differs in its ability to regulate transcript...

  19. A point mutation affecting an SP1 binding site in the promoter of the ferrochelatase gene impairs gene transcription and causes erythropoietic protoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Elena; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Mazzucchelli, Renata; Moriondo, Valeria; Mologni, Daniela; Zanone Poma, Barbara; Riva, Agostino

    2005-05-01

    Clinical manifestation of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) results from coinheritance of a mutated allele and a wild-type low-expressed allele of the ferrochelatase (FECH) gene. Currently, up to 90 different mutations affecting the coding region or splicing junctions of the FECH gene have been identified. Despite the high molecular heterogeneity, no functional mutations have been previously reported in the promoter region. The weaker allele expression has been controversially associated to the presence of different intragenic polymorphisms. We applied a two-step screening strategy using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis followed by direct sequencing in order to rapidly identify FECH gene mutations in Italian EPP patients. We identified two unrelated subjects showing a normal FECH coding region but a single G>C base substitution at position -250 in the FECH promoter and the -251G, IVS1-23T, and IVS3-48C polymorphisms in trans to the substitution. To investigate the effect of the -250G>C mutation on protein binding to the FECH promoter, we conducted electro mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift analysis. To determine its effect on the transcriptional activity, K562 and Jurkat cell lines were transiently transfected. EMSA showed that the -250G>C mutation results in the loss of an SP1 binding site, and transient transfection assays demonstrated that such mutation strongly impairs promoter activity. Moreover, we showed that the -251A>G polymorphism, although unable to affect SP1 binding, displays a significant reduction in the transcriptional activity of the promoter. This is the first report of a mutation in the FECH promoter affecting binding of a transcription factor and causing EPP phenotype.

  20. Significant biological role of Sp1 transactivation in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Amin, Samir; Nanjappa, Puru; Rodig, Scott; Prabhala, Rao; Li, Cheng; Minvielle, Stephane; Tai, Yu-tzu; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The transcription factor Sp1 controls number of cellular processes by regulating the expression of critical cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis-related genes containing proximal GC/GT-rich promoter elements. We here provide both experimental and clinical evidence that Sp1 plays an important regulatory role in MM cell growth and survival. Experimental design We have investigated the functional Sp1 activity in MM cells using a plasmid with renilla luciferase reporter gene driven by Sp1-responsive promoter. We have also used both SiRNA and ShRNA-mediated Sp1 knock-down to investigate the growth and survival effects of Sp1 on MM cells, and further investigated the anti-MM activity of Terameprocol (TMP), a small molecule which specifically competes with Sp1-DNA binding in vitro and in vivo. Results We have confirmed high Sp1 activity in MM cells which is further induced by adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). Sp1 knock down decreases MM cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Sp1-DNA binding inhibition by TMP inhibits MM cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, inducing caspase 9-dependent apoptosis and overcoming the protective effects of BMSCs. Conclusions Our results demonstrate Sp1 as an important transcription factor in myeloma that can be therapeutically targeted for clinical application by TMP. PMID:21856768

  1. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  2. WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sterol regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I requires nuclear factor-Y- and Sp-1-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S; Chirala, S S; Wakil, S J

    2000-04-11

    To understand cholesterol-mediated regulation of human fatty acid synthase promoter I, we tested various 5'-deletion constructs of promoter I-luciferase reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells. The reporter gene constructs that contained only the Sp-1-binding site (nucleotides -82 to -74) and the two tandem sterol regulatory elements (SREs; nucleotides -63 to -46) did not respond to cholesterol. Only the reporter gene constructs containing a nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) sequence, the CCAAT sequence (nucleotides -90 to -86), an Sp-1 sequence, and the two tandem SREs responded to cholesterol. The NF-Y-binding site, therefore, is essential for cholesterol response. Mutating the SREs or the NF-Y site and inserting 4 bp between the Sp-1- and NF-Y-binding sites both resulted in a minimal cholesterol response of the reporter genes. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays using anti-SRE-binding protein (SREBP) and anti-NF-Ya antibodies confirmed that these SREs and the NF-Y site bind the respective factors. We also identified a second Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -40 and -30 that can substitute for the mutated Sp-1 site located between nucleotides -82 and -74. The reporter gene expression of the wild-type promoter and the Sp-1 site (nucleotides -82 to -74) mutant promoter was similar when SREBP1a [the N-terminal domain of SREBP (amino acids 1-520)] was constitutively overexpressed, suggesting that Sp-1 recruits SREBP to the SREs. Under the same conditions, an NF-Y site mutation resulted in significant loss of reporter gene expression, suggesting that NF-Y is required to activate the cholesterol response.

  4. Role of Sp1 and SREBP-1a in the insulin-mediated regulation of glucokinase transcription in the liver of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Miriam; Metón, Isidoro; Córdoba, Marlon; Fernández, Felipe; Baanante, Isabel V

    2008-01-15

    Insulin induction of glucokinase (GCK) transcription in the liver is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis. To study the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of hepatic GCK expression in the carnivorous fish gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), we analysed the role of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a) and specificity protein (Sp) 1 in insulin-dependent GCK transcription. Transient transfection experiments performed in HepG2 cells and electrophoretic mobility shift assays allowed us to identify a cis-element in the proximal region of GCK promoter implicated in transactivation by SREBP-1a. Consistently, mutations in the SRE binding site completely abolished the enhancing effect of SREBP-1a. These results and previous findings suggest that SREBP-1a plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of key enzymes in glycolysis-gluconeogenesis. Since SREBP-1a and Sp1 may mediate insulin action on S. aurata GCK transcription, we analysed the effect of insulin on HepG2 cells transfected with GCK promoter reporter constructs carrying intact or mutated SRE or Sp boxes. Insulin transactivated GCK irrespective of the presence of an intact or mutated SRE box. However, insulin failed to induce GCK transcription when using reporter constructs that had either a mutated Sp site or no Sp site. Our findings indicate that Sp1, rather than SREBP-1a, mediates the insulin-dependent induction of S. aurata GCK.

  5. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  6. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  7. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-07

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  9. The family feud: turning off Sp1 by Sp1-like KLF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2005-11-15

    Sp1 is one of the best characterized transcriptional activators. The biological importance of Sp1 is underscored by the fact that several hundreds of genes are thought to be regulated by this protein. However, during the last 5 years, a more extended family of Sp1-like transcription factors has been identified and characterized by the presence of a conserved DNA-binding domain comprising three Krüppel-like zinc fingers. Each distinct family member differs in its ability to regulate transcription, and, as a consequence, to influence cellular processes. Specific activation and repression domains located within the N-terminal regions of these proteins are responsible for these differences by facilitating interactions with various co-activators and co-repressors. The present review primarily focuses on discussing the structural, biochemical and biological functions of the repressor members of this family of transcription factors. The existence of these transcriptional repressors provides a tightly regulated mechanism for silencing a large number of genes that are already known to be activated by Sp1.

  10. Human Dbf4/ASK promoter is activated through the Sp1 and MluI cell-cycle box (MCB) transcription elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing; Lee, Hoyun

    2002-11-07

    Dbf4 is the regulatory subunit of Cdc7 kinase, which is essential for entry into and traversing through S phase. The level of Dbf4, which is critical for the activation of Cdc7, is regulated by transcription and protein degradation. To gain a better understanding as to how the transcription of human Dbf4 (HuDbf4) is regulated, we have cloned and characterized its promoter. We found that HuDbf4 core promoter is localized within (-)211 to -285 of the translation start-codon. This 75 bp DNA segment contains, among others, a putative MluI Cell-cycle Box (MCB). A point mutation within the MCB dramatically reduced the promoter activity. This is the first example that an MCB element plays an essential role in the activation of a core promoter in mammalian cells. The auxiliary elements required for the full promoter activity are present within 162-bp upstream from the core promoter (i.e., -286/-447). A point mutation within the Sp1 element at -353/-361 resulted in a decrease of promoter activity to the basal level, while the deletion of the putative HES-1 at -326/-331 dramatically increased the promoter activity. Taken together, our data suggests that the MCB element is essential for the core promoter activation, while the Sp1 positive regulator and the HES-1 repressor coordinately determine the efficiency of the HuDbf4 promoter. We have also found: (i) that the major transcription initiations occur at -220, -235 and -245; (ii) that HuDbf4 gene consists of 12 exons, which spread over a 33-kb region.

  11. Sp1 and Sp3 Are the Transcription Activators of Human ek1 Promoter in TSA-Treated Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; See Too, Wei Cun; Few, Ling Ling

    2016-01-01

    Ethanolamine kinase (EK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of ethanolamine, the first step in the CDP-ethanolamine pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Human EK exists as EK1, EK2α and EK2β isoforms, encoded by two separate genes, named ek1 and ek2. EK activity is stimulated by carcinogens and oncogenes, suggesting the involvement of EK in carcinogenesis. Currently, little is known about EK transcriptional regulation by endogenous or exogenous signals, and the ek gene promoter has never been studied. In this report, we mapped the important regulatory regions in the human ek1 promoter. 5' deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified a Sp site at position (-40/-31) that was essential for the basal transcription of this gene. Treatment of HCT116 cells with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, significantly upregulated the ek1 promoter activity through the Sp(-40/-31) site and increased the endogenous expression of ek1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that TSA increased the binding of Sp1, Sp3 and RNA polymerase II to the ek1 promoter in HCT116 cells. The effect of TSA on ek1 promoter activity was cell-line specific as TSA treatment did not affect ek1 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we showed that Sp1 and Sp3 are not only essential for the basal transcription of the ek1 gene, their accessibility to the target site on the ek1 promoter is regulated by histone protein modification in a cell line dependent manner.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-2 up-regulates the expression of nestin through the Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling axis in C6 glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kai-Wei [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yuan-Li [Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China); Wong, Zong-Ruei; Su, Peng-Han [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Bu-Miin [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ju, Tsai-Kai [Instrumentation Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Technology Commons, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsi-Yuan, E-mail: hyhy@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. •Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. •The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. •The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. •Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce and regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFR–MAPK–ERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells.

  13. Elevated transcription factor specificity protein 1 in autistic brains alters the expression of autism candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanseem, Ismail; Anitha, Ayyappan; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suda, Shiro; Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ueki, Takatoshi; Katayama, Taiichi; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Minoshima, Shinsei; Mori, Norio

    2012-03-01

    Profound changes in gene expression can result from abnormalities in the concentrations of sequence-specific transcription factors like specificity protein 1 (Sp1). Specificity protein 1 binding sites have been reported in the promoter regions of several genes implicated in autism. We hypothesize that dysfunction of Sp1 could affect the expression of multiple autism candidate genes, contributing to the heterogeneity of autism. We assessed any alterations in the expression of Sp1 and that of autism candidate genes in the postmortem brain (anterior cingulate gyrus [ACG], motor cortex, and thalamus) of autism patients (n = 8) compared with healthy control subjects (n = 13). Alterations in the expression of candidate genes upon Sp1/DNA binding inhibition with mithramycin and Sp1 silencing by RNAi were studied in SK-N-SH neuronal cells. We observed elevated expression of Sp1 in ACG of autism patients (p = .010). We also observed altered expression of several autism candidate genes. GABRB3, RELN, and HTR2A showed reduced expression, whereas CD38, ITGB3, MAOA, MECP2, OXTR, and PTEN showed elevated expression in autism. In SK-N-SH cells, OXTR, PTEN, and RELN showed reduced expression upon Sp1/DNA binding inhibition and Sp1 silencing. The RNA integrity number was not available for any of the samples. Transcription factor Sp1 is dysfunctional in the ACG of autistic brain. Consequently, the expression of potential autism candidate genes regulated by Sp1, especially OXTR and PTEN, could be affected. The diverse downstream pathways mediated by the Sp1-regulated genes, along with the environmental and intracellular signal-related regulation of Sp1, could explain the complex phenotypes associated with autism.

  14. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation of the t......To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...... a select group of transcription factors that demonstrate the diversity displayed in their mode of activation and inactivation....

  15. Olean-18-ene triterpenoids from Celastraceae species inhibit HIV replication targeting NF-kB and Sp1 dependent transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Alex A; Muñóz, Alejandro; Torres-Romero, David; Bedoya, Luis M; Perestelo, Nayra R; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Alcamí, José; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2012-06-01

    In the present study we report the isolation of nine new olean-18-ene triterpenes (1-9), along with three known ones (10-12), from Cassine xylocarpa and Maytenus jelskii. Their stereostructures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques (COSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC), and spectrometric methods. The natural compounds and derivatives 13-15 have been tested for their potential as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. Five compounds from this series displayed potent antiviral activity with IC(50)s in the micromolar range (1, 3, 4, 7 and 8) being 1 and 8 the most active compounds. The target of these compounds was different from antiretroviral drugs currently licensed as they act as inhibitors of enhancer-dependent transcription. The structure-activity relationships were established based on the regiosubstitution and oxidation degree of the triterpene scaffold, revealing that these aspects were able to modulate the selectivity and intensity of HIV inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Blobel, Gerd A

    2013-04-02

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed "mitotic bookmarking." Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors.

  17. Induction of MUC2 and MUC5AC mucins by factors of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family is mediated by EGF receptor/Ras/Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade and Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, Michaël; Pigny, Pascal; Copin, Marie-Christine; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2002-08-30

    The 11p15 mucin genes (MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B and MUC6) possess a cell-specific pattern of expression in normal lung that is altered during carcinogenesis. Growth factors of the epidermal growth factor family are known to target key genes that in turn may affect the homeostasis of lung mucosae. Our aim was to study the regulation of the 11p15 mucin genes both at the promoter and protein levels to assess whether their altered expression may represent a key event during lung carcinogenesis. Studies were performed in the mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 lung cancer cell line. Cell treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) resulted in a dramatic increase of MUC2 and MUC5AC mRNAs levels, promoter activity, and apomucin expression, whereas those of MUC5B and MUC6 were unchanged. pGL3 deletion mutants of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC5B promoters were constructed and used in transient transfection assays to characterize EGF- and TGF-alpha-responsive regulatory regions within the promoters. They were located in the -2627/-2097 and -202/-1 regions of MUC2 and MUC5AC promoters, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate that transcription factor Sp1 not only binds and activates MUC2 and MUC5AC promoters but also participates to their EGF- and TGF-alpha-mediated up-regulation. We also show that Sp3 is a strong inhibitor of 11p15 mucin gene transcription. In conclusion, MUC2 and MUC5AC are two target genes of EGFR ligands in lung cancer cells, and up-regulation of these two genes goes through concomitant activation of the EGFR/Ras/Raf/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase-signaling pathway and Sp1 binding to their promoters.

  18. Inhibition of Sp1 functions by its sequestration into PML nuclear bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Li

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs are comprised of PML and a striking variety of its associated proteins. Various cellular functions have been attributed to PML NBs, including the regulation of gene expression. We report here that induced expression of PML recruits Sp1 into PML NBs, leading to the reduction of Sp1 transactivation function. Specifically, Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay demonstrated that induced expression of PML significantly diminishes the amount of Sp1 binding to its target gene promoter, immunofluorescence staining showed dramatic increase in the co-localization between PML and Sp1 upon induction of PML expression, moreover, PML and Sp1 co-fractionated in the core nuclear matrix. Our study further showed that PML promotes SUMOylation of Sp1 in a RING-motif-dependent manner, SUMOylation of Sp1 facilitates physical interaction between Sp1 and PML and recruitment of Sp1 into the PML NBs, the SUMO binding motif of PML was also important for its interaction with Sp1. The results of this study demonstrate a novel mechanism by which PML regulates gene expression through sequestration of the transcription factor into PML NBs.

  19. Transcription factor interactions mediate EGF-dependent COX-2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaiming; Shu, Hui-Kuo G

    2013-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is linked to poor prognosis in patients with malignant gliomas. Amplification/overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly seen in these tumors. EGFR signaling, through activation of the p38-MAPK/PKC-δ/Sp1 cascade, plays an essential role in the regulation of COX-2 expression in glioma cells. Here, we report that Src kinase contributes upstream to this signaling cascade. In addition, more detailed analysis revealed the involvement of FOXM1, a member of the forkhead box family of transcriptional activators, in EGF-dependent COX-2 induction. FOXM1 protein increased after stimulation with EGF, although its role in modulating COX-2 expression does not depend on this increase. While a conventional FOXM1 responsive element resides in a distal region (-2872/-2539 relative to the transcriptional start site) of the COX-2 promoter, this is not required for EGF-dependent induction of COX-2. Instead, FOXM1 forms a cooperative interaction with Sp1 at the Sp1-binding site (-245/-240 relative to the start site) of the COX-2 promoter to mediate EGF-induced COX-2 expression. Definition of this novel interaction provides a clearer understanding of the mechanistic basis for EGF induction of COX-2. These data provide a guide for the evaluation of potential newer therapeutic targets that have relevance in this disease. ©2013 AACR.

  20. Triptolide inhibits transcription of hTERT through down-regulation of transcription factor specificity protein 1 in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Pathology and Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Wang, Huan; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yu [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); Sun, Xiaoping, E-mail: xsun6@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a key component responsible for the regulation of telomerase activity, plays important roles in cellular immortalization and cancer development. Triptolide purified from Tripterygium extracts displays a broad-spectrum bioactivity profile, including immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor. In this study, it is investigated whether triptolide reduces hTERT expression and suppresses its activity in PEL cells. The mRNA and protein levels of hTERT were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activity of hTERT promoter was determined by Dual luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrated that triptolide decreased expression of hTERT at both mRNA and protein levels. Further gene sequence analysis indicated that the activity of hTERT promoter was suppressed by triptolide. Triptolide also reduced the half-time of hTERT. Additionally, triptolide inhibited the expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1(Sp1) in PEL cells. Furthermore, knock-down of Sp1 by using specific shRNAs resulted in down-regulation of hTERT transcription and protein expression levels. Inhibition of Sp1 by specific shRNAs enhanced triptolide-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of triptolide on hTERT transcription is possibly mediated by inhibition of transcription factor Sp1 in PEL cells. - Highlights: • Triptolide reduces expression of hTERT by decreasing its transcription level. • Triptolide reduces promoter activity and stability of hTERT. • Triptolide down-regulates expression of Sp1. • Special Sp1 shRNAs inhibit transcription and protein expression of hTERT. • Triptolide and Sp1 shRNA2 induce cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis.

  1. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed. © 2013, Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Vascular Injury Triggers Krüppel-Like Factor 6 (KLF6) Mobilization and Cooperation with Sp1 to Promote Endothelial Activation through Upregulation of the Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Martín, Eva M.; Blanco, Francisco J.; Roquè, Mercé; Novensà, Laura; Tarocchi, Mirko; Lee, Ursula E.; Suzuki, Toru; Friedman, Scott L.; Botella, Luisa M.; Bernabéu, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Activin receptor-Like Kinase-1 (ALK1) is an endothelial TGF-β receptor involved in angiogenesis. ALK1 expression is high in the embryo vasculature, becoming less detectable in the quiescent endothelium of adult stages. However, ALK1 expression becomes rapidly increased after angiogenic stimuli such as vascular injury. Objective To characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of ALK1 upon vascular injury. Methods and Results Alk1 becomes strongly upregulated in endothelial (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) of mouse femoral arteries after wire-induced endothelial denudation. In vitro, denudation of monolayers of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) also leads to an increase in ALK1. Interestingly, a key factor in tissue remodeling, Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6), translocates to the cell nucleus during wound healing, concomitantly with an increase in the ALK1 gene transcriptional rate. KLF6 knock down in HUVECs promotes ALK1 mRNA downregulation. Moreover, Klf6+/− mice have lower levels of Alk1 in their vasculature compared with their wild type siblings. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that KLF6 interacts with ALK1 promoter in ECs, and this interaction is enhanced during wound healing. We demonstrate that KLF6 is transactivating ALK1 gene, and this transactivation occurs by a synergistic cooperative mechanism with Sp1. Finally, Alk1 levels in vSMCs are not directly upregulated in response to damage, but in response to soluble factors, such as IL-6, released from ECs after injury. Conclusions ALK1 is upregulated in ECs during vascular injury by a synergistic cooperative mechanism between KLF6 and Sp1, and in vSMCs by an EC-vSMC paracrine communication during vascular remodeling. PMID:23048070

  3. Astaxanthin Suppresses MPP+-Induced Oxidative Damage in PC12 Cells through a Sp1/NR1 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate astaxanthin (ATX neuroprotection, and its mechanism, on a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridine ion (MPP+-induced cell model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Mature, differentiated PC12 cells treated with MPP+ were used as an in vitro cell model. The MTT assay was used to investigate cell viability after ATX treatment, and western blot analysis was used to observe Sp1 (activated transcription factor 1 and NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1 protein expression, real-time PCR was used to monitor Sp1 and NR1 mRNA, and cell immunofluorescence was used to determine the location of Sp1 and NR1 protein and the nuclear translocation of Sp1. Results: PC12 cell viability was significantly reduced by MPP+ treatment. The expression of Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were increased compared with the control (p < 0.01. Following co-treatment with ATX and MPP+, cell viability was significantly increased, and Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were decreased, compared with the MPP+ groups (p < 0.01. In addition, mithracycin A protected PC12 cells from oxidative stress caused by MPP+ by specifically inhibiting the expression of Sp1. Moreover, cell immunofluorescence revealed that ATX could suppress Sp1 nuclear transfer. Conclusion: ATX inhibited oxidative stress induced by MPP+ in PC12 cells, via the SP1/NR1 signaling pathway.

  4. NELL-1, an osteoinductive factor, is a direct transcriptional target of Osterix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available NELL-1 is a novel secreted protein associated with premature fusion of cranial sutures in craniosynostosis that has been found to promote osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization. Our previous study showed that Runx2, the key transcription factor in osteoblast differentiation, transactivates the NELL-1 promoter. In this study, we evaluated the regulatory involvement and mechanisms of Osterix, an essential transcription factor of osteoblasts, in NELL-1 gene expression and function. Promoter analysis showed a cluster of potential Sp1 sites (Sp1/Osterix binding sites within approximately 70 bp (from -71 to -142 of the 5' flanking region of the human NELL-1 transcriptional start site. Luciferase activity in our NELL-1 promoter reporter systems was significantly decreased in Saos-2 cells when Osterix was overexpressed. Mutagenesis study demonstrated that this suppression is mediated by the Sp1 sites. The binding specificity of Osterix to these Sp1 sites was confirmed in Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts by EMSA in vitro and ChIP assay in vivo. ChIP assay also showed that Osterix downregulated NELL-1 by affecting binding of RNA polymerase II to the NELL-1 promoter, but not by competing with Runx2 binding to the OSE2 sites. Moreover, NELL-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased when Osterix was overexpressed in Saos-2, U2OS, Hela and Glioma cells. Correspondingly, knockdown of Osterix increased NELL-1 transcription and osteoblastic differentiation in both Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts. These results suggest that Osterix is a direct transcriptional regulator with repressive effect on NELL-1 gene expression, contributing to a delicate balance of regulatory effects on NELL-1 transcription with Runx2, and may play a crucial role in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings also extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of Runx2, Osterix, and NELL-1 and demonstrate their crosstalk during

  5. NF1, Sp1 and HSF1 are synergistically involved in sulfide-induced sqr activation in echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Qin, Zhenkui; Li, Xueyu; Ma, Xiaoyu; Gao, Beibei; Zhang, Zhifeng, E-mail: zzfp107@ouc.edu.cn

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Sulfide activates sqr transcription against respiratory toxicity in Urechis unicinctus. • Sulfide increases expressions and activities of NF1, Sp1 and HSF1 in a time-dependent manner. • NF1 and Sp1 participate in both basal and early sulfide-induced sqr transcription. • HSF1 functions more significantly than NF1 and Sp1 in sulfide-induced sqr transcription. • Transcription factors NF1, Sp1 and HSF1 enhance sqr promoter activity synergistically. - Abstract: Background: Sulfide is a well-known environmental toxic substance. Mitochondrial sulfide oxidation is a main mechanism of sulfide detoxification in organisms, and sulfide: quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is a key enzyme which is involved in transferring electrons from sulfide to ubiquinone and converting sulfide into thiosulfate. Previous studies have revealed the SQR-mediated mitochondrial sulfide oxidation exists in the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, and its sqr mRNA level increased significantly when the worm is exposed to sulfide. In this study, we attempt to reveal the synergistic regulation of transcription factors on sulfide-induced sqr transcription in U. unicinctus. Methods: ChIP and EMSA were used to identify the interactions between sqr proximal promoter (from −391 to +194 bp) and transcription factors NF1 (nuclear factor 1) and Sp1 (specificity protein 1). Site-directed mutation and transfection assays further revealed their binding sites and synergistic roles of HSF1, NF1 and Sp1 in the sqr transcription. When U. unicinctus were exposed to 150 μM sulfide, the expression levels and nuclear contents of NF1 and Sp1 were examined by Western blotting, and the binding contents between NF1 or Sp1 and the sqr promoter were also detected by ChIP. Results: Transcription factors NF1 and Sp1 were confirmed to interact with the sqr proximal promoter, and their binding sites were identified in −75 to −69 bp for NF1 and −210 to −201 bp for Sp1. Transfection assays showed mutation

  6. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism....... The biosynthetic machinery of GLS is governed by interplay of six MYB and three bHLH transcription factors. MYB28, MYB29 and MYB76 regulate methionine-derived GLS, and MYB51, MYB34 and MYB122 regulate tryptophan-derived GLS. The three bHLH transcription factors MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 physically interact with all six...

  7. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  8. An Sp1/Sp3 binding polymorphism confers methylation protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanis A Boumber

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of genes show aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer, yet little is known about the causes of this hypermethylation. We identified RIL as a frequent methylation target in cancer. In search for factors that influence RIL hypermethylation, we found a 12-bp polymorphic sequence around its transcription start site that creates a long allele. Pyrosequencing of homozygous tumors revealed a 2.1-fold higher methylation for the short alleles (P<0.001. Bisulfite sequencing of cancers heterozygous for RIL showed that the short alleles are 3.1-fold more methylated than the long (P<0.001. The comparison of expression levels between unmethylated long and short EBV-transformed cell lines showed no difference in expression in vivo. Electrophorectic mobility shift assay showed that the inserted region of the long allele binds Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, a binding that is absent in the short allele. Transient transfection of RIL allele-specific transgenes showed no effects of the additional Sp1 site on transcription early on. However, stable transfection of methylation-seeded constructs showed gradually decreasing transcription levels from the short allele with eventual spreading of de novo methylation. In contrast, the long allele showed stable levels of expression over time as measured by luciferase and approximately 2-3-fold lower levels of methylation by bisulfite sequencing (P<0.001, suggesting that the polymorphic Sp1 site protects against time-dependent silencing. Our finding demonstrates that, in some genes, hypermethylation in cancer is dictated by protein-DNA interactions at the promoters and provides a novel mechanism by which genetic polymorphisms can influence an epigenetic state.

  9. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes.

  10. Synthetic transcription elongation factors license transcription across repressive chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Graham S; Grieshop, Matthew P; Ali, Asfa; Qi, Jun; Lawlor, Matthew; Kumar, Deepak; Ahmad, Istaq; McNally, Anna; Teider, Natalia; Worringer, Katie; Sivasankaran, Rajeev; Syed, Deeba N; Eguchi, Asuka; Ashraf, Md; Jeffery, Justin; Xu, Mousheng; Park, Paul M C; Mukhtar, Hasan; Srivastava, Achal K; Faruq, Mohammed; Bradner, James E; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2017-11-30

    Releasing a paused RNA polymerase II into productive elongation is tightly-regulated, especially at genes that impact human development and disease. To exert control over this rate-limiting step, we designed sequence-specific synthetic transcription elongation factors (Syn-TEFs). These molecules are composed of programmable DNA-binding ligands flexibly tethered to a small molecule that engages the transcription elongation machinery. By limiting activity to targeted loci, Syn-TEFs convert constituent modules from broad-spectrum inhibitors of transcription into gene-specific stimulators. We present Syn-TEF1, a molecule that actively enables transcription across repressive GAA repeats that silence frataxin expression in Friedreich's ataxia, a terminal neurodegenerative disease with no effective therapy. Furthermore, the modular design of Syn-TEF1 defines a general framework for developing a class of molecules that license transcription elongation at targeted genomic loci. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors and Metformin Regulate Expression of the Long Non-coding RNA HULC

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is evidence that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor (TF) regulates expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. RNA interference (RNAi) studies showed that among several lncRNAs expressed in HepG2, SNU-449 and SK-Hep-1...

  12. Evolution of general transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbin, K V; Ruvinsky, A

    2013-02-01

    Three genes GTF2IRD1, GTF2I, and GTF2IRD2, which encode members of the GTF2I (or TFII-I) family of so-called general transcription factors, were discovered and studied during the last two decades. Chromosome location and similarity of exon-intron structures suggest that the family evolved by duplications. The initial duplication of ancestral proto-GTF2IRD1 gene likely occurred in early vertebrates prior to origin of cartilaginous fish and led to formation of GTF2I (>450 MYA), which was later lost in bony fish but successfully evolved in the land vertebrates. The second duplication event, which created GTF2IRD2, occurred prior to major radiation events of eutherian mammalian evolution (>100 MYA). During recent steps of primate evolution there was another duplication which led to formation of GTF2IRD2B (evolution of the genes. The atypical substitutions are often located on secondary structures joining α-helices and affect 3D arrangement of the protein globule. Such substitutions are commonly traced at the early stages of evolution in Tetrapoda, Amniota, and Mammalia.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  14. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  15. Transcription Factor Pathways and Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulley, David J.; Black, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout life. Mutations in numerous transcription factors have been identified in patients and families with some of the most common forms of cardiac malformations and arrhythmias. This review discusses factor pathways known to be important for normal heart development and how abnormalities in these pathways have been linked to morphological and functional forms of congenital heart defects. A comprehensive, current list of known transcription factor mutations associated with congenital heart disease is provided, but the review focuses primarily on three key transcription factors, Nkx2-5, GATA4, and Tbx5, and their known biochemical and genetic partners. By understanding the interaction partners, transcriptional targets, and upstream activators of these core cardiac transcription factors, additional information about normal heart formation and further insight into genes and pathways affected in congenital heart disease should result. PMID:22449847

  16. The ets-related transcription factor GABP directs bidirectional transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Collins

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of genes in the human genome are distributed such that their transcription start sites are located less than 1 kb apart on opposite strands. These divergent gene pairs have a single intergenic segment of DNA, which in some cases appears to share regulatory elements, but it is unclear whether these regions represent functional bidirectional promoters or two overlapping promoters. A recent study showed that divergent promoters are enriched for consensus binding sequences of a small group of transcription factors, including the ubiquitous ets-family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP. Here we show that GABP binds to more than 80% of divergent promoters in at least one cell type. Furthermore, we demonstrate that GABP binding is correlated and associated with bidirectional transcriptional activity in a luciferase transfection assay. In addition, we find that the addition of a strict consensus GABP site into a set of promoters that normally function in only one direction significantly increases activity in the opposite direction in 67% of cases. Our findings demonstrate that GABP regulates the majority of divergent promoters and suggest that bidirectional transcriptional activity is mediated through GABP binding and transactivation at both divergent and nondivergent promoters.

  17. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Li, Huiyun; Zeng, Jun; Shao, Yafeng; Zhu, Lu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior. PMID:25196345

  18. Divergent activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene promoter among genetic lines of pigs is partially conferred by nuclear factor (NF)-B, specificity protein (SP)1-like and GATA-4 binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Emily A; Smith, Jacqueline E; Cederberg, Rebecca A; White, Brett R

    2016-06-29

    Binding of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) to its receptor (GnRHR) on gonadotropes within the anterior pituitary gland is essential to reproduction. In pigs, the GnRHR gene is also located near a genetic marker for ovulation rate, a primary determinant of prolificacy. We hypothesized that pituitary expression of the GnRHR gene is alternatively regulated in genetic strains with elevated ovulation rates (Chinese Meishan and Nebraska Index) vs. standard white crossbred swine (Control). Luciferase reporter vectors containing 5118 bp of GnRHR gene promoter from either the Control, Index or Meishan swine lines were generated. Transient transfection of line-specific, full length, deletion and mutation constructs into gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cells were performed to compare promoter activity and identify regions necessary for divergent regulation of the porcine GnRHR gene. Additionally, transcription factors that bind the GnRHR promoter from each line were identified with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dramatic differences in luciferase activity among Control, Index and Meishan promoters (19-, 27- and 49-fold over promoterless control, respectively; P Index promoters. Transient transfection of vectors containing block replacement mutations of either the GATA-4 or NF-κB binding sites within the context of their native promoters resulted in a 50 and 60 % reduction of luciferase activity, respectively (P Index promoters resulted in binding of the p52 and p65 subunits of NF-κB and a specificity protein 1 (SP1)-like factor (-1235) as well as GATA-4 (-845). Vectors containing the full-length Meishan promoter harboring individual mutations spanning these regions reduced luciferase activity by 25 and 20 %, respectively, compared to native sequence (P Index promoters in αT3-1 cells is partially due to three single nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in the unique binding of GATA-4 (-1690), the p52/p65 subunits of NF-kB in combination with a SP1

  19. Transcription Factor Networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y. Rhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular fates and functions depend on differential gene expression, which occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and is controlled by complex regulatory networks of transcription factors (TFs. TFs act through combinatorial interactions with other TFs, cofactors, and chromatin-remodeling proteins. Here, we define protein-protein interactions using a coaffinity purification/mass spectrometry method and study 459 Drosophila melanogaster transcription-related factors, representing approximately half of the established catalog of TFs. We probe this network in vivo, demonstrating functional interactions for many interacting proteins, and test the predictive value of our data set. Building on these analyses, we combine regulatory network inference models with physical interactions to define an integrated network that connects combinatorial TF protein interactions to the transcriptional regulatory network of the cell. We use this integrated network as a tool to connect the functional network of genetic modifiers related to mastermind, a transcriptional cofactor of the Notch pathway.

  20. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed.

  1. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and the probable mechanism. Methods: After ... Keywords: Mitochondrial transcription factor A, NF-κB, Hypoxia, Human retinal endothelial cell,. Diabetic retinopathy ..... choice for diabetic retinopathy therapy, as TFAM activity clearly affects the ...

  2. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  3. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium. A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior.

  4. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  5. Characterization of the human Activin-A receptor type II-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1 promoter and its regulation by Sp1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella Luisa M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1 is a Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β receptor type I, mainly expressed in endothelial cells that plays a pivotal role in vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. Mutations in the ALK1 gene (ACVRL1 give rise to Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, a dominant autosomal vascular dysplasia caused by a haploinsufficiency mechanism. In spite of its patho-physiological relevance, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of ACVRL1. Here, we have studied the different origins of ACVRL1 transcription, we have analyzed in silico its 5'-proximal promoter sequence and we have characterized the role of Sp1 in the transcriptional regulation of ACVRL1. Results We have performed a 5'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5'RACE of ACVRL1 transcripts, finding two new transcriptional origins, upstream of the one previously described, that give rise to a new exon undiscovered to date. The 5'-proximal promoter region of ACVRL1 (-1,035/+210 was analyzed in silico, finding that it lacks TATA/CAAT boxes, but contains a remarkably high number of GC-rich Sp1 consensus sites. In cells lacking Sp1, ACVRL1 promoter reporters did not present any significant transcriptional activity, whereas increasing concentrations of Sp1 triggered a dose-dependent stimulation of its transcription. Moreover, silencing Sp1 in HEK293T cells resulted in a marked decrease of ACVRL1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated multiple Sp1 binding sites along the proximal promoter region of ACVRL1 in endothelial cells. Furthermore, demethylation of CpG islands, led to an increase in ACVRL1 transcription, whereas in vitro hypermethylation resulted in the abolishment of Sp1-dependent transcriptional activation of ACVRL1. Conclusions Our results describe two new transcriptional start sites in ACVRL1 gene, and indicate that Sp1 is a key regulator of ACVRL1 transcription, providing new insights into

  6. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  7. Sp1 acetylation is associated with loss of DNA binding at promoters associated with cell cycle arrest and cell death in a colon cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Gareth J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Butyrate, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi and product of fibre fermentation, is postulated to mediate the protective effect of dietary fibre against colon cancer. The transcription factor Sp1 is a target of acetylation and is known to be associated with class I HDACs, including HDAC1. Sp1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor and Sp1-regulated genes include those involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and lipogenesis: all major pathways in cancer development. The only known acetylated residue of Sp1 is lysine703 which resides in the DNA binding domain. Here we show that acetylated Sp1 loses p21- and bak-promoter -binding function in vitro. Furthermore treatment with a panel of HDAC inhibitors showed clustering of activities for a subset of inhibitors, causing G2 cell cycle arrest, Sp1 acetylation, p21 and Bak over-expression, all with very similar EC50 concentrations. These HDACi activities were not distributed according to the molecular class of compound. In order to mimic loss of binding, an siRNA strategy was used to reduce Sp1 expression. This resulted in altered expression of multiple elements of the p53/p21 pathway. Taken together our data suggest a mechanistic model for the chemopreventive actions of butyrate in colon epithelial cells, and provide new insight into the differential activities some classes of HDAC inhibitors.

  8. Hey bHLH transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David; Wiese, Cornelia; Gessler, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are direct targets of canonical Notch signaling. The three mammalian Hey proteins are closely related to Hes proteins and they primarily repress target genes by either directly binding to core promoters or by inhibiting other transcriptional activators. Individual candidate gene approaches and systematic screens identified a number of Hey target genes, which often encode other transcription factors involved in various developmental processes. Here, we review data on interaction partners and target genes and conclude with a model for Hey target gene regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how expression of Hey proteins affects processes like cell fate decisions and differentiation, e.g., in cardiovascular, skeletal, and neural development or oncogenesis and how this relates to the observed developmental defects and phenotypes observed in various knockout mice. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  10. The LIM Homeodomain Transcription Factor LHX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichao; Gutierrez, Diana; Li, Xiao; Bidlack, Felicitas; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Andrade, Kelsey; Margolis, Henry C.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    LHX6 is a LIM-homeobox transcription factor expressed during embryogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating LHX6 transcriptional activities are unknown. LHX6 and the PITX2 homeodomain transcription factor have overlapping expression patterns during tooth and craniofacial development, and in this report, we demonstrate new transcriptional mechanisms for these factors. PITX2 and LHX6 are co-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium and epithelial cell lines. Lhx6 expression is increased in Pitx2c transgenic mice and decreased in Pitx2 null mice. PITX2 activates endogenous Lhx6 expression and the Lhx6 promoter, whereas LHX6 represses its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal endogenous PITX2 binding to the Lhx6 promoter. LHX6 directly interacts with PITX2 to inhibit PITX2 transcriptional activities and activation of multiple promoters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal an LHX6·PITX2 nuclear interaction in living cells. LHX6 has a dominant repressive effect on the PITX2 synergistic activation with LEF-1 and β-catenin co-factors. Thus, LHX6 acts as a transcriptional repressor and represses the expression of several genes involved in odontogenesis. We have identified specific defects in incisor, molar, mandible, bone, and root development and late stage enamel formation in Lhx6 null mice. Amelogenin and ameloblastin expression is reduced and/or delayed in the Lhx6 null mice, potentially resulting from defects in dentin deposition and ameloblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that LHX6 regulates cell proliferation in the cervical loop and promotes cell differentiation in the anterior region of the incisor. We demonstrate new molecular mechanisms for LHX6 and an interaction with PITX2 for normal craniofacial and tooth development. PMID:23229549

  11. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protei...

  12. Transcription factor decoy technology: A therapeutic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Markus; Wagner, Andreas H

    2017-11-15

    Targeting transcription factors represents one possibility to interfere with a known activated regulatory pathway that promotes disease. Double-stranded transcription factor decoy (TFD) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) are therapeutic drug candidates, which are able to specifically target and neutralize key transcription factors involved in the pathogenesis of a given disease. These short double-stranded TFD molecules mimic the consensus DNA binding site of a specific transcription factor in the promoter region of its target genes. Therefore, it is possible to exploit this nucleic acid-based drug class for the treatment of diseases caused by aberrant expression of such target genes the products of which are involved in disease initiation and progression. This research update focuses firstly on the mechanism of action of TFD molecules. Long-term effects of such ODNs depend on their stability and the efficiency by which they are delivered to the target tissue and taken up by their target cells. Hence structural modifications like e.g., single-stranded TFD molecules hybridising to itself to form an intramolecular hairpin molecule or circular ODNs assuming a dumbbell configuration, intended to enhance both stability and efficacy, are addressed. Also specific drug delivery methods like ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction with TFD ODN-coated microbubbles or adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors for tissue-specific transduction and long-term TFD molecule expression in non-dividing cells will be discussed. Finally, current therapeutic applications of TFD ODN will be summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  14. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger

  15. TCP transcription factors: architectures of plant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, Nora G Uberti; Viola, Ivana L; Welchen, Elina; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    After its initial definition in 1999, the TCP family of transcription factors has become the focus of a multiplicity of studies related with plant development at the cellular, organ, and tissue levels. Evidence has accumulated indicating that TCP transcription factors are the main regulators of plant form and architecture and constitute a tool through which evolution shapes plant diversity. The TCP transcription factors act in a multiplicity of pathways related with cell proliferation and hormone responses. In recent years, the molecular pathways of TCP protein action and biochemical studies on their mode of interaction with DNA have begun to shed light on their mechanism of action. However, the available information is fragmented and a unifying view of TCP protein action is lacking, as well as detailed structural studies of the TCP-DNA complex. Also important, the possible role of TCP proteins as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment has deserved little attention. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the structure and functions of TCP transcription factors and analyze future perspectives for the study of the role of these proteins and their use to modify plant development.

  16. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as a modulator of NF-κB, on proliferation of hypoxia-induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC), and the probable mechanism. Methods: After exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2) for 5 days, cell proliferation and cell cycle of HREC were ...

  17. Sp1 expression is disrupted in schizophrenia; a possible mechanism for the abnormal expression of mitochondrial complex I genes, NDUFV1 and NDUFV2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Ben-Shachar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevailing hypothesis regards schizophrenia as a polygenic disease, in which multiple genes combine with each other and with environmental stimuli to produce the variance of its clinical symptoms. We investigated whether the ubiquitous transcription factor Sp1 is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and consequently can affect the expression of genes implicated in this disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: mRNA of Sp1 and of mitochondrial complex I subunits (NDUFV1, NDUFV2 was analyzed in three postmortem brain regions obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Collection, and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients and controls. Sp1 role in the transcription of these genes was studied as well. Sp1 was abnormally expressed in schizophrenia in both brain and periphery. Its mRNA alteration pattern paralleled that of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, decreasing in the prefrontal cortex and the striatum, while increasing in the parieto-occipital cortex and in lymphocytes of schizophrenic patients as compared with controls. Moreover, a high and significant correlation between these genes existed in normal subjects, but was distorted in patients. Sp1 role in the regulation of complex I subunits, was demonstrated by the ability of the Sp1/DNA binding inhibitor, mithramycin, to inhibit the transcription of NDUFV1 and NDUFV2, in neuroblastoma cells. In addition, Sp1 activated NDUFV2 promoter by binding to its three GC-boxes. Both activation and binding were inhibited by mithramycin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that abnormality in Sp1, which can be the main activator/repressor or act in combination with additional transcription factors and is subjected to environmental stimuli, can contribute to the polygenic and clinically heterogeneous nature of schizophrenia.

  18. An Sp1/Sp3 Site in the Downstream Region of Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) oriS Influences Origin-Dependent DNA Replication and Flanking Gene Transcription and Is Important for VZV Replication In Vitro and in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Makeda; Sommer, Marvin; Arvin, Ann; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and orientation of origin-binding protein (OBP) sites are the main architectural contrasts between varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) origins of DNA replication (oriS). One important difference is the absence of a downstream OBP site in VZV, raising the possibility that an alternative cis element may replace its function. Our previous work established that Sp1, Sp3, and YY1 bind to specific sites within the downstream region of VZV oriS; we hypothesize that one or both of these sites may be the alternative cis element(s). Here, we show that the mutation of the Sp1/Sp3 site decreases DNA replication and transcription from the adjacent ORF62 and ORF63 promoters following superinfection with VZV. In contrast, in the absence of DNA replication or in transfection experiments with ORF62, only ORF63 transcription is affected. YY1 site mutations had no significant effect on either process. Recombinant viruses containing these mutations were then constructed. The Sp1/Sp3 site mutant exhibited a significant decrease in virus growth in MeWo cells and in human skin xenografts, while the YY1 site mutant virus grew as well as the wild type in MeWo cells, even showing a late increase in VZV replication in skin xenografts following infection. These results suggest that the Sp1/Sp3 site plays an important role in both VZV origin-dependent DNA replication and ORF62 and ORF63 transcription and that, in contrast to HSV, these events are linked during virus replication. PMID:22933283

  19. Butyrate suppresses expression of neuropilin I in colorectal cell lines through inhibition of Sp1 transactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staton Carolyn A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropilin is a transmembrane receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and is expressed in normal endothelial cells and upregulated in cancer cells. Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1 has been shown to promote tumour cell migration and survival in colon cancer in response to VEGF binding. The expression profiles of neuropilins, associated co-receptors and known ligands have been mapped in three colorectal cell lines: Caco-2, HCT116 & HT29. We have previously shown that butyrate, a naturally occurring histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi produced by fermentation of fibre in the colon, causes apoptosis of colon cancer cell lines. Results Here we demonstrate that butyrate down-regulates NRP-1 and VEGF at the mRNA and protein level in colorectal cancer cell lines. NRP-1 is a known transcriptional target of Sp1, whose activity is regulated by acetylation. NRP-1 down-regulation by butyrate was associated with decreased binding affinity of Sp1 for canonical Sp-binding sites in the NRP-1 promoter. siRNA-mediated knock-down of Sp1 implied that Sp1 may have strong DNA binding activity but weak transactivation potential. Conclusion The downregulation of the key apoptotic and angiogenesis regulator NRP-1 by butyrate suggests a novel contributory mechanism to the chemopreventive effect of dietary fibre.

  20. Site-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation: a selective method to individually analyze neighboring transcription factor binding sites in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuch Ronaldo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites (TFBSs play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. It is therefore vital to know how the allocation pattern of TFBSs affects the functioning of any particular gene in vivo. A widely used method to analyze TFBSs in vivo is the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. However, this method in its present state does not enable the individual investigation of densely arranged TFBSs due to the underlying unspecific DNA fragmentation technique. This study describes a site-specific ChIP which aggregates the benefits of both EMSA and in vivo footprinting in only one assay, thereby allowing the individual detection and analysis of single binding motifs. Findings The standard ChIP protocol was modified by replacing the conventional DNA fragmentation, i. e. via sonication or undirected enzymatic digestion (by MNase, through a sequence specific enzymatic digestion step. This alteration enables the specific immunoprecipitation and individual examination of occupied sites, even in a complex system of adjacent binding motifs in vivo. Immunoprecipitated chromatin was analyzed by PCR using two primer sets - one for the specific detection of precipitated TFBSs and one for the validation of completeness of the enzyme digestion step. The method was established exemplary for Sp1 TFBSs within the egfr promoter region. Using this site-specific ChIP, we were able to confirm four previously described Sp1 binding sites within egfr promoter region to be occupied by Sp1 in vivo. Despite the dense arrangement of the Sp1 TFBSs the improved ChIP method was able to individually examine the allocation of all adjacent Sp1 TFBS at once. The broad applicability of this site-specific ChIP could be demonstrated by analyzing these SP1 motifs in both osteosarcoma cells and kidney carcinoma tissue. Conclusions The ChIP technology is a powerful tool for investigating transcription factors in vivo, especially

  1. The AP-2 family of transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Eckert, Dawid; Buhl, Sandra; Weber, Susanne; Jäger, Richard; Schorle, Hubert

    2005-01-01

    The AP-2 family of transcription factors consists of five different proteins in humans and mice: AP-2α, AP-2β, AP-2γ, AP-2δ and AP-2ε. Frogs and fish have known orthologs of some but not all of these proteins, and homologs of the family are also found in protochordates, insects and nematodes. The proteins have a characteristic helix-span-helix motif at the carboxyl terminus, which, together with a central basic region, mediates dimerization and DNA binding. The amino terminus contains the tra...

  2. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASAK eKANDEMIR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pea3 subfamily of ETS transcription factors consist of three major proteins, Pea3, ERM and ER81. Although important for many different tissues that exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3.

  3. The evolution of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinerson, Charles I; Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Shen, Qingxi J; Rushton, Paul J

    2015-02-27

    The availability of increasing numbers of sequenced genomes has necessitated a re-evaluation of the evolution of the WRKY transcription factor family. Modern day plants descended from a charophyte green alga that colonized the land between 430 and 470 million years ago. The first charophyte genome sequence from Klebsormidium flaccidum filled a gap in the available genome sequences in the plant kingdom between unicellular green algae that typically have 1-3 WRKY genes and mosses that contain 30-40. WRKY genes have been previously found in non-plant species but their occurrence has been difficult to explain. Only two WRKY genes are present in the Klebsormidium flaccidum genome and the presence of a Group IIb gene was unexpected because it had previously been thought that Group IIb WRKY genes first appeared in mosses. We found WRKY transcription factor genes outside of the plant lineage in some diplomonads, social amoebae, fungi incertae sedis, and amoebozoa. This patchy distribution suggests that lateral gene transfer is responsible. These lateral gene transfer events appear to pre-date the formation of the WRKY groups in flowering plants. Flowering plants contain proteins with domains typical for both resistance (R) proteins and WRKY transcription factors. R protein-WRKY genes have evolved numerous times in flowering plants, each type being restricted to specific flowering plant lineages. These chimeric proteins contain not only novel combinations of protein domains but also novel combinations and numbers of WRKY domains. Once formed, R protein WRKY genes may combine different components of signalling pathways that may either create new diversity in signalling or accelerate signalling by short circuiting signalling pathways. We propose that the evolution of WRKY transcription factors includes early lateral gene transfers to non-plant organisms and the occurrence of algal WRKY genes that have no counterparts in flowering plants. We propose two alternative hypotheses

  4. Analysis of the petunia MADS-box transcription factor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immink, R.G.H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Busscher-Lange, J.; Kooiker, M.; Busscher, M.; Angenent, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of plant development. One of the major groups of transcription factors is the MADS-box family, of which at least 80 members are encoded in the Arabidopsis genome. In this study, 23 members of the petunia MADS-box transcription factor family were investigated

  5. [Progresses on plant AP2/ERF transcription factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Wang, Qing-Ju; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2012-07-01

    Plant AP2/ERF transcription factor with AP2/ERF domain containing 60-70 amino acids is a huge gene family present in all plant. AP2/ERF transcriptional factors are involved in various biological functions such as plant development, flower development, fruit and seed maturation, wounding, pathogen defense, high salty, drought, and so on. AP2/ERF transcription factor are involved in salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene, abscisic acid signal transduction pathways and among them. The transcription factors are cross-talk factor in stress signal pathway. This paper summarizes the most advanced researches on types, biological functions, and gene regulations of plant AP2/ERF transcription factors.

  6. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  7. Determination of specificity influencing residues for key transcription factor families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Garde, Christian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major modulators of transcription and subsequent cellular processes. The binding of TFs to specific regulatory elements is governed by their specificity. Considering the gap between known TFs sequence and specificity, specificity prediction frameworks are highly...

  8. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Langum, Tanner J; Boken, Ashley K; Rushton, Deena L; Boomsma, Darius D; Rinerson, Charles I; Rabara, Jennifer; Reese, R Neil; Chen, Xianfeng; Rohila, Jai S; Rushton, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    .... Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits...

  9. Differential effects of arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) on nuclear transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltreider, R C; Pesce, C A; Ihnat, M A; Lariviere, J P; Hamilton, J W

    1999-07-01

    The toxic metals arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) are considered human carcinogens, although they may act through different mechanisms. We previously showed that when administered at single low, non-overtly toxic doses, chromium, arsenic, and several other chemical carcinogens preferentially alter expression of several model inducible genes in both whole-animal and cell-culture systems. In this study, we assessed whether chromium and arsenic target specific signaling pathways within cells to selectively modulate gene expression. We examined the effects of non-cytotoxic and cytotoxic doses of arsenic(III) and chromium(VI) on nuclear binding of the transcription factors AP-1, NF-kappaB, Sp1, and YB-1 in human MDA-MB-435 breast cancer and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells. These transcription factors were chosen because they may regulate many inducible genes, including those previously shown to be altered by metal treatments. We report that both arsenic and chromium significantly altered nuclear binding levels of these factors to their respective cis-acting elements. However, there were qualitative and quantitative differences in these effects that were dependent on the metal, time, dose, transcription factor, and cell line. These effects may play a significant role in metal-induced alterations in gene expression.

  10. TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannock Jennifer F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription is a major control point in many biological processes. Transcription factors (TFs can activate and/or repress the transcriptional rate of target genes and vascular plant genomes devote approximately 7% of their coding capacity to TFs. Global analysis of TFs has only been performed for three complete higher plant genomes – Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, poplar (Populus trichocarpa and rice (Oryza sativa. Presently, no large-scale analysis of TFs has been made from a member of the Solanaceae, one of the most important families of vascular plants. To fill this void, we have analysed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum TFs using a dataset of 1,159,022 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs obtained by methylation filtering of the tobacco genome. An analytical pipeline was developed to isolate TF sequences from the GSR data set. This involved multiple (typically 10–15 independent searches with different versions of the TF family-defining domain(s (normally the DNA-binding domain followed by assembly into contigs and verification. Our analysis revealed that tobacco contains a minimum of 2,513 TFs representing all of the 64 well-characterised plant TF families. The number of TFs in tobacco is higher than previously reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Results TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors, is an integrative database that provides a portal to sequence and phylogeny data for the identified TFs, together with a large quantity of other data concerning TFs in tobacco. The database contains an individual page dedicated to each of the 64 TF families. These contain background information, domain architecture via Pfam links, a list of all sequences and an assessment of the minimum number of TFs in this family in tobacco. Downloadable phylogenetic trees of the major families are provided along with detailed information on the bioinformatic pipeline that was used to find

  11. Nrf2 transcription factor gene regulates basal transcription of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Key words: Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), antioxidant response element (ARE), mitochondrial superoxide ... the commonality of the presence of a cis-acting anti- oxidant response element (ARE) ... stream genes encoding GSTs (Lee et al., 2002) and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Ishii et al., ...

  12. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5‧ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors.

  13. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  14. Conserved POU-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within FZD5 promoter: Transcriptional mechanisms of FZD5 in undifferentiated human ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    Canonical WNT signals are transduced through Frizzled (FZD) family receptor and LRP5/LRP6 co-receptor to upregulate FGF20, JAG1, DKK1, WISP1, CCND1 and MYC genes for cell-fate determination, while non-canonical WNT signals are transduced through FZD family receptor and ROR2/PTK7/RYK co-receptor to activate RHOA/RHOU/RAC/CDC42, JNK, PKC, NLK and NFAT signaling cascades for the regulation of tissue polarity, cell movement, and adhesion. We previously reported molecular cloning and characterization of human FZD5, which showed six amino-acid substitutions with human Hfz5. FZD5, functioning as WNT5A receptor, is the key molecule in the fields of oncology, regenerative medicine, cardiology, rheumatology, diabetology, and gastroenterology. Here, comparative integromics analyses on FZD5 orthologs were performed by using bioinformatics (Techint) and human intelligence (Humint). Chimpanzee FZD5 and cow Fzd5 genes were identified within NW_104292.1 and AC166656.2 genome sequences, respectively. FZD5 orthologs were seven-transmembrane proteins with extracellular Frizzled domain, leucine zipper motif around the 5th transmembrane domain, and cytoplasmic DVL- and PDZ-binding motifs. Ser523 and Ser529 around the DVL-binding motif of FZD5 orthologs were putative aPKC phosphorylation sites. POU5F1 (OCT4)-binding site linked to SP1-binding site within the 5'-promoter region of human FZD5 gene was evolutionarily conserved among mammalian FZD5 orthologs. POU5F1 was more related to POU2F and POU3F subfamily members. POU5F1 was preferentially expressed in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic islet, and diffuse-type gastric cancer. POU2F1 (OCT1) was expressed in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, adult colon, POU2F2 in ES cells, fetal liver/spleen, and POU2F3 in diffuse-type gastric cancer. Multiple SP1/KLF family members, other than KLF2 or KLF4, were expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. Together, these facts indicate that POU5F1 and POU2F subfamily members

  15. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic footprint......Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...

  16. miR-23b/SP1/c-myc forms a feed-forward loop supporting multiple myeloma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulciniti, M; Amodio, N; Bandi, R L; Cagnetta, A; Samur, M K; Acharya, C; Prabhala, R; D'Aquila, P; Bellizzi, D; Passarino, G; Adamia, S; Neri, A; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; Anderson, K C; Tassone, P; Munshi, N C

    2016-01-15

    Deregulated microRNA (miR)/transcription factor (TF)-based networks represent a hallmark of cancer. We report here a novel c-Myc/miR-23b/Sp1 feed-forward loop with a critical role in multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) cell growth and survival. We have found miR-23b to be downregulated in MM and WM cells especially in the presence of components of the tumor bone marrow milieu. Promoter methylation is one mechanism of miR-23b suppression in myeloma. In gain-of-function studies using miR-23b mimics-transfected or in miR-23b-stably expressing MM and WM cell lines, we observed a significant decrease in cell proliferation and survival, along with induction of caspase-3/7 activity over time, thus supporting a tumor suppressor role for miR-23b. At the molecular level, miR-23b targeted Sp1 3'UTR and significantly reduced Sp1-driven nuclear factor-κB activity. Finally, c-Myc, an important oncogenic transcription factor known to stimulate MM cell proliferation, transcriptionally repressed miR-23b. Thus MYC-dependent miR-23b repression in myeloma cells may promote activation of oncogenic Sp1-mediated signaling, representing the first feed-forward loop with critical growth and survival role in myeloma.

  17. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Prateek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete assembled genome sequence of wheat is not yet available. Therefore, model plant systems for wheat are very valuable. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits. Studies of WRKY transcription factors in Brachypodium and wheat therefore promise to lead to new strategies for wheat improvement. Results We have identified and manually curated the WRKY transcription factor family from Brachypodium using a pipeline designed to identify all potential WRKY genes. 86 WRKY transcription factors were found, a total higher than all other current databases. We therefore propose that our numbering system (BdWRKY1-BdWRKY86 becomes the standard nomenclature. In the JGI v1.0 assembly of Brachypodium with the MIPS/JGI v1.0 annotation, nine of the transcription factors have no gene model and eleven gene models are probably incorrectly predicted. In total, twenty WRKY transcription factors (23.3% do not appear to have accurate gene models. To facilitate use of our data, we have produced The Database of Brachypodium distachyon WRKY Transcription Factors. Each WRKY transcription factor has a gene page that includes predicted protein domains from MEME analyses. These conserved protein domains reflect possible input and output domains in signaling. The database also contains a BLAST search function where a large dataset of WRKY transcription factors, published genes, and an extensive set of wheat ESTs can be searched. We also produced a phylogram containing the WRKY transcription factor families from Brachypodium, rice, Arabidopsis, soybean, and Physcomitrella patens, together with published WRKY transcription factors from wheat. This phylogenetic tree provides evidence for orthologues, co-orthologues, and paralogues of Brachypodium WRKY transcription factors

  18. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Langum, Tanner J; Boken, Ashley K; Rushton, Deena L; Boomsma, Darius D; Rinerson, Charles I; Rabara, Jennifer; Reese, R Neil; Chen, Xianfeng; Rohila, Jai S; Rushton, Paul J

    2012-06-22

    A complete assembled genome sequence of wheat is not yet available. Therefore, model plant systems for wheat are very valuable. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits. Studies of WRKY transcription factors in Brachypodium and wheat therefore promise to lead to new strategies for wheat improvement. We have identified and manually curated the WRKY transcription factor family from Brachypodium using a pipeline designed to identify all potential WRKY genes. 86 WRKY transcription factors were found, a total higher than all other current databases. We therefore propose that our numbering system (BdWRKY1-BdWRKY86) becomes the standard nomenclature. In the JGI v1.0 assembly of Brachypodium with the MIPS/JGI v1.0 annotation, nine of the transcription factors have no gene model and eleven gene models are probably incorrectly predicted. In total, twenty WRKY transcription factors (23.3%) do not appear to have accurate gene models. To facilitate use of our data, we have produced The Database of Brachypodium distachyon WRKY Transcription Factors. Each WRKY transcription factor has a gene page that includes predicted protein domains from MEME analyses. These conserved protein domains reflect possible input and output domains in signaling. The database also contains a BLAST search function where a large dataset of WRKY transcription factors, published genes, and an extensive set of wheat ESTs can be searched. We also produced a phylogram containing the WRKY transcription factor families from Brachypodium, rice, Arabidopsis, soybean, and Physcomitrella patens, together with published WRKY transcription factors from wheat. This phylogenetic tree provides evidence for orthologues, co-orthologues, and paralogues of Brachypodium WRKY transcription factors. The description of the WRKY transcription factor

  19. Sp1 is essential for p16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts during senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: p16(INK4a tumor suppressor protein has been widely proposed to mediate entrance of the cells into the senescent stage. Promoter of p16(INK4a gene contains at least five putative GC boxes, named GC-I to V, respectively. Our previous data showed that a potential Sp1 binding site, within the promoter region from -466 to -451, acts as a positive transcription regulatory element. These results led us to examine how Sp1 and/or Sp3 act on these GC boxes during aging in cultured human diploid fibroblasts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mutagenesis studies revealed that GC-I, II and IV, especially GC-II, are essential for p16(INK4a gene expression in senescent cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that both Sp1 and Sp3 bind to these elements and the binding activity is enhanced in senescent cells. Ectopic overexpression of Sp1, but not Sp3, induced the transcription of p16(INK4a. Both Sp1 RNAi and Mithramycin, a DNA intercalating agent that interferes with Sp1 and Sp3 binding activities, reduced p16(INK4a gene expression. In addition, the enhanced binding of Sp1 to p16(INK4a promoter during cellular senescence appeared to be the result of increased Sp1 binding affinity, not an alteration in Sp1 protein level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All these results suggest that GC- II is the key site for Sp1 binding and increase of Sp1 binding activity rather than protein levels contributes to the induction of p16(INK4a expression during cell aging.

  20. Pioneering barren land: mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro

    2013-02-25

    Genome condensation during mitosis presents a chromatin landscape largely inaccessible to RNA polymerase II and most transcription factors. Caravaca et al. (2013) now report in Genes and Development that the pioneer transcription factor FOXA1 is retained at mitotic chromosomes, bookmarking the genome to enable gene expression reestablishment upon mitotic exit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  2. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  3. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  4. Regulation of the Ets transcription factor Tel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roukens, Mark Guido

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we report novel studies on the molecular regulation of the transcriptional repressor Tel (Translocation Ets Leukemia). The work in this thesis is presented as follows: Chapter 1 is an introduction which summarizes the literature about Tel and its Drosophila orthologue Yan as it was

  5. Emerging roles for MEF2 transcription factors in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, A J; Cole, C J; Josselyn, S A

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, transcription factors are critical for linking external stimuli to protein production, enabling neurons and neuronal networks to adapt to the ever-changing landscape. Gene transcription and protein synthesis are also vital for the formation of long-term memory. Members of the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors have a well-characterized role in the development of a variety of tissues, but their role in the adult brain is only beginning to be understood. Recent evidence indicates that MEF2 regulates the structural and synaptic plasticity underlying memory formation. However, in stark contrast to most other transcription factors implicated in memory, MEF2-mediated transcription constrains (rather than promotes) memory formation. Here, we review recent data examining the role of MEF2 in adult memory formation in rodents. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  6. Curcumin and synthetic analogs induce reactive oxygen species and decreases specificity protein (Sp transcription factors by targeting microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhy Shruti U

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines, and studies in this laboratory in bladder and pancreatic cancer cells show that curcumin downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of curcumin and several synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of curcumin and synthetic analogs on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using standardized assays. The changes in Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analysed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a, miR-20a, miR-17-5p and ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 mRNA expression. Results The IC50 (half-maximal values for growth inhibition (24 hr of colon cancer cells by curcumin and synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs of curcumin varied from 10 μM for curcumin to 0.7 μM for the most active synthetic piperidine analog RL197, which was used along with curcumin as model agents in this study. Curcumin and RL197 inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET, survivin, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and NFκB (p65 and p50. Curcumin and RL197 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS, and cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione significantly attenuated curcumin- and RL197-induced growth inhibition and downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes. The mechanism of curcumin-/RL197-induced repression of Sp transcription factors was ROS-dependent and due to induction of the Sp repressors ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 and downregulation of microRNAs (miR-27a, miR-20a and miR-17-5p that regulate these repressors

  7. GATA family transcriptional factors: emerging suspects in hematologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Juehua; Chen, Yi-Hua; Peterson, LoAnn C

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors are zinc finger DNA binding proteins that regulate transcription during development and cell differentiation. The three important GATA transcription factors GATA1, GATA2 and GATA3 play essential roles in the development and maintenance of hematopoietic systems. GATA1 is required for the erythroid and megakaryocytic commitment during hematopoiesis. GATA2 is crucial for the proliferation and survival of early hematopoietic cells, and is also involved in lineage specific transcriptional regulation as the dynamic partner of GATA1. GATA3 plays an essential role in T lymphoid cell development and immune regulation. As a result, mutations in genes encoding the GATA transcription factors or alteration in the protein expression level or their function have been linked to a variety of human hematologic disorders. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge regarding the disrupted biologic function of GATA in various hematologic disorders.

  8. The pluripotency transcription factor network at work in reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotency-associated transcription factors possess a pivotal role to maintain pluripotency in pluripotent stem cells as well as to induce pluripotency in somatic cells. They direct specific pattern of gene expression from the genome by co-operating with the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Recent findings revealed that these mechanisms possess unique features in pluripotent stem cells, which is different from that in somatic cells either qualitatively and quantitatively. To reprogram somatic cells, pluripotency-associated transcription factors should modulate the co-operating machineries to establish the optimal environment for their function to maintain pluripotency-associated transcription factor network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Maintenance of Transcription-Translation Coupling by Elongation Factor P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Elgamal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of tight coupling between translation and transcription, the ribosome enables synthesis of full-length mRNAs by preventing both formation of intrinsic terminator hairpins and loading of the transcription termination factor Rho. While previous studies have focused on transcription factors, we investigated the role of Escherichia coli elongation factor P (EF-P, an elongation factor required for efficient translation of mRNAs containing consecutive proline codons, in maintaining coupled translation and transcription. In the absence of EF-P, the presence of Rho utilization (rut sites led to an ~30-fold decrease in translation of polyproline-encoding mRNAs. Coexpression of the Rho inhibitor Psu fully restored translation. EF-P was also shown to inhibit premature termination during synthesis and translation of mRNAs encoding intrinsic terminators. The effects of EF-P loss on expression of polyproline mRNAs were augmented by a substitution in RNA polymerase that accelerates transcription. Analyses of previously reported ribosome profiling and global proteomic data identified several candidate gene clusters where EF-P could act to prevent premature transcription termination. In vivo probing allowed detection of some predicted premature termination products in the absence of EF-P. Our findings support a model in which EF-P maintains coupling of translation and transcription by decreasing ribosome stalling at polyproline motifs. Other regulators that facilitate ribosome translocation through roadblocks to prevent premature transcription termination upon uncoupling remain to be identified.

  10. Chromatin Kinases Act on Transcription Factors and Histone Tails in Regulation of Inducible Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefowicz, Steven Z; Shimada, Miho; Armache, Anja; Li, Charles H; Miller, Rand M; Lin, Shu; Yang, Aerin; Dill, Brian D; Molina, Henrik; Park, Hee-Sung; Garcia, Benjamin A; Taunton, Jack; Roeder, Robert G; Allis, C David

    2016-10-20

    The inflammatory response requires coordinated activation of both transcription factors and chromatin to induce transcription for defense against pathogens and environmental insults. We sought to elucidate the connections between inflammatory signaling pathways and chromatin through genomic footprinting of kinase activity and unbiased identification of prominent histone phosphorylation events. We identified H3 serine 28 phosphorylation (H3S28ph) as the principal stimulation-dependent histone modification and observed its enrichment at induced genes in mouse macrophages stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we identified mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MSKs) as primary mediators of H3S28ph in macrophages. Cell-free transcription assays demonstrated that H3S28ph directly promotes p300/CBP-dependent transcription. Further, MSKs can activate both signal-responsive transcription factors and the chromatin template with additive effects on transcription. Specific inhibition of MSKs in macrophages selectively reduced transcription of stimulation-induced genes. Our results suggest that MSKs incorporate upstream signaling inputs and control multiple downstream regulators of inducible transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptional Control of Synaptic Plasticity by Transcription Factor NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Christian; Haenold, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors is required for the induction of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. All components of this signaling pathway are localized at synapses, and transcriptionally active NF-κB dimers move to the nucleus to translate synaptic signals into altered gene expression. Neuron-specific inhibition results in altered connectivity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses and functionally in selective learning deficits. Recent research on transgenic mice with impaired or hyperactivated NF-κB gave important insights into plasticity-related target gene expression that is regulated by NF-κB. In this minireview, we update the available data on the role of this transcription factor for learning and memory formation and comment on cross-sectional activation of NF-κB in the aged and diseased brain that may directly or indirectly affect κB-dependent transcription of synaptic genes. PMID:26881128

  12. Regulation of transcription initiation by Gfh factors from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Aleksei; Esyunina, Daria; Pupov, Danil; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Transcription factors of the Gre family bind within the secondary channel of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) directly modulating its catalytic activities. Universally conserved Gre factors activate RNA cleavage by RNAP, by chelating catalytic metal ions in the RNAP active site, and facilitate both promoter escape and transcription elongation. Gfh factors are Deinococcus/Thermus-specific homologues of Gre factors whose transcription functions remain poorly understood. Recently, we found that Gfh1 and Gfh2 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans dramatically stimulate RNAP pausing during transcription elongation in the presence of Mn(2+), but not Mg(2+), ions. In contrast, we show that Gfh1 and Gfh2 moderately inhibit transcription initiation in the presence of either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. By using a molecular beacon assay, we demonstrate that Gfh1 and Gfh2 do not significantly change promoter complex stability or the rate of promoter escape by D. radiodurans RNAP. At the same time, Gfh factors significantly increase the apparent KM value for the 5'-initiating nucleotide, without having major effects on the affinity of metal ions for the RNAP active site. Similar inhibitory effects of Gfh factors are observed for transcription initiation on promoters recognized by the principal and an alternative σ factor. In summary, our data suggest that D. radiodurans Gfh factors impair the binding of initiating substrates independently of the metal ions bound in the RNAP active site, but have only mild overall effects on transcription initiation. Thus the mechanisms of modulation of RNAP activity by these factors are different for various steps of transcription. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Ab initio prediction of transcription factor targets using structural knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches for identification and detection of transcription factor binding sites rely on an extensive set of known target genes. Here we describe a novel structure-based approach applicable to transcription factors with no prior binding data. Our approach combines sequence data and structural information to infer context-specific amino acid-nucleotide recognition preferences. These are used to predict binding sites for novel transcription factors from the same structural family. We demonstrate our approach on the Cys(2His(2 Zinc Finger protein family, and show that the learned DNA-recognition preferences are compatible with experimental results. We use these preferences to perform a genome-wide scan for direct targets of Drosophila melanogaster Cys(2His(2 transcription factors. By analyzing the predicted targets along with gene annotation and expression data we infer the function and activity of these proteins.

  14. The Arabidopsis Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriela Toledo-Ortiz; Enamul Huq; Peter H. Quail

    2003-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that bind as dimers to specific DNA target sites and that have been well characterized in nonplant eukaryotes as important regulatory components...

  15. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  16. TrSDB: a proteome database of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Antoni; Aguilar, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Querol, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    TrSDB—TranScout Database—(http://ibb.uab.es/trsdb) is a proteome database of eukaryotic transcription factors based upon predicted motifs by TranScout and data sources such as InterPro and Gene Ontology Annotation. Nine eukaryotic proteomes are included in the current version. Extensive and diverse information for each database entry, different analyses considering TranScout classification and similarity relationships are offered for research on transcription factors or gene expression. PMID:14681387

  17. MiR-22/Sp-1 Links Estrogens With the Up-Regulation of Cystathionine γ-Lyase in Myocardium, Which Contributes to Estrogenic Cardioprotection Against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Tang, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Cong, Bing-Hai; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Li, Xiao-Han; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Ni, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, generated in the myocardium predominantly via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), is cardioprotective. Our previous study has shown that estrogens enhance CSE expression in myocardium of female rats. The present study aims to explore the mechanisms by which estrogens regulate CSE expression, in particular to clarify the role of estrogen receptor subtypes and the transcriptional factor responsible for the estrogenic effects. We found that either the CSE inhibitor or the CSE small interfering RNA attenuated the protective effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) against H2O2- and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in primary cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. E2 stimulates CSE expression via estrogen receptor (ER)-α both in cultured cardiomyocytes in vitro and in the myocardium of female mice in vivo. A specificity protein-1 (Sp-1) consensus site was identified in the rat CSE promoter and was found to mediate the E2-induced CSE expression. E2 increases ERα and Sp-1 and inhibits microRNA (miR)-22 expression in myocardium of ovariectomized rats. In primary cardiomyocytes, E2 stimulates Sp-1 expression through the ERα-mediated down-regulation of miR-22. It was confirmed that both ERα and Sp-1 were targeted by miR-22. In the myocardium of ovariectomized rats, the level of miR-22 inversely correlated to CSE, ERα, Sp-1, and antioxidant biomarkers and positively correlated to oxidative biomarkers. In summary, this study demonstrates that estrogens stimulate Sp-1 through the ERα-mediated down-regulation of miR-22 in cardiomyocytes, leading to the up-regulation of CSE, which in turn results in an increase of antioxidative defense. Interaction of ERα, miR-22, and Sp-1 may play a critical role in the control of oxidative stress status in the myocardium of female rats.

  18. Betulinic acid inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and induces proteasome-dependent and -independent downregulation of specificity proteins (Sp transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathi Satya

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betulinic acid (BA inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines and tumors and the effects of BA have been attributed to its mitochondriotoxicity and inhibition of multiple pro-oncogenic factors. Previous studies show that BA induces proteasome-dependent degradation of specificity protein (Sp transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in prostate cancer cells and this study focused on the mechanism of action of BA in colon cancer cells. Methods The effects of BA on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo were determined using standardized assays. The effects of BA on Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analyzed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a and ZBTB10 mRNA expression. Results BA inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in RKO and SW480 colon cancer cells and inhibited tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing RKO cells as xenograft. BA also decreased expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors which are overexpressed in colon cancer cells and decreased levels of several Sp-regulated genes including survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor, p65 sub-unit of NFκB, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1, and pituitary tumor transforming gene-1. The mechanism of action of BA was dependent on cell context, since BA induced proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in SW480 and RKO cells, respectively. In RKO cells, the mechanism of BA-induced repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, ROS-mediated repression of microRNA-27a, and induction of the Sp repressor gene ZBTB10. Conclusions These results suggest that the anticancer activity of BA in colon cancer cells is due, in part, to downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors; however, the mechanism of this response is cell context-dependent.

  19. Mineralocorticoid receptor interaction with SP1 generates a new response element for pathophysiologically relevant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Sandra; Ruhs, Stefanie; Schumann, Katja; Strätz, Nicole; Trenkmann, Kay; Schreier, Barbara; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-induced transcription factor belonging to the steroid receptor family and involved in water-electrolyte homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and fibrosis in the renocardiovascular system. The MR shares a common hormone-response-element with the glucocorticoid receptor but nevertheless elicits MR-specific effects including enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression via unknown mechanisms. The EGFR is a receptor tyrosine kinase that leads to activation of MAP kinases, but that can also function as a signal transducer for other signaling pathways. In the present study, we mechanistically investigate the interaction between a newly discovered MR- but not glucocorticoid receptor- responsive-element (=MRE1) of the EGFR promoter, specificity protein 1 (SP1) and MR to gain general insights into MR-specificity. Biological relevance of the interaction for EGFR expression and consequently for different signaling pathways in general is demonstrated in human, rat and murine vascular smooth muscle cells and cells of EGFR knockout mice. A genome-wide promoter search for identical binding regions followed by quantitative PCR validation suggests that the identified MR-SP1-MRE1 interaction might be applicable to other genes. Overall, a novel principle of MR-specific gene expression is explored that applies to the pathophysiologically relevant expression of the EGFR and potentially also to other genes.

  20. Cellular Transcription Factor YY1 Mediates the Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) IE62 Transcriptional Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Sommer, Marvin; Arvin, Ann; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Several cellular transcription factors have been shown to be involved in IE62-mediated activation. The YY1 cellular transcription factor has activating and repressive effects on gene transcription. Analysis of the VZV genome revealed 19 postulated YY1 binding sites located within putative promoters of 16 VZV genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) confirmed the binding of YY1 to ORF10, ORF28/29 and gI promoters and the mutation of these binding sites inhibited YY1 binding and the promoter activation by IE62 alone or following VZV infection. Mutation of the ORF28/29 YY1 site in the VZV genome displayed insignificant influence on virus growth in melanoma cells; but it inhibited the virus replication significantly at day 5 and 6 post infection in HELF cells. This work suggests a novel role for the cellular factor YY1 in VZV replication through the mediation of IE62 activation of viral gene expression. PMID:24418559

  1. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Ulf; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2011-01-01

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/.

  2. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  3. Prevalence of transcription factors in ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, Richard B; Zhou, M.; Ohm, Robin A; Leeggangers, Hendrika A C F; Visser, Loek; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene regulation underlies fungal physiology and therefore is a major factor in fungal biodiversity. Analysis of genome sequences has revealed a large number of putative transcription factors in most fungal genomes. The presence of fungal orthologs for individual regulators has been

  4. Prevalence of transcription factors in ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, Richard B.; Zhou, Miaomiao; Ohm, Robin A.; Leeggangers, Melissa; Visser, Loek; Vries, De Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulation underlies fungal physiology and therefore is a major factor in fungal biodiversity. Analysis of genome sequences has revealed a large number of putative transcription factors in most fungal genomes. The presence of fungal orthologs for individual regulators has been analysed and

  5. TIPT2 and geminin interact with basal transcription factors to synergize in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitulescu Mara E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The re-replication inhibitor Geminin binds to several transcription factors including homeodomain proteins, and to members of the polycomb and the SWI/SNF complexes. Results Here we describe the TATA-binding protein-like factor-interacting protein (TIPT isoform 2, as a strong binding partner of Geminin. TIPT2 is widely expressed in mouse embryonic and adult tissues, residing both in cyto- and nucleoplasma, and enriched in the nucleolus. Like Geminin, also TIPT2 interacts with several polycomb factors, with the general transcription factor TBP (TATA box binding protein, and with the related protein TBPL1 (TRF2. TIPT2 synergizes with geminin and TBP in the activation of TATA box-containing promoters, and with TBPL1 and geminin in the activation of the TATA-less NF1 promoter. Geminin and TIPT2 were detected in the chromatin near TBP/TBPL1 binding sites. Conclusion Together, our study introduces a novel transcriptional regulator and its function in cooperation with chromatin associated factors and the basal transcription machinery.

  6. Induction of human neuronal cells by defined transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Yang, Nan; Vierbuchen, Thomas; Ostermeier, Austin; Fuentes, Daniel R.; Yang, Troy Q.; Citri, Ami; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Marro, Samuele; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wernig, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Summary Somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, or expression of lineage-specific factors have been shown to induce cell-fate changes in diverse somatic cell types1–12. We recently observed that forced expression of a combination of three transcription factors, Brn2 (also known as Pou3f2), Ascl1, and Myt1l can efficiently convert mouse fibroblasts into functional induced neuronal (iN) cells13. Here, we show that the same three factors can generate functional neurons from human pluripotent stem cells as early as 6 days after transgene activation. When combined with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1, these factors could also convert fetal and postnatal human fibroblasts into iN cells displaying typical neuronal morphologies and expressing multiple neuronal markers, even after downregulation of the exogenous transcription factors. Importantly, the vast majority of human iN cells were able to generate action potentials and many matured to receive synaptic contacts when co-cultured with primary mouse cortical neurons. Our data demonstrate that non-neural human somatic cells, as well as pluripotent stem cells, can be directly converted into neurons by lineage-determining transcription factors. These methods may facilitate robust generation of patient-specific human neurons for in vitro disease modeling or future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:21617644

  7. A Transcription Factor Pulse Can Prime Chromatin for Heritable Transcriptional Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iberg-Badeaux, Aimee; Collombet, Samuel; Laurent, Benoit; van Oevelen, Chris; Chin, Kuo-Kai; Thieffry, Denis; Graf, Thomas; Shi, Yang

    2017-02-15

    Short-term and long-term transcriptional memory is the phenomenon whereby the kinetics or magnitude of gene induction is enhanced following a prior induction period. Short-term memory persists within one cell generation or in postmitotic cells, while long-term memory can survive multiple rounds of cell division. We have developed a tissue culture model to study the epigenetic basis for long-term transcriptional memory (LTTM) and subsequently used this model to better understand the epigenetic mechanisms that enable heritable memory of temporary stimuli. We find that a pulse of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) induces LTTM on a subset of target genes that survives nine cell divisions. The chromatin landscape at genes that acquire LTTM is more repressed than at those genes that do not exhibit memory, akin to a latent state. We show through chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and chemical inhibitor studies that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation is important for establishing memory in this model but that Pol II itself is not retained as part of the memory mechanism. More generally, our work reveals that a transcription factor involved in lineage specification can induce LTTM and that failure to rerepress chromatin is one epigenetic mechanism underlying transcriptional memory. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. The Transcription Factor THO Promotes Transcription Initiation and Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinfeng; French, Sarah L; Beyer, Ann L; Schneider, David A

    2016-02-05

    Although ribosomal RNA represents the majority of cellular RNA, and ribosome synthesis is closely connected to cell growth and proliferation rates, a complete understanding of the factors that influence transcription of ribosomal DNA is lacking. Here, we show that the THO complex positively affects transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). We found that THO physically associates with the rDNA repeat and interacts genetically with Pol I transcription initiation factors. Pol I transcription in hpr1 or tho2 null mutants is dramatically reduced to less than 20% of the WT level. Pol I occupancy of the coding region of the rDNA in THO mutants is decreased to ~50% of WT level. Furthermore, although the percentage of active rDNA repeats remains unaffected in the mutant cells, the overall rDNA copy number increases ~2-fold compared with WT. Together, these data show that perturbation of THO function impairs transcription initiation and elongation by Pol I, identifying a new cellular target for the conserved THO complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Dissecting teleost B cell differentiation using transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwollo, Patty

    2011-09-01

    B cell developmental pathways in teleost fishes are poorly understood. In the absence of serological reagents, an alternative approach to dissecting teleost B cell development is to use transcription factors that are differentially expressed during B cell development. This review discusses the structure and function of six transcription factors that play essential roles during teleost B cell development: Ikaros, E2A, EBF, Pax5, Blimp1, and XbpI. Research on alternative splicing of both the Ikaros and Pax5 genes in rainbow trout is presented, including their functional significance. An application is discussed that should aid in elucidating teleost B cell development and activation, by using transcription factors as developmental markers in flow cytometric analysis. Possible future studies in teleost B cell development are suggested in the context of gene regulation. Lastly, broader impacts and practical applications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. FOXO Transcriptional Factors and Long-Term Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several pathologies such as neurodegeneration and cancer are associated with aging, which is affected by many genetic and environmental factors. Healthy aging conceives human longevity, possibly due to carrying the defensive genes. For instance, FOXO (forkhead box O genes determine human longevity. FOXO transcription factors are involved in the regulation of longevity phenomenon via insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling. Only one FOXO gene (FOXO DAF-16 exists in invertebrates, while four FOXO genes, that is, FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4, and FOXO6 are found in mammals. These four transcription factors are involved in the multiple cellular pathways, which regulate growth, stress resistance, metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis in mammals. However, the accurate mode of longevity by FOXO factors is unclear until now. This article describes briefly the existing knowledge that is related to the role of FOXO factors in human longevity.

  11. OCTAMER-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: GENOMICS AND FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The Octamer-binding proteins (Oct) are a group of highly conserved transcription factors that specifically bind to the octamer motif (ATGCAAAT) and closely related sequences that are found in promoters and enhancers of a wide variety of both ubiquitously expressed and cell type-specific genes. Oct factors belong to the larger family of POU domain factors that are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved bipartite DNA binding domain, consisting of an amino-terminal specific subdomai...

  12. Differential regulation of TGA transcription factors by post-transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Dominique; Privat, Isabelle; Trifa, Youssef; Zhou, Jun-Ma; Klessig, Daniel F; Lam, Eric

    2002-12-01

    Transcription factors often belong to multigene families and their individual contribution in a particular regulatory network remains difficult to assess. We show here that specific members from a family of conserved Arabidopsis bZIP transcription factors, the TGA proteins, are regulated in their protein stability by developmental stage-specific proteolysis. Using GFP fusions of three different Arabidopsis TGA factors that represent members of distinct subclasses of the TGA factor family, we demonstrate that two of these TGA proteins are specifically targeted for proteolysis in mature leaf cells. Using a supershift gel mobility assay, we found evidence for similar regulation of the cognate proteins as compared to the GFP fusion proteins expressed under the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Using various inhibitors, we showed that the expression of at least one of these three TGA factors could be stabilized by inhibition of proteasome-mediated proteolysis. This study indicates that TGA transcription factors may be regulated by distinct pathways of targeted proteolysis that can serve to modulate the contribution of specific members of a multigene family in complex regulatory pathways.

  13. Bioinformatic landscapes for plant transcription factor system research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun; Lu, Wenjie; Deng, Dexiang

    2016-02-01

    Diverse bioinformatic resources have been developed for plant transcription factor (TF) research. This review presents the bioinformatic resources and methodologies for the elucidation of plant TF-mediated biological events. Such information is helpful to dissect the transcriptional regulatory systems in the three reference plants Arabidopsis , rice, and maize and translation to other plants. Transcription factors (TFs) orchestrate diverse biological programs by the modulation of spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression via binding cis-regulatory elements. Advanced sequencing platforms accompanied by emerging bioinformatic tools revolutionize the scope and extent of TF research. The system-level integration of bioinformatic resources is beneficial to the decoding of TF-involved networks. Herein, we first briefly introduce general and specialized databases for TF research in three reference plants Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. Then, as proof of concept, we identified and characterized heat shock transcription factor (HSF) members through the TF databases. Finally, we present how the integration of bioinformatic resources at -omics layers can aid the dissection of TF-mediated pathways. We also suggest ways forward to improve the bioinformatic resources of plant TFs. Leveraging these bioinformatic resources and methodologies opens new avenues for the elucidation of transcriptional regulatory systems in the three model systems and translation to other plants.

  14. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  15. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  16. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MicroRNA and transcription factor mediated regulatory network analysis reveals critical regulators and regulatory modules in myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangde Zhang

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI is a severe coronary artery disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of MI have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we compiled MI-related genes, MI-related microRNAs (miRNAs and known human transcription factors (TFs, and we then identified 1,232 feed-forward loops (FFLs among these miRNAs, TFs and their co-regulated target genes through integrating target prediction. By merging these FFLs, the first miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network for MI was constructed, from which four regulators (SP1, ESR1, miR-21-5p and miR-155-5p and three regulatory modules that might play crucial roles in MI were then identified. Furthermore, based on the miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network and literature survey, we proposed a pathway model for miR-21-5p, the miR-29 family and SP1 to demonstrate their potential co-regulatory mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The majority of the regulatory relations in the model were confirmed by previous studies, which demonstrated the reliability and validity of this miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network. Our study will aid in deciphering the complex regulatory mechanisms involved in MI and provide putative therapeutic targets for MI.

  18. The role of WRKY transcription factors in plant abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ligang; Song, Yu; Li, Shujia; Zhang, Liping; Zou, Changsong; Yu, Diqiu

    2012-02-01

    The WRKY gene family has been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. Modification of the expression patterns of WRKY genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. Furthermore, a single WRKY gene often responds to several stress factors, and then their proteins may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. WRKY proteins also function via protein-protein interaction and autoregulation or cross-regulation is extensively recorded among WRKY genes, which help us understand the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by WRKY proteins. Here, we review recent progress made in starting to reveal the role of WRKY transcription factors in plant abiotic stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo phosphorylation of WRKY transcription factor by MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Nobuaki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Plants activate signaling networks in response to diverse pathogen-derived signals, facilitating transcriptional reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. Identification of phosphorylation targets of MAPK and in vivo detection of the phosphorylated substrates are important processes to elucidate the signaling pathway in plant immune responses. We have identified a WRKY transcription factor, which is phosphorylated by defense-related MAPKs, SIPK and WIPK. Recent evidence demonstrated that some group I WRKY transcription factors, which contain a conserved motif in the N-terminal region, are activated by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation. In this chapter, we describe protocols for preparation of anti-phosphopeptide antibodies, detection of activated MAPKs using anti-phospho-MAPK antibody, and activated WRKY using anti-phospho-WRKY antibody, respectively.

  20. Sp1 upregulates expression of TRF2 and TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Ruizhe; Wang, Qi; Gao, Yabo; Qi, Xiaoguang; Jiang, He; Yao, Jingjing; Lin, Xiaolin; Wu, Yunlin; Wang, Lifu

    2009-11-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a key role in the protective activity of telomere and is overexpression in several kinds of solid cancer cells. However, the role of overexpressed TRF2 in colorectal carcinoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TRF2, address the mechanism of TRF2 overexpression in human colorectal carcinoma. In present study, we examined the expression of TRF2 in colorectal cancer tissues from 39 patients, peritumoral normal tissues from 21 patients, and colon carcinoma SW480 cell line by quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression in SW480, tumorigenesis of TRF2 was tested by cell proliferation, soft agar assay, cytofluorimetric analysis and cytogenetic analysis. To discover transcription factor that mediated TRF2 expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (Chip) Assay and Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were employed. Overexpression of TRF2 protein was detected in SW480 cells and 19 of 39 colorectal carcinoma tissues (49%), no overexpression was observed in 21 of 21 adjacent peritumoral normal colorectal tissues. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression, the proliferation and colony formation of SW480 cells were significantly inhibited. Defective TRF2 induced apoptosis and increased chromosomal instability in SW480 cells, in which there were more end-to-end fusions and ring chromosomes. Chip assay and EMSA showed that transcription factor Sp1 is involved in upregulation of TRF2. These results indicate that TRF2 is overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma, Sp1 upregulates TRF2 expression, TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, which suggests that TRF2 and SP1 may become new targets for the development of anti-cancer therapy in colorectal carcinoma.

  1. The Role of WRKY Transcription Factors in Plant Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shree P. Pandey; Imre E. Somssich

    2009-01-01

    ... variable environments, is mainly achieved by enforcement of a network of various transcription factors (TFs). WRKY TFs are a large family of regulatory proteins forming such a network (Eulgem and Somssich, 2007). They are involved in various plant processes but most notably in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. In this update, we will re...

  2. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs. Sourav Ghosh, Satish Sati, Shantanu Sengupta and Vinod Scaria. J. Genet. 94, 17–25. Gencode V9 lncRNA gene : 11004. Known lncRNA : 1175. Novel lncRNA : 5898. Putative lncRNA :.

  3. Transcription factor profiling unveils the oncogenes involved in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T cell lymphomas ... Figure 1. Schematic representation of the different steps of signal ... potential. Wild type oncogenes that function normally in contrast to ... transduction, these include growth factor receptors (e.g. .... This leads to the formation of DNA/transcription.

  4. Development of a Transcription Factor-Based Lactam Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Barajas, Jesus F.; Burdu, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    a chemoinformatic approach inspired by small molecule drug discovery. We define this approach as analogue generation toward catabolizable chemicals or AGTC. We discovered a lactam biosensor based on the ChnR/Pb transcription factor-promoter pair. The microbial biosensor is capable of sensing ε-caprolactam, Î...

  5. GATA family of transcription factors of vertebrates: phylogenetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    Wuhan 430072, P R China. *Corresponding authors (Fax, 86-27-68756253; Email, rjzhou@whu.edu.cn, hhcheng@whu.edu.cn). GATA genes are an evolutionarily conserved family, which encode a group of important transcription factors involved in the regulation of diverse processes including the development of the heart ...

  6. Expression analysis of OsbZIP transcription factors in resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2013-08-21

    Aug 21, 2013 ... abiotic stresses. Resistance response mediated by the rice blast resistance gene Pi36 is a typical signal transduction, in which 12 OsbZIP genes were differentially ... Key words: OsbZIP transcription factors, rice blast, resistance response, plant hormones stresses. ..... Crosstalk between abiotic and biotic.

  7. Control of cellulose biosynthesis by overexpression of a transcription factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Kim; , Joo-Yeol

    2017-05-16

    The invention relates to the over-expression of a transcription factor selected from the group consisting of MYB46, HAM1, HAM2, MYB112, WRKY11, ERF6, and any combination thereof in a plant, which can modulate and thereby modulating the cellulose content of the plant.

  8. Transcriptional factor influence on OTA production and the quelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the influence of some transcriptional factors on ochratoxin A production as well as investigates the quelling attributes of some designed siRNA on the OTA producing Aspergillus section Nigri using standard recommended techniques. Results obtained following comparison of the pks gene promoter ...

  9. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs. [Ghosh S., Sati S., Sengupta S. and Scaria V. 2015 Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs. J. Genet.

  10. The WRKY transcription factor family and senescence in switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Early aerial senescence in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can significantly limit biomass yields. WRKY transcription factors that can regulate senescence could be used to reprogram senescence and enhance biomass yields. Methods: All potential WRKY genes present in the version 1.0 of the...

  11. Cloning and characterization of a putative transcription factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... The ABA-controlled process is vital for plant survival. At present, certain cellular and ... et al., 1998; Eferl et al., 1999). C/EBP family of. bZIP transcription factors control the proliferation and .... al., 1999) using a biolistic PDS-1000/HeTM particle gun (Bio-Rad). After incubation for 18 - 24 h, fluorescence ...

  12. WRKY transcription factor superfamily: Structure, origin and functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    terminal ends contain the WRKYGQR amino acid sequence and a zinc-finger motif. WRKY transcription factors can regulate the expression of target genes that contain the W-box elements (C/T)TGAC(C/T) in the promoter regions by specifically ...

  13. Thirty-seven transcription factor genes differentially respond to a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thirty-seven transcription factor genes differentially respond to a harpin protein and affect resistance to the green peach aphid in Arabidopsis. Ruoxue Liu Beibei Lü Xiaomeng Wang Chunling Zhang Shuping Zhang Jun Qian Lei Chen Haojie Shi Hansong Dong. Articles Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 435-450 ...

  14. Analysis of genomic sequence motifs for deciphering transcription factor binding and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eBoeva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation.

  15. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Belibasakis, G N; Emingil, G; Saygan, B; Turkoglu, O; Atilla, G; Bostanci, N

    2011-01-01

    Belibasakis GN, Emingil G, Saygan B, Turkoglu O, Atilla G, Bostanci N. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases. APMIS 2011; 119: 167-172. Periodontitis is a disease of infectious aetiology that causes inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Activated T cells are central to the pathogenesis of the disease, by producing receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) that stimulates bone resorption. Antigenic activation of T cells ...

  16. Distinguishing Direct versus Indirect Transcription Factor-DNA Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    Transcriptional regulation is largely enacted by transcription factors (TFs) binding DNA. Large numbers of TF binding motifs have been revealed by ChIP-chip experiments followed by computational DNA motif discovery. However, the success of motif discovery algorithms has been limited when applied to sequences bound in vivo (such as those identified by ChIP-chip) because the observed TF-DNA interactions are not necessarily direct: some TFs predominantly associate with DNA indirectly through protein partners, while others exhibit both direct and indirect binding.

  17. Role of Transcription Factors in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti ePatodia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Following axotomy, the activation of multiple intracellular signalling cascades causes the expression of a cocktail of regeneration-associated transcription factors which interact with each other and the extracellular environment to determine the fate of the injured neurons. The nerve injury response is channelled through manifold and parallel pathways, integrating diverse inputs and controlling a complex transcriptional output. Transcription factors form a vital link in the chain of regeneration, converting injury-induced stress signals into downstream protein expression via gene regulation. They can regulate the intrinsic ability of axons to grow, by controlling expression of whole cassettes of gene targets. In this review, we have investigated the functional role of a number of different transcription factors – c-jun, ATF3, CREB, STAT3, C/EBP β & δ, Oct-6, Sox11, p53, NFκB, and ELK3 – in peripheral nerve regeneration. Studies involving use of conditional mutants, microarrays, promoter region mapping and different injury paradigms, have enabled us to understand their distinct as well as overlapping roles in achieving functional and anatomical regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

  18. A dynamic mode of mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teves, Sheila S; An, Luye; Hansen, Anders S; Xie, Liangqi; Darzacq, Xavier; Tjian, Robert

    2016-11-19

    During mitosis, transcription is shut off, chromatin condenses, and most transcription factors (TFs) are reported to be excluded from chromosomes. How do daughter cells re-establish the original transcription program? Recent discoveries that a select set of TFs remain bound on mitotic chromosomes suggest a potential mechanism for maintaining transcriptional programs through the cell cycle termed mitotic bookmarking. Here we report instead that many TFs remain associated with chromosomes in mouse embryonic stem cells, and that the exclusion previously described is largely a fixation artifact. In particular, most TFs we tested are significantly enriched on mitotic chromosomes. Studies with Sox2 reveal that this mitotic interaction is more dynamic than in interphase and is facilitated by both DNA binding and nuclear import. Furthermore, this dynamic mode results from lack of transcriptional activation rather than decreased accessibility of underlying DNA sequences in mitosis. The nature of the cross-linking artifact prompts careful re-examination of the role of TFs in mitotic bookmarking.

  19. Artificial transcription factor-mediated regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Niels; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2014-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes with artificial transcription factors (TFs) can offer new tools for plant biotechnology. Three systems are available for mediating site-specific DNA recognition of artificial TFs: those based on zinc fingers, TALEs, and on the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Artificial TFs require an effector domain that controls the frequency of transcription initiation at endogenous target genes. These effector domains can be transcriptional activators or repressors, but can also have enzymatic activities involved in chromatin remodeling or epigenetic regulation. Artificial TFs are able to regulate gene expression in trans, thus allowing them to evoke dominant mutant phenotypes. Large scale changes in transcriptional activity are induced when the DNA binding domain is deliberately designed to have lower binding specificity. This technique, known as genome interrogation, is a powerful tool for generating novel mutant phenotypes. Genome interrogation has clear mechanistic and practical advantages over activation tagging, which is the technique most closely resembling it. Most notably, genome interrogation can lead to the discovery of mutant phenotypes that are unlikely to be found when using more conventional single gene-based approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards resolving the transcription factor network controlling myelin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Debra L; Denarier, Eric; Friedman, Hana C; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Peterson, Alan C

    2011-10-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced from spirally-wrapped oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of inherited or acquired myelin abnormalities in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, it plays a critical role in nervous system function. Myelin sheath production coincides with rapid up-regulation of numerous genes. The complexity of their subsequent expression patterns, along with recently recognized heterogeneity within the oligodendrocyte lineage, suggest that the regulatory networks controlling such genes drive multiple context-specific transcriptional programs. Conferring this nuanced level of control likely involves a large repertoire of interacting transcription factors (TFs). Here, we combined novel strategies of computational sequence analyses with in vivo functional analysis to establish a TF network model of coordinate myelin-associated gene transcription. Notably, the network model captures regulatory DNA elements and TFs known to regulate oligodendrocyte myelin gene transcription and/or oligodendrocyte development, thereby validating our approach. Further, it links to numerous TFs with previously unsuspected roles in CNS myelination and suggests collaborative relationships amongst both known and novel TFs, thus providing deeper insight into the myelin gene transcriptional network.

  1. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  3. p53 inhibits the expression of p125 and the methylation of POLD1 gene promoter by downregulating the Sp1-induced DNMT1 activities in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liang Zhang,1 Weiping Yang,2 Xiao Zhu,1 Changyuan Wei1 1Department of Breast Surgery, 2Department of Ultrasound, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: p125 is one of four subunits of human DNA polymerases – DNA Pol δ as well as one of p53 target protein encoded by POLD1. However, the function and significance of p125 and the role that p53 plays in regulating p125 expression are not fully understood in breast cancer. Tissue sections of human breast cancer obtained from 70 patients whose median age was 47.6 years (range: 38–69 years with stage II–III breast cancer were studied with normal breast tissue from the same patients and two human breast cell lines (MCF-7 and MCF-10A. p53 expression levels were reduced, while p125 protein expression was increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell line detected by Western blot and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The methylation level of the POLD1 gene promoter was greater in breast cancer tissues and cells when compared with normal tissues and cells. In MCF-7 cell model, p53 overexpression caused a decrease in the level of p125 protein, while the methylation level of the p125 gene promoter was also inhibited by p53 overexpression. To further investigate the regulating mechanism of p53 on p125 expression, our study focused on DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and transcription factor Sp1. Both DNMT1 and Sp1 protein expression were reduced when p53 was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. The Sp1 binding site appears to be important for DNMT1 gene transcription; Sp1 and p53 can bind together, which means that DNMT1 gene expression may be downregulated by p53 through binding to Sp1. Because DNMT1 methylation level of the p125 gene promoter can affect p125 gene transcription, we propose that p53 may indirectly regulate p125 gene promoter expression through the control of DNMT1 gene transcription. In

  4. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  5. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D; Goodship, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  6. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  7. Functionally Significant, Rare Transcription Factor Variants in Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R.; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L.; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J.; Eloranta, Jyrki J.; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A. Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D.; Goodship, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods and Results We sequenced the coding, 5′UTR, and 3′UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. Significance This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3–13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease. PMID:25093829

  8. Subgroup-specific intrinsic disorder profiles of arabidopsis NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Emil G.; O'Shea, Charlotte; Skriver, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Protein intrinsic disorder (ID), referring to the lack of a fixed tertiary structure, is significant in signaling and transcription. We recently characterized ID in 6 phylogenetically representative Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factors. Their transcription regulatory domains are mostly...

  9. C-terminal in Sp1-like artificial zinc-finger proteins plays crucial roles in determining their DNA binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baozhen; Xiang, Shengyan; Yin, Yanru; Gu, Liankun; Deng, Dajun

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the C-terminal zinc-finger-3 in transcription factor Sp1 contributes more than the N-terminal zinc-finger-1 in determining Sp1's DNA binding capacity. Sp1-like artificial poly-zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) are powerful biotechnological tools for gene-specific recognization and manipulation. It is important to understand whether the C-terminal fingers in the Sp1-like artificial ZFPs remain crucial for their DNA binding ability. Recently, a set of p16 promoter-specific seven-ZFPs (7ZFPs) has been constructed to reactivate the expression of methylation-silenced p16. These 7ZFPs contain one N-terminal three-zinc-finger domain of Sp1 (3ZF), two Sp1-like two-zinc-finger domains derived from the Sp1 finger-2 and finger-3 (2ZF) in the middle and C-terminal regions. In the present study, sets of variants for several representative 7ZFPs with the p16-binding affinity were further constructed. This was accomplished through finger replacements and key amino acid mutations in the N-terminal fingers, C-terminal fingers, and linker peptide, respectively. Their p16-binding activity was analysed using gel mobility shift assays. Results showed that the motif replacement or a key amino acid mutation (S > R) at position +2 of the α-helix in the C-terminal 2ZF domain completely abolished their p16-binding affinity. Deletion of three amino acids in a consensus linker (TGEKP > TG) between finger-7 and the 6 × Histidine-tag in the C-terminal also dramatically abolished their binding affinity. In contrast, the replacement of the finger-3 in the N-terminal 3ZF domain did not affect their binding affinity, but decreased their binding stability. Altogether, the present study show that the C-terminal region may play crucial roles in determining the DNA binding affinity of Sp1-like artificial ZFPs.

  10. Identification and Transcript Analysis of the TCP Transcription Factors in the Diploid Woodland Strawberry Fragaria vesca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Cui, Meng-Yuan; Han, Yong-Tao; Gao, Kuan; Feng, Jia-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORS (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple processes of plant growth and development. However, no systematic study has been performed in strawberry. In this study, 19 FvTCP genes were identified in the diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) accession Heilongjiang-3. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the FvTCP genes were classified into two main classes, with the second class further divided into two subclasses, which was supported by the exon-intron organizations and the conserved motif structures. Promoter analysis revealed various cis-acting elements related to growth and development, hormone and/or stress responses. We analyzed FvTCP gene transcript accumulation patterns in different tissues and fruit developmental stages. Among them, 12 FvTCP genes exhibited distinct tissue-specific transcript accumulation patterns. Eleven FvTCP genes were down-regulated in different fruit developmental stages, while five FvTCP genes were up-regulated. Transcripts of FvTCP genes also varied with different subcultural propagation periods and were induced by hormone treatments and biotic and abiotic stresses. Subcellular localization analysis showed that six FvTCP-GFP fusion proteins showed distinct localizations in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Notably, transient over-expression of FvTCP9 in strawberry fruits dramatically affected the expression of a series of genes implicated in fruit development and ripening. Taken together, the present study may provide the basis for functional studies to reveal the role of this gene family in strawberry growth and development. PMID:28066489

  11. Transcription factors as readers and effectors of DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heng; Wang, Guohua; Qian, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to decode DNA methylomes at single-base-pair resolution under various physiological conditions. Many aberrant or differentially methylated sites have been discovered, but the mechanisms by which changes in DNA methylation lead to observed phenotypes, such as cancer, remain elusive. The classical view of methylation-mediated protein-DNA interactions is that only proteins with a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) can interact with methylated DNA. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that transcription factors lacking a MBD can also interact with methylated DNA. The identification of these proteins and the elucidation of their characteristics and the biological consequences of methylation-dependent transcription factor-DNA interactions are important stepping stones towards a mechanistic understanding of methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human development and disease. PMID:27479905

  12. Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Blaudin de Thé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of transcription factors, including En1/2, Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, and Pitx3, with key roles in midbrain dopaminergic (mDA neuron development, also regulate adult mDA neuron survival and physiology. Mouse models with targeted disruption of some of these genes display several features reminiscent of Parkinson disease (PD, in particular the selective and progressive loss of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc. The characterization of these animal models has provided valuable insights into various mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Therefore, the dissection of the mechanisms and survival signalling pathways engaged by these transcription factors to protect mDA neuron from degeneration can suggest novel therapeutic strategies. The work on En1/2-mediated neuroprotection also highlights the potential of protein transduction technology for neuroprotective approaches in PD.

  13. Divergence of transcription factor binding sites across related yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Anthony R; Gianoulis, Tara A; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Yu, Haiyuan; Rozowsky, Joel; Seringhaus, Michael R; Wang, Lu Yong; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2007-08-10

    Characterization of interspecies differences in gene regulation is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both phenotypic diversity and evolution. By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray analysis, the divergence in the binding sites of the pseudohyphal regulators Ste12 and Tec1 was determined in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. mikatae, and S. bayanus under pseudohyphal conditions. We have shown that most of these sites have diverged across these species, far exceeding the interspecies variation in orthologous genes. A group of Ste12 targets was shown to be bound only in S. mikatae and S. bayanus under pseudohyphal conditions. Many of these genes are targets of Ste12 during mating in S. cerevisiae, indicating that specialization between the two pathways has occurred in this species. Transcription factor binding sites have therefore diverged substantially faster than ortholog content. Thus, gene regulation resulting from transcription factor binding is likely to be a major cause of divergence between related species.

  14. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  15. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  17. Transcription factors: normal and malignant development of blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravid, Katya; Licht, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    ... and the Development of the Erythroid Lineage James J. Bieker 71 II TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND THE MYELOID LINEAGE 85 6 RUNX1(AML1) and CBFB: Genes Required for the Development of All Definitive Hematopoietic Lineages 87 Nancy A. Speck and Elaine Dzierzak 7 PU.1 and the Development of the Myeloid Lineage Daniel G. Tenen 103 vvi CONTENTS 8 CCAAT/Enhancer-...

  18. The WRKY Transcription Factor Genes in Lotus japonicus

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Song; Pengfei Wang; Zhibiao Nan; Xingjun Wang

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factor genes play critical roles in plant growth and development, as well as stress responses. WRKY genes have been examined in various higher plants, but they have not been characterized in Lotus japonicus. The recent release of the L. japonicus whole genome sequence provides an opportunity for a genome wide analysis of WRKY genes in this species. In this study, we identified 61 WRKY genes in the L. japonicus genome. Based on the WRKY protein structure, L. japonicus WRKY (...

  19. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed. PMID:26184177

  20. Isolation and characterization of the human A-myb promoter: regulation by NF-Y and Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, V; Lopa, R; Spreafico, F; Bolognese, F; Mantovani, R; Tavner, F; Watson, R; Introna, M; Golay, J

    2000-08-10

    The A-myb transcription factor shows a restricted tissue distribution and is cell cycle regulated. Furthermore its deregulation has profound effects on the growth and/or differentiation of the cells in which it is normally expressed. We have therefore characterized its promoter. A 12 kb genomic clone was isolated that comprises the first exon, part of the first intron as well as upstream regulatory sequences. Multiple transcription start sites have been identified which operate in both B lymphocytes and epithelial cells and the upsteam region was shown to have promoter, activity. The boundaries of the minimal promoter region (-183-14), of a positive upstream (-538-183) and a negative downstream regulatory region (NRE) (+83+374) have been defined. The NRE is promoter- and orientation-independent but position specific. The A-myb minimal promoter is GC-rich, does not contain any TATA box but has a functional CCAAT box. The CCAAT box and minimal promoter is highly conserved in the corresponding murine sequence. The CCAAT box efficiently binds the NF-Y complex and its mutation decreases basal promoter activity by 50%. Two Sp1 binding sites are present upstream from the CCAAT box which can bind Spl and contribute to A-myb promoter activity by 70 and 30%, respectively. The two Sp1 sites and CCAAT box together contribute to over 80% of A-myb basal promoter activity and are therefore the major regulatory elements. Finally, we show that the promoter is cell cycle regulated and that the SP1 and CCAAT elements are required for S phase induction.

  1. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Galán-Vásquez

    Full Text Available The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  2. Isolation, classification and transcription profiles of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-lan; Shen, Shu-ling; Yin, Xue-ren; Xu, Qian; Sun, Chong-de; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-07-01

    The AP2/ERF gene family encodes plant-specific transcription factors. In model plants, AP2/ERF genes have been shown to be expressed in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, and many function downstream of the ethylene, biotic, and abiotic stress signaling pathways. In citrus, ethylene is effective in regulation citrus fruit quality, such as degreening and aroma. However, information about the citrus AP2/ERF family is limited, and would enhance our understanding of fruit responses to environmental stress, fruit development and quality. CitAP2/ERF genes were isolated using the citrus genome database, and their expression patterns analyzed by real-time PCR using various orange organs and samples from a fruit developmental series. 126 sequences with homologies to AP2/ERF proteins were identified from the citrus genome, and, on the basis of their structure and sequence, assigned to the ERF family (102), AP2 family (18), RAV family (4) and Soloist (2). MEME motif analysis predicted the defining AP2/ERF domain and EAR repressor domains. Analysis of transcript accumulation in Citrus sinensis cv. 'Newhall' indicated that CitAP2/ERF genes show organ-specific and temporal expression, and provided a framework for understanding the transcriptional regulatory roles of AP2/ERF gene family members in citrus. Hierarchical cluster analysis and t tests identified regulators that potentially function during orange fruit growth and development.

  3. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates.We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data.Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct-interaction detection and TFBS-discovery accuracy. We estimated the accuracy

  4. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the 5' flanking region of SRY causes sex reversal in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuning; Liu, Tingjun; Wang, Yong; Deng, Jichao; Chen, Mao; Yuan, Lin; Lu, Yi; Xu, Yuxin; Yao, Haobin; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2017-06-13

    Sex-determining region Y is a crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in mammals. Mutations of the Sp1-binding site in the 5' flanking region of SRY are associated with clinical male-to-female sex reversal syndrome, although such occurrences are rare and, until now, have not been reported in animal models. In this study, we mutated Sp1-binding sites in the 5' flanking region of the rabbit SRY gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As expected, the SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits had female external and internal genitalia and exhibited normal female copulatory behaviors, but they were infertile, and the adults displayed reduced follicles. Interestingly, we successfully obtained offspring from sex-reversed SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits using embryo transfer. In summary, our study demonstrates that Sp1 is a major regulator in SRY gene transcription, and mutations of the Sp1 binding sites (Sp1-B and Sp1-C) in the 5' flanking region of SRY induce sex reversal in rabbits, which can be used as targets for clinical research of male-to-female sex reversal syndrome. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sex reversal syndrome patients have the potential to become pregnant with the use of embryo transfer.

  5. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY causes sex reversal in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Deng, Jichao; Chen, Mao; Yuan, Lin; Lu, Yi; Xu, Yuxin; Yao, Haobin; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2017-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y is a crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in mammals. Mutations of the Sp1-binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY are associated with clinical male-to-female sex reversal syndrome, although such occurrences are rare and, until now, have not been reported in animal models. In this study, we mutated Sp1-binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the rabbit SRY gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As expected, the SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits had female external and internal genitalia and exhibited normal female copulatory behaviors, but they were infertile, and the adults displayed reduced follicles. Interestingly, we successfully obtained offspring from sex-reversed SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits using embryo transfer. In summary, our study demonstrates that Sp1 is a major regulator in SRY gene transcription, and mutations of the Sp1 binding sites (Sp1-B and Sp1-C) in the 5′ flanking region of SRY induce sex reversal in rabbits, which can be used as targets for clinical research of male-to-female sex reversal syndrome. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sex reversal syndrome patients have the potential to become pregnant with the use of embryo transfer. PMID:28445127

  6. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...

  7. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  8. Analysis list: SP1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP1 Blood,Digestive tract,Liver,Pluripotent stem cell + hg19 http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/SP1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/SP1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscien...cedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/SP1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u.../hg19/colo/SP1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/SP1....Digestive_tract.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/SP1.Liver.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience

  9. NAC Transcription Factors in Stress Responses and Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte

    Plant-specific NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors have recently received considerable attention due to their significant roles in plant development and stress signalling. This interest has resulted in a number of physiological, genetic and cell biological studies of their functions. Some...... low degree of average structure but different patterns of disorder/order and molecular recognition features (MoRFs). For example, senescence-associated ANAC046 has a simple pattern with just a single MoRF. Analysis in yeast and thermodynamic characterisation suggested that the 11-residue C-terminal Mo......RF is a functional hotspot for both transcriptional activity and interaction with the cellular hub protein Radical Induced Cell Death1 (RCD1). Specific amino acid residues essential for the interaction were identified. These studies and structural analysis suggested that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does...

  10. A transcription factor hierarchy defines an environmental stress response network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liang; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Wise, Aaron; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Chen, Huaming; Watanabe, Marina; Thomas, Jerushah; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-11-04

    Environmental stresses are universally encountered by microbes, plants, and animals. Yet systematic studies of stress-responsive transcription factor (TF) networks in multicellular organisms have been limited. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) influences the expression of thousands of genes, allowing us to characterize complex stress-responsive regulatory networks. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, we identified genome-wide targets of 21 ABA-related TFs to construct a comprehensive regulatory network in Arabidopsis thaliana Determinants of dynamic TF binding and a hierarchy among TFs were defined, illuminating the relationship between differential gene expression patterns and ABA pathway feedback regulation. By extrapolating regulatory characteristics of observed canonical ABA pathway components, we identified a new family of transcriptional regulators modulating ABA and salt responsiveness and demonstrated their utility to modulate plant resilience to osmotic stress. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Predictive value of Sp1/Sp3/FLIP signature for prostate cancer recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roble G Bedolla

    Full Text Available Prediction of prostate cancer prognosis is challenging and predictive biomarkers of recurrence remain elusive. Although prostate specific antigen (PSA has high sensitivity (90% at a PSA level of 4.0 ng/mL, its low specificity leads to many false positive results and considerable overtreatment of patients and its performance at lower ranges is poor. Given the histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of prostate cancer, we propose that a panel of markers will be a better tool than a single marker. We tested a panel of markers composed of the anti-apoptotic protein FLIP and its transcriptional regulators Sp1 and Sp3 using prostate tissues from 64 patients with recurrent and non-recurrent cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy as primary treatment for prostate cancer and were followed with PSA measurements for at least 5 years. Immunohistochemical staining for Sp1, Sp3, and FLIP was performed on these tissues and scored based on the proportion and intensity of staining. The predictive value of the FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 signature for clinical outcome (recurrence vs. non-recurrence was explored with logistic regression, and combinations of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 and Gleason score were analyzed with a stepwise (backward and forward logistic model. The discrimination of the markers was identified by sensitivity-specificity analysis and the diagnostic value of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 was determined using area under the curve (AUC for receiver operator characteristic curves. The AUCs for FLIP, Sp1, Sp3, and Gleason score for predicting PSA failure and non-failure were 0.71, 0.66, 0.68, and 0.76, respectively. However, this increased to 0.93 when combined. Thus, the "biomarker signature" of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 combined with Gleason score predicted disease recurrence and stratified patients who are likely to benefit from more aggressive treatment.

  12. A new transcription factor for mitosis: in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the RFX transcription factor Sak1 works with forkhead factors to regulate mitotic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Angad; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2015-08-18

    Mitotic genes are one of the most strongly oscillating groups of genes in the eukaryotic cell cycle. Understanding the regulation of mitotic gene expression is a key issue in cell cycle control but is poorly understood in most organisms. Here, we find a new mitotic transcription factor, Sak1, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Sak1 belongs to the RFX family of transcription factors, which have not previously been connected to cell cycle control. Sak1 binds upstream of mitotic genes in close proximity to Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor previously implicated in regulation of mitotic genes. We show that Sak1 is the major activator of mitotic gene expression and also confirm the role of Fkh2 as the opposing repressor. Sep1, another forkhead transcription factor, is an activator for a small subset of mitotic genes involved in septation. From yeasts to humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in mitotic gene expression and it will be interesting to see whether RFX transcription factors may also be involved in other organisms. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Engineering phenolics metabolism in the grasses using transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotewold, Erich [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-26

    The economical competitiveness of agriculture-derived biofuels can be significantly enhanced by increasing biomass/acre yields and by furnishing the desired carbon balance for facilitating liquid fuel production (e.g., ethanol) or for high-energy solid waste availability to be used as biopower (e.g., for electricity production). Biomass production and carbon balance are tightly linked to the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, which are found in crops and in agricultural residues either as lignins, as part of the cell wall, or as soluble phenolics which play a variety of functions in the biology of plants. The grasses, in particular maize, provide the single major source of agricultural biomass, offering significant opportunities for increasing renewable fuel production. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of transcription factors for manipulating plant metabolic pathways, an approach that will be applied here towards altering the composition of phenolic compounds in maize. Previously, we identified a small group of ten maize R2R3-MYB transcription factors with all the characteristics of regulators of different aspects of phenolic biosynthesis. Here, we propose to investigate the participation of these R2R3-MYB factors in the regulation of soluble and insoluble maize phenolics, using a combination of over-expression and down-regulation of these transcription factors in transgenic maize cultured cells and in maize plants. Maize cells and plants altered in the activity of these regulatory proteins will be analyzed for phenolic composition by targeted metabolic profiling. Specifically, we will I) Investigate the effect of gain- and loss-of-function of a select group of R2R3-MYB transcription factors on the phenolic composition of maize plants and II) Identify the biosynthetic genes regulated by each of the selected R2R3-MYB factors. While a likely outcome of these studies are transgenic maize plants with altered phenolic composition, this research will significantly

  14. Differential regulation of the TLR4 signalling pathway in post-mortem prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in chronic schizophrenia: Relationship with SP transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Karina S; Pinacho, Raquel; Leza, Juan C; Costa, Joan; Ramos, Belén; García-Bueno, Borja

    2017-10-03

    Alterations in innate immunity may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) is a master element of innate immunity. The specificity proteins (SPs), transcription factors recently implicated in SZ, are putative regulatory agents of this. This work was aimed at describing alterations in the TLR4 signalling pathway in postmortem brain prefrontal cortex (PFC) and cerebellum (CB) of 16 chronic SZ patients and 14 controls. The possible association of TLR4 pathway with SP1 and SP4 and SZ negative symptomatology is explored. In PFC, TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/inhibitory subunit of nuclear factor kappa B alpha (IκBα) protein levels were lower in SZ patients, while nuclear transcription factor-κB (NFκB) activity, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and the lipid peroxidation index malondialdehyde (MDA) appeared increased. The pattern of changes in CB is opposite, except for COX-2 expression that remained augmented and MDA levels unaltered. Network interaction analysis showed that TLR4/MyD88/IκBα/NFκB/COX-2 pathway was coupled in PFC and uncoupled in CB. SP4 co-expressed with TLR4 and NFκB in PFC and both SP1 and SP4 co-expressed with NFκB in CB. In PFC, correlation analysis found an inverse relationship between NFκB and negative symptoms. In summary, we found brain region-specific alterations in the TLR4 signalling pathway in chronic SZ, in which SP transcription factors could participate at different levels. Further studies are required to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of innate immunity in SZ and its relationship with symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Grainyhead-like Transcription Factors in Craniofacial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinelli, M R; de Vries, M E; Jane, S M; Dworkin, S

    2017-10-01

    Craniofacial development in vertebrates involves the coordinated growth, migration, and fusion of several facial prominences during embryogenesis, processes governed by strict genetic and molecular controls. A failure in any of the precise spatiotemporal sequences of events leading to prominence fusion often leads to anomalous facial, skull, and jaw formation-conditions termed craniofacial defects (CFDs). Affecting approximately 0.1% to 0.3% of live births, CFDs are a highly heterogeneous class of developmental anomalies, which are often underpinned by genetic mutations. Therefore, identifying novel disease-causing mutations in genes that regulate craniofacial development is a critical prerequisite to develop new preventive or therapeutic measures. The Grainyhead-like ( GRHL) transcription factors are one such gene family, performing evolutionarily conserved roles in craniofacial patterning. The antecedent member of this family, Drosophila grainyhead ( grh), is required for head skeleton development in fruit flies, loss or mutation of Grhl family members in mouse and zebrafish models leads to defects of both maxilla and mandible, and recently, mutations in human GRHL3 have been shown to cause or contribute to both syndromic (Van Der Woude syndrome) and nonsyndromic palatal clefts. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the craniofacial-specific function of the Grainyhead-like family in multiple model species, identify some of the major target genes regulated by the Grhl transcription factors in craniofacial patterning, and, by examining animal models, draw inferences as to how these data will inform the likely roles of GRHL factors in human CFDs comprising palatal clefting. By understanding the molecular networks regulated by Grhl2 and Grhl3 target genes in other systems, we can propose likely pathways that mediate the effects of these transcription factors in human palatogenesis.

  16. Sequentially acting Sox transcription factors in neural lineage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsland, Maria; Ramsköld, Daniel; Zaouter, Cécile; Klum, Susanne; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can generate all cell types, but how cell lineages are initially specified and maintained during development remains largely unknown. Different classes of Sox transcription factors are expressed during neurogenesis and have been assigned important roles from early lineage specification to neuronal differentiation. Here we characterize the genome-wide binding for Sox2, Sox3, and Sox11, which have vital functions in ES cells, neural precursor cells (NPCs), and maturing neurons, respectively. The data demonstrate that Sox factor binding depends on developmental stage-specific constraints and reveal a remarkable sequential binding of Sox proteins to a common set of neural genes. Interestingly, in ES cells, Sox2 preselects for neural lineage-specific genes destined to be bound and activated by Sox3 in NPCs. In NPCs, Sox3 binds genes that are later bound and activated by Sox11 in differentiating neurons. Genes prebound by Sox proteins are associated with a bivalent chromatin signature, which is resolved into a permissive monovalent state upon binding of activating Sox factors. These data indicate that a single key transcription factor family acts sequentially to coordinate neural gene expression from the early lineage specification in pluripotent cells to later stages of neuronal development.

  17. Transcriptional control of adenosine signaling by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors during ischemic or inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Jens M; Brodsky, Kelley; Ehrentraut, Heidi; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2013-02-01

    Inflammatory lesions, ischemic tissues, or solid tumors are characterized by the occurrence of severe tissue hypoxia within the diseased tissue. Subsequent stabilization of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors-particularly of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1A)--results in significant alterations of gene expression of resident cells or inflammatory cells that have been recruited into such lesions. Interestingly, studies of hypoxia-induced changes of gene expression identified a transcriptional program that promotes extracellular adenosine signaling. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that functions through the activation of four distinct adenosine receptors--the ADORA1, ADORA2A, ADORA2B, and ADORA3 receptors. Extracellular adenosine is predominantly derived from the phosphohydrolysis of precursor nucleotides, such as adenosine triphosphate or adenosine monophosphate. HIF1A-elicited alterations in gene expression enhance the enzymatic capacity within inflamed tissues to produce extracellular adenosine. Moreover, hypoxia-elicited induction of adenosine receptors--particularly of ADORA2B--results in increased signal transduction. Functional studies in genetic models for HIF1A or adenosine receptors implicate this pathway in an endogenous feedback loop that dampens excessive inflammation and promotes injury resolution, while at the same time enhancing ischemia tolerance. Therefore, pharmacological strategies to enhance HIF-elicited adenosine production or to promote adenosine signaling through adenosine receptors are being investigated for the treatment of acute inflammatory or ischemic diseases characterized by tissue hypoxia.

  18. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  19. M-CSF signals through the MAPK/ERK pathway via Sp1 to induce VEGF production and induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Curry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: M-CSF recruits mononuclear phagocytes which regulate processes such as angiogenesis and metastases in tumors. VEGF is a potent activator of angiogenesis as it promotes endothelial cell proliferation and new blood vessel formation. Previously, we reported that in vitro M-CSF induces the expression of biologically-active VEGF from human monocytes. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In this study, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism of M-CSF-induced VEGF production. Using a construct containing the VEGF promoter linked to a luciferase reporter, we found that a mutation reducing HIF binding to the VEGF promoter had no significant effect on luciferase production induced by M-CSF stimulation. Further analysis revealed that M-CSF induced VEGF through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via the transcription factor, Sp1. Thus, inhibition of either ERK or Sp1 suppressed M-CSF-induced VEGF at the mRNA and protein level. M-CSF also induced the nuclear localization of Sp1, which was blocked by ERK inhibition. Finally, mutating the Sp1 binding sites within the VEGF promoter or inhibiting ERK decreased VEGF promoter activity in M-CSF-treated human monocytes. To evaluate the biological significance of M-CSF induced VEGF production, we used an in vivo angiogenesis model to illustrate the ability of M-CSF to recruit mononuclear phagocytes, increase VEGF levels, and enhance angiogenesis. Importantly, the addition of a neutralizing VEGF antibody abolished M-CSF-induced blood vessel formation. CONCLUSION: These data delineate an ERK- and Sp1-dependent mechanism of M-CSF induced VEGF production and demonstrate for the first time the ability of M-CSF to induce angiogenesis via VEGF in vivo.

  20. Genomic structure and cloning of two transcript isoforms of human Sp8.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Milona (Maria-athina); J.E. Gough (Julie); A.J. Edgar (Alasdair)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The Specificity proteins (Sp) are a family of transcription factors that have three highly conserved zinc-fingers located towards the carboxy-terminal that bind GC-boxes and assist in the initiation of gene transcription. Human Sp1-7 genes have been

  1. Global mapping of transcription factor motifs in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfego, David; Rodeck, Ulrich; Kriete, Andres

    2018-01-01

    Biological aging is a complex process dependent on the interplay of cell autonomous and tissue contextual changes which occur in response to cumulative molecular stress and manifest through adaptive transcriptional reprogramming. Here we describe a transcription factor (TF) meta-analysis of gene expression datasets accrued from 18 tissue sites collected at different biological ages and from 7 different in-vitro aging models. In-vitro aging platforms included replicative senescence and an energy restriction model in quiescence (ERiQ), in which ATP was transiently reduced. TF motifs in promoter regions of trimmed sets of target genes were scanned using JASPAR and TRANSFAC. TF signatures established a global mapping of agglomerating motifs with distinct clusters when ranked hierarchically. Remarkably, the ERiQ profile was shared with the majority of in-vivo aged tissues. Fitting motifs in a minimalistic protein-protein network allowed to probe for connectivity to distinct stress sensors. The DNA damage sensors ATM and ATR linked to the subnetwork associated with senescence. By contrast, the energy sensors PTEN and AMPK connected to the nodes in the ERiQ subnetwork. These data suggest that metabolic dysfunction may be linked to transcriptional patterns characteristic of many aged tissues and distinct from cumulative DNA damage associated with senescence.

  2. Investigation of molecular size of transcription factor TFIIE in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Unzai, Satoru; Sato, Mamoru; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Okuda, Masahiko; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Akashi, Satoko

    2005-11-15

    Human general transcription factor IIE (TFIIE), a component of a transcription preinitiation complex associated with RNA polymerase II, was characterized by size-exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Recombinant human TFIIE was purified to homogeneity and shown to contain equimolar amounts of TFIIEalpha (50 kDa) and TFIIEbeta (35 kDa) by SDS-PAGE. In the analysis of size-exclusion chromatography of the purified sample, as already reported, TFIIE was shown to be a 170-kDa alpha(2)beta(2) heterotetramer. However, by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry the purified sample gave the molecular mass of 84,152 +/- 5, indicating that TFIIE is an alphabeta heterodimer but not a heterotetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiment of TFIIE provided that only a single component with the molecular mass of ca. 80,000 existed in solution, also suggesting an alphabeta heterodimer. In addition, its extraordinarily rod-like molecular shape was confirmed by SAXS. It is likely that the rod-like molecular shape of TFIIE has misled larger molecular size in size-exclusion chromatography, which was calibrated by globular proteins. It is demonstrated that TFIIE exists as a heterodimer under our present conditions in solution, although two molecules of heterodimer might be required for the formation of the preinitiation complex with RNA polymerase II for starting the transcription process. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. NAC transcription factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 enhances drought tolerance in tomato

    KAUST Repository

    Thirumalaikumar, Venkatesh P.

    2017-06-22

    Water deficit (drought stress) massively restricts plant growth and the yield of crops; reducing the deleterious effects of drought is therefore of high agricultural relevance. Drought triggers diverse cellular processes including the inhibition of photosynthesis, the accumulation of cell-damaging reactive oxygen species, and gene expression reprogramming, besides others. Transcription factors (TF) are central regulators of transcriptional reprogramming and expression of many TF genes is affected by drought, including members of the NAC family. Here, we identify the NAC factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a regulator of drought tolerance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Expression of tomato JUB1 (SlJUB1) is enhanced by various abiotic stresses, including drought. Inhibiting SlJUB1 by virus-induced gene silencing drastically lowers drought tolerance concomitant with an increase in ion leakage, an elevation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels, and a decrease of the expression of various drought-responsive genes. In contrast, overexpression of AtJUB1 from Arabidopsis thaliana increases drought tolerance in tomato, alongside with a higher relative leaf water content during drought and reduced H2 O2 levels. AtJUB1 was previously shown to stimulate expression of DREB2A, a TF involved in drought responses, and of the DELLA genes GAI and RGL1. We show here that SlJUB1 similarly controls the expression of the tomato orthologs SlDREB1, SlDREB2, and SlDELLA. Furthermore, AtJUB1 directly binds to the promoters of SlDREB1, SlDREB2 and SlDELLA in tomato. Our study highlights JUB1 as a transcriptional regulator of drought tolerance and suggests considerable conservation of the abiotic stress-related gene regulatory networks controlled by this NAC factor between Arabidopsis and tomato. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. ROLE OF PAX-5 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR IN IMMUNOLOGICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Mineev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.  The  review  article  concerns  various  features  of  PAX-5  (paired  box  5  transcription  factor,  its structure, functions, regulation of activity, involvement into differentiation and activation of B lymphocytes, switching to IgE synthesis, its role in oncogenesis, and a putative role of this factor for development of bronchial asthma.Further  insight  into  specific  properties  of  PAX-5  factor  in  bronchial  asthma  may  provide  a  promising approach to studying mechanisms of this disorder. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 6, pp 569-580

  5. The ETS family of oncogenic transcription factors in solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Gina M; Pitarresi, Jason R; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Findings over the past decade have identified aberrant activation of the ETS transcription factor family throughout all stages of tumorigenesis. Specifically in solid tumours, gene rearrangement and amplification, feed-forward growth factor signalling loops, formation of gain-of-function co-regulatory complexes and novel cis-acting mutations in ETS target gene promoters can result in increased ETS activity. In turn, pro-oncogenic ETS signalling enhances tumorigenesis through a broad mechanistic toolbox that includes lineage specification and self-renewal, DNA damage and genome instability, epigenetics and metabolism. This Review discusses these different mechanisms of ETS activation and subsequent oncogenic implications, as well as the clinical utility of ETS factors.

  6. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application......TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... of serum response factor, drives myofibroblast transition from various precursors. We have shown that TGFβ is necessary but insufficient for epithelial-myofibroblast transition in intact epithelia; the other prerequisite is the uncoupling of intercellular contacts, which induces Rho-dependent nuclear...

  7. Structural characterization of mammalian bHLH-PAS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2017-04-01

    The mammalian basic helix-loop-helix-PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) transcription factors share common architectural features that include a bHLH DNA-binding domain and tandemly positioned PAS domains. The sixteen members of this family include the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), ARNT (also known as HIF-1β), CLOCK and BMAL1. Most bHLH-PAS proteins have been genetically linked to variety of diseases in humans, including cancers, metabolic syndromes and psychiatric conditions. To function as transcription factors, the bHLH-PAS proteins must form heterodimeric complexes. Recent crystallographic studies of HIF-α-ARNT and CLOCK-BMAL1 complexes have unveiled the organization of their multi-domain bHLH-PAS-A-PAS-B segments, revealing how these architectures can give rise to unique patterns of heterodimerization. As our structural understanding becomes better integrated with ligand-discovery and target gene identification, a more comprehensive picture of their architectural and functional properties will emerge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of transcription factors in ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene regulation underlies fungal physiology and therefore is a major factor in fungal biodiversity. Analysis of genome sequences has revealed a large number of putative transcription factors in most fungal genomes. The presence of fungal orthologs for individual regulators has been analysed and appears to be highly variable with some regulators widely conserved and others showing narrow distribution. Although genome-scale transcription factor surveys have been performed before, no global study into the prevalence of specific regulators across the fungal kingdom has been presented. Results In this study we have analysed the number of members for 37 regulator classes in 77 ascomycete and 31 basidiomycete fungal genomes and revealed significant differences between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. In addition, we determined the presence of 64 regulators characterised in ascomycetes across these 108 genomes. This demonstrated that overall the highest presence of orthologs is in the filamentous ascomycetes. A significant number of regulators lacked orthologs in the ascomycete yeasts and the basidiomycetes. Conversely, of seven basidiomycete regulators included in the study, only one had orthologs in ascomycetes. Conclusions This study demonstrates a significant difference in the regulatory repertoire of ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi, at the level of both regulator class and individual regulator. This suggests that the current regulatory systems of these fungi have been mainly developed after the two phyla diverged. Most regulators detected in both phyla are involved in central functions of fungal physiology and therefore were likely already present in the ancestor of the two phyla. PMID:24650355

  9. OsWRKY IIa Transcription Factors Modulate Rice Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Ying; Laura E. Bartley; Canlas, Patrick; Ronald, Pamela C

    2010-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate diverse plant processes including responses to biotic stresses. Our previous studies indicate that OsWRKY62, an OsWRKY IIa subfamily member, functions as a negative regulator of the rice defense against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Here, we report that a large inverted repeat construct designed to knock down the expression of the four OsWRKY IIa subfamily members (OsWRKY62, OsWRKY28, OsWRKY71, and OsWRKY76) leads to overexpression of all four genes and di...

  10. A systems approach to analyze transcription factors in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Eric; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Boer, Ernie de; Bryne, Jan Christian; Thongjuea, Supat; Rijkers, Erikjan; Demmers, Jeroen; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in the development of multicellular organisms. The sequential actions of critical TFs direct cells to adopt defined differentiation pathways leading to functional, fully differentiated tissues. Here, we describe a generic experimental pipeline that integrates biochemistry, genetics and next generation sequencing with bioinformatics to characterize TF complexes composition, function and target genes at a genome-wide scale. We show an application of this experimental pipeline which aims to unravel the molecular events taking place during hematopoietic cell differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting the transcription factor Myb by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Frampton, Jon; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2017-03-01

    The transcription factor Myb is a key regulator of hematopoietic cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and several other human cancers. Pharmacological inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy. Recently, the first low-molecular-weight compounds that show Myb inhibitory activity have been identified. Characterization of these compounds suggests disruption of the protein-protein-interaction of Myb and the coactivator p300 as a suitable strategy to inhibit Myb. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of Specialized Metabolism by WRKY Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Yuan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are well known for regulating plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, much less is known about how WRKY TFs affect plant-specialized metabolism. Analysis of WRKY TFs regulating the production of specialized metabolites emphasizes the values of the family outside of traditionally accepted roles in stress tolerance. WRKYs with conserved roles across plant species seem to be essential in regulating specialized metabolism. Overall, the WRKY family plays an essential role in regulating the biosynthesis of important pharmaceutical, aromatherapy, biofuel, and industrial components, warranting considerable attention in the forthcoming years. PMID:25501946

  13. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  14. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elisabeth Hellweg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Charged particles such as carbon ions bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g. on linear energy transfer (LET. For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, cell cycle arrest, an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair, cell cycle arrest or cell-destructive (cell death reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges amongst others in the activation of transcription factors such as p53, Nuclear Factor kappaB (NF-kappaB, activated protein 1 (AP-1, nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and Cyclic-Nucleotide Response Element-Binding Protein (CREB. Depending on dose, radiation quality and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. In low-LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-kappaB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-kappaB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ATM dependent manner. The NF-kappaB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90-300 keV/µm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  15. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  16. FOXO Transcription Factors: Their Clinical Significance and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the class O of forkhead box transcription factors (FOXO have important roles in metabolism, cellular proliferation, stress resistance, and apoptosis. The activity of FOXOs is tightly regulated by posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, and ubiquitylation. Activation of cell survival pathways such as phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT/IKK or RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates FOXOs at different sites which regulate FOXOs nuclear localization or degradation. FOXO transcription factors are upregulated in a number of cell types including hepatocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and cardiac myocytes. They are involved in a number of pathologic and physiologic processes that include proliferation, apoptosis, autophagy, metabolism, inflammation, cytokine expression, immunity, differentiation, and resistance to oxidative stress. These processes impact a number of clinical conditions such as carcinogenesis, diabetes, diabetic complications, cardiovascular disease, host response, and wound healing. In this paper, we focus on the potential role of FOXOs in different disease models and the regulation of FOXOs by various stimuli.

  17. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  18. Expression of the transcription factor PITX2 in ameloblastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Mario A; Licéaga-Escalera, Carlos; Licéaga-Reyes, Rodrigo; Carreón-Burciaga, Ramón Gil; González-González, Rogelio; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare odontogenic tumour that combines the histological features of ameloblastoma with cytological atypia. Until 2005, the incidence of ameloblastic carcinoma was unknown, and since then, fewer than 60 cases have been reported. These tumours may originate from pre-existing tumours or cysts, or they arise de novo from the activation or transformation of embryological cells. PITX2 is a transcription factor that is a product and regulator of the WNT cell signalling pathway, which has been involved in development of several tumours. To analyse whether PITX2 could be involved in the biological behaviour of ameloblastic carcinoma, we analysed the expression of this transcription factor in a sample of this tumour and nine benign ameloblastomas to compare. The results of Western blotting and RT-PCR analyses were positive, and considering the hundreds of genes that PITX2 regulates, we believe that its expression could be intimately linked to the behaviour of ameloblastic carcinoma and possibly other odontogenic lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  20. Generation of pure GABAergic neurons by transcription factor programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Chanda, Soham; Marro, Samuele; Ng, Yi-Han; Janas, Justyna A; Haag, Daniel; Ang, Cheen Euong; Tang, Yunshuo; Flores, Quetzal; Mall, Moritz; Wapinski, Orly; Li, Mavis; Ahlenius, Henrik; Rubenstein, John L; Chang, Howard Y; Buylla, Arturo Alvarez; Südhof, Thomas C; Wernig, Marius

    2017-06-01

    Approaches to differentiating pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into neurons currently face two major challenges-(i) generated cells are immature, with limited functional properties; and (ii) cultures exhibit heterogeneous neuronal subtypes and maturation stages. Using lineage-determining transcription factors, we previously developed a single-step method to generate glutamatergic neurons from human PSCs. Here, we show that transient expression of the transcription factors Ascl1 and Dlx2 (AD) induces the generation of exclusively GABAergic neurons from human PSCs with a high degree of synaptic maturation. These AD-induced neuronal (iN) cells represent largely nonoverlapping populations of GABAergic neurons that express various subtype-specific markers. We further used AD-iN cells to establish that human collybistin, the loss of gene function of which causes severe encephalopathy, is required for inhibitory synaptic function. The generation of defined populations of functionally mature human GABAergic neurons represents an important step toward enabling the study of diseases affecting inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  1. DAF-16/FOXO Transcription Factor in Aging and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with age-related diseases and an increase susceptibility of cancer. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms that underlie aging and longevity would contribute to implications for preventing and treating the age-dependent diseases or cancers. Multiple signaling pathways such as the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway, TOR signaling, AMPK pathway, JNK pathway and germline signaling have been found to be involved in aging and longevity. And DAF-16/FOXO, as a key transcription factor, could integrate different signals from these pathways to modulate aging, and longevity via shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Hence, understanding how DAF-16/FOXO functions will be pivotal to illustrate the processes of aging and longevity. Here, we summarized how DAF-16/FOXO receives signals from these pathways to affect aging and longevity. We also briefly discussed the transcriptional regulation and posttranslational modifications of DAF-16/FOXO, its co-factors as well as its potential downstream targets participating in lifespan according to the published data in C. elegans and in mammals, and in most cases, we may focus on the studies in C. elegans which has been considered to be a very good animal model for longevity research.

  2. Class-C SOX Transcription Factors Control GnRH Gene Expression via the Intronic Transcriptional Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Dae; Choe, Han Kyoung; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Myungjin; Seong, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    GnRH is a pivotal hypothalamic neurohormone governing reproduction and sexual development. Because transcriptional regulation is crucial for the spatial and temporal expression of the GnRH gene, a region approximately 3.0 kb upstream of the mammalian GnRH promoter has been extensive studied. In the present study, we demonstrate a transcription-enhancer located in the first intron (intron A) region of the GnRH gene. This transcriptional enhancer harbors putative sex-determining region Y-related high-mobility-group box (SOX) family transcription factor-binding sites, which are well conserved across many mammalian species. The class-C SOX member proteins (SOX-C) (SOX4 and SOX11) specifically augment this transcriptional activation by binding to these SOX-binding sites. In accordance, SOX11 is highly enriched in immortalized GnRH-producing GT1-1 cells, and suppression of its expression significantly decreases GnRH gene expression as well as GnRH secretion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that endogenous SOX-C factors recognize and bind to the intronic enhancer in GT1-1 cells and the hypothalamus. Accompanying immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that SOX4 or SOX11 are highly expressed in the majority of hypothalamic GnRH neurons in adult mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that SOX-C transcription factors function as important transcriptional regulators of cell type-specific GnRH gene expression by acting on the intronic transcriptional enhancer. PMID:21527504

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c...... with and phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), which is the master regulator of this process, on the promoter of PPARgamma target genes. PPARgamma-cdk9 interaction results in increased transcriptional activity of PPARgamma and therefore increased adipogenesis.......-Myc or MyoD. The P-TEFb complex is composed of a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk9) subunit and a regulatory partner (cyclin T1, cyclin T2, or cyclin K). Because cdk9 has been shown to participate in differentiation processes, such as muscle cell differentiation, we studied a possible role of cdk9...

  4. Accurate prediction of inducible transcription factor binding intensities in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Guertin

    Full Text Available DNA sequence and local chromatin landscape act jointly to determine transcription factor (TF binding intensity profiles. To disentangle these influences, we developed an experimental approach, called protein/DNA binding followed by high-throughput sequencing (PB-seq, that allows the binding energy landscape to be characterized genome-wide in the absence of chromatin. We applied our methods to the Drosophila Heat Shock Factor (HSF, which inducibly binds a target DNA sequence element (HSE following heat shock stress. PB-seq involves incubating sheared naked genomic DNA with recombinant HSF, partitioning the HSF-bound and HSF-free DNA, and then detecting HSF-bound DNA by high-throughput sequencing. We compared PB-seq binding profiles with ones observed in vivo by ChIP-seq and developed statistical models to predict the observed departures from idealized binding patterns based on covariates describing the local chromatin environment. We found that DNase I hypersensitivity and tetra-acetylation of H4 were the most influential covariates in predicting changes in HSF binding affinity. We also investigated the extent to which DNA accessibility, as measured by digital DNase I footprinting data, could be predicted from MNase-seq data and the ChIP-chip profiles for many histone modifications and TFs, and found GAGA element associated factor (GAF, tetra-acetylation of H4, and H4K16 acetylation to be the most predictive covariates. Lastly, we generated an unbiased model of HSF binding sequences, which revealed distinct biophysical properties of the HSF/HSE interaction and a previously unrecognized substructure within the HSE. These findings provide new insights into the interplay between the genomic sequence and the chromatin landscape in determining transcription factor binding intensity.

  5. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks.

  6. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  7. Extracellular acidosis stimulates NHE2 expression through activation of transcription factor Egr-1 in the intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saminathan Muthusamy

    Full Text Available Na(+/H(+ exchangers (NHEs play important roles in regulating internal pH (pHi, cell volume and neutral Na(+ absorption in the human intestine. Earlier studies have shown that low extracellular pH (pHe and metabolic acidosis increases the expression and function of NHE1-3 genes. However, transcriptional mechanisms involved remained unknown. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying acid-induced NHE2 expression in C2BBe1 and SK-CO15 intestinal epithelial cells. Assessing total RNA and protein by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively, displayed significant increases in the NHE2 mRNA and protein levels in cells exposed to acidic media (pH 6.5 and 6.7 compared to normal medium. Acid treatment was also associated with a significant enhancement in NHE2 transport activity. Quantification of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA indicated that the rate of NHE2 transcription was increased in response to acid. Furthermore, acid caused a significant increase in NHE2 promoter activity confirming transcriptional upregulation. Through functional and mutational studies the acid-response element was mapped to a 15-nucleotide GC-rich sequence at bp -337 to -323 upstream from the transcription start site. We previously identified this element as an overlapping Egr-1/Sp1/Egr-1 motif that was essential for the NHE2 upregulation by mitogen-induced transcription factor Egr-1. Cells exposed to acid exhibited a temporal increase in Egr-1 mRNA and protein expression. These events were followed by Egr-1 nuclear accumulation, as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy, and potentiated its in vitro and in vivo interaction with the NHE2 promoter. Disruption of ESE motif and knockdown of Egr-1 expression by targeted small interfering RNA abrogated the acid-induced NHE2 transcriptional activity. These data indicate that the acid-dependent NHE2 stimulation is implemented by transcriptional upregulation of NHE2 via acid-induced Egr-1 in the intestinal

  8. Systematic analysis of disease-related regulatory mutation classes reveals distinct effects on transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Kirsti; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2009-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation is essential in understanding the gene expression in its entirety. Transcription is regulated, among other things, by transcription factors that bind to DNA and can enhance or repress the transcription process. If a transcription factor fails to bind to DNA or binds to a wrong DNA region that can cause severe effects to the gene expression, to the cell and even to the individual. The problems in transcription factor binding can be caused by alterations in DNA structure which often occurs when parts of the DNA strands are mutated. An increasing number of the identified disease-related mutations occur in gene regulatory sequences. These regulatory mutations can disrupt transcription factor binding sites or create new ones. We have studied effects of mutations on transcription factor binding affinity computationally. We have compared our results with experimentally verified cases where a mutation in a gene regulatory region either creates a new transcription factor binding site or deletes a previously existing one. We have investigated the statistical properties of the changes on transcription factor binding affinity according to the mutation type. Our analysis shows that the probability of a loss of a transcription factor binding site and a creation of a new one varies remarkably by the mutation type. Our results demonstrate that computational analysis provides valuable information about the effect of mutations on transcription factor binding sites. The analysis results also give a useful test set for in vitro studies of regulatory mutation effects.

  9. Restoration of Mesenchymal RPE by Transcription Factor-Mediated Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ying-Hsuan; Radeke, Monte J; Radeke, Carolyn M; Coffey, Pete J

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a major component of the wound healing response and a negative determinant of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) differentiation. We have shown previously that inhibition of TGFβ signaling restored the capacity of mesenchymal RPE to differentiate; however, the potential lessens with extensive passaging. We investigated TGFβ-independent mechanisms that regulate RPE differentiation following repetitive passaging. Retinal pigment epithelium-EMT was induced by repetitive passaging of fetal RPE at subconfluence. Suppression of EMT was achieved by the addition of A-83-01, a TGFβ receptor kinase inhibitor. Transcriptomic analysis was used to identify potential TGFβ independent processes that prevent differentiation after extensive passage. Downregulated transcription factors were identified and transduced into highly passaged RPE to restore cell differentiation. Restoration was evaluated according to morphology, expression of RPE/mesenchymal markers, transcriptomic analysis, cell doubling time, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. A-83-01-treated RPE failed to differentiate after 7 passages (P7). This failure was concomitant with downregulation of RPE genes, misregulation of cell cycle genes, a decline in proliferative potential, and cell senescence. Exogenous expression of MYCN and OTX2 in conjunction with A-83-01 restored P7-RPE differentiation to a status similar to minimally passaged RPE. Moreover, the treatment allowed cells to maintain their differentiation capacity after extended passaging. Retinal pigment epithelium subjected to chronic wound stimulus undergoes TGFβ-mediated EMT, loss of expression of signature RPE genes, and senescence. Targeting these aspects with a TGFβ receptor kinase inhibitor, a RPE transcription factor, and a cell cycle regulator restores the capacity of highly passaged RPE cells to regenerate and differentiate.

  10. Sp1 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 1/cyclin B1 represses its DNA-binding activity during mitosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, J-Y; Wang, S-A; Yang, W-B; Yang, H-C; Hung, C-Y; Su, T-P; Chang, W-C; Hung, J-J

    2012-11-22

    Sp1 is important for the transcription of many genes. Our previous studies have shown that Sp1 is degraded in normal cell, but it is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis and exists a priori in the daughter cells, ready to engage in gene transcription and thereby contributes to the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. The mechanism by which Sp1 is preserved in cancer cells during mitosis remains unknown. In this study, we observed that Sp1 strongly colocalized with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B1 during mitosis. Moreover, we showed that Sp1 is a novel mitotic substrate of CDK1/cyclin B1 and is phosphorylated by it at Thr 739 before the onset of mitosis. Phospho-Sp1 reduced its DNA-binding ability and facilitated the chromatin condensation process during mitosis. Mutation of Thr739 to alanine resulted in Sp1 remaining in the chromosomes, delayed cell-cycle progression, and eventually led to apoptosis. Screening of Sp1-associated proteins during mitosis by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the tethering of Sp1 to myosin/F-actin. Furthermore, phospho-Sp1 and myosin/F-actin appeared to exist as a congregated ring at the periphery of the chromosome. However, at the end of mitosis and the beginning of interphase, Sp1 was dephosphorylated by PP2A and returned to the chromatin. These results indicate that cancer cells use CDK1 and PP2A to regulate the movement of Sp1 in and out of the chromosomes during cell-cycle progression, which may benefit cancer-cell proliferation.

  11. WRKY Transcription Factors: Molecular Regulation and Stress Responses in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjal J Phukan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants in their natural habitat have to face multiple stresses simultaneously. Evolutionary adaptation of developmental, physiological and biochemical parameters give advantage over a single window of stress but not multiple. On the other hand transcription factors like WRKY can regulate diverse responses through a complicated network of genes. So molecular orchestration of WRKYs in plant may provide the most anticipated outcome of simultaneous multiple responses. Activation or repression through W-box and W-box like sequences is regulated at transcriptional, translational and domain level. Because of the tight regulation involved in specific recognition and binding of WRKYs to downstream promoters, they have become promising candidate for crop improvement. Epigenetic, retrograde and proteasome mediated regulation enable WRKYs to attain the dynamic cellular homeostatic reprograming. Overexpression of several WRKYs face the paradox of having several beneficial affects but with some unwanted traits. These overexpression-associated undesirable phenotypes need to be identified and removed for proper growth, development and yeild. Taken together, we have highlighted the diverse regulation and multiple stress response of WRKYs in plants along with the future prospects in this field of research.

  12. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the SOX18 Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Frank; Overman, Jeroen; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Salim, Angela; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Prokoph, Nina; Robertson, Avril A B; Lua, Linda; Alexandrov, Kirill; Koopman, Peter; Capon, Robert J; Sierecki, Emma; Gambin, Yann; Jauch, Ralf; Cooper, Matthew A; Zuegg, Johannes; Francois, Mathias

    2017-03-16

    Pharmacological modulation of transcription factors (TFs) has only met little success over the past four decades. This is mostly due to standard drug discovery approaches centered on blocking protein/DNA binding or interfering with post-translational modifications. Recent advances in the field of TF biology have revealed a central role of protein-protein interaction in their mode of action. In an attempt to modulate the activity of SOX18 TF, a known regulator of vascular growth in development and disease, we screened a marine extract library for potential small-molecule inhibitors. We identified two compounds, which inspired a series of synthetic SOX18 inhibitors, able to interfere with the SOX18 HMG DNA-binding domain, and to disrupt HMG-dependent protein-protein interaction with RBPJ. These compounds also perturbed SOX18 transcriptional activity in a cell-based reporter gene system. This approach may prove useful in developing a new class of anti-angiogenic compounds based on the inhibition of TF activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin; Ding, Zhong Jie; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Multiple steps in the regulation of transcription-factor level and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Ab, G

    1996-01-01

    This review focuses on the regulation of transcription factors, many of which are DNA-binding proteins that recognize cis-regulatory elements of target genes and are the most direct regulators of gene transcription. Transcription factors serve as integration centres of the different

  15. Fundamental Design Principles for Transcription-Factor-Based Metabolite Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ahmad A; Liu, Di; Zhang, Fuzhong; Oyarzún, Diego A

    2017-10-20

    Metabolite biosensors are central to current efforts toward precision engineering of metabolism. Although most research has focused on building new biosensors, their tunability remains poorly understood and is fundamental for their broad applicability. Here we asked how genetic modifications shape the dose-response curve of biosensors based on metabolite-responsive transcription factors. Using the lac system in Escherichia coli as a model system, we built promoter libraries with variable operator sites that reveal interdependencies between biosensor dynamic range and response threshold. We developed a phenomenological theory to quantify such design constraints in biosensors with various architectures and tunable parameters. Our theory reveals a maximal achievable dynamic range and exposes tunable parameters for orthogonal control of dynamic range and response threshold. Our work sheds light on fundamental limits of synthetic biology designs and provides quantitative guidelines for biosensor design in applications such as dynamic pathway control, strain optimization, and real-time monitoring of metabolism.

  16. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  17. A role for the transcription factor HEY1 in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Quarto, Micaela; Vernell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest-grade glioma, is the most frequent tumour of the brain with a very poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Although little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie glioblastoma formation, a number of signal transduction routes...... and that expression of HEY1 in GBM correlates with tumour-grade and survival. In addition, we show by chromatin immunoprecipitations, luciferase assays and Northern blot experiments that HEY1 is a bona fide target of the E2F family of transcription factors, connecting the Ras and Notch signalling pathways. Finally......, we show that ectopic expression of HEY1 induces cell proliferation in neural stem cells, while depletion of HEY1 by RNA interference reduces proliferation of glioblastoma cells in tissue culture. Together, these data imply a role for HEY1 in the progression of GBM, and therefore we propose that HEY1...

  18. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol or sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  19. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vichi; F. Coin (Frédéric); J-P. Renaud (Jean-Paul); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Moras; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA boxbinding protein

  20. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 entry by transcription factor XBP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Lin, Chiou-Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong, E-mail: jimtong@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lau, Kean Seng [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IRE1 was activated but no XBP1 splicing was detected during enterovirus 71 infection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XBP1 was subject to translational shutoff by enterovirus 71-induced eIF4G cleavage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uptake of UV-irradiated virus was decreased in XBP1-overexpressing cells. -- Abstract: Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) plays an important role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or unfolded protein, stress response by activating its downstream transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1). We demonstrated previously that enterovirus 71 (EV71) upregulated XBP1 mRNA levels but did not activate spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA or its downstream target genes, EDEM and chaperones. In this study, we investigated further this regulatory mechanism and found that IRE1 was phosphorylated and activated after EV71 infection, whereas its downstream XBP1s protein level decreased. We also found that XBP1s was not cleaved directly by 2A{sup pro}, but that cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G by the EV71 2A{sup pro} protein may contribute to the decrease in XBP1s expression. Knockdown of XBP1 increased viral protein expression, and the synthesis of EV71 viral protein and the production of EV71 viral particles were inhibited in XBP1-overexpressing RD cells. When incubated with replication-deficient and UV-irradiated EV71, XBP1-overexpressing RD cells exhibited reduced viral RNA levels, suggesting that the inhibition of XBP1s by viral infection may underlie viral entry, which is required for viral replication. Our findings are the first indication of the ability of XBP1 to inhibit viral entry, possibly via its transcriptional activity in regulating molecules in the endocytic machinery.

  1. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Ying eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal.These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  2. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Activating Transcription Factor 5-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Umemura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5 is a member of the CREB/ATF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors. We previously reported that ATF5-deficient (ATF5-/- mice demonstrated abnormal olfactory bulb development due to impaired interneuron supply. Furthermore, ATF5-/- mice were less aggressive than ATF5+/+ mice. Although ATF5 is widely expressed in the brain, and involved in the regulation of proliferation and development of neurons, the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain remains unknown. Our objective was to investigate the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain. We performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis using ATF5-/- mice and wild type littermates. ATF5-/- mice exhibited abnormal locomotor activity in the open field test. They also exhibited abnormal anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark transition test and open field test. Furthermore, ATF5-/- mice displayed reduced social interaction in the Crawley’s social interaction test and increased pain sensitivity in the hot plate test compared with wild type. Finally, behavioral flexibility was reduced in the T-maze test in ATF5-/- mice compared with wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that ATF5-/- mice display disturbances of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in several brain regions. These results indicate that ATF5 deficiency elicits abnormal behaviors and the disturbance of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The behavioral abnormalities of ATF5-/- mice may be due to the disturbance of monoamine levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that ATF5-/- mice may be a unique animal model of some psychiatric disorders.

  3. Osteogenic Potential of the Transcription Factor c-MYB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oralova, V; Matalova, E; Killinger, M; Knopfova, L; Smarda, J; Buchtova, M

    2017-03-01

    The transcription factor c-MYB is a well-known marker of undifferentiated cells such as haematopoietic cell precursors, but recently it has also been observed in differentiated cells that produce hard tissues. Our previous findings showed the presence of c-MYB in intramembranous bones and its involvement in the chondrogenic steps of endochondral ossification, where the up-regulation of early chondrogenic markers after c-myb overexpression was observed. Since we previously detected c-MYB in osteoblasts, we aimed to analyse the localisation of c-MYB during later stages of endochondral bone formation and address its function during bone matrix production. c-MYB-positive cells were found in the chondro-osseous junction zone in osteoblasts of trabecular bone as well as deeper in the zone of ossification in cells of spongy bone. To experimentally evaluate the osteogenic potential of c-MYB during endochondral bone formation, micromasses derived from embryonic mouse limb buds were established. Nuclear c-MYB protein expression was observed in long-term micromasses, especially in the areas around nodules. c-myb overexpression induced the expression of osteogenic-related genes such as Bmp2, Comp, Csf2 and Itgb1. Moreover, alizarin red staining and osteocalcin labelling promoted mineralised matrix production in c-myb-overexpressing cultures, whereas downregulation of c-myb by siRNA reduced mineralised matrix production. In conclusion, c-Myb plays a role in the osteogenesis of long bones by inducing osteogenic genes and causing the enhancement of mineral matrix production. This action of the transcription factor c-Myb might be of interest in the future for the establishment of novel approaches to tissue regeneration.

  4. P. gingivalis modulates keratinocytes through FOXO transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    Full Text Available P. gingivalis is a prominent periodontal pathogen that has potent effects on host cells. In this study we challenged gingival epithelial cells with P. gingivalis with the aim of assessing how mRNA levels of key target genes were modulated by P. gingivalis via the transcription factors FOXO1 and FOXO3. Primary mono- and multi-layer cultures of gingival epithelial cells were challenged and barrier function was examined by fluorescent dextran and apoptosis was measured by cytoplasmic histone associated DNA. Gene expression levels were measured by real-time PCR with and without FOXO1 and FOXO3 siRNA compared to scrambled siRNA. P. gingivalis induced a loss of barrier function and stimulated gingival epithelial cell apoptosis in multilayer cultures that was in part gingipain dependent. P. gingivalis stimulated an increase in FOXO1 and FOXO3 mRNA, enhanced mRNA levels of genes associated with differentiated keratinocyte function (keratin-1, -10, -14, and involucrin, increased mRNA levels of apoptotic genes (BID and TRADD, reduced mRNA levels of genes that regulate inflammation (TLR-2 and -4 and reduced those associated with barrier function (integrin beta-1, -3 and -6. The ability of P. gingivalis to modulate these genes was predominantly FOXO1 and FOXO3 dependent. The results indicate that P. gingivalis has pronounced effects on gingival keratinocytes and modulates mRNA levels of genes that affect host response, differentiation, apoptosis and barrier function. Moreover, this modulation is dependent upon the transcription factors FOXO1 or FOXO3. In addition, a new function for FOXO1 was identified, that of suppressing TLR-2 and TLR-4 and maintaining integrin beta -1, beta -3 and beta -6 basal mRNA levels in keratinocytes.

  5. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  6. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  7. T-2 toxin induces the expression of porcine CYP3A22 via the upregulation of the transcription factor, NF-Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wen, Jikai; Chen, Ruohong; Zhang, Tingting; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Yiqun

    2016-10-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the major pollutants in crops and feedstuffs. CYP3A22, one of hCYP3A4 homologs, detoxifies T-2 toxin in pigs. We investigated the mechanisms of expression activation of CYP3A22 under basal and induced conditions. Based on MatInspector analysis, several mutations in the CYP3A22 promoter were assayed by dual luciferase reporter to identify the function of cis elements in the region. EMSA experiments were used to assess the binding of transcription factors to the cis elements. The mRNA and protein levels of CYP3A22 and the transcription factors were measured by RT-qPCR and Western blot. The enhancement of NF-Y binding to the CYP3A22 promoter was assayed by ChIP. As predicted, two cis DNA elements in the CYP3A22 promoter, a CCAAT box and GC box, were confirmed to be crucial in the activation of CYP3A22 transcription. These two DNA motifs recruited two transcription factors, NF-Y and Sp1, which are involved in the activation of the basal transcription of CYP3A22. More interestingly, CYP3A22 expression was induced in porcine primary hepatocytes by the treatment with 0.1μg/mL T-2 toxin. This induction of transcription by T-2 toxin was dominantly regulated by the binding of NF-Y to the CCAAT box, rather than GC box, which recruits Sp1 and functions only in the constitutive expression of CYP3A22. Our study reveals the regulatory mechanisms of both basal and inducible transactivation of CYP3A22 in pigs. In particular, we identified that the mechanism by which T-2 toxin induces CYP3A22 expression is mediated by the upregulation of NF-YA. Although porcine CYP3A22 is homologous to hCYP3A4, the regulation of basal and induced expression of CYP3A22 occurred via distinct mechanisms. This may account for the variety of CYP3A expression in animals and humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR, mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP, whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  9. Genome-wide identification of transcription factors and transcription-factor binding sites in oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Dongmei; Li, Jing; Jing, Gongchao; Ning, Kang; Xu, Jian

    2014-06-26

    Nannochloropsis spp. are a group of oleaginous microalgae that harbor an expanded array of lipid-synthesis related genes, yet how they are transcriptionally regulated remains unknown. Here a phylogenomic approach was employed to identify and functionally annotate the transcriptional factors (TFs) and TF binding-sites (TFBSs) in N. oceanica IMET1. Among 36 microalgae and higher plants genomes, a two-fold reduction in the number of TF families plus a seven-fold decrease of average family-size in Nannochloropsis, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta were observed. The degree of similarity in TF-family profiles is indicative of the phylogenetic relationship among the species, suggesting co-evolution of TF-family profiles and species. Furthermore, comparative analysis of six Nannochloropsis genomes revealed 68 "most-conserved" TFBS motifs, with 11 of which predicted to be related to lipid accumulation or photosynthesis. Mapping the IMET1 TFs and TFBS motifs to the reference plant TF-"TFBS motif" relationships in TRANSFAC enabled the prediction of 78 TF-"TFBS motif" interaction pairs, which consisted of 34 TFs (with 11 TFs potentially involved in the TAG biosynthesis pathway), 30 TFBS motifs and 2,368 regulatory connections between TFs and target genes. Our results form the basis of further experiments to validate and engineer the regulatory network of Nannochloropsis spp. for enhanced biofuel production.

  10. Beyond Transcription Factors: The Role of Chromatin Modifying Enzymes in Regulating Transcription Required for Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ruth M.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the alluring aspects of examining chromatin modifications in the role of modulating transcription required for long-term memory processes is that these modifications may provide transient and potentially stable epigenetic marks in the service of activating and/or maintaining transcriptional processes. These, in turn, may ultimately…

  11. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis in nectarine (Prunus persica) by a set of R2R3 MYB transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaglia, Daniela; Espley, Richard V; Henry-Kirk, Rebecca A; Andreotti, Carlo; Ziosi, Vanina; Hellens, Roger P; Costa, Guglielmo; Allan, Andrew C

    2013-04-25

    Flavonoids such as anthocyanins, flavonols and proanthocyanidins, play a central role in fruit colour, flavour and health attributes. In peach and nectarine (Prunus persica) these compounds vary during fruit growth and ripening. Flavonoids are produced by a well studied pathway which is transcriptionally regulated by members of the MYB and bHLH transcription factor families. We have isolated nectarine flavonoid regulating genes and examined their expression patterns, which suggests a critical role in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis. In nectarine, expression of the genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid pathway correlated with the concentration of proanthocyanidins, which strongly increases at mid-development. In contrast, the only gene which showed a similar pattern to anthocyanin concentration was UDP-glucose-flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT), which was high at the beginning and end of fruit growth, remaining low during the other developmental stages. Expression of flavonol synthase (FLS1) correlated with flavonol levels, both temporally and in a tissue specific manner. The pattern of UFGT gene expression may be explained by the involvement of different transcription factors, which up-regulate flavonoid biosynthesis (MYB10, MYB123, and bHLH3), or repress (MYB111 and MYB16) the transcription of the biosynthetic genes. The expression of a potential proanthocyanidin-regulating transcription factor, MYBPA1, corresponded with proanthocyanidin levels. Functional assays of these transcription factors were used to test the specificity for flavonoid regulation. MYB10 positively regulates the promoters of UFGT and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) but not leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). In contrast, MYBPA1 trans-activates the promoters of DFR and LAR, but not UFGT. This suggests exclusive roles of anthocyanin regulation by MYB10 and proanthocyanidin regulation by MYBPA1. Further, these transcription factors appeared to be responsive to both

  13. Parathyroid hormone inhibition of Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 transcription: Intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Bezerra, Camila Nogueira Alves, E-mail: camilab@icb.usp.br; Queiroz-Leite, Gabriella Duarte; Polidoro, Juliano Zequini; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2015-06-12

    The main transport mechanism of reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate and fluid in the renal proximal tubules involves Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger 3 (NHE3), which is acutely and chronically downregulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH). Although PTH is known to exert an inhibitory effect on NHE3 expression and transcription, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that, in opossum kidney proximal tubule (OKP) cells, PTH-induced inhibition of Nhe3 gene promoter occurs even in the core promoter that controls expression of the reporter gene. We found that inhibition of the protein kinase A (PKA) and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways transformed PTH from an inhibitor of promoter activity into an activator of that same activity, as did point mutations in the EGR1, Sp1, and Sp3 binding consensus elements in the promoter. In nuclear extracts of PTH-treated OKP cells, we also observed increased expression of EGR1 mRNA and of some Sp3 isoforms. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed a supershift of the −61 to −42-bp probe with an anti-EGR1 antibody in PTH-treated cells, suggesting that EGR1 binding is relevant for the inhibitory activity of PTH. We conclude that PTH-induced inhibition of NHE3 transcription is related to higher EGR1 expression; to EGR1 binding to the proximal and core promoters; and to PKA and JAK/STAT pathway activation. This mechanism might be responsible, at least in part, for lower NHE3 expression and sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubules in the presence of high PTH levels. - Highlights: • PTH regulation of Nhe3 promoter depends on EGR1 binding. • EGR1, PKA and JAK/STAT are involved in PTH inhibition of the Nhe3 promoter. • PTH alters expression of EGR1 and Sp3. • PTH inhibits the Nhe3 promoter by regulating PKA and JAK/STAT signaling.

  14. Hypoxia, Hypoxia-inducible Transcription Factors, and Renal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Johannes; Grampp, Steffen; Maher, Eamonn R; Moch, Holger; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Russo, Paul; Mole, David R

    2016-04-01

    Renal cancer is a common urologic malignancy, and therapeutic options for metastatic disease are limited. Most clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) are associated with loss of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (pVHL) function and deregulation of hypoxia pathways. This review summarizes recent evidence from genetic and biological studies showing that hypoxia and hypoxia-related pathways play critical roles in the development and progress of renal cancer. We used a systematic search for articles using the keywords hypoxia, HIF, renal cancer, and VHL. Identification of the tumor suppressor pVHL has allowed the characterization of important ccRCC-associated pathways. pVHL targets α-subunits of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF) for proteasomal degradation. The two main HIF-α isoforms have opposing effects on RCC biology, possibly through distinct interactions with additional oncogenes. Furthermore, HIF-1α activity is commonly diminished by chromosomal deletion in ccRCCs, and increased HIF-1 activity reduces tumor burden in xenograft tumor models. Conversely, polymorphisms at the HIF-2α gene locus predispose to the development of ccRCCs, and HIF-2α promotes tumor growth. Genetic studies have revealed a prominent role for chromatin-modifying enzyme genes in ccRCC, and these may further modulate specific aspects of the HIF response. This suggests that, rather than global activation of HIF, specific components of the response are important in promoting kidney cancer. Some of these processes are already targets for current therapeutic strategies, and further dissection of this pathway might yield novel methods of treating RCC. In contrast to many tumor types, HIF-1α and HIF-2α have opposing effects in ccRCC biology, with HIF-1α acting as a tumor suppressor and HIF-2α acting as an oncogene. The overall effect of VHL inactivation will depend on fine-tuning of the HIF response. High levels of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF) are

  15. Transcription factor AP2 beta involved in severe female alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Niklas; Göktürk, Camilla; Comasco, Erika; Nilsson, Kent W; Oreland, Lars; Hallman, Jarmila

    2009-12-11

    Susceptibility to alcoholism and antisocial behavior exhibits an evident link to monoaminergic neurotransmission. The serotonin system in particular, which is associated with regulation of mood and behavior, has an influence on personality characters that are firmly connected to risk of developing alcoholism and antisocial behavior, such as impulsiveness, and aggression. The transcription factor TFAP2b has repeatedly been shown to be involved in monoaminergic transmission, likely due to a regulatory effect on genes that are fundamental to this system, e.g. monoamine oxidase type A, and the serotonin transporter. Recent research has identified a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding TFAP2B that regulates its level of expression. In the present study we have compared a sample of female alcoholics (n=107), sentenced to institutional care for their severe addiction, contrasted against a control sample of adolescent females (n=875). The results showed that parental alcohol misuse was significantly more common among the alcoholic females, and also that parental alcohol misuse was associated with a reduction in age of alcohol debut. We also addressed the question of whether a functional TFAP2b polymorphism was associated with alcoholism. Results showed that the high-functioning allele was significantly more common among the female alcoholics, compared to the non-alcoholic controls. Furthermore, the results also indicated that psychosocial factors, in terms of parental alcohol misuse, depression or psychiatric disorder, had an influence on the association. It was observed that the genetic association was restricted to the subset of cases that had not experienced these negative psychosocial factors.

  16. Transcription factor HBP1 is a direct anti-cancer target of transcription factor FOXO1 in invasive oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chien-Yi; Huang, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Roth, Mendel M; Chou, I-Tai; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Fen; Huang, Chun-Yin

    2017-02-28

    Either FOXO1 or HBP1 transcription factor is a downstream effector of the PI3K/Akt pathway and associated with tumorigenesis. However, the relationship between FOXO1 and HBP1 in oral cancer remains unclear. Analysis of 30 oral tumor specimens revealed that mean mRNA levels of both FOXO1 and HBP1 in non-invasive and invasive oral tumors were found to be significantly lower than that of the control tissues, and the status of low FOXO1 and HBP1 (oral tumors. To investigate if HBP1 is a direct transcription target of FOXO1, we searched potential FOXO1 binding sites in the HBP1 promoter using the MAPPER Search Engine, and two putative FOXO1 binding sites located in the HBP1 promoter -132 to -125 bp and -343 to -336 bp were predicted. These binding sites were then confirmed by both reporter gene assays and the in cellulo ChIP assay. In addition, Akt activity manipulated by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Akt mutants was shown to negatively affect FOXO1-mediated HBP1 promoter activation and gene expression. Last, the biological significance of the FOXO1-HBP1 axis in oral cancer malignancy was evaluated in cell growth, colony formation, and invasiveness. The results indicated that HBP1 knockdown potently promoted malignant phenotypes of oral cancer and the suppressive effect of FOXO1 on cell growth, colony formation, and invasion was alleviated upon HBP1 knockdown in invasive oral cancer cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for HBP1 as a direct downstream target of FOXO1 in oral cancer malignancy.

  17. Regulation of cell proliferation by the E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K

    1998-01-01

    demonstrated that individual members of the E2F transcription factor family are likely to have distinct roles in mammalian development and homeostasis. Additional mechanisms regulating the activity of the E2F transcription factors have been reported, including subcellular localization and proteolysis of the E2......Fs in the proteasomes. Novel target genes for the E2F transcription factors have been identified that link the E2Fs directly to the initiation of DNA replication....

  18. TBP binding and the rate of transcription initiation from the human β-globin gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Antoniou (Michael); E. Spanopoulou; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. de Boer (Ernie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractDNA-protein interaction studies in vitro revealed several factors binding over the TATA box and the region of transcription initiation (cap) site of the human beta-globin promoter; TATA binding protein TBP at -30, Sp1 at -19, GATA-1 at -12 and +5, YY1 at -9 and a novel factor C1 over the

  19. Hacking an Algal Transcription Factor for Lipid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Hu, Guipeng; Liu, Liming

    2018-02-03

    Transcriptional engineering is a viable means for engineering microalgae to produce lipid, but it often results in a trade-off between production and growth. A recent study shows that engineering a single transcriptional regulator enables efficient carbon partitioning to lipid biosynthesis with high biomass productivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional analysis of Dof transcription factors controlling heading date and PPDK gene expression in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 1 presents a general introduction to the factors involved in crop domestication and the specific role of transcription factors in this process. Chapter 2 describes the functional analysis of a Dof-type transcription factor, named OsDof24, from rice.chapter 3 describes the role of OsDof25 in

  1. TRF2: TRansForming the view of general transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kedmi, Adi; Ideses, Diana; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is pivotal for development and differentiation of organisms. Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) initiates at the core promoter. Core promoters, which encompass the transcription start site, may contain functional core promoter elements, such as the TATA box, initiator, TCT and downstream core promoter element. TRF2 (TATA-box-binding protein-related factor 2) does not bind TATA box-containing promoters. Rather, it is recruited to core promoters via sequences other than the TATA box. We review the recent findings implicating TRF2 as a basal transcription factor in the regulation of diverse biological processes and specialized transcriptional programs.

  2. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  3. Synergic reprogramming of mammalian cells by combined exposure to mitotic Xenopus egg extracts and transcription factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olivier Ganier; Stéphane Bocquet; Isabelle Peiffer; Vincent Brochard; Philippe Arnaud; Aurore Puy; Alice Jouneau; Robert Feil; Jean-Paul Renard; Marcel Méchali

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of somatic cell nuclei to enucleated eggs and ectopic expression of specific transcription factors are two different reprogramming strategies used to generate pluripotent cells from differentiated cells...

  4. Single molecule transcription factor dynamics in the syncytial Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzacq, Xavier

    During early development in the Drosophila embryo, cell fates are determined over the course of just 2 hours with exquisite spatio-temoral precision. One of the key regulators of this process is the transcription factor Bicoid which forms a concentration gradient across the long axis of the embryo. Although Bicoids' primary role is activation at the anterior, where concentrations are highest, it is also known to play a role in the posterior where there are only 100s of molecules per nucleus. Understanding how Bicoid can find its target at such low concentrations has remained intractable, largely due to the inability to perform single molecule imaging in the context of the developing embryo. Here we use lattice light sheet microscopy to overcome the technical barriers of sample thickness and auto-fluorescence to characterize the single molecule dynamics of Bicoid. We find that off-rates do not vary across the embryo and that instead the on-rates are modulated through the formation of clusters that enrich local concentration. This data is contrary to the current concentration dependent model of Bicoid function since local concentration within the nucleus is now a regulated parameter and suggests a previously unknown mechanism for regulation at extremely low concentrations.

  5. WRKY transcription factors in plant responses to stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Ma, Shenghui; Ye, Nenghui; Jiang, Ming; Cao, Jiashu; Zhang, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    The WRKY gene family is among the largest families of transcription factors (TFs) in higher plants. By regulating the plant hormone signal transduction pathway, these TFs play critical roles in some plant processes in response to biotic and abiotic stress. Various bodies of research have demonstrated the important biological functions of WRKY TFs in plant response to different kinds of biotic and abiotic stresses and working mechanisms. However, very little summarization has been done to review their research progress. Not just important TFs function in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses, WRKY also participates in carbohydrate synthesis, senescence, development, and secondary metabolites synthesis. WRKY proteins can bind to W-box (TGACC (A/T)) in the promoter of its target genes and activate or repress the expression of downstream genes to regulate their stress response. Moreover, WRKY proteins can interact with other TFs to regulate plant defensive responses. In the present review, we focus on the structural characteristics of WRKY TFs and the research progress on their functions in plant responses to a variety of stresses. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Pluripotent stem cell transcription factors during human odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Juliana Malta; da Costa-Neves, Adriana; Kerkis, Irina; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Stem cells are capable of generating various cell lines and can be obtained from adult or embryonic tissues for clinical therapies. Stem cells from deciduous dental pulp are among those that are easily obtainable from adult tissues and have been widely studied because of their ability to differentiate into a variety of cell lines in the presence of various chemical mediators. We have analyze the expression of several proteins related to the differentiation and proliferative potential of cell populations that compose the tooth germ of human fetuses. We evaluate 20 human fetuses of both genders. After being paraffin-embedded, cap and bell stages of tooth germ development were subjected to immunohistochemistry for the following markers: Oct-4, Nanog, Stat-3 and Sox-2. The studied antibodies showed nuclear or cytoplasmic immunnostaining within various anatomical structures and with various degrees of expression, indicating the action of these proteins during tooth development. We conclude that the interrelationship between these transcription factors is complex and associated with self-renewal and cell differentiation. Our results suggest that the expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and Stat-3 are related to differentiation in ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

  7. Bivariate Genomic Footprinting Detects Changes in Transcription Factor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjoon Baek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In response to activating signals, transcription factors (TFs bind DNA and regulate gene expression. TF binding can be measured by protection of the bound sequence from DNase digestion (i.e., footprint. Here, we report that 80% of TF binding motifs do not show a measurable footprint, partly because of a variable cleavage pattern within the motif sequence. To more faithfully portray the effect of TFs on chromatin, we developed an algorithm that captures two TF-dependent effects on chromatin accessibility: footprinting and motif-flanking accessibility. The algorithm, termed bivariate genomic footprinting (BaGFoot, efficiently detects TF activity. BaGFoot is robust to different accessibility assays (DNase-seq, ATAC-seq, all examined peak-calling programs, and a variety of cut bias correction approaches. BaGFoot reliably predicts TF binding and provides valuable information regarding the TFs affecting chromatin accessibility in various biological systems and following various biological events, including in cases where an absolute footprint cannot be determined.

  8. Bivariate Genomic Footprinting Detects Changes in Transcription Factor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Songjoon; Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L

    2017-05-23

    In response to activating signals, transcription factors (TFs) bind DNA and regulate gene expression. TF binding can be measured by protection of the bound sequence from DNase digestion (i.e., footprint). Here, we report that 80% of TF binding motifs do not show a measurable footprint, partly because of a variable cleavage pattern within the motif sequence. To more faithfully portray the effect of TFs on chromatin, we developed an algorithm that captures two TF-dependent effects on chromatin accessibility: footprinting and motif-flanking accessibility. The algorithm, termed bivariate genomic footprinting (BaGFoot), efficiently detects TF activity. BaGFoot is robust to different accessibility assays (DNase-seq, ATAC-seq), all examined peak-calling programs, and a variety of cut bias correction approaches. BaGFoot reliably predicts TF binding and provides valuable information regarding the TFs affecting chromatin accessibility in various biological systems and following various biological events, including in cases where an absolute footprint cannot be determined. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. SoxC transcription factors in retinal development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Hertz, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Glaucoma and other optic neuropathies result in optic nerve degeneration and the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through complex signaling pathways. Although the mechanisms that regulate RGC development remain unclear, uncovering novel developmental pathways may support new strategies to regenerate the optic nerve or replace RGCs. Here we review recent studies that provide strong evidence that the Sry-related high-mobility-group C (SoxC) subfamily of transcription factors (TFs) are necessary and sufficient for axon guidance and RGC fate specification. These findings also uncover novel SoxC-dependent mechanisms that serve as master regulators during important steps of RGC development. For example, we review work showing that SoxC TFs regulate RGC axon guidance and direction through the optic chiasm towards their appropriate targets in the brain. We also review work demonstrating that Sox11 subcellular localization is, in part, controlled through small ubiquitin-like post-translational modifier (SUMO) and suggest compensatory cross-talk between Sox4 and Sox11. Furthermore, Sox4 overexpression is shown to positively drive RGC differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Finally, we discuss how these findings may contribute to the advancement of regenerative and cell-based therapies to treat glaucoma and other optic nerve neuropathies.

  10. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  11. The Sox transcriptional factors: Functions during intestinal development in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2017-03-01

    The intestine has long been studied as a model for adult stem cells due to the life-long self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium through the proliferation of the adult intestinal stem cells. Recent evidence suggests that the formation of adult intestinal stem cells in mammals takes place during the thyroid hormone-dependent neonatal period, also known as postembryonic development, which resembles intestinal remodeling during frog metamorphosis. Studies on the metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis have revealed that many members of the Sox family, a large family of DNA binding transcription factors, are upregulated in the intestinal epithelium during the formation and/or proliferation of the intestinal stem cells. Similarly, a number of Sox genes have been implicated in intestinal development and pathogenesis in mammals. Futures studies are needed to determine the expression and potential involvement of this important gene family in the development of the adult intestinal stem cells. These include the analyses of the expression and regulation of these and other Sox genes during postembryonic development in mammals as well as functional investigations in both mammals and amphibians by using the recently developed gene knockout technologies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The transcription factor FOXL2 in ovarian function and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfride De Baere

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Blepharophimosis Ptosis Epicanthus-inversus Syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by complex eyelid malformations often associated with premature ovarian failure (POF. BPES is basically an autosomal dominant disease, due to mutations in the FOXL2 gene, which encodes a forkhead transcription factor. More than one hundred mutations of FOXL2 have been described to date. In agreement with the BPES phenotype, FOXL2 is expressed (though not exclusively in the developing eyelids and in fetal and adult ovaries. Two mouse knock-out models have been produced. They recapitulate the BPES phenotype and have provided insights into the pathology. Loss-of-function mutations in FOXL2 are predicted to lead to BPES and POF, while hypomorphic mutations might lead to BPES without ovarian dysfunction. However, exceptions to the genotype-phenotype correlation have been described. To better understand the pathogenic effect of these mutations it is crucial to study the normal regulation of FOXL2 and its targets. We briefly address these aspects in this review and hope that basic research around FOXL2 will eventually lead to uncover new therapeutic avenues.

  13. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul eFernandez-Lopez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors (WCBs have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC and LysR, metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur and NikR or antibiotics (TetR and MarR. Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain (EBD. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task.

  14. Predicting Transcription Factor Specificity with All-Atom Models

    CERN Document Server

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Mirny, Leonid A; Kardar, Mehran

    2008-01-01

    The binding of a transcription factor (TF) to a DNA operator site can initiate or repress the expression of a gene. Computational prediction of sites recognized by a TF has traditionally relied upon knowledge of several cognate sites, rather than an ab initio approach. Here, we examine the possibility of using structure-based energy calculations that require no knowledge of bound sites but rather start with the structure of a protein-DNA complex. We study the PurR E. coli TF, and explore to which extent atomistic models of protein-DNA complexes can be used to distinguish between cognate and non-cognate DNA sites. Particular emphasis is placed on systematic evaluation of this approach by comparing its performance with bioinformatic methods, by testing it against random decoys and sites of homologous TFs. We also examine a set of experimental mutations in both DNA and the protein. Using our explicit estimates of energy, we show that the specificity for PurR is dominated by direct protein-DNA interactions, and w...

  15. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-López, Raul; Ruiz, Raul; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Whole cell biosensors (WCBs) have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF) used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC, and LysR), metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur, and NikR) or antibiotics (TetR and MarR). Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task. PMID:26191047

  16. The WRKY Transcription Factor Genes in Lotus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factor genes play critical roles in plant growth and development, as well as stress responses. WRKY genes have been examined in various higher plants, but they have not been characterized in Lotus japonicus. The recent release of the L. japonicus whole genome sequence provides an opportunity for a genome wide analysis of WRKY genes in this species. In this study, we identified 61 WRKY genes in the L. japonicus genome. Based on the WRKY protein structure, L. japonicus WRKY (LjWRKY genes can be classified into three groups (I–III. Investigations of gene copy number and gene clusters indicate that only one gene duplication event occurred on chromosome 4 and no clustered genes were detected on chromosomes 3 or 6. Researchers previously believed that group II and III WRKY domains were derived from the C-terminal WRKY domain of group I. Our results suggest that some WRKY genes in group II originated from the N-terminal domain of group I WRKY genes. Additional evidence to support this hypothesis was obtained by Medicago truncatula WRKY (MtWRKY protein motif analysis. We found that LjWRKY and MtWRKY group III genes are under purifying selection, suggesting that WRKY genes will become increasingly structured and functionally conserved.

  17. The WRKY Transcription Factor Genes in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Nan, Zhibiao; Wang, Xingjun

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factor genes play critical roles in plant growth and development, as well as stress responses. WRKY genes have been examined in various higher plants, but they have not been characterized in Lotus japonicus. The recent release of the L. japonicus whole genome sequence provides an opportunity for a genome wide analysis of WRKY genes in this species. In this study, we identified 61 WRKY genes in the L. japonicus genome. Based on the WRKY protein structure, L. japonicus WRKY (LjWRKY) genes can be classified into three groups (I-III). Investigations of gene copy number and gene clusters indicate that only one gene duplication event occurred on chromosome 4 and no clustered genes were detected on chromosomes 3 or 6. Researchers previously believed that group II and III WRKY domains were derived from the C-terminal WRKY domain of group I. Our results suggest that some WRKY genes in group II originated from the N-terminal domain of group I WRKY genes. Additional evidence to support this hypothesis was obtained by Medicago truncatula WRKY (MtWRKY) protein motif analysis. We found that LjWRKY and MtWRKY group III genes are under purifying selection, suggesting that WRKY genes will become increasingly structured and functionally conserved.

  18. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-08-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  19. Computational identification of combinatorial regulation and transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taewoo; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Dae-Won; Lee, Doheon

    2007-08-15

    A number of computational methods have been used to unravel the core mechanisms governing the regulation of gene expression, but these techniques examine only portions of the genetic regulatory mechanism. For example, some studies have failed to include the combined action of multiple transcription factors (TFs) or the importance of TF binding constraints (i.e., the binding position and orientation), while others have examined combinations of only 2 or 3 TFs. Thus, we sought to develop a new method for identifying regulatory modules in yeast, using an algorithm that includes all combinations of TFs plus a number of binding constraints when identifying target genes. We successfully developed a computational method for using microarray and TF-DNA interaction data to identify regulatory modules. All possible combinations of yeast TFs and various binding constraints were tested to identify regulatory modules. Within the identified modules, target genes were found to have common binding constraints such as fixed binding regions and orientations for each TF. Moreover, targets showed similar mRNA expression profiles and high functional coherence. Our novel approach, which accounts for both combined actions of TFs and their binding constraints, can be used to identify target genes and reliably predict regulatory modules over a broad range of functional categories. Complete results and additional information are available online at http://bisl. kaist.ac.kr/~dhlee/comModule/index.html. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Embryonic epigenetic reprogramming by a pioneer transcription factor in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zeng; Shen, Lisha; Gu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yizhong; Yu, Hao; He, Yuehui

    2017-11-02

    Epigenetic modifications, including chromatin modifications and DNA methylation, have a central role in the regulation of gene expression in plants and animals. The transmission of epigenetic marks is crucial for certain genes to retain cell lineage-specific expression patterns and maintain cell fate. However, the marks that have accumulated at regulatory loci during growth and development or in response to environmental stimuli need to be deleted in gametes or embryos, particularly in organisms such as plants that do not set aside a germ line, to ensure the proper development of offspring. In Arabidopsis thaliana, prolonged exposure to cold temperatures (winter cold), in a process known as vernalization, triggers the mitotically stable epigenetic silencing of the potent floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), and renders plants competent to flower in the spring; however, this silencing is reset during each generation. Here we show that the seed-specific transcription factor LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) promotes the initial establishment of an active chromatin state at FLC and activates its expression de novo in the pro-embryo, thus reversing the silenced state inherited from gametes. This active chromatin state is passed on from the pro-embryo to post-embryonic life, and leads to transmission of the embryonic memory of FLC activation to post-embryonic stages. Our findings reveal a mechanism for the reprogramming of embryonic chromatin states in plants, and provide insights into the epigenetic memory of embryonic active gene expression in post-embryonic phases, through which an embryonic factor acts to 'control' post-embryonic development processes that are distinct from embryogenesis in plants.

  1. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  2. YB-1 gene expression is kept constant during myocyte differentiation through replacement of different transcription factors and then falls gradually under the control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toru; Moue, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Nishikawa, Taishi

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that translation of acetylcholine receptor α-subunit (AChR α) mRNA in skeletal muscle cells is regulated by Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) in response to neural activity, and that in the postnatal mouse developmental changes in the amount of YB-1 mRNA are similar to those of AChR α mRNA, which is known to be regulated by myogenic transcription factors. Here, we examined transcriptional regulation of the YB-1 gene in mouse skeletal muscle and differentiating C2C12 myocytes. Although neither YB-1 nor AChR α was detected at either the mRNA or protein level in adult hind limb muscle, YB-1 expression was transiently activated in response to denervation of the sciatic nerve and completely paralleled that of AChR α, suggesting that these genes are regulated by the same transcription factors. However, during differentiation of C2C12 cells to myotubes, the level of YB-1 remained constant even though the level of AChR α increased markedly. Reporter gene, gel mobility shift and ChIP assays revealed that in the initial stage of myocyte differentiation, transcription of the YB-1 gene was regulated by E2F1 and Sp1, and was then gradually replaced under the control of both MyoD and myogenin through an E-box sequence in the proximal region of the YB-1 gene promoter. These results suggest that transcription factors for the YB-1 gene are exchanged during skeletal muscle cell differentiation, perhaps playing a role in translational control of mRNAs by YB-1 in both myotube formation and the response of skeletal muscle tissues to neural stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Users guide for the ANL IBM SP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gropp, W.; Lusk, E.; Pieper, S.C.

    1994-10-01

    This guide presents the features of the IBM SP1 installed in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The guide describes the available hardware and software, access policies, and hints for using the system productively.

  4. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network......% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control...... motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles...

  5. [Functions of transcription factor TRF2 in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytova, D V; Kopantseva, M R; Nabirochkina, E N; Vorob'eva, N E; Georgieva, S G; Krasnov, A N

    2008-03-01

    A study was made of the function of the Drosophila melanogaster TRF2 protein. Expression analysis of the trf2(P1) mutation implicated TRF2 in the D. melanogaster embryo development. High-level expression of the trf2 gene was observed in female germline cells. A high level of TRF2 was detected in primary spermatocytes and trophocytes, characterized by intense transcription. In the female gonads, TRF2 was detected in both nurse cells with intense transcription and transcriptionally inactive oocyte nuclei. In addition, TRF2 proved to be necessary for premeiotic chromatin condensation and further differentiation of germline cells.

  6. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Jeong, Jieun; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  7. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  8. MicroRNA-27a regulates basal transcription by targeting the p44 subunit of general transcription factor IIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Maximiliano M

    2011-05-24

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a complex RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor comprising 10 different polypeptides that display activities involved in transcription and DNA repair processes. Although biochemical studies have uncovered TFIIH importance, little is known about how the mRNAs that code for TFIIH subunits are regulated. Here it is shown that mRNAs encoding seven of the TFIIH subunits (p34, p44, p52, p62, XPB, CDK7, and p8) are regulated at the posttranscriptional level in a Dicer-dependent manner. Indeed, abolition of the miRNA pathway induces abnormal accumulation, stabilization, and translational activation of these seven mRNAs. Herein, miR-27a was identified as a key regulator of p44 mRNA. Moreover, miR-27a was shown to destabilize the p44 subunit of the TFIIH complex during the G2-M phase, thereby modulating the transcriptional shutdown observed during this transition. This work is unique in providing a demonstration of global transcriptional regulation through the action of a single miRNA.

  9. WRKY transcription factors: key components in abscisic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Deena L; Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Lin, Jun; Ringler, Patricia; Boken, Ashley K; Langum, Tanner J; Smidt, Lucas; Boomsma, Darius D; Emme, Nicholas J; Chen, Xianfeng; Finer, John J; Shen, Qingxi J; Rushton, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of many plant processes, including the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, senescence, seed dormancy and seed germination. For over 15 years, limited evidence has been available suggesting that WRKY TFs may play roles in regulating plant responses to the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), notably some WRKY TFs are ABA-inducible repressors of seed germination. However, the roles of WRKY TFs in other aspects of ABA signalling, and the mechanisms involved, have remained unclear. Recent significant progress in ABA research has now placed specific WRKY TFs firmly in ABA-responsive signalling pathways, where they act at multiple levels. In Arabidopsis, WRKY TFs appear to act downstream of at least two ABA receptors: the cytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR-protein phosphatase 2C-ABA complex and the chloroplast envelope-located ABAR-ABA complex. In vivo and in vitro promoter-binding studies show that the target genes for WRKY TFs that are involved in ABA signalling include well-known ABA-responsive genes such as ABF2, ABF4, ABI4, ABI5, MYB2, DREB1a, DREB2a and RAB18. Additional well-characterized stress-inducible genes such as RD29A and COR47 are also found in signalling pathways downstream of WRKY TFs. These new insights also reveal that some WRKY TFs are positive regulators of ABA-mediated stomatal closure and hence drought responses. Conversely, many WRKY TFs are negative regulators of seed germination, and controlling seed germination appears a common function of a subset of WRKY TFs in flowering plants. Taken together, these new data demonstrate that WRKY TFs are key nodes in ABA-responsive signalling networks. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  11. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Manhart, Michael; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2014-07-01

    Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  12. LASAGNA: a novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-03-24

    Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/.

  13. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation.

  14. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingyu; Affeldt, Katharyn J; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-10-13

    Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE) of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation. Copyright © 2016 Luo et al.

  15. The WRKY transcription factor family and senescence in switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinerson, Charles I; Scully, Erin D; Palmer, Nathan A; Donze-Reiner, Teresa; Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Shen, Qingxi J; Sattler, Scott E; Rohila, Jai S; Sarath, Gautam; Rushton, Paul J

    2015-11-09

    Early aerial senescence in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can significantly limit biomass yields. WRKY transcription factors that can regulate senescence could be used to reprogram senescence and enhance biomass yields. All potential WRKY genes present in the version 1.0 of the switchgrass genome were identified and curated using manual and bioinformatic methods. Expression profiles of WRKY genes in switchgrass flag leaf RNA-Seq datasets were analyzed using clustering and network analyses tools to identify both WRKY and WRKY-associated gene co-expression networks during leaf development and senescence onset. We identified 240 switchgrass WRKY genes including members of the RW5 and RW6 families of resistance proteins. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis of the flag leaf transcriptomes across development readily separated clusters of co-expressed genes into thirteen modules. A visualization highlighted separation of modules associated with the early and senescence-onset phases of flag leaf growth. The senescence-associated module contained 3000 genes including 23 WRKYs. Putative promoter regions of senescence-associated WRKY genes contained several cis-element-like sequences suggestive of responsiveness to both senescence and stress signaling pathways. A phylogenetic comparison of senescence-associated WRKY genes from switchgrass flag leaf with senescence-associated WRKY genes from other plants revealed notable hotspots in Group I, IIb, and IIe of the phylogenetic tree. We have identified and named 240 WRKY genes in the switchgrass genome. Twenty three of these genes show elevated mRNA levels during the onset of flag leaf senescence. Eleven of the WRKY genes were found in hotspots of related senescence-associated genes from multiple species and thus represent promising targets for future switchgrass genetic improvement. Overall, individual WRKY gene expression profiles could be readily linked to developmental stages of flag leaves.

  16. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function.

  17. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Up-regulation of type II collagen gene by 17β-estradiol in articular chondrocytes involves Sp1/3, Sox-9, and estrogen receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneix, Laure; Servent, Aurélie; Porée, Benoît; Ollitrault, David; Branly, Thomas; Bigot, Nicolas; Boujrad, Noureddine; Flouriot, Gilles; Demoor, Magali; Boumediene, Karim; Moslemi, Safa; Galéra, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The existence of a link between estrogen deprivation and osteoarthritis (OA) in postmenopausal women suggests that 17β-estradiol (17β-E2) may be a modulator of cartilage homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that 17β-E2 stimulates, via its receptor human estrogen receptor α 66 (hERα66), type II collagen expression in differentiated and dedifferentiated (reflecting the OA phenotype) articular chondrocytes. Transactivation of type II collagen gene (COL2A1) by ligand-independent transactivation domain (AF-1) of hERα66 was mediated by "GC" binding sites of the -266/-63-bp promoter, through physical interactions between ERα, Sp1/Sp3, Sox9, and p300, as demonstrated in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Re-Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation (Re-ChIP) assays in primary and dedifferentiated cells. 17β-E2 and hERα66 increased the DNA-binding activities of Sp1/Sp3 and Sox-9 to both COL2A1 promoter and enhancer regions. Besides, Sp1, Sp3, and Sox-9 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) prevented hERα66-induced transactivation of COL2A1, suggesting that these factors and their respective cis-regions are required for hERα66-mediated COL2A1 up-regulation. Our results highlight the genomic pathway by which 17β-E2 and hERα66 modulate Sp1/Sp3 heteromer binding activity and simultaneously participate in the recruitment of the essential factors Sox-9 and p300 involved respectively in the chondrocyte-differentiated status and COL2A1 transcriptional activation. These novel findings could therefore be attractive for tissue engineering of cartilage in OA, by the fact that 17β-E2 could promote chondrocyte redifferentiation. 17β-E2 up-regulates type II collagen gene expression in articular chondrocytes. An ERα66/Sp1/Sp3/Sox-9/p300 protein complex mediates this stimulatory effect. This heteromeric complex interacts and binds to Col2a1 promoter and enhancer in vivo. Our findings highlight a new regulatory mechanism for 17β-E2 action in chondrocytes. 17β-E2 might be an attractive

  19. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor 'hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is tightly controlled by a complex network of transcription factors acting at different stages of differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family members are key regulators of this process. We have employed DNase I...... hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides...... with cooperative binding of multiple early transcription factors (including glucocorticoid receptor, retinoid X receptor, Stat5a, C/EBPβ and -δ) to transcription factor 'hotspots'. Our results demonstrate that C/EBPβ marks a large number of these transcription factor 'hotspots' before induction of differentiation...

  20. Molecular mechanisms of Sox transcription factors during the development of liver, bile duct, and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chunyue

    2017-03-01

    The liver and pancreas are the prime digestive and metabolic organs in the body. After emerging from the neighboring domains of the foregut endoderm, they turn on distinct differentiation and morphogenesis programs that are regulated by hierarchies of transcription factors. Members of SOX family of transcription factors are expressed in the liver and pancreas throughout development and act upstream of other organ-specific transcription factors. They play key roles in maintaining stem cells and progenitors. They are also master regulators of cell fate determination and tissue morphogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of SOX transcription factors in mediating liver and pancreas development. We discuss their contribution to adult organ function, homeostasis and injury responses. We also speculate how the knowledge of SOX transcription factors can be applied to improve therapies for liver diseases and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis predicts drivers of altered gene expression in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lake, A.D.; Chaput, A.L.; Novák, Petr; Cherrington, N.J.; Smith, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, December 15 (2016), s. 62-71 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Transcription factor * Liver * Gene expression * Bioinformatics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.581, year: 2016

  2. Protein-protein interactions in the regulation of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yingjun; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2013-03-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor, SPF1, from sweet potato. Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the functional diversity, almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TTGACC/T W-box sequences and, therefore, mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors. Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors. It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes. In this review, we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute, at different levels, to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  3. Increasing coverage of transcription factor position weight matrices through domain-level homology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Bernard

    Full Text Available Transcription factor-DNA interactions, central to cellular regulation and control, are commonly described by position weight matrices (PWMs. These matrices are frequently used to predict transcription factor binding sites in regulatory regions of DNA to complement and guide further experimental investigation. The DNA sequence preferences of transcription factors, encoded in PWMs, are dictated primarily by select residues within the DNA binding domain(s that interact directly with DNA. Therefore, the DNA binding properties of homologous transcription factors with identical DNA binding domains may be characterized by PWMs derived from different species. Accordingly, we have implemented a fully automated domain-level homology searching method for identical DNA binding sequences.By applying the domain-level homology search to transcription factors with existing PWMs in the JASPAR and TRANSFAC databases, we were able to significantly increase coverage in terms of the total number of PWMs associated with a given species, assign PWMs to transcription factors that did not previously have any associations, and increase the number of represented species with PWMs over an order of magnitude. Additionally, using protein binding microarray (PBM data, we have validated the domain-level method by demonstrating that transcription factor pairs with matching DNA binding domains exhibit comparable DNA binding specificity predictions to transcription factor pairs with completely identical sequences.The increased coverage achieved herein demonstrates the potential for more thorough species-associated investigation of protein-DNA interactions using existing resources. The PWM scanning results highlight the challenging nature of transcription factors that contain multiple DNA binding domains, as well as the impact of motif discovery on the ability to predict DNA binding properties. The method is additionally suitable for identifying domain-level homology mappings to

  4. The transcription factor DREAM represses A20 and mediates inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Soni, Dheeraj; Wang, Dong-mei; Xue, Jiaping; Singh, Vandana; Thippegowda, Prabhakar B.; Cheppudira, Bopaiah P.; Mishra, Rakesh K.; DebRoy, Auditi; Qian, Zhijian; Bachmaier, Kurt; Zhao, Youyang; Christman, John W.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Ma, Averil

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the transcription-repressor DREAM binds to the A20 promoter to repress the expression of A20, the deubiquitinase suppressing inflammatory NF-κB signaling. DREAM-deficient (Dream−/− ) mice displayed persistent and unchecked A20 expression in response to endotoxin. DREAM functioned by transcriptionally repressing A20 through binding to downstream regulatory elements (DREs). In contrast, USF1 binding to the DRE-associated E-box domain activated A20 expression in response to inf...

  5. TheRIN-MCFusion of MADS-Box Transcription Factors Has Transcriptional Activity and Modulates Expression of Many Ripening Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Xu, Huijinlan; Ju, Zheng; Cao, Dongyan; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Grierson, Donald; Qin, Guozheng; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2018-01-01

    Fruit development and ripening is regulated by genetic and environmental factors and is of critical importance for seed dispersal, reproduction, and fruit quality. Tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) ripening inhibitor ( rin ) mutant fruit have a classic ripening-inhibited phenotype, which is attributed to a genomic DNA deletion resulting in the fusion of two truncated transcription factors, RIN and MC In wild-type fruit, RIN, a MADS-box transcription factor, is a key regulator of the ripening gene expression network, with hundreds of gene targets controlling changes in color, flavor, texture, and taste during tomato fruit ripening; MC , on the other hand, has low expression in fruit, and the potential functions of the RIN-MC fusion gene in ripening remain unclear. Here, overexpression of RIN-MC in transgenic wild-type cv Ailsa Craig tomato fruits impaired several ripening processes, and down-regulating RIN-MC expression in the rin mutant was found to stimulate the normal yellow mutant fruit to produce a weak red color, suggesting a distinct negative role for RIN-MC in tomato fruit ripening. By comparative transcriptome analysis of rin and rin 35S :: RIN-MC RNA interference fruits, a total of 1,168 and 1,234 genes were identified as potential targets of RIN-MC activation and inhibition. Furthermore, the RIN-MC fusion gene was shown to be translated into a chimeric transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus and was capable of protein interactions with other MADS-box factors. These results indicated that tomato RIN-MC fusion plays a negative role in ripening and encodes a chimeric transcription factor that modulates the expression of many ripening genes, thereby contributing to the rin mutant phenotype. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-6 controls the development of pancreatic ducts in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierreux, Christophe E; Poll, Aurélie V; Kemp, Caroline R; Clotman, Frédéric; Maestro, Miguel A; Cordi, Sabine; Ferrer, Jorge; Leyns, Luc; Rousseau, Guy G; Lemaigre, Frédéric P

    2006-02-01

    A number of hereditary polycystic diseases are associated with formation of cysts within the pancreatic ducts. The cysts result from abnormal tubulogenesis, but how normal pancreatic duct development is controlled remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the transcriptional mechanisms that control pancreatic duct development by addressing the role of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-6. Using immunostaining, we have determined the expression pattern of HNF-6 in pancreatic ducts during mouse development. Hnf6 null mice at various stages of development were studied by immunolocalization methods to assess the morphology, differentiation, and proliferation status of ductal cells. The expression of genes involved in hereditary polycystic diseases was determined by real-time, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We show that HNF-6 is expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelium throughout development and that, in the absence of HNF-6, duct morphogenesis is perturbed. Although development of the intercalated ducts is normal, cysts appear within the interlobular and intralobular ducts. This is associated with abnormal development of primary cilia at the apical pole of the duct cells and with reduced expression of a set of genes involved in polycystic diseases, namely those coding for HNF-1beta and for the cilium-associated proteins polyductin/fibrocystin and cystin. We identify HNF-6 as the first transcriptional regulator of pancreatic duct development and reveal the existence of different regulatory mechanisms in distinct duct compartments. HNF-6 controls a network of genes involved in cilium formation and in hereditary polycystic diseases. Finally, HNF-6 deficiency represents a genetically defined model of pancreatic cystic disease.

  7. High performance transcription factor-DNA docking with GPU computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiadong; Hong, Bo; Takeda, Takako; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2012-06-21

    Protein-DNA docking is a very challenging problem in structural bioinformatics and has important implications in a number of applications, such as structure-based prediction of transcription factor binding sites and rational drug design. Protein-DNA docking is very computational demanding due to the high cost of energy calculation and the statistical nature of conformational sampling algorithms. More importantly, experiments show that the docking quality depends on the coverage of the conformational sampling space. It is therefore desirable to accelerate the computation of the docking algorithm, not only to reduce computing time, but also to improve docking quality. In an attempt to accelerate the sampling process and to improve the docking performance, we developed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based protein-DNA docking algorithm. The algorithm employs a potential-based energy function to describe the binding affinity of a protein-DNA pair, and integrates Monte-Carlo simulation and a simulated annealing method to search through the conformational space. Algorithmic techniques were developed to improve the computation efficiency and scalability on GPU-based high performance computing systems. The effectiveness of our approach is tested on a non-redundant set of 75 TF-DNA complexes and a newly developed TF-DNA docking benchmark. We demonstrated that the GPU-based docking algorithm can significantly accelerate the simulation process and thereby improving the chance of finding near-native TF-DNA complex structures. This study also suggests that further improvement in protein-DNA docking research would require efforts from two integral aspects: improvement in computation efficiency and energy function design. We present a high performance computing approach for improving the prediction accuracy of protein-DNA docking. The GPU-based docking algorithm accelerates the search of the conformational space and thus increases the chance of finding more near

  8. CF3DODA-Me induces apoptosis, degrades Sp1, and blocks the transformation phase of the blebbishield emergency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Rikiya; Jinesh, Goodwin G; Xue, Wenrui; Safe, Stephen; Kamat, Ashish M

    2017-05-01

    Cancer stem cells are capable of undergoing cellular transformation after commencement of apoptosis through the blebbishield emergency program in a VEGF-VEGFR2-dependent manner. Development of therapeutics targeting the blebbishield emergency program would thus be important in cancer therapy. Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) orchestrates the transcription of both VEGF and VEGFR2; hence, Sp1 could act as a therapeutic target. Here, we demonstrate that CF3DODA-Me induced apoptosis, degraded Sp1, inhibited the expression of multiple drivers of the blebbishield emergency program such as VEGFR2, p70S6K, and N-Myc through activation of caspase-3, inhibited reactive oxygen species; and inhibited K-Ras activation to abolish transformation from blebbishields as well as transformation in soft agar. These findings confirm CF3DODA-Me as a potential therapeutic candidate that can induce apoptosis and block transformation from blebbishields.

  9. Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF transcription factor family expansion, diversification, divergence and selection in eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allie M Graham

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF transcription factors are crucial for regulating a variety of cellular activities in response to oxygen stress (hypoxia. In this study, we determine the evolutionary history of HIF genes and their associated transactivation domains, as well as perform selection and functional divergence analyses across their four characteristic domains. Here we show that the HIF genes are restricted to metazoans: At least one HIF-α homolog is found within the genomes of non-bilaterians and bilaterian invertebrates, while most vertebrate genomes contain between two and six HIF-α genes. We also find widespread purifying selection across all four characteristic domain types, bHLH, PAS, NTAD, CTAD, in HIF-α genes, and evidence for Type I functional divergence between HIF-1α, HIF-2α /EPAS, and invertebrate HIF genes. Overall, we describe the evolutionary histories of the HIF transcription factor gene family and its associated transactivation domains in eukaryotes. We show that the NTAD and CTAD domains appear de novo, without any appearance outside of the HIF-α subunits. Although they both appear in invertebrates as well as vertebrate HIF- α sequences, there seems to have been a substantial loss across invertebrates or were convergently acquired in these few lineages. We reaffirm that HIF-1α is phylogenetically conserved among most metazoans, whereas HIF-2α appeared later. Overall, our findings can be attributed to the substantial integration of this transcription factor family into the critical tasks associated with maintenance of oxygen homeostasis and vascularization, particularly in the vertebrate lineage.

  10. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  11. The WRKY Transcription Factor WRKY71/EXB1 Controls Shoot Branching by Transcriptionally Regulating RAX Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongshu; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wang, Xinlei; Han, Xiang; Wei, Baoye; Wang, Jianqiao; Li, Boxun; Yu, Hao; Huang, Qingpei; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2015-11-01

    Plant shoot branching is pivotal for developmental plasticity and crop yield. The formation of branch meristems is regulated by several key transcription factors including REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1), RAX2, and RAX3. However, the regulatory network of shoot branching is still largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of EXCESSIVE BRANCHES1 (EXB1), which affects axillary meristem (AM) initiation and bud activity. Overexpression of EXB1 in the gain-of-function mutant exb1-D leads to severe bushy and dwarf phenotypes, which result from excessive AM initiation and elevated bud activities. EXB1 encodes the WRKY transcription factor WRKY71, which has demonstrated transactivation activities. Disruption of WRKY71/EXB1 by chimeric repressor silencing technology leads to fewer branches, indicating that EXB1 plays important roles in the control of shoot branching. We demonstrate that EXB1 controls AM initiation by positively regulating the transcription of RAX1, RAX2, and RAX3. Disruption of the RAX genes partially rescues the branching phenotype caused by EXB1 overexpression. We further show that EXB1 also regulates auxin homeostasis in control of shoot branching. Our data demonstrate that EXB1 plays pivotal roles in shoot branching by regulating both transcription of RAX genes and auxin pathways. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional analysis of a WRKY transcription factor involved in transcriptional activation of the DBAT gene in Taxus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Zhang, P; Zhang, M; Fu, C; Yu, L

    2013-01-01

    Although the regulation of taxol biosynthesis at the transcriptional level remains unclear, 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10 β-O-acetyl transferase (DBAT) is a critical enzyme in the biosynthesis of taxol. The 1740 bp fragment 5'-flanking sequence of the dbat gene was cloned from Taxus chinensis cells. Important regulatory elements needed for activity of the dbat promoter were located by deletion analyses in T. chinensis cells. A novel WRKY transcription factor, TcWRKY1, was isolated with the yeast one-hybrid system from a T. chinensis cell cDNA library using the important regulatory elements as bait. The gene expression of TcWRKY1 in T. chinensis suspension cells was specifically induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Biochemical analysis indicated that TcWRKY1 protein specifically interacts with the two W-box (TGAC) cis-elements among the important regulatory elements. Overexpression of TcWRKY1 enhanced dbat expression in T. chinensis suspension cells, and RNA interference (RNAi) reduced the level of transcripts of dbat. These results suggest that TcWRKY1 participates in regulation of taxol biosynthesis in T. chinensis cells, and that dbat is a target gene of this transcription factor. This research also provides a potential candidate gene for engineering increased taxol accumulation in Taxus cell cultures. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Functional characterization of tobacco transcription factor TGA2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegler, C.; Lenk, I.; Krawczyk, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activation sequence-1 (as-1)-like regulatory cis elements mediate transcriptional activation in response to increased levels of plant signalling molecules auxin and salicylic acid (SA). Our earlier work has shown that tobacco cellular as-1-binding complex SARP (salicylic acid responsive protein...

  14. High-resolution genome-wide in vivo footprinting of diverse transcription factors in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Alan P; Song, Lingyun; Lee, Bum-Kyu; London, Darin; Keefe, Damian; Birney, Ewan; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Crawford, Gregory E; Furey, Terrence S

    2011-03-01

    Regulation of gene transcription in diverse cell types is determined largely by varied sets of cis-elements where transcription factors bind. Here we demonstrate that data from a single high-throughput DNase I hypersensitivity assay can delineate hundreds of thousands of base-pair resolution in vivo footprints in human cells that precisely mark individual transcription factor-DNA interactions. These annotations provide a unique resource for the investigation of cis-regulatory elements. We find that footprints for specific transcription factors correlate with ChIP-seq enrichment and can accurately identify functional versus nonfunctional transcription factor motifs. We also find that footprints reveal a unique evolutionary conservation pattern that differentiates functional footprinted bases from surrounding DNA. Finally, detailed analysis of CTCF footprints suggests multiple modes of binding and a novel DNA binding motif upstream of the primary binding site.

  15. Global transcriptional regulatory network for Escherichia coli robustly connects gene expression to transcription factor activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Xin; Sastry, Anand; Mih, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) have been studied intensely for >25 y. Yet, even for the Escherichia coli TRN-probably the best characterized TRN-several questions remain. Here, we address three questions: (i) How complete is our knowledge of the E. coli TRN; (ii) how well can we predict...... were collected from published, validated chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and RegulonDB. For 21 different TF knockouts, up to 63% of the differentially expressed genes in the hiTRN were traced to the knocked-out TF through regulatory cascades. Second, we trained supervised machine learning...

  16. Liver glucokinase gene expression is controlled by the onecut transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoy, V J; Decaux, J F; Pierreux, C E; Lemaigre, F P; Rousseau, G G

    2002-08-01

    Glucokinase plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and the expression of its gene is differentially regulated in pancreatic beta cells and in the liver through distinct promoters. The factors that determine the tissue-specific expression of the glucokinase gene are not known. Putative binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-6, the prototype of the ONECUT family of transcription factors, are present in the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and hnf6 knockout mice are diabetic [corrected]. We hypothesized that HNF-6 controls the activity of the hepatic glucokinase promoter. We tested the binding of recombinant HNF-6 to DNA sequences from the mouse hepatic glucokinase promoter in vitro and the effect of HNF-6 on promoter activity in transfected cells. We investigated in vivo the role of HNF-6 in mice by examining the effect of inactivating the hnf6 gene on glucokinase gene-specific deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites in liver chromatin and on liver glucokinase mRNA concentration. HNF-6 bound to the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and stimulated its activity. Inactivation of the hnf6 gene did not modify the pattern of deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites but was associated with a decrease of liver glucokinase mRNA to half the control value. Although HNF-6 is not required to open chromatin of the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene, it stimulates transcription of the glucokinase gene in the liver. This could partly explain the diabetes observed in hnf6 knockout mice.

  17. Transcription Factor Functional Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Defense Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo S. Alves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to biotic stress in plants lead to dramatic reprogramming of gene expression, favoring stress responses at the expense of normal cellular functions. Transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression at the transcriptional level, and controlling the activity of these factors alters the transcriptome of the plant, leading to metabolic and phenotypic changes in response to stress. The functional analysis of interactions between transcription factors and other proteins is very important for elucidating the role of these transcriptional regulators in different signaling cascades. In this review, we present an overview of protein-protein interactions for the six major families of transcription factors involved in plant defense: basic leucine zipper containing domain proteins (bZIP, amino-acid sequence WRKYGQK (WRKY, myelocytomatosis related proteins (MYC, myeloblastosis related proteins (MYB, APETALA2/ ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS (AP2/EREBP and no apical meristem (NAM, Arabidopsis transcription activation factor (ATAF, and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC (NAC. We describe the interaction partners of these transcription factors as molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of signal transduction pathways that take place during plant defense responses. These interactions determine the activation or repression of response pathways and are crucial to understanding the regulatory networks that modulate plant defense responses.

  18. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-10-17

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  19. A critique on nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3: The key transcription factors in periodontal pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjith Ambili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is initiated by microorganisms in dental plaque, and host immunoinflammatory response to the microbial challenge helps in disease progression. Conventional periodontal therapy was mainly targeted on the elimination of microbial component. However, a better understanding of molecular aspects in host response will enable the clinicians to formulate effective host modulation therapy (HMT for the periodontal management. Inflammatory mediators were the main targets for HMT in the past. Transcription factors can regulate the production of multiple mediators simultaneously, and inhibition of these factors will be more beneficial than blocking individual molecule. Two important transcription factors implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases are nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3. The role of these factors in periodontal disease is a less explored area. This comprehensive review is aimed at unveiling the critical role of NF-κB and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in periodontal pathogenesis. An online search was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. All publications till 2016 related to NF-κB, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, and inflammation were included in writing this review. A total of 27,390 references were published based on the search terms used. Out of these, 507 were related to the periodontal research published in English till 2016. Relevant papers were chosen after carefully reading the abstract. This review has attempted to comprehend the existing knowledge regarding the role of transcription factors NF-κB and STAT3 in periodontal disease. Moreover, it also provides a connecting molecular link for the periodontal medicine concept.

  20. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  1. MicroRNA-124 controls human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic switch via Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yangfeng; Yu, Shangyi; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jiajun; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhiyun

    2017-09-01

    Phenotypic switch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and aortic dissection. However, the mechanisms of phenotypic modulation are still unclear. MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of VSMC function. We recently found that microRNA-124 (miR-124) was downregulated in proliferative vascular diseases that were characterized by a VSMC phenotypic switch. Therefore, we speculated that the aberrant expression of miR-124 might play a critical role in human aortic VSMC phenotypic switch. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that miR-124 was dramatically downregulated in the aortic media of clinical specimens of the dissected aorta and correlated with molecular markers of the contractile VSMC phenotype. Overexpression of miR-124 by mimicking transfection significantly attenuated platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced human aortic VSMC proliferation and phenotypic switch. Furthermore, we identified specificity protein 1 (Sp1) as the downstream target of miR-124. A luciferase reporter assay was used to confirm direct miR-124 targeting of the 3'-untranslated region of the Sp1 gene and repression of Sp1 expression in human aortic VSMCs. Furthermore, constitutively active Sp1 in miR-124-overexpressing VSMCs reversed the antiproliferative effects of miR-124. These results demonstrated a novel mechanism of miR-124 modulation of VSMC phenotypic switch by targeting Sp1 expression.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-124 is involved in the proliferation of a variety of cell types. However, miRNAs are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. We first identified miR-124 as a critical regulator in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, proliferation, and phenotype switch by targeting the 3'-untranslated region of specificity protein 1. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1. PMID:25654332

  3. High co-expression of Sp1 and HER-2 is correlated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weihua; Jin, Ziliang; Zhou, Fei; Cui, Jiujie; Wang, Lei; Wang, Liwei

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate co-expression of HER-2 and Sp1 in gastric cancer (GC) so as to determine whether these two proteins may be correlated with poor prognosis of GC patients. We examined the HER-2 overexpression and amplification and expression levels of Sp1 in 227 GC patients using immune-histochemical staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Data on clinicopathological features and relevant prognostic factors in these patients were analyzed. Of the 227 gastric cancer samples, 11.89% were positive for HER-2 overexpression/amplification under the new scoring system, and the frequency of negative, weak positive and strong positive expression of Sp1 was 14.98%, 48.01% and 37.0% respectively. No statistically positive correlation was observed between the expression levels of HER-2 and Sp1 in GC tissues. HER-2 overexpression was closely correlated to the Lauren type, degree of differentiation, tumor size and lymph node metastasis, and Sp1 as well (P HER-2 and Sp1 predicted poor survival in univariate analysis as well as in a Cox proportional hazards model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor ‘hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam; Sung, Myong-Hee; Baek, Songjoon; Loft, Anne; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is a tightly controlled differentiation process regulated by a complex transcriptional network. Here, DNase I hypersensitive site analysis, DHSseq, reveals the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that occur during adipogenesis and identifies sites that are bound by multiple transcription factors.

  5. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  6. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  7. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vichi; F. Coin (Frédéric); J-P. Renaud (Jean-Paul); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Moras; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA box-binding protein (TBP)/TFIID

  8. Transcription factor co-repressors in cancer biology: roles and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Campbell, Moray J

    2010-06-01

    Normal transcription displays a high degree of flexibility over the choice, timing and magnitude of mRNA expression levels that tend to oscillate and cycle. These processes allow for combinatorial actions, feedback control and fine-tuning. A central role has emerged for the transcriptional co-repressor proteins such as NCOR1, NCOR2/SMRT, CoREST and CTBPs, to control the actions of many transcriptional factors, in large part, by recruitment and activation of a range of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Thus, co-repressors and chromatin remodeling factors are recruited to transcription factors at specific promoter/enhancer regions and execute changes in the chromatin structure. The specificity of this recruitment is controlled in a spatial-temporal manner. By playing a central role in transcriptional control, as they move and target transcription factors, co-repressors act as a key driver in the epigenetic economy of the nucleus. Co-repressor functions are selectively distorted in malignancy, by both loss and gain of function and contribute to the generation of transcriptional rigidity. Features of transcriptional rigidity apparent in cancer cells include the distorted signaling of nuclear receptors and the WNTs/beta-catenin axis. Understanding and predicting the consequences of altered co-repressor expression patterns in cancer cells has diagnostic and prognostic significance, and also have the capacity to be targeted through selective epigenetic therapies.

  9. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  10. A mutation in a functional Sp1 binding site of the telomerase RNA gene (hTERC promoter in a patient with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Philip J

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the gene coding for the RNA component of telomerase, hTERC, have been found in autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (DC and aplastic anemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a clonal blood disorder associated with aplastic anemia and characterized by the presence of one or more clones of blood cells lacking glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins due to a somatic mutation in the PIGA gene. Methods We searched for mutations in DNA extracted from PNH patients by amplification of the hTERC gene and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC. After a mutation was found in a potential transcription factor binding site in one patient electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to detect binding of transcription factors to that site. The effect of the mutation on the function of the promoter was tested by transient transfection constructs in which the promoter is used to drive a reporter gene. Results Here we report the finding of a novel promoter mutation (-99C->G in the hTERC gene in a patient with PNH. The mutation disrupts an Sp1 binding site and destroys its ability to bind Sp1. Transient transfection assays show that mutations in this hTERC site including C-99G cause either up- or down-regulation of promoter activity and suggest that the site regulates core promoter activity in a context dependent manner in cancer cells. Conclusions These data are the first report of an hTERC promoter mutation from a patient sample which can modulate core promoter activity in vitro, raising the possibility that the mutation may affect the transcription of the gene in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo, and that dysregulation of telomerase may play a role in the development of bone marrow failure and the evolution of PNH clones.

  11. Identification of drought-induced transcription factors in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corley C Holbrook

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors play key roles in the regulation of genes involved in normal development as well as tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Specific transcription factors that are induced in peanut under drought conditions have not been identified.  The objectives of this study were to compare gene-expression patterns of various transcription factors of a drought tolerant versus a susceptible peanut genotype under drought conditions and to identify transcripts that were regulated in a drought dependent manner. Twelve putative transcription factors were identified and real-time PCR analysis was performed which resulted in the identification of three unique transcripts in which ahERF1 was highly induced in the recovery stage; ahERF7 and ahERF8 were also highly induced by drought and returned to nominal levels after recovery.  These sequences contain DNA binding domains that are present in the APETALA2/Ethelene Responsive Factors (AP2/ERF family of transcription factors which have been shown to be induced by stress.  Induction levels and patterns of gene-expression of ahERF1, ahERF7 and ahERF8 may be used to select plants that may have higher drought tolerance.

  12. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale.

  13. Interactome analysis of transcriptional coactivator multiprotein bridging factor 1 unveils a yeast AP-1-like transcription factor involved in oxidation tolerance of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Ling; Dong, Wei-Xia; Ding, Jin-Li; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2017-09-04

    Oxidation tolerance is an important determinant to predict the virulence and biocontrol potential of Beauveria bassiana, a well-known entomopathogenic fungus. As a transcriptional coactivator, multiprotein bridging factor 1 mediates the activity of transcription factor in diverse physiological processes, and its homolog in B. bassiana (BbMBF1) contributes to fungal oxidation tolerance. In this study, the BbMBF1-interactomes under oxidative stress and normal growth condition were deciphered by mass spectrometry integrated with the immunoprecipitation. BbMBF1p factor has a broad interaction with proteins that are involved in various cellular processes, and this interaction is dynamically regulated by oxidative stress. Importantly, a B. bassiana homolog of yeast AP-1-like transcription factor (BbAP-1) was specifically associated with the BbMBF1-interactome under oxidation and significantly contributed to fungal oxidation tolerance. In addition, qPCR analysis revealed that several antioxidant genes are jointly controlled by BbAP-1 and BbMBF1. Conclusively, it is proposed that BbMBF1p protein mediates BbAP-1p factor to transcribe the downstream antioxidant genes in B. bassiana under oxidative stress. This study demonstrates for the first time a proteomic view of the MBF1-interactome in fungi, and presents an initial framework to probe the transcriptional mechanism involved in fungal response to oxidation, which will provide a new strategy to improve the biocontrol efficacy of B. bassiana.

  14. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m......RNA expression changes are significantly associated. Among key metabolic pathways, this analysis revealed de novo synthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides and ATP producing and consuming reactions at fast cellular growth. By scoring the significance of overlap between growth rate dependent genes and known...

  15. Napsin A and Thyroid Transcription Factor-1-Positive Cerebellar Tumor with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Kuwata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare case of cerebellar metastasis of unknown origin, in which a primary lung adenocarcinoma was diagnosed by pathological examination of a cerebellar metastatic tumor, using immunohistochemical markers and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation of primary lung cancer. A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a hemorrhagic cerebellar tumor and multiple small brain tumors. She underwent cerebellar tumor resection. On pathological examination, the tumor was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. However, the primary tumor site was unidentifiable even with several imaging inspections. On immunohistochemical analysis, the resected tumor was positive for napsin A and thyroid transcription factor-1. In addition, an EGFR mutation was detected in the tumor. Therefore, primary lung cancer was diagnosed and the patient was started on gefitinib (250 mg/day therapy.

  16. Cocaine and the AP-1 transcription factor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, B T

    1998-05-30

    Cocaine addition in humans develops gradually with repeated administrations and persists long after cocaine has cleared the body. The mechanisms underlying this persistent form of neuroplasticity are not understood and can involve both structural and biochemical mechanisms. The long time course for cocaine addiction in humans and for development of cocaine self-administration in animal models suggest the involvement of alterations in gene expression leading to altered signaling in the brain. In the striatum (Str) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats. Pretreatment with repeated cocaine administrations downregulates the induction of various immediate early genes (IEGs) by a subsequent acute challenge with cocaine. Some of these downregulated IEGs encode Fos-related components of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) complex, which is likely re regulate a number of genes important for neuronal function. Interestingly, repeated cocaine administration induces novel delta FosB-related proteins (called chronic Fos-related antigens (Fras)) in the NAc and Str that replace the downregulated isoforms of Fos. Unlike the acutely induced, short-lasting isoforms of Fos and FosB, the chronic Fras persist long after the last cocaine administration. The known form of delta FosB per se lacks the domain required to activate transcription. If the chronic Fras are similar in structure to delta FosB, then the induction of chronic Fras likely leads to a blockade of AP-1-dependent transcription resulting in altered gene expression. We presently purifying the chronic Fras to obtain amino acid sequence in order to directly examine our hypothesis about the effects of repeated cocaine administration on AP-1 dependent transcription and gene expression in the brain

  17. Heat and water stress induce unique transcriptional signatures of heat-shock proteins and transcription factors in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheta, Margarida; Becker, Jörg D; Coito, João L; Carvalho, Luísa; Amâncio, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Grapevine is an extremely important crop worldwide.In southern Europe, post-flowering phases of the growth cycle can occur under high temperatures, excessive light, and drought conditions at soil and/or atmospheric level. In this study, we subjected greenhouse grown grapevine, variety Aragonez, to two individual abiotic stresses, water deficit stress(WDS), and heat stress (HS). The adaptation of plants to stress is a complex response triggered by cascades of molecular net works involved in stress perception, signal transduction, and the expression of specific stress-related genes and metabolites. Approaches such as array-based transcript profiling allow assessing the expression of thousands of genes in control and stress tissues. Using microarrays, we analyzed the leaf transcriptomic profile of the grapevine plants. Photosynthesis measurements verified that the plants were significantly affected by the stresses applied. Leaf gene expression was obtained using a high-throughput transcriptomic grapevine array, the 23K custom-made Affymetrix Vitis GeneChip. We identified 1,594 genes as differentially expressed between control and treatments and grouped them into ten major functional categories using MapMan software. The transcriptome of Aragonez was more significantly affected by HS when compared with WDS. The number of genes coding for heat-shock proteins and transcription factors expressed solely in response to HS suggesting their expression as unique signatures of HS. However, across-talk between the response pathways to both stresses was observed at the level of AP2/ERF transcription factors.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of defence genes and involvement of the WRKY transcription factor in arbuscular mycorrhizal potato root colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallou, Adrien; Declerck, Stéphane; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie

    2012-03-01

    The establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal associations causes major changes in plant roots and affects significantly the host in term of plant nutrition and resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. As a consequence, major changes in root transcriptome, especially in plant genes related to biotic stresses, are expected. Potato microarray analysis, followed by real-time quantitative PCR, was performed to detect the wide transcriptome changes induced during the pre-, early and late stages of potato root colonization by Glomus sp. MUCL 41833. The microarray analysis revealed 526 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated genes during the pre-stage, 272 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated genes during the early stage and 734 up-regulated and 122 down-regulated genes during the late stage of root colonization. The most important class of regulated genes was associated to plant stress and in particular to the WRKY transcription factors genes during the pre-stage of root colonization. The expression profiling clearly demonstrated a wide transcriptional change during the pre-, early and late stages of root colonization. It further suggested that the WRKY transcription factor genes are involved in the mechanisms controlling the arbuscular mycorrhizal establishment by the regulation of plant defence genes.

  20. Targeting Transcription Factor Binding to DNA by Competing with DNA Binders as an Approach for Controlling Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Lambert, Melanie; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Helene

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are recognized as the master regulators of gene expression. Interestingly, about 10% of the transcription factors described in mammals are up to date directly implicated in a very large number of human diseases. With the exception of ligand-inducible nuclear receptors, transcription factors have longtime been considered as "undruggable" targets for therapeutics. However, the significant breakthroughs in their protein biochemistry and interactions with DNA at the structural level, together with increasing needs for new targeted-approaches particularly in cancers, has changed this postulate and opened the way for targeting transcription factors. Along with a better knowledge of their specific DNA binding sequences by genome wide and high throughput sequencing assay, these informations make possible the potent targeting of the transcription factors by three approaches dependently of their mechanism of action. In this review, we discuss the different physicochemical interactions between the transcription factors and the DNA helix, and the protein/protein interactions within a transcription factor complex and their impacts on the DNA structure. In order to impair transcription factor activities, small molecules compounds can either act by direct interaction on the transcription factor, or by blocking the protein/protein interactions in a transcription complex, or by competing with the transcription factor itself and specifically targeting its cognate binding sequence. For this latter mode of transcription targeting, we pay special attention to the DNA intercalating, alkylating or groove binders for transcription factor/DNA binding modulation.

  1. Direct transcriptional activation of BT genes by NLP transcription factors is a key component of the nitrate response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeo; Maekawa, Shugo; Konishi, Mineko; Yoshioka, Nozomi; Sasaki, Yuki; Maeda, Haruna; Ishida, Tetsuya; Kato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Junji; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2017-01-29

    Nitrate modulates growth and development, functioning as a nutrient signal in plants. Although many changes in physiological processes in response to nitrate have been well characterized as nitrate responses, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrate response are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that NLP transcription factors, which are key regulators of the nitrate response, directly activate the nitrate-inducible expression of BT1 and BT2 encoding putative scaffold proteins with a plant-specific domain structure in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, the 35S promoter-driven expression of BT2 partially rescued growth inhibition caused by reductions in NLP activity in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, simultaneous disruption of BT1 and BT2 affected nitrate-dependent lateral root development. These results suggest that direct activation of BT1 and BT2 by NLP transcriptional activators is a key component of the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrate response in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  3. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, ...

  4. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes...

  5. The Arabidopsis transcription factor WRKY27 influences wilt disease symptom development caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Deslandes, Laurent; Auriac, Marie‐Christine; Marco, Yves; Somssich, Imre E

    2008-01-01

    .... Here we show that the Arabidopsis mutant wrky27‐1 , which lacks a functional WRKY27 transcription factor, showed delayed symptom development in response to the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum...

  6. The transcription factor BATF modulates cytokine-mediated responses in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopel, Nina; Graser, Anna; Mousset, Stephanie; Finotto, Susetta

    2016-08-01

    The transcription factor BATF (basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like), belongs to the AP-1 family of transcription factors and has been shown to be predominantly expressed in cells of haematopoietic origin, especially in B and T cells. In studies using Batf-deficient mice, a profound defect in the differentiation of T helper cells type 17 (Th17) and follicular T helper cells (Tfh) was described, as well as an impairment of antibody production with switched isotypes. More recently BATF has been described to influence also Th2 and Th9 responses in models of murine experimental asthma. In CD8(+) T cells BATF has been found associated with anti-viral responses. This review summarizes the role of BATF in CD4(+) T cell subsets and in CD8(+) T cells, with particular focus on this transcription factor in the setting of allergic asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  8. The Drosophila Sp8 transcription factor Buttonhead prevents premature differentiation of intermediate neural progenitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Yonggang; Li, Xiaosu; Zhang, Xian; Mei, Shaolin; Li, Hongyu; Urso, Andreacarola; Zhu, Sijun

    2014-01-01

    ..., but mechanisms preventing differentiation and cell cycle exit of INPs are not well understood. In this study, we report that the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Sp8 transcription factor Buttonhead (Btd...

  9. The XPB subunit of repair/transcription factor TFIIH directly interacts with SUG1, a subunit of the 26S proteasome and putative transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); M. Rossignol; R.A. Fraser; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L. Ma (Libin); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the basal transcription initiation/DNA repair factor TFIIH are responsible for three human disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The non-repair features of CS and TTD are thought to be due to a partial inactivation of

  10. In silico mining and PCR-based approaches to transcription factor discovery in non-model plants: gene discovery of the WRKY transcription factors in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Jun; Xiang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are key regulators of numerous biological processes in plant growth and development, as well as plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Research on biological functions of plant WRKY genes has focused in the past on model plant species or species with largely characterized transcriptomes. However, a variety of non-model plants, such as forest conifers, are essential as feed, biofuel, and wood or for sustainable ecosystems. Identification of WRKY genes in these non-model plants is equally important for understanding the evolutionary and function-adaptive processes of this transcription factor family. Because of limited genomic information, the rarity of regulatory gene mRNAs in transcriptomes, and the sequence divergence to model organism genes, identification of transcription factors in non-model plants using methods similar to those generally used for model plants is difficult. This chapter describes a gene family discovery strategy for identification of WRKY transcription factors in conifers by a combination of in silico-based prediction and PCR-based experimental approaches. Compared to traditional cDNA library screening or EST sequencing at transcriptome scales, this integrated gene discovery strategy provides fast, simple, reliable, and specific methods to unveil the WRKY gene family at both genome and transcriptome levels in non-model plants.

  11. DMPD: The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18163952 The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. Li H... The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. PubmedID 18163952 Title The interfero...n signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. Authors Li H, Gade P, Xi

  12. PEA3/ETV4-related transcription factors coupled with active ERK signalling are associated with poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keld, R

    2011-06-28

    Background: Transcription factors often play important roles in tumourigenesis. Members of the PEA3 subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors fulfil such a role and have been associated with tumour metastasis in several different cancers. Moreover, the activity of the PEA3 subfamily transcription factors is potentiated by Ras-ERK pathway signalling, which is itself often deregulated in tumour cells.\\r\

  13. Transcription factor retention on mitotic chromosomes: regulatory mechanisms and impact on cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccaud, Mahé; Suter, David M

    2017-09-01

    During mitosis, gene transcription stops, and the bulk of DNA-binding proteins are excluded from condensed chromosomes. While most gene-specific transcription factors are largely evicted from mitotic chromosomes, a subset remains bound to specific and non-specific DNA sites. Here, we review the current knowledge on the mechanisms leading to the retention of a subset of transcription factors on mitotic chromosomes and discuss the implications in gene expression regulation and their potential as an epigenetic mechanism controlling stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Borgne Michel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges, and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions, by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions. In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine

  15. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor ‘hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam; Sung, Myong-Hee; Baek, Songjoon; Loft, Anne; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is tightly controlled by a complex network of transcription factors acting at different stages of differentiation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family members are key regulators of this process. We have employed DNase I hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides with cooperative binding of multiple early transcription factors (including glucocorticoid receptor, retinoid X receptor, Stat5a, C/EBPβ and -δ) to transcription factor ‘hotspots'. Our results demonstrate that C/EBPβ marks a large number of these transcription factor ‘hotspots' before induction of differentiation and chromatin remodelling and is required for their establishment. Furthermore, a subset of early remodelled C/EBP-binding sites persists throughout differentiation and is later occupied by PPARγ, indicating that early C/EBP family members, in addition to their well-established role in activation of PPARγ transcription, may act as pioneering factors for PPARγ binding. PMID:21427703

  16. Identification of direct targets of plant transcription factors using the GR fusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M; Wellmer, Frank; Wagner, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor-dependent activation of plant transcription factors has proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of their direct target genes. In the absence of the synthetic steroid hormone dexamethasone (dex), transcription factors fused to the hormone-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (TF-GR) are held in an inactive state, due to their cytoplasmic localization. This requires physical interaction with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) complex. Hormone binding leads to disruption of the interaction between GR and HSP90 and allows TF-GR fusion proteins to enter the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, they bind to specific DNA sequences and immediately activate or repress expression of their targets. This system is well suited for the identification of direct target genes of transcription factors in plants, as (A) there is little basal protein activity in the absence of dex, (B) steroid application leads to rapid transcription factor activation, (C) no side effects of dex treatment are observed on the physiology of the plant, and (D) secondary effects of transcription factor activity can be eliminated by simultaneous application of an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, cycloheximide (cyc). In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for the preparation of plant material, for dex and cyc treatment, for RNA extraction, and for the PCR-based or genome-wide identification of direct targets of transcription factors fused to GR.

  17. Convergence of protein kinase C and JAK-STAT signaling on transcription factor GATA-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Paradis, Pierre; Aries, Anne; Komati, Hiba; Lefebvre, Chantal; Wang, Hao; Nemer, Mona

    2005-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AII), a potent vasoactive hormone, acts on numerous organs via G-protein-coupled receptors and elicits cell-specific responses. At the level of the heart, AII stimulation alters gene transcription and leads to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Numerous intracellular signaling pathways are activated in this process; however, which of these directly link receptor activation to transcriptional regulation remains undefined. We used the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) gene (NPPA) as a marker to elucidate the signaling cascades involved in AII transcriptional responses. We show that ANF transcription is activated directly by the AII type 1 receptor and precedes the development of myocyte hypertrophy. This response maps to STAT and GATA binding sites, and the two elements transcriptionally cooperate to mediate signaling through the JAK-STAT and protein kinase C (PKC)-GATA-4 pathways. PKC phosphorylation enhances GATA-4 DNA binding activity, and STAT-1 functionally and physically interacts with GATA-4 to synergistically activate AII and other growth factor-inducible promoters. Moreover, GATA factors are able to recruit STAT proteins to target promoters via GATA binding sites, which are sufficient to support synergy. Thus, STAT proteins can act as growth factor-inducible coactivators of tissue-specific transcription factors. Interactions between STAT and GATA proteins may provide a general paradigm for understanding cell specificity of cytokine and growth factor signaling.

  18. Targeted inactivation of transcription factors by overexpression of their truncated forms in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Hong, Shin-Young; Ryu, Jae Yong; Jeong, Eun-Young; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-10-01

    Transcription factors are central constituents of gene regulatory networks that control diverse aspects of plant development and environmental adaptability. Therefore they have been explored for decades as primary targets for agricultural biotechnology. A gene of interest can readily be introduced into many crop plants, whereas targeted gene inactivation is practically difficult in many cases. Here, we developed an artificial small interfering peptide (a-siPEP) approach, which is based on overexpression of specific protein domains, and evaluated its application for the targeted inactivation of transcription factors in the dicot model, Arabidopsis, and monocot model, Brachypodium. We designed potential a-siPEPs of two representative MADS box transcription factors, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSOR OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and AGAMOUS (AG), and a MYB transcription factor, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Transgenic plants overproducing the a-siPEPs displayed phenotypes comparable to those of gene-deficient mutants. The a-siPEPs attenuate nuclear import and DNA-binding of target transcription factors. Our data demonstrate that the a-siPEP tool is an efficient genetic means of inactivating specific transcription factors in plants. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Regulation of the yeast metabolic cycle by transcription factors with periodic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrini Matteo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When growing budding yeast under continuous, nutrient-limited conditions, over half of yeast genes exhibit periodic expression patterns. Periodicity can also be observed in respiration, in the timing of cell division, as well as in various metabolite levels. Knowing the transcription factors involved in the yeast metabolic cycle is helpful for determining the cascade of regulatory events that cause these patterns. Results Transcription factor activities were estimated by linear regression using time series and genome-wide transcription factor binding data. Time-translation matrices were estimated using least squares and were used to model the interactions between the most significant transcription factors. The top transcription factors have functions involving respiration, cell cycle events, amino acid metabolism and glycolysis. Key regulators of transitions between phases of the yeast metabolic cycle appear to be Hap1, Hap4, Gcn4, Msn4, Swi6 and Adr1. Conclusions Analysis of the phases at which transcription factor activities peak supports previous findings suggesting that the various cellular functions occur during specific phases of the yeast metabolic cycle.

  20. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bol John F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA. An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3 plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress

  1. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Charlotte van der Does

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called 'effectors'. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol, effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the 'pathogenicity' chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  2. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Does, H Charlotte; Fokkens, Like; Yang, Ally; Schmidt, Sarah M; Langereis, Léon; Lukasiewicz, Joanna M; Hughes, Timothy R; Rep, Martijn

    2016-11-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called 'effectors'. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the 'pathogenicity' chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol pathogenicity

  3. The adenovirus oncoprotein E1a stimulates binding of transcription factor ETF to transcriptionally activate the p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, T K; Braithwaite, A W

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an important role in regulating the cellular response to DNA damage. During adenovirus infection, levels of p53 protein also increase. It has been shown that this increase is due not only to increased stability of the p53 protein but to the transcriptional activation of the p53 gene during infection. We demonstrate here that the E1a proteins of adenovirus are responsible for activating the mouse p53 gene and that both major E1a proteins, 243R and 289R, are required for complete activation. E1a brings about the binding of two cellular transcription factors to the mouse p53 promoter. One of these, ETF, binds to three upstream sites in the p53 promoter and one downstream site, whereas E2F binds to one upstream site in the presence of E1a. Our studies indicate that E2F binding is not essential for activation of the p53 promoter but that ETF is. Our data indicate the ETF site located downstream of the start site of transcription is the key site in conferring E1a responsiveness on the p53 promoter.

  4. [Expression, subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of transcription factor up stream stimulatory factor-1 in odontoblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-An; Wen, Ling-Ying; Yang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Jun

    2007-09-01

    To examine the expression and subcellular localization of transcription factor USF1 in odontoblasts and investigate whether nuclear translocation occurs under stimuli. Odontoblasts MDPC-23 were cultured on coverslips and divided into 2 groups. Group 1 received no stimuli, and group 2 was stimulated by nicotine with various concentrations respectively for 1h. Then the mountings of odontoblasts were prepared and immunocytochemical staining was performed with specific USF1 antibody via SABC method. Hela cells were used as positive control. The staining was positive in the cytoplasm of odontoblasts in group 1, but in the nuclei of Hela cells and in 100 mg/L nicotine-stimulated odontoblasts in group 2. There exists USF1 protein in odontoblasts, which locates in the cytoplasm and could translocate into nuclei under the stimulation of nicotine.

  5. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

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    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  6. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  7. Molecular phylogenetic and expression analysis of the complete WRKY transcription factor family in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kai-Fa; Chen, Juan; Chen, Yan-Feng; Wu, Ling-Juan; Xie, Dao-Xin

    2012-04-01

    The WRKY transcription factors function in plant growth and development, and response to the biotic and abiotic stresses. Although many studies have focused on the functional identification of the WRKY transcription factors, much less is known about molecular phylogenetic and global expression analysis of the complete WRKY family in maize. In this study, we identified 136 WRKY proteins coded by 119 genes in the B73 inbred line from the complete genome and named them in an orderly manner. Then, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of five species was performed to explore the origin and evolutionary patterns of these WRKY genes, and the result showed that gene duplication is the major driving force for the origin of new groups and subgroups and functional divergence during evolution. Chromosomal location analysis of maize WRKY genes indicated that 20 gene clusters are distributed unevenly in the genome. Microarray-based expression analysis has revealed that 131 WRKY transcripts encoded by 116 genes may participate in the regulation of maize growth and development. Among them, 102 transcripts are stably expressed with a coefficient of variation (CV) value of transcripts produced by 25 WRKY genes with the CV value of >15% are further analysed to discover new organ- or tissue-specific genes. In addition, microarray analyses of transcriptional responses to drought stress and fungal infection showed that maize WRKY proteins are involved in stress responses. All these results contribute to a deep probing into the roles of WRKY transcription factors in maize growth and development and stress tolerance.

  8. PATZ1 down-regulates FADS1 by binding to rs174557 and is opposed by SP1/SREBP1c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gang; Ameur, Adam; Enroth, Stefan; Bysani, Madhusudhan; Nord, Helena; Cavalli, Marco; Essand, Magnus; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The FADS1 and FADS2 genes in the FADS cluster encode the rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Genetic variation in this region has been associated with a large number of diseases and traits many of them correlated to differences in metabolism of PUFAs. However, the causative variants leading to these associations have not been identified. Here we find that the multiallelic rs174557 located in an AluYe5 element in intron 1 of FADS1 is functional and lies within a PATZ1 binding site. The derived allele of rs174557, which is the common variant in most populations, diminishes binding of PATZ1, a transcription factor conferring allele-specific downregulation of FADS1. The PATZ1 binding site overlaps with a SP1 site. The competitive binding between the suppressive PATZ1 and the activating complex of SP1 and SREBP1c determines the enhancer activity of this region, which regulates expression of FADS1. PMID:27932482

  9. Long non-coding RNA ZFAS1 interacts with miR-150-5p to regulate Sp1 expression and ovarian cancer cell malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bairong; Hou, Yan; Chen, Hong; Yang, Shanshan; Liu, Tianbo; Lin, Mei; Lou, Ge

    2017-03-21

    We reported that long non-coding RNA ZFAS1 was upregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues, and was negatively correlated to the overall survival rate of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer in this study. While depletion of ZFAS1 inhibited proliferation, migration, and development of chemoresistance, overexpression of ZFAS1 exhibited an even higher proliferation rate, migration activity, and chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. We further found miR-150-5p was a potential target of ZFAS1, which was downregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. MiR-150-5p subsequently inhibited expression of transcription factor Sp1, as evidence by luciferase assays. Inhibition of miR-150-5p rescued the suppressed proliferation and migration induced by depletion of ZFAS1 in epithelial ovarian cancer cells, at least in part. Taken together, our findings revealed a critical role of ZFAS1/miR-150-5p/Sp1 axis in promoting proliferation rate, migration activity, and development of chemoresistance in epithelial ovarian cancer. And ZFAS1/miR-150-5p may serve as novel markers and therapeutic targets of epithelial ovarian cancer.

  10. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  11. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  12. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  13. Association of transcription factor gene LMX1B with autism.

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    Ismail Thanseem

    Full Text Available Multiple lines of evidence suggest a serotoninergic dysfunction in autism. The role of LMX1B in the development and maintenance of serotoninergic neurons is well known. In order to examine the role, if any, of LMX1B with autism pathophysiology, a trio-based SNP association study using 252 family samples from the AGRE was performed. Using pair-wise tagging method, 24 SNPs were selected from the HapMap data, based on their location and minor allele frequency. Two SNPs (rs10732392 and rs12336217 showed moderate association with autism with p values 0.018 and 0.022 respectively in transmission disequilibrium test. The haplotype AGCGTG also showed significant association (p = 0.008. Further, LMX1B mRNA expressions were studied in the postmortem brain tissues of autism subjects and healthy controls samples. LMX1B transcripts was found to be significantly lower in the anterior cingulate gyrus region of autism patients compared with controls (p = 0.049. Our study suggests a possible role of LMX1B in the pathophysiology of autism. Based on previous reports, it is likely to be mediated through a seretoninergic mechanism. This is the first report on the association of LMX1B with autism, though it should be viewed with some caution considering the modest associations we report.

  14. Association of transcription factor gene LMX1B with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanseem, Ismail; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Anitha, Ayyappan; Suda, Shiro; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Keiko; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest a serotoninergic dysfunction in autism. The role of LMX1B in the development and maintenance of serotoninergic neurons is well known. In order to examine the role, if any, of LMX1B with autism pathophysiology, a trio-based SNP association study using 252 family samples from the AGRE was performed. Using pair-wise tagging method, 24 SNPs were selected from the HapMap data, based on their location and minor allele frequency. Two SNPs (rs10732392 and rs12336217) showed moderate association with autism with p values 0.018 and 0.022 respectively in transmission disequilibrium test. The haplotype AGCGTG also showed significant association (p = 0.008). Further, LMX1B mRNA expressions were studied in the postmortem brain tissues of autism subjects and healthy controls samples. LMX1B transcripts was found to be significantly lower in the anterior cingulate gyrus region of autism patients compared with controls (p = 0.049). Our study suggests a possible role of LMX1B in the pathophysiology of autism. Based on previous reports, it is likely to be mediated through a seretoninergic mechanism. This is the first report on the association of LMX1B with autism, though it should be viewed with some caution considering the modest associations we report.

  15. Professional ASPNET 35 SP1 Edition In C# and VB

    CERN Document Server

    Evjen, Bill; Rader, Devin

    2009-01-01

    Professional ASP.NET 3.5 SP1 In C# and VB. ASP.NET 3.5 brings the power of Visual Studio® 2008 along with the multitude of language improvements in C# 2008 and Visual Basic® 2008 as well as powerful new technology called LINQ, together with the ASP.NET 2.0 Framework you already know and love. Packed with valuable coverage of ASP.NET 3.5 SP1, this essential resource offers both C# and VB examples throughout the book, and shares new and updated content on the ADO.NET Entity Framework, ADO.NET Dynamic Data, and ADO.NET Data Services. While ASP.NET 3.5 boasts server controls like the ListView and

  16. Mechanism of metformin-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Ras activity in pancreatic cancer: role of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Abudayyeh, Ala; Rodrigues Hoffman, Aline; Safe, Stephen

    2014-10-03

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity for multiple cancers including pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism of action of metformin is unclear. A recent study showed that metformin down-regulated specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors (TFs) Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors, and this was accompanied by down-regulation of several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. Treatment with metformin or down-regulation of Sp TFs by RNAi also inhibits two major pro-oncogenic pathways in pancreatic cancer cells, namely mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and epidermal growth factor (EGFR)-dependent activation of Ras. Metformin and Sp knockdown by RNAi decreased expression of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling. Ras activity was also decreased by metformin and Sp knockdown of EGFR, another Sp-regulated gene. Thus, the antineoplastic activities of metformin in pancreatic cancer are due, in part, to down-regulation of Sp TFs and Sp-regulated IGF-1R and EGFR, which in turn results in inhibition of mTOR and Ras signaling, respectively. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

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    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  18. A bHLH transcription factor regulates iron intake under Fe deficiency in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2014-10-24

    Iron (Fe) deficiency can represent a serious constraint on crop growth and productivity. A number of members of the bHLH transcription factor family are known to be involved in the plant Fe deficiency response. Plants have evolved two distinct uptake strategies when challenged by Fe deficiency: dicotyledonous and non-graminaceous species rely mostly on a reduction strategy regulated by bHLH transcription factors, whereas rice relies on a chelation strategy, also regulated by bHLH transcription factors. CmbHLH1, a bHLH transcription factor which is localized within the nucleus, was isolated from chrysanthemum. Its transcription was up-regulated both by Fe deficiency and by the exogenous application of abscisic acid. The roots of transgenic chrysanthemum plants in which CmbHLH1 was up-regulated were better able than those of the wild type chrysanthemum cultivar to acidify their immediate external environment by enhancing the transcription of the H(+)-ATPase encoding gene CmHA. However, there was no effect of the transgene on the efficiency of uptake of either manganese or zinc. Here, Chrysanthemum CmbHLH1 contributed to Fe uptake via H(+)-ATPase mediated acidification of the rhizosphere. ABA may be positively involved in the process.

  19. Suppression of estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by connective tissue growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Cheng

    Full Text Available Secreted growth factors have been shown to stimulate the transcriptional activity of estrogen receptors (ER that are responsible for many biological processes. However, whether these growth factors physically interact with ER remains unclear. Here, we show for the first time that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF physically and functionally associates with ER. CTGF interacted with ER both in vitro and in vivo. CTGF interacted with ER DNA-binding domain. ER interaction region in CTGF was mapped to the thrombospondin type I repeat, a cell attachment motif. Overexpression of CTGF inhibited ER transcriptional activity as well as the expression of estrogen-responsive genes, including pS2 and cathepsin D. Reduction of endogenous CTGF with CTGF small interfering RNA enhanced ER transcriptional activity. The interaction between CTGF and ER is required for the repression of estrogen-responsive transcription by CTGF. Moreover, CTGF reduced ER protein expression, whereas the CTGF mutant that did not repress ER transcriptional activity also did not alter ER protein levels. The results suggested the transcriptional regulation of estrogen signaling through interaction between CTGF and ER, and thus may provide a novel mechanism by which cross-talk between secreted growth factor and ER signaling pathways occurs.

  20. The Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor ANAC096 cooperates with bZIP-type transcription factors in dehydration and osmotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng-Yi; Kim, Soo Youn; Hyeon, Do Young; Kim, Dae Heon; Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Jin, Jing Bo; Joo, Se-Hwan; Kim, Seong-Ki; Hong, Jong Chan; Hwang, Daehee; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-11-01

    Multiple transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in plants under abiotic stress, but how these multiple TFs cooperate in abiotic stress responses remains largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that the NAC (for NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC2) TF ANAC096 cooperates with the bZIP-type TFs ABRE binding factor and ABRE binding protein (ABF/AREB) to help plants survive under dehydration and osmotic stress conditions. ANAC096 directly interacts with ABF2 and ABF4, but not with ABF3, both in vitro and in vivo. ANAC096 and ABF2 synergistically activate RD29A transcription. Our genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that a major proportion of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive genes are under the transcriptional regulation of ANAC096. We found that the Arabidopsis thaliana anac096 mutant is hyposensitive to exogenous ABA and shows impaired ABA-induced stomatal closure and increased water loss under dehydration stress conditions. Furthermore, we found the anac096 abf2 abf4 triple mutant is much more sensitive to dehydration and osmotic stresses than the anac096 single mutant or the abf2 abf4 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that ANAC096 is involved in a synergistic relationship with a subset of ABFs for the transcriptional activation of ABA-inducible genes in response to dehydration and osmotic stresses.

  1. The Arabidopsis NAC Transcription Factor ANAC096 Cooperates with bZIP-Type Transcription Factors in Dehydration and Osmotic Stress Responses[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng-Yi; Kim, Soo Youn; Hyeon, Do Young; Kim, Dae Heon; Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Jin, Jing Bo; Joo, Se-Hwan; Kim, Seong-Ki; Hong, Jong Chan; Hwang, Daehee; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in plants under abiotic stress, but how these multiple TFs cooperate in abiotic stress responses remains largely unknown. In this study, we provide evidence that the NAC (for NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC2) TF ANAC096 cooperates with the bZIP-type TFs ABRE binding factor and ABRE binding protein (ABF/AREB) to help plants survive under dehydration and osmotic stress conditions. ANAC096 directly interacts with ABF2 and ABF4, but not with ABF3, both in vitro and in vivo. ANAC096 and ABF2 synergistically activate RD29A transcription. Our genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that a major proportion of abscisic acid (ABA)–responsive genes are under the transcriptional regulation of ANAC096. We found that the Arabidopsis thaliana anac096 mutant is hyposensitive to exogenous ABA and shows impaired ABA-induced stomatal closure and increased water loss under dehydration stress conditions. Furthermore, we found the anac096 abf2 abf4 triple mutant is much more sensitive to dehydration and osmotic stresses than the anac096 single mutant or the abf2 abf4 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that ANAC096 is involved in a synergistic relationship with a subset of ABFs for the transcriptional activation of ABA-inducible genes in response to dehydration and osmotic stresses. PMID:24285786

  2. A systems biology perspective on the role of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Drought is one of the major challenges affecting crop productivity and yield. However, water stress responses are notoriously multigenic and quantitative with strong environmental effects on phenotypes. It is also clear that water stress often does not occur alone under field conditions but rather in conjunction with other abiotic stresses such as high temperature and high light intensities. A multidisciplinary approach with successful integration of a whole range of -omics technologies will not only define the system, but also provide new gene targets for both transgenic approaches and marker-assisted selection. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling and some constitute major hubs in the signaling webs. The main transcription factors in this network include MYB, bHLH, bZIP, ERF, NAC, and WRKY transcription factors. The role of WRKY transcription factors in abiotic stress signaling networks is just becoming apparent and systems biology approaches are starting to define their places in the signaling network. Using systems biology approaches, there are now many transcriptomic analyses and promoter analyses that concern WRKY transcription factors. In addition, reports on nuclear proteomics have identified WRKY proteins that are up-regulated at the protein level by water stress. Interactomics has started to identify different classes of WRKY-interacting proteins. What are often lacking are connections between metabolomics, WRKY transcription factors, promoters, biosynthetic pathways, fluxes and downstream responses. As more levels of the system are characterized, a more detailed understanding of the roles of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in crops will be obtained.

  3. Transcription factor Rex in regulation of pathophysiology in oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitoun, J P; Wen, Z T

    2016-04-01

    The NAD(+) and NADH-sensing transcriptional regulator Rex is widely conserved across gram-positive bacteria. Rex monitors cellular redox poise and controls the expression of genes/operons involved in diverse pathways including alternative fermentation, oxidative stress responses, and biofilm formation. The oral cavity undergoes frequent and drastic fluctuations in nutrient availability, pH, temperature, oxygen tension, saliva, and shear forces. The oral streptococci are major colonizers of oral mucosa and tooth surfaces and include commensals as well as opportunistic pathogens, including the primary etiological agent of dental caries, Streptococcus mutans. Current understanding of the Rex regulon in oral bacteria is mostly based on studies in S. mutans and endodontic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. Indeed, other oral bacteria encode homologs of the Rex protein and much is to be gleaned from more in-depth studies. Our current understanding has Rex positioned at the interface of oxygen and energy metabolism. In biofilms, heterogeneous oxygen tension influences the ratio of intracellular NADH and NAD(+) , which is finely tuned through glycolysis and fermentation. In S. mutans, Rex regulates the expression of glycolytic enzyme NAD(+) -dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADH-dependent fermentation enzymes/complexes lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, alcohol-acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and fumarate reductase. In addition, Rex controls the expression of NADH oxidase, a major enzyme used to eliminate oxidative stress and regenerate NAD(+) . Here, we summarize recent studies carried out on the Rex regulators in S. mutans and E. faecalis. This research has important implications for understanding how Rex monitors redox balance and optimizes fermentation pathways for survival and subsequent pathogenicity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The transcription factor KLF2 restrains CD4⁺ T follicular helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Yong; Skon, Cara N; Lee, You Jeong; Oh, Soohwan; Taylor, Justin J; Malhotra, Deepali; Jenkins, Marc K; Rosenfeld, M Geoffrey; Hogquist, Kristin A; Jameson, Stephen C

    2015-02-17

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are essential for efficient B cell responses, yet the factors that regulate differentiation of this CD4(+) T cell subset are incompletely understood. Here we found that the KLF2 transcription factor serves to restrain Tfh cell generation. Induced KLF2 deficiency in activated CD4(+) T cells led to increased Tfh cell generation and B cell priming, whereas KLF2 overexpression prevented Tfh cell production. KLF2 promotes expression of the trafficking receptor S1PR1, and S1PR1 downregulation is essential for efficient Tfh cell production. However, KLF2 also induced expression of the transcription factor Blimp-1, which repressed transcription factor Bcl-6 and thereby impaired Tfh cell differentiation. Furthermore, KLF2 induced expression of the transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 and enhanced Th1 differentiation. Hence, our data indicate KLF2 is pivotal for coordinating CD4(+) T cell differentiation through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: via control of T cell localization and by regulation of lineage-defining transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring the roles of basal transcription factor 3 in eukaryotic growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Mengyun; Tu, Jumin

    2015-01-01

    Basal transcription factor 3 (BTF3) has been reported to play a significant part in the transcriptional regulation linking with eukaryotes growth and development. Alteration in the BTF3 gene expression patterns or variation in their activities adds to the explanation of different signaling pathways and regulatory networks. Moreover, BTF3s often respond to numerous stresses, and subsequently they are involved in regulation of various mechanisms. BTF3 proteins also function through protein-protein contact, which can assist us to identify the multifaceted processes of signaling and transcriptional regulation controlled by BTF3 proteins. In this review, we discuss current advances made in starting to explore the roles of BTF3 transcription factors in eukaryotes especially in plant growth and development.

  6. Transcription factor ZNF25 is associated with osteoblast differentiation of human skeletal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twine, Natalie A.; Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Background The differentiation of human bone marrow derived skeletal stem cells (known as human bone marrow stromal or mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs) into osteoblasts involves the activation of a small number of well-described transcription factors. To identify additional osteoblastic transcription...... containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 and RAN-binding protein 3-like. We also observed enrichment in extracellular matrix organization, skeletal system development and regulation of ossification in the entire upregulated set of genes. Consistent with its function as a transcription factor during osteoblast...... differentiation of hMSC, we showed that the ZNF25 protein exhibits nuclear localization and is expressed in osteoblastic and osteocytic cells in vivo. ZNF25 is conserved in tetrapod vertebrates and contains a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) transcriptional repressor domain. Conclusions This study shows...

  7. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Mikael Kryger; Stender, Emil G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis...... because of its simple MoRF pattern and its ability to interact with RCD1 (radical-induced cell death 1). Experiments in yeast and thermodynamic characterization suggest that its single MoRF region is sufficient for both transcriptional activation and interaction with RCD1. The remainder of the large...

  8. The transcription factor Myt3 acts as a pro-survival factor in β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R Tennant

    Full Text Available We previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as specifically expressed in pancreatic islets. Here, we sought to determine the expression and regulation of Myt3 in islets and to determine its significance in regulating islet function and survival.Myt3 expression was determined in embryonic pancreas and adult islets by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. ChIP-seq, ChIP-qPCR and luciferase assays were used to evaluate regulation of Myt3 expression. Suppression of Myt3 was used to evaluate gene expression, insulin secretion and apoptosis in islets.We show that Myt3 is the most abundant MYT family member in adult islets and that it is expressed in all the major endocrine cell types in the pancreas after E18.5. We demonstrate that Myt3 expression is directly regulated by Foxa2, Pdx1, and Neurod1, which are critical to normal β-cell development and function, and that Ngn3 induces Myt3 expression through alterations in the Myt3 promoter chromatin state. Further, we show that Myt3 expression is sensitive to both glucose and cytokine exposure. Of specific interest, suppressing Myt3 expression reduces insulin content and increases β-cell apoptosis, at least in part, due to reduced Pdx1, Mafa, Il-6, Bcl-xl, c-Iap2 and Igfr1 levels, while over-expression of Myt3 protects islets from cytokine induced apoptosis.We have identified Myt3 as a novel transcriptional regulator with a critical role in β-cell survival. These data are an important step in clarifying the regulatory networks responsible for β-cell survival, and point to Myt3 as a potential therapeutic target for improving functional β-cell mass.

  9. CDK8 Kinase Phosphorylates Transcription Factor STAT1 to Selectively Regulate the Interferon Response

    OpenAIRE

    Bancerek, Joanna; Poss, Zachary C.; Steinparzer, Iris; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddäus; Mikulic, Ivana; Dölken, Lars; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Kovarik, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Gene regulation by cytokine-activated transcription factors of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family requires serine phosphorylation within the transactivation domain (TAD). STAT1 and STAT3 TAD phosphorylation occurs upon promoter binding by an unknown kinase. Here, we show that the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the Mediator complex phosphorylated regulatory sites within the TADs of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, including S727 within the STAT1 TAD ...

  10. Comparative Analysis of Transcription Factors Families across Fungal Tree of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-19

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the transcription of genes, by binding to specific DNA sequences. Based on literature (Shelest, 2008; Weirauch and Hughes,2011) collected and manually curated list of DBD Pfam domains (in total 62 DBD domains) We looked for distribution of TFs in 395 fungal genomes plus additionally in plant genomes (Phytozome), prokaryotes(IMG), some animals/metazoans and protists genomes

  11. Identification of a novel and unique transcription factor in the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Komaki-Yasuda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are largely unclear, with only a small number of specific regulatory transcription factors (AP2 family having been identified. In particular, the transcription factors that function in the intraerythrocytic stage remain to be elucidated. Previously, as a model case for stage-specific transcription in the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic stage, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of pf1-cys-prx, a trophozoite/schizont-specific gene, and suggested that some nuclear factors bind specifically to the cis-element of pf1-cys-prx and enhance transcription. In the present study, we purified nuclear factors from parasite nuclear extract by 5 steps of chromatography, and identified a factor termed PREBP. PREBP is not included in the AP2 family, and is a novel protein with four K-homology (KH domains. The KH domain is known to be found in RNA-binding or single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. PREBP is well conserved in Plasmodium species and partially conserved in phylum Apicomplexa. To evaluate the effects of PREBP overexpression, we used a transient overexpression and luciferase assay combined approach. Overexpression of PREBP markedly enhanced luciferase expression under the control of the pf1-cys-prx cis-element. These results provide the first evidence of a novel transcription factor that activates the gene expression in the malaria parasite intraerythrocytic stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the evolution of specific transcription machinery in Plasmodium and other eukaryotes.

  12. Regulatory factor X4 variant 3: a transcription factor involved in brain development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghui; Zeldin, Darryl C; Blackshear, Perry J

    2007-12-01

    Regulatory factor X4 variant 3 (RFX4_v3) is a recently identified transcription factor specifically expressed in the brain. Gene disruption in mice demonstrated that interruption of a single allele (heterozygous, +/-) prevented formation of the subcommissural organ (SCO), resulting in congenital hydrocephalus, whereas interruption of two alleles (homozygous, -/-) caused fatal failure of dorsal midline brain structure formation. These mutagenesis studies implicated RFX4_v3 in early brain development as well as the genesis of the SCO. Rfx4_v3 deficiency presumably causes abnormalities in brain by altering the expression levels of many genes that are crucial for brain morphogenesis, such as the signaling components in the Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein, and retinoic acid pathways. RFX4_v3 might affect these critical signaling pathways in brain development. Cx3cl1, a chemokine gene highly expressed in brain, was identified as a direct target for RFX4_v3, indicating that RFX4_v3 possesses trans-acting activity to stimulate gene expression. Rfx4_v3 is highly expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and might be involved in regulating the circadian clock. One haplotype in RFX4_v3 gene is linked to a higher risk of bipolar disorder, suggesting that this protein might contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. This Mini-Review describes our current knowledge about RFX4_v3, an important protein that appears to be involved in many aspects of brain development and disease. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Gfh factors and NusA cooperate to stimulate transcriptional pausing and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Aleksei; Olina, Anna; Esyunina, Daria; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2017-03-01

    Lineage-specific Gfh factors from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which bind within the secondary channel of RNA polymerase, stimulate transcriptional pausing at a wide range of pause signals (elemental, hairpin-dependent, post-translocated, backtracking-dependent, and consensus pauses) and increase intrinsic termination. Universal bacterial factor NusA, which binds near the RNA exit channel, enhances the effects of Gfh factors on termination and hairpin-dependent pausing but do not act on other pause sites. It is proposed that NusA and Gfh target different steps in the pausing pathway and may act together to regulate transcription under stress conditions. Thus, transcription factors that interact with nascent RNA in the RNA exit channel can communicate with secondary channel regulators to modulate RNA polymerase activities. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Transcription factor network in embryonic stem cells: heterogeneity under the stringency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai-Futatsugi, Yoko; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling regulates transcription factors to maintain the self-renewability and pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Recently, we have proposed a network model that consists of transcription factors such as, Klf4, Sox2, Tbx3, Nanog, and Oct3/4, which form a parallel pathway downstream from LIF signaling (Nature, 460, 2009, Niwa et al.). In this parallel pathway, the transcription factors maintain the pluripotency of ES cells through mutual balance with some degree of redundancy and compensation. While self-renewability and pluripotency are maintained well under such seemingly stringent regulation, studies of single cells revealed heterogeneity among individual ES cells. This heterogeneity may underlie the mechanism that allows ES cells to exit self-renewal and enter into differentiation to exert pluripotency. Here we focus on recent studies on the heterogeneity of ES cells and discuss their inherent metastability.

  15. Neural crest specification: tissues, signals, and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C D; Jayasena, C S; Nie, S; Bronner, M E

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient population of multipotent and migratory cells unique to vertebrate embryos. Initially derived from the borders of the neural plate, these cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition to leave the central nervous system, migrate extensively in the periphery, and differentiate into numerous diverse derivatives. These include but are not limited to craniofacial cartilage, pigment cells, and peripheral neurons and glia. Attractive for their similarities to stem cells and metastatic cancer cells, neural crest cells are a popular model system for studying cell/tissue interactions and signaling factors that influence cell fate decisions and lineage transitions. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms required for neural crest formation in various vertebrate species, focusing on the importance of signaling factors from adjacent tissues and conserved gene regulatory interactions, which are required for induction and specification of the ectodermal tissue that will become neural crest. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A transcript cleavage factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis important for its survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab China

    Full Text Available After initiation of transcription, a number of proteins participate during elongation and termination modifying the properties of the RNA polymerase (RNAP. Gre factors are one such group conserved across bacteria. They regulate transcription by projecting their N-terminal coiled-coil domain into the active center of RNAP through the secondary channel and stimulating hydrolysis of the newly synthesized RNA in backtracked elongation complexes. Rv1080c is a putative gre factor (MtbGre in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protein enhanced the efficiency of promoter clearance by lowering abortive transcription and also rescued arrested and paused elongation complexes on the GC rich mycobacterial template. Although MtbGre is similar in domain organization and shares key residues for catalysis and RNAP interaction with the Gre factors of Escherichia coli, it could not complement an E. coli gre deficient strain. Moreover, MtbGre failed to rescue E. coli RNAP stalled elongation complexes, indicating the importance of specific protein-protein interactions for transcript cleavage. Decrease in the level of MtbGre reduced the bacterial survival by several fold indicating its essential role in mycobacteria. Another Gre homolog, Rv3788 was not functional in transcript cleavage activity indicating that a single Gre is sufficient for efficient transcription of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  17. Role of Transcription Factor Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance

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    Mi-Young Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver not due to alcohol abuse. NAFLD is accompanied by variety of symptoms related to metabolic syndrome. Although the metabolic link between NAFLD and insulin resistance is not fully understood, it is clear that NAFLD is one of the main cause of insulin resistance. NAFLD is shown to affect the functions of other organs, including pancreas, adipose tissue, muscle and inflammatory systems. Currently efforts are being made to understand molecular mechanism of interrelationship between NAFLD and insulin resistance at the transcriptional level with specific focus on post-translational modification (PTM of transcription factors. PTM of transcription factors plays a key role in controlling numerous biological events, including cellular energy metabolism, cell-cycle progression, and organ development. Cell type- and tissue-specific reversible modifications include lysine acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. Moreover, phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine residues have been shown to affect protein stability, subcellular distribution, DNA-binding affinity, and transcriptional activity. PTMs of transcription factors involved in insulin-sensitive tissues confer specific adaptive mechanisms in response to internal or external stimuli. Our understanding of the interplay between these modifications and their effects on transcriptional regulation is growing. Here, we summarize the diverse roles of PTMs in insulin-sensitive tissues and their involvement in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  18. Cellular Levels of Signaling Factors Are Sensed by β-actin Alleles to Modulate Transcriptional Pulse Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Kalo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response of β-actin to extra-cellular stimuli is a paradigm for transcription factor complex assembly and regulation. Serum induction leads to a precisely timed pulse of β-actin transcription in the cell population. Actin protein is proposed to be involved in this response, but it is not known whether cellular actin levels affect nuclear β-actin transcription. We perturbed the levels of key signaling factors and examined the effect on the induced transcriptional pulse by following endogenous β-actin alleles in single living cells. Lowering serum response factor (SRF protein levels leads to loss of pulse integrity, whereas reducing actin protein levels reveals positive feedback regulation, resulting in elevated gene activation and a prolonged transcriptional response. Thus, transcriptional pulse fidelity requires regulated amounts of signaling proteins, and perturbations in factor levels eliminate the physiological response, resulting in either tuning down or exaggeration of the transcriptional pulse.

  19. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TyAnna L Lovato

    Full Text Available Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2 is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification.

  20. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor

  1. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Every transcription factor deserves its map: Scaling up epitope tagging of proteins to bypass antibody problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, E Christopher; Watkins, Timley A; Mendenhall, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide identification of transcription factor binding sites with the ChIP-seq method is an extremely important scientific endeavor - one that should ideally be performed for every transcription factor in as many cell types as possible. A major hurdle on the way to this goal is the necessity for a specific, ChIP-grade antibody for each transcription factor of interest, which is often not available. Here, we describe CETCh-seq, a recently published method utilizing genome engineering with the CRISPR/Cas9 system to circumvent the need for a specific antibody. Using the CETCh-seq method, targeted genomic editing results in an epitope-tagged transcription factor, which is recognized by a well-characterized, standard antibody, efficacious for ChIP-seq. We have used CETCh-seq in human cancer cell lines as well as mouse embryonic stem cells. We find that roughly 60% of transcription factors tagged using CETCh-seq produce a high quality ChIP-seq map, a significant improvement over traditional antibody-based methods. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The HMG box transcription factor Sox4 contributes to the development of the endocrine pancreas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, M.E.; Yang, K.Y.; Kalousova, A.; Janet, L.; Kosaka, Y.; Lynn, F.C.; Wang, J.; Mrejen, C.; Episkopou, V.; Clevers, J.C.; German, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Sry/hydroxymethylglutaryl box (Sox) transcription factors in the development of the pancreas, we determined the expression pattern of Sox factors in the developing mouse pancreas. By RT-PCR, we detected the presence of multiple Sox family members in both the developing

  4. ZNF143 protein is an important regulator of the myeloid transcription factor C/EBP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzalez, D.; Luyten, A.; Bartholdy, B.; Zhou, Q.; Kardošová, Miroslava; Ebralidze, A.; Swanson, K.D.; Radomska, H.S.; Zhang, P.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Welner, R.S.; Levantini, E.; Steidl, U.; Chong, G.; Collombet, S.; Choi, M.H.; Friedman, A.D.; Scott, L.M.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Tenen, D.G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 46 (2017), s. 18924-18936 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein * gene regulation * hematopoiesis * promoter * transcription factor * EBPalpha * ZNF143 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  5. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell

  6. Mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue is associated with differential expression of transcription regulatory factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villena, J. A.; Carmona, M. C.; Rodriguez de la Concepción, M.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Vinas, O.; Mampel, T.; Iglesias, R.; Giralt, M.; Villarroya, F.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 11 (2002), s. 1934-1944 ISSN 1420-682X Grant - others:Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología(ES) PM98.0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * mitochondria * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.259, year: 2002

  7. Structural determinants of DNA recognition by plant MADS-domain transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino Acuna, J.M.; Smaczniak, C.; Angenent, G.C.; Kaufmann, K.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant MADS-domain transcription factors act as key regulators of many developmental processes. Despite the wealth of information that exists about these factors, the mechanisms by which they recognize their cognate DNA-binding site, called CArG-box (consensus CCW6GG), and how different MADS-domain

  8. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Pierre; Repoila, Francis; Bardowski, Jacek; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho–null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks. PMID:28723971

  9. The human mucin MUC4 is transcriptionally regulated by caudal-related homeobox, hepatocyte nuclear factors, forkhead box A, and GATA endodermal transcription factors in epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vincent, Audrey; Perrais, Michaël; Ducourouble, Marie-Paule; Male, Anita Korteland-van; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Pigny, Pascal; Carraway, Kermit L; Freund, Jean-Noël; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2007-08-03

    The human gene MUC4 encodes a large transmembrane mucin that is developmentally regulated and expressed along the undifferentiated pseudostratified epithelium, as early as 6.5 weeks during fetal development. Immunohistochemical analysis of Muc4 expression in developing mouse lung and gastrointestinal tract showed a different spatio-temporal pattern of expression before and after cytodifferentiation. The molecular mechanisms governing MUC4 expression during development are, however, unknown. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF), forkhead box A (FOXA), GATA, and caudal-related homeobox transcription factors (TFs) are known to control cell differentiation of gut endoderm derived-tissues during embryonic development. They also control the expression of cell- and tissue-specific genes and may thus control MUC4 expression. To test this hypothesis, we studied and deciphered the molecular mechanisms responsible for MUC4 transcriptional regulation by these TFs. Experiments using small interfering RNA, cell co-transfection, and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that MUC4 is regulated at the transcriptional level by CDX-1 and -2, HNF-1 alpha and -1 beta, FOXA1/A2, HNF-4 alpha and -4 gamma, and GATA-4, -5, and -6 factors in a cell-specific manner. Binding of TFs was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and gel-shift assays. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MUC4 is a target gene of endodermal TFs and thus point out an important role for these TFs in regulating MUC4 expression during epithelial differentiation during development, cancer, and repair.

  10. High-Resolution Mapping and Dynamics of the Transcriptome, Transcription Factors, and Transcription Co-Factor Networks in Classically and Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the prime innate immune cells of the inflammatory response, and the combination of multiple signaling inputs derived from the recognition of host factors [e.g., interferon-g (IFN-γ] and invading pathogen products (e.g., toll-like receptors (TLRs agonists are required to maintain essential macrophage function. The profound effects on biological outcomes of inflammation associated with IFN-γ pretreatment (“priming” and TLR4 ligand bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced macrophage activation (M1 or classical activation have long been recognized, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Therefore, we analyzed gene expression profiles of macrophages and identified genes, transcription factors (TFs, and transcription co-factors (TcoFs that are uniquely or highly expressed in IFN-γ-mediated TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible versus only TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible primary macrophages. This macrophage gene expression has not been observed in macrophage cell lines. We also showed that interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 (M2 or alternative activation elicited the induction of a distinct subset of genes related to M2 macrophage polarization. Importantly, this macrophage gene expression was also associated with promoter conservation. In particular, our approach revealed novel roles for the TFs and TcoFs in response to inflammation. We believe that the systematic approach presented herein is an important framework to better understand the transcriptional machinery of different macrophage subtypes.

  11. Modulation of oncogenic transcription factors by bioactive natural products in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpourghadi, Mohadeseh; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2018-02-01

    Carcinogenesis, a multi-step phenomenon, characterized by alterations at genetic level and affecting the main intracellular pathways controlling cell growth and development. There are growing number of evidences linking oncogenes to the induction of malignancies, especially breast cancer. Modulations of oncogenes lead to gain-of-function signals in the cells and contribute to the tumorigenic phenotype. These signals yield a large number of proteins that cause cell growth and inhibit apoptosis. Transcription factors such as STAT, p53, NF-κB, c-JUN and FOXM1, are proteins that are conserved among species, accumulate in the nucleus, bind to DNA and regulate the specific genes targets. Oncogenic transcription factors resulting from the mutation or overexpression following aberrant gene expression relay the signals in the nucleus and disrupt the transcription pattern. Activation of oncogenic transcription factors is associated with control of cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and cell differentiation. Among different cancer types, breast cancer is one of top ten cancers worldwide. There are different subtypes of breast cancer cell-lines such as non-aggressive MCF-7 and aggressive and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells, which are identified with distinct molecular profile and different levels of oncogenic transcription factor. For instance, MDA-MB-231 carries mutated and overexpressed p53 with its abnormal, uncontrolled downstream signalling pathway that account for resistance to several anticancer drugs compared to MCF-7 cells with wild-type p53. Appropriate enough, inhibition of oncogenic transcription factors has become a potential target in discovery and development of anti-tumour drugs against breast cancer. Plants produce diverse amount of organic metabolites. Universally, these metabolites with biological activities are known as "natural products". The chemical structure and function of natural products have been studied since 1850s. Investigating these properties leaded

  12. Norepinephrine activates NF-κB transcription factor in cultured rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela, Darine; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Peres, Rafael; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo Antonio; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2014-01-17

    The circadian rhythm in mammalian pineal melatonin secretion is modulated by norepinephrine (NE) released at night. NE interaction with β1-adrenoceptors activates PKA that phosphorylates the transcription factor CREB, leading to the transcription and translation of the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme. Several studies have reported the interplay between CREB and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and a circadian rhythm for this transcription factor was recently described in the rat pineal gland. In this work we studied a direct effect of NE on NF-κB activation and the role played by this factor on melatonin synthesis and Aanat transcription and activity. Cultured rat pineal glands were incubated in the presence of two different NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate or sodium salicylate, and stimulated with NE. Melatonin content was quantified by HPLC with electrochemical detection. AANAT activity was measured by a radiometric assay and the expression of Aanat mRNA was analyzed by real-time PCR. Gel shift assay was performed to study the NF-κB activation in cultured rat pineal glands stimulated by NE. Our results showed that the p50/p50 homodimer of NF-κB is activated by NE and that it has a role in melatonin synthesis, acting on Aanat transcription and activity. Here we present evidence that NF-κB is an important transcription factor that acts, directly or indirectly, on Aanat transcription and activity leading to a modulation of melatonin synthesis. NE plays a role in the translocation of NF-κB p50/p50 homodimer to the nucleus of pinealocytes, thus probably influencing the nocturnal pineal melatonin synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulation of the activity of Sp transcription factors by mithramycin analogues as a new strategy for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Malek

    Full Text Available Deregulated activity of transcription factors (TFs of the Sp/KLF family, like Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4, and consequent over-expression of Sp-regulated genes occur frequently in human cancers. This provides the rationale for development of inhibitors of Sp TFs as cancer therapeutics. Mithramycin A (MTM-A is a natural polyketide that binds GC-rich DNA sequences, inhibits activity of Sp TFs and exhibits potent antitumor activity in experimental systems. However, clinical use of MTM-A is limited by the severe toxicity of the compound. Here, we studied two MTM-A analogues, which had been generated by genetically engineering of the MTM-A biosynthetic pathway, and evaluated their activity in human prostate cancer in cell cultures and mouse models. The compounds, named MTM-SDK and MTM-SK, were highly effective in vitro inhibiting proliferation of prostate cancer cells and transcription of Sp-regulated genes by blocking binding of Sp proteins to the gene promoters. When administered to mice, both compounds were well tolerated with maximum tolerated doses of MTM-SDK and MTM-SK, respectively, 4- and 32- fold higher than MTM-A. After systemic administration, both compounds were cleared rapidly from the bloodstream but maintained plasma levels well above the active concentrations required in vitro for inhibition of Sp TF activity and cell proliferation. Consistently, MTM-SDK and MTM-SK inhibited transcription of Sp-regulated genes in prostate tumor xenografts and exhibited potent antitumor activity in subcutaneous and metastatic tumor xenograft models with no or minimal toxicity. Taken together, these data indicate that MTM-SDK and MTM-SK possess significantly improved pharmacological and toxicological properties compared to MTM-A and represent promising drugs for treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  14. SOX11 transcription factor functional analysis in aggressive MCL

    OpenAIRE

    Vegliante, Maria Carmela

    2013-01-01

    El linfoma de células del manto (LCM) es un subtipo agresivo de linfoma non Hodgkin asociado a un mal pronóstico y recaídas frecuentes. Recientemente, el factor de transcripción neuronal SOX11 se ha identificado como un marcador muy específico de LCM. SOX11 se encuentra sobreexpresado constantemente en todos los LCM agresivos y en niveles más bajos en un subgrupo de Burkitt linfoma (BL) y leucemia linfoblástica aguda (LLA) aunque no en otros neoplasmas linfoides. SOX11 se encontró exclus...

  15. Transcription Factor Ets-2 Acts as a Preinduction Repressor of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Transcription in Naive T Helper Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagoulias, Ioannis; Georgakopoulos, Tassos; Aggeletopoulou, Ioanna; Agelopoulos, Marios; Thanos, Dimitris; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-12-23

    IL-2 is the first cytokine produced when naive T helper (Th) cells are activated and differentiate into dividing pre-Th0 proliferating precursors. IL-2 expression is blocked in naive, but not activated or memory, Th cells by the transcription factor Ets-2 that binds to the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)-2 of the proximal IL-2 promoter. Ets-2 acts as an independent preinduction repressor in naive Th cells and does not interact physically with the transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) that binds to the ARRE-2 in activated Th cells. In naive Th cells, Ets-2 mRNA expression, Ets-2 protein levels, and Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 decrease upon cell activation followed by the concomitant expression of IL-2. Cyclosporine A stabilizes Ets-2 mRNA and protein when the cells are activated. Ets-2 silences directly constitutive or induced IL-2 expression through the ARRE-2. Conversely, Ets-2 silencing allows for constitutive IL-2 expression in unstimulated cells. Ets-2 binding to ARRE-2 in chromatin is stronger in naive compared with activated or memory Th cells; in the latter, Ets-2 participates in a change of the IL-2 promoter architecture, possibly to facilitate a quick response when the cells re-encounter antigen. We propose that Ets-2 expression and protein binding to the ARRE-2 of the IL-2 promoter are part of a strictly regulated process that results in a physiological transition of naive Th cells to Th0 cells upon antigenic stimulation. Malfunction of such a repression mechanism at the molecular level could lead to a disturbance of later events in Th cell plasticity, leading to autoimmune diseases or other pathological conditions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

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    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  17. First trimester maternal serum pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein (SP1) as a marker of adverse pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kasper; Larsen, Torben; Laursen, Inga

    2009-01-01

    = 500). Concentrations were converted to multiples of the median (MoM) in controls and groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant factors for predicting adverse pregnancy outcome. Screening performance was assessed using receiver......OBJECTIVE: To establish the first trimester levels of pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein (SP1) in pregnancies with adverse outcome. Furthermore, to determine the screening performance for adverse outcome using SP1 alone and in combination with other first trimester markers including pro......MBP and PAPP-A. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted in a primary hospital setting. The SP1 concentration was measured in first trimester maternal serum in pregnancies with small-for-gestational age fetuses (SGA) (n = 150), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 88), preeclampsia (n = 40) and in controls (n...

  18. The DOF transcription factor Dof5.1 influences leaf axial patterning by promoting Revoluta transcription in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyungsae

    2010-10-05

    Dof proteins are transcription factors that have a conserved single zinc finger DNA-binding domain. In this study, we isolated an activation tagging mutant Dof5.1-D exhibiting an upward-curling leaf phenotype due to enhanced expression of the REV gene that is required for establishing adaxialabaxial polarity. Dof5.1-D plants also had reduced transcript levels for IAA6 and IAA19 genes, indicating an altered auxin biosynthesis in Dof5.1-D. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif and the REV promoter region indicated that the DNA-binding domain of Dof5.1 binds to a TAAAGT motif located in the 5′-distal promoter region of the REV promoter. Further, transient and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays verified binding activity of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif with the REV promoter. Consistent with binding assays, constitutive over-expression of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding domain in wild-type plants caused a downward-curling phenotype, whereas crossing Dof5.1-D to a rev mutant reverted the upward-curling phenotype of the Dof5.1-D mutant leaf to the wild-type. These results suggest that the Dof5.1 protein directly binds to the REV promoter and thereby regulates adaxialabaxial polarity. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. SUMOylation of the KRAB zinc-finger transcription factor PARIS/ZNF746 regulates its transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Tamotsu, E-mail: nishida@gene.mie-u.ac.jp; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2016-05-13

    Parkin-interacting substrate (PARIS), a member of the family of Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc-finger transcription factors, is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase parkin. PARIS represses the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that PARIS can be SUMOylated, and its SUMOylation plays a role in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT y (PIASy) was identified as an interacting protein of PARIS and shown to enhance its SUMOylation. PIASy repressed PGC-1a promoter activity, and this effect was attenuated by PARIS in a manner dependent on its SUMOylation status. Co-expression of SUMO-1 with PIASy completely repressed PGC-1a promoter activity independently of PARIS expression. PARIS-mediated PGC-1a promoter repression depended on the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC), whereas PIASy repressed the PGC-1a promoter in an HDAC-independent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PARIS and PIASy modulate PGC-1a gene transcription through distinct molecular mechanisms. -- Highlights: •PARIS can be SUMOylated in vivo and in vitro. •SUMOylation of PARIS functions in the repression of PGC-1a promoter activity. •PIASy interacts with PARIS and enhances its SUMOylation. •PIASy influences PARIS-mediated repression of PGC-1a promoter activity.

  20. Targeting cancer stem cells: emerging role of Nanog transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mong-Lien Wang,1 Shih-Hwa Chiou,2,3 Cheng-Wen Wu1,4–61Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: The involvement of stemness factors in cancer initiation and progression has drawn much attention recently, especially after the finding that introducing four stemness factors in somatic cells is able to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Following accumulating data revealing abnormal elevated expression levels of key stemness factors, like Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, in several types of cancer stem cells; the importance and therapeutic potential of targeting these stemness regulators in cancers has turned to research focus. Nanog determines cell fate in both embryonic and cancer stem cells; activating Nanog at an inappropriate time would result in cancer stem cells rather than normal pluripotent stem cells or differentiated somatic cells. Upregulated Nanog is correlated with poor survival outcome of patients with various types of cancer. The discoveries of downstream regulatory pathways directly or indirectly mediated by Nanog indicate that Nanog regulates several aspects of cancer development such as tumor cell proliferation, self-renewal, motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, immune evasion, and drug-resistance, which are all defined features for cancer stem cells. The current review paper illustrates the central role of Nanog in the regulatory networks of cancer malignant development and stemness acquirement, as well as in the communication between cancer cells and the surrounding stroma. Though a more defined model is needed to test the

  1. Bioinformatics analysis of biomarkers and transcriptional factor motifs in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X D; Liu, N; Xu, X J

    2014-10-01

    In this study, biomarkers and transcriptional factor motifs were identified in order to investigate the etiology and phenotypic severity of Down syndrome. GSE 1281, GSE 1611, and GSE 5390 were downloaded from the gene expression ominibus (GEO). A robust multiarray analysis (RMA) algorithm was applied to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In order to screen for biological pathways and to interrogate the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway database, the database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery (DAVID) was used to carry out a gene ontology (GO) function enrichment for DEGs. Finally, a transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, and a hypergeometric distribution test was applied to select for significantly enriched transcriptional factor motifs. CBR1, DYRK1A, HMGN1, ITSN1, RCAN1, SON, TMEM50B, and TTC3 were each up-regulated two-fold in Down syndrome samples compared to normal samples; of these, SON and TTC3 were newly reported. CBR1, DYRK1A, HMGN1, ITSN1, RCAN1, SON, TMEM50B, and TTC3 were located on human chromosome 21 (mouse chromosome 16). The DEGs were significantly enriched in macromolecular complex subunit organization and focal adhesion pathways. Eleven significantly enriched transcription factor motifs (PAX5, EGR1, XBP1, SREBP1, OLF1, MZF1, NFY, NFKAPPAB, MYCMAX, NFE2, and RP58) were identified. The DEGs and transcription factor motifs identified in our study provide biomarkers for the understanding of Down syndrome pathogenesis and progression.

  2. Bioinformatics analysis of biomarkers and transcriptional factor motifs in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.D. Kong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, biomarkers and transcriptional factor motifs were identified in order to investigate the etiology and phenotypic severity of Down syndrome. GSE 1281, GSE 1611, and GSE 5390 were downloaded from the gene expression ominibus (GEO. A robust multiarray analysis (RMA algorithm was applied to detect differentially expressed genes (DEGs. In order to screen for biological pathways and to interrogate the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database, the database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery (DAVID was used to carry out a gene ontology (GO function enrichment for DEGs. Finally, a transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, and a hypergeometric distribution test was applied to select for significantly enriched transcriptional factor motifs. CBR1, DYRK1A, HMGN1, ITSN1, RCAN1, SON, TMEM50B, and TTC3 were each up-regulated two-fold in Down syndrome samples compared to normal samples; of these, SON and TTC3 were newly reported. CBR1, DYRK1A, HMGN1, ITSN1, RCAN1, SON, TMEM50B, and TTC3 were located on human chromosome 21 (mouse chromosome 16. The DEGs were significantly enriched in macromolecular complex subunit organization and focal adhesion pathways. Eleven significantly enriched transcription factor motifs (PAX5, EGR1, XBP1, SREBP1, OLF1, MZF1, NFY, NFKAPPAB, MYCMAX, NFE2, and RP58 were identified. The DEGs and transcription factor motifs identified in our study provide biomarkers for the understanding of Down syndrome pathogenesis and progression.

  3. Exploring comprehensive within-motif dependence of transcription factor binding in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung

    2015-11-23

    Modeling the binding of transcription factors helps to decipher the control logic behind transcriptional regulatory networks. Position weight matrix is commonly used to describe a binding motif but assumes statistical independence between positions. Although current approaches take within-motif dependence into account for better predictive performance, these models usually rely on prior knowledge and incorporate simple positional dependence to describe binding motifs. The inability to take complex within-motif dependence into account may result in an incomplete representation of binding motifs. In this work, we applied association rule mining techniques and constructed models to explore within-motif dependence for transcription factors in Escherichia coli. Our models can reflect transcription factor-DNA recognition where the explored dependence correlates with the binding specificity. We also propose a graphical representation of the explored within-motif dependence to illustrate the final binding configurations. Understanding the binding configurations also enables us to fine-tune or design transcription factor binding sites, and we attempt to present the configurations through exploring within-motif dependence.

  4. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  5. Role of Forkhead Transcription Factors in Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Ponugoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder, characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from insulin deficiency and/or insulin resistance. Recent evidence suggests that high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and subsequent oxidative stress are key contributors in the development of diabetic complications. The FOXO family of forkhead transcription factors including FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4, and FOXO6 play important roles in the regulation of many cellular and biological processes and are critical regulators of cellular oxidative stress response pathways. FOXO1 transcription factors can affect a number of different tissues including liver, retina, bone, and cell types ranging from hepatocytes to microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes to osteoblasts. They are induced by oxidative stress and contribute to ROS-induced cell damage and apoptosis. In this paper, we discuss the role of FOXO transcription factors in mediating oxidative stress-induced cellular response.

  6. Nuclear factor ETF specifically stimulates transcription from promoters without a TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, R; Merlino, G T; Pastan, I

    1989-09-15

    Transcription factor ETF stimulates the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene which does not have a TATA box in the promoter region. Here, we show that ETF recognizes various GC-rich sequences including stretches of deoxycytidine or deoxyguanosine residues and GC boxes with similar affinities. ETF also binds to TATA boxes but with a lower affinity. ETF stimulated in vitro transcription from several promoters without TATA boxes but had little or no effect on TATA box-containing promoters even though they had strong ETF-binding sites. These inactive ETF-binding sites became functional when placed upstream of the EGFR promoter whose own ETF-binding sites were removed. Furthermore, when a TATA box was introduced into the EGFR promoter, the responsiveness to ETF was abolished. These results indicate that ETF is a specific transcription factor for promoters which do not contain TATA elements.

  7. Transcription Factor Antagonism Controls Enteroendocrine Cell Specification from Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Pang, Zhimin; Huang, Huanwei; Wang, Chenhui; Cai, Tao; Xi, Rongwen

    2017-04-20

    The balanced maintenance and differentiation of local stem cells is required for Homeostatic renewal of tissues. In the Drosophila midgut, the transcription factor Escargot (Esg) maintains undifferentiated states in intestinal stem cells, whereas the transcription factors Scute (Sc) and Prospero (Pros) promote enteroendocrine cell specification. However, the mechanism through which Esg and Sc/Pros coordinately regulate stem cell differentiation is unknown. Here, by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with genetic studies, we show that both Esg and Sc bind to a common promoter region of pros. Moreover, antagonistic activity between Esg and Sc controls the expression status of Pros in stem cells, thereby, specifying whether stem cells remain undifferentiated or commit to enteroendocrine cell differentiation. Our study therefore reveals transcription factor antagonism between Esg and Sc as a novel mechanism that underlies fate specification from intestinal stem cells in Drosophila.

  8. Using mouse models to study function of transcriptional factors in T cell development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Peng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laboratory mice have widely been used as tools for basic biological research and models for studying human diseases. With the advances of genetic engineering and conditional knockout (CKO mice, we now understand hematopoiesis is a dynamic stepwise process starting from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs which are responsible for replenishing all blood cells. Transcriptional factors play important role in hematopoiesis. In this review we compile several studies on using genetic modified mice and humanized mice to study function of transcriptional factors in lymphopoiesis, including T lymphocyte and Natural killer (NK cell development. Finally, we focused on the key transcriptional factor Bcl11b and its function in regulating T cell specification and commitment.

  9. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  10. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  11. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  12. NAC Transcription Factors of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their Involvement in Leaf Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    yielding cereal crops are generated. In cereals, the process of leaf senescence is of utmost relevance when discussing yield. It is during the senescence process that all nutrients are transported from the withering leaf to the developing grains. Furthermore, the timing of senescence determines...... the photosynthetically productive period of the crop plant. Improving the process of senescence by genetic means rather than by increasing the amount of fertiliser is one potential approach towards a higher sustainable productivity. In several species of plants, the NAC transcription factors have been shown to regulate...... parts of the senescence process. The specific aims of this study were therefore (1) to establish and characterise the NAC transcription factors of the model cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (2) to identify and study putative barley NAC transcription factors involved in the regulation of leaf...

  13. Transcription factors regulating uspA genes in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahieldin, Ahmed; Atef, Ahmed; Shokry, Ahmed M; Al-Karim, Saleh; Al Attas, Sanaa G; Gadallah, Nour O; Edris, Sherif; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; Hassan, Sabah M; Abo-Aba, Salah; El-Domyati, Fotouh M

    2017-01-01

    RNA-Seq of the Catharanthus roseus SRA database was done in order to detect putative universal stress proteins (USPs) and their possible controlling factors. Previous analysis indicated the existence and characterization of uspA-like genes. In silico analysis of RNA-Seq database in several plant tissues revealed the possible functions and regulations of some uspA-like transcripts whose transcription factors (TFs) that might drive their expression were detected. BLAST indicated the existence of TF superfamilies erf (ethylene-responsive TF), bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) and WRKY that might regulate several uspA-like genes. This data was proven via semi-quantitative RT-PCR in four plant tissues. Several of these transcription factor superfamilies are known for their action in the plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-02-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  16. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chun; Galbraith, Simon J; Liao, James C; Eskin, Eleazar

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA) to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  17. Arabidopsis DOF transcription factors act redundantly to reduce CONSTANS expression and are essential for a photoperiodic flowering response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornara, Fabio; Panigrahi, Kishore C S; Gissot, Lionel; Sauerbrunn, Nicolas; Rühl, Mark; Jarillo, José A; Coupland, George

    2009-07-01

    Flowering of Arabidopsis is induced by long summer days (LDs). The transcriptional regulator CONSTANS (CO) promotes flowering, and its transcription is increased under LDs. We systematically misexpressed transcription factors in companion cells and identified several DOF proteins that delay flowering by repressing CO transcription. Combining mutations in four of these, including CYCLING DOF FACTOR 2 (CDF2), caused photoperiod-insensitive early flowering by increasing CO mRNA levels. CO transcription is promoted to differing extents by GIGANTEA (GI) and the F-box protein FKF1. We show that GI stabilizes FKF1, thereby reducing CDF2 abundance and allowing transcription of CO. Despite the crucial function of GI in wild-type plants, introducing mutations in the four DOF-encoding genes into gi mutants restored the diurnal rhythm and light inducibility of CO. Thus, antagonism between GI and DOF transcription factors contributes to photoperiodic flowering by modulating an underlying diurnal rhythm in CO transcript levels.

  18. Comparative cell cycle transcriptomics reveals synchronization of developmental transcription factor networks in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johard, Helena; Mahdessian, Diana; Fedr, Radek; Marks, Carolyn; Medalová, Jiřina; Souček, Karel; Lundberg, Emma; Linnarsson, Sten; Bryja, Vítězslav; Sekyrova, Petra; Altun, Mikael; Andäng, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The cell cycle coordinates core functions such as replication and cell division. However, cell-cycle-regulated transcription in the control of non-core functions, such as cell identity maintenance through specific transcription factors (TFs) and signalling pathways remains unclear. Here, we provide a resource consisting of mapped transcriptomes in unsynchronized HeLa and U2OS cancer cells sorted for cell cycle phase by Fucci reporter expression. We developed a novel algorithm for data analysis that enables efficient visualization and data comparisons and identified cell cycle synchronization of Notch signalling and TFs associated with development. Furthermore, the cell cycle synchronizes with the circadian clock, providing a possible link between developmental transcriptional networks and the cell cycle. In conclusion we find that cell cycle synchronized transcriptional patterns are temporally compartmentalized and more complex than previously anticipated, involving genes, which control cell identity and development. PMID:29228002

  19. Host Transcription Factors in the Immediate Pro-Inflammatory Response to the Parasitic Mite Psoroptes ovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stewart T. G.; McNeilly, Tom N.; Watkins, Craig A.; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Huntley, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sheep scab, caused by infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis, results in the rapid development of cutaneous inflammation and leads to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of the disease. We described previously the global host transcriptional response to infestation with P. ovis, elucidating elements of the inflammatory processes which lead to the development of a rapid and profound immune response. However, the mechanisms by which this response is instigated remain unclear. To identify novel methods of intervention a better understanding of the early events involved in triggering the immune response is essential. The objective of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the instigation of the immediate pro-inflammatory response. Results Through a combination of transcription factor binding site enrichment and pathway analysis we identified key roles for a number of transcription factors in the instigation of cutaneous inflammation. In particular, defined roles were elucidated for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the orchestration of the early pro-inflammatory response, with these factors being implicated in the activation of a suite of inflammatory mediators. Conclusions Interrogation of the host temporal response to P. ovis infestation has enabled the further identification of the mechanisms underlying the development of the immediate host pro-inflammatory response. This response involves key regulatory roles for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Pathway analysis demonstrated that the activation of these transcription factors may be triggered following a host LPS-type response, potentially involving TLR4-signalling and also lead to the intriguing possibility that this could be triggered by a P. ovis allergen. PMID:21915322

  20. Host transcription factors in the immediate pro-inflammatory response to the parasitic mite Psoroptes ovis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart T G Burgess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sheep scab, caused by infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis, results in the rapid development of cutaneous inflammation and leads to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of the disease. We described previously the global host transcriptional response to infestation with P. ovis, elucidating elements of the inflammatory processes which lead to the development of a rapid and profound immune response. However, the mechanisms by which this response is instigated remain unclear. To identify novel methods of intervention a better understanding of the early events involved in triggering the immune response is essential. The objective of this study was to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the instigation of the immediate pro-inflammatory response. RESULTS: Through a combination of transcription factor binding site enrichment and pathway analysis we identified key roles for a number of transcription factors in the instigation of cutaneous inflammation. In particular, defined roles were elucidated for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the orchestration of the early pro-inflammatory response, with these factors being implicated in the activation of a suite of inflammatory mediators. CONCLUSIONS: Interrogation of the host temporal response to P. ovis infestation has enabled the further identification of the mechanisms underlying the development of the immediate host pro-inflammatory response. This response involves key regulatory roles for the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1. Pathway analysis demonstrated that the activation of these transcription factors may be triggered following a host LPS-type response, potentially involving TLR4-signalling and also lead to the intriguing possibility that this could be triggered by a P. ovis allergen.

  1. Oleanane triterpenoids with inhibitory activity against NFAT transcription factor from Liquidambar formosana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Nguyen Tien; Lee, Im Seon; Cai, Xing Fu; Shen, Guanghai; Kim, Young Ho

    2004-03-01

    In a search for inhibitory components from natural products against NFAT transcription factor, this study investigated the ethyl acetate extract of the fruits of Liquidambar formosana. Four oleanane triterpenoids were isolated and identified to be liquidambaric acid, oleanolic acid, 3alpha-acetoxy-25-hydroxy-olean-12-en-28-oic acid and lantanolic acid. Of these compounds, 3alpha-acetoxy-25-hydroxy-olean-12-en-28-oic acid (IC50: 4.63 microM) and lantanolic acid (IC50: 12.62 microM) exhibited strong inhibitory activity against the NFAT transcription factor.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships between Arabidopsis and sugarcane bZIP transcriptional regulatory factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentz Michel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We built a complete and non-redundant database of bZIP transcriptional regulatory factors from the Arabidopsis reference genome. These Arabidopsis bZIP factors were ordered into thirteen families of evolutionary related proteins and this classification was used to identify and organize sugarcane cDNAs encoding bZIP proteins. We also show how this classification should help in defining putative clusters of orthologous groups of higher plant bZIP regulators and briefly discuss the expected benefits of this procedure to efficiently characterize sugarcane bZIP transcriptional regulators.

  3. Induction of miR-137 by Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Directly Targets Sp1 Protein Translation and Mediates Its Anticancer Activity Both In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xingruo; Xu, Zhou; Gu, Jiayan; Huang, Haishan; Gao, Guangxun; Zhang, Xiaoru; Li, Jingxia; Jin, Honglei; Jiang, Guosong; Sun, Hong; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-01

    Our recent studies found that isorhapontigenin (ISO) showed a significant inhibitory effect on human bladder cancer cell growth, accompanied with cell-cycle G0-G1 arrest as well as downregulation of Cyclin D1 expression at transcriptional level via inhibition of Sp1 transactivation in bladder cancer cells. In the current study, the potential ISO inhibition of bladder tumor formation has been explored in a xenograft nude mouse model, and the molecular mechanisms underlying ISO inhibition of Sp1 expression and anticancer activities have been elucidated both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the studies demonstrated that ISO treatment induced the expression of miR-137, which in turn suppressed Sp1 protein translation by directly targeting Sp1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Similar to ISO treatment, ectopic expression of miR-137 alone led to G0-G1 cell growth arrest and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in human bladder cancer cells, which could be completely reversed by overexpression of GFP-Sp1. The inhibition of miR-137 expression attenuated ISO-induced inhibition of Sp1/Cyclin D1 expression, induction of G0-G1 cell growth arrest, and suppression of cell anchorage-independent growth. Taken together, our studies have demonstrated that miR-137 induction by ISO targets Sp1 mRNA 3'-UTR and inhibits Sp1 protein translation, which consequently results in reduction of Cyclin D1 expression, induction of G0-G1 growth arrest, and inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in vitro and in vivo. Our results have provided novel insights into understanding the anticancer activity of ISO in the therapy of human bladder cancer. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Multifunctional role of the transcription factor Blimp-1 in coordinating plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnich, Martina; Tagoh, Hiromi; Bönelt, Peter; Axelsson, Elin; Fischer, Maria; Cebolla, Beatriz; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Nutt, Stephen L; Jaritz, Markus; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2016-03-01

    The transcription