WorldWideScience

Sample records for sp model expectations

  1. The Probability Model of Expectation Disconfirmation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hsin HUANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a probability model to explore the dynamic process of customer’s satisfaction. Bases on expectation disconfirmation theory, the satisfaction is constructed with customer’s expectation before buying behavior and the perceived performance after purchase. The experiment method is designed to measure expectation disconfirmation effects and we also use the collection data to estimate the overall satisfaction and model calibration. The results show good fitness between the model and the real data. This model has application for business marketing areas in order to manage relationship satisfaction.

  2. Testing Expected Shortfall Models for Derivative Positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, F.L.J.; Melenberg, B.; Schumacher, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we test several risk management models for computing expected shortfall for one-period hedge errors of hedged derivatives positions.Contrary to value-at-risk, expected shortfall cannot be tested using the standard binomial test, since we need information of the distribution in the

  3. Expected commodity returns and pricing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortazar, Gonzalo; Kovacevic, Ivo; Schwartz, Eduardo S.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic models of commodity prices have evolved considerably in terms of their structure and the number and interpretation of the state variables that model the underlying risk. Using multiple factors, different specifications and modern estimation techniques, these models have gained wide acceptance because of their success in accurately fitting the observed commodity futures' term structures and their dynamics. It is not well emphasized however that these models, in addition to providing the risk neutral distribution of future spot prices, also provide their true distribution. While the parameters of the risk neutral distribution are estimated more precisely and are usually statistically significant, some of the parameters of the true distribution are typically measured with large errors and are statistically insignificant. In this paper we argue that to increase the reliability of commodity pricing models, and therefore their use by practitioners, some of their parameters — in particular the risk premium parameters — should be obtained from other sources and we show that this can be done without losing any precision in the pricing of futures contracts. We show how the risk premium parameters can be obtained from estimations of expected futures returns and provide alternative procedures for estimating these expected futures returns. - Highlights: • Simple methodology to improve the performance of commodity pricing models • New information about commodity futures expected return is added to the estimation. • No significant effect in pricing futures contracts is observed. • More reliable commodity pricing model's expected returns are obtained. • Methodology is open to any expected futures return model preferred by practitioner

  4. Heterogeneous expectations in monetary DSGE models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massaro, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper derives a general New Keynesian framework with heterogeneous expectations by explicitly solving the micro-foundations underpinning the model. The resulting reduced form is analytically tractable and encompasses the representative rational agent benchmark as a special case. We specify a

  5. A multiresolution model of rhythmic expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, L.M.; Honing, H.; Miyazaki, K.; Hiraga, Y.; Adachi, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Tsuzaki, M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a computational model of rhythmic cognition that predicts expected onset times. A dynamic representation of musical rhythm, the multiresolution analysis using the continuous wavelet transform is used. This representation decomposes the temporal structure of a musical rhythm into time

  6. Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    depend on the reader’s own experiences, individual feelings, personal associations or on conventions of reading, interpretive communities and cultural conditions? This volume brings together narrative theory, fictionality theory and speech act theory to address such questions of expectations...... and intentionality in relation to narrative and fiction....

  7. Parametrization of model consistant expectations in the Sidrauski model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenveen, Victoria; Sterken, Elmer

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses a cubic parametrisation of model consistent expectations in a nonlinear dynamic monetary growth model. The so-called Sidrauski model links money, inflation and consumption growth. Iterative least squares combined with simulation is used to address the alleged impact of inflation

  8. Solving rational expectations models using Excel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strulik, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Problems of discrete time optimal control can be solved using backward iteration and Microsoft Excel. The author explains the method in general and shows how the basic models of neoclassical growth and real business cycles are solved......Problems of discrete time optimal control can be solved using backward iteration and Microsoft Excel. The author explains the method in general and shows how the basic models of neoclassical growth and real business cycles are solved...

  9. Expectations and stability in oligopoly models

    CERN Document Server

    Okuguchi, Koji

    1976-01-01

    Ever since A.C.Cournot(1838), economists have been increasingly interested in oligopoly, a state of industry where firms producing homogeneous goods or close substitutes are limited in number. The fewness of firms in oligopoly gives rise to interdependence which they have to take into account in choosing their optimal output or pricing policies in each production period. Since each firm's profit is a function of all firms' outputs in an oligopoly without product differ­ entiation, each firm in choosing its optimal output in any period has to know beforehand all other rival firms' outputs in the same period. As this is in general impossible, it has to form some kind of expecta­ tion on other firms' most likely outputs. Cournot thought that in each period each firm assumed that all its rivals' outputs would remain at the same level as in the preceding period. Needless to say, the Cournot assumption is too naive to be realistically supported. However, the Cournot profit maximizing oligopoly model characterized...

  10. Investigating Academic Literacy Expectations: A Curriculum Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Sonya L.; Stahl, Norman A.; Kantner, M. Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Although much research has examined students' readiness levels as they prepare to transition from high school to college, little published research exists on the specific literacy expectations students will face in their early college experiences. This article provides an overview of a model for determining the reading demands and expectations in…

  11. Testing exact rational expectations in cointegrated vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers the testing of restrictions implied by rational expectations hypotheses in a cointegrated vector autoregressive model for I(1) variables. If the rational expectations involve one-step-ahead observations only and the coefficients are known, an explicit parameterization...

  12. The rational expectations equilibrium inventory model theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    This volume consists of six essays that develop and/or apply "rational expectations equilibrium inventory models" to study the time series behavior of production, sales, prices, and inventories at the industry level. By "rational expectations equilibrium inventory model" I mean the extension of the inventory model of Holt, Modigliani, Muth, and Simon (1960) to account for: (i) discounting, (ii) infinite horizon planning, (iii) observed and unobserved by the "econometrician" stochastic shocks in the production, factor adjustment, storage, and backorders management processes of firms, as well as in the demand they face for their products; and (iv) rational expectations. As is well known according to the Holt et al. model firms hold inventories in order to: (a) smooth production, (b) smooth production changes, and (c) avoid stockouts. Following the work of Zabel (1972), Maccini (1976), Reagan (1982), and Reagan and Weitzman (1982), Blinder (1982) laid the foundations of the rational expectations equilibrium inve...

  13. Testing a model of caffeinated alcohol-specific expectancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Stamates, Amy L

    2015-08-01

    The present study sought to further understand the association between caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) use and alcohol-related risks. In particular, we focused on the role of two identified expectancies specific to CAB use: intoxication enhancement and avoidance of negative consequences. Although outcome expectancies are consistent predictors of substance use, limited research has examined expectancies related to CAB use and their association with alcohol-related behaviors, such as protecting themselves from alcohol-related harms. Consequently, the present study examined CAB-specific expectancies and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) as mediators of CAB use and negative consequences. Participants were 322 (219 women) college drinkers who completed self-report measures of typical CAB and alcohol use, CAB-specific expectancies, PBS use, and alcohol-related harms. Structural equation modeling revealed, after controlling for typical non-CAB heavy alcohol use, a significant indirect effect of CAB use to alcohol-related problems through avoidance of negative consequences CAB expectancies and PBS use. However, intoxication enhancement expectancies did not mediate this association. Our findings indicate that heavier CAB use was associated with stronger expectations that drinking CABs can help avoid negative consequences. These beliefs were related to using fewer PBS when drinking and a greater likelihood of experiencing problems. Given that these expectancies may be underlying mechanisms of CAB use, their inclusion in existing alcohol interventions may be beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On a Graphical Technique for Evaluating Some Rational Expectations Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders R.

    2011-01-01

    . In addition to getting a visual impression of the fit of the model, the purpose is to see if the two spreads are nevertheless similar as measured by correlation, variance ratio, and noise ratio. We extend these techniques to a number of rational expectation models and give a general definition of spread...

  15. The expected-outcome model of two-player games

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The Expected-Outcome Model of Two-Player Games deals with the expected-outcome model of two-player games, in which the relative merit of game-tree nodes, rather than board positions, is considered. The ambiguity of static evaluation and the problems it generates in the search system are examined and the development of a domain-independent static evaluator is described. Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the rationale for the mathematical study of games, followed by a discussion on some previous artificial intelligence (AI) research efforts on game-trees. The nex

  16. sp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    adopted as the first line drug. SP has few untoward effects if used carefully in therapeutic doses. Nausea, vomiting, generalized body weakness; diarrhea, skin rashes and hematological reactions are some of the associated side effects. The drug can cause severe skin reactions such as Steven Johnson's syndrome. This.

  17. Approximate Minimization of the Regularized Expected Error over Kernel Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra; Sanguineti, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2008), s. 747-756 ISSN 0364-765X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/0557; GA ČR GA201/08/1744 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : suboptimal solutions * expected error * convex functionals * kernel methods * model complexity * rates of convergence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.086, year: 2008

  18. Modeling expectations in agent-based models: an application to central bank's communication and monetary policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salle, I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Expectations play a major role in macroeconomic dynamics, especially regarding the conduct of monetary policy. Yet, modeling the interplay between communication, expectations and aggregate outcomes remains a challenging task, mainly because this requires deviation from the paradigm of rational

  19. Increasing Self-Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations: A Model to Facilitate Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jean M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Without organizationwide commitment to training programs, educators may be able to increase learners' self-efficacy to acquire desired skills or behavior. But behavior and skills will not be transferred to the job if learners have low expectations about their use or if positive reinforcement is lacking. (SK)

  20. Expected Timber-Based Economic Impacts of a Wood-Boring Beetle (Acanthotomicus Sp.) That Kills American Sweetgum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaeta, Andres; Soto, José R; Adams, Damian C; Hulcr, Jiri

    2017-08-01

    American sweetgum trees (Liquidambar styraciflua L. [Altingiaceae]) in China are being killed by a newly discovered wood-boring beetle "sweetgum inscriber" (Acanthotomicus sp.). It has not been detected in the United States yet, but given the extent of trade with Asian countries, eventual arrival of this beetle is a serious concern. The American sweetgum is one of the main hardwood species in the southern United States, and provides several economic and ecological benefits to society. We present the first economic analysis of the potential damage from sweetgum inscriber (SI) to timber-based land values in the southern United States. We modeled economic impacts for a range of feasible SI arrival rates that reflect policy interventions: 1) no efforts to prevent arrival (scenario A, once every 14 and 25 yr), 2) partial prevention by complying with ISPM 15 standards (scenario B, once every 33 and 100 yr), and 3) total prevention of arrival (scenario C, zero transmission of SI). Our results indicated much lower land values for sweetgum plantations without the prevention on SI establishment (scenario A, US$1,843-US$4,383 ha-1) compared with partial prevention (scenario B, US$5,426-US$8,050 ha-1) and total eradication of SI (scenario C, US$9,825). Across the region, upper bound timber-based economic losses to plantation owners is US$151.9 million (US$4.6 million annually)-an estimate that can help inform policy decisions. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. ZNJPrice/Earnings Ratio Model through Dividend Yield and Required Yield Above Expected Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Mihalina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Price/earnings ratio is the most popular and most widespread evaluation model used to assess relative capital asset value on financial markets. In functional terms, company earnings in the very long term can be described with high significance. Empirically, it is visible from long-term statistics that the demanded (required yield on capital markets has certain regularity. Thus, investors first require a yield above the stable inflation rate and then a dividend yield and a capital increase caused by the growth of earnings that influence the price, with the assumption that the P/E ratio is stable. By combining the Gordon model for current dividend value, the model of market capitalization of earnings (price/earnings ratio and bearing in mind the influence of the general price levels on company earnings, it is possible to adjust the price/earnings ratio by deriving a function of the required yield on capital markets measured by a market index through dividend yield and inflation rate above the stable inflation rate increased by profit growth. The S&P 500 index for example, has in the last 100 years grown by exactly the inflation rate above the stable inflation rate increased by profit growth. The comparison of two series of price/earnings ratios, a modelled one and an average 7-year ratio, shows a notable correlation in the movement of two series of variables, with a three year deviation. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that three years of the expected inflation level, dividend yield and profit growth rate of the market index are discounted in the current market prices. The conclusion is that, at the present time, the relationship between the adjusted average price/earnings ratio and its effect on the market index on one hand and the modelled price/earnings ratio on the other can clearly show the expected dynamics and course in the following period.

  2. Greater expectations: using hierarchical linear modeling to examine expectancy for treatment outcome as a predictor of treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page; Henrich, Christopher C; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2008-12-01

    A client's expectation that therapy will be beneficial has long been considered an important factor contributing to therapeutic outcomes, but recent empirical work examining this hypothesis has primarily yielded null findings. The present study examined the contribution of expectancies for treatment outcome to actual treatment outcome from the start of therapy through 12-month follow-up in a clinical sample of individuals (n=72) treated for fear of flying with either in vivo exposure or virtual reality exposure therapy. Using a piecewise hierarchical linear model, outcome expectancy predicted treatment gains made during therapy but not during follow-up. Compared to lower levels, higher expectations for treatment outcome yielded stronger rates of symptom reduction from the beginning to the end of treatment on 2 standardized self-report questionnaires on fear of flying. The analytic approach of the current study is one potential reason that findings contrast with prior literature. The advantages of using hierarchical linear modeling to assess interindividual differences in longitudinal data are discussed.

  3. A Verhulst model for microalgae Botryococcus sp. growth and nutrient removal in wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaian, Siti Suhana; Bakeri, Noorhadila Mohd; Sunar, Norshuhaila Mohamed; Gani, Paran

    2017-08-01

    Microalgae Botryococcus sp. is a colonial green alga found in lakes and reservoirs in Malaysia. Previous studies reported that the potential of Botryococcus sp. photosynthesis as a source of fuel. The Botryococcus sp. contains hydrocarbon up to 75% of dry weight, which can be converted into petrol, diesel or turbine fuel or other liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons. Recently, an experimental study was conducted on phycoremediation technology for wastewater using Botryococcus sp. The phycoremediation technology is useful to remove the excess of nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus and also have the ability to remove various pollutants from wastewater. This research implements the Verhulst model to estimate the nutrient removal by microalgae Botryococcus sp. from the wastewater. This model has been validated with the experiments of microalgae Botryococcus sp. grown in domestic and palm oil wastewater. The results suggested that microalgae Botryococcus sp. could be cultured in domestic and palm oil wastewater while nutrients are reduced from these wastewaters.

  4. Effects of Stochastic Traffic Flow Model on Expected System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    feasible. 2.2.2 Brownian Bridge Stochastic Path Model Like the linear model, the Brownian bridge ( Karlin and Taylor 1981) model uses the idea of...IEEE Computer Vision and Pattern Recog- nition Workshop, Piscataway, New Jersey: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. Karlin , S

  5. The expected model of a cadastre in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Ciak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A cadastre is a based on a cadastral map official register of land, property and other utilities that constitute subjects of taxation as well as the source of information on cadastral objects. As indicated in the reference books, it constitutes an institution of law, which in the social perception is seen as providing legal order in the scope of establishing the range of laws, of the sense of security resulting from the fact of the entering of the subjects of taxation and the possibility to exert one’s rights under the registration proceedings. However, the current shape of the register does not meet social expectations. The suggested reform of the taxation of property in Poland (cadastre meets numerous obstacles such as a formal and legal, political, financial or social barrier.

  6. Failure Analysis of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) Analyzer Model SP-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) subcontractor Wiltech contacted the NASA Electrical Lab (NE-L) and requested a failure analysis of a Solvent Purity Meter; model SP-IOOO produced by the VerTis Instrument Company. The meter, used to measure the contaminate in a solvent to determine the relative contamination on spacecraft flight hardware and ground servicing equipment, had been inoperable and in storage for an unknown amount of time. NE-L was asked to troubleshoot the unit and make a determination on what may be required to make the unit operational. Through the use of general troubleshooting processes and the review of a unit in service at the time of analysis, the unit was found to be repairable but would need the replacement of multiple components.

  7. Expected Utility and Sequential Elimination Models of Career Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Michal; Lichtenberg, James W.

    Decision-making strategies have traditionally been classified as either prescriptive/normative or descriptive/behavioral in nature. Proponents of prescriptive/normative decision-making models attempt to develop procedures for making optimal decisions while proponents of the descriptive/behavioral models look for a choice that meets a minimal set…

  8. Simulating disturbances and modelling expected train passenger delays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    Forecasts of regularity for railway systems have traditionally – if at all – been computed for trains, not for passengers. It has only relatively recently become possible to model and evaluate the actual passenger delays. This paper describes how it is possible to use a passenger regularity model...

  9. Modelling expected train passenger delays on large scale railway networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    Forecasts of regularity for railway systems have traditionally – if at all – been computed for trains, not for passengers. Relatively recently it has become possible to model and evaluate the actual passenger delays by a passenger regularity model for the operation already carried out. First...

  10. The Optimal Portfolio Selection Model under g-Expectation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    complicated and sophisticated, the optimal solution turns out to be surprisingly simple, the payoff of a portfolio of two binary claims. Also I give the economic meaning of my model and the comparison with that one in the work of Jin and Zhou, 2008.

  11. Probing for the Multiplicative Term in Modern Expectancy-Value Theory: A Latent Interaction Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Marsh, Herbert W.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Ludtke, Oliver; Nagy, Gabriel; Jonkmann, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    In modern expectancy-value theory (EVT) in educational psychology, expectancy and value beliefs additively predict performance, persistence, and task choice. In contrast to earlier formulations of EVT, the multiplicative term Expectancy x Value in regression-type models typically plays no major role in educational psychology. The present study…

  12. College Students' Motivation toward Weight Training: An Application of Expectancy-Value Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Xiang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Guided by an expectancy-value model of achievement choice (Eccles et al., 1983; Wigfield & Eccles, 2000), the relationships among expectancy-related beliefs, subjective task values (importance, interest, and usefulness), and achievement outcomes (intention, engagement, and performance) were examined in a college-level beginning weight training…

  13. Expected Utility and Catastrophic Risk in a Stochastic Economy-Climate Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of extreme climate change, we ask how to conduct expected utility analysis in the presence of catastrophic risks. Economists typically model decision making under risk and uncertainty by expected util- ity with constant relative risk aversion (power utility); statisticians typi- cally

  14. Protective behavioral strategies, alcohol expectancies, and drinking motives in a model of college student drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy; Milletich, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    An extensive body of research asserts alcohol expectancies, or beliefs regarding the effects of alcohol, as an important influence on drinking. However, the extent to which expectancies are related to drinking motives and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) has yet to be examined. Existing alcohol mediational models suggest associations between expectancies and drinking motives as well as positive drinking motives and PBS use. Thus, it is possible that drinking motives and PBS use act as intervening factors in the relationship between expectancies and alcohol outcomes. Consequently, the cross-sectional study presented here aimed to test the indirect effect of expectancies (i.e., social facilitation) on alcohol outcomes through drinking motives and PBS use. Participants were 520 (358 female) college student drinkers with a mean age of 20.80 (SD = 4.61) years. Students completed measures of expectancies, drinking motives, PBS use, alcohol use, and alcohol-related problems. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that drinking motives and PBS mediated the relationship between social expectancies and alcohol use. In particular, expectancies were associated with greater positive drinking motives, drinking motives were associated with less PBS use, and PBS was associated with less alcohol use and fewer alcohol-related problems. Given the key role of PBS in explaining drinking outcomes in our model, active efforts to incorporate PBS in alcohol interventions may be particularly beneficial for college students. Further, our findings support the consideration of PBS use as a part of the motivational model of alcohol use in future work.

  15. Attachment, Working Models of Parenting, and Expectations for Using Television in Childrearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Amy I.; Manohar, Uttara

    2012-01-01

    This study used attachment theory to understand college students' working models of parenting and expectations for how they would use television in parenting. We found that secure parent-child attachment histories were related to more positive expectations of parenting and that avoidant and anxious-ambivalent parent-child attachment histories were…

  16. Inerting a Boeing 747SP Center Wing Tank Scale Model With Nitrogen-Enriched Air

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavage, William

    2002-01-01

    Tests were performed in a 0.24 scale model of a Boeing 747SP center wing tank to validate the existing assumptions for inerting complex geometric spaces, which were developed from previous experiments, and to facilitate design...

  17. Higgs compositeness in Sp(2N) gauge theories — The pure gauge model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ed; Ki Hong, Deog; Lee, Jong-Wan; David Lin, C.-J.; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio; Vadacchino, Davide

    2018-03-01

    As a first step in the study of Sp(2N) composite Higgs models, we obtained a set of novel numerical results for the pure gauge Sp(4) lattice theory in 3+1 space-time dimensions. Results for the continuum extrapolations of the string tension and the glueball mass spectrum are presented and their values are compared with the same quantities in neighbouring SU(N) models.

  18. On a Numerical and Graphical Technique for Evaluating some Models Involving Rational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    Campbell and Shiller (1987) proposed a graphical technique for the present value model which consists of plotting the spread and theoretical spread as calculated from the cointegrated vector autoregressive model. We extend these techniques to a number of rational expectation models and give...

  19. On a numerical and graphical technique for evaluating some models involving rational expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    Campbell and Shiller (1987) proposed a graphical technique for the present value model which consists of plotting the spread and theoretical spread as calculated from the cointegrated vector autoregressive model. We extend these techniques to a number of rational expectation models and give...

  20. A rational expectations model for simulation and policy evaluation of the Spanish economy

    OpenAIRE

    Boscá, J. E.; Díaz, A.; Doménech, R.; Ferri, J.; Pérez, E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the model used for simulation purposes within the Spanish Ministry of Economic Affairs and Finance. REMS (a Rational Expectations Model for the Spanish economy) is a small open economy dynamic general equilibrium model in the vein of the New-Neoclassical-Keynesian synthesis models, with a strongly micro-founded system of equations. In the long run REMS behaves in accordance with the neoclassical growth model. In the short run, it incorporates nominal, real and financial fr...

  1. Canonical Statistical Model for Maximum Expected Immission of Wire Conductor in an Aperture Enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, Paul G.; Vazquez, Gabriel; Christiano, Daniel J.; Trout, Dawn H.

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of the maximum expected electromagnetic pick-up of conductors inside a realistic shielding enclosure is an important canonical problem for system-level EMC design of space craft, launch vehicles, aircraft and automobiles. This paper introduces a simple statistical power balance model for prediction of the maximum expected current in a wire conductor inside an aperture enclosure. It calculates both the statistical mean and variance of the immission from the physical design parameters of the problem. Familiar probability density functions can then be used to predict the maximum expected immission for deign purposes. The statistical power balance model requires minimal EMC design information and solves orders of magnitude faster than existing numerical models, making it ultimately viable for scaled-up, full system-level modeling. Both experimental test results and full wave simulation results are used to validate the foundational model.

  2. Modeling radiative transport in ICF plasmas on an IBM SP2 supercomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, J.A.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-Madison the authors have integrated a collisional-radiative-equilibrium model into their CONRAD radiation-hydrodynamics code. This integrated package allows them to accurately simulate the transport processes involved in ICF plasmas; including the important effects of self-absorption of line-radiation. However, as they increase the amount of atomic structure utilized in their transport models, the computational demands increase nonlinearly. In an attempt to meet this increased computational demand, they have recently embarked on a mission to parallelize the CONRAD program. The parallel CONRAD development is being performed on an IBM SP2 supercomputer. The parallelism is based on a message passing paradigm, and is being implemented using PVM. At the present time they have determined that approximately 70% of the sequential program can be executed in parallel. Accordingly, they expect that the parallel version will yield a speedup on the order of three times that of the sequential version. This translates into only 10 hours of execution time for the parallel version, whereas the sequential version required 30 hours

  3. Future life expectancy in 35 industrialised countries: projections with a Bayesian model ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontis, Vasilis; Bennett, James E; Mathers, Colin D; Li, Guangquan; Foreman, Kyle; Ezzati, Majid

    2017-04-01

    Projections of future mortality and life expectancy are needed to plan for health and social services and pensions. Our aim was to forecast national age-specific mortality and life expectancy using an approach that takes into account the uncertainty related to the choice of forecasting model. We developed an ensemble of 21 forecasting models, all of which probabilistically contributed towards the final projections. We applied this approach to project age-specific mortality to 2030 in 35 industrialised countries with high-quality vital statistics data. We used age-specific death rates to calculate life expectancy at birth and at age 65 years, and probability of dying before age 70 years, with life table methods. Life expectancy is projected to increase in all 35 countries with a probability of at least 65% for women and 85% for men. There is a 90% probability that life expectancy at birth among South Korean women in 2030 will be higher than 86·7 years, the same as the highest worldwide life expectancy in 2012, and a 57% probability that it will be higher than 90 years. Projected female life expectancy in South Korea is followed by those in France, Spain, and Japan. There is a greater than 95% probability that life expectancy at birth among men in South Korea, Australia, and Switzerland will surpass 80 years in 2030, and a greater than 27% probability that it will surpass 85 years. Of the countries studied, the USA, Japan, Sweden, Greece, Macedonia, and Serbia have some of the lowest projected life expectancy gains for both men and women. The female life expectancy advantage over men is likely to shrink by 2030 in every country except Mexico, where female life expectancy is predicted to increase more than male life expectancy, and in Chile, France, and Greece where the two sexes will see similar gains. More than half of the projected gains in life expectancy at birth in women will be due to enhanced longevity above age 65 years. There is more than a 50% probability

  4. USE OF VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS: A THEORETICAL MODEL USING DECOMPOSED EXPECTANCY DISCONFIRMATION THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Fernando Antonio de Melo; Ramos, Anatália Saraiva Martins; Andrade, Adrianne Paula Vieira de; Oliveira, Bruna Miyuki Kasuya de

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study aims to investigate the determinants of satisfaction and the resulting continuance intention in the e-learning context. The constructs of decomposed expectancy disconfirmation theory (DEDT) are evaluated from the perspective of users of a virtual learning environment (VLE) in relation to expectations and perceived performance. An online survey collected responses from 197 students of a public management distance learning course. Structural equation modeling was oper...

  5. Stock Selection for Portfolios Using Expected Utility-Entropy Decision Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yang and Qiu proposed and then recently improved an expected utility-entropy (EU-E measure of risk and decision model. When segregation holds, Luce et al. derived an expected utility term, plus a constant multiplies the Shannon entropy as the representation of risky choices, further demonstrating the reasonability of the EU-E decision model. In this paper, we apply the EU-E decision model to selecting the set of stocks to be included in the portfolios. We first select 7 and 10 stocks from the 30 component stocks of Dow Jones Industrial Average index, and then derive and compare the efficient portfolios in the mean-variance framework. The conclusions imply that efficient portfolios composed of 7(10 stocks selected using the EU-E model with intermediate intervals of the tradeoff coefficients are more efficient than that composed of the sets of stocks selected using the expected utility model. Furthermore, the efficient portfolio of 7(10 stocks selected by the EU-E decision model have almost the same efficient frontier as that of the sample of all stocks. This suggests the necessity of incorporating both the expected utility and Shannon entropy together when taking risky decisions, further demonstrating the importance of Shannon entropy as the measure of uncertainty, as well as the applicability of the EU-E model as a decision-making model.

  6. A model for calculating expected performance of the Apollo unified S-band (USB) communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, N. W.

    1971-01-01

    A model for calculating the expected performance of the Apollo unified S-band (USB) communication system is presented. The general organization of the Apollo USB is described. The mathematical model is reviewed and the computer program for implementation of the calculations is included.

  7. Disconfirming User Expectations of the Online Service Experience: Inferred versus Direct Disconfirmation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Martin; Palmer, Adrian; Wright, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Disconfirmation models of online service measurement seek to define service quality as the difference between user expectations of the service to be received and perceptions of the service actually received. Two such models-inferred and direct disconfirmation-for measuring quality of the online experience are compared (WebQUAL, SERVQUAL). Findings…

  8. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Expectancy-Violation and Information-Theoretic Models of Melodic Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Eerola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses two types of models for melodic complexity: one based on expectancy violations and the other one related to an information-theoretic account of redundancy in music. Seven different datasets spanning artificial sequences, folk and pop songs were used to refine and assess the models. The refinement eliminated unnecessary components from both types of models. The final analysis pitted three variants of the two model types against each other and could explain from 46-74% of the variance in the ratings across the datasets. The most parsimonious models were identified with an information-theoretic criterion. This suggested that the simplified expectancy-violation models were the most efficient for these sets of data. However, the differences between all optimized models were subtle in terms both of performance and simplicity.

  10. An under-met and over-met expectations model of employee reactions to merit raises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, John; Shaw, Jason D; Duffy, Michelle K; Mitra, Atul

    2008-03-01

    The authors developed a model of how raise expectations influence the relationship between merit pay raises and employee reactions and tested it using a sample of hospital employees. Pay-for-performance (PFP) perceptions were consistently related to personal reactions (e.g., pay raise happiness, pay-level satisfaction, and turnover intentions). Merit pay raises were strongly related to reactions only among employees with high raise expectations and high PFP perceptions. The interactive effects of under-met/over-met expectations and PFP perceptions were mediated by the extent to which participants saw the raise as generous and they were happy with the raises they received. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for expectation-fulfillment theories, merit pay research, and the administration of incentives. Copyright 2008 APA

  11. Fast inference in generalized linear models via expected log-likelihoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Alexandro D.; Paninski, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Generalized linear models play an essential role in a wide variety of statistical applications. This paper discusses an approximation of the likelihood in these models that can greatly facilitate computation. The basic idea is to replace a sum that appears in the exact log-likelihood by an expectation over the model covariates; the resulting “expected log-likelihood” can in many cases be computed significantly faster than the exact log-likelihood. In many neuroscience experiments the distribution over model covariates is controlled by the experimenter and the expected log-likelihood approximation becomes particularly useful; for example, estimators based on maximizing this expected log-likelihood (or a penalized version thereof) can often be obtained with orders of magnitude computational savings compared to the exact maximum likelihood estimators. A risk analysis establishes that these maximum EL estimators often come with little cost in accuracy (and in some cases even improved accuracy) compared to standard maximum likelihood estimates. Finally, we find that these methods can significantly decrease the computation time of marginal likelihood calculations for model selection and of Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for sampling from the posterior parameter distribution. We illustrate our results by applying these methods to a computationally-challenging dataset of neural spike trains obtained via large-scale multi-electrode recordings in the primate retina. PMID:23832289

  12. The expected adjacency and modularity matrices in the degree corrected stochastic block model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasino Dario

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide explicit expressions for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices that can be written as the Hadamard product of a block partitioned matrix with constant blocks and a rank one matrix. Such matrices arise as the expected adjacency or modularity matrices in certain random graph models that are widely used as benchmarks for community detection algorithms.

  13. Applying an expectancy-value model to study motivators for work-task based information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard, Karen Tølbøl; Skov, Mette

    2015-01-01

    for interpersonal and internal sources increased when the task had high-value motivation or low-expectancy motivation or both. Research limitations/implications: The study is based on a relatively small sample and considers only one motivation theory. This should be addressed in future research along......Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to operationalise and verify a cognitive motivation model that has been adapted to information seeking. The original model was presented within the field of psychology. Design/methodology/approach: An operationalisation of the model is presented based...... on the theory of expectancy-value and on the operationalisation used when the model was first developed. Data for the analysis were collected from a sample of seven informants working as consultants in Danish municipalities. Each participant filled out a questionnaire, kept a log book for a week...

  14. The impossibility of involuntary unemployment in an overlapping generations model with rational expectation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    1992-01-01

    If there is unemployment no matter how low the wage rate becomes, one speaks of involuntary unemployment. This phenomenon has been shown to arise in a variety of temporary or atemporal macro models with imperfect competition in the goods markets. In this paper we investigate whether the phenomenon...... of involuntary unemployment arises in a Hartian overlapping generations model with rational expectations. It does not, neither in the short nor in the long run...

  15. Evaluation of the consumer model: relationship between patients' expectations, perceptions and satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, O; Dushenat, M; Friedman, N

    2001-08-01

    To evaluate the consumer model in a health care system, by studying the relationship between four variables: expectations, perceived degree of fulfillment, satisfaction and changing of physicians. Cross-sectional study; telephone interview of patients who had visited a primary care physician 1-2 months previously. The Maccabi health plan, Israel. A random sample of 759 patients, aged 18 and over residing in two towns in Israel. Response rate to telephone interview was 50.7% (n=385). Expectation, perceived expectations fulfilled by the physician, satisfaction with the visit to the primary care physician and intention to change physician. The gap between the expectations and their fulfillment showed a low correlation with satisfaction. For attributes where a large difference was found, no correlation was found with patient satisfaction. Attributes such as 'diagnosis', 'preventive health care' and 'answering questions' presented correlation coefficients of 0.3. The correlation between the perceived fulfillment of these attributes and satisfaction presented higher correlation coefficients (between 0.4-0.5). This limits the consumer model as a way to predict satisfaction. Satisfaction correlated highly with intention to change physician. The mean score for the satisfaction of those intending to change doctors was 3.8 compared to 5.5 in the group of consumers not intending to change doctors. The consumer model is able to explain only to a modest extent the variation in satisfaction, but dissatisfaction is a good predictor of the intention to change doctors.

  16. Probabilistic models of expectation violation predict psychophysiological emotional responses to live concert music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egermann, Hauke; Pearce, Marcus T; Wiggins, Geraint A; McAdams, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a study testing the often-theorized role of musical expectations in inducing listeners' emotions in a live flute concert experiment with 50 participants. Using an audience response system developed for this purpose, we measured subjective experience and peripheral psychophysiological changes continuously. To confirm the existence of the link between expectation and emotion, we used a threefold approach. (1) On the basis of an information-theoretic cognitive model, melodic pitch expectations were predicted by analyzing the musical stimuli used (six pieces of solo flute music). (2) A continuous rating scale was used by half of the audience to measure their experience of unexpectedness toward the music heard. (3) Emotional reactions were measured using a multicomponent approach: subjective feeling (valence and arousal rated continuously by the other half of the audience members), expressive behavior (facial EMG), and peripheral arousal (the latter two being measured in all 50 participants). Results confirmed the predicted relationship between high-information-content musical events, the violation of musical expectations (in corresponding ratings), and emotional reactions (psychologically and physiologically). Musical structures leading to expectation reactions were manifested in emotional reactions at different emotion component levels (increases in subjective arousal and autonomic nervous system activations). These results emphasize the role of musical structure in emotion induction, leading to a further understanding of the frequently experienced emotional effects of music.

  17. Integrating technology readiness into the expectation-confirmation model: an empirical study of mobile services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chih; Liu, Ming-Ling; Lin, Chieh-Peng

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate technology readiness into the expectation-confirmation model (ECM) for explaining individuals' continuance of mobile data service usage. After reviewing the ECM and technology readiness, an integrated model was demonstrated via empirical data. Compared with the original ECM, the findings of this study show that the integrated model may offer an ameliorated way to clarify what factors and how they influence the continuous intention toward mobile services. Finally, the major findings are summarized, and future research directions are suggested.

  18. Den receptionsgrammatiske SP-model som tertium comparationis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Marianne Grove

    1999-01-01

    The main purpose of the article will be to discuss whether a syntactic model for analysing German NPs from a receptive perspective can also be used for analysing Danish NPs and thereby function as tertium comparationis. A syntactic model that has been developped for analysing German NPs from...... this perspective will serve as point of departure. The discus-sed model is based on four description principles: the "frase", the "ramme", the "felt" and finally the "kæde" principles. In the article these principles of the German model will be presented and it will then be discussed whether it is reasonable...... to apply the principles to a Danish model. It will be argued that the principles can be applied to a Danish model. But at the same time it will be obvious that the manifestation of the principles is of a different kind in Danish. The observations made on Danish material will finally lead to a change...

  19. Models of expected returns on the brazilian market: Empirical tests using predictive methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Mussa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Predictive methodologies for test of the expected returns models are largely diffused on the international academic environment. However, these methods have not been used in Brazil in a systematic way. Generally, empirical studies proceeded with Brazilian stock market data are concentrated only in the first step of these methodologies. The purpose of this article was test and compare the models CAPM, 3-factors and 4-factors using a predictive methodology, considering two steps – temporal and cross-section regressions – with standard errors obtained by the techniques of Fama and Macbeth (1973. The results indicated the superiority of the 4-fators model as compared to the 3-fators model, and the superiority of the 3- factors model as compared to the CAPM, but no one of the tested models were enough on the explanation of the Brazilian stock returns. Contrary to some empirical evidences, that do not use predictive methodology, the size and momentum effect seem do not exist on the Brazilian capital markets, but there are evidences of the value effect and the relevance of the market for explanation of expected returns. These finds rise some questions, mainly caused by the originality of the methodology on the local market and by the fact that this subject is still incipient and polemic on the Brazilian academic environment.

  20. Bioremediation in fractured rock: 1. Modeling to inform design, monitoring, and expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedeman, Claire; Shapiro, Allen M.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Goode, Daniel J.; Lacombe, Pierre; DeFlaun, Mary F.; Drew, Scott R.; Johnson, Carole D.; Williams, John H.; Curtis, Gary P.

    2018-01-01

    Field characterization of a trichloroethene (TCE) source area in fractured mudstones produced a detailed understanding of the geology, contaminant distribution in fractures and the rock matrix, and hydraulic and transport properties. Groundwater flow and chemical transport modeling that synthesized the field characterization information proved critical for designing bioremediation of the source area. The planned bioremediation involved injecting emulsified vegetable oil and bacteria to enhance the naturally occurring biodegradation of TCE. The flow and transport modeling showed that injection will spread amendments widely over a zone of lower‐permeability fractures, with long residence times expected because of small velocities after injection and sorption of emulsified vegetable oil onto solids. Amendments transported out of this zone will be diluted by groundwater flux from other areas, limiting bioremediation effectiveness downgradient. At nearby pumping wells, further dilution is expected to make bioremediation effects undetectable in the pumped water. The results emphasize that in fracture‐dominated flow regimes, the extent of injected amendments cannot be conceptualized using simple homogeneous models of groundwater flow commonly adopted to design injections in unconsolidated porous media (e.g., radial diverging or dipole flow regimes). Instead, it is important to synthesize site characterization information using a groundwater flow model that includes discrete features representing high‐ and low‐permeability fractures. This type of model accounts for the highly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity and groundwater fluxes in fractured‐rock aquifers, and facilitates designing injection strategies that target specific volumes of the aquifer and maximize the distribution of amendments over these volumes.

  1. Improved Expectation Maximization Algorithm for Gaussian Mixed Model Using the Kernel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Izhan Mohd Yusoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraud activities have contributed to heavy losses suffered by telecommunication companies. In this paper, we attempt to use Gaussian mixed model, which is a probabilistic model normally used in speech recognition to identify fraud calls in the telecommunication industry. We look at several issues encountered when calculating the maximum likelihood estimates of the Gaussian mixed model using an Expectation Maximization algorithm. Firstly, we look at a mechanism for the determination of the initial number of Gaussian components and the choice of the initial values of the algorithm using the kernel method. We show via simulation that the technique improves the performance of the algorithm. Secondly, we developed a procedure for determining the order of the Gaussian mixed model using the log-likelihood function and the Akaike information criteria. Finally, for illustration, we apply the improved algorithm to real telecommunication data. The modified method will pave the way to introduce a comprehensive method for detecting fraud calls in future work.

  2. Parameter estimation of Monod model by the Least-Squares method for microalgae Botryococcus Braunii sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, J. J.; Jamaian, S. S.; Salleh, R. M.; Nor, M. E.; Aman, F.

    2018-04-01

    This research aims to estimate the parameters of Monod model of microalgae Botryococcus Braunii sp growth by the Least-Squares method. Monod equation is a non-linear equation which can be transformed into a linear equation form and it is solved by implementing the Least-Squares linear regression method. Meanwhile, Gauss-Newton method is an alternative method to solve the non-linear Least-Squares problem with the aim to obtain the parameters value of Monod model by minimizing the sum of square error ( SSE). As the result, the parameters of the Monod model for microalgae Botryococcus Braunii sp can be estimated by the Least-Squares method. However, the estimated parameters value obtained by the non-linear Least-Squares method are more accurate compared to the linear Least-Squares method since the SSE of the non-linear Least-Squares method is less than the linear Least-Squares method.

  3. Expected Shannon Entropy and Shannon Differentiation between Subpopulations for Neutral Genes under the Finite Island Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Anne; Jost, Lou; Hsieh, T C; Ma, K H; Sherwin, William B; Rollins, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Shannon entropy H and related measures are increasingly used in molecular ecology and population genetics because (1) unlike measures based on heterozygosity or allele number, these measures weigh alleles in proportion to their population fraction, thus capturing a previously-ignored aspect of allele frequency distributions that may be important in many applications; (2) these measures connect directly to the rich predictive mathematics of information theory; (3) Shannon entropy is completely additive and has an explicitly hierarchical nature; and (4) Shannon entropy-based differentiation measures obey strong monotonicity properties that heterozygosity-based measures lack. We derive simple new expressions for the expected values of the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distribution at a neutral locus in a single isolated population under two models of mutation: the infinite allele model and the stepwise mutation model. Surprisingly, this complex stochastic system for each model has an entropy expressable as a simple combination of well-known mathematical functions. Moreover, entropy- and heterozygosity-based measures for each model are linked by simple relationships that are shown by simulations to be approximately valid even far from equilibrium. We also identify a bridge between the two models of mutation. We apply our approach to subdivided populations which follow the finite island model, obtaining the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distributions of the subpopulations and of the total population. We also derive the expected mutual information and normalized mutual information ("Shannon differentiation") between subpopulations at equilibrium, and identify the model parameters that determine them. We apply our measures to data from the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Australia. Our measures provide a test for neutrality that is robust to violations of equilibrium assumptions, as verified on real world data from starlings.

  4. Frequency-domain optical tomographic image reconstruction algorithm with the simplified spherical harmonics (SP3) light propagation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Jia, Jingfei; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2017-06-01

    We introduce here the finite volume formulation of the frequency-domain simplified spherical harmonics model with n -th order absorption coefficients (FD-SP N ) that approximates the frequency-domain equation of radiative transfer (FD-ERT). We then present the FD-SP N based reconstruction algorithm that recovers absorption and scattering coefficients in biological tissue. The FD-SP N model with 3 rd order absorption coefficient (i.e., FD-SP 3 ) is used as a forward model to solve the inverse problem. The FD-SP 3 is discretized with a node-centered finite volume scheme and solved with a restarted generalized minimum residual (GMRES) algorithm. The absorption and scattering coefficients are retrieved using a limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. Finally, the forward and inverse algorithms are evaluated using numerical phantoms with optical properties and size that mimic small-volume tissue such as finger joints and small animals. The forward results show that the FD-SP 3 model approximates the FD-ERT (S 12 ) solution within relatively high accuracy; the average error in the phase (<3.7%) and the amplitude (<7.1%) of the partial current at the boundary are reported. From the inverse results we find that the absorption and scattering coefficient maps are more accurately reconstructed with the SP 3 model than those with the SP 1 model. Therefore, this work shows that the FD-SP 3 is an efficient model for optical tomographic imaging of small-volume media with non-diffuse properties both in terms of computational time and accuracy as it requires significantly lower CPU time than the FD-ERT (S 12 ) and also it is more accurate than the FD-SP 1 .

  5. A model for spatial variations in life expectancy; mortality in Chinese regions in 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life expectancy in China has been improving markedly but health gains have been uneven and there is inequality in survival chances between regions and in rural as against urban areas. This paper applies a statistical modelling approach to mortality data collected in conjunction with the 2000 Census to formally assess spatial mortality contrasts in China. The modelling approach provides interpretable summary parameters (e.g. the relative mortality risk in rural as against urban areas and is more parsimonious in terms of parameters than the conventional life table model. Results Predictive fit is assessed both globally and at the level of individual five year age groups. A proportional model (age and area effects independent has a worse fit than one allowing age-area interactions following a bilinear form. The best fit is obtained by allowing for child and oldest age mortality rates to vary spatially. Conclusion There is evidence that age (21 age groups and area (31 Chinese administrative divisions are not proportional (i.e. independent mortality risk factors. In fact, spatial contrasts are greatest at young ages. There is a pronounced rural survival disadvantage, and large differences in life expectancy between provinces.

  6. CyanOmics: an integrated database of omics for the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaohua; Feng, Jie; Li, Tao; Ge, Feng; Zhao, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an important group of organisms that carry out oxygenic photosynthesis and play vital roles in both the carbon and nitrogen cycles of the Earth. The annotated genome of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, as an ideal model cyanobacterium, is available. A series of transcriptomic and proteomic studies of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells grown under different conditions have been reported. However, no database of such integrated omics studies has been constructed. Here we present CyanOmics, a database based on the results of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 omics studies. CyanOmics comprises one genomic dataset, 29 transcriptomic datasets and one proteomic dataset and should prove useful for systematic and comprehensive analysis of all those data. Powerful browsing and searching tools are integrated to help users directly access information of interest with enhanced visualization of the analytical results. Furthermore, Blast is included for sequence-based similarity searching and Cluster 3.0, as well as the R hclust function is provided for cluster analyses, to increase CyanOmics's usefulness. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first integrated omics analysis database for cyanobacteria. This database should further understanding of the transcriptional patterns, and proteomic profiling of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and other cyanobacteria. Additionally, the entire database framework is applicable to any sequenced prokaryotic genome and could be applied to other integrated omics analysis projects. Database URL: http://lag.ihb.ac.cn/cyanomics. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  8. Kinetic modeling and process analysis for Desmodesmus sp. lutein photo-production

    OpenAIRE

    del Rio-Chanona, Ehecatl Antonio; Ahmed, Nur rashid; Zhang, Dongda; Lu, Yinghua; Jing, Keju

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a high-value bioproduct synthesized by microalga Desmodesmus sp. In the current study two aspects of this process are thoroughly investigated: identifying the complex effects of light intensity and nitrate concentration on bio- mass growth and lutein synthesis, and constructing an accurate kinetic model capable of simulating the entire biopro- cess dynamic performance, neither of which has been previously addressed. Three original contributions are presented here. First, it is found...

  9. Modelling energy technology dynamics: methodology for adaptive expectations models with learning by doing and learning by searching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouvaritakis, N.; Soria, A.; Isoard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a module endogenising technical change which is capable of being attached to large scale energy models that follow an adaptive-expectations. The formulation includes, apart from the more classical learning by doing effects, quantitative relationships between technology performance and R and D expenditure. It even attempts to go further by partially endogenising the latter by incorporating an optimisation module describing private equipment manufacturers' R and D budget allocation in a context of risk and expectation. Having presented this module in abstract, the paper proceeds to describe how an operational version of it has been constructed and implemented inside a large-scale partial equilibrium world energy model (the POLES model). Concerning learning functions problems associated with the data are alluded to, the hybrid econometric methods used to estimate them are presented as well as the adjustments which had to be effected to ensure a smooth incorporation into the large model. In the final sections is explained the use of the model itself to generate partial foresight parameters for the determination of return expectations particularly in view of CO 2 constraints and associated carbon values. (orig.)

  10. A new car-following model for autonomous vehicles flow with mean expected velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Xing, Zhu; Li-Dong, Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Due to the development of the modern scientific technology, autonomous vehicles may realize to connect with each other and share the information collected from each vehicle. An improved forward considering car-following model was proposed with mean expected velocity field to describe the autonomous vehicles flow behavior. The new model has three key parameters: adjustable sensitivity, strength factor and mean expected velocity field size. Two lemmas and one theorem were proven as criteria for judging the stability of homogeneousautonomous vehicles flow. Theoretical results show that the greater parameters means larger stability regions. A series of numerical simulations were carried out to check the stability and fundamental diagram of autonomous flow. From the numerical simulation results, the profiles, hysteresis loop and density waves of the autonomous vehicles flow were exhibited. The results show that with increased sensitivity, strength factor or field size the traffic jam was suppressed effectively which are well in accordance with the theoretical results. Moreover, the fundamental diagrams corresponding to three parameters respectively were obtained. It demonstrates that these parameters play almost the same role on traffic flux: i.e. before the critical density the bigger parameter is, the greater flux is and after the critical density, the opposite tendency is. In general, the three parameters have a great influence on the stability and jam state of the autonomous vehicles flow.

  11. Liver segmentation from CT images using a sparse priori statistical shape model (SP-SSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuehu; Zheng, Yongchang; Gan, Lan; Wang, Xuan; Sang, Xinting; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes a new liver segmentation method based on a sparse a priori statistical shape model (SP-SSM). First, mark points are selected in the liver a priori model and the original image. Then, the a priori shape and its mark points are used to obtain a dictionary for the liver boundary information. Second, the sparse coefficient is calculated based on the correspondence between mark points in the original image and those in the a priori model, and then the sparse statistical model is established by combining the sparse coefficients and the dictionary. Finally, the intensity energy and boundary energy models are built based on the intensity information and the specific boundary information of the original image. Then, the sparse matching constraint model is established based on the sparse coding theory. These models jointly drive the iterative deformation of the sparse statistical model to approximate and accurately extract the liver boundaries. This method can solve the problems of deformation model initialization and a priori method accuracy using the sparse dictionary. The SP-SSM can achieve a mean overlap error of 4.8% and a mean volume difference of 1.8%, whereas the average symmetric surface distance and the root mean square symmetric surface distance can reach 0.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively.

  12. Liver segmentation from CT images using a sparse priori statistical shape model (SP-SSM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehu Wang

    Full Text Available This study proposes a new liver segmentation method based on a sparse a priori statistical shape model (SP-SSM. First, mark points are selected in the liver a priori model and the original image. Then, the a priori shape and its mark points are used to obtain a dictionary for the liver boundary information. Second, the sparse coefficient is calculated based on the correspondence between mark points in the original image and those in the a priori model, and then the sparse statistical model is established by combining the sparse coefficients and the dictionary. Finally, the intensity energy and boundary energy models are built based on the intensity information and the specific boundary information of the original image. Then, the sparse matching constraint model is established based on the sparse coding theory. These models jointly drive the iterative deformation of the sparse statistical model to approximate and accurately extract the liver boundaries. This method can solve the problems of deformation model initialization and a priori method accuracy using the sparse dictionary. The SP-SSM can achieve a mean overlap error of 4.8% and a mean volume difference of 1.8%, whereas the average symmetric surface distance and the root mean square symmetric surface distance can reach 0.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively.

  13. New expected loss impairment model – a challenge for the banks in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Popova-Yosifova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces some of the leading works on loan impairment published by supervisory authorities, auditing companies and researchers. It makes analysis of the impairment model on the basis of the expected credit losses introduced with the requirements of International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS 9 Financial Instruments effective for periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018. There are a number of research works which show that the senior bankers may in some ways manage the financial result through the impairment, where it is assumed that the new impairment model will bring higher recognized losses. It also makes a comparative analysis of the announced information on the loan impairment and the preparation for the introduction of the IFRS 9 Financial Instruments requirements into the annual financial statements of the public banks in Bulgaria for the period 2013 – 2016.

  14. Reverse epidemiology, obesity and mortality in chronic kidney disease: modelling mortality expectations using energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a predisposing factor for chronic illnesses such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the effect of obesity on mortality is reversed. Obese patients appear protected. Two ideas have been advanced to explain this 'reverse epidemiology'. First, obesity may buffer patients from wasting. Second, fat may sequester uraemic toxins leading to a systematic error in the prescription of dialysis. Our aim was to use data on the scaling of daily energy expenditure, fat and lean tissue mass to predict the pattern of variation in mortality with obesity under the contrasting hypotheses. We used data on daily energy demands measured using the doubly labelled water technique and body composition collected on a cohort of 503 individuals to model the expected impacts of wasting and fat sequestration/underdialysis on mortality. A model predicting mortality due to wasting replicated the mortality pattern of the obesity paradox. However, quantitatively the beneficial effect of being fat was predicted to be much larger than that observed in the actual CKD population. Similar results were found for the fat sequestration/underdialysis hypothesis, but in this case the discrepancy was smaller. These models tend to support the fat sequestration and underdialysis idea more than the wasting hypothesis. In part (or in whole) this may be because of inadequacies in the model construction which are currently based on rather crude assumptions. Refinement of the models may enable better tests between alternative ideas for the obesity paradox. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Estimating model error covariances in nonlinear state-space models using Kalman smoothing and the expectation-maximisation algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Dreano, Denis

    2017-04-05

    Specification and tuning of errors from dynamical models are important issues in data assimilation. In this work, we propose an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm to estimate the model error covariances using classical extended and ensemble versions of the Kalman smoother. We show that, for additive model errors, the estimate of the error covariance converges. We also investigate other forms of model error, such as parametric or multiplicative errors. We show that additive Gaussian model error is able to compensate for non additive sources of error in the algorithms we propose. We also demonstrate the limitations of the extended version of the algorithm and recommend the use of the more robust and flexible ensemble version. This article is a proof of concept of the methodology with the Lorenz-63 attractor. We developed an open-source Python library to enable future users to apply the algorithm to their own nonlinear dynamical models.

  16. THE PRACTEAM MODEL REGARDING SCHOOL TO ACTIVE LIFE TRANSITION. STUDENTS’ EXPECTANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodescu Anca Otilia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The project “Practical training of economist’s students. Inter-regional partnership in the labor market between universities and the business environment” focuses on student’s transition from school to labor market. Concretely, it tries to highlight the general role of practical training – specifically the field related practical training set as a mandatory discipline in the curriculum, by identifying possibilities of interventions from supervisors. Starting with literature review regarding determinants of school to active life transition, the present contribution discusses the outline of the practical training set as a mandatory discipline in the curriculum. Within PRACTeam project the practical training itself is accompanied with a series of supplementary services (aptitude testing, counseling, career guidance, mentoring by a trained tutor, granting financial aid, awarding excellence over contests and internships. It represents an active partnership on the labor market meant to address directly students’ expectations regarding practical training, work, and entrepreneurship. At least two main benefits may be derived from the training and tutoring. First, as a dual type model of transition from school to active life, allowing students to become insiders in the labor market. Secondly, changes in supervisor’ patterns of interactions and behavior/attitudes toward work and employees may also occur, which in turn may improve the work. A pretest-posttest non-experimental design was applied for the PRACTeam evaluation. Using administered questionnaires and focus group method to students before and after they completed their practical stages we examined their attitudes and behavior towards elements of the dual model of transition. The paper concludes that a dual type model of transition from school to active life - that implies the education and practice occur simultaneously, successfully meets students’ expectancies and may be

  17. Variation that can be expected when using particle tracking models in connectivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagl, Marc; Payne, Mark; Lacroix, Geneviève; Bolle, Loes J.; Daewel, Ute; Dickey-Collas, Mark; Gerkema, Theo; Huret, Martin; Janssen, Frank; Kreus, Markus; Pätsch, Johannes; Pohlmann, Thomas; Ruardij, Piet; Schrum, Corinna; Skogen, Morten D.; Tiessen, Meinard C. H.; Petitgas, Pierre; van Beek, Jan K. L.; van der Veer, Henk W.; Callies, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    Hydrodynamic Ocean Circulation Models and Lagrangian particle tracking models are valuable tools e.g. in coastal ecology to identify the connectivity between offshore spawning and coastal nursery areas of commercially important fish, for risk assessment and more for defining or evaluating marine protected areas. Most studies are based on only one model and do not provide levels of uncertainty. Here this uncertainty was addressed by applying a suite of 11 North Sea models to test what variability can be expected concerning connectivity. Different notional test cases were calculated related to three important and well-studied North Sea fish species: herring (Clupea harengus), and the flatfishes sole (Solea solea) and plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). For sole and plaice we determined which fraction of particles released in the respective spawning areas would reach a coastal marine protected area. For herring we determined the fraction located in a wind park after a predefined time span. As temperature is more and more a focus especially in biological and global change studies, furthermore inter-model variability in temperatures experienced by the virtual particles was determined. The main focus was on the transport variability originating from the physical models and thus biological behavior was not included. Depending on the scenario, median experienced temperatures differed by 3 °C between years. The range between the different models in one year was comparable to this temperature range observed between modelled years. Connectivity between flatfish spawning areas and the coastal protected area was highly dependent on the release location and spawning time. No particles released in the English Channel in the sole scenario reached the protected area while up to 20% of the particles released in the plaice scenario did. Interannual trends in transport directions and connectivity rates were comparable between models but absolute values displayed high variations. Most

  18. Exploring the relationship between sustainability and project success - conceptual model and expected relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Silvius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is one of the most important challenges of our time. Companies are integrating sustainability in their marketing, communication and their actions. Sustainability has more recently also been linked to project management. The logic behind this link is that sustainability needs change and projects are realizing change. Several studies explored how the concept of sustainability impact project management. The research project reported in this paper elaborates on these works by studying how sustainability affects project success. Project managers, logically, strive for project success and considering sustainability may influence this success. Based upon a review of relevant literature, the paper develops a conceptual model that provides a more detailed understanding of how considering different dimensions of sustainability may affect the individual criteria of project success. The study also provides a conceptual mapping of the different relationships between dimensions of sustainability and criteria of project success. This mapping shows that the most positive relationships are expected for the relationship between sustainability and the success criteria stakeholder satisfaction, future readiness and controlled project execution. The expected relationship between considering sustainability and completing the project on schedule and within budget is uncertain.

  19. Teams ranking of Malaysia Super League using Bayesian expectation maximization for Generalized Bradley Terry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Shahdiba Binti Md; Mahmud, Zamalia

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of sports data has always aroused great interest among statisticians and sports data have been investigated from different perspectives often aim at forecasting the results. The study focuses on the 12 teams who join the Malaysian Super League (MSL) for season 2015. This paper used Bayesian Expectation Maximization for Generalized Bradley Terry Model to estimate all the football team's rankings. The Generalized Bradley-Terry model is possible to find the maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of the skill ratings λ using a simple iterative procedure. In order to maximize the function of ML, we need inferential bayesian method to get posterior distribution which can be computed quickly. The team's ability was estimated based on the previous year's game results by calculating the probability of winning based on the final scores for each team. It was found that model with tie scores does make a difference in affect the model of estimating the football team's ability in winning the next match. However, team with better results in the previous year has a better chance for scoring in the next game.

  20. Context, Experience, Expectation, and Action—Towards an Empirically Grounded, General Model for Analyzing Biographical Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig Reiter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a general, empirically grounded model for analyzing biographical uncertainty. The model is based on findings from a qualitative-explorative study of transforming meanings of unemployment among young people in post-Soviet Lithuania. In a first step, the particular features of the uncertainty puzzle in post-communist youth transitions are briefly discussed. A historical event like the collapse of state socialism in Europe, similar to the recent financial and economic crisis, is a generator of uncertainty par excellence: it undermines the foundations of societies and the taken-for-grantedness of related expectations. Against this background, the case of a young woman and how she responds to the novel threat of unemployment in the transition to the world of work is introduced. Her uncertainty management in the specific time perspective of certainty production is then conceptually rephrased by distinguishing three types or levels of biographical uncertainty: knowledge, outcome, and recognition uncertainty. Biographical uncertainty, it is argued, is empirically observable through the analysis of acting and projecting at the biographical level. The final part synthesizes the empirical findings and the conceptual discussion into a stratification model of biographical uncertainty as a general tool for the biographical analysis of uncertainty phenomena. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100120

  1. Application of model predictive control strategy based on fuzzy identification to an SP-100 space reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Man Gyun [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, 375 Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: magyna@chosun.ac.kr; Upadhyaya, Belle R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    In this work, a model predictive control method combined with fuzzy identification, is applied to the design of the thermoelectric (TE) power control in the SP-100 space reactor. The future TE power is predicted by using the fuzzy model identified by a subtractive clustering method of a fast and robust algorithm. The objectives of the proposed fuzzy model predictive controller are to minimize both the difference between the predicted TE power and the desired power, and the variation of control drum angle that adjusts the control reactivity. Also, the objectives are subject to maximum and minimum control drum angle and maximum drum angle variation speed. The genetic algorithm that is effective in accomplishing multiple objectives is used to optimize the fuzzy model predictive controller. A lumped parameter simulation model of the SP-100 nuclear space reactor is used to verify the proposed controller. The results of numerical simulations to check the performance of the proposed controller show that the TE generator power level controlled by the proposed controller could track the target power level effectively, satisfying all control constraints.

  2. What is important for hearing aid satisfaction? Application of the expectancy-disconfirmation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Khan, Asad; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Between 68.1-89.5% of clients report that they are satisfied with their hearing aids. Two variables that are thought to contribute to dissatisfaction with hearing aids are product performance, and a mismatch between performance and client prefitting expectations about hearing-aid performance (i.e., disconfirmation). A focus on variables related to satisfaction is relevant to improving hearing rehabilitation services. The aim of this study was to determine if measures of hearing-aid performance and disconfirmation, specifically related to hearing ability and hearing-aid problems, were associated with overall hearing-aid satisfaction among a sample of hearing-aid users. A retrospective research design was employed. A total of 123 individuals participated in the study (57% male; mean age: 72 yr). All participants owned hearing aids. A personal details questionnaire and the Profile of Hearing Aid Consumer Satisfaction questionnaire (Wong et al, 2009) were completed by participants, 3-12 mo after they obtained hearing aids. Overall hearing-aid satisfaction was a dichotomized variable (satisfaction vs. dissatisfaction); therefore, logistic regression modeling was applied to the data to determine which variables were associated with overall hearing-aid satisfaction. Sixty-one percent of the sample reported that they were satisfied with their hearing aids. Hearing-aid satisfaction was associated with the ability to hear with hearing aids and better-than-expected performance in this same area; fewer hearing-aid problems; and fewer problems with hearing-aid manipulation, hearing-aid appearance, and wearer discomfort than were anticipated before hearing-aid fitting. It is recommended that to improve hearing-aid satisfaction, clinicians should ensure optimal hearing-aid benefit in the listening situations that the person with hearing impairment most wants to hear better; reduce the likelihood of hearing-aid problems occurring; and promote positive disconfirmation (performance

  3. A validation study of lawless expectancy model on low-level rural black workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Edwards

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this research is to validate the expectancy theory model propogated by Lawler(1971; 1973 on low level rural Black shop assistants in the Republic of Transkei. The criterion measure, performance, is measured by a performance appraisal instrument developed by the NIPR and the expectancy theory components by means of a translated version of the instrument which appears in the Michigan Organizational Assessment Package Part II. For a sample of 183 shop assistants from 10 organizations, the instrument yielded reliability coefficients ranging from 0,72 to 0,84. Evidence of validity was obtained by means of correlational analysis. A multiple correlation coefficient of R² = 0,29 was obtained. Further evidence of validity was found by means of maximum likelihood path analytic procedures. Opsomming Die geldigheid van Lawler se verwagtingsteorie vir landelike Swart winkelassistente in die Republiekvan Transkei word in die studie ondersoek. Die komponente van die verwagtingsteorie is gemeet deur 'n vertaalde weergawe van die Michigan Organizational Assessment Package (Part II, terwyl die kriterium, werksprestasie, beoordeel is deur middel van 'n prestasiebeoordelingsvraelys ontwikkel deur die NIPN. Met 'n steekproef van 183 winkelassistente uit 10 organisasies het die motiveringsvraelys betroubaarheidskoeffisiente gelewer van tussen 0,72 en 0,84. Met uitsondering van die E→ P komponent was al die korrelasies met die kriterium beduidend op die l%-peil en het gevarieer tussen 0,24 en 0,26 met 'n gekwadreerde meervoudige korrelasiekoeffisient van 0,29. Genoeg positiewe bewyse is in die studie verkry om met redelike sekerheid te aanvaar dat die verwagtingsteorie van toepassing gemaak kan word op lae-vlak landelike Swart workers.

  4. Deformed model Sp(4) model for studying pairing correlations in atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, A I; Sviratcheva, K

    2002-01-01

    A fermion representation of the compact symplectic sp(4) algebra introduces a theoretical framework for describing pairing correlations in atomic nuclei. The important non-deformed and deformed subalgebras of sp sub ( sub q sub ) (4) and the corresponding reduction chains are explored for the multiple orbit problem. One realization of the u sub ( sub q sub ) (2) subalgebra is associated with the valence isospin, other reductions describe coupling between identical nucleons or proton-neutron pairs. Microscopic non-deformed and deformed Hamiltonians are expressed in terms of the generators of the sp(4) and sp sub q (4) algebras. In both cases eigenvalues of the isospin breaking Hamiltonian are fit to experimental ground state energies. The theory can be used to investigate the origin of the deformation and predict binding energies of nuclei in proton-rich regions. The q-deformation parameter changes the pairing strength and in so doing introduces a non-linear coupling into the collective degree of freedom

  5. truncSP: An R Package for Estimation of Semi-Parametric Truncated Linear Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karlsson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Problems with truncated data occur in many areas, complicating estimation and inference. Regarding linear regression models, the ordinary least squares estimator is inconsistent and biased for these types of data and is therefore unsuitable for use. Alternative estimators, designed for the estimation of truncated regression models, have been developed. This paper presents the R package truncSP. The package contains functions for the estimation of semi-parametric truncated linear regression models using three different estimators: the symmetrically trimmed least squares, quadratic mode, and left truncated estimators, all of which have been shown to have good asymptotic and ?nite sample properties. The package also provides functions for the analysis of the estimated models. Data from the environmental sciences are used to illustrate the functions in the package.

  6. Diagnostics of Expectations of Economic Agents as an Instrument for the Modelling of Economic Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat Rashitovich Safiullin

    2017-06-01

    anticipation of cyclic fluctuations. Therefore, there is a need of the scientific justification (verification and approbation of the models of the cyclical fluctuations constructed on the basis of the factors, which would have both the high level of sensitivity to the changes in external and internal environment of the economic system, and the high level of the predictability of cyclic trends. The authors have theoretically substantiated and approved the model of cyclical fluctuations of the economy. It is based ojn the integrated cross-correlation indicator characterizing the expectations of economic agents

  7. Comparison of measurement models based on expectations and perceived performance for the satisfaction study in health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E. Forero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on satisfaction measurement features several models for establishing the relationship between expectations, service performance and satisfaction. The set of measures used includes the Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA, expectation disconfirmation and the satisfaction determinants model. This paper presents a comparison of different measurement models on the basis of a sample of 2900 health services users. The comparison shows that the expectations disconfirmation model allows to establish significant correlations between service attributes and general satisfaction, yet it warrants an adjustment of data distribution to identify the attributes where confirmation and disconfirmation are presented – when not due to chance. On the other hand, the direct effect approach allows to identify predictor attributes of satisfaction better than the other models do, whereas the importance – performance model is easier to implement but can generate erroneous conclusions about the service attributes that generate satisfaction.

  8. Culture-related service expectations: a comparative study using the Kano model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejaili, Fayez F; Assad, Lina; Shaheen, Faissal A; Moussa, Dujana H; Karkar, Ayman; AlRukhaimi, Mona; Barhamein, Majdah; Al Suwida, Abdulkareem; Al Alhejaili, Faris F; Al Harbi, Ali S; Al Homrany, Mohamed; Attar, Bisher; Al-Sayyari, Abdulla A

    2009-01-01

    To compare service expectations between Arab and Austrian patients. We used a Kano model-based questionnaire with 20 service attributes of relevance to the dialysis patient. We analyzed 530, 172, 60, and 68 responses from Saudi, Austrian, Syrian, and UAE patients, respectively. We compared the customer satisfaction coefficient and the frequencies of response categories ("must be," "attractive," "one-dimensional," and "indifferent") for each of the 20 service attributes and in each of the 3 national groups of patients. We also investigated whether any differences seen were related to sex, age, literacy rate, or duration on dialysis. We observed higher satisfaction coefficients and "one-directional" responses among Arab patients and higher dissatisfaction coefficients and "must be" and "attractive" responses among Austrian patients. These were not related to age or duration on dialysis but were related to literacy rate. We speculate that these discrepancies between Austrian and Arab patients might be related to underdeveloped sophistication in market competitive forces and to cultural influences.

  9. Competing risk model for reduction in life expectancy from radiogenic latent cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.T.

    1978-01-01

    Because of the large number of persons who could potentially receive low doses of radiation as a result of a nuclear reactor accident, the number of fatalities from latent cancers is generally larger than the early, or prompt, fatalities. For this reason the latent cancer fatality risk of reactor accidents is perceived as being more important than the early fatality risk. In addition, there exists the temptation to add the latent cancer fatality risk to the early fatality risk for the purpose of comparing reactor accident risks to other risks that society is exposed to, such as automobile accidents, airplane accidents, hurricanes, etc. However, the impact on the individual, and society as a whole, due to latent cancer fatalities is significantly different from the impact produced by early fatalities. Early fatalities generally result in appreciable life shortening for the affected individual while latent cancer fatalities generally result in very limited life shortening. A mathematical model was developed to express the reduction in life expectancy due to latent radiogenic cancer as a function of dose received

  10. Modeling the accumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in grasses (Agrotis sp. and Poa sp. and stinging nettle (Urtica dioica on selected sites taking into account soil physico-chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boshoff M. C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil properties on the accumulation of metals in two vegetation types was evaluated at 10 sites with a wide variation in soil physicochemical properties pH, organic carbon, clay percentage , total soil metal concentration and exchangeable soil metal content. Accumulation modeling was conducted for grasses (Agrostis sp. and Poa sp. and stinging nettle (Urtica dioica.

  11. Aspirations and Expectations of West Malaysian Youth: Two Models of Social Class Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshimitsu; And Others

    1973-01-01

    While the occupational aspirations of Malay and Chinese male students in the secondary schools reveal fairly similar configurations, the socio-economic expectations of Malays are higher and largely independent of social class origins. (Authors)

  12. Using the Expectancy Value Model of Motivation to Understand the Relationship between Student Attitudes and Achievement in Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Michelle; Creed, Peter A.; Neumann, David L.

    2012-01-01

    We tested a model of the relationship between attitudes toward statistics and achievement based on Eccles' Expectancy Value Model (1983). Participants (n = 149; 83% female) were second-year Australian university students in a psychology statistics course (mean age = 23.36 years, SD = 7.94 years). We obtained demographic details, past performance,…

  13. Artificial Intelligence versus Statistical Modeling and Optimization of Cholesterol Oxidase Production by using Streptomyces Sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Lakshmi; Singh, Vineeta; Niwas, Ram; Osama, Khwaja; Khan, Saif; Haque, Shafiul; Tripathi, C K M; Mishra, B N

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (COD) is a bi-functional FAD-containing oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol into 4-cholesten-3-one. The wider biological functions and clinical applications of COD have urged the screening, isolation and characterization of newer microbes from diverse habitats as a source of COD and optimization and over-production of COD for various uses. The practicability of statistical/ artificial intelligence techniques, such as response surface methodology (RSM), artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA) have been tested to optimize the medium composition for the production of COD from novel strain Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500. All experiments were performed according to the five factor central composite design (CCD) and the generated data was analysed using RSM and ANN. GA was employed to optimize the models generated by RSM and ANN. Based upon the predicted COD concentration, the model developed with ANN was found to be superior to the model developed with RSM. The RSM-GA approach predicted maximum of 6.283 U/mL COD production, whereas the ANN-GA approach predicted a maximum of 9.93 U/mL COD concentration. The optimum concentrations of the medium variables predicted through ANN-GA approach were: 1.431 g/50 mL soybean, 1.389 g/50 mL maltose, 0.029 g/50 mL MgSO4, 0.45 g/50 mL NaCl and 2.235 ml/50 mL glycerol. The experimental COD concentration was concurrent with the GA predicted yield and led to 9.75 U/mL COD production, which was nearly two times higher than the yield (4.2 U/mL) obtained with the un-optimized medium. This is the very first time we are reporting the statistical versus artificial intelligence based modeling and optimization of COD production by Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500.

  14. Comparison of different artificial neural network architectures in modeling of Chlorella sp. flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenooz, Alireza Moosavi; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee; Ranjbar, Reza; Nikbakht, Fatemeh; Bolouri, Oberon

    2017-07-03

    Biodiesel production from microalgae feedstock should be performed after growth and harvesting of the cells, and the most feasible method for harvesting and dewatering of microalgae is flocculation. Flocculation modeling can be used for evaluation and prediction of its performance under different affective parameters. However, the modeling of flocculation in microalgae is not simple and has not performed yet, under all experimental conditions, mostly due to different behaviors of microalgae cells during the process under different flocculation conditions. In the current study, the modeling of microalgae flocculation is studied with different neural network architectures. Microalgae species, Chlorella sp., was flocculated with ferric chloride under different conditions and then the experimental data modeled using artificial neural network. Neural network architectures of multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function architectures, failed to predict the targets successfully, though, modeling was effective with ensemble architecture of MLP networks. Comparison between the performances of the ensemble and each individual network explains the ability of the ensemble architecture in microalgae flocculation modeling.

  15. A jam-jar model of life expectancy and limits to life

    OpenAIRE

    Mayhew, L.; Smith, D.

    2015-01-01

    Age at death will increasingly cluster in the 90s and the life expectancy of men and women will converge, according to a study by academics from Cass Business School in partnership with the ILC-UK.\\ud \\ud Over the coming decades, men in particular will live longer, increasing the need for the country to face the challenges of an ageing society.\\ud \\ud Based on historical mortality data from England and Wales, the researchers developed a new method for forecasting life expectancy – the results...

  16. Transcriptional activation of REST by Sp1 in Huntington's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ravache

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Huntington's disease (HD, mutant huntingtin (mHtt disrupts the normal transcriptional program of disease neurons by altering the function of several gene expression regulators such as Sp1. REST (Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription Factor, a key regulator of neuronal differentiation, is also aberrantly activated in HD by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that the level of REST mRNA is increased in HD mice and in NG108 cells differentiated into neuronal-like cells and expressing a toxic mHtt fragment. Using luciferase reporter gene assay, we delimited the REST promoter regions essential for mHtt-mediated REST upregulation and found that they contain Sp factor binding sites. We provide evidence that Sp1 and Sp3 bind REST promoter and interplay to fine-tune REST transcription. In undifferentiated NG108 cells, Sp1 and Sp3 have antagonistic effect, Sp1 acting as an activator and Sp3 as a repressor. Upon neuronal differentiation, we show that the amount and ratio of Sp1/Sp3 proteins decline, as does REST expression, and that the transcriptional role of Sp3 shifts toward a weak activator. Therefore, our results provide new molecular information to the transcriptional regulation of REST during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, specific knockdown of Sp1 abolishes REST upregulation in NG108 neuronal-like cells expressing mHtt. Our data together with earlier reports suggest that mHtt triggers a pathogenic cascade involving Sp1 activation, which leads to REST upregulation and repression of neuronal genes.

  17. On the Expected Discounted Penalty Function for the Classical Risk Model with Potentially Delayed Claims and Random Incomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiming Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the expected discounted penalty function of a compound Poisson risk model with random incomes and potentially delayed claims. It is assumed that each main claim will produce a byclaim with a certain probability and the occurrence of the byclaim may be delayed depending on associated main claim amount. In addition, the premium number process is assumed as a Poisson process. We derive the integral equation satisfied by the expected discounted penalty function. Given that the premium size is exponentially distributed, the explicit expression for the Laplace transform of the expected discounted penalty function is derived. Finally, for the exponential claim sizes, we present the explicit formula for the expected discounted penalty function.

  18. Assessment of the expected construction company’s net profit using neural network and multiple regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Mohamad

    2013-09-01

    This research aims to develop a mathematical model for assessing the expected net profit of any construction company. To achieve the research objective, four steps were performed. First, the main factors affecting firms’ net profit were identified. Second, pertinent data regarding the net profit factors were collected. Third, two different net profit models were developed using the Multiple Regression (MR and the Neural Network (NN techniques. The validity of the proposed models was also investigated. Finally, the results of both MR and NN models were compared to investigate the predictive capabilities of the two models.

  19. Probability Bracket Notation: the Unified Expressions of Conditional Expectation and Conditional Probability in Quantum Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing M.

    2009-01-01

    After a brief introduction to Probability Bracket Notation (PBN), indicator operator and conditional density operator (CDO), we investigate probability spaces associated with various quantum systems: system with one observable (discrete or continuous), system with two commutative observables (independent or dependent) and a system of indistinguishable non-interacting many-particles. In each case, we derive unified expressions of conditional expectation (CE), conditional probability (CP), and ...

  20. Model averaging in the presence of structural uncertainty about treatment effects: influence on treatment decision and expected value of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Malcolm J; Welton, Nicky J; Briggs, Andrew H; Ades, A E

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches to estimation of Markov models with data from randomized controlled trials tend either to make a judgment about which transition(s) treatments act on, or they assume that treatment has a separate effect on every transition. An alternative is to fit a series of models that assume that treatment acts on specific transitions. Investigators can then choose among alternative models using goodness-of-fit statistics. However, structural uncertainty about any chosen parameterization will remain and this may have implications for the resulting decision and the need for further research. We describe a Bayesian approach to model estimation, and model selection. Structural uncertainty about which parameterization to use is accounted for using model averaging and we developed a formula for calculating the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) in averaged models. Marginal posterior distributions are generated for each of the cost-effectiveness parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation in WinBUGS, or Monte-Carlo simulation in Excel (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA). We illustrate the approach with an example of treatments for asthma using aggregate-level data from a connected network of four treatments compared in three pair-wise randomized controlled trials. The standard errors of incremental net benefit using structured models is reduced by up to eight- or ninefold compared to the unstructured models, and the expected loss attaching to decision uncertainty by factors of several hundreds. Model averaging had considerable influence on the EVPI. Alternative structural assumptions can alter the treatment decision and have an overwhelming effect on model uncertainty and expected value of information. Structural uncertainty can be accounted for by model averaging, and the EVPI can be calculated for averaged models. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Artificial Intelligence versus Statistical Modeling and Optimization of Cholesterol Oxidase Production by using Streptomyces Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Pathak

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (COD is a bi-functional FAD-containing oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol into 4-cholesten-3-one. The wider biological functions and clinical applications of COD have urged the screening, isolation and characterization of newer microbes from diverse habitats as a source of COD and optimization and over-production of COD for various uses. The practicability of statistical/ artificial intelligence techniques, such as response surface methodology (RSM, artificial neural network (ANN and genetic algorithm (GA have been tested to optimize the medium composition for the production of COD from novel strain Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500. All experiments were performed according to the five factor central composite design (CCD and the generated data was analysed using RSM and ANN. GA was employed to optimize the models generated by RSM and ANN. Based upon the predicted COD concentration, the model developed with ANN was found to be superior to the model developed with RSM. The RSM-GA approach predicted maximum of 6.283 U/mL COD production, whereas the ANN-GA approach predicted a maximum of 9.93 U/mL COD concentration. The optimum concentrations of the medium variables predicted through ANN-GA approach were: 1.431 g/50 mL soybean, 1.389 g/50 mL maltose, 0.029 g/50 mL MgSO4, 0.45 g/50 mL NaCl and 2.235 ml/50 mL glycerol. The experimental COD concentration was concurrent with the GA predicted yield and led to 9.75 U/mL COD production, which was nearly two times higher than the yield (4.2 U/mL obtained with the un-optimized medium. This is the very first time we are reporting the statistical versus artificial intelligence based modeling and optimization of COD production by Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500.

  2. Unequal Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    the impact of educational tracking on expectation formation among high school students in the U.S., whereas Chapter III analyzes the role of the grade point average in the expectation formation process among socially disadvantaged high school students in the U.S. The empirical analyses in both chapters...

  3. spBayes: An R Package for Univariate and Multivariate Hierarchical Point-referenced Spatial Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Andrew O; Banerjee, Sudipto; Carlin, Bradley P

    2007-04-01

    Scientists and investigators in such diverse fields as geological and environmental sciences, ecology, forestry, disease mapping, and economics often encounter spatially referenced data collected over a fixed set of locations with coordinates (latitude-longitude, Easting-Northing etc.) in a region of study. Such point-referenced or geostatistical data are often best analyzed with Bayesian hierarchical models. Unfortunately, fitting such models involves computationally intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods whose efficiency depends upon the specific problem at hand. This requires extensive coding on the part of the user and the situation is not helped by the lack of available software for such algorithms. Here, we introduce a statistical software package, spBayes, built upon the R statistical computing platform that implements a generalized template encompassing a wide variety of Gaussian spatial process models for univariate as well as multivariate point-referenced data. We discuss the algorithms behind our package and illustrate its use with a synthetic and real data example.

  4. spBayes: An R Package for Univariate and Multivariate Hierarchical Point-referenced Spatial Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew O. Finley

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and investigators in such diverse fields as geological and environmental sciences, ecology, forestry, disease mapping, and economics often encounter spatially referenced data collected over a fixed set of locations with coordinates (latitude–longitude, Easting–Northing etc. in a region of study. Such point-referenced or geostatistical data are often best analyzed with Bayesian hierarchical models. Unfortunately, fitting such models involves computationally intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods whose efficiency depends upon the specific problem at hand. This requires extensive coding on the part of the user and the situation is not helped by the lack of available software for such algorithms. Here, we introduce a statistical software package, spBayes, built upon the R statistical computing platform that implements a generalized template encompassing a wide variety of Gaussian spatial process models for univariate as well as multivariate point-referenced data. We discuss the algorithms behind our package and illustrate its use with a synthetic and real data example.

  5. Expectations and implementations of the flipped classroom model in undergraduate mathematics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Emilie; Karakok, Gulden

    2015-10-01

    The flipped classroom model is being used more frequently in undergraduate mathematics courses. As with any new teaching model, in-depth investigations of both various implementation styles and how the new model improves student learning are needed. Currently, many practitioners have been sharing their implementations of this model. However, there has not yet been an investigation of the various implementations of the model to discern general trends in this movement. With this research goal in mind, we conducted a study exploring various implementations of the flipped classroom model by interviewing 19 faculty members who experienced using this model at 14 different institutes. Results indicate that participants had similar motivations for implementation; however, subsequent implementations were different. In addition, we share participants' perspectives on (a) student learning of pre-requisite, procedural and conceptual knowledge, and (b) how this particular model promotes such knowledge developments. Finally, we provide suggestions for future implementations and research regarding this particular teaching model.

  6. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

  7. Hybrid metaheuristic approaches to the expectation maximization for estimation of the hidden Markov model for signal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Shamsul; Yearwood, John; Togneri, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The expectation maximization (EM) is the standard training algorithm for hidden Markov model (HMM). However, EM faces a local convergence problem in HMM estimation. This paper attempts to overcome this problem of EM and proposes hybrid metaheuristic approaches to EM for HMM. In our earlier research, a hybrid of a constraint-based evolutionary learning approach to EM (CEL-EM) improved HMM estimation. In this paper, we propose a hybrid simulated annealing stochastic version of EM (SASEM) that combines simulated annealing (SA) with EM. The novelty of our approach is that we develop a mathematical reformulation of HMM estimation by introducing a stochastic step between the EM steps and combine SA with EM to provide better control over the acceptance of stochastic and EM steps for better HMM estimation. We also extend our earlier work and propose a second hybrid which is a combination of an EA and the proposed SASEM, (EA-SASEM). The proposed EA-SASEM uses the best constraint-based EA strategies from CEL-EM and stochastic reformulation of HMM. The complementary properties of EA and SA and stochastic reformulation of HMM of SASEM provide EA-SASEM with sufficient potential to find better estimation for HMM. To the best of our knowledge, this type of hybridization and mathematical reformulation have not been explored in the context of EM and HMM training. The proposed approaches have been evaluated through comprehensive experiments to justify their effectiveness in signal modeling using the speech corpus: TIMIT. Experimental results show that proposed approaches obtain higher recognition accuracies than the EM algorithm and CEL-EM as well.

  8. A CVAR scenario for a standard monetary model using theory-consistent expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    A theory-consistent CVAR scenario describes a set of testable regularities capturing basic assumptions of the theoretical model. Using this concept, the paper considers a standard model for exchange rate determination and shows that all assumptions about the model's shock structure and steady...

  9. Variation that can be expected when using particle tracking models in connectivity studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hufnagl, Marc; Payne, Mark; Lacroix, Geneviève

    2017-01-01

    •A suite of ocean circulation and Lagrangian models were compared to determine inter-model uncertainty and variation.•Absolute results (positions, temperatures, etc.) varied between models, but trends were comparable.•More plaice than sole larvae reached a marine protected area although released...

  10. Modeling the expected lifetime and evolution of a deme's principal genetic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    2014-03-01

    The principal genetic sequence (PGS) is the most common genetic sequence in a deme. The PGS changes over time because new genetic sequences are created by inversions, compete with the current PGS, and a small fraction become PGSs. A set of coupled difference equations provides a description of the evolution of the PGS distribution function in an ensemble of demes. Solving the set of equations produces the survival probability of a new genetic sequence and the expected lifetime of an existing PGS as a function of inversion size and rate, recombination rate, and deme size. Additionally, the PGS distribution function is used to explain the transition pathway from old to new PGSs. We compare these results to a cellular automaton based representation of a deme and the drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. yakuba.

  11. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    , they are correlated among people who share environments because these individuals satisfice within their cognitive bounds by using cues in order of validity, as opposed to using cues arbitrarily. Any difference in expectations thereby arise from differences in cognitive ability, because two individuals with identical......The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover...... cognitive bounds will perceive business opportunities identically. In addition, because cues provide information about latent causal structures of the environment, changes in causality must be accompanied by changes in cognitive representations if adaptation is to be maintained. The concept of evolutionary...

  12. Unequal Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    In this dissertation I examine the relationship between subjective beliefs about the outcomes of educational choices and the generation of inequality of educational opportunity (IEO) in post-industrial society. Taking my departure in the rational action turn in the sociology of educational...... different educational choices according to their family background. IEO thus appears to be mediated by the expectations students hold for their futures. Taken together, this research agenda argues that both researchers and policy-makers need to consider the expectation-based origin of educational...... for their educational futures. Focusing on the causes rather than the consequences of educational expectations, I argue that students shape their expectations in response to the signals about their academic performance they receive from institutionalized performance indicators in schools. Chapter II considers...

  13. Modeling Quality-Adjusted Life Expectancy Loss Resulting from Tobacco Use in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert M.; Anderson, John P.; Kaplan, Cameron M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development of a model for estimating the effects of tobacco use upon Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and to estimate the impact of tobacco use on health outcomes for the United States (US) population using the model. Method: We obtained estimates of tobacco consumption from 6 years of the National Health Interview…

  14. Gender and work-family conflict: testing the rational model and the gender role expectations model in the Spanish cultural context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Salguero, Antonia; Martínez-de-Lecea, José-María Salinas; del Carmen Aguilar-Luzón, María

    2012-01-01

    Gutek, Searle, and Klepa (1991) proposed two models to explain the gender differences in work-family conflict: the rational model and the gender role expectations model. Both models have mostly been tested on American and Canadian samples, and have obtained partial support. Given the cultural differences between North American countries and Spain, we should question whether the two models are equally applicable to Spanish society or whether one of them captures Spanish men and women's experience of work-family conflict better than the other. So, the aim of this study is to test which of the models better explains the gender differences in work-family conflict in the Spanish cultural context (or if, indeed, the two models apply equally well). Given the typical cultural dimensions of Spanish society, we expected to find greater support for the gender role expectations model than for the rational model. However, the results obtained in this study indicated that, while the rational model can explain the gender differences that were found, the gender role expectations model cannot capture Spanish people's work-family conflict experiences. The results are interpreted in terms of cultural dimensions characteristic of the Spanish context.

  15. Possibility/Necessity-Based Probabilistic Expectation Models for Linear Programming Problems with Discrete Fuzzy Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katagiri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers linear programming problems (LPPs where the objective functions involve discrete fuzzy random variables (fuzzy set-valued discrete random variables. New decision making models, which are useful in fuzzy stochastic environments, are proposed based on both possibility theory and probability theory. In multi-objective cases, Pareto optimal solutions of the proposed models are newly defined. Computational algorithms for obtaining the Pareto optimal solutions of the proposed models are provided. It is shown that problems involving discrete fuzzy random variables can be transformed into deterministic nonlinear mathematical programming problems which can be solved through a conventional mathematical programming solver under practically reasonable assumptions. A numerical example of agriculture production problems is given to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed models to real-world problems in fuzzy stochastic environments.

  16. Assessment of the expected construction company’s net profit using neural network and multiple regression models

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad, H.H.; Ibrahim, A.H.; Massoud, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Net profit is an important financial performance indicator for any construction firm. Firm financial managers should strive to maximize this net profit. Modeling company’s net profit helps to investigate the serious effects of the different financial conditions on the expected net profit for the construction companies working in the Egyptian market. It simply helps financial managers to make sure that their companies business operations are running in a profitable manner. This research aim...

  17. Test models for estimating radiation balance in different scales for Jaboticabal, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria de Alencar Beserra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The net radiation (Rn in agroecosystems is the amount of energy that is available in the environment to heating processes of living organisms, air and soil; perspiration of animals and plants; photosynthesis and water evaporation. The Rn defines the type of climate and weather conditions prevailing in a region affecting the availability and thermal water, the fundamental understanding of genotype-environment, which ultimately determine the productivity of the agricultural system. Rn usually is used in models of weather and climate studies. The sustainability and economic viability of zootechnical activity is dependent on the positive interaction between animal and environment. Environmental factors such as water, shading, thermal exchanges sensible heat (conduction, convection and radiation skin and latent heat losses (evaporation and transpiration, conditioned by Rn, must be managed to provide the best results. The present study was conducted to develop and test models for accurate and precise radiation balance on the scales daily, monthly and seasonal ten-day for Jaboticabal - SP, due to the importance of estimates of net radiation for agricultural activities. We used daily meteorological data from weather station located in Jaboticabal, SP (coordinates: 21 ° 14'05 "South, 48 ° 17'09" West, 615m altitude at Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio Mesquita Filho" - FCAV/UNESP in a situation of default grass "Bahiagrass" during the period 20/08/2005 to 20/01/2012. The data used were the maximum temperature (Tmax, minimum (Tmin and mean (TMED; maximum relative humidity (URMáx, minimum (URMín and average (URMéd precipitation (mm, average velocity (m/s, Qo, solar radiation (MJ m-2, sunshine (hour meter (MJ m², soil temperature at two depths (Tsoil2CM, Tsoil5CM and class A pan evaporation (TCA (mm. The measures taken by the balance radiometer were taken as a reference to test other models. The models tested were those reported by NORMAN et al

  18. Expect With Me: development and evaluation design for an innovative model of group prenatal care to improve perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shayna D; Lewis, Jessica B; Thomas, Jordan L; Grilo, Stephanie A; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-05-18

    Despite biomedical advances and intervention efforts, rates of preterm birth and other adverse outcomes in the United States have remained relatively intransigent. Evidence suggests that group prenatal care can reduce these risks, with implications for maternal and child health as well as substantial cost savings. However, widespread dissemination presents challenges, in part because training and health systems have not been designed to deliver care in a group setting. This manuscript describes the design and evaluation of Expect With Me, an innovative model of group prenatal care with a strong integrated information technology (IT) platform designed to be scalable nationally. Expect With Me follows clinical guidelines from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Expect With Me incorporates the best evidence-based features of existing models of group care with a novel integrated IT platform designed to improve patient engagement and support, enhance health behaviors and decision making, connect providers and patients, and improve health service delivery. A multisite prospective longitudinal cohort study is being conducted to examine the impact of Expect With Me on perinatal and postpartum outcomes, and to identify and address barriers to national scalability. Process and outcome evaluation will include quantitative and qualitative data collection at patient, provider, and organizational levels. Mixed-method data collection includes patient surveys, medical record reviews, patient focus groups; provider surveys, session evaluations, provider focus groups and in-depth interviews; an online tracking system; and clinical site visits. A two-to-one matched cohort of women receiving individual care from each site will provide a comparison group (n = 1,000 Expect With Me patients; n = 2,000 individual care patients) for outcome and cost analyses. By bundling prevention and care services into a high-touch, high-tech group prenatal care model

  19. Analysis of a Rough Elliptic Bore Journal Bearing using Expectancy Model of Roughness Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance characteristics of a rough elliptic bore journal bearing are studied. The bearing bore of isotropic roughness orientation is characterized by stochastic function and the film geometry is quantified to elliptic shape. There after the Reynolds equation and energy equation are descretized for pressure and temperature respectively. A finite difference model is developed to evaluate hydrodynamic pressure and oil temperature. Solution to this model is done using effective influence Newton-Raphson method. Performance parameters such as load bearing ability, friction, flow-in and side leakages are computed and discussed.

  20. Expected shortfall estimation for apparently infinite-mean models of operational risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirillo, P.; Taleb, Nassim Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Statistical analyses on actual data depict operational risk as an extremely heavy-tailed phenomenon, able to generate losses so extreme as to suggest the use of infinite-mean models. But no loss can actually destroy more than the entire value of a bank or of a company, and this upper bound should be

  1. Modeling daily flowering probabilities: expected impact of climate change on Japanese cherry phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jenica M; Terres, Maria A; Katsuki, Toshio; Iwamoto, Kojiro; Kobori, Hiromi; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi; Primack, Richard B; Wilson, Adam M; Gelfand, Alan; Silander, John A

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the drivers of phenological events is vital for forecasting species' responses to climate change. We developed flexible Bayesian survival regression models to assess a 29-year, individual-level time series of flowering phenology from four taxa of Japanese cherry trees (Prunus spachiana, Prunus × yedoensis, Prunus jamasakura, and Prunus lannesiana), from the Tama Forest Cherry Preservation Garden in Hachioji, Japan. Our modeling framework used time-varying (chill and heat units) and time-invariant (slope, aspect, and elevation) factors. We found limited differences among taxa in sensitivity to chill, but earlier flowering taxa, such as P. spachiana, were more sensitive to heat than later flowering taxa, such as P. lannesiana. Using an ensemble of three downscaled regional climate models under the A1B emissions scenario, we projected shifts in flowering timing by 2100. Projections suggest that each taxa will flower about 30 days earlier on average by 2100 with 2-6 days greater uncertainty around the species mean flowering date. Dramatic shifts in the flowering times of cherry trees may have implications for economically important cultural festivals in Japan and East Asia. The survival models used here provide a mechanistic modeling approach and are broadly applicable to any time-to-event phenological data, such as plant leafing, bird arrival time, and insect emergence. The ability to explicitly quantify uncertainty, examine phenological responses on a fine time scale, and incorporate conditions leading up to an event may provide future insight into phenologically driven changes in carbon balance and ecological mismatches of plants and pollinators in natural populations and horticultural crops. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Process optimization and modeling for the cultivation of Nannochloropsis sp. and Tetraselmis striata via response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamoglu, Esra; Demirel, Zeliha; Conk Dalay, Meltem

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal physical process conditions for the cultivation of locally isolated strains of Nannochloropsis sp. and Tetraselmis striata to achieve maximum growth rate. It was essential to evaluate biomass production at different agitation rates, light intensities, and temperature levels. Central composite design and response surface methodology were applied to design the experiments and optimize the cultivation process for Nannochloropsis sp. and T. striata. The specific growth rate of 0.250 d(-1) was obtained for Nannochloropsis sp. cells under the light intensity of 54 μmol photons · m(-2) · s(-1) , at the agitation rate of 151 rpm in 24.5°C. The optimal physical process conditions for T. striata were obtained under the light intensity of 56 μmol photons · m(-2) · s(-1) in 25.5°C at the agitation rate of 151 rpm in 25.5°C, resulting in a specific growth rate of 0.226 d(-1) . The predicted values were justified by the verification tests. Good agreement between the predicted values and the experimental values confirmed the validity of the models for the cultivation of microalgal strains. In this article, the noteworthy result was that temperature was a dominant factor in obtaining high chl-a content for Nannochloropsis sp., whereas the growth of T. striata strongly depended on light exposure. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  3. Evaluation of the product ratio coherent model in forecasting mortality rates and life expectancy at births by States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shair, Syazreen Niza; Yusof, Aida Yuzi; Asmuni, Nurin Haniah

    2017-05-01

    Coherent mortality forecasting models have recently received increasing attention particularly in their application to sub-populations. The advantage of coherent models over independent models is the ability to forecast a non-divergent mortality for two or more sub-populations. One of the coherent models was recently developed by [1] known as the product-ratio model. This model is an extension version of the functional independent model from [2]. The product-ratio model has been applied in a developed country, Australia [1] and has been extended in a developing nation, Malaysia [3]. While [3] accounted for coherency of mortality rates between gender and ethnic group, the coherency between states in Malaysia has never been explored. This paper will forecast the mortality rates of Malaysian sub-populations according to states using the product ratio coherent model and its independent version— the functional independent model. The forecast accuracies of two different models are evaluated using the out-of-sample error measurements— the mean absolute forecast error (MAFE) for age-specific death rates and the mean forecast error (MFE) for the life expectancy at birth. We employ Malaysian mortality time series data from 1991 to 2014, segregated by age, gender and states.

  4. Great Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickens, Charles

    2005-01-01

    One of Dickens's most renowned and enjoyable novels, Great Expectations tells the story of Pip, an orphan boy who wishes to transcend his humble origins and finds himself unexpectedly given the opportunity to live a life of wealth and respectability. Over the course of the tale, in which Pip

  5. The Financial Coaching Advice Model: An Exploration into how it Satisfies Expectations of Quality Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Knutsen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For 20 years, the financial planning sector in Australia has been transitioning from a sales-orientated force to aprofession of qualified and skilled practitioners. Today, the potential for professional financial planning adviceto benefit Australians financially, economically and psychologically is recognised by government. Financially,these benefits include increased savings, less interest expense through faster debt reduction, higher investmentreturns and appropriate levels of insurance. Economically, a more financially literate society has the potentialfor less reliance on an already burdened social security system. Psychologically, the benefits include the peaceof mind that comes from an individual being confident in financial matters. However, despite this level ofrecognition and development, national surveys have reported that only a small percentage of the populationactually seek professional financial advice. The factors attributing to these low percentages included the gapsin financial literacy limiting an individual’s engagement in financial matters and consumer’s current mistrust ofthe financial advice business models that remain dominated by commission-driven product sales. Thesedeficiencies have led some financial planning firms to break from financial product sales as the primary advicemodel and focus on financial coaching. Exploratory interviews with the practitioners and clients of a selectedfinancial planning firm have generated insightful discussion into how a financial coaching advice model isachieving the financial, economic and psychological benefits recognised by government as the potentialoutcomes of professional financial advice. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from that discussionand demonstrate the opportunities embedded within a financial coaching advice model. It is argued that thisdiscussion offers a foundation for future research direction in an area currently under researched in

  6. Experiments expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Gorini, B; Meschi, E

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the expectations and the constraints of the experiments relatively to the commissioning procedure and the running conditions for the 2015 data taking period. The views about the various beam parameters for the p-p period, like beam energy, maximum pileup, bunch spacing and luminosity limitation in IP2 and IP8, are discussed. The goals and the constraints of the 2015 physics program are also presented, including the heavy ions period as well as the special...

  7. Do French macroseismic intensity observations agree with expectations from the European Seismic Hazard Model 2013?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Julien; Beauval, Céline; Douglas, John

    2018-02-01

    Probabilistic seismic hazard assessments are the basis of modern seismic design codes. To test fully a seismic hazard curve at the return periods of interest for engineering would require many thousands of years' worth of ground-motion recordings. Because strong-motion networks are often only a few decades old (e.g. in mainland France the first accelerometric network dates from the mid-1990s), data from such sensors can be used to test hazard estimates only at very short return periods. In this article, several hundreds of years of macroseismic intensity observations for mainland France are interpolated using a robust kriging-with-a-trend technique to establish the earthquake history of every French mainland municipality. At 24 selected cities representative of the French seismic context, the number of exceedances of intensities IV, V and VI is determined over time windows considered complete. After converting these intensities to peak ground accelerations using the global conversion equation of Caprio et al. (Ground motion to intensity conversion equations (GMICEs): a global relationship and evaluation of regional dependency, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 105:1476-1490, 2015), these exceedances are compared with those predicted by the European Seismic Hazard Model 2013 (ESHM13). In half of the cities, the number of observed exceedances for low intensities (IV and V) is within the range of predictions of ESHM13. In the other half of the cities, the number of observed exceedances is higher than the predictions of ESHM13. For intensity VI, the match is closer, but the comparison is less meaningful due to a scarcity of data. According to this study, the ESHM13 underestimates hazard in roughly half of France, even when taking into account the uncertainty in the conversion from intensity to acceleration. However, these results are valid only for the acceleration range tested in this study (0.01 to 0.09 g).

  8. Modelos da distribuição temporal de chuvas intensas em Piracicaba, SP Time distribution models of intense rainfall in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Décio E. Cruciani

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da variação temporal de chuvas intensas é de grande importância na hidrologia, para a análise e previsão de eventos extremos, necessárias em projetos de controle de engenharia. Com esse objetivo, foram analisados dados de pluviogramas da cidade de Piracicaba, SP, do período de 1966 a 2000, para se determinar a distribuição temporal de chuvas intensas de 60 e de 120 min de duração. As chuvas de 60 min foram subdivididas em três intervalos iguais e sucessivos de 20 min cada um, enquanto as chuvas de 120 min foram subdivididas em quatro intervalos iguais e sucessivos de 30 min cada um. O modelo de distribuição da precipitação que predominou para as chuvas de 60 e 120 min, foi do tipo exponencial negativo, com 85,7 e 50,7% dos casos, respectivamente. Para as chuvas de 60 min, com altura pluviométrica média de 20,7 mm, a distribuição foi de 72,3, 21,4 e 6,2% do total precipitado, respectivamente, nos três intervalos sucessivos de 20 min. Para as chuvas de 120 min, com altura pluviométrica média de 33,3 mm, o resultado foi de 60,1, 25,2, 11,1 e 3,6%, respectivamente, nos quatro intervalos sucessivos de 30 min. O modelo de distribuição temporal dessas chuvas não foi modificado pelo total precipitado nem pela sua duração, nos intervalos em questão.Time distribution models of intense and short rains are very important in hydrology and for extreme predictions in engineering projects. With this purpose, rain data of Piracicaba, SP, Brazil, from 1966 to 2000 were analyzed to establish time distribution models of 60 and 120 min intense rains, during the rainy season from October through March. Time distribution models were assessed by three intervals of twenty minutes duration, for 60 min rains and by four intervals of thirty minutes duration for 120 min rains. The prevailing precipitation model for both, 60 and 120 min rains was a negative exponential distribution, in 85.7 and 50.7% of cases, respectively. For 60 min

  9. Timing and expectation of reward: a neuro-computational model of the afferents to the ventral tegmental area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien eVitay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural activity in dopaminergic areas such as the ventral tegmental area is influenced by timing processes, in particular by the temporal expectation of rewards during Pavlovian conditioning. Receipt of a reward at the expected time allows to compute reward-prediction errors which can drive learning in motor or cognitive structures. Reciprocally, dopamine plays an important role in the timing of external events. Several models of the dopaminergic system exist, but the substrate of temporal learning is rather unclear. In this article, we propose a neuro-computational model of the afferent network to the ventral tegmental area, including the lateral hypothalamus, the pedunculopontine nucleus, the amygdala, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the ventral basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens and the ventral pallidum, as well as the lateral habenula and the rostromedial tegmental nucleus. Based on a plausible connectivity and realistic learning rules, this neuro-computational model reproduces several experimental observations, such as the progressive cancellation of dopaminergic bursts at reward delivery, the appearance of bursts at the onset of reward-predicting cues or the influence of reward magnitude on activity in the amygdala and ventral tegmental area. While associative learning occurs primarily in the amygdala, learning of the temporal relationship between the cue and the associated reward is implemented as a dopamine-modulated coincidence detection mechanism in the nucleus accumbens.

  10. Expectancy Theory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    The subject exerts effort toward the accomplishment of a task goal and the mere exertion of effort may give him pleasure or pain , satisfaction or...force or tendency to act could be as difficult for the hard-nosed experimentalist to grapple with as an other-world apparition . Is this F. any more or...take great pains not to refer to such a variable as "qualitative," "categorical," "nominal," "dummy," or any other of the terms that are used to

  11. Groundwater age and lifetime expectancy modelling approach for site characterization and performance assessment of radwaste repository in clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornaton, F.; Perrochet, P.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A deep geological repository of high level and long lived radwaste requires an understanding of the far field and near field groundwater flow and of the transport properties, at actual and future climatic conditions. Andra, French National radioactive waste management Agency, is developing since last 15 years an integrated multi-scale hydrogeological model of whole Paris basin of 200000 km 2 of area (regional scale) to produce a regional flow field associated to groundwater behavior. It includes locally the Meuse/Haute Marne clay site of about 250 km 2 of area in the eastern part of the Paris basin that was chosen for the emplacement of a repository. The Callovo-Oxfordian host formation is a clay layer characterized by a very low permeability of the order 10 -14 m/s, a mean thickness of 130 m at about 500 m depth, and is embedded by calcareous aquifer formations (Dogger and Oxfordian). The hydrogeological conceptual model is based on stratigraphic and petro-physic modeling of the Paris basin and is accounting for the structural, geological, hydrogeological and geochemical data in an integrated way. This model represents 27 hydrogeological units at the scale of the Paris Basin, and it is refined at the scale of the sector to represent 27 different layers that range in age from the Trias to the Portlandian. The finite element flow and transport simulator Ground Water (GW) is used to solve for groundwater flow at steady-state in a 3 Million elements model, considering current climatic conditions. The model is calibrated against about 1250 hydraulic head measurements, and results in maximum absolute hydraulic head differences of 20 meters at the regional scale and 3 meters at the local scale. The calibrated reference model includes transmissive major faults as well as structures acting as barrier to flow. Groundwater age (the time elapsed since recharge) and lifetime expectancy (the time remaining prior to exit) are

  12. Method for determining the duration of construction basing on evolutionary modeling taking into account random organizational expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekseytsev Anatoliy Viktorovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems of construction planning is failure to meet time constraints and increase of workflow duration. In the recent years informational technologies are efficiently used to solve the problem of estimation of construction period. The issue of optimal estimate of the duration of construction, taking into account the possible organizational expectations is considered in the article. In order to solve this problem the iteration scheme of evolutionary modeling, in which random values of organizational expectations are used as variable parameters is developed. Adjustable genetic operators are used to improve the efficiency of the search for solutions. The reliability of the proposed approach is illustrated by an example of formation of construction schedules of monolithic foundations for buildings, taking into account possible disruptions of supply of concrete and reinforcement cages. Application of the presented methodology enables automated acquisition of several alternative scheduling of construction in accordance with standard or directive duration. Application of this computational procedure has the prospects of taking into account of construction downtime due to weather, accidents related to construction machinery breakdowns or local emergency collapses of the structures being erected.

  13. Disability transitions and health expectancies among adults 45 years and older in Malawi: a cohort-based model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin F Payne

    Full Text Available Falling fertility and increasing life expectancy contribute to a growing elderly population in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA; by 2060, persons aged 45 y and older are projected to be 25% of SSA's population, up from 10% in 2010. Aging in SSA is associated with unique challenges because of poverty and inadequate social supports. However, despite its importance for understanding the consequences of population aging, the evidence about the prevalence of disabilities and functional limitations due to poor physical health among older adults in SSA continues to be very limited.Participants came from 2006, 2008, and 2010 waves of the Malawi Longitudinal Survey of Families and Health, a study of the rural population in Malawi. We investigate how poor physical health results in functional limitations that limit the day-to-day activities of individuals in domains relevant to this subsistence-agriculture context. These disabilities were parameterized based on questions from the SF-12 questionnaire about limitations in daily living activities. We estimated age-specific patterns of functional limitations and the transitions over time between different disability states using a discrete-time hazard model. The estimated transition rates were then used to calculate the first (to our knowledge microdata-based health expectancies calculated for SSA. The risks of experiencing functional limitations due to poor physical health are high in this population, and the onset of disabilities happens early in life. Our analyses show that 45-y-old women can expect to spend 58% (95% CI, 55%-64% of their remaining 28 y of life (95% CI, 25.7-33.5 with functional limitations; 45-y-old men can expect to live 41% (95% CI, 35%-46% of their remaining 25.4 y (95% CI, 23.3-28.8 with such limitations. Disabilities related to functional limitations are shown to have a substantial negative effect on individuals' labor activities, and are negatively related to subjective well

  14. An Assessment of the Expected Cost-Effectiveness of Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccines in Ontario, Canada Using a Static Model.

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    Ayman Chit

    Full Text Available Ontario, Canada, immunizes against influenza using a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3 under a Universal Influenza Immunization Program (UIIP. The UIIP offers IIV3 free-of-charge to all Ontarians over 6 months of age. A newly approved quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4 offers wider protection against influenza B disease. We explored the expected cost-utility and budget impact of replacing IIV3 with IIV4, within the context of Ontario's UIIP, using a probabilistic and static cost-utility model. Wherever possible, epidemiological and cost data were obtained from Ontario sources. Canadian or U.S. sources were used when Ontario data were not available. Vaccine efficacy for IIV3 was obtained from the literature. IIV4 efficacy was derived from meta-analysis of strain-specific vaccine efficacy. Conservatively, herd protection was not considered. In the base case, we used IIV3 and IIV4 prices of $5.5/dose and $7/dose, respectively. We conducted a sensitivity analysis on the price of IIV4, as well as standard univariate and multivariate statistical uncertainty analyses. Over a typical influenza season, relative to IIV3, IIV4 is expected to avert an additional 2,516 influenza cases, 1,683 influenza-associated medical visits, 27 influenza-associated hospitalizations, and 5 influenza-associated deaths. From a societal perspective, IIV4 would generate 76 more Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs and a net societal budget impact of $4,784,112. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for this comparison was $63,773/QALY. IIV4 remains cost-effective up to a 53% price premium over IIV3. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that IIV4 was cost-effective with a probability of 65% for a threshold of $100,000/QALY gained. IIV4 is expected to achieve reductions in influenza-related morbidity and mortality compared to IIV3. Despite not accounting for herd protection, IIV4 is still expected to be a cost-effective alternative to IIV3 up to

  15. Modelling of the soft X-ray tungsten spectra expected to be registered by GEM detection system for WEST

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    Syrocki Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, the interaction between the plasma and the tungsten chosen as the plasma-facing wall material imposes that the hot central plasma loses energy by X-ray emission from tungsten ions. On the other hand, the registered X-ray spectra provide alternative diagnostics of the plasma itself. Highly ionized tungsten emits extremely complex X-ray spectra that can be understood only after exhaustive theoretical studies. The detailed analyses will be useful for proper interpretation of soft X-ray plasma radiation expected to be registered on ITER-like machines, that is, Tungsten (W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak (WEST. The simulations of the soft X-ray spectra structures for tungsten ions have been performed using the flexible atomic code (FAC package within the framework of collisional-radiative (CR model approach for electron temperatures and densities relevant to WEST tokamak.

  16. Expected estimating equation using calibration data for generalized linear models with a mixture of Berkson and classical errors in covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsoba, Jean de Dieu; Lee, Shen-Ming; Wang, Ching-Yun

    2014-02-20

    Data collected in many epidemiological or clinical research studies are often contaminated with measurement errors that may be of classical or Berkson error type. The measurement error may also be a combination of both classical and Berkson errors and failure to account for both errors could lead to unreliable inference in many situations. We consider regression analysis in generalized linear models when some covariates are prone to a mixture of Berkson and classical errors, and calibration data are available only for some subjects in a subsample. We propose an expected estimating equation approach to accommodate both errors in generalized linear regression analyses. The proposed method can consistently estimate the classical and Berkson error variances based on the available data, without knowing the mixture percentage. We investigated its finite-sample performance numerically. Our method is illustrated by an application to real data from an HIV vaccine study. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of Natural versus Synthetic Surfactant with SP-B and SP-C Analogs in a Porcine Model of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Bodil; Curstedt, Tore; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Saugstad, Ola Didrik

    2014-01-01

    Meconium displaces surfactant from the alveolar surface and inhibits its function. The development of active synthetic surfactants is complicated, especially to synthesize the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C. A synthetic surfactant, CHF5633 containing SP-B and SP-C analogs, has been designed to act similarly to the natural surfactant poractant alfa. To test the resistance to meconium inactivation of CHF5633 compared to poractant alfa. Secondary outcome measurements were respiratory and inflammatory parameters. Twenty-six newborn pigs, bodyweight 1.4-2.0 kg were randomized to receive either poractant alfa or CHF5633. After anesthesia, surgery and final stabilization, meconium was instilled endotracheally followed by surfactant. Bronchial lavage fluid was obtained before intervention and every second hour. Respiratory parameters were registered and blood samples drawn before intervention and every hour. Surfactant was inactivated in both groups 6 h after meconium instillation, but CHF5633 was more resistant than poractant alfa in terms of lipid peroxidation. Respiratory parameters were similar in both groups. Inflammatory and hemostatic parameters differed between groups, suggesting that the surfactants may play different roles in the meconium-induced inflammatory process. Due to the differential effects and complex pattern observed, the data do not indicate that one of the surfactants was superior with respect to inflammatory and hemostatic responses. This study indicates that CHF5633 is as efficient as poractant alfa in experimental meconium aspiration syndrome. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

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    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and used it to determine which DNA replication genes are essential. Results Using a directed in-frame gene knockout method in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we examined nineteen genes predicted to be involved in DNA replication. Preliminary bioinformatic analysis of the large haloarchaeal Orc/Cdc6 family, related to eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6, showed five distinct clades of Orc/Cdc6 proteins conserved in all sequenced haloarchaea. Of ten orc/cdc6 genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, only two were found to be essential, orc10, on the large chromosome, and orc2, on the minichromosome, pNRC200. Of the three replicative-type DNA polymerase genes, two were essential: the chromosomally encoded B family, polB1, and the chromosomally encoded euryarchaeal-specific D family, polD1/D2 (formerly called polA1/polA2 in the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome sequence. The pNRC200-encoded B family polymerase, polB2, was non-essential. Accessory genes for DNA replication initiation and elongation factors, including the putative replicative helicase, mcm, the eukaryotic-type DNA primase, pri1/pri2, the DNA polymerase sliding clamp, pcn, and the flap endonuclease, rad2, were all essential. Targeted genes were classified as non-essential if knockouts were obtained and essential based on statistical analysis and/or by demonstrating the inability to isolate chromosomal knockouts except in the presence of a complementing plasmid copy of the gene. Conclusion The results showed that ten

  19. AN OPTIMIZATION MODEL TO MINIMIZE THE EXPECTED END-TO-END TRANSMISSION TIME IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

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    Marlon da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Time metrics are extremely important to evaluate the transmission performance on Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs, whose main characteristic is to use multihop technology to extend the network coverage area. One of such metrics is WCETT (Weighted Cumulative Expected Transmission Time, in which transmission times per hop are weighted for both proactive and reactive conditions. Furthermore, such metrics are able to detect delays that can degrade some network services. This paper presents an optimization model to minimize WCETT in a WMN, subject to constraints grouped by bandwidth, flow control and power control. As the model includes nonlinear constraints, we propose a heuristic to solve it, which divides the problem in two subproblems. The first subproblem maximizes the network link capacity and a Simulated Annealing algorithm is used to solve it. Considering the link capacities obtained, the second subproblem minimizes the WCETTs, which is formulated as a linear programming model. Some numerical results are presented, based on instances of WMNs randomly generated. Some of these results are compared with the results obtained by a commercial simulator in order to verify the coherence of the proposed heuristic for realistic scenarios.

  20. Estimation of expected number of accidents and workforce unavailability through Bayesian population variability analysis and Markov-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas Moura, Márcio das; Azevedo, Rafael Valença; Droguett, Enrique López; Chaves, Leandro Rego; Lins, Isis Didier

    2016-01-01

    Occupational accidents pose several negative consequences to employees, employers, environment and people surrounding the locale where the accident takes place. Some types of accidents correspond to low frequency-high consequence (long sick leaves) events, and then classical statistical approaches are ineffective in these cases because the available dataset is generally sparse and contain censored recordings. In this context, we propose a Bayesian population variability method for the estimation of the distributions of the rates of accident and recovery. Given these distributions, a Markov-based model will be used to estimate the uncertainty over the expected number of accidents and the work time loss. Thus, the use of Bayesian analysis along with the Markov approach aims at investigating future trends regarding occupational accidents in a workplace as well as enabling a better management of the labor force and prevention efforts. One application example is presented in order to validate the proposed approach; this case uses available data gathered from a hydropower company in Brazil. - Highlights: • This paper proposes a Bayesian method to estimate rates of accident and recovery. • The model requires simple data likely to be available in the company database. • These results show the proposed model is not too sensitive to the prior estimates.

  1. Numerical modelling of the geochemical evolution of the near field under the hydrothermal conditions expected for a KBS-3 repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Sena, C.; Salas, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the KBS-3 concept for the nuclear waste repository, designed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB), the bentonite buffer is placed around the copper canisters that contain the spent nuclear fuel, isolating it of the host rock. In order to check - hypotheses for the evolution of the bentonite buffer under the thermo-hydraulic conditions expected in a KBS-3 repository, SKB is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). In the present work, numerical simulations are developed to simulate: i) thermo-hydraulic processes; ii) geochemical reactions and; iii) transport of solutes, that have been measured in the LOT A2 test, and, that are expected in the near-field of a KBS-3 repository. The numerical model for the LOT A2 test is based on analytical results and on field-scale experiments. The validation of this model allows us to implement it for the thermal period of the near field of the KBS-3 repository, based on previous modelling exercises. During the operation of a KBS-3 repository (after deposition of the copper canisters), the unsaturated bentonite will be submitted to a relatively high thermal gradient, induced by the radioactive decay of the spent nuclear fuel. On the other hand, the saturated host rock will provide aqueous solution to the unsaturated bentonite, induced by differential hydraulic pressures, under specific thermal and mechanic conditions. In this context, the bentonite will gradually become fully water saturated. Experimental results indicate that during the saturation period, the transport of solutes in the bentonite buffer will be influenced by water uptake from the surrounding host rock towards the wetting front, and also by a cyclic evaporation/condensation process, induced by the thermal gradient. Our numerical models take into account the transport of solutes and geochemical reactions under nonisothermal

  2. Implementation of Depuration for Model Quality Assessment of Gold Ribeirão Water, Araraquara-SP

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    Daniel Jadyr Leite Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models used to simulate the quality and the process of self-purification of water bodies are important tools to aid the management of water resources. The main objective of this paper was to apply a mathematical model (QUAL-UFMG to evaluate the water quality of the stream “ribeirão do Ouro", Araraquara (SP. Based on the profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO and of the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5,20 obtained along the longitudinal section of the river, it was possible to determine the areas of self-purification and to verify compliance with the standards of water quality established by Resolution CONAMA 357/2005. The model and the obtained results will be able to support managers and researchers in the prevention, control and studies related to pollution of this water body.

  3. Effective and robust approach for fluorescence molecular tomography based on CoSaMP and SP3 model

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    Xiaowei He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT allows the detection and quantification of various biological processes in small animals in vivo, which expands the horizons of pre-clinical research and drug development. Efficient three-dimensional (3D reconstruction algorithm is the key to accurate localization and quantification of fluorescent target in FMT. In this paper, 3D reconstruction of FMT is regarded as a sparse signal recovery problem and the compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP algorithm is adopted to obtain greedy recovery of fluorescent signals. Moreover, to reduce the modeling error, the simplified spherical harmonics approximation to the radiative transfer equation (RTE, more specifically SP3, is utilized to describe light propagation in biological tissues. The performance of the proposed reconstruction method is thoroughly evaluated by simulations on a 3D digital mouse model by comparing it with three representative greedy methods including orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP, stagewise OMP(StOMP, and regularized OMP (ROMP. The CoSaMP combined with SP3 shows an improvement in reconstruction accuracy and exhibits distinct advantages over the comparative algorithms in multiple targets resolving. Stability analysis suggests that CoSaMP is robust to noise and performs stably with reduction of measurements. The feasibility and reconstruction accuracy of the proposed method are further validated by phantom experimental data.

  4. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. Geotechnical Applications of the Self Potential (SP) Method. Report 4. Numerical Modeling of SP Anomalies: Documentation of Program SPPC and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Vicksburg, MS Fitterman, D. V., and Corwin, R. F. 1982. "Inversion of Self Potential Data from the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field , Mexico ," Geophysics, Vol...reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Geophysics Subsurface fluid flow Seepage Self potential )9 ABSTRACT (Continue...homogeneous halfspace. A field example is also shown where SP data collected near a leaky dam site is used to locate the zone of leakage. The

  5. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economistís model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  6. The Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Roman; Johansen, Søren; Rahbek, Anders

    We introduce the Qualitative Expectations Hypothesis (QEH) as a new approach to modeling macroeconomic and financial outcomes. Building on John Muth's seminal insight underpinning the Rational Expectations Hypothesis (REH), QEH represents the market's forecasts to be consistent with the predictions...... of an economist's model. However, by assuming that outcomes lie within stochastic intervals, QEH, unlike REH, recognizes the ambiguity faced by an economist and market participants alike. Moreover, QEH leaves the model open to ambiguity by not specifying a mechanism determining specific values that outcomes take...

  7. Generation of a statistical shape model with probabilistic point correspondences and the expectation maximization- iterative closest point algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, Heike; Pennec, Xavier; Ayache, Nicholas; Ehrhardt, Jan; Handels, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    Identification of point correspondences between shapes is required for statistical analysis of organ shapes differences. Since manual identification of landmarks is not a feasible option in 3D, several methods were developed to automatically find one-to-one correspondences on shape surfaces. For unstructured point sets, however, one-to-one correspondences do not exist but correspondence probabilities can be determined. A method was developed to compute a statistical shape model based on shapes which are represented by unstructured point sets with arbitrary point numbers. A fundamental problem when computing statistical shape models is the determination of correspondences between the points of the shape observations of the training data set. In the absence of landmarks, exact correspondences can only be determined between continuous surfaces, not between unstructured point sets. To overcome this problem, we introduce correspondence probabilities instead of exact correspondences. The correspondence probabilities are found by aligning the observation shapes with the affine expectation maximization-iterative closest points (EM-ICP) registration algorithm. In a second step, the correspondence probabilities are used as input to compute a mean shape (represented once again by an unstructured point set). Both steps are unified in a single optimization criterion which depe nds on the two parameters 'registration transformation' and 'mean shape'. In a last step, a variability model which best represents the variability in the training data set is computed. Experiments on synthetic data sets and in vivo brain structure data sets (MRI) are then designed to evaluate the performance of our algorithm. The new method was applied to brain MRI data sets, and the estimated point correspondences were compared to a statistical shape model built on exact correspondences. Based on established measures of ''generalization ability'' and ''specificity'', the estimates were very satisfactory

  8. A hybrid expectation maximisation and MCMC sampling algorithm to implement Bayesian mixture model based genomic prediction and QTL mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Bowman, Phil J; Goddard, Michael E; Hayes, Ben J

    2016-09-21

    Bayesian mixture models in which the effects of SNP are assumed to come from normal distributions with different variances are attractive for simultaneous genomic prediction and QTL mapping. These models are usually implemented with Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling, which requires long compute times with large genomic data sets. Here, we present an efficient approach (termed HyB_BR), which is a hybrid of an Expectation-Maximisation algorithm, followed by a limited number of MCMC without the requirement for burn-in. To test prediction accuracy from HyB_BR, dairy cattle and human disease trait data were used. In the dairy cattle data, there were four quantitative traits (milk volume, protein kg, fat% in milk and fertility) measured in 16,214 cattle from two breeds genotyped for 632,002 SNPs. Validation of genomic predictions was in a subset of cattle either from the reference set or in animals from a third breeds that were not in the reference set. In all cases, HyB_BR gave almost identical accuracies to Bayesian mixture models implemented with full MCMC, however computational time was reduced by up to 1/17 of that required by full MCMC. The SNPs with high posterior probability of a non-zero effect were also very similar between full MCMC and HyB_BR, with several known genes affecting milk production in this category, as well as some novel genes. HyB_BR was also applied to seven human diseases with 4890 individuals genotyped for around 300 K SNPs in a case/control design, from the Welcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). In this data set, the results demonstrated again that HyB_BR performed as well as Bayesian mixture models with full MCMC for genomic predictions and genetic architecture inference while reducing the computational time from 45 h with full MCMC to 3 h with HyB_BR. The results for quantitative traits in cattle and disease in humans demonstrate that HyB_BR can perform equally well as Bayesian mixture models implemented with full MCMC in

  9. Environmental interactions and the SP-100 power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Civil Space Technology Initiative High-Capacity-Power Environmental Interactions Program has made great progress in defining and evaluating the interactions of the SP-100 power system with its expected ambient environments. The NASCAP/LEO and POLAR computer codes demonstrated that local electric fields at the user interface module are high. Therefore, particular attention must be paid to geometries and materials in this region to prevent arcing at conductor-insulator junctions in low Earth orbit. NASCAP/LEO and EPSAT computer models revealed that SP-100 payloads float about 100 V negative of the LEO plasma. In addition, ground tests and modeling done for the Space Station Freedom Electrical Grounding Tiger Team found that dielectric coatings often break down at such voltages in a plasma. Thus, surface coatings for SP-100 payloads should be carefully selected. Sputtering may also be a concern for long-duration missions in LEO at these voltages. Much work has been done on a sputtering model to evaluate surface material loss rates on SP-100 payloads. In ground plasma chamber tests of cables and cable insulators at SP-100 voltages, parasitic power losses due to the plasma current collected from possible pinholes or coating defects were quantified and shown to be small. Modeling revealed that the power loss from currents to other surfaces is also small. The atomic oxygen durability of SP-100 materials and coatings continues to be investigated in ground tests. In the upcoming Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM-3) Shuttle flight experiment, a host of SP-100 materials will be evaluated for atomic oxygen durability in LEO. Finally, an evaluation of the interactions of the SP-100 power system with lunar and planetary environments has started. At a workshop on chemical and electrical interactions on Mars recently held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, many of primary interactions were identified

  10. PENERAPAN MODEL ARBITRAGE PRICING THEORY DENGAN PENDEKATAN VECTOR AUTOREGRESSION DALAM MENGESTIMASI EXPECTED RETURN SAHAM (Studi Kasus: Saham-Saham Kompas100 Periode 2010-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIAN RISKA AYUNING TYAS

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT is an alternative model to estimate the price of securities based of arbitrage concept. In APT, the returns of securities are affected by several factors. This research is aimed to estimate the expected returns of securities using APT model and Vector Autoregressive model. There are ten stocks incorporated in Kompas100 index and four macroeconomic variables, these are inflation, exchange rates, the amountof circulate money (JUB, and theinterest rateof Bank Indonesia(SBI are applied in this research. The first step in using VAR is to test the stationary of the data using colerogram and the results indicate that all data are stationary. The second step is to select the optimal lag based on the smallest value of AIC. The Granger causality test shows that the LPKR stock is affected by the inflation and the exchange rate while the nine other stocks do not show the existence of the expected causality. The results of causality test are then estimated by the VAR models in order to obtain expected returnof macroeconomic factors. The expected return of macroeconomic factors obtained is used in the APT model, then the expected return stock LPKR is calculated. It shows that the expected return of LPKR is 3,340%

  11. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity.

  12. Involvement of Interleukin-10 in the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Sanyinjiao (SP6 Acupuncture in a Mouse Model of Peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Duarte da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the anti-inflammatory effect of manual acupuncture at the Sanyinjiao or Spleen 6 (SP6 point on carrageenan-induced peritonitis in mice and investigated mechanisms that may underlie this effect. In the first set of experiments, male Swiss mice were allocated into five groups: the control (sterile saline, dexamethasone (DEXA, invasive sham-acupuncture (non-acupoint, SP6 acupuncture and carrageenan-treated groups. Ten minutes after needle retention or 30 min after DEXA treatment, mice received an intraperitoneal injection of carrageenan (750 μg/mouse. After 4 h, total leukocyte and differential cell counts (neutrophils and mononuclear, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, vascular permeability and cytokine levels were evaluated. In another set of experiments, adrenalectomized (ADX mice were used to study the involvement of the adrenal gland on the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. Mice were allocated into two groups: the ADX and sham-operated animals (Sham ADX that were subdivided into four subgroups each: the control (sterile saline, DEXA, SP6 acupuncture and carrageenan-treated groups. The SP6 and DEXA treatments inhibited the inflammatory cell infiltration, vascular permeability and MPO activity in carrageenan-injected mice. In addition, the SP6 treatment also increased interleukin (IL-10 levels. In contrast, when the animals were adrenalectomized, the SP6 treatment failed to reduce total leukocyte and the plasma extravasation. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrates the anti-inflammatory effect of SP6 acupuncture in a model of carrageenan-induced peritonitis. Our results demonstrated that SP6 acupuncture depends of the adrenal glands and increased IL-10 levels to produce its anti-inflammatory action.

  13. A nonparametric random coefficient approach for life expectancy growth using a hierarchical mixture likelihood model with application to regional data from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhning, Dankmar; Karasek, Sarah; Terschüren, Claudia; Annuß, Rolf; Fehr, Rainer

    2013-03-09

    Life expectancy is of increasing prime interest for a variety of reasons. In many countries, life expectancy is growing linearly, without any indication of reaching a limit. The state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) in Germany with its 54 districts is considered here where the above mentioned growth in life expectancy is occurring as well. However, there is also empirical evidence that life expectancy is not growing linearly at the same level for different regions. To explore this situation further a likelihood-based cluster analysis is suggested and performed. The modelling uses a nonparametric mixture approach for the latent random effect. Maximum likelihood estimates are determined by means of the EM algorithm and the number of components in the mixture model are found on the basis of the Bayesian Information Criterion. Regions are classified into the mixture components (clusters) using the maximum posterior allocation rule. For the data analyzed here, 7 components are found with a spatial concentration of lower life expectancy levels in a centre of NRW, formerly an enormous conglomerate of heavy industry, still the most densely populated area with Gelsenkirchen having the lowest level of life expectancy growth for both genders. The paper offers some explanations for this fact including demographic and socio-economic sources. This case study shows that life expectancy growth is widely linear, but it might occur on different levels.

  14. Vacuum expectation values of Higgs scalars in a SU(2)/sub L/ X SU(2)/sub R/ X U(1) gauge model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazoe, T.; Mainland, G.B.; Tanaka, K.

    1978-01-01

    The vacuum expectation values of the Higgs scalars are determined within the framework of a six quark SU(2)/sub L/ x SU(2)/sub R/ x U(1) gauge model after the imposition of discrete symmetrics that are necessary in order to express the Cabibbo angle in terms of quark mass ratios and phases of the vacuum expectation values. Both real and complex solutions are found for the vacuum expectation values depending on the relative values of the parameters in the Higgs potential

  15. Using sparse polynomial chaos expansions for the global sensitivity analysis of groundwater lifetime expectancy in a multi-layered hydrogeological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, G.; Konakli, K.; Sudret, B.; Kerrou, J.; Perrochet, P.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2016-01-01

    The study makes use of polynomial chaos expansions to compute Sobol' indices within the frame of a global sensitivity analysis of hydro-dispersive parameters in a simplified vertical cross-section of a segment of the subsurface of the Paris Basin. Applying conservative ranges, the uncertainty in 78 input variables is propagated upon the mean lifetime expectancy of water molecules departing from a specific location within a highly confining layer situated in the middle of the model domain. Lifetime expectancy is a hydrogeological performance measure pertinent to safety analysis with respect to subsurface contaminants, such as radionuclides. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the variability in the mean lifetime expectancy can be sufficiently explained by the uncertainty in the petrofacies, i.e. the sets of porosity and hydraulic conductivity, of only a few layers of the model. The obtained results provide guidance regarding the uncertainty modeling in future investigations employing detailed numerical models of the subsurface of the Paris Basin. Moreover, the study demonstrates the high efficiency of sparse polynomial chaos expansions in computing Sobol' indices for high-dimensional models. - Highlights: • Global sensitivity analysis of a 2D 15-layer groundwater flow model is conducted. • A high-dimensional random input comprising 78 parameters is considered. • The variability in the mean lifetime expectancy for the central layer is examined. • Sparse polynomial chaos expansions are used to compute Sobol' sensitivity indices. • The petrofacies of a few layers can sufficiently explain the response variance.

  16. Identification of a quinone dehydrogenase from a Bacillus sp. involved in the decolourization of the lignin-model dye, Azure B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandounas, Luaine; Pinkse, Martijn; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2013-01-25

    In this study we have investigated the molecular background of the previously reported dye decolourization potential of Bacillus sp. LD003. Strain LD003 was previously isolated on Kraft lignin and was able to decolourize various lignin model dyes. Specifically Azure B (AB) was decolourized efficiently. Proteins possibly involved in AB decolourization were partially purified, fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified via mass spectrometry. Five candidate enzymes were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli. Of these, only a quinone dehydrogenase was shown to decolourize AB. Thus, this quinone dehydrogenase was identified as an AB decolourizing enzyme of Bacillus sp. LD003. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Holert, Johannes

    2013-01-15

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds.

  18. Identification of a quinone dehydrogenase from a Bacillus sp. involved in the decolourization of the lignin-model dye, Azure B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandounas, L.; Pinkse, M.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the molecular background of the previously reported dye decolourization potential of Bacillus sp. LD003. Strain LD003 was previously isolated on Kraft lignin and was able to decolourize various lignin model dyes. Specifically Azure B (AB) was decolourized

  19. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations are generated with different degrees of certainty. Given distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations of each context, as obtained with the probe-tone paradigm, this certainty can be quantified in terms of Shannon entropy. Because expectations arise from...... statistical learning, causing comparatively sharper key profiles in musicians, we hypothesised that musical learning can be modelled as a process of entropy reduction through experience. Specifically, implicit learning of statistical regularities allows reduction in the relative entropy (i.e. symmetrised...... Kullback-Leibler or Jensen-Shannon Divergence) between listeners’ prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions of a musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians were revisited. In Experiments 1-2 participants...

  20. Models for S&P500 Dynamics: Evidence from Realized Volatility, Daily Returns, and Option Prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Jacobs, Kris; Mimouni, Karim

    Most recent empirical option valuation studies build on the affine square root (SQR) stochastic volatility model. The SQR model is a convenient choice, because it yields closed-form solutions for option prices. However, relatively little is known about the resulting biases. We investigate...... diffusion for variance which we refer to as the VAR model. This model captures the stylized facts in realized volatilities, it performs well in fitting various samples of index returns, and it has the lowest option implied volatility mean squared errors in- and out-of-sample....

  1. Expectation-Maximization-Maximization: A Feasible MLE Algorithm for the Three-Parameter Logistic Model Based on a Mixture Modeling Reformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chanjin; Meng, Xiangbin; Guo, Shaoyang; Liu, Zhengguang

    2017-01-01

    Stable maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of item parameters in 3PLM with a modest sample size remains a challenge. The current study presents a mixture-modeling approach to 3PLM based on which a feasible Expectation-Maximization-Maximization (EMM) MLE algorithm is proposed. The simulation study indicates that EMM is comparable to the Bayesian EM in terms of bias and RMSE. EMM also produces smaller standard errors (SEs) than MMLE/EM. In order to further demonstrate the feasibility, the method has also been applied to two real-world data sets. The point estimates in EMM are close to those from the commercial programs, BILOG-MG and flexMIRT, but the SEs are smaller.

  2. Expectation-Maximization-Maximization: A Feasible MLE Algorithm for the Three-Parameter Logistic Model Based on a Mixture Modeling Reformulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjin Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable maximum likelihood estimation (MLE of item parameters in 3PLM with a modest sample size remains a challenge. The current study presents a mixture-modeling approach to 3PLM based on which a feasible Expectation-Maximization-Maximization (EMM MLE algorithm is proposed. The simulation study indicates that EMM is comparable to the Bayesian EM in terms of bias and RMSE. EMM also produces smaller standard errors (SEs than MMLE/EM. In order to further demonstrate the feasibility, the method has also been applied to two real-world data sets. The point estimates in EMM are close to those from the commercial programs, BILOG-MG and flexMIRT, but the SEs are smaller.

  3. Investigation of market efficiency and Financial Stability between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange: Monthly and yearly Forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns using ARMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, Mohammad Mahdi; Nassir Zadeh, Farzaneh

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the presence and changes in, long memory features in the returns and volatility dynamics of S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. Recently, multifractal analysis has been evolved as an important way to explain the complexity of financial markets which can hardly be described by linear methods of efficient market theory. In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. The random walk hypothesis is evaluated against alternatives accommodating either unifractality or multifractality. Several studies find that the return volatility of stocks tends to exhibit long-range dependence, heavy tails, and clustering. Because stochastic processes with self-similarity possess long-range dependence and heavy tails, it has been suggested that self-similar processes be employed to capture these characteristics in return volatility modeling. The present study applies monthly and yearly forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns in S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. The statistical analysis of S&P 500 shows that the ARMA model for S&P 500 outperforms the London stock exchange and it is capable for predicting medium or long horizons using real known values. The statistical analysis in London Stock Exchange shows that the ARMA model for monthly stock returns outperforms the yearly. ​A comparison between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange shows that both markets are efficient and have Financial Stability during periods of boom and bust.

  4. Pengaruh Beta Saham Terhadap Expected Return Dengan Model Capital Asset Pricing Pada Perusahaan Publik Di Bursa Efek Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Nasser, Etty M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to obtain empirical evidence of whether market beta has a significant influence on the expected return. This research examines 30 manufacturing companies listed in Jakarta Stock Exchange during 2001-2005 period. Data are mostly secondary data, obtained from Indonesian Capita! Market Directory and annual reports of the companies from 'Pusat Referensi Pasar Modal Indonesia' in Jakarta Stock Exchange. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is multipl...

  5. PENGARUH BETA SAHAM TERHADAP EXPECTED RETURN DENGAN MODEL CAPITAL ASSET PRICING PADA PERUSAHAAN PUBLIK DI BURSA EFEK JAKARTA

    OpenAIRE

    Etty M. Nasser

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research is to obtain empirical evidence of whether market beta has a significant influence on the expected return. This research examines 30 manufacturing companies listed in Jakarta Stock Exchange during 2001-2005 period. Data are mostly secondary data, obtained from Indonesian Capita! Market Directory and annual reports of the companies from 'Pusat Referensi Pasar Modal Indonesia' in Jakarta Stock Exchange. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is multipl...

  6. A comparison of Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) model with Haber's Rule to describe effects of exposure time on toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vibha; Yu, Qiming J.; Connell, Des W.

    2015-01-01

    The Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) Model (LC 50  = [ln(NLE) – ln(LT 50 )]/d) has been proposed as an alternative to Haber's Rule. The model is based on a linear relationship between LC 50 (Lethal Exposure Concentration) and lnLT 50 (Lethal Exposure Time) and uses NLE (Normal Life Expectancy) as a limiting point as well as a long term data point (where d is a constant). The purposes of this paper were to compare the RLE Model with Haber's Rule with available toxicity data and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. When LT 50 is relatively short and LC 50 is high, Haber's Rule is consistent with the RLE model. But the difference between the two was evident in the situation when LT 50 is relatively long and LC 50 is low where the RLE model is a marked departure from Haber's Rule. The RLE Model can be used to appropriately evaluate long term effects of exposure. - Highlights: • The strength and weakness of Haber's Rule in relation to the RLE model is needed. • Haber's Rule now used universally is quite inappropriate for environmental toxicity. • Normal life expectancy, a new parameter l is used to evaluate effects of exposure time on toxicity. • According to RLE model when LC 50 approaches zero, then LT 50  = Normal Life Expectancy. • The RLE model can be used to evaluate long term effects of exposure-accurately and easily. - The RLE approach is a more appropriate alternative particularly to evaluate long term effects of exposure. It can be easily used to estimate long term effects of exposure

  7. A systems biology approach to reconcile metabolic network models with application to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Fallah-Mehrabadi, Jalil; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Zahiri, Javad; Javad Niroomand, Mohammad; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-07-19

    Production of biofuels has been one of the promising efforts in biotechnology in the past few decades. The perspective of these efforts can be reduction of increasing demands for fossil fuels and consequently reducing environmental pollution. Nonetheless, most previous approaches did not succeed in obviating many big challenges in this way. In recent years systems biology with the help of microorganisms has been trying to overcome these challenges. Unicellular cyanobacteria are widespread phototrophic microorganisms that have capabilities such as consuming solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth and thus can be a suitable chassis for the production of valuable organic materials such as biofuels. For the ultimate use of metabolic potential of cyanobacteria, it is necessary to understand the reactions that are taking place inside the metabolic network of these microorganisms. In this study, we developed a Java tool to reconstruct an integrated metabolic network of a cyanobacterium (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803). We merged three existing reconstructed metabolic networks of this microorganism. Then, after modeling for biofuel production, the results from flux balance analysis (FBA) disclosed an increased yield in biofuel production for ethanol, isobutanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and propanol. The numbers of blocked reactions were also decreased for 2-methyl-1-butanol production. In addition, coverage of the metabolic network in terms of the number of metabolites and reactions was increased in the new obtained model.

  8. Pyrolysis mechanism of microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. based on model compounds and their interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Tang, Xiaohan; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis experiments were conducted by model compounds of algal components. • Interaction affected little bio-crude yield of model compounds co-pyrolysis. • Some interaction pathways between microalgae components were recommended. • N-heterocyclic compounds were further pyrolysis products of Maillard reaction products. • Surfactant synthesis (lipid-amino acids and lipid-glucose) between algal components. - Abstract: Pyrolysis is one of important pathways to convert microalgae to liquid biofuels and key components of microalgae have different chemical composition and structure, which provides a barrier for large-scale microalgae-based liquid biofuel application. Microalgae component pyrolysis mechanism should be researched to optimal pyrolysis process parameters. In this study, single pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of microalgal components (model compounds castor oil, soybean protein and glucose) were conducted to reveal interaction between them by thermogrametric analysis and bio-crude evaluation. Castor oil (model compound of lipid) has higher pyrolysis temperature than other model compounds and has the maximum contribution to bio-crude formation. Bio-crude from soybean protein has higher N-heterocyclic compounds as well as phenols, which could be important aromatic hydrocarbon source during biorefineries and alternative aviation biofuel production. Potential interaction pathways based on model compounds are recommended including further decomposition of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) and surfactant synthesis, which indicate that glucose played an important role on pyrolysis of microalgal protein and lipid components. The results should provide necessary information for microalgae pyrolysis process optimization and large-scale pyrolysis reactor design.

  9. Reputation and Rational Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Torben; Risager, Ole

    1987-01-01

    The paper considers the importance of reputation in relation to disinflationary policies in a continuous time ration expectations model, where the private sector has incomplete information about the true preferences of the government. It is proved that there is a unique equilibrium with the important property that the costs of disinflation arise in the start of the game where the policy has not yet gained credibility. Published in connection with a visit at the IIES.

  10. Metabolic Rhythms of the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp ATCC 51142 Correlate with Modeled Dynamics of Circadian Clock

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červený, Jan; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 24 (2009), s. 295-303 ISSN 0748-7304 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/1284 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : circadian clock * cyanobacteria * model * photosynthesis * respiration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.418, year: 2009

  11. 76 FR 36390 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747SP Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... power control modules (PCM). This proposed AD was prompted by a report of a rudder hard-over event on a... rudder PCM manifold, which could result in a hard-over of the rudder surface leading to an increase in... of a Model 747-400 series airplane of a lower rudder hard-over event caused by a lower rudder PCM...

  12. Model for analyzing growth kinetics of a slowly growing Mycobacterium sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.S.; Carriere, J.F.; Collins, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a simple method for quantifying viable mycobacteria and for determining generation time. We used statistical models and computer analysis of growth curves generated for the slowly growing mycobacterium Mycobacterium paratuberculosis under controlled conditions to derive a mathematical formula relating the dependent variable, growth, to the independent variables, log10 number of organisms in the inoculum (inoculum size) and incubation time. Growth was measured by a radiometric method which detects 14 CO 2 release during metabolism of a 14 C-labeled substrate. The radiometric method allowed for early detection of growth and detected as few as three viable bacteria. The coefficient of variation between culture vials inoculated with the same number of M. paratuberculosis was 0.083. Radiometric measurements were highly correlated to spectrophotometric and plate count methods for measuring growth (r = 0.962 and 0.992, respectively). The proportion of the total variability explained by the model in a goodness of fit test was 0.9994. Application of the model to broth cultures provided accurate estimates of the number of M. paratuberculosis (standard error = 0.21, log10 scale) and the growth rate (coefficient of variation, 0.03). Generation time was observed to be dependent upon the number of organisms in the inoculum. The model accurately described all phases of growth of M. paratuberculosis and can likely be applied to other slowly growing microorganisms

  13. Replicability and models of priming: What a resource computation framework can tell us about expectations of replicability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesario, J.; Jonas, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue that whether or not a replication attempt is informative is dependent on the accuracy of one's underlying model to explain the effect, as it is the explanatory model that enumerates the contingencies necessary for producing the effect. If the model is incorrect, then a

  14. Phenomenological Hamiltonian of Sp(2,R) model for heavy deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.I.; Asherova, R.M.; Filippov, G.F.; Smirnov, Yu.F.; Zajtsev, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the frame of the symplectic collective model, operating with the microscopical basic functions of irraducible representation of SU(3) groups the energy spectrum of collective excitation in 164 Kr nucleus is calculated. Also the aOsolute and relative values of probabilities E2-transitions between collective states are obtained. The indexes of SU(3) symmetry are chosen in correspondence with rules of Nillsson orbital occupation

  15. Heterokont predator Develorapax marinus gen. et sp. nov. – a model of the ochrophyte ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Aleoshin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic lineages of Heterokonta (or stramenopiles, in contrast to a single monophyletic group of autotrophs, Ochrophyta, form several clades that independently branch off the heterokont stem lineage. The nearest neighbors of Ochrophyta in the phylogenetic tree appear to be almost exclusively bacterivorous, whereas the hypothesis of plastid acquisition by the ancestors of the ochrophyte lineage suggests an ability to engulf eukaryotic alga. In line with this hypothesis, the heteretrophic predator at the base of the ochrophyte lineage may be regarded as a model for the ochrophyte ancestor. Here we present a new genus and species of marine free-living heterotrophic heterokont Develorapax marinus, which falls into an isolated heterokont cluster, along with the marine flagellate Developayella elegans, and is able to engulf eukaryotic cells. Together with environmental sequences D. marinus and D. elegans form a class-level clade Developea nom. nov. represented by species adapted to different environmental conditions and with a wide geographical distribution. The position of Developea among Heterokonta in large-scale phylogenetic tree is discussed. We propose that members of the Developea clade represent a model for transition from bacterivory to a predatory feeding mode by selection for larger prey. Presumably, such transition in the grazing strategy is possible in the presence of bacterial biofilms, and has likely occured in the ochrophyte ancestor.

  16. Aiptasia sp. larvae as a model to reveal mechanisms of symbiont selection in cnidarians

    KAUST Repository

    Wolfowicz, Iliona

    2016-09-01

    Symbiosis, defined as the persistent association between two distinct species, is an evolutionary and ecologically critical phenomenon facilitating survival of both partners in diverse habitats. The biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems depends on a functional symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the highly diverse genus Symbiodinium, which reside in coral host cells and continuously support their nutrition. The mechanisms underlying symbiont selection to establish a stable endosymbiosis in non-symbiotic juvenile corals are unclear. Here we show for the first time that symbiont selection patterns for larvae of two Acropora coral species and the model anemone Aiptasia are similar under controlled conditions. We find that Aiptasia larvae distinguish between compatible and incompatible symbionts during uptake into the gastric cavity and phagocytosis. Using RNA-Seq, we identify a set of candidate genes potentially involved in symbiosis establishment. Together, our data complement existing molecular resources to mechanistically dissect symbiont phagocytosis in cnidarians under controlled conditions, thereby strengthening the role of Aiptasia larvae as a powerful model for cnidarian endosymbiosis establishment.

  17. Candidatus Sodalis melophagi sp. nov.: phylogenetically independent comparative model to the tsetse fly symbiont Sodalis glossinidius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Chrudimský

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Sodalis live in symbiosis with various groups of insects. The best known member of this group, a secondary symbiont of tsetse flies Sodalis glossinidius, has become one of the most important models in investigating establishment and evolution of insect-bacteria symbiosis. It represents a bacterium in the early/intermediate state of the transition towards symbiosis, which allows for exploring such interesting topics as: usage of secretory systems for entering the host cell, tempo of the genome modification, and metabolic interaction with a coexisting primary symbiont. In this study, we describe a new Sodalis species which could provide a useful comparative model to the tsetse symbiont. It lives in association with Melophagus ovinus, an insect related to tsetse flies, and resembles S. glossinidius in several important traits. Similar to S. glossinidius, it cohabits the host with another symbiotic bacterium, the bacteriome-harbored primary symbiont of the genus Arsenophonus. As a typical secondary symbiont, Candidatus Sodalis melophagi infects various host tissues, including bacteriome. We provide basic morphological and molecular characteristics of the symbiont and show that these traits also correspond to the early/intermediate state of the evolution towards symbiosis. Particularly, we demonstrate the ability of the bacterium to live in insect cell culture as well as in cell-free medium. We also provide basic characteristics of type three secretion system and using three reference sequences (16 S rDNA, groEL and spaPQR region we show that the bacterium branched within the genus Sodalis, but originated independently of the two previously described symbionts of hippoboscoids. We propose the name Candidatus Sodalis melophagi for this new bacterium.

  18. Candidatus Sodalis melophagi sp. nov.: phylogenetically independent comparative model to the tsetse fly symbiont Sodalis glossinidius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrudimský, Tomáš; Husník, Filip; Nováková, Eva; Hypša, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Sodalis live in symbiosis with various groups of insects. The best known member of this group, a secondary symbiont of tsetse flies Sodalis glossinidius, has become one of the most important models in investigating establishment and evolution of insect-bacteria symbiosis. It represents a bacterium in the early/intermediate state of the transition towards symbiosis, which allows for exploring such interesting topics as: usage of secretory systems for entering the host cell, tempo of the genome modification, and metabolic interaction with a coexisting primary symbiont. In this study, we describe a new Sodalis species which could provide a useful comparative model to the tsetse symbiont. It lives in association with Melophagus ovinus, an insect related to tsetse flies, and resembles S. glossinidius in several important traits. Similar to S. glossinidius, it cohabits the host with another symbiotic bacterium, the bacteriome-harbored primary symbiont of the genus Arsenophonus. As a typical secondary symbiont, Candidatus Sodalis melophagi infects various host tissues, including bacteriome. We provide basic morphological and molecular characteristics of the symbiont and show that these traits also correspond to the early/intermediate state of the evolution towards symbiosis. Particularly, we demonstrate the ability of the bacterium to live in insect cell culture as well as in cell-free medium. We also provide basic characteristics of type three secretion system and using three reference sequences (16 S rDNA, groEL and spaPQR region) we show that the bacterium branched within the genus Sodalis, but originated independently of the two previously described symbionts of hippoboscoids. We propose the name Candidatus Sodalis melophagi for this new bacterium.

  19. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations have long been quantified using expectedness ratings. Motivated by statistical learning and sharper key profiles in musicians, we model musical learning as a process of reducing the relative entropy between listeners' prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions...... of a given musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians are revisited. Exp. 1-2 used jazz, classical and hymn melodies. Exp. 3-5 collected ratings before and after exposure to 5, 15 or 400 novel melodies generated from...... a finite-state grammar using the Bohlen-Pierce scale. We find group differences in entropy corresponding to degree and relevance of musical training and within-participant decreases after short-term exposure. Thus, whereas inexperienced listeners make high-entropy predictions by default, statistical...

  20. Performance of the Angstrom-Prescott Model (A-P) and SVM and ANN techniques to estimate daily global solar irradiation in Botucatu/SP/Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maurício Bruno Prado; Francisco Escobedo, João; Juliana Rossi, Taiza; dos Santos, Cícero Manoel; da Silva, Sílvia Helena Modenese Gorla

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the comparative study of different methods for estimating daily global solar irradiation (H): Angstrom-Prescott (A-P) model and two Machine Learning techniques (ML) - Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The H database was measured from 1996 to 2011 in Botucatu/SP/Brazil. Different combinations of input variables were adopted. MBE, RMSE, d Willmott, r and r2 statistical indicators obtained in the validation of A-P and SVM and ANN models showed that: SVM technique has better performance in estimating H than A-P and ANN models. A-P model has better performance in estimating H than ANN.

  1. A new semi-supervised learning model combined with Cox and SP-AFT models in cancer survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hua; Li, Zi-Na; Meng, De-Yu; Xia, Liang-Yong; Liang, Yong

    2017-10-12

    Gene selection is an attractive and important task in cancer survival analysis. Most existing supervised learning methods can only use the labeled biological data, while the censored data (weakly labeled data) far more than the labeled data are ignored in model building. Trying to utilize such information in the censored data, a semi-supervised learning framework (Cox-AFT model) combined with Cox proportional hazard (Cox) and accelerated failure time (AFT) model was used in cancer research, which has better performance than the single Cox or AFT model. This method, however, is easily affected by noise. To alleviate this problem, in this paper we combine the Cox-AFT model with self-paced learning (SPL) method to more effectively employ the information in the censored data in a self-learning way. SPL is a kind of reliable and stable learning mechanism, which is recently proposed for simulating the human learning process to help the AFT model automatically identify and include samples of high confidence into training, minimizing interference from high noise. Utilizing the SPL method produces two direct advantages: (1) The utilization of censored data is further promoted; (2) the noise delivered to the model is greatly decreased. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model compared to the traditional Cox-AFT model.

  2. Robust estimation of the expected survival probabilities from high-dimensional Cox models with biomarker-by-treatment interactions in randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Ternès

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thanks to the advances in genomics and targeted treatments, more and more prediction models based on biomarkers are being developed to predict potential benefit from treatments in a randomized clinical trial. Despite the methodological framework for the development and validation of prediction models in a high-dimensional setting is getting more and more established, no clear guidance exists yet on how to estimate expected survival probabilities in a penalized model with biomarker-by-treatment interactions. Methods Based on a parsimonious biomarker selection in a penalized high-dimensional Cox model (lasso or adaptive lasso, we propose a unified framework to: estimate internally the predictive accuracy metrics of the developed model (using double cross-validation; estimate the individual survival probabilities at a given timepoint; construct confidence intervals thereof (analytical or bootstrap; and visualize them graphically (pointwise or smoothed with spline. We compared these strategies through a simulation study covering scenarios with or without biomarker effects. We applied the strategies to a large randomized phase III clinical trial that evaluated the effect of adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy in 1574 early breast cancer patients, for which the expression of 462 genes was measured. Results In our simulations, penalized regression models using the adaptive lasso estimated the survival probability of new patients with low bias and standard error; bootstrapped confidence intervals had empirical coverage probability close to the nominal level across very different scenarios. The double cross-validation performed on the training data set closely mimicked the predictive accuracy of the selected models in external validation data. We also propose a useful visual representation of the expected survival probabilities using splines. In the breast cancer trial, the adaptive lasso penalty selected a prediction model with 4

  3. Use of ecological niche modeling as a tool for predicting the potential distribution of Microcystis sp (cyanobacteria in the Aguamilpa Dam, Nayarit, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Martinez-Meyer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ecological niche modeling is an important tool to evaluate the spatial distribution of terrestrial species, however, its applicability has been little explored in the aquatic environment. Microcystis sp., a species of cyanobacteria, is widely recognized for its ability to produce a group of toxins known as microcystins, which can cause death of animals as fish, birds and mammals depending on the amount of toxin absorbed. Like any taxonomic group, cyanobacteria has environmental thresholds, therefore, a suitable ecological niche will define their distribution. This study was conducted in Aguamilpa Hydroelectric Reservoir, an artificial ecosystem that started operations in 1994. In this system we evaluated the potential distribution of Microcystis sp., by generating a prediction model based on the concept of ecological niche MAXENT, using a Digital Elevation Model in cells of 100 m x 100 m (1 ha spatial resolution and monitoring eleven physicochemical and biological variables and nutrients in water. The distribution maps were developed using ArcMap 9.2®. The results indicated that Microcystis sp., is distributed mainly in the upper tributary basin (Huaynamota basin during the dry season. There was less chance to find cyanobacteria in the entire system during the cold dry season, while during the warm dry season cyanobacteria was recognized at the confluence of two rivers. During the rainfall season there were no reports of cyanobacteria presence. This species is often associated with arising trophic processes of anthropogenic origin; therefore, attention is required in specific areas that have been identified in this work to improve Aguamilpa’s watershed management and restoration. It was also recognized the importance of phosphorus and nitrogen interaction, which determines the distribution of Microcystis sp., in the Aguamilpa Reservoir. The results of this study demonstrated that ecological niche modeling was a suitable tool to assess the

  4. On-line detection of apnea/hypopnea events using SpO2 signal: a rule-based approach employing binary classifier models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koley, Bijoy Laxmi; Dey, Debangshu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an online method for automatic detection of apnea/hypopnea events, with the help of oxygen saturation (SpO2) signal, measured at fingertip by Bluetooth nocturnal pulse oximeter. Event detection is performed by identifying abnormal data segments from the recorded SpO2 signal, employing a binary classifier model based on a support vector machine (SVM). Thereafter the abnormal segment is further analyzed to detect different states within the segment, i.e., steady, desaturation, and resaturation, with the help of another SVM-based binary ensemble classifier model. Finally, a heuristically obtained rule-based system is used to identify the apnea/hypopnea events from the time-sequenced decisions of these classifier models. In the developmental phase, a set of 34 time domain-based features was extracted from the segmented SpO2 signal using an overlapped windowing technique. Later, an optimal set of features was selected on the basis of recursive feature elimination technique. A total of 34 subjects were included in the study. The results show average event detection accuracies of 96.7% and 93.8% for the offline and the online tests, respectively. The proposed system provides direct estimation of the apnea/hypopnea index with the help of a relatively inexpensive and widely available pulse oximeter. Moreover, the system can be monitored and accessed by physicians through LAN/WAN/Internet and can be extended to deploy in Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones.

  5. The determinants of the growth expectations of the early-stage entrepreneurs (TEA using the ordinal logistic model (OLM: the case of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Özçam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses the Ordinal Logistic Model (OLM to analyze the determinants of the growth expectations of total early-stage entrepreneurship activity (TEA expressed in terms of new jobs to be created within their firms in four categories. Specifically, given the increasing importance of entrepreneurship in job creation, innovation and economic growth, we try to inquire into the question of why some of the new entrepreneurs and not the others expect a rapid development of their ventures. The data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM for the years 2006-2008 for Turkey were employed. Our findings indicate that the personal characteristics of the early-stage Turkish entrepreneurs such as gender, education and household income, in addition to their motivation and current size of their businesses are important factors in resolving the prevalence of high-expectation new firms. Moreover, some scenarios particular to some sub-groups or population cells of Turkish developing entrepreneurs which may create the bulk of high-expectation entrepreneurial pursuit were conducted using OLM. As far as the policy implications are concerned, the availability and access of capital funding to early-stage entrepreneurs and an education system more relevant to today’s competitive world might both contribute better to Turkish economy’s prosperity, and seems to be very important for policy considerations.

  6. Modeling Brand Extension as a Real Option: How Expectation, Competition and Financial Constraints Drive the Timing of Extensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H. Pattikawa

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDespite their strategic importance firm’s motivations to extend brands have received only modest attentions by marketing scholars. We use multiple events duration models to examine the timing of launching brand extensions. We provide a theoretical framework of brand extensions based on

  7. Modeling the effects of multicontextual physics instruction on learner expectations and understanding of force and motion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deese Becht, Sara-Maria Francis

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold involving both practical and theoretical modeling components. The practical component, an experiential-learning phase, investigated a study population for effects that increasing levels of multicontextual physics activities have on student understanding of Newtonian systems of motion. This contextual-learning model measured learner convictions and non-response gaps and analyzed learner response trends on context, technology, challenge, growth, and success. The theoretical component, a model-building phase, designed a dynamic-knowing model for learning along a range of experiential tasks, from low to high context, monitored for indicators of learning in science and mathematics: learner academic performance and ability, learner control and academic attitude, and a learner non- response gap. This knowing model characterized a learner's process-of-knowing on a less to more expert- like learner-response continuum using performance and perspective indices associated with level of contextual- imagery referent system. Data for the contextual-learning model were collected on 180 secondary subjects: 72 middle and 108 high, with 36 physics subjects as local experts. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups differing only on context level of force and motion activities. Three levels of information were presented through context-based tasks: momentum constancy as inertia, momentum change as impulse, and momentum rate of change as force. The statistical analysis used a multi-level factorial design with repeated measures and discriminate analysis of response-conviction items. Subject grouping criteria included school level, ability level in science and mathematics, gender and race. Assessment criteria used pre/post performance scores, confidence level in physics concepts held, and attitude towards science, mathematics, and technology. Learner indices were computed from logit- transforms applied to learner outcomes

  8. Testing for Expected Return and Market Price of Risk in Chinese A-B Share Market: A Geometric Brownian Motion and Multivariate GARCH Model Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    There exist dual-listed stocks which are issued by the same company in some stock markets. Although these stocks bare the same firm-specific risk and enjoy identical dividends and voting policies, they are priced differently. Some previous studies show this seeming deviation from the law of one...... stock markets. Models with dynamic of Geometric Brownian Motion are adopted, multivariate GARCH models are also introduced to capture the feature of time-varying volatility in stock returns. The results suggest that the different pric- ing can be explained by the difference in expected returns between...

  9. EREM: Parameter Estimation and Ancestral Reconstruction by Expectation-Maximization Algorithm for a Probabilistic Model of Genomic Binary Characters Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Carmel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary binary characters are features of species or genes, indicating the absence (value zero or presence (value one of some property. Examples include eukaryotic gene architecture (the presence or absence of an intron in a particular locus, gene content, and morphological characters. In many studies, the acquisition of such binary characters is assumed to represent a rare evolutionary event, and consequently, their evolution is analyzed using various flavors of parsimony. However, when gain and loss of the character are not rare enough, a probabilistic analysis becomes essential. Here, we present a comprehensive probabilistic model to describe the evolution of binary characters on a bifurcating phylogenetic tree. A fast software tool, EREM, is provided, using maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of the model and to reconstruct ancestral states (presence and absence in internal nodes and events (gain and loss events along branches.

  10. EREM: Parameter Estimation and Ancestral Reconstruction by Expectation-Maximization Algorithm for a Probabilistic Model of Genomic Binary Characters Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Liran; Wolf, Yuri I; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary binary characters are features of species or genes, indicating the absence (value zero) or presence (value one) of some property. Examples include eukaryotic gene architecture (the presence or absence of an intron in a particular locus), gene content, and morphological characters. In many studies, the acquisition of such binary characters is assumed to represent a rare evolutionary event, and consequently, their evolution is analyzed using various flavors of parsimony. However, when gain and loss of the character are not rare enough, a probabilistic analysis becomes essential. Here, we present a comprehensive probabilistic model to describe the evolution of binary characters on a bifurcating phylogenetic tree. A fast software tool, EREM, is provided, using maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of the model and to reconstruct ancestral states (presence and absence in internal nodes) and events (gain and loss events along branches).

  11. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics Theory and Expected Experimental Errors when Applied to a Scramjet Isolator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert Jeffrey; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2011-01-01

    A scramjet isolator model test apparatus is being assembled in the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The test apparatus is designed to support multiple measurement techniques for investigating the flow field in a scramjet isolator model. The test section is 1-inch high by 2-inch wide by 24-inch long and simulates a scramjet isolator with an aspect ratio of two. Unheated, dry air at a constant stagnation pressure and temperature is delivered to the isolator test section through a Mach 2.5 planar nozzle. The isolator test section is mechanically back-pressured to contain the resulting shock train within the 24-inch isolator length and supports temperature, static pressure, and high frequency pressure measurements at the wall. Additionally, nonintrusive methods including laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), spontaneous Raman scattering, particle image velocimetry, and schlieren imaging are being incorporated to measure off-wall fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of the flow field. Interchangeable glass and metallic sidewalls and optical access appendages permit making multiple measurements simultaneously. The measurements will be used to calibrate computational fluid dynamics turbulence models and characterize the back-pressured flow of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus, including the optical access appendages; the physics of the LITA method; and estimates of LITA measurement uncertainty for measurements of the speed of sound and temperature.

  12. When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, T; Harmon, L J; Shurin, J B

    2012-09-01

    Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body size and trophic position). We find that when foraging trade-offs result in food webs where all species occupy integer trophic levels, lineage diversity and trait disparity are concentrated early in the tree, consistent with the early burst model. In contrast, in food webs in which many omnivorous species feed at multiple trophic levels, high levels of turnover of species' identities and traits tend to eliminate the early burst signal. These results suggest testable predictions about how the niche structure of ecological communities may be reflected by macroevolutionary patterns. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Modelagem empírica do processo de biodegradação de efluentes protéicos por enzimas de Carica papaya sp. Empirical modeling of biodegradation process of proteic effluents by enzymes of Carica papaya sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P. M. Biazus

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi modelar empiricamente a biodegradação de efluentes protéicos por enzimas papaínas do látex de Carica papaya sp. num biorreator agitado, para facilitar a otimização do processo por metodologia de análise de superfície de resposta (RSM e aplicar em tratamento de efluentes provenientes de indústrias de processamento de carne. As análises das curvas de biodegradação mostraram que o tempo de residência para os biorreatores está entre 28 e 30 h. O modelo empírico que mais se ajustou aos dados de biodegradação sob influência dos fatores (pH e temperatura foi o de um hiperplano e a região de operação otimizada para a degradação de proteínas pelas papaínas foi aquela que apresentou os maiores valores de temperatura e menores valores de pH.The objective of this research was to model empirically the proteic effluent biodegradation by papains enzymes from Carica papaya sp. in an agitated bioreactor, to facilitate the optimization process by response surface methodology (RSM and to apply in treatment of effluents from meat processing industries. The analysis of biodegradation curves showed that bioreactors residence time is between 28 and 30 h. Hiper plane empirical model was the one that best fitted to biodegradation data under the influence factors (pH and temperature and the optimized operation zone for the protein biodegradation by papains was the one that presented the high temperature and low pH values.

  14. SP. Pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Gendre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nell'occhiello di un articolo dal titolo Il Peru dei de[Jini rosa e de/la grande pioggia si legge: "da una partenza  in aereo al «pescado»  che ti  sfamera."1 Questa parola spagnola, giustamente chiusa tra caporali, a noi pare molto interes­ sante, perche, nonostante l'apparenza, non ha nulla da spartire sotto i1 profilo se­ mantico con l'it. pescato. lnfatti, tutti i piu importanti dizionari della lingua italiana, di ieri e di oggi, etimologici e non 2, registrano  accanto a pescata,  ii lemma pescato, 3 ma lo spiegano come "quantita di pesce catturato nel corso di una battuta o di una stagione di pesca",4 mentre lo sp. pescado  indica i1 "pesce (solo nel senso di: pesGe pescato da mangiare [...]".s

  15. Evaluation of the Users’ Continuous Intention to Use PACS Based on the Expectation Confirmation Model in Teaching Hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaram Nematolahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Users’ behavioral intention to use the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS is important in the systems’ success and is an indicator of the users’ satisfaction with commitment and dependence on information systems. The present study aimed to evaluate the users’ continuous intention to use PACS based on the expectation confirmation model in educational hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Nemazee and Shahid Faghihi hospitals, Shiraz, Iran in 2014. The subjects were 50 general practitioners, residents and specialists selected through stratified random sampling. The study data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire. The content validity of the questionnaire items was confirmed by five experts in health information management. To evaluate the accuracy of relationships among the measurement models, reliability criteria, including Cronbach’s alpha and composite reliability, convergent and divergent validity were used which showed acceptable reliability and validity. The data were entered into Smart PLS software, version 3.1.9 and analyzed through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM by using Partial Least Squares (PLS approach. Results: The results showed appropriate fitness of reliability indices (Cronbach’s alpha >0.7, composite reliability >0.7, loading >0.7, validity indices (AVE >0.5, structural model (redundancy =0.395, Q2CI=0.364, f2H5=0.524, R2CI=0.687, and the total model (GoF=0.518. Moreover, all the research hypotheses, except H1 (the relationship between expectation confirmation and perceived usefulness with T-value of 1.96. Conclusion: Expectation confirmation, perceived usefulness, and satisfaction were effective in continuous intention to use PACS. Thus, these factors should be considered by designers, developers, and managers while designing and implementing information systems to guarantee their success and improve the

  16. Deriving the largest expected number of elementary particles in the standard model from the maximal compact subgroup H of the exceptional Lie group E7(-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    The maximal number of elementary particles which could be expected to be found within a modestly extended energy scale of the standard model was found using various methods to be N = 69. In particular using E-infinity theory the present Author found the exact transfinite expectation value to be =α-bar o /2≅69 where α-bar o =137.082039325 is the exact inverse fine structure constant. In the present work we show among other things how to derive the exact integer value 69 from the exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy. It is found that the relevant number is given by dim H = 69 where H is the maximal compact subspace of E 7(-5) so that N = dim H = 69 while dim E 7 = 133

  17. Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Random Effects and Unknown Initial Conditions Using the Stochastic Approximation Expectation-Maximization (SAEM) Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Lu, Zhaohua; Sherwood, Andrew; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has evidenced the increased prevalence of irregularly spaced longitudinal data in social sciences. Clearly lacking, however, are modeling tools that allow researchers to fit dynamic models to irregularly spaced data, particularly data that show nonlinearity and heterogeneity in dynamical structures. We consider the issue of fitting multivariate nonlinear differential equation models with random effects and unknown initial conditions to irregularly spaced data. A stochastic approximation expectation-maximization algorithm is proposed and its performance is evaluated using a benchmark nonlinear dynamical systems model, namely, the Van der Pol oscillator equations. The empirical utility of the proposed technique is illustrated using a set of 24-h ambulatory cardiovascular data from 168 men and women. Pertinent methodological challenges and unresolved issues are discussed.

  18. Discussing Landscape Compositional Scenarios Generated with Maximization of Non-Expected Utility Decision Models Based on Weighted Entropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pinto Casquilho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The search for hypothetical optimal solutions of landscape composition is a major issue in landscape planning and it can be outlined in a two-dimensional decision space involving economic value and landscape diversity, the latter being considered as a potential safeguard to the provision of services and externalities not accounted in the economic value. In this paper, we use decision models with different utility valuations combined with weighted entropies respectively incorporating rarity factors associated to Gini-Simpson and Shannon measures. A small example of this framework is provided and discussed for landscape compositional scenarios in the region of Nisa, Portugal. The optimal solutions relative to the different cases considered are assessed in the two-dimensional decision space using a benchmark indicator. The results indicate that the likely best combination is achieved by the solution using Shannon weighted entropy and a square root utility function, corresponding to a risk-averse behavior associated to the precautionary principle linked to safeguarding landscape diversity, anchoring for ecosystem services provision and other externalities. Further developments are suggested, mainly those relative to the hypothesis that the decision models here outlined could be used to revisit the stability-complexity debate in the field of ecological studies.

  19. Participants' Role Expectations in Genetics Research and Re-consent: Revising the Theory and Methods of Mental Models Research Relating to Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Celeste M; Shen, Lijiang; Edwards, Karen L; Bowen, Deborah J; Korngiebel, Diane M; Johnson, Catherine O

    2016-01-01

    The rise of large cohort-based health research that includes genetic components has increased the communication challenges for researchers. Controversies have been amplified over requirements for re-consent, return of results, and privacy protections, among other issues. This study extended research on the impact that the perceived role of "research participant" might have on communication expectations to illuminate research participants' preferences for re-consent. The study employed an online survey of participants in a long-standing cancer genetics registry. Results confirmed previous exploratory findings that research participants endorse multiple mental models of participant roles in research (doctor-patient, collaborator, donor, legal contract, etc.). Regression analyses indicated that high and low salience of different models of the role of research participant are related to different communication expectations. However, the pattern of relationships among roles is relevant. The results of the regression analysis also indicated that preference for mandatory re-consent and its relationship to mental models of roles are related to attitudes of trust, benefits, and informational risks. The discussion identifies implications as including the use of explicit approaches to address role relationships in communication with research participants. It also points to implications for methodological approaches in mental model research.

  20. Projected Effects of Radiation-Induced Cancers on Life Expectancy in Patients Undergoing CT Surveillance for Limited-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Kathryn P; Turan, Ekin A; Eisenberg, Jonathan; Kong, Chung Y; Barnes, Jeffrey A; Pandharipande, Pari Vijay

    2015-06-01

    Patients with limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergo frequent posttreatment surveillance CT examinations, raising concerns about the cumulative magnitude of radiation exposure. The purpose of this study was to project radiation-induced cancer risks relative to competing risks of HL and account for the differential timing of each. We adapted a previously developed Markov model to project lifetime mortality risks and life expectancy losses due to HL versus radiation-induced cancers in HL patients undergoing surveillance CT. In the base case, we modeled 35-year-old men and women undergoing seven CT examinations of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis over 5 years. Radiation-induced cancer risks and deaths for 17 organ systems were modeled using an organ-specific approach, accounting for specific anatomy exposed at CT. Cohorts of 20-, 50-, and 65-year-old men and women were evaluated in secondary analyses. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty of radiation risk projections. For 35-year-old adults, we projected 3324/100,000 (men) and 3345/100,000 (women) deaths from recurrent lymphoma and 245/100,000 (men, 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 121-369) and 317/100,000 (women, 95% UI: 202-432) radiation-induced cancer deaths. Discrepancies in life expectancy losses between HL (428 days in men, 482 days in women) and radiation-induced cancers (11.6 days in men, [95% UI: 5.7-17.5], 15.6 days in women [95% UI: 9.8-21.4]) were proportionately greater because of the delayed timing of radiation-induced cancers relative to recurrent HL. Deaths and life expectancy losses from radiation-induced cancers were highest in the youngest cohorts. Given the low rate of radiation-induced cancer deaths associated with CT surveillance, modest CT benefits would justify its use in patients with limited-stage HL.

  1. Colobopsis explodens sp. n., model species for studies on “exploding ants” (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, with biological notes and first illustrations of males of the Colobopsis cylindrica group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Laciny

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic description of all castes of Colobopsis explodens Laciny & Zettel, sp. n. from Borneo, Thailand, and Malaysia is provided, which serves as a model species for biological studies on “exploding ants” in Southeast Asia. The new species is a member of the Colobopsis cylindrica (COCY group and falls into a species complex that has been repeatedly summarized under the name Colobopsis saundersi (Emery, 1889 (formerly Camponotus saundersi. The COCY species group is known under its vernacular name “exploding ants” for a unique behaviour: during territorial combat, workers of some species sacrifice themselves by rupturing their gaster and releasing sticky and irritant contents of their hypertrophied mandibular gland reservoirs to kill or repel rivals. This study includes first illustrations and morphometric characterizations of males of the COCY group: Colobopsis explodens Laciny & Zettel, sp. n. and Colobopsis badia (Smith, 1857. Characters of male genitalia and external morphology are compared with other selected taxa of Camponotini. Preliminary notes on the biology of C. explodens Laciny & Zettel, sp. n. are provided. To fix the species identity of the closely related C. badia, a lectotype from Singapore is designated. The following taxonomic changes within the C. saundersi complex are proposed: Colobopsis solenobia (Menozzi, 1926, syn. n. and Colobopsis trieterica (Menozzi, 1926, syn. n. are synonymized with Colobopsis corallina Roger, 1863, a common endemic species of the Philippines. Colobopsis saginata Stitz, 1925, stat. n., hitherto a subspecies of C. badia, is raised to species level.

  2. Clinical evaluation of iterative reconstruction (ordered-subset expectation maximization) in dynamic positron emission tomography: quantitative effects on kinetic modeling with N-13 ammonia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens Dahlgaard; Rasmussen, R.; Freiberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the quantitative properties of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) on kinetic modeling with nitrogen 13 ammonia compared with filtered backprojection (FBP) in healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac N-13 ammonia positron...... and OSEM flow values were observed with a flow underestimation of 45% (rest/dipyridamole) in the septum and of 5% (rest) and 15% (dipyridamole) in the lateral myocardial wall. CONCLUSIONS: OSEM reconstruction of myocardial perfusion images with N-13 ammonia and PET produces high-quality images for visual...

  3. Reconstruction and in silico analysis of an Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 genome-scale metabolic model for acarbose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali eWang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 produces the -glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of its cellular metabolism, a genome-scale metabolic model of strain SE50/110, iYLW1028, was reconstructed on the bases of the genome annotation, biochemical databases, and extensive literature mining. Model iYLW1028 comprises 1028 genes, 1128 metabolites and 1219 reactions. 122 and 81 genes were essential for cell growth on acarbose synthesis and sucrose media, respectively, and the acarbose biosynthetic pathway in SE50/110 was expounded completely. Based on model predictions, the addition of arginine and histidine to the media increased acarbose production by 78% and 59%, respectively. Additionally, dissolved oxygen has a great effect on acarbose production based on model predictions. Furthermore, genes to be overexpressed for the overproduction of acarbose were identified, and the deletion of treY eliminated the formation of by-product component C. Model iYLW1028 is a useful platform for optimizing and systems metabolic engineering for acarbose production in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110.

  4. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sayedur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment.

  5. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Sayedur; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models). The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment.

  6. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the 5' flanking region of SRY causes sex reversal in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuning; Liu, Tingjun; Wang, Yong; Deng, Jichao; Chen, Mao; Yuan, Lin; Lu, Yi; Xu, Yuxin; Yao, Haobin; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2017-06-13

    Sex-determining region Y is a crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in mammals. Mutations of the Sp1-binding site in the 5' flanking region of SRY are associated with clinical male-to-female sex reversal syndrome, although such occurrences are rare and, until now, have not been reported in animal models. In this study, we mutated Sp1-binding sites in the 5' flanking region of the rabbit SRY gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As expected, the SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits had female external and internal genitalia and exhibited normal female copulatory behaviors, but they were infertile, and the adults displayed reduced follicles. Interestingly, we successfully obtained offspring from sex-reversed SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits using embryo transfer. In summary, our study demonstrates that Sp1 is a major regulator in SRY gene transcription, and mutations of the Sp1 binding sites (Sp1-B and Sp1-C) in the 5' flanking region of SRY induce sex reversal in rabbits, which can be used as targets for clinical research of male-to-female sex reversal syndrome. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sex reversal syndrome patients have the potential to become pregnant with the use of embryo transfer.

  7. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY causes sex reversal in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Deng, Jichao; Chen, Mao; Yuan, Lin; Lu, Yi; Xu, Yuxin; Yao, Haobin; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2017-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y is a crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in mammals. Mutations of the Sp1-binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY are associated with clinical male-to-female sex reversal syndrome, although such occurrences are rare and, until now, have not been reported in animal models. In this study, we mutated Sp1-binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the rabbit SRY gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As expected, the SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits had female external and internal genitalia and exhibited normal female copulatory behaviors, but they were infertile, and the adults displayed reduced follicles. Interestingly, we successfully obtained offspring from sex-reversed SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits using embryo transfer. In summary, our study demonstrates that Sp1 is a major regulator in SRY gene transcription, and mutations of the Sp1 binding sites (Sp1-B and Sp1-C) in the 5′ flanking region of SRY induce sex reversal in rabbits, which can be used as targets for clinical research of male-to-female sex reversal syndrome. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sex reversal syndrome patients have the potential to become pregnant with the use of embryo transfer. PMID:28445127

  8. Best Practice Life Expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    probability estimates of best-practice life expectancy levels or make projections about future maximum life expectancy. Comments: Our findings may be useful for policymakers and insurance/pension analysts who would like to obtain estimates and probabilities of future maximum life expectancies.......Background: Whereas the rise in human life expectancy has been extensively studied, the evolution of maximum life expectancies, i.e., the rise in best-practice life expectancy in a group of populations, has not been examined to the same extent. The linear rise in best-practice life expectancy has...... been reported previously by various authors. Though remarkable, this is simply an empirical observation. Objective: We examine best-practice life expectancy more formally by using extreme value theory. Methods: Extreme value distributions are fit to the time series (1900 to 2012) of maximum life...

  9. Comparison of rSP-C surfactant with natural and synthetic surfactants after late treatment in a rat model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Dietrich; Germann, Paul-Georg; Hauschke, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    In a previous paper we showed that an SP-C containing surfactant preparation has similar activity as bovine-derived surfactants in a rat lung lavage model of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In this study surfactant was given ten minutes after the last lavage (early treatment). In the present investigation we were interested how different surfactant preparations behave when they are administered 1 h after the last lavage (late treatment). Four protein containing surfactants (rSP-C surfactant, bLES, Infasurf and Survanta) were compared with three protein-free surfactants (ALEC, Exosurf and the phospholipid (PL) mixture of the rSP-C surfactant termed PL surfactant) with respect to their ability to improve gas exchange in this more stringent model when surfactant is given one hour after the last lavage. For better comparison of the surfactants the doses were related to phospholipids. The surfactants were given at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg−1 body weight. The surfactants were compared to an untreated control group that was only ventilated for the whole experimental period. Tracheotomized rats (8–12 per dose and surfactant) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min−1, inspiration expiration ratio of 1 : 2, peak inspiratory pressure of 28 cmH2O at positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Animals were ventilated for one hour after the last lavage and thereafter the surfactants were intratracheally instilled. During the whole experimental period the ventilation was not changed. Partial arterial oxygen pressures (PaO2, mmHg) at 30 min and 120 min after treatment were used for statistical comparison. All protein containing surfactants caused a dose-dependent increase of the reduced PaO2 values at 30 min after treatment. The protein-free surfactants showed only weak dose-dependent increase in PaO2 values at this time. This difference between the

  10. Choices and changes: Eccles' Expectancy-Value model and upper-secondary school students' longitudinal reflections about their choice of a STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkegaard, Eva; Ulriksen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    During the past 30 years, Eccles' comprehensive social-psychological Expectancy-Value Model of Motivated Behavioural Choices (EV-MBC model) has been proven suitable for studying educational choices related to Science, Technology, Engineering and/or Mathematics (STEM). The reflections of 15 students in their last year in upper-secondary school concerning their choice of tertiary education were examined using quantitative EV-MBC surveys and repeated qualitative interviews. This article presents the analyses of three cases in detail. The analytical focus was whether the factors indicated in the EV-MBC model could be used to detect significant changes in the students' educational choice processes. An important finding was that the quantitative EV-MBC surveys and the qualitative interviews gave quite different results concerning the students' considerations about the choice of tertiary education, and that significant changes in the students' reflections were not captured by the factors of the EV-MBC model. This questions the validity of the EV-MBC surveys. Moreover, the quantitative factors from the EV-MBC model did not sufficiently explain students' dynamical educational choice processes where students in parallel considered several different potential educational trajectories. We therefore call for further studies of the EV-MBC model's use in describing longitudinal choice processes and especially in investigating significant changes.

  11. A Comprehensively Curated Genome-Scale Two-Cell Model for the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 71201[CC-BY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is a nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, a fraction of the vegetative cells in each filament terminally differentiate to nongrowing heterocysts. Heterocysts are metabolically and structurally specialized to enable O2-sensitive nitrogen fixation. The functionality of the filament, as an association of vegetative cells and heterocysts, is postulated to depend on metabolic exchange of electrons, carbon, and fixed nitrogen. In this study, we compile and evaluate a comprehensive curated stoichiometric model of this two-cell system, with the objective function based on the growth of the filament under diazotrophic conditions. The predicted growth rate under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions, as well as the effect of external carbon and nitrogen sources, was thereafter verified. Furthermore, the model was utilized to comprehensively evaluate the optimality of putative metabolic exchange reactions between heterocysts and vegetative cells. The model suggested that optimal growth requires at least four exchange metabolites. Several combinations of exchange metabolites resulted in predicted growth rates that are higher than growth rates achieved by only considering exchange of metabolites previously suggested in the literature. The curated model of the metabolic network of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 enhances our ability to understand the metabolic organization of multicellular cyanobacteria and provides a platform for further study and engineering of their metabolism. PMID:27899536

  12. Draft genome sequences of six neonatal meningitis-causing escherichia coli isolates (SP-4, SP-5, SP-13, SP-16, SP-46, and SP-65)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli isolates (SP-4, SP-5, SP-13, SP-16, SP-46, and SP-65) were recovered from infants in the Netherlands from 1989 to 1997. Here, we report the draft genome sequences for these six E. coli isolates, which are currently being used to validate food safety processing te...

  13. Using SpF to Achieve Petascale for Legacy Pseudospectral Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Thomas L.; Jiang, Weiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Pseudospectral (PS) methods possess a number of characteristics (e.g., efficiency, accuracy, natural boundary conditions) that are extremely desirable for dynamo models. Unfortunately, dynamo models based upon PS methods face a number of daunting challenges, which include exposing additional parallelism, leveraging hardware accelerators, exploiting hybrid parallelism, and improving the scalability of global memory transposes. Although these issues are a concern for most models, solutions for PS methods tend to require far more pervasive changes to underlying data and control structures. Further, improvements in performance in one model are difficult to transfer to other models, resulting in significant duplication of effort across the research community. We have developed an extensible software framework for pseudospectral methods called SpF that is intended to enable extreme scalability and optimal performance. Highlevel abstractions provided by SpF unburden applications of the responsibility of managing domain decomposition and load balance while reducing the changes in code required to adapt to new computing architectures. The key design concept in SpF is that each phase of the numerical calculation is partitioned into disjoint numerical kernels that can be performed entirely inprocessor. The granularity of domain decomposition provided by SpF is only constrained by the datalocality requirements of these kernels. SpF builds on top of optimized vendor libraries for common numerical operations such as transforms, matrix solvers, etc., but can also be configured to use open source alternatives for portability. SpF includes several alternative schemes for global data redistribution and is expected to serve as an ideal testbed for further research into optimal approaches for different network architectures. In this presentation, we will describe our experience in porting legacy pseudospectral models, MoSST and DYNAMO, to use SpF as well as present preliminary

  14. Determining health expectancies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robine, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jean-Marie Robine 9 1 Increase in Life Expectancy and Concentration of Ages at Death . . . . France Mesle´ and Jacques Vallin 13 2 Compression of Morbidity...

  15. Humans expect generosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Rodríguez-Lara, Ismael; Sánchez, Angel

    2017-02-01

    Mechanisms supporting human ultra-cooperativeness are very much subject to debate. One psychological feature likely to be relevant is the formation of expectations, particularly about receiving cooperative or generous behavior from others. Without such expectations, social life will be seriously impeded and, in turn, expectations leading to satisfactory interactions can become norms and institutionalize cooperation. In this paper, we assess people’s expectations of generosity in a series of controlled experiments using the dictator game. Despite differences in respective roles, involvement in the game, degree of social distance or variation of stakes, the results are conclusive: subjects seldom predict that dictators will behave selfishly (by choosing the Nash equilibrium action, namely giving nothing). The majority of subjects expect that dictators will choose the equal split. This implies that generous behavior is not only observed in the lab, but also expected by subjects. In addition, expectations are accurate, matching closely the donations observed and showing that as a society we have a good grasp of how we interact. Finally, correlation between expectations and actual behavior suggests that expectations can be an important ingredient of generous or cooperative behavior.

  16. Predicting mortality in the intensive care unit: a comparison of the University Health Consortium expected probability of mortality and the Mortality Prediction Model III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Angela K M; Feiner, John R; Grimes, Barbara; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Quality benchmarks are increasingly being used to compare the delivery of healthcare, and may affect reimbursement in the future. The University Health Consortium (UHC) expected probability of mortality (EPM) is one such quality benchmark. Although the UHC EPM is used to compare quality across UHC members, it has not been prospectively validated in the critically ill. We aimed to define the performance characteristics of the UHC EPM in the critically ill and compare its ability to predict mortality with the Mortality Prediction Model III (MPM-III). The first 100 consecutive adult patients discharged from the hospital (including deaths) each quarter from January 1, 2009 until September 30, 2011 that had an intensive care unit (ICU) stay were included. We assessed model discrimination, calibration, and overall performance, and compared the two models using Bland-Altman plots. Eight hundred ninety-one patients were included. Both the UHC EPM and the MPM-III had excellent performance (Brier score 0.05 and 0.06, respectively). The area under the curve was good for both models (UHC 0.90, MPM-III 0.87, p = 0.28). Goodness of fit was statistically significant for both models (UHC p = 0.002, MPM-III p = 0.0003), but improved with logit transformation (UHC p = 0.41; MPM-III p = 0.07). The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement at extremes of mortality, but agreement diverged as mortality approached 50 %. The UHC EPM exhibited excellent overall performance, calibration, and discrimination, and performed similarly to the MPM-III. Correlation between the two models was poor due to divergence when mortality was maximally uncertain.

  17. Performance appraisal of expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russkikh G.A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available this article provides basic concepts for teachers to estimate and reach planned students’ expectations, describes functions and elements of expectations; nature of external and internal estimate, technology to estimate the results, gives recommendations how to create diagnostic assignments.

  18. Marijuana: College Students' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumstein, Regina

    1980-01-01

    Focused on college students' expectations about marijuana. Undergraduates (N=210) expected marijuana to have sedating effects; they largely discounted psychological consequences. Students considered marijuana to be an educational issue and favored decriminalization of the drug. Users, occasional users, and nonusers differed significantly in…

  19. Query complexity in expectation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaniewski, J.; Lee, T.; de Wolf, R.; Halldórsson, M.M.; Iwama, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Speckmann, B.

    2015-01-01

    We study the query complexity of computing a function f:{0,1}n→R+ in expectation. This requires the algorithm on input x to output a nonnegative random variable whose expectation equals f(x), using as few queries to the input x as possible. We exactly characterize both the randomized and the quantum

  20. Life Expectancy in 2040

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; DuGoff, Eva H; Wu, Albert W.

    2016-01-01

    expectancy at age 20 will increase by approximately one year per decade for females and males between now and 2040. According to the clinical experts, 70% of the improvement in life expectancy will occur in cardiovascular disease and cancer, while in the last 30 years most of the improvement has occurred...

  1. Dynamic model of a thin layer photobioreactor, used for the cultivation of the microalga Chlorella sp. and bacteria in wastewater of high organic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Gines Alfaro-Vives

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic mathematical model is presented to describe the symbiotic growth of the microalgae Chlorella sp. and bacteria in a photobioreactor thin film used in the wastewater treatment of high organic load. A good correlation is shown by the experimental results, since the variations of the process parameters (pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, concentration of dissolved carbon dioxide and substrate concentration in the culture medium were compared with the experimental results and in 95 % of cases coincide with an error of + -3%. Furthermore, the influence of the operating parameters on the performance of algae obtained is evaluated, using the model, the total net productivity per unit area was obtained with a maximum error of + -2, 5 % with respect to the experimental values.

  2. Expected utility with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendon, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1994-01-01

    An uncertain and not just risky situation may be modeled using so-called belief functions assigning lower probabilities to subsets of outcomes. In this article we extend the von Neumann-Morgenstern expected utility theory from probability measures to belief functions. We use this theory...

  3. Gompertz-Makeham Life Expectancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missov, Trifon I.; Lenart, Adam; Vaupel, James W.

    We study the Gompertz and Gompertz-Makeham mortality models. We prove that the resulting life expectancy can be expressed in terms of a hypergeometric function if the population is heterogeneous with gamma-distributed individual frailty, or an incomplete gamma function if the study population...

  4. Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships Page Content Article Body Signs of ... good about what happens when they are together. Respect You ask each other what you want to ...

  5. Extrapolative Expectations and Market Stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Vega-Redondo, Fernando

    1989-01-01

    An auctioneer model of market adjustment is proposed which, unlike the standard formulation, has prices react to extrapolated (rather than prevailing) excess demands. If expectations are sufficiently sensitive to current rates of change, every regular market equilibrium is shown to be locally stable. The model can be regarded as providing an institutional interpretation to Newton-like methods of market adjustment that, as the Newton process itself, ensure stability of every regular zero of a ...

  6. Expected years ever married

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Mogi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the second half of the 20th century, remarkable marriage changes were seen: a great proportion of never married population, high average age at first marriage, and large variance in first marriage timing. Although it is theoretically possible to separate these three elements, disentangling them analytically remains a challenge. Objective: This study's goal is to answer the following questions: Which of the three effects, nonmarriage, delayed marriage, or expansion, has the most impact on nuptiality changes? How does the most influential factor differ by time periods, birth cohorts, and countries? Methods: To quantify nuptiality changes over time, we define the measure 'expected years ever married' (EYEM. We illustrate the use of EYEM, looking at time trends in 15 countries (six countries for cohort analysis and decompose these trends into three components: scale (the changes in the proportion of never married - nonmarriage, location (the changes in timing of first marriage - delayed marriage, and variance (the changes in the standard deviation of first marriage age - expansion. We used population counts by sex, age, and marital status from national statistical offices and the United Nations database. Results: Results show that delayed marriage is the most influential factor on period EYEM's changes, while nonmarriage has recently begun to contribute to the change in North and West Europe and Canada. Period and cohort analysis complement each other. Conclusions: This study introduces a new index of nuptiality and decomposes its change into the contribution of three components: scale, location, and variance. The decomposition steps presented here offer an open possibility for more elaborate parametric marriage models.

  7. Predictive value of Sp1/Sp3/FLIP signature for prostate cancer recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roble G Bedolla

    Full Text Available Prediction of prostate cancer prognosis is challenging and predictive biomarkers of recurrence remain elusive. Although prostate specific antigen (PSA has high sensitivity (90% at a PSA level of 4.0 ng/mL, its low specificity leads to many false positive results and considerable overtreatment of patients and its performance at lower ranges is poor. Given the histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of prostate cancer, we propose that a panel of markers will be a better tool than a single marker. We tested a panel of markers composed of the anti-apoptotic protein FLIP and its transcriptional regulators Sp1 and Sp3 using prostate tissues from 64 patients with recurrent and non-recurrent cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy as primary treatment for prostate cancer and were followed with PSA measurements for at least 5 years. Immunohistochemical staining for Sp1, Sp3, and FLIP was performed on these tissues and scored based on the proportion and intensity of staining. The predictive value of the FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 signature for clinical outcome (recurrence vs. non-recurrence was explored with logistic regression, and combinations of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 and Gleason score were analyzed with a stepwise (backward and forward logistic model. The discrimination of the markers was identified by sensitivity-specificity analysis and the diagnostic value of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 was determined using area under the curve (AUC for receiver operator characteristic curves. The AUCs for FLIP, Sp1, Sp3, and Gleason score for predicting PSA failure and non-failure were 0.71, 0.66, 0.68, and 0.76, respectively. However, this increased to 0.93 when combined. Thus, the "biomarker signature" of FLIP/Sp1/Sp3 combined with Gleason score predicted disease recurrence and stratified patients who are likely to benefit from more aggressive treatment.

  8. Política monetaria en el modelo con expectativas, curva de Phillips: práctica de ordenador Política monetària en el model amb expectatives, corba de Philipps: pràctica d'ordinador Monetary Policy in the Expectations Model, Phillips Curve: A Computer Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Hromcová

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recomendamos un ejercicio numérico que permite a los estudiantes observar la dinámica de un simple modelo, compuesto por la curva de Phillips, ley de Okun y demanda agregada, ante variaciones en la política monetaria. El ejercicio tiene como objetivo enseñar a los estudiantes la importancia de la manera en la que se forman las expectativas y la (nocredibilidad del banco central para el cumplimiento de los objetivos de la política monetaria.Monetary Policy in the Expectations Model, Phillips Curve: A Computer Practice

  9. Utilization of Anabaena sp. in CO{sub 2} removal processes. Modelling of biomass, exopolysaccharides productivities and CO{sub 2} fixation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Fernandez, J.F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, C.V.; Acien Fernandez, F.G.; Fernandez Sevilla, J.M.; Molina Grima, E. [Almeria Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-05-15

    This paper focuses on modelling the growth rate and exopolysaccharides production of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047, to be used in carbon dioxide removal and biofuels production. For this, the influence of dilution rate, irradiance and aeration rate on the biomass and exopolysaccharides productivity, as well as on the CO{sub 2} fixation rate, have been studied. The productivity of the cultures was maximum at the highest irradiance and dilution rate assayed, resulting to 0.5 g{sub bio} l{sup -1} day{sup -1} and 0.2 g{sub eps} l{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the CO{sub 2} fixation rate measured was 1.0 gCO{sub 2} l{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The results showed that although Anabaena sp. was partially photo-inhibited at irradiances higher than 1,300 {mu}E m-2 s{sup -1}, its growth rate increases hyperbolically with the average irradiance inside the culture, and so does the specific exopolysaccharides production rate. The latter, on the other hand, decreases under high external irradiances, indicating that the exopolysaccharides metabolism hindered by photo-damage. Mathematical models that consider these phenomena have been proposed. Regarding aeration, the yield of the cultures decreased at rates over 0.5 v/v/min or when shear rates were higher than 60 s{sup -1}, demonstrating the existence of thus existence of stress damage by aeration. The behaviour of the cultures has been verified outdoors in a pilot-scale airlift tubular photobioreactor. From this study it is concluded that Anabaena sp. is highly recommended to transform CO{sub 2} into valuable products as has been proved capable of metabolizing carbon dioxide at rates of 1.2 gCO{sub 2} l{sup -1} day{sup -1} outdoors. The adequacy of the proposed equations is demonstrated, resulting to a useful tool in the design and operation of photobioreactors using this strain. (orig.)

  10. Expected Improvements in the Quantitative Remote Sensing of Optically Complex Waters with the Use of an Optically Fast Hyperspectral Spectrometer—A Modeling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley J. Moses

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using simulated data, we investigated the effect of noise in a spaceborne hyperspectral sensor on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of at-sensor radiances and the consequent uncertainties in retrieved water quality parameters. Specifically, we investigated the improvement expected as the F-number of the sensor is changed from 3.5, which is the smallest among existing operational spaceborne hyperspectral sensors, to 1.0, which is foreseeable in the near future. With the change in F-number, the uncertainties in the atmospherically corrected reflectance decreased by more than 90% across the visible-near-infrared spectrum, the number of pixels with negative reflectance (caused by over-correction decreased to almost one-third, and the uncertainties in the retrieved water quality parameters decreased by more than 50% and up to 92%. The analysis was based on the sensor model of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO but using a 30-m spatial resolution instead of HICO’s 96 m. Atmospheric correction was performed using Tafkaa. Water quality parameters were retrieved using a numerical method and a semi-analytical algorithm. The results emphasize the effect of sensor noise on water quality parameter retrieval and the need for sensors with high Signal-to-Noise Ratio for quantitative remote sensing of optically complex waters.

  11. Alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA plays a role in ethanol tolerance in model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rebeca

    2017-04-01

    The protein AdhA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has been previously reported to show alcohol dehydrogenase activity towards ethanol and both NAD and NADP. This protein is currently being used in genetically modified strains of Synechocystis capable of synthesizing ethanol showing the highest ethanol productivities. In the present work, mutant strains of Synechocystis lacking AdhA have been constructed and tested for tolerance to ethanol. The lack of AdhA in the wild-type strain reduces survival to externally added ethanol at lethal concentration of 4% (v/v). On the other hand, the lack of AdhA in an ethanologenic strain diminishes tolerance of cells to internally produced ethanol. It is also shown that light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG) of the wild-type strain is impaired in the mutant strain lacking AdhA (∆adhA strain). Photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and photoheterotrophic growth are not affected in the mutant strain. Based on phenotypic characterization of ∆adhA mutants, the possible physiological function of AdhA in Synechocystis is discussed.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  13. Examining the relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, positive smoking outcome expectancies, and cigarette smoking in people with substance use disorders: a multiple mediator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Bryce; Bernier, Jennifer; Kenner, Frank; Kenne, Deric R; Boros, Alec P; Richardson, Christopher J; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is highly prevalent in people with substance use disorders (SUDs) and is associated with significant physical health problems. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is also highly associated with both SUDs and cigarette smoking and may serve as a barrier to smoking cessation efforts. In addition, people with PTSD are more likely to hold positive smoking outcome expectancies (i.e., beliefs that smoking cigarettes results in positive outcomes); these beliefs may contribute to cigarette smoking in people with SUDs experiencing PTSD symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between PTSD symptoms and typical daily cigarette smoking/cigarette dependence symptoms in a sample of 227 trauma-exposed current smokers with SUDs (59.9% male, 89.4% Caucasian) seeking detoxification treatment services. Additionally, the indirect effects of multiple types of positive smoking outcome expectancies on these relationships were examined. Participants completed questionnaires assessing PTSD symptoms, positive smoking outcome expectancies, cigarette consumption, and cigarette dependence symptoms. Results indicated that PTSD symptoms were not directly related to cigarette consumption or cigarette dependence symptoms. However, negative affect reduction outcome expectancies were shown to have a significant indirect effect between PTSD symptoms and cigarette consumption, while negative affect reduction, boredom reduction, and taste-sensorimotor manipulation outcome expectancies were all found to have significant indirect effects between PTSD symptoms and cigarette dependence symptoms. The indirect effect involving negative affect reduction outcome expectancies was statistically larger than that of taste sensorimotor manipulation outcome expectancies, while negative affect reduction and boredom reduction outcome expectancies were comparable in magnitude. These results suggest that expectancies that smoking can manage negative affective experiences are related to

  14. Performance expectation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.E.

    1998-09-04

    This document outlines the significant accomplishments of fiscal year 1998 for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team. Opportunities for improvement to better meet some performance expectations have been identified. The PHMC has performed at an excellent level in administration of leadership, planning, and technical direction. The contractor has met and made notable improvement of attaining customer satisfaction in mission execution. This document includes the team`s recommendation that the PHMC TWRS Performance Expectation Plan evaluation rating for fiscal year 1998 be an Excellent.

  15. SP (4,R) symmetry in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    A classification of nuclear states according to the noncompact sympletic Lie algebras sp(2n,R), n = 1, 2, 3, is investigated. Such a classification has recently been shown to be physically meaningful. This classification scheme is the appropriate generalization fo Elliott's SU 3 model of rotational states in deformed light nuclei to include core excitations. A restricted classification according to the Lie algebra, sp(4,R), is motivated. Truncation of the model space to a single sp(4,R) irreducible representation allows the inclusion of states possessing very high excitation energy. An sp(4,R) model study is performed on S = T = 0 positive-parity rotational bands in the deformed light nuclei 16 O and 24 Mg. States are included in the model space that possess up to 10h ω in excitation energy. Results for the B(E2) transition rates compare favorable with experiment, without resort to effective charges

  16. Expected Term Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buraschi, Andrea; Piatti, Ilaria; Whelan, Paul

    This paper studies the properties of bond risk premia in the cross-section of subjective expectations. We exploit an extensive dataset of yield curve forecasts from financial institutions and document a number of novel findings. First, contrary to evidence presented for stock markets but consiste...... of heterogeneous beliefs is taken into account....

  17. Great Expectations. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kelley

    Based on Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand the differences between totalitarianism and democracy; and a that a writer of a story considers theme, plot, characters, setting, and point of view. The main activity of the lesson involves students working in groups to…

  18. Parenting with High Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timperlake, Benna Hull; Sanders, Genelle Timperlake

    2014-01-01

    In some ways raising deaf or hard of hearing children is no different than raising hearing children; expectations must be established and periodically tweaked. Benna Hull Timperlake, who with husband Roger, raised two hearing children in addition to their deaf daughter, Genelle Timperlake Sanders, and Genelle, now a deaf professional, share their…

  19. Homology modeling and docking studies of a Δ9-fatty acid desaturase from a Cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Garba

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases perform oxygenated desaturation reactions to insert double bonds within fatty acyl chains in regioselective and stereoselective manners. The Δ9-fatty acid desaturase strictly creates the first double bond between C9 and 10 positions of most saturated substrates. As the three-dimensional structures of the bacterial membrane fatty acid desaturases are not available, relevant information about the enzymes are derived from their amino acid sequences, site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping in similar membrane-bound desaturases. The cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8 was found to produce high amount of monounsaturated fatty acids at low temperature. Subsequently, an active Δ9-fatty acid desaturase was isolated and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper we report homology modeling and docking studies of a Δ9-fatty acid desaturase from a Cold-tolerant Pseudomonas sp. AMS8 for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Three dimensional structure of the enzyme was built using MODELLER version 9.18 using a suitable template. The protein model contained the three conserved-histidine residues typical for all membrane-bound desaturase catalytic activity. The structure was subjected to energy minimization and checked for correctness using Ramachandran plots and ERRAT, which showed a good quality model of 91.6 and 65.0%, respectively. The protein model was used to preform MD simulation and docking of palmitic acid using CHARMM36 force field in GROMACS Version 5 and Autodock tool Version 4.2, respectively. The docking simulation with the lowest binding energy, −6.8 kcal/mol had a number of residues in close contact with the docked palmitic acid namely, Ile26, Tyr95, Val179, Gly180, Pro64, Glu203, His34, His206, His71, Arg182, Thr85, Lys98 and His177. Interestingly, among the binding residues are His34, His71 and His206 from the first, second, and third conserved histidine motif, respectively

  20. Metastable neural dynamics mediates expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucato, Luca; La Camera, Giancarlo; Fontanini, Alfredo

    Sensory stimuli are processed faster when their presentation is expected compared to when they come as a surprise. We previously showed that, in multiple single-unit recordings from alert rat gustatory cortex, taste stimuli can be decoded faster from neural activity if preceded by a stimulus-predicting cue. However, the specific computational process mediating this anticipatory neural activity is unknown. Here, we propose a biologically plausible model based on a recurrent network of spiking neurons with clustered architecture. In the absence of stimulation, the model neural activity unfolds through sequences of metastable states, each state being a population vector of firing rates. We modeled taste stimuli and cue (the same for all stimuli) as two inputs targeting subsets of excitatory neurons. As observed in experiment, stimuli evoked specific state sequences, characterized in terms of `coding states', i.e., states occurring significantly more often for a particular stimulus. When stimulus presentation is preceded by a cue, coding states show a faster and more reliable onset, and expected stimuli can be decoded more quickly than unexpected ones. This anticipatory effect is unrelated to changes of firing rates in stimulus-selective neurons and is absent in homogeneous balanced networks, suggesting that a clustered organization is necessary to mediate the expectation of relevant events. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism for speeding up sensory coding in cortical circuits. NIDCD K25-DC013557 (LM); NIDCD R01-DC010389 (AF); NSF IIS-1161852 (GL).

  1. Chinese students' great expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative to...... system, they think of themselves as having a role in the transformation of Chinese attitudes to education and parent-child relations.......The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative...

  2. Life expectancy and education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Strulik, Holger

    2017-01-01

    This paper exploits the unexpected decline in the death rate from cardiovascular diseases since the 1970s as a large positive health shock that affected predominantly old-age mortality; i.e. the fourth stage of the epidemiological transition. Using a difference-in-differences estimation strategy......, we find that US states with higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease prior to the 1970s experienced greater increases in adult life expectancy and higher education enrollment. Our estimates suggest that a one-standard deviation higher treatment intensity is associated with an increase...... in adult life expectancy of 0.37 years and 0.07–0.15 more years of higher education....

  3. A cultural and social cognitive model of differences in acculturation orientations, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol-related risk behaviors among Hispanic college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Schwartz, Seth J; Zamboanga, Byron L; Ham, Lindsay S; Huang, Shi

    2013-04-01

    The present study used a cultural and social cognitive conceptual framework to investigate whether alcohol expectancies and valuations would mediate the associations between specific acculturation orientations and alcohol-related risk behaviors. The sample comprised 1,527 Hispanic students attending colleges and universities in diverse regions of the United States. Respondents completed self-report measures of Hispanic and American cultural practices; alcohol expectancies and valuations; and self-reported frequency of hazardous alcohol use, binge drinking, sexual activity under the influence of alcohol, driving under the influence of alcohol, and riding with a drunk driver. Latent class analysis was used to classify participants into acculturation orientations. Results indicated that acculturation orientations were differentially associated with alcohol-related risk outcomes, with separated bicultural and low bicultural orientations inversely related to all of the alcohol-related risk behaviors except for riding with a drunk driver. Negative expectancy valuations were positively associated with endorsement of binge drinking and drunk driving and negative expectancies were negatively associated with binge drinking, drunk driving, and riding with a drunk driver. With the exception of sexual activity under the influence of alcohol, the associations between acculturation orientations and alcohol-related risk behaviors were partially mediated by positive alcohol expectancies. Our findings provided relevant data that are informative for preventing alcohol and related risk behaviors among Hispanic college students. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Grade Expectations: Rationality and Overconfidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan R. Magnus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Confidence and overconfidence are essential aspects of human nature, but measuring (overconfidence is not easy. Our approach is to consider students' forecasts of their exam grades. Part of a student's grade expectation is based on the student's previous academic achievements; what remains can be interpreted as (overconfidence. Our results are based on a sample of about 500 second-year undergraduate students enrolled in a statistics course in Moscow. The course contains three exams and each student produces a forecast for each of the three exams. Our models allow us to estimate overconfidence quantitatively. Using these models we find that students' expectations are not rational and that most students are overconfident, in agreement with the general literature. Less obvious is that overconfidence helps: given the same academic achievement students with larger confidence obtain higher exam grades. Female students are less overconfident than male students, their forecasts are more rational, and they are also faster learners in the sense that they adjust their expectations more rapidly.

  5. Grade Expectations: Rationality and Overconfidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Jan R.; Peresetsky, Anatoly A.

    2018-01-01

    Confidence and overconfidence are essential aspects of human nature, but measuring (over)confidence is not easy. Our approach is to consider students' forecasts of their exam grades. Part of a student's grade expectation is based on the student's previous academic achievements; what remains can be interpreted as (over)confidence. Our results are based on a sample of about 500 second-year undergraduate students enrolled in a statistics course in Moscow. The course contains three exams and each student produces a forecast for each of the three exams. Our models allow us to estimate overconfidence quantitatively. Using these models we find that students' expectations are not rational and that most students are overconfident, in agreement with the general literature. Less obvious is that overconfidence helps: given the same academic achievement students with larger confidence obtain higher exam grades. Female students are less overconfident than male students, their forecasts are more rational, and they are also faster learners in the sense that they adjust their expectations more rapidly. PMID:29375449

  6. Expectation of recovery from low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Vach, Werner; Axø, Marie

    2014-01-01

    participants completed questionnaires at their first consultation due to LBP and 78% were followed for 3 months. At baseline, recovery expectations were measured on a 0-10 scale. Outcome measures were LBP intensity and Global Perceived Effect (GPE). Associations were tested in regression models......Study Design. A prospective cohort study conducted in general practice (GP) and chiropractic practice (CP).Objectives. To explore which patient characteristics were associated with recovery expectations in low back pain (LBP) patients, whether expectations predicted 3-month outcome, and to what...... extent expectations were associated with empirical prognostic factors.Summary of Background Data. Patients' recovery expectations have been associated with prognosis, but it is largely unknown why patients expect what they do, and how expectations relate to other prognostic factors.Methods. 1169...

  7. ExaSP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-08

    ExaSP2 is a reference implementation of typical linear algebra algorithms and workloads for a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) electronic structure code. The algorithm is based on a recursive second-order Fermi-Operator expansion method (SP2) and is tailored for density functional based tight-binding calculations of material systems.

  8. Using expected localization in segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemlon, Stephen; Cho, Kyugon; Dunn, Stanley M.

    1992-02-01

    Segmentation paradigms are based on manipulating some distinguishing characteristic of the various objects that are present in the image being analyzed. These characteristics are often well known for given objects in a given class of images. The intelligent use of this knowledge can simplify the segmentation process without necessarily targeting it for a particular class of images. This paper outlines a segmentation paradigm that uses models which characterize the expected presentation of possible image objects. It explains how knowledge of the expected localization of certain objects can be used to refine the segmentation process, to optimize object extraction and identification, and to learn some invariant characteristics of the objects and their surroundings, for use by high level intelligent processes. We present results of experiments with MRI human brain scans, dental radiographs, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) serial sections of hemocytes (insect blood cells).

  9. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus

  10. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  11. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  12. Probability via expectation

    CERN Document Server

    Whittle, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This book is a complete revision of the earlier work Probability which ap­ peared in 1970. While revised so radically and incorporating so much new material as to amount to a new text, it preserves both the aim and the approach of the original. That aim was stated as the provision of a 'first text in probability, de­ manding a reasonable but not extensive knowledge of mathematics, and taking the reader to what one might describe as a good intermediate level'. In doing so it attempted to break away from stereotyped applications, and consider applications of a more novel and significant character. The particular novelty of the approach was that expectation was taken as the prime concept, and the concept of expectation axiomatized rather than that of a probability measure. In the preface to the original text of 1970 (reproduced below, together with that to the Russian edition of 1982) I listed what I saw as the advantages of the approach in as unlaboured a fashion as I could. I also took the view that the text...

  13. Gender Roles and Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A. Eisenchlas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of the advent of cyber communication is that increasing numbers of people go online to ask for, obtain, and presumably act upon advice dispensed by unknown peers. Just as advice seekers may not have access to information about the identities, ideologies, and other personal characteristics of advice givers, advice givers are equally ignorant about their interlocutors except for the bits of demographic information that the latter may offer freely. In the present study, that information concerns sex. As the sex of the advice seeker may be the only, or the predominant, contextual variable at hand, it is expected that that identifier will guide advice givers in formulating their advice. The aim of this project is to investigate whether and how the sex of advice givers and receivers affects the type of advice, through the empirical analysis of a corpus of web-based Spanish language forums on personal relationship difficulties. The data revealed that, in the absence of individuating information beyond that implicit in the advice request, internalized gender expectations along the lines of agency and communality are the sources from which advice givers draw to guide their counsel. This is despite the trend in discursive practices used in formulating advice, suggesting greater language convergence across sexes.

  14. Analysis of Äspö Pillar Stability Experiment: Continuous thermo-mechanical model development and calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blaheta, Radim; Byczanski, Petr; Čermák, M.; Hrtus, Rostislav; Kohut, Roman; Kolcun, Alexej; Malík, Josef; Sysala, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2013), s. 124-135 ISSN 1674-7755 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : in situ pillar stability experiment * model calibration by back analysis * continuous mechanics * damage of granite rocks * Finite element method (FEM) Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1674775513000103

  15. Interaction of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Rhizobium phaseoli and Rhodotorula sp. in bioleaching process based on Lotka–Volterra model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuecheng Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: The relationship among microorganisms during leaching could be described appropriately by Lotka–Volterra model between the initial and peak values. The relationship of A. ferrooxidans and R. phaseoli could be considered as mutualism, whereas, the relationship of A. ferrooxidans and R. phaseoli could be considered as commensalism.

  16. Energy providers: customer expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridham, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    The deregulation of the gas and electric power industries, and how it will impact on customer service and pricing rates was discussed. This paper described the present situation, reviewed core competencies, and outlined future expectations. The bottom line is that major energy consumers are very conscious of energy costs and go to great lengths to keep them under control. At the same time, solutions proposed to reduce energy costs must benefit all classes of consumers, be they industrial, commercial, institutional or residential. Deregulation and competition at an accelerated pace is the most likely answer. This may be forced by external forces such as foreign energy providers who are eager to enter the Canadian energy market. It is also likely that the competition and convergence between gas and electricity is just the beginning, and may well be overshadowed by other deregulated industries as they determine their core competencies

  17. Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov., a novel toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-reservoir model column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ommedal, Hege; Torsvik, Terje

    2007-12-01

    A Gram-negative, sulphate-reducing bacterium (strain H3(T)) was isolated from an oil-reservoir model column. The new isolate was able to oxidize toluene coupled to hydrogen sulphide production. For growth, the optimum salt concentration was 1.5 % (w/v), the optimum pH was 7.2 and the optimum temperature was 34 degrees C. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.6-1.0 microm in diameter and 1.4-2.5 microm in length. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)omega7c and C(17 : 0) cyclo, and the cells also contained dimethylacetals. Cloning and sequencing of a 1505 bp long fragment of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain H3(T) is a member of the Deltaproteobacteria and is related closely to Desulfotignum balticum DSM 7044(T). The G+C content of the DNA was 52.0 mol% and the DNA-DNA similarity to D. balticum DSM 7044(T) was 56.1 %. Based on differences in DNA sequence and the unique property of toluene degradation, it is proposed that strain H3(T) should be designated a member of a novel species within the genus Desulfotignum, for which the name Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H3(T) (=DSM 18732(T)=ATCC BAA-1460(T)).

  18. Expectations, Bond Yields and Monetary Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Albert Lee

    2011-01-01

    expectations about inflation, output growth, and the anticipated path of monetary policy actions contain important information for explaining movements in bond yields. Estimates from a forward-looking monetary policy rule suggest that the central bank exhibits a preemptive response to inflationary expectations...... while accommodating output growth and monetary policy expectations. Forecasted GDP growth plays a significant role in explaining time variation in the market prices of risk. The sensitivity of long yields is linked to the persistence of expected inflation under the risk-neutral measure. Models...

  19. Challenges, fears and expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Urbanija

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The author deals with developmental projections in the future. In the light of the accelerated development of civilization periods, we can talk about postinformation era or at least about its characteristics which are directly related to basic questions of life and society and problems of survival concerning library and information sciences. In the frames of globalization and individualization, the users will turn from quantity of information to selective and quality ones.As to the contents, these information will be related to the basic facts of life and society and the problems of survival (globalization on one hand, while on the other, they will be more focused, more confined as to their contents and of higher quality necessary for individual performance and survival (individualization. In the background of these events, even more fears than today will be rising, related to loss of work, loss of professional identity, loss of the sense of meaning, loss of economical and social standard. From the actual situation and from the above mentioned fears expectations will arise. It will be possible to master the quantity of information with information and communication technologies and to enable access to them while human cognitive abilities will represent a bottleneck to their flow also in the future. An important field of the work of librarians in the future will be in the area of interdisciplinary connections with cognitive sciences.

  20. Expectations from ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, P.

    2008-01-01

    Prof. Patricia Fleming, centred her presentation on ethical expectations in regulating safety for future generations. The challenge is to find a just solution, one that provides for a defensible approach to inter-generational equity. The question on equity is about whether we are permitted to treat generations differently and to still meet the demands of justice. And the question must be asked regarding these differences: 'in what ways do they make a moral difference?' She asked the question regarding the exact meaning of the ethical principle 'Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that predicted impacts on the health of future generations will not be greater than relevant levels of impact that are acceptable today'. Some countries have proposed different standards for different time periods, either implicitly or explicitly. In doing so, have they preserved our standards of justice or have they abandoned them? Prof. Fleming identified six points to provide with some moral maps which might be used to negotiate our way to a just solution to the disposal of nuclear waste. (author)

  1. Expectations and speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Molly; Russell, Jamie

    2015-05-01

    Socio-indexical cues and paralinguistic information are often beneficial to speech processing as this information assists listeners in parsing the speech stream. Associations that particular populations speak in a certain speech style can, however, make it such that socio-indexical cues have a cost. In this study, native speakers of Canadian English who identify as Chinese Canadian and White Canadian read sentences that were presented to listeners in noise. Half of the sentences were presented with a visual-prime in the form of a photo of the speaker and half were presented in control trials with fixation crosses. Sentences produced by Chinese Canadians showed an intelligibility cost in the face-prime condition, whereas sentences produced by White Canadians did not. In an accentedness rating task, listeners rated White Canadians as less accented in the face-prime trials, but Chinese Canadians showed no such change in perceived accentedness. These results suggest a misalignment between an expected and an observed speech signal for the face-prime trials, which indicates that social information about a speaker can trigger linguistic associations that come with processing benefits and costs.

  2. Stakeholder expectation and satisfaction in road maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, M.; Hartmann, Andreas; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the process of stakeholder satisfaction is a prerequisite for successful stakeholder management. The expectancy disconfirmation model describes the process of stakeholder satisfaction by relating customers’ satisfaction with a product or service to discrepancy between the perceived

  3. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Yang, Mingkun; Chen, Zhuo; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yi, Xingling; Li, Chongyang; He, Chenliu; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ge, Feng

    2015-02-06

    Cyanobacteria are the oldest known life form inhabiting Earth and the only prokaryotes capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium used extensively in research on photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Posttranslational protein modification by lysine acetylation plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; however, its extent and function in cyanobacteria remain unexplored. Herein, we performed a global acetylome analysis on Synechocystis through peptide prefractionation, antibody enrichment, and high accuracy LC-MS/MS analysis; identified 776 acetylation sites on 513 acetylated proteins; and functionally categorized them into an interaction map showing their involvement in various biological processes. Consistent with previous reports, a large fraction of the acetylation sites are present on proteins involved in cellular metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, many proteins involved in photosynthesis, including the subunits of phycocyanin (CpcA, CpcB, CpcC, and CpcG) and allophycocyanin (ApcA, ApcB, ApcD, ApcE, and ApcF), were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation may play regulatory roles in the photosynthesis process. Six identified acetylated proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon metabolism were further validated by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our data provide the first global survey of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and reveal previously unappreciated roles of lysine acetylation in the regulation of photosynthesis. The provided data set may serve as an important resource for the functional analysis of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and facilitate the elucidation of the entire metabolic networks and photosynthesis process in this model cyanobacterium.

  4. Partnership between painters and sculptors in 17th-century Spain: on model drawings by Francisco Rizi for an altarpiece of the Expectant Virgin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamas-Delgado, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a case study of the collaboration between sculptors and painters in the context of the construction of altarpieces in 17th-century Spain. It analyses a drawing by Francisco Rizi (Madrid, 1614-Escorial, 1685 in the British Museum depicting a sculptural group and fragments of an architectural framework, and relates it to two other drawings by the same artist in the National Library of Spain. They are identified as fragments of the design drawing of the former altarpiece of the Expectant Virgin in the church of the Calced Trinitarians in Madrid.

  5. Assessing the Efficacy of First-Aid Measures in Physalia sp. Envenomation, Using Solution- and Blood Agarose-Based Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie L. Wilcox

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Stings from the hydrozoan species in the genus Physalia cause intense, immediate skin pain and elicit serious systemic effects. There has been much scientific debate about the most appropriate first aid for these stings, particularly with regard to whether vinegar use is appropriate (most current recommendations recommend against vinegar. We found that only a small percentage (≤1.0% of tentacle cnidae discharge during a sting event using an ex vivo tissue model which elicits spontaneous stinging from live cnidarian tentacles. We then tested a variety of rinse solutions on both Atlantic and Pacific Physalia species to determine if they elicit cnidae discharge, further investigating any that did not cause immediate significant discharge to determine if they are able to inhibit cnidae discharge in response to chemical and physical stimuli. We found commercially available vinegars, as well as the recently developed Sting No More® Spray, were the most effective rinse solutions, as they irreversibly inhibited cnidae discharge. However, even slight dilution of vinegar reduced its protective effects. Alcohols and folk remedies, such as urine, baking soda and shaving cream, caused varying amounts of immediate cnidae discharge and failed to inhibit further discharge, and thus likely worsen stings.

  6. Assessing the Efficacy of First-Aid Measures in Physalia sp. Envenomation, Using Solution- and Blood Agarose-Based Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Christie L.; Headlam, Jasmine L.; Doyle, Thomas K.; Yanagihara, Angel A.

    2017-01-01

    Stings from the hydrozoan species in the genus Physalia cause intense, immediate skin pain and elicit serious systemic effects. There has been much scientific debate about the most appropriate first aid for these stings, particularly with regard to whether vinegar use is appropriate (most current recommendations recommend against vinegar). We found that only a small percentage (≤1.0%) of tentacle cnidae discharge during a sting event using an ex vivo tissue model which elicits spontaneous stinging from live cnidarian tentacles. We then tested a variety of rinse solutions on both Atlantic and Pacific Physalia species to determine if they elicit cnidae discharge, further investigating any that did not cause immediate significant discharge to determine if they are able to inhibit cnidae discharge in response to chemical and physical stimuli. We found commercially available vinegars, as well as the recently developed Sting No More® Spray, were the most effective rinse solutions, as they irreversibly inhibited cnidae discharge. However, even slight dilution of vinegar reduced its protective effects. Alcohols and folk remedies, such as urine, baking soda and shaving cream, caused varying amounts of immediate cnidae discharge and failed to inhibit further discharge, and thus likely worsen stings. PMID:28445412

  7. Fuzzy SP-irresolute functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, fuzzy SP-irresolute, fuzzy SP-irresolute open and fuzzy SP-irresolute closed functions between fuzzy topological spaces in Sostak sense are defined. Their properties and the relationships between these functions and other functions introduced previously are investigated. Next fuzzy SP-connectedness is introduced and studied with the help of r-fuzzy strongly preopen sets

  8. Expectations from Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, A.

    2008-01-01

    Prof. A. Blowers observed that the social context within which radioactive waste management is considered has evolved over time. The early period where radioactive waste was a non-issue was succeeded by a period of intense conflict over solutions. The contemporary context is more consensual, in which solutions are sought that are both technically sound and socially acceptable. Among the major issues is that of inter-generational equity embraced in the question: how long can or should our responsibility to the future extend? He pointed out the differences in timescales. On the one hand, geo-scientific timescales are very long term, emphasizing the issue of how far into the future it is possible to make predictions about repository safety. By contrast, socio cultural timescales are much shorter, focusing on the foreseeable future of one or two generations and raising the issue of how far into the future we should be concerned. He listed. the primary expectations from society which are: safety and security to alleviate undue burdens to future generations and flexibility in order to enable the future generations to have a stake in decision making. The need to reconcile the two had led to a contemporary emphasis on phased geological disposal incorporating retrievability. However, the long timescales for implementation of disposal provided for sufficient flexibility without the need for retrievability. Future generations would inevitably have sold stake in decision making. Prof. A.. Blowers pointed out that society is also concerned with participation in decision making for implementation. The key elements for success are: openness and transparency, staged process, participation, partnership, benefits to enhance the well being of communities and a democratic framework for decision making, including the ratification of key decisions and the right for communities to withdraw from the process up to a predetermined point. This approach for decision making may also have

  9. Expected Business Conditions and Bond Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jonas Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I study the predictability of bond risk premia by means of expectations to future business conditions using survey forecasts from the Survey of Professional Forecasters. I show that expected business conditions consistently affect excess bond returns and that the inclusion...... of expected business conditions in standard predictive regressions improve forecast performance relative to models using information derived from the current term structure or macroeconomic variables. The results are confirmed in a real-time out-of-sample exercise, where the predictive accuracy of the models...

  10. Macro Expectations, Aggregate Uncertainty, and Expected Term Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Christian D.; Schmeling, Maik; Schrimpf, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Based on individual expectations from the Survey of Professional Forecasters, we construct a realtime proxy for expected term premium changes on long-term bonds. We empirically investigate the relation of these bond term premium expectations with expectations about key macroeconomic variables...... and in ation rates. Expectations about real macroeconomic variables seem to matter more than expectations about nominal factors. Additional findings on term structure factors suggest that the level and slope factor capture information related to uncertainty about real and nominal macroeconomic prospects...

  11. Macro Expectations, Aggregate Uncertainty, and Expected Term Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Christian D.; Schmeling, Maik; Schrimpf, Andreas

    Based on individual expectations from the Survey of Professional Forecasters, we construct a realtime proxy for expected term premium changes on long-term bonds. We empirically investigate the relation of these bond term premium expectations with expectations about key macroeconomic variables...... and in ation rates. Expectations about real macroeconomic variables seem to matter more than expectations about nominal factors. Additional findings on term structure factors suggest that the level and slope factor capture information related to uncertainty about real and nominal macroeconomic prospects...

  12. Expectation Consistent Approximate Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opper, Manfred; Winther, Ole

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel framework for approximations to intractable probabilistic models which is based on a free energy formulation. The approximation can be understood from replacing an average over the original intractable distribution with a tractable one. It requires two tractable probability...

  13. Social gradient in life expectancy and health expectancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Andersen, Otto; Kjøller, Mette

    2004-01-01

    Health status of a population can be evaluated by health expectancy expressed as average lifetime in various states of health. The purpose of the study was to compare health expectancy in population groups at high, medium and low educational levels.......Health status of a population can be evaluated by health expectancy expressed as average lifetime in various states of health. The purpose of the study was to compare health expectancy in population groups at high, medium and low educational levels....

  14. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Meyer-Cifuentes

    Full Text Available Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15-1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99% with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15-1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15-1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15-1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place.

  15. [Relationship between expectations regarding aging and physical activity among middle aged adults in urban areas: based on the Pender's Health Promotion Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hye; Choi, MoonKi; Lee, JuHee; Cho, Hyewon

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the level of expectations regarding aging (ERA) and identify relationship between ERA and physical activity of middle aged adults. Participants were middle aged adults who resided in the community in three cities in Korea. Data were collected using questionnaires that contained items on individual characteristic, International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ), and behavior-specific cognitive factors including ERA-12. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted to examine whether ERA would predict physical activity by controlling other factors. The mean age of the participants was 51.1±6.9 years. The mean score for ERA (possible range=0 to 100) was 40.04±14.31. More than half of the participants (62.6%) were not engaged in health promoting physical activity. Gender, employment status and exercise confidence were associated with level of physical activity (F=7.14, p<.001, R²=.36). After controlling for individual factors and behavior-specific cognitive factors, ERA was independently related to physical activity (F=7.19, p<.001, R²=.38). The results demonstrate that individuals' belief about aging has effects on physical activity in Korean middle aged adults. Thus, nursing interventions which focused on ERA could help enhance physical activity in middle aged adults.

  16. Reveromycins A and B from Streptomyces sp. 3–10: Antifungal activity against plant pathogenic fungi in vitro and in a strawberry food model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine the antifungal activity of the metabolites from Streptomyces sp. 3–10, and to purify and identify the metabolites. Meanwhile, the taxonomic status of strain 3–10 was re-evaluated. The cultural filtrates of strain 3–10 in potato dextrose broth were extract...

  17. Model prediction for ranking lead-acid batteries according to expected lifetime in renewable energy systems and autonomous power-supply systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, J.; Sauer, D.U.; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2007-01-01

    -of-discharge, the current rate, the existing acid stratification, and the time since the last full charging. The actual Ah throughput is continuously multiplied by a weight factor that represents the actual operating conditions. Even though the modelling approach is mainly heuristic, all of the effects that are taken...

  18. Prediction error variance and expected response to selection, when selection is based on the best predictor – for Gaussian and threshold characters, traits following a Poisson mixed model and survival traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Just

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider selection based on the best predictor of animal additive genetic values in Gaussian linear mixed models, threshold models, Poisson mixed models, and log normal frailty models for survival data (including models with time-dependent covariates with associated fixed or random effects. In the different models, expressions are given (when these can be found – otherwise unbiased estimates are given for prediction error variance, accuracy of selection and expected response to selection on the additive genetic scale and on the observed scale. The expressions given for non Gaussian traits are generalisations of the well-known formulas for Gaussian traits – and reflect, for Poisson mixed models and frailty models for survival data, the hierarchal structure of the models. In general the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total variance in the Gaussian part of the model (heritability on the normally distributed level of the model or a generalised version of heritability plays a central role in these formulas.

  19. LS3MIP (v1.0) Contribution to CMIP6: The Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project Aims, Setup and Expected Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Hurk, Bart; Kim, Hyungjun; Krinner, Gerhard; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Derksen, Chris; Oki, Taikan; Douville, Herve; Colin, Jeanne; Ducharne, Agnes; Cheruy, Frederique; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project (LS3MIP) is designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of land surface, snow, and soil moisture feedbacks on climate variability and climate change, and to diagnose systematic biases in the land modules of current Earth System Models (ESMs). The solid and liquid water stored at the land surface has a large influence on the regional climate, its variability and predictability, including effects on the energy, water and carbon cycles. Notably, snow and soil moisture affect surface radiation and flux partitioning properties, moisture storage and land surface memory. They both strongly affect atmospheric conditions, in particular surface air temperature and precipitation, but also large-scale circulation patterns. However, models show divergent responses and representations of these feedbacks as well as systematic biases in the underlying processes. LS3MIP will provide the means to quantify the associated uncertainties and better constrain climate change projections, which is of particular interest for highly vulnerable regions (densely populated areas, agricultural regions, the Arctic, semi-arid and other sensitive terrestrial ecosystems).The experiments are subdivided in two components, the first addressing systematic land biases in offline mode (LMIP, building upon the 3rd phase of Global Soil Wetness Project; GSWP3) and the second addressing land feedbacks attributed to soil moisture and snow in an integrated framework (LFMIP, building upon the GLACE-CMIP blueprint).

  20. CMS: Beyond all possible expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After having retraced the entire Standard Model up to the Top, the CMS collaboration is ready to go further and continue the success of what Guido Tonelli – its spokesperson – defines as a ‘magic year’. Things evolve fast at CMS, but scientists have taken up the challenge and are ready for the future.   ‘Enthusiasm’ is the word that best describes the feeling one gets when talking to Guido Tonelli. “In just a few months we have rediscovered the Standard Model and have gone even further by producing new results for cross-sections, placing new limits on the creation of heavy masses, making studies on the excited states of quarks, and seeking new resonances. We could not have expected so much such a short space of time. It’s fantastic”, he says. “We went through the learning phase very smoothly. Our detector was very quickly ready to do real physics and we were able to start to produce results almost ...

  1. Cryptosporidium sp. in lizards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, D.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (1998), s. 8 ISSN 1066-5234. [ Cryptosporidium sp. in lazards. 01.01.1998-02.01.1998, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA508/95/0273; GA AV ČR IPP2020702 Subject RIV: fp - Other Medical Disciplines

  2. Linking surfactant protein SP-D and IL-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qaseem, Asif S; Sonar, Sanchaita; Mahajan, Lakshna

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an innate immune molecule that plays a protective role against lung infection, allergy, asthma and inflammation. In vivo experiments with murine models have shown that SP-D can protect against allergic challenge via a range of mechanisms including inhibition...

  3. Developmental changes and gender effects on motivational constructs based on the expectancy-value model in Czech and United States students regarding learning of science, mathematics, and other subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun-Mi

    This study employed American and Czech student samples to investigate the motivational constructs used in Eccles and Wigfield's (1983) expectancy-value model. To predict achievement behavior, the model specifies relationships among expectancy for-success and task value, task-specific self-concept, perception of task-difficulty, perceptions of social environment, and interpretations and attributions for past events in relation to the social world. Czech and American students (n = 1,145) in grades 4--12 were the participants in this study. The causal relationships among the constructs were tested to investigate structural similarities and differences in the models for both countries. This study also explored developmental changes, gender, and national differences in the students' motivational beliefs for these motivational constructs: Expectancy for Success, Intrinsic Interest Value, Task-specific Self-concept, Perception of Task-difficulty, and Perceived Vocational Gender Dominance for science, mathematics, and other school subjects. The findings indicated that, for both countries, with respect to changes over grade level, compared to the younger students, the older students showed lower motivational beliefs for most subject areas except reading. However, the Czech students in grades 6--8 showed more positive motivational beliefs in life science and social studies than did the Czech students in other grade levels. In comparing genders, the male students exhibited more positive motivational beliefs in physical science than did the female students, and female students showed more positive motivational beliefs in reading than did the male students. For life science, the Czech female students rated Intrinsic Interest Value and Task-specific Self-concept higher than did their peer male students. The American students' motivational beliefs in reading were more positive than were Czech students', and the Czech students held more positive motivational beliefs in life

  4. Prior expectations facilitate metacognition for perceptual decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M T; Seth, A K; Barrett, A B; Kanai, R

    2015-09-01

    The influential framework of 'predictive processing' suggests that prior probabilistic expectations influence, or even constitute, perceptual contents. This notion is evidenced by the facilitation of low-level perceptual processing by expectations. However, whether expectations can facilitate high-level components of perception remains unclear. We addressed this question by considering the influence of expectations on perceptual metacognition. To isolate the effects of expectation from those of attention we used a novel factorial design: expectation was manipulated by changing the probability that a Gabor target would be presented; attention was manipulated by instructing participants to perform or ignore a concurrent visual search task. We found that, independently of attention, metacognition improved when yes/no responses were congruent with expectations of target presence/absence. Results were modeled under a novel Bayesian signal detection theoretic framework which integrates bottom-up signal propagation with top-down influences, to provide a unified description of the mechanisms underlying perceptual decision and metacognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Economic Loan Loss Provision and Expected Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hlawatsch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention of a loan loss provision is the anticipation of the loan's expected losses by adjusting the book value of the loan. Furthermore, this loan loss provision has to be compared to the expected loss according to Basel II and, in the case of a difference, liable equity has to be adjusted. This however assumes that the loan loss provision and the expected loss are based on a similar economic rationale, which is only valid conditionally in current loan loss provisioning methods according to IFRS. Therefore, differences between loan loss provisions and expected losses should only result from different approaches regarding the parameter estimation within each model and not due to different assumptions regarding the outcome of the model. The provisioning and accounting model developed in this paper overcomes the before-mentioned shortcomings and is consistent with an economic rationale of expected losses. Additionally, this model is based on a close-to-market valuation of the loan that is in favor of the basic idea of IFRS. Suggestions for changes in current accounting and capital requirement rules are provided.

  6. An evaluation of inflation expectations in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Soybilgen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of inflation play a critical role in the process of price setting in the market. Central banks closely follow developments in inflation expectations to implement a successful monetary policy. The Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey (CBRT conducts a survey of experts and decision makers in the financial and real sectors to reveal market expectations and predictions of current and future inflation. The survey is conducted every month. This paper examines the accuracy of these survey predictions using forecast evaluation techniques. We focus on both point and sign accuracy of the predictions. Although point predictions from CBRT surveys are compared with those of autoregressive models, sign predictions are evaluated on their value to a user. We also test the predictions for bias. Unlike the empirical evidence from other economies, our results show that autoregressive models outperform most of inflation expectations in forecasting inflation. This indicates that inflation expectations have poor point forecast accuracies. However, we show that sign predictions for all inflation expectations have value to a user.

  7. Expectations on Track? High School Tracking and Adolescent Educational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of adaptation in expectation formation processes by analyzing how educational tracking in high schools affects adolescents' educational expectations. I argue that adolescents view track placement as a signal about their academic abilities and respond to it in terms...... of modifying their educational expectations. Applying a difference-in-differences approach to the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988, I find that being placed in an advanced or honors class in high school positively affects adolescents’ expectations, particularly if placement is consistent across...... subjects and if placement contradicts tracking experiences in middle school. My findings support the hypothesis that adolescents adapt their educational expectations to ability signals sent by schools....

  8. Decomposing change in life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas Romo, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    We extend Nathan Keyfitz's research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates...... at all ages, and the second term captures the effect of heterogeneity in the pace of improvement in mortality at different ages. We extend the formula to decompose change in life expectancy into age-specific and cause-specific components, and apply the methods to analyze changes in life expectancy...

  9. Identification of microbial carotenoids and isoprenoid quinones from Rhodococcus sp. B7740 and its stability in the presence of iron in model gastric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yashu; Xie, Bijun; Yang, Jifang; Chen, Jigang; Sun, Zhida

    2018-02-01

    Rhodococcus sp. B7740 is a newfound bacterium which was isolated from 25m deep seawater in the arctic. In this paper, Rhodococcus sp. B7740 was firstly discovered to produce abundant natural isoprenoids, including ubiquinone-4(UQ-4), 13 kinds of menaquinones, three rare aromatic carotenoids and more than one common carotenoid. These compounds were identified by UV-Visible, HPLC-APCI-MS/MS and HRMS spectra. Results demonstrated that Rhodococcus sp. B7740 might be a worthy source of natural isoprenoids especially for scarce aromatic carotenoids. Among them, isorenieratene with 528.3762Da (calculated for 528.3756Da, error: 1.1ppm), a carotenoid with aromatic ring, was purified by HSCCC. The stability of isorenieratene under the mimical gastric conditions was measured compared with common dietary carotenoids, β-carotene and lutein. Unlike β-carotene and lutein, isorenieratene exhibited rather stable in the presence of free iron or heme iron. Its high retention rate in gastrointestinal tract after ingestion indicates the benefits for health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The Effect of Acupuncture to SP6 on Skin Temperature Changes of SP6 and SP10: An Observation of “Deqi”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Deqi sensation is a complex but an important component for acupuncture effect. In this study, we tried to observe the relationship between Deqi and skin temperature changes and whether there was some relativity between Deqi and needle stimulations on cold congealing and dysmenorrhea rat model. Thirty-two female Sprague Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into four groups (Saline Control Group, Model Group, Group A with strong stimulation, and Group B with small stimulation. Group A and Group B were performed with different stimulations. We found that, compared with saline control group, model group, and Group B, Group A showed that the skin temperature changes on right acupoint SP6 and SP10 increased significantly at 5 min–10 min interval. The skin temperature changes on left SP6 decreased at instant–5 min interval. The skin temperature changes on right SP10 decreased significantly at instant–5 min interval and 10 min–20 min interval. Thermogenic action along Spleen Meridian of Foot Greater Yin was manifested as simultaneous skin temperature increase on right SP6 and SP10 at 5 min–10 min interval after needling SP6, which was helpful to illustrate the relationship between the characteristic of Deqi and needle stimulations.

  11. Model for simulation of medium period operation and calculation of expected prices in hydrothermal systems; Modelo para la simulacion de la operacion de mediano plazo y el calculo de precios esperados en sistemas hidrotermicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdeano, Carlos A.; Ano, Osvaldo; Vargas, Alberto [Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina). Inst. de Energia Electrica]. E-mail: galdeano@iee.unsj.edu.ar

    2001-07-01

    This work presents a methodology and software (Simula) in order to calculate through simulations, the medium period operation (from one to three years) of hydrothermal systems according to a group of options selected by the user. This methodology is based on employment of decision tables which are obtained by Dynamical Stochastic Programming (DSP) in the optimization model called ZONDA v3.0. The procedure uses a linking element to the optimum expected values of water expenditures for each one of the system controllable reservoirs and, allows the optimum system operation to be determined for each hypothesis of hydraulic contribution in relation to the investigated period.

  12. Tsukamurella inchonensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Brzezinka, H; Burghardt, J; Lee, H J; Schaal, K P

    1995-07-01

    Chemotaxonomic and genomic 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of two isolates obtained from two different clinical materials clearly delineated a new species of the genus Tsukamurella. This new species can be identified by its 16S ribosomal DNA similarity values, as well as its physiological characteristics. The name Tsukamurella inchonensis sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates, which are represented by strain IMMIB D-771T (= DSM 44067T) (T = type strain). This strain exhibits only 45% DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola.

  13. SP-100 surety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This report describes surety evaluations conducted during GFY 1985 in support of the General Electric design for a Space Nuclear Power System - SP-100. Those surety evaluations address both safety and safeguards requirements, which are derived from OSNP-1 and supporting documents. The report includes results of neutronics (criticality) calculations performed by Los Alamos. The results have been benchmarked against independent calculations performed by General Electric with different codes. These comparisons show close agreement, and are summarized. Los Alamos has also provided specifications of explosion and fire environments, which have been used in evaluation of the GE SP-100 concept. Following the summary of key results, surety requirements are given and recommendations toward specification of requirements for later SP-100 project phases are presented. A conceptual design summary is presented. To establish a comprehensive background for surety evaluations, a reference mission profile and potential accidents for each phase of the mission are identified. The main body of the report addresses surety of the General Electric Thermoelectric Conversion design. GE has also developed a Stirling Engine concept, and performed comprehensive surety evaluations for it. These evaluations are reported

  14. Expectations and satisfactions of graduate students in administration at FEA-USP about training periods Expectativas e satisfação dos alunos de graduação em administração da FEA-USP/SP em relação aos estágios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Marcondes Homen de Mello e Castro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many companies began to consider their training programs as a means to acquire fundamental strategic qualifications to obtain and support competitive advantages. However, few companies were concerned about trainee needs and expectations related to these programs. The opinion of these trainees was surveyed about development opportunities so as to identify the expectations and needs that motivated those seeking these programs and how these aspects were satisfied. Semi-structured questionnaires were completed by FEA business students in the Supervised Training course. After scoring, content analysis was conducted to support qualitative investigation of individual comments. Results disclosed that students expected to apply their acquired education in the real company world so as to grow professionally and achieve recognition inside and outside the company. Further trainees showed motivation to achieve self-accomplishment once the preceding levels of the Maslow hierarchy had been satisfied and indicated that companies offered such opportunities.Muitas empresas começaram a pensar os seus programas de estágio como meio de adquirir competências estratégicas fundamentais para sustentar e criar vantagens competitivas. Porém, poucas companhias estão se preocupando com o outro lado da mesa, com as necessidades e expectativas dos clientes desses programas. Assim, este estudo objetivou levantar a opinião dos estagiários sobre as oportunidades de desenvolvimento oferecidas pelas empresas e, por meio disso, identificar as expectativas e necessidades que os motivam a buscar esses programas e como esses aspectos estão sendo satisfeitos. Para isso, utilizaram-se questionários semi-estruturados, respondidos pelos alunos de Administração na disciplina Estágio Supervisionado. Após a mensuração quantitativa dos dados, optou-se pela análise de conteúdo, que deu suporte à investigação qualitativa dos comentários pessoais dos discentes. Os

  15. Neural correlates of rhythmic expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore P. Zanto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal expectancy is thought to play a fundamental role in the perception of rhythm. This review summarizes recent studies that investigated rhythmic expectancy by recording neuroelectric activity with high temporal resolution during the presentation of rhythmic patterns. Prior event-related brain potential (ERP studies have uncovered auditory evoked responses that reflect detection of onsets, offsets, sustains,and abrupt changes in acoustic properties such as frequency, intensity, and spectrum, in addition to indexing higher-order processes such as auditory sensory memory and the violation of expectancy. In our studies of rhythmic expectancy, we measured emitted responses - a type of ERP that occurs when an expected event is omitted from a regular series of stimulus events - in simple rhythms with temporal structures typical of music. Our observations suggest that middle-latency gamma band (20-60 Hz activity (GBA plays an essential role in auditory rhythm processing. Evoked (phase-locked GBA occurs in the presence of physically presented auditory events and reflects the degree of accent. Induced (non-phase-locked GBA reflects temporally precise expectancies for strongly and weakly accented events in sound patterns. Thus far, these findings support theories of rhythm perception that posit temporal expectancies generated by active neural processes.

  16. Fertility expectations and residential mobility in Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ermisch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is plausible that people take into account anticipated changes in family size in choosing where to live. But estimation of the impact of anticipated events on current transitions in an event history framework is challenging because expectations must be measured in some way and, like indicators of past childbearing, expected future childbearing may be endogenous with respect to housing decisions. Objective: The objective of the study is to estimate how expected changes in family size affect residential movement in Great Britain in a way which addresses these challenges. Methods: We use longitudinal data from a mature 18-wave panel survey, the British Household Panel Survey, which incorporates a direct measure of fertility expectations. The statistical methods allow for the potential endogeneity of expectations in our estimation and testing framework. Results: We produce evidence consistent with the idea that past childbearing mainly affects residential mobility through expectations of future childbearing, not directly through the number of children in the household. But there is heterogeneity in response. In particular, fertility expectations have a much greater effect on mobility among women who face lower costs of mobility, such as private tenants. Conclusions: Our estimates indicate that expecting to have a(nother child in the future increases the probability of moving by about 0.036 on average, relative to an average mobility rate of 0.14 per annum in our sample. Contribution: Our contribution is to incorporate anticipation of future events into an empirical model of residential mobility. We also shed light on how childbearing affects mobility.

  17. Fitting Expectation to Identify Plausible Explanations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    .... Some of the terms required by the model are not available, and a simulation-based expectation fitting algorithm is used to estimate these unknown values. Through simulation and an assumption about the type of distribution, it is possible to investigate questions that do not have a closed form solution.

  18. SP-R210 (Myo18A Isoforms as Intrinsic Modulators of Macrophage Priming and Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Yang

    Full Text Available The surfactant protein (SP-A receptor SP-R210 has been shown to increase phagocytosis of SP-A-bound pathogens and to modulate cytokine secretion by immune cells. SP-A plays an important role in pulmonary immunity by enhancing opsonization and clearance of pathogens and by modulating macrophage inflammatory responses. Alternative splicing of the Myo18A gene results in two isoforms: SP-R210S and SP-R210L, with the latter predominantly expressed in alveolar macrophages. In this study we show that SP-A is required for optimal expression of SP-R210L on alveolar macrophages. Interestingly, pre-treatment with SP-A prepared by different methods either enhances or suppresses responsiveness to LPS, possibly due to differential co-isolation of SP-B or other proteins. We also report that dominant negative disruption of SP-R210L augments expression of receptors including SR-A, CD14, and CD36, and enhances macrophages' inflammatory response to TLR stimulation. Finally, because SP-A is known to modulate CD14, we used a variety of techniques to investigate how SP-R210 mediates the effect of SP-A on CD14. These studies revealed a novel physical association between SP-R210S, CD14, and SR-A leading to an enhanced response to LPS, and found that SP-R210L and SP-R210S regulate internalization of CD14 via distinct macropinocytosis-like mechanisms. Together, our findings support a model in which SP-R210 isoforms differentially regulate trafficking, expression, and activation of innate immune receptors on macrophages.

  19. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  20. Life expectancy in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Life expectancy in patients with bipolar disorder has been reported to be decreased by 11 to 20 years. These calculations are based on data for individuals at the age of 15 years. However, this may be misleading for patients with bipolar disorder in general as most patients have a later...... onset of illness. The aim of the present study was to calculate the remaining life expectancy for patients of different ages with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. METHODS: Using nationwide registers of all inpatient and outpatient contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark from 1970 to 2012 we...... remaining life expectancy in bipolar disorder and that of the general population decreased with age, indicating that patients with bipolar disorder start losing life-years during early and mid-adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: Life expectancy in bipolar disorder is decreased substantially, but less so than previously...

  1. Physical activity extends life expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisure-time physical activity is associated with longer life expectancy, even at relatively low levels of activity and regardless of body weight, according to a study by a team of researchers led by the NCI.

  2. Biosorption of uranium by Azolla, SP, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Ludmila C.; Alves, Eliakim G.; Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: lcvieira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Rafael V. de P., E-mail: rafael@itatijuca.com [Itatijuca Biotech, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Canevesi, Rafael L.S.; Silva, Edson A., E-mail: edson.silva2@unioeste.br [Universidade Estadual do Oeste Parana (UNIOESTE), Toledo, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive liquid waste needs special attention and requires suitable treatment before deposition. Among the potential technologies under development for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes the biosorption has been highlighted by being an efficient and low cost technique. Biosorption process involves the exchange of ions contained in the biomass matrix by others present in solution. There are many biomasses that could be applied in treatment of radioactive wastes, for example, agricultural residues and macrophyte. The aim of this study is evaluate the ability of the Azolla sp., a floating aquatic plant, to absorb uranium in solution. Azolla sp. is a macrophyte that has been used to treat effluents containing heavy metals. The biosorption capacity of uranium by Azolla sp. was experimentally determined and modeled by isotherms. Experiments were performed to determine metal uptake, and then the solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The isotherms applied to model the data was Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips Toth, Redlich Peternson, Two-Site-Langmuir, Radke Prausnitz to develop a technique for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste generated at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Brazil. (author)

  3. Biosorption of uranium by Azolla, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Ludmila C.; Alves, Eliakim G.; Marumo, Julio T.; Ferreira, Rafael V. de P.; Canevesi, Rafael L.S.; Silva, Edson A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive liquid waste needs special attention and requires suitable treatment before deposition. Among the potential technologies under development for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes the biosorption has been highlighted by being an efficient and low cost technique. Biosorption process involves the exchange of ions contained in the biomass matrix by others present in solution. There are many biomasses that could be applied in treatment of radioactive wastes, for example, agricultural residues and macrophyte. The aim of this study is evaluate the ability of the Azolla sp., a floating aquatic plant, to absorb uranium in solution. Azolla sp. is a macrophyte that has been used to treat effluents containing heavy metals. The biosorption capacity of uranium by Azolla sp. was experimentally determined and modeled by isotherms. Experiments were performed to determine metal uptake, and then the solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The isotherms applied to model the data was Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips Toth, Redlich Peternson, Two-Site-Langmuir, Radke Prausnitz to develop a technique for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste generated at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Brazil. (author)

  4. Control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. in cultures of Arthrospira sp. Control de Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. en cultivos de Arthrospira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Méndez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. has been developed in many countries for the production of proteins, pigments and other compounds. Outdoor mass cultures are often affected by biological contamination, drastically reducing productivity as far as bringing death. This study evaluates the control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. with two chemical compounds: urea (U and ammonium bicarbonate (AB, in laboratory conditions and outdoor mass culture of Arthrospira sp. The lethal concentration 100 (LC100 at 24 h for Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. determined was of 60-80 mg L-1 (U and 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. The average effective inhibition concentration for 50% of the population (IC50 in Arthrospira sp., after 72 h, was 80 mg L-1 (U and 150 mg L-1 (AB. The application of doses of 60 mg L-1 (U or 100 mg L-1 (AB in the outdoor mass culture of this contaminated microalga, completely inhibited grazing and did not affect the growth of Arthrospira sp. but rather promoted rapid recovery of algal density at levels prior to infestation. These compounds provided an economical and effective control of predators in cultures of Arthrospira sp.El cultivo de la cianobacteria Arthrospira sp. ha sido desarrollado en muchos países para la obtención de proteínas, pigmentos y otros compuestos. Cultivo que a nivel industrial se ve afectado frecuentemente por contaminación biológica, reduciendo drásticamente la productividad hasta causar la muerte. Este estudio evalúa el control de Branchionus sp. y de Amoeba sp. con dos compuestos químicos, la urea (U y bicarbonato de amonio (AB en cultivos de Arthrospira sp. La concentración letal 100 (LC100 determinada a las 24 h para Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. fue de 60-80 mg L-1 (U y 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. La concentración media de inhibición efectiva, después de 72 h, para el 50% de la población (IC50 en Arthrospira fue de 80 mg L-1 (U y 150 mg L-1 (AB. La aplicación de dosis de 60 mg L-1 (U ó 100 mg L-1 (AB en

  5. Policing Challenged and People’s Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur Mohan Shrestha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Peace, security, rule of law, and sustainable development are driving principles in a democratic notion of developing country like Nepal. "3Is': Injustice, Insecurity and Imbalance have been reflecting in the post transitional Nepal. The study came with the objectives of investigating the peoples' perceptions on the adaptation of policing, the challenges and expectation. The information was collected from 1111(N respondents all over the country from different ways of life, applying mixed method questionnaire survey and interview. The research show the need of system based policing like 'intelligence-led'; 'police public partnership', and 'proactive' respectively. The influence of politicization, political instability, external influence, lack of role model leadership, open border, rampant corruption, nepotism-favoritism, lack of research are the major challenges in the security organizations. Furthermore, most educated and high profile personalities have less interest to encourage their generation in police services. People are expecting proficient and accountable police forces. Keywords: Policing, Challenges, People's Expectation

  6. Tsukamurella pulmonis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Brzezinka, H; Burghardt, J; Rifai, M; Seifert, P; Feldmann, K; Schaal, K P

    1996-04-01

    Chemotaxonomic and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of an isolate from the sputum of a patient with a mycobacterial lung infection clearly delineated a new species of the genus Tsukamurella. This new species can be defined on the basis of genotypic and phenotypic data. The name Tsukamurella pulmonis sp. nov. is proposed for this organism; the type strain is IMMIB D-1321T (= DSM 44142T). This isolate shows 44.2 and 36.2% DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola DSM 20162T (T = type strain) and Tsukamurella inchonensis DSM 44067T, respectively.

  7. Longitudinal analyses of adoptive parents' expectations and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foli, Karen J; Lim, Eunjung; South, Susan C

    2017-12-01

    Grounded in a theoretical model specific to adoptive parents, we examined the relationship between parental expectations and depressive symptoms across time. Assessments of 129 adoptive parents of 64 children were performed at three time points before and after placement of an adopted child with the family: 4-6 weeks pre-placement and 4-6 weeks and 5-6 months post-placement. Expectations were assessed in four dimensions: expectations of self as parents, of the child, of family and friends, and of society. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. Associations between parental expectations and depressive symptoms were analyzed, and longitudinal multilevel modeling was conducted to explore influences on expectations over time. Parental expectations changed from pre- to post-placement. With the exception of expectations of self as parent, adoptive parents' pre-adoption expectations were affirmed in the post-adoption time periods. In each expectation dimension, higher affirmation of expectations was correlated with decreased depressive symptoms before and after placement of a child. While parental expectations are not unique to adoptive parents, the essence and characteristics of certain expectations are unique to these parents. When working with adoptive parents, nurses who care for families should assess expectations both pre- and post-placement with awareness of their relationship to depressive symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Estudo da erosão na microbacia do Ceveiro (Piracicaba, SP: I - Estimativa das taxas de perda de solo e estudo de sensibilidade dos fatores do modelo EUPS Erosion study in the Ceveiro Watershed (Piracicaba, SP.: I - Estimation o soil loss rates and sensitivity factor analysis of the USLE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara de Andrade Marinho Weill

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A erosão acelerada do solo constitui um sério problema global de degradação de terras agrícolas. Por ser a pesquisa de erosão comumente cara e morosa, a utilização de modelos permite estimar a perda de solo em localidades e condições não diretamente representadas nos estudos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar a expectativa de erosão do solo em uma área intensivamente cultivada com cana-de-açúcar no município de Piracicaba (SP, como subsídio ao diagnóstico do uso atual das terras visando ao controle do processo. O trabalho foi realizado em ambiente de sistema de informação geográfica aplicando a equação universal de perda de solo (EUPS. Especificamente pretendeu-se estudar a influência dos fatores K (erodibilidade do solo, LS (topográfico, C (uso e manejo da cultura e P (práticas de controle da erosão nas estimativas de perda de solo. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o processo de degradação dos solos por erosão acelerada é intenso em cerca de dois terços da área avaliada, ocupados principalmente com cana-de-açúcar. Nessas áreas, a perda média estimada de 58 Mg ha-1 ano-1 equivale a cerca de quatro vezes o limite superior da tolerância média indicada. Nas áreas remanescentes, ocupadas com mata, vegetação ciliar, reflorestamento e pastagens, as taxas estimadas de perda de solo são baixas, em torno de 2 Mg ha-1 ano-1 , abaixo dos valores de tolerância. O estudo de sensibilidade dos fatores do modelo revelou que, para uma mesma condição climática (fator R constante, os fatores C e P (cobertura e manejo da cultura e práticas de controle da erosão definiram a ordem de grandeza das perdas, em unidades, dezenas ou centenas de Mg ha-1 ano-1 . Para uma mesma categoria de uso da terra (fatores C e P constantes, o fator LS foi o que explicou a maior parte da variação observada. Os resultados obtidos a partir de uma simulação mostraram que a influência do fator K (erodibilidade do solo nas

  9. The construction of normal expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt; Røpke, Inge

    2008-01-01

    The gradual upward changes of standards in normal everyday life have significant environmental implications, and it is therefore important to study how these changes come about. The intention of the article is to analyze the social construction of normal expectations through a case study. The case...... concerns the present boom in bathroom renovations in Denmark, which offers an excellent opportunity to study the interplay between a wide variety of consumption drivers and social changes pointing toward long-term changes of normal expectations regarding bathroom standards. The study is problemoriented......, and the increased focus on body care and fitness. The contours of the emerging normal expectations are outlined and discussed in an environmental perspective....

  10. Consumer's inflation expectations in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ormonde Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper investigates what are the main components of consumer's inflation expectations. We combine the FGV's Consumer Survey with the indices of inflation (IPCA and government regulated prices, professional forecasts disclosed in the Focus report, and media data which we crawl from one of the biggest and most important Brazilian newspapers, Folha de São Paulo, to determine what factors are responsible for and improve consumer's forecast accuracy. We found gender, age and city of residence as major elements when analyzing micro-data. Aggregate data shows the past inflation as an important trigger in the formation of consumers' expectations and professional forecasts as negligible. Moreover, the media plays a significant role, accounting not only for the expectations' formation but for a better understanding of actual inflation as well.

  11. Expectations for a scientific collaboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2003-01-01

    with respect to scientific collaboratories. Interviews were conducted with 17 scientists who work in a variety of settings and have a range of experience conducting and managing scientific research. Results indicate that scientists expect a collaboratory to: support their strategic plans; facilitate management......In the past decade, a number of scientific collaboratories have emerged, yet adoption of scientific collaboratories remains limited. Meeting expectations is one factor that influences adoption of innovations, including scientific collaboratories. This paper investigates expectations scientists have...... of the scientific process; have a positive or neutral impact on scientific outcomes; provide advantages and disadvantages for scientific task execution; and provide personal conveniences when collaborating across distances. These results both confirm existing knowledge and raise new issues for the design...

  12. Physicochemical characterization, modelling and optimization of ultrasono-assisted acid pretreatment of two Pennisetum sp. using Taguchi and artificial neural networking for enhanced delignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sonali; Dandapat, Snigdha Jyotsna; Thatoi, Hrudayanath

    2017-02-01

    Acid as well as ultrasono-assisted acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass of two Pennisetum sp.; Denanath grass (DG) and Hybrid Napier grass (HNG) have been investigated for enhanced delignification and maximum exposure of cellulose for production of bioethanol. Screening of pretreatment with different acids such as H 2 SO 4 , HCl, H 3 PO 4 and H 2 NO 3 were optimized for different temperature, soaking time and acid concentrations using Taguchi orthogonal array and the data obtained were statistically validated using artificial neural networking. HCl was found to be the most effective acid for pretreatment of both the Pennisetum sp. The optimized conditions of HCl pretreatment were acid concentration of 1% and 1.5%, soaking time 130 and 50 min and temperature 121 °C and 110 °C which yielded maximum delignification of 33.0% and 33.8% for DG and HNG respectively. Further ultrosono-assisted HCl pretreatment with a power supply of 100 W, temperature of 353 K, and duty cycle of 70% has resulted in significantly higher delignification of 80.4% and 82.1% for both DG and HNG respectively than that of acid pretreatment. Investigation using SEM, FTIR and autofloresence microscopy for both acid and ultrasono-assisted acid pretreatment lignocellulosic biomass revealed conformational changes of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass with decreased lignin content and increased exposure of cellulose, with greater effectiveness in case of ultrasono assisted acid pretreatment condition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Self-Averaging Expectation Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    We investigate the problem of approximate inference using Expectation Propagation (EP) for large systems under some statistical assumptions. Our approach tries to overcome the numerical bottleneck of EP caused by the inversion of large matrices. Assuming that the measurement matrices are realizat...... on a signal recovery problem of compressed sensing and compare with standard EP....

  14. Privacy Expectations in Online Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pure, Rebekah Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Advances in digital networked communication technology over the last two decades have brought the issue of personal privacy into sharper focus within contemporary public discourse. In this dissertation, I explain the Fourth Amendment and the role that privacy expectations play in the constitutional protection of personal privacy generally, and…

  15. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    My program examines the plant secondary metabolites (i.e. phenolics) important for human health, and which impart the organoleptic properties that are quality indicators for fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions; a...

  16. Metaphors As Storehouses of Expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Allan K.; Thomas, A. Ross

    1996-01-01

    Explores how metaphors are used to identify and store some expectations that structure schools' interactions and communications. Outlines a systems-theoretical view of schools derived from Niklas Luhmann's social theories. Illustrates how the metaphors identified in an earlier study provide material contexts for identifying and storing structures…

  17. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  18. Dynamic decision making without expected utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre; Jaffray, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    Non-expected utility theories, such as rank dependent utility (RDU) theory, have been proposed as alternative models to EU theory in decision making under risk. These models do not share the separability property of expected utility theory. This implies that, in a decision tree, if the reduction...... of compound lotteries assumption is made (so that preferences at each decision node reduce to RDU preferences among lotteries) and that preferences at different decision nodes are identical (same utility function and same weighting function), then the preferences are not dynamically consistent; in particular......, the sophisticated strategy, i.e., the strategy generated by a standard rolling back of the decision tree, is likely to be dominated w.r.t. stochastic dominance. Dynamic consistency of choices remains feasible, and the decision maker can avoid dominated choices, by adopting a non-consequentialist behavior, with his...

  19. The Expected Interest Rate Path: Alignment of Expectations vs. Creative Opacity

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Gosselin; Aileen Lotz; Charles Wyplosz

    2008-01-01

    We examine the effects of the release by a central bank of its expected future interest rate in a simple two-period model with heterogeneous information between the central bank and the private sector. The model is designed to rule out common-knowledge and time-inconsistency effects. Transparency—when the central bank publishes its interest rate path—fully aligns central bank and private-sector expectations about the future inflation rate. The private sector fully trusts the central bank to e...

  20. Carbon sp chains in graphene nanoholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Ivano E.; Ferri, Nicola; Onida, Giovanni; Manini, Nicola

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays sp carbon chains terminated by graphene or graphitic-like carbon are synthesized routinely in several nanotech labs. We propose an ab initio study of such carbon-only materials, by computing their structure and stability, as well as their electronic, vibrational and magnetic properties. We adopt a fair compromise of microscopic realism with a certain level of idealization in the model configurations, and predict a number of properties susceptible to comparison with experiment.

  1. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  2. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, A F; Rainey, F A; Burghardt, J; Brzezinka, H; Schmitt, S; Seifert, P; Zimmermann, O; Mauch, H; Gierth, D; Lux, I; Schaal, K P

    1997-07-01

    Chemotaxonomic and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses of four bacterial isolates from blood cultures from patients with cardiac pacemaker implants and sputa of patients with chronic lung infections clearly demonstrated that these bacteria belong to the genus Tsukamurella. DNA-DNA hybridization data, as well as the physiological characteristics of the isolates, indicate that they are closely related and belong to a single species that differs from previously described members of the genus Tsukamurella. The name Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates, and the new species is represented by strain IMMIB D-1397T (= DSM 44234T). Strain IMMIB D-1397T exhibits 53.4, 53.5, and 54.7% DNA-DNA relatedness to Tsukamurella paurometabola DSM 20162T, Tsukamurella inchonensis DSM 44067T, and Tsukamurella pulmonis DSM 44142T, respectively.

  3. Ethical issues and societal expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlay, D.

    2010-01-01

    Daniel Metlay (NWTRB) declared that institutions had always recognised an ethical obligation to manage high- level radioactive waste in unprecedented ways. This obligation has not only endured, but has become more explicit and multidimensional and it now subsumed under a more general rubric of 'societal expectations'. D. Metlay directed attention toward the proceedings of previous RWMC-RF workshop ', which contains five essays, authored by Kjell Andersson, Andrew Blowers, Carl-Reinhold Braakenhielm, Francois Dermange, and Patricia Fleming, that are relevant to the question of ethical issues and societal expectations. D. Metlay observed that 'societal expectations' are hard to define and thus very hard to measure. They may vary considerably with time and from country to country. As an illustration he referred to an inquiry performed by a task group 30 years ago in a document entitled 'Proposed Goals for Radioactive Waste Management' (NUREG-0300) on behalf of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Conclusions from D. Metlay are that, for the most part, societal expectations in the United States appear to be quite stable over a period of more than 30 years. In two areas, however, there are clear differences in emphasis between expectations articulated in the last few years and those recorded in 1978. (1) While then there was emphasis on the operational reliability of organisations and institutions. In particular, much care was taken to discuss the inherent limitations on bureaucratic error-correction in the future. The focus is nowadays more on bureaucratic behaviours associated with carrying out decision-making processes in the present. (2) While there is current emphasis on the importance of trust, transparency, and accountability, the NRC document may cast some doubt on the reliability of a stepwise decision-making process. In the domain of radioactive waste management, error signals are notoriously unclear, and strong disagreements over objectives and value trade

  4. Photosynthetic versatility in the genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a model anoxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Grim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth’s biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis. Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR used in cyanobacterial anoxygenic photosynthesis and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential

  5. Avaliação de um modelo de passo invariante na predição da estrutura de um povoamento de Eucalyptus sp. Evaluation of a step invariant model for the prediction of eucalyptus stand structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Shirlen Soares

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o modelo de distribuição diamétrica de passo invariante proposto por Guimarães (1994 na projeção da produção de um povoamento de Eucalyptus sp., simulando as alterações nas estruturas horizontal e vertical ao longo do tempo. Utilizaram-se dados da primeira rotação de povoamentos de eucalipto híbrido estaca (Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla, plantados no espaçamento 3,0 x 2,0 m, localizados na região noroeste do Estado da Bahia, provenientes de medições anuais com idade de medição variando entre 25 e 89 meses. Para realizar as prognoses, foram empregados percentis tomados a 50 e 75% da distribuição diamétrica e as alturas correspondentes aos diâmetros nessas posições. Verificou-se que o modelo de projeção é factível e pode ser utilizado com eficiência, já que ocorreram tendências semelhantes entre os volumes prognosticados e os observados nas parcelas. Além disso, devido à sua simplicidade e à compatibilidade dos resultados, recomenda-se a sua utilização na projeção do crescimento e produção de Eucalyptus sp.This study was carried out to evaluate the step-invariant diametric distribution model, proposed by Guimarães (1994, for the prediction of a Eucalyptus stand production, simulating the alterations in the horizontal and vertical structures with time. Data were taken from annual measurements, with measurement age between 25 and 89 months, of the first rotation of hybrid eucalyptus stands (Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla, plant spacing of 3.0 x 2.0 m, located in the northeast region of State of Bahia. To perform prognoses percentiles were taken at 50 and 75% of the diametric distribution, and the heights corresponding to the diameters in these positions. The prediction model was proved to be feasible for efficient use, since there were similar tendencies between the forecasted and the observed volumes in the plots. Besides, its use in growth and

  6. Smooth paths of conditional expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Andruchow, Esteban; Larotonda, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a von Neumann algebra with a finite trace $\\tau$, represented in $H=L^2(A,\\tau)$, and let $B_t\\subset A$ be sub-algebras, for $t$ in an interval $I$. Let $E_t:A\\to B_t$ be the unique $\\tau$-preserving conditional expectation. We say that the path $t\\mapsto E_t$ is smooth if for every $a\\in A$ and $v \\in H$, the map $$ I\

  7. FRANCHISE EXPECTATIONS: CASE OF KAZAKHSTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Raissa Kaziyeva

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to provide a critical review of franchising development in Kazakhstan by focusing on the relationship between the franchisor and the franchisee. We have conducted extensive research and communicated with lots of potential and existing Kazakhstani franchisors and franchisees, operating since 2003. Our findings show that the process of signing franchising agreements is quite challenging in Kazakhstan.  Thorough investigation of the differences between expectations ...

  8. Rising Expectations, Social Unrest & Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between peace and development holds the key to effective strategies for addressing the roots of social unrest. Rising expectations are the principal driving force for social development. However, the faster and higher aspirations rise, the greater the gap between expectations and reality. That gap promotes a sense of frustration, depravation and aggression leading to social unrest and violence. The opposite is also true: rising economic opportunity can mitigate or eliminate social unrest. The remarkable renunciation of armed struggle by the IRA in North Ireland in mid - 2005 appears inexplicable until the impact of rising incomes and expanding employment opportunities in the Republic of Ireland is also taken into account. A similar approach can be applied to address the problems of violence and social unrest in Kashmir and Palestine. Here too apparently intractable conflicts will lend themselves to be addressed economically. India's recent efforts to provide guaranteed employment to its rural poor are part of a strategy to stem the rising tide of social unrest in impoverished areas resulting from rising expectations among the poor.

  9. Estimating Unobservable Inflation Expectations in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Rondina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses an econometric model and Bayesian estimation to reverse engineer the path of inflation expectations implied by the New Keynesian Phillips Curve and the data. The estimated expectations roughly track the patterns of a number of common measures of expected inflation available from surveys or computed from financial data. In particular, they exhibit the strongest correlation with the inflation forecasts of the respondents in the University of Michigan Survey of Consumers. The estimated model also shows evidence of the anchoring of long run inflation expectations to a value that is in the range of the target inflation rate.

  10. The future of life expectancy and life expectancy inequalities in England and Wales: Bayesian spatiotemporal forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James E; Li, Guangquan; Foreman, Kyle; Best, Nicky; Kontis, Vasilis; Pearson, Clare; Hambly, Peter; Ezzati, Majid

    2015-07-11

    To plan for pensions and health and social services, future mortality and life expectancy need to be forecast. Consistent forecasts for all subnational units within a country are very rare. Our aim was to forecast mortality and life expectancy for England and Wales' districts. We developed Bayesian spatiotemporal models for forecasting of age-specific mortality and life expectancy at a local, small-area level. The models included components that accounted for mortality in relation to age, birth cohort, time, and space. We used geocoded mortality and population data between 1981 and 2012 from the Office for National Statistics together with the model with the smallest error to forecast age-specific death rates and life expectancy to 2030 for 375 of England and Wales' 376 districts. We measured model performance by withholding recent data and comparing forecasts with this withheld data. Life expectancy at birth in England and Wales was 79·5 years (95% credible interval 79·5-79·6) for men and 83·3 years (83·3-83·4) for women in 2012. District life expectancies ranged between 75·2 years (74·9-75·6) and 83·4 years (82·1-84·8) for men and between 80·2 years (79·8-80·5) and 87·3 years (86·0-88·8) for women. Between 1981 and 2012, life expectancy increased by 8·2 years for men and 6·0 years for women, closing the female-male gap from 6·0 to 3·8 years. National life expectancy in 2030 is expected to reach 85·7 (84·2-87·4) years for men and 87·6 (86·7-88·9) years for women, further reducing the female advantage to 1·9 years. Life expectancy will reach or surpass 81·4 years for men and reach or surpass 84·5 years for women in every district by 2030. Longevity inequality across districts, measured as the difference between the 1st and 99th percentiles of district life expectancies, has risen since 1981, and is forecast to rise steadily to 8·3 years (6·8-9·7) for men and 8·3 years (7·1-9·4) for women by 2030. Present forecasts underestimate

  11. Am I Halfway? Life Lived = Expected Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Zarulli, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    life expectancy at that age. This relationship in stable population models between life lived and life left has captured the attention of mathematical demographers since Lotka. Our paper aims to contribute to the halfway-age debate by showing its time trends under mortality models and with current data......“Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita, Mi ritrovai per una selva oscura, Ché la diritta via era smarrita. [In the middle of the journey of our life, I came to myself in a dark wood, for the straight way was lost.]” (Dante 1308-1320) We have reached halfway in life when our age equals our remaining...... from high longevity countries. We further contrast the halfway-age results by sex, and between period and cohort perspectives. We find that in 1850 life expectancy at birth was higher than halfway-age by around ten years (HMD-mean halfway-age of 33.3 and 32.2 against HMD-mean life expectancy of 44...

  12. Accurate, inaccurate, or biased teacher expectations: Do Dutch teachers differ in their expectations at the end of primary education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Anneke C; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2015-12-01

    In several tracked educational systems, realizing optimal placements in classes in the first year of secondary education depends on the accuracy of teacher expectations. The aim of this study was to investigate between-teacher differences in their expectations regarding the academic aptitude of their students. The sample consisted of 500 teachers (classes) who provided their expectations of 7,550 students in the final grade of Dutch primary education. We analysed the extent to which teachers differed in their expectations and in what contexts their expectations were biased, using multilevel random slope models. Multilevel analysis showed teacher expectation bias to be related to gender and socio-ethnic background of students. The differences among teachers in expectations for Turkish, Moroccan, and other foreign students with low-educated parents were larger than the average teacher expectation bias for these groups in the sample. When student characteristics were controlled for, we found that the teachers in our sample had higher expectations for students in high-performing classes or classes with only a small proportion of students from low-SES families. Teacher expectation bias for demographic groups, however, was found to be independent of the class population. The results indicate the importance of the teacher and the necessity of using multilevel models when investigating the complex nature of between-teacher differences in expectations of student performance. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Life Expectancy in Pleural and Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Shavelle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mesothelioma is a rare cancer with a historically dire prognosis. We sought to calculate life expectancies for patients with pleural or peritoneal mesothelioma, both at time of diagnosis and several years later, and to examine whether survival has improved in recent years. Methods. Data on 10,258 pleural and 1,229 peritoneal patients from the SEER US national cancer database, 1973–2011, were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results. The major factors related to survival were age, sex, stage, grade, histology, and treatment. Survival improved only modestly over the study period: 0.5% per year for pleural and 2% for peritoneal. Conclusions. Life expectancies were markedly reduced from normal, even amongst 5-year survivors with the most favorable characteristics and treatment options.

  14. Expectations from experts in ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermange, F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to try to answer the three questions raised by Claudio Pescatore. 1. When the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management requires that we do not compromise the ability of future generations to meet their needs and aspirations, what is meant by 'needs and aspirations'? 2. What are regulators expected to do to identify the needs and aspirations of the relevant future generations, and to provide convincing regulatory assurance that they will be protected? 3. How many generations ahead constitute 'future generations' for the purpose of implementing sustainable development? (author)

  15. The SP Theory of Intelligence: Benefits and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gerard Wolff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes existing and expected benefits of the SP theory ofintelligence, and some potential applications. The theory aims to simplify and integrate ideasacross artificial intelligence, mainstream computing, and human perception and cognition,with information compression as a unifying theme. It combines conceptual simplicitywith descriptive and explanatory power across several areas of computing and cognition.In the SP machine—an expression of the SP theory which is currently realized in theform of a computer model—there is potential for an overall simplification of computingsystems, including software. The SP theory promises deeper insights and better solutions inseveral areas of application including, most notably, unsupervised learning, natural languageprocessing, autonomous robots, computer vision, intelligent databases, software engineering,information compression, medical diagnosis and big data. There is also potential inareas such as the semantic web, bioinformatics, structuring of documents, the detection ofcomputer viruses, data fusion, new kinds of computer, and the development of scientifictheories. The theory promises seamless integration of structures and functions within andbetween different areas of application. The potential value, worldwide, of these benefits andapplications is at least $190 billion each year. Further development would be facilitatedby the creation of a high-parallel, open-source version of the SP machine, available toresearchers everywhere.

  16. Bradysia sp. em morangueiro Bradysia sp. in strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadete Radin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available No trabalho, relatam-se os primeiros registros de Bradysia sp. (Insecta: Diptera: Sciaridae em morangueiro (Fragaria x ananassa Duch., cultivado no Município de Eldorado do Sul, RS. O cultivo foi realizado em sacolas com três metros de comprimento, preenchidas com substrato composto de casca de arroz e turfa, dispostas horizontalmente sobre bancadas de madeira, em ambiente protegido. A presença de Bradysia sp. foi observada na segunda quinzena de agosto de 2005. Neste trabalho, estão descritos os sintomas apresentados no morangueiro pela praga, prováveis conseqüências sobre o aparecimento de doenças e uma breve descrição morfológica da Bradysia sp., adulto e fase larval.This paper describes the first record of Bradysia sp. (Insecta; Diptera; Sciaridae in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cultivated in the city of Eldorado do Sul, RS, Brazil. Strawberry was planted in plastic bags filled with a mixture of burnt rice hulls and peat and cultivated in a greenhouse. The presence of Bradysia sp was noticed in the second fortnight of August, 2005. The symptoms in strawberry and the probable consequences in terms of disease arising were described in the present study, as well as the morphological characterization of Bradysia sp. and its illustrations.

  17. SP-100 reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.; Atwell, J.; Pluta, P.R.; Smith, M.A.; Solorzano, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    The SP-100 space reactor power system is being designed and developed as part of the Ground Engineering System (GES) contract between General Electric Company as the system developer and the Department of Energy. Other key participants in the GES program include Westinghouse Hanford Company (site operator), Los Alamos National Laboratory (fuel development and production), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (materials), and Westinghouse, Advanced Energy Systems Division (shield, HTS equipment). The GES Program includes two major elements. First, the development of a Reference Flight System design at 100 kWe output to the user, and second the validation of the Reference Flight System design by analysis and by testing. Development of key technologies along with component and system testing is an essential part of the validation program. The nuclear subsystem validation includes the design, manufacture, assembly and operational testing of a Ground Reactor Test Assembly. The subject of this paper is the reactor design for the Reference Flight System. The reference flight design is in the preliminary design stage and will evolve over the next year

  18. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung

    2014-01-01

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety

  19. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety.

  20. Beyond Expected Utility in the Economics of Health and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Cordoba, Juan Carlos; Ripoll, Marla

    2013-01-01

    We document various limitations of the expected utility model for the study of health and longevity. The model assumes individuals are indifferent between early and late resolution of uncertainty. This assumption gives rise to predictions regarding the economic value of life that are inconsistent with relevant evidence. For example, poor individuals would price life below the present value of foregone income or even negatively. We show that a non-expected utility model disentangling intertemp...

  1. Amphibian (Xenopus sp.) iodothyronine deiodinase ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA-MED amphibian thyroid group is currently screening chemicals for inhibition of human iodothyronine deiodinase activity as components of the thyroid system important in human development. Amphibians are a bellwether taxonomic group to gauge toxicity of chemicals in the environment. Amphibian thyroid function is not only important in development but also metamorphosis. Xenopus sp. have been used extensively as model organisms and are well characterized genetically. We propose to screen a list of chemicals (selected from the human DIO screening results) to test for inhibition of Xenopus deiodinases. Large quantities of the enzymes will be produced using an adenovirus system. Our preliminary results show that there may be catalytic differences between human and Xenopus deiodinases. The Twin Ports Early Career Scientists is a new group formed within the Duluth-Superior scientific community. This presentation will provide a basic introduction to my research and our mission at EPA, and help to establish networking and collaboration relationships across disciplines and institutions.

  2. Harm beliefs and coping expectancies in youth with specific phobias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Öst, Lars-Göran; Ryan, Sarah M; Capriola, Nicole N; Reuterskiöld, Lena

    2017-04-01

    Catastrophic beliefs and lowered coping expectancies are often present in individuals with specific phobias (SPs). The current study examined these beliefs and expectancies in 251 youth who received One Session Treatment for one of the three most common types of SP in youth (animals, natural environment, and situational). We compared the children's subjective beliefs to objective ratings of the likelihood of occurrence and the dangerousness of the feared events. Results revealed pre-treatment differences in the youths' beliefs across phobia types and age. Specifically, children with animal phobias rated their beliefs as more likely to occur than did children with environmental and situational phobias. In addition, older children rated their beliefs as more dangerous than younger children. However, regardless of phobia type or child age, the beliefs improved following treatment. Changes in catastrophic beliefs and coping expectancies were related to changes in clinical severity following treatment but not 6-months following treatment. Moreover, at pre-treatment, children viewed their beliefs as significantly more catastrophic and likely to occur than did independent coders of these beliefs; however, these differences were no longer evident following treatment. Clinical implications are discussed, highlighting how changes in beliefs and expectancies might be associated with treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthetic surfactant based on analogues of SP-B and SP-C is superior to single-peptide surfactants in ventilated premature rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almlén, Andreas; Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Robertson, Bengt; Johansson, Jan; Curstedt, Tore

    2010-06-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is currently treated with surfactant preparations obtained from natural sources and attempts to develop equally active synthetic surfactants have been unsuccessful. One difference in composition is that naturally derived surfactants contain the two hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C while synthetic preparations contain analogues of either SP-B or SP-C. It was recently shown that both SP-B and SP-C (or SP-C33, an SP-C analogue) are necessary to establish alveolar stability at end-expiration in a rabbit RDS model, as reflected by high lung gas volumes without application of positive end-expiratory pressure. To study the efficacy of fully synthetic surfactants containing analogues of both SP-B and SP-C compared to surfactants with only one protein analogue. Premature newborn rabbits, treated with synthetic surfactants, were ventilated for 30 min without positive end-expiratory pressure. Tidal volumes as well as lung gas volumes at end-expiration were determined. Treatment with 2% Mini-B (a short-cut version of SP-B) and 2% SP-C33, or its C-terminally truncated form SP-C30, in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol, 68:31 (w/w) resulted in median lung gas volumes of 8-9 ml/kg body weight, while animals treated with 2% Mini-B surfactant or 2% SP-C33/SP-C30 surfactant had lung gas volumes of 3-4 ml/kg, and those treated with Curosurf, a porcine surfactant, 15-17 ml/kg. In contrast, mixing SP-C33 with peptides with different distributions of positively charged and hydrophobic residues did not improve lung gas volumes. The data indicate that synthetic surfactants containing analogues of both SP-B and SP-C might be superior to single-peptide surfactants in the treatment of RDS.

  4. Great expectations: large wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, E.

    2001-01-01

    This article focuses on wind turbine product development, and traces the background to wind turbines from the first generation 1.5 MW machines in 1995-6, plans for the second generation 3-5 MW class turbines to meet the expected boom in offshore wind projects, to the anticipated installation of a 4.5 MW turbine, and offshore wind projects planned for 2000-2002. The switch by the market leader Vestas to variable speed operation in 2000, the new product development and marketing strategy taken by the German Pro + Pro consultancy in their design of a 1.5 MW variable speed pitch control concept, the possible limiting of the size of turbines due to logistical difficulties, opportunities offered by air ships for large turbines, and the commissioning of offshore wind farms are discussed. Details of some 2-5 MW offshore wind turbine design specifications are tabulated

  5. [Manufactured baby food: safety expectations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, L; Van Egroo, L-D; Galesne, N

    2010-12-01

    Food safety is a concern for parents of infants, and healthcare professionals are often questioned by them about this topic. Baby food European regulation ensures high levels of safety and is more rigorous than common food regulation. Maximal limit for pesticides in baby food demonstrates the high level of requirements. This limit must be below the 10 ppb detection threshold, whatever the chemical used. Other contaminants such as nitrates are also the subject of greater expectations in baby food. Food safety risks control needs a specific know-how that baby food manufacturers have acquired and experienced, more particularly by working with producers of high quality raw material. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Trading Stages: Life Expectancies in Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim; Horvitz, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied because they are hard to use and interpret, and tools for age and stage structured populations are missing. We present easily interpretable expressions for the sensitivities and elasticities of life expectancy to vital rates in age-stage models, and illustrate their application with two biological examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography. PMID:22664576

  7. Motor activity improves temporal expectancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Fautrelle

    Full Text Available Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1 pointing with a whole-body movement, (2 pointing only with the arm, (3 imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4 simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5 pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6 reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments.

  8. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  9. A Theory of False Cognitive Expectancies in Airline Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Antonio I.

    The Theory of False Cognitive Expectancies was developed by studying high reliability flight operations. Airline pilots depend extensively on cognitive expectancies to perceive, understand, and predict actions and events. Out of 1,363 incident reports submitted by airline pilots to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aviation Safety Reporting System over a year's time, 110 reports were found to contain evidence of 127 false cognitive expectancies in pilots. A comprehensive taxonomy was developed with six categories of interest. The dataset of 127 false expectancies was used to initially code tentative taxon values for each category. Intermediate coding through constant comparative analysis completed the taxonomy. The taxonomy was used for the advanced coding of chronological context-dependent visualizations of expectancy factors, known as strands, which depict the major factors in the creation and propagation of each expectancy. Strands were mapped into common networks to detect highly represented expectancy processes. Theoretical integration established 11 sources of false expectancies, the most common expectancy errors, and those conspicuous factors worthy of future study. The most prevalent source of false cognitive expectancies within the dataset was determined to be unconscious individual modeling based on past events. Integrative analyses also revealed relationships between expectancies and flight deck automation, unresolved discrepancies, and levels of situation awareness. Particularly noteworthy were the findings that false expectancies can combine in three possible permutations to diminish situation awareness and examples of how false expectancies can be unwittingly transmitted from one person to another. The theory resulting from this research can enhance the error coding process used during aircraft line oriented safety audits, lays the foundation for developing expectancy management training programs, and will allow researchers to proffer

  10. News on Inflation and the Epidemiology of Inflation Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfajfar, Damjan; Santoro, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the nexus between news coverage on inflation and households’ inflation expectations. In doing so, we test the epidemiological foundations of the sticky information model (Carroll ). We use both aggregate and household-level data from the Survey Research Center at the University...... of Michigan. We highlight a fundamental disconnection among news on inflation, consumers’ frequency of expectation updating, and the accuracy of their expectations. Our evidence provides at best weak support to the epidemiological framework, as most of the consumers who update their expectations do not revise...

  11. Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov., Penicillium elleniae sp. nov., Penicillium penarojense sp. nov., Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. and Penicillium wotroi sp. nov., isolated from leaf litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, Jos; López-Quintero, Carlos A.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    Several species of the genus Penicillium were isolated during a survey of the mycobiota of leaf litter and soil in Colombian Amazon forest. Five species, Penicillium penarojense sp. nov. (type strain CBS 113178T = IBT 23262T), Penicillium wotroi sp. nov. (type strain CBS 118171T = IBT 23253T......), Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov. (type strain CBS 113149T = IBT 23247T), Penicillium elleniae sp. nov. (type strain CBS 118135T = IBT 23229T) and Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. (type strain CBS 126216T = IBT 23203T) are described here as novel species. Their taxonomic novelty was determined using......, andrastin A, pulvilloric acid, paxillin, paspaline and janthitrem, were commonly produced by these phylogenetically related species. The novel species had a high growth rate on agar media, but could be distinguished from each other by several macro- and microscopical characteristics....

  12. Uji Fitokimia, Kandungan Total Fenol dan Aktivitas Antioksidan Mikroalga Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp., dan Nannochloropsis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diini Fithriani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kandungan fitokimia, total fenol, dan aktivitas antioksidan dari mikroalga Spirulina sp., Nannochloropsis sp., dan Chlorella sp. Mikroalga diekstrak dengan ekstraksi tunggal menggunakan etanol. Skrining fitokimia dilakukan secara kualitatif. Analisis total fenol dilakukan secara spektrofotometri dengan metode Folin-Ciocalteu. Analisis antioksidan dilakukan dengan metode 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH dan Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP. Skrining fitokimia menunjukkan keberadaan tanin, flavonoid, steroid, glikosida, dan alkaloid pada ekstrak etanol ketiga jenis mikroalga, sedangkan saponin hanya terdeteksi pada ekstrak etanol Spirulina sp. dan Chlorella sp., adapun triterpenoid tidak terdeteksi pada ekstrak etanol ketiga jenis mikroalga. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kandungan total fenol, aktivitas antioksidan (IC50, dan kapasitas antioksidan (FRAP tertinggi diperoleh pada ekstrak etanol Spirulina sp. dengan nilai berturut turut sebesar 0,32 ± 0,025 mg GAE g-1D.W., 518,94 ppm, dan  49,95 ± 2,02 (mmol Fe2+ eq.g-1D.W. Dalam penelitian ini diketahui bahwa kandungan fenol total memiliki korelasi  yang kuat  dengan kapasitas antioksidan metode FRAP (R2= 0,84, dan aktivitas antioksidan metode DPPH (R2= 0,79.

  13. Uji Fitokimia, Kandungan Total Fenol Dan Aktivitas Antioksidan Mikroalga Spirulina Sp., Chlorella Sp., dan Nannochloropsis Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diini Fithriani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kandungan fitokimia, total fenol, dan aktivitas antioksidan dari mikroalga Spirulina sp., Nannochloropsis sp., dan Chlorella sp. Mikroalga diekstrak dengan ekstraksi tunggal menggunakan etanol. Skrining fitokimia dilakukan secara kualitatif. Analisis total fenol dilakukan secara spektrofotometri dengan metode Folin-Ciocalteu. Analisis antioksidan dilakukan dengan metode 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH dan Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP. Skrining fitokimia menunjukkan keberadaan tanin, flavonoid, steroid, glikosida, dan alkaloid pada ekstrak etanol ketiga jenis mikroalga, sedangkan saponin hanya terdeteksi pada ekstrak etanol Spirulina sp. dan Chlorella sp., adapun triterpenoid tidak terdeteksi pada ekstrak etanol ketiga jenis mikroalga. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kandungan total fenol, aktivitas antioksidan (IC50, dan kapasitas antioksidan (FRAP tertinggi diperoleh pada ekstrak etanol Spirulina sp. dengan nilai berturut turut sebesar 0,32 ± 0,025 mg GAE g-1D.W., 518,94 ppm, dan  49,95 ± 2,02 (mmol Fe2+ eq.g-1D.W. Dalam penelitian ini diketahui bahwa kandungan fenol total memiliki korelasi  yang kuat  dengan kapasitas antioksidan metode FRAP (R2= 0,84, dan aktivitas antioksidan metode DPPH (R2= 0,79.

  14. Analytical models for development of high performance metal targets irradiated in IPEN-CNEN/SP Cyclone 30 and Cyclone 18 cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Henrique Barcellos de

    2009-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that describe the basic elements for metal targets irradiation in cyclotrons. Important parameters such as maximum beam current value and thermal power deposited on target were obtained and compared with practical situations. In an unprecedented way, were determined analytically the features found in intense thermal transient situations, when high protons concentrations in a small region of the beam cause intense temperature gradients in small regions of the target. Comparing with results found in the literature showed that the developed models are satisfactory, in view of all limitations of the proposed model. (author)

  15. Best-practice life expectancy: An extreme value approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Medford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the rise in human life expectancy has been extensively studied, the evolution of maximum life expectancies, i.e., the rise in best-practice life expectancy in a group of populations, has not been examined to the same extent. The linear rise in best-practice life expectancy has been reported previously by various authors. Though remarkable, this is simply an empirical observation. Objective: We examine best-practice life expectancy more formally by using extreme value theory. Methods: Extreme value distributions are fit to the time series (1900 to 2012 of maximum life expectancies at birth and age 65, for both sexes, using data from the Human Mortality Database and the United Nations. Conclusions: Generalized extreme value distributions offer a theoretically justified way to model best-practice life expectancies. Using this framework one can straightforwardly obtain probability estimates of best-practice life expectancy levels or make projections about future maximum life expectancy. Comments: Our findings may be useful for policymakers and insurance/pension analysts who would like to obtain estimates and probabilities of future maximum life expectancies.

  16. Risk assessment and spread of the potentially invasive Ceratitis rosa Karsch and Ceratitis quilicii De Meyer, Mwatawala & Virgilio sp. Nov. using life-cycle simulation models: Implications for phytosanitary measures and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysantus Mbi Tanga

    Full Text Available Integrative taxonomy has resolved the species status of the potentially invasive Ceratitis rosa Karsch into two separate species with distinct ecological requirements: C. rosa "lowland type" and the newly described species Ceratitis quilicii De Meyer, Mwatawala & Virgilio sp. nov. "highland type". Both species are tephritid pests threatening the production of horticultural crops in Africa and beyond. Studies were carried out by constructing thermal reaction norms for each life stage of both species at constant and fluctuating temperatures. Non-linear functions were fitted to continuously model species development, mortality, longevity and oviposition to establish phenology models that were stochastically simulated to estimate the life table parameters of each species. For spatial analysis of pest risk, three generic risk indices were visualized using the advanced Insect Life Cycle Modeling software. The study revealed that the highest fecundity, intrinsic rate of natural increase and net reproductive rate for C. rosa and C. quilicii was at 25 and 30°C, respectively. The resulting model successfully fits the known distribution of C. rosa and C. quilicii in Africa and the two Indian Ocean islands of La Réunion and Mauritius. Globally, the model highlights the substantial invasion risk posed by C. rosa and C. quilicii to cropping regions in the Americas, Australia, India, China, Southeast Asia, Europe, and West and Central Africa. However, the proportion of the regions predicted to be climatically suitable for both pests is narrower for C. rosa in comparison with C. quilicii, suggesting that C. quilicii will be more tolerant to a wider range of climatic conditions than C. rosa. This implies that these pests are of significant concern to biosecurity agencies in the uninvaded regions. Therefore, these findings provide important information to enhance monitoring/surveillance and designing pest management strategies to limit the spread and reduce

  17. Educational Expectations and Media Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Missomelius

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates themedia-supported educational resources that arecurrently under discussion, such as OERs and MOOCs. Considering the discursive connection between these formats, which is couched in terms of educational freedom and openness, the article’sthesis is that these are expectations which are placed on the media technologies themselves, andthen transferred to learning scenarios. To this end, the article will pursue such questions as: What are the learners, learning materials and learning scenarios allegedly free from or free for? What obstructive configurations should be omitted? To what extent are these characteristics which are of a nature to guaranteelearning processes in the context of lifelong learning or can these characteristics better be attributed to the media technologies themselves and the ways in which they are used? What advantages or new accentuations are promised by proponents of theeducation supplied by media technology? Which discourses provide sustenance for such implied “post-typographic educational ideals” (Giesecke 2001 and Lemke 1998? The importance to learners, teachers and decision-makers at educational institutions of being well informed as far as media is concerned is becoming increasingly apparent.

  18. Protective Effects of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Treatment in 1,3-β-glucan-modulated Allergic Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakih, Dalia; Pilecki, Bartosz; Schlosser, Anders

    2015-01-01

    -γ production. rfhSP-D treatment further reduced mucous metaplasia and Th2 cytokine secretion to background levels. In summary, rfhSP-D treatment resulted in attenuation of both allergic inflammation and 1,3-β-glucan mediated neutrophilic inflammation. Our data suggest that treatment with high dose SP......SP-D is a pulmonary collectin important in lung immunity. SP-D-deficient mice (Sftpd(-/-)) are reported to be susceptible to ovalbumin (OVA)- and fungal allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation, while treatment with exogenous SP-D has therapeutic effects in such disease models. β......-glucans are a diverse group of polysaccharides previously suggested to serve as fungal ligands for SP-D. We set out to investigate if SP-D could interact with 1,3-β-glucan and attenuate allergic pulmonary inflammation in the presence of 1,3-β-glucan. Allergic airway disease was induced in Sftpd(-/-) and Sftpd(+/+) mice...

  19. Smoking Outcome Expectancies among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H.; Baker, Timothy B.

    Alcohol expectancies have been found to predict later onset of drinking among adolescents. This study examined whether the relationship between level of alcohol use and expectancies is paralleled with cigarette smoking, and attempted to identify the content of smoking expectancies. An instrument to measure the subjective expected utility of…

  20. Understanding mechanisms that control fish spawning and larval recruitment: Parameter optimization of an Eulerian model (SEAPODYM-SP) with Peruvian anchovy and sardine eggs and larvae data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Olga; Lehodey, Patrick; Senina, Inna; Echevin, Vincent; Ayón, Patricia; Bertrand, Arnaud; Gaspar, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The Spatial Ecosystem And Populations Dynamics Model "SEAPODYM", based on a system of Eulerian equations and initially developed for large pelagic fish (e.g., tuna), was modified to describe spawning habitat and eggs and larvae dynamics of small pelagic fish. The spawning habitat is critical since it controls the initial recruitment of larvae and the subsequent spatio-temporal variability of natural mortality during their drift with currents. A robust statistical approach based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation is presented to optimize the model parameters defining the spawning habitat and the eggs and larvae dynamics. To improve parameterization, eggs and larvae density observations are assimilated in the model. The model and its associated optimization approach allow investigating the significance of the mechanisms proposed to control fish spawning habitat and larval recruitment: temperature, prey abundance, trade-off between prey and predators, and retention and dispersion processes. An application to the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens) and sardine (Sardinops sagax) illustrates the ability of the model to simulate the main features of spatial dynamics of these two species in the Humboldt Current System. For both species, in climatological conditions, the main observed spatial patterns are well reproduced and are explained by the impact of prey and predator abundance and by physical retention with currents, while temperature has a lower impact. In agreement with observations, sardine larvae are mainly predicted in the northern part of the Peruvian shelf (5-10°S), while anchovy larvae extend further south. Deoxygenation, which can potentially limit the accessibility of adult fish to spawning areas, does not appear to have an impact in our model setting. Conversely, the observed seasonality in spawning activity, especially the spawning rest period in austral autumn, is not well simulated. It is proposed that this seasonal cycle is more likely driven by the

  1. Modeling the Relationship between Safety Climate and Safety Performance in a Developing Construction Industry: A Cross-Cultural Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Hafiz; Chan, Albert P C; Utama, Wahyudi P; Gao, Ran; Zafar, Irfan

    2017-03-28

    This study attempts to validate a safety performance (SP) measurement model in the cross-cultural setting of a developing country. In addition, it highlights the variations in investigating the relationship between safety climate (SC) factors and SP indicators. The data were collected from forty under-construction multi-storey building projects in Pakistan. Based on the results of exploratory factor analysis, a SP measurement model was hypothesized. It was tested and validated by conducting confirmatory factor analysis on calibration and validation sub-samples respectively. The study confirmed the significant positive impact of SC on safety compliance and safety participation , and negative impact on number of self-reported accidents/injuries . However, number of near-misses could not be retained in the final SP model because it attained a lower standardized path coefficient value. Moreover, instead of safety participation , safety compliance established a stronger impact on SP. The study uncovered safety enforcement and promotion as a novel SC factor, whereas safety rules and work practices was identified as the most neglected factor. The study contributed to the body of knowledge by unveiling the deviations in existing dimensions of SC and SP. The refined model is expected to concisely measure the SP in the Pakistani construction industry, however, caution must be exercised while generalizing the study results to other developing countries.

  2. Forecasting differences in life expectancy by education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Pieter; Peters, Frederik; Mackenbach, Johan; Nusselder, Wilma

    2016-07-01

    Forecasts of life expectancy (LE) have fuelled debates about the sustainability and dependability of pension and healthcare systems. Of relevance to these debates are inequalities in LE by education. In this paper, we present a method of forecasting LE for different educational groups within a population. As a basic framework we use the Li-Lee model that was developed to forecast mortality coherently for different groups. We adapted this model to distinguish between overall, sex-specific, and education-specific trends in mortality, and extrapolated these time trends in a flexible manner. We illustrate our method for the population aged 65 and over in the Netherlands, using several data sources and spanning different periods. The results suggest that LE is likely to increase for all educational groups, but that differences in LE between educational groups will widen. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the advantages of our proposed method.

  3. Shapes of leaves with parallel venation. Modelling of the Epipactis sp. (Orchidaceae leaves with the help of a system of coupled elastic beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jakubska-Busse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Static properties of leaves with parallel venation, with particular emphasis on the genus EpipactisZinn, 1757 (Orchidaceae, Neottieae have been modelled with coupled quasi-parallel elastic “beams.” The non-linear theory of strongly bended beams have been employed. The resulting boundary-value problem has been solved numerically with the help of the finite-difference method. Possible dislocations resulting in additional Dirac-delta like forces have been take into account. Morphological similarity of the model and real leaves has been obtained. In particular, the concentrated forces have been shown to cause undulation in the leaves.

  4. Investment Dynamics with Natural Expectations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Andreas; Hebert, Benjamin; Laibson, David

    2012-01-01

    We study an investment model in which agents have the wrong beliefs about the dynamic properties of fundamentals. Specifically, we assume that agents underestimate the rate of mean reversion. The model exhibits the following six properties: (i) Beliefs are excessively optimistic in good times and excessively pessimistic in bad times. (ii) Asset prices are too volatile. (iii) Excess returns are negatively autocorrelated. (iv) High levels of corporate profits predict negative future excess returns. (v) Real economic activity is excessively volatile; the economy experiences amplified investment cycles. (vi) Corporate profits are positively autocorrelated in the short run and negatively autocorrelated in the medium run. The paper provides an illustrative model of animal spirits, amplified business cycles, and excess volatility. PMID:23243469

  5. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Lavanchy, Paula Maria Martinez; Marin-Cevada, Vianey

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent ...

  6. Comparative analysis of tree classification models for detecting fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense (TR4) based on multi soil sensor parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estuar, Maria Regina Justina; Victorino, John Noel; Coronel, Andrei; Co, Jerelyn; Tiausas, Francis; Señires, Chiara Veronica

    2017-09-01

    Use of wireless sensor networks and smartphone integration design to monitor environmental parameters surrounding plantations is made possible because of readily available and affordable sensors. Providing low cost monitoring devices would be beneficial, especially to small farm owners, in a developing country like the Philippines, where agriculture covers a significant amount of the labor market. This study discusses the integration of wireless soil sensor devices and smartphones to create an application that will use multidimensional analysis to detect the presence or absence of plant disease. Specifically, soil sensors are designed to collect soil quality parameters in a sink node from which the smartphone collects data from via Bluetooth. Given these, there is a need to develop a classification model on the mobile phone that will report infection status of a soil. Though tree classification is the most appropriate approach for continuous parameter-based datasets, there is a need to determine whether tree models will result to coherent results or not. Soil sensor data that resides on the phone is modeled using several variations of decision tree, namely: decision tree (DT), best-fit (BF) decision tree, functional tree (FT), Naive Bayes (NB) decision tree, J48, J48graft and LAD tree, where decision tree approaches the problem by considering all sensor nodes as one. Results show that there are significant differences among soil sensor parameters indicating that there are variances in scores between the infected and uninfected sites. Furthermore, analysis of variance in accuracy, recall, precision and F1 measure scores from tree classification models homogeneity among NBTree, J48graft and J48 tree classification models.

  7. Exact rational expectations, cointegration, and reduced rank regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    We interpret the linear relations from exact rational expectations models as restrictions on the parameters of the statistical model called the cointegrated vector autoregressive model for non-stationary variables. We then show how reduced rank regression, Anderson (1951), plays an important role...

  8. Exact rational expectations, cointegration, and reduced rank regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    2008-01-01

    We interpret the linear relations from exact rational expectations models as restrictions on the parameters of the statistical model called the cointegrated vector autoregressive model for non-stationary variables. We then show how reduced rank regression, Anderson (1951), plays an important role...

  9. Exact Rational Expectations, Cointegration, and Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders Rygh

    We interpret the linear relations from exact rational expectations models as restrictions on the parameters of the statistical model called the cointegrated vector autoregressive model for non-stationary variables. We then show how reduced rank regression, Anderson (1951), plays an important role...

  10. Shapes of leaves with parallel venation. Modelling of the Epipactis sp. (Orchidaceae) leaves with the help of a system of coupled elastic beams

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubska-Busse, Anna; Janowicz, Maciej; Ochnio, Luiza; Jackowska-Zduniak, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Static properties of leaves with parallel venation, with particular emphasis on the genus EpipactisZinn, 1757 (Orchidaceae, Neottieae) have been modelled with coupled quasi-parallel elastic “beams.” The non-linear theory of strongly bended beams have been employed. The resulting boundary-value problem has been solved numerically with the help of the finite-difference method. Possible dislocations resulting in additional Dirac-delta like forces have been take into account. Morphological simila...

  11. Keynes, investment, unemployment and expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ron P.; Zoega, Gylfi

    2009-01-01

    In Keynes' General Theory, investment determines effective demand, which determines unemployment and the labour market plays a negligible role. In New Keynesian models, labour market institutions determine the natural rate of unemployment and the speed at which unemployment adjusts to it. Investment is mostly ignored as a key variable behind the problem of high unemployment, despite a strong empirical association between investment and unemployment. We discuss the evolution of the 'Keynesian'...

  12. Comparison of a static and a dynamic in vitro model to estimate the bioaccessibility of As, Cd, Pb and Hg from food reference materials Fucus sp. (IAEA-140/TM) and Lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Escribano, Silvia; Denis, Sylvain; Blanquet-Diot, Stephanie; Calatayud, Marta; Barrios, Laura; Velez, Dinoraz; Alric, Monique; Montoro, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccessibility, the fraction of an element solubilized during gastrointestinal digestion and available for absorption, is a factor that should be considered when evaluating the health risk of contaminants from food. Static and dynamic models that mimic human physiological conditions have been used to evaluate bioaccessibility. This preliminary study compares the bioaccessibility of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) in two food certified reference materials (CRMs) (seaweed: Fucus sp., IAEA-140/TM; Lobster hepatopancreas: TORT-2), using two in vitro gastrointestinal digestion methods: a static method (SM) and a dynamic multicompartment method (TIM-1). There are significant differences (p < 0.05) between the bioaccessible values of As, Cd, Pb and Hg obtained by SM and TIM-1 in the two CRMs. The specific form in which the elements studied are present in the CRM may help to explain the bioaccessibility values obtained. - Research Highlights: →Data are reported for As, Cd, Pb and Hg bioaccessibility from food CRMs. →The static and TIM-1 methods give significantly different bioaccessibility values. →The possible influence of speciation on bioaccessibility is discussed. →To improve bioaccessibility quality data, food reference materials are needed.

  13. Comparison of a static and a dynamic in vitro model to estimate the bioaccessibility of As, Cd, Pb and Hg from food reference materials Fucus sp. (IAEA-140/TM) and Lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Escribano, Silvia [Instituto de Agroquimica y Tecnologia de Alimentos (IATA-CSIC), Apdo. 73, 46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Denis, Sylvain; Blanquet-Diot, Stephanie [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Auvergne, ERT 18, Conception ingenierie et developpement de l' aliment et du medicament, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Calatayud, Marta [Instituto de Agroquimica y Tecnologia de Alimentos (IATA-CSIC), Apdo. 73, 46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Barrios, Laura [Departamento de Informatica Cientifica (SGAI-CSIC), C/ Pinar 19, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Velez, Dinoraz, E-mail: deni@iata.csic.es [Instituto de Agroquimica y Tecnologia de Alimentos (IATA-CSIC), Apdo. 73, 46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Alric, Monique [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Auvergne, ERT 18, Conception ingenierie et developpement de l' aliment et du medicament, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Montoro, Rosa [Instituto de Agroquimica y Tecnologia de Alimentos (IATA-CSIC), Apdo. 73, 46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccessibility, the fraction of an element solubilized during gastrointestinal digestion and available for absorption, is a factor that should be considered when evaluating the health risk of contaminants from food. Static and dynamic models that mimic human physiological conditions have been used to evaluate bioaccessibility. This preliminary study compares the bioaccessibility of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) in two food certified reference materials (CRMs) (seaweed: Fucus sp., IAEA-140/TM; Lobster hepatopancreas: TORT-2), using two in vitro gastrointestinal digestion methods: a static method (SM) and a dynamic multicompartment method (TIM-1). There are significant differences (p < 0.05) between the bioaccessible values of As, Cd, Pb and Hg obtained by SM and TIM-1 in the two CRMs. The specific form in which the elements studied are present in the CRM may help to explain the bioaccessibility values obtained. - Research Highlights: {yields}Data are reported for As, Cd, Pb and Hg bioaccessibility from food CRMs. {yields}The static and TIM-1 methods give significantly different bioaccessibility values. {yields}The possible influence of speciation on bioaccessibility is discussed. {yields}To improve bioaccessibility quality data, food reference materials are needed.

  14. The expected results method for data verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monday, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The credibility of United States Army analytical experiments using distributed simulation depends on the quality of the simulation, the pedigree of the input data, and the appropriateness of the simulation system to the problem. The second of these factors is best met by using classified performance data from the Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity (AMSAA) for essential battlefield behaviors, like sensors, weapon fire, and damage assessment. Until recently, using classified data has been a time-consuming and expensive endeavor: it requires significant technical expertise to load, and it is difficult to verify that it works correctly. Fortunately, new capabilities, tools, and processes are available that greatly reduce these costs. This paper will discuss these developments, a new method to verify that all of the components are configured and operate properly, and the application to recent Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC) experiments. Recent developments have focused improving the process to load the data. OneSAF has redesigned their input data file formats and structures so that they correspond exactly with the Standard File Format (SFF) defined by AMSAA, ARCIC developed a library of supporting configurations that correlate directly to the AMSAA nomenclature, and the Entity Validation Tool was designed to quickly execute the essential models with a test-jig approach to identify problems with the loaded data. The missing part of the process is provided by the new Expected Results Method. Instead of the usual subjective assessment of quality, e.g., "It looks about right to me", this new approach compares the performance of a combat model with authoritative expectations to quickly verify that the model, data, and simulation are all working correctly. Integrated together, these developments now make it possible to use AMSAA classified performance data with minimal time and maximum assurance that the experiment's analytical results will be of the highest

  15. Toxicity of Bioactive and Probiotic Marine Bacteria and Their Secondary Metabolites in Artemia sp. and Caenorhabditis elegans as Eukaryotic Model Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, Anna; Månsson, Maria; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    or both model eukaryotes. The toxicity of P. luteoviolacea S4060 could be related to the production of the antibacterial compound pentabromopseudilin, while the adverse effect observed in the presence of P. halotolerans S2753 and V. coralliilyticus S2052 could not be explained by the production...... of holomycin nor andrimid, the respective antibiotic compounds in these organisms. In contrast, the tropodithietic acid (TDA)-producing bacteria Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395 and Ruegeria mobilis F1926 and TDA itself had no adverse effect on the target organisms. These results reaffirm TDA...

  16. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Èile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckiisubgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13NT ( = DSM 26257T = CCUG 63287T), Bin4NT ( = DSM 26254T = CCUG 63291T), Hon2NT ( = DSM 26255T = CCUG 63289T), Hma8NT ( = DSM 26256T = CCUG 63629T), Hma2NT ( = DSM 26263T = CCUG 63633T), Bma5NT ( = DSM 26265T = CCUG 63301T) and Biut2NT ( = DSM 26262T = CCUG 63631T). PMID:24944337

  17. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers. 

  18. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers.

  19. Ecdysteroids from a Zoanthus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksamrarn, Apichart; Jankam, Aroon; Tarnchompoo, Bongkoch; Putchakarn, Sumaitt

    2002-08-01

    A new ecdysteroid, zoanthusterone, has been isolated from a marine zoanthid, Zoanthus sp. Ten known ecdysteroids, ponasterone A, 20-hydroxyecdysone 2-acetate, viticosterone E, integristerone A 25-acetate, 2-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone, ecdysone, ajugasterone C, dacryhainansterone, inokosterone, and 20-hydroxyecdysone, have also been isolated. This is the first report of ecdysteroids in a Zoanthus species.

  20. Sporulation of Cyclospora sp. oocysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, H V; Paton, C A; Mitambo, M M; Girdwood, R W

    1997-01-01

    Cyclospora sp. oocysts sporulated maximally at 22 and 30 degrees C for 14 days retarded sporulation. Up to 12% of human- and baboon-derived oocysts previously stored at 4 degrees C for 1 to 2 months sporulated when stored for 6 to 7 days at 30 degrees C.

  1. Distribution of the number of Eurytrema sp. eggs per gram of feces in naturally infected cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belém, P A; Oliveira, M R; Padovani, C R

    1993-09-01

    Eurytrema sp. egg counts (epg) in the feces of naturally infected cattle were performed and the technique employed showed 94.2% probability of detecting positive cases of the infection with a single examination independently of the host parasite burden. It was also demonstrated that the epg of Eurytrema sp. follows a negative binomial distribution model and is characterized by its small magnitude.

  2. Flux Balance Analysis of Cyanobacterial Metabolism.The Metabolic Network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knoop, H.; Gründel, M.; Zilliges, Y.; Lehmann, R.; Hoffmann, S.; Lockau, W.; Steuer, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2013), e1003081-e1003081 ISSN 1553-7358 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : SP STRAIN PCC-6803 * SP ATCC 51142 * photoautotrophic metabolism * anacystis-nidulans * reconstructions * pathway * plants * models * growth Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  3. Of Hope, Fear and Rational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Villy

    2011-01-01

    The study explores how gender and differences in preferences affect subjective expectations among a group of students.......The study explores how gender and differences in preferences affect subjective expectations among a group of students....

  4. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. Post-Procedure. This new educational video for GI patients, produced by the ...

  5. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. ... Center GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Video and Audio Podcasts Digestive ...

  6. C-Section Recovery: What to Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also recovering from pregnancy. Here's what to expect: Vaginal discharge (lochia). Expect a bright red, heavy flow of ... your health care provider if you have heavy vaginal bleeding, discharge with a foul odor, or you have a ...

  7. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reflect the current state-of-the-art scientific work and are based on the principles of evidence- ... Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. ...

  8. Components of attention modulated by temporal expectation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik; Vangkilde, Signe Allerup; Bundesen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    By varying the probabilities that a stimulus would appear at particular times after the presentation of a cue and modeling the data by the theory of visual attention (Bundesen, 1990), Vangkilde, Coull, and Bundesen (2012) provided evidence that the speed of encoding a singly presented stimulus...... conditions. In line with the Easterbrook (1959) hypothesis, under high temporal expectancy, the processing was also more focused (selective). First, the storage capacity of VSTM was lower, so that fewer stimuli were encoded into VSTM. Second, the distribution of attentional weights across stimuli was less...... even: The efficiency of selecting targets rather than distractors for encoding into VSTM was higher, as was the spread of the attentional weights of the target letters....

  9. Expected Anomalies in the Fossil Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Fischer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of intermediates in the fossil record has been frequently discussed ever since Darwin. The extent of ‘gaps’ (missing transitional stages has been used to argue against gradual evolution from a common ancestor. Traditionally, gaps have often been explained by the improbability of fossilization and the discontinuous selection of found fossils. Here we take an analytical approach and demonstrate why, under certain sampling conditions, we may not expect intermediates to be found. Using a simple null model, we show mathematically that the question of whether a taxon sampled from some time in the past is likely to be morphologically intermediate to other samples (dated earlier and later depends on the shape and dimensions of the underlying phylogenetic tree that connects the taxa, and the times from which the fossils are sampled.

  10. Expected satiation alone does not predict actual intake of desserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillocheau, Etienne; Davidenko, Olga; Marsset-Baglieri, Agnès; Darcel, Nicolas; Gaudichon, Claire; Tomé, Daniel; Fromentin, Gilles

    2018-04-01

    The degree to which consumers expect foods to satisfy hunger, referred to as expected satiation, has been reported to predict food intake. Yet this relationship has not been established precisely, at a quantitative level. We sought to explore this relationship in detail by determining whether expected satiation predicts the actual intake of semi-solid desserts. Two separate experiments were performed: the first used variations of a given food (eight apple purées), while the second involved a panel of different foods within a given category (eight desserts). Both experiments studied the consumption of two products assigned to volunteers based on their individual liking and expected satiation ratings, given ad libitum at the end of a standardised meal. A linear model was used to find predictors of food intake and included expected satiation scores, palatability scores, BMI, age, sex, TFEQ-R, TFEQ-D, water consumption during the meal, reported frequency of eating desserts, and reported frequency of consuming tested products as explanatory variables. Expected satiation was a significant predictor of actual food intake in both experiments (apple purée: F(1,97) = 18.60, P < .001; desserts: F(1,106) = 9.05, P < .01), along with other parameters such as product palatability and the volunteers' age, sex and food restriction (variation explained by the model/expected satiation in the experiments: 57%/23% and 36%/17%, respectively). However, we found a significant gap between expected and actual consumption of desserts, on group and on individual level. Our results confirm the importance of expected satiation as a predictor of subsequent food intake, but highlight the need to study individual consumption behaviour and preferences in order to fully understand the role of expected satiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expected Business Conditions and Bond Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jonas Nygaard

    This paper studies the predictability of bond risk premia by means of expectations to future business conditions using survey forecasts from the Survey of Professional Forecasters. We show that expected business conditions consistently affect excess bond returns and that the inclusion of expected...

  12. Master's degree studies: Expectations versus reality | Swanepoel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, I discuss to what extent the expectations of government, universities as provider institutions, and students as clients are reconcilable regarding master's degree studies. I also consider the position of the lecturer, who is expected to produce whilst being caught between the expectations of these stakeholders.

  13. High Performance Expectations: Concept and causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher

    2017-01-01

    High performance expectations (HPE) are central in public management because employees tend to contribute more when their leaders have high expectations to them. However, we know little about how leaders make it clear to employees that they have these high expectations. Building on transformation...

  14. Measuring Risk When Expected Losses Are Unbounded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Balbás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method to introduce coherent risk measures for risks with infinite expectation, such as those characterized by some Pareto distributions. Extensions of the conditional value at risk, the weighted conditional value at risk and other examples are given. Actuarial applications are analyzed, such as extensions of the expected value premium principle when expected losses are unbounded.

  15. Raw materials from the region of Rio Claro - SP for the manufacture of ceramic coatings: technological characteristics and geological-technological modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, R.A.; Roveri, C.D.; Maestrelli, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    The Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Polo (PCSG) is the largest national producer of ceramic tiles, located in east-central region of Sao Paulo, encompassing different cities. PCSG uses various clays as the main raw material from the Corumbatai Formation, which is inserted in the Sedimentary Basin of Parana, with more than 1.5 square kilometers. In this context, X-ray diffractograms of samples from different areas of PCSG were used for application of the cluster analysis. Aiming to group the samples in families and subsequently to seek the most representative for the complete analysis. Also, ceramic tests were made by the following methods: the green bulk density after pressing, flexural strength modulus for green. , tests were conducted after firing at 1070 °C and 1120 °C: apparent density after drying, flexural modulus; after firing: apparent density after firing, water absorption linear shrinkage sintering, apparent porosity, modulus of resistance to bending after burning. Further, from the georeferenced sample were created tables for industry in the area, to facilitate the identification of new sample by XRD. Furthermore, the 3D model of the region was developed from the interesting characteristics for ceramic use, using Micromine Mining Software, Enterprise Micromine. (author)

  16. Dietary intervention with green dwarf banana flour (Musa sp AAA) prevents intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarminio, Viviane; Fruet, Andrea C; Witaicenis, Aline; Rall, Vera L M; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-03-01

    Dietary products are among the therapeutic approaches used to modify intestinal microflora and to promote protective effects during the intestinal inflammatory process. Because the banana plant is rich in resistant starch, which is used by colonic microbiota for the anaerobic production of the short-chain fatty acids that serve as a major fuel source for colonocytes: first, green dwarf banana flour produces protective effects on the intestinal inflammation acting as a prebiotic and, second, combination of this dietary supplementation with prednisolone presents synergistic effects. For this, we used the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Our results revealed that the protective effect produced by a combination of 10% green dwarf banana flour with prednisolone was more pronounced than those promoted by a single administration of prednisolone or a diet containing 10% or 20% banana flour. This beneficial effect was associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status because the banana flour diet prevented the glutathione depletion and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity was associated with an inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity, a reduction in macroscopic and microscopic scores, and an extension of the lesions. In conclusion, the dietary use of the green dwarf banana flour constitutes an important dietary supplement and complementary medicine product to prevention and treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Galaxies appear simpler than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, M J; Romano, J D; Garcia-Appadoo, D A; West, A A; Dalcanton, J J; Cortese, L

    2008-10-23

    Galaxies are complex systems the evolution of which apparently results from the interplay of dynamics, star formation, chemical enrichment and feedback from supernova explosions and supermassive black holes. The hierarchical theory of galaxy formation holds that galaxies are assembled from smaller pieces, through numerous mergers of cold dark matter. The properties of an individual galaxy should be controlled by six independent parameters including mass, angular momentum, baryon fraction, age and size, as well as by the accidents of its recent haphazard merger history. Here we report that a sample of galaxies that were first detected through their neutral hydrogen radio-frequency emission, and are thus free from optical selection effects, shows five independent correlations among six independent observables, despite having a wide range of properties. This implies that the structure of these galaxies must be controlled by a single parameter, although we cannot identify this parameter from our data set. Such a degree of organization appears to be at odds with hierarchical galaxy formation, a central tenet of the cold dark matter model in cosmology.

  18. The SP Theory of Intelligence: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gerard Wolff

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is an overview of the SP theory of intelligence, which aims to simplify and integrate concepts across artificial intelligence, mainstream computing and human perception and cognition, with information compression as a unifying theme. It is conceived of as a brain-like system that receives "New" information and stores some or all of it in compressed form as "Old" information; and it is realised in the form of a computer model, a first version of the SP machine. The matching and unification of patterns and the concept of multiple alignment are central ideas. Using heuristic techniques, the system builds multiple alignments that are "good" in terms of information compression. For each multiple alignment, probabilities may be calculated for associated inferences. Unsupervised learning is done by deriving new structures from partial matches between patterns and via heuristic search for sets of structures that are "good" in terms of information compression. These are normally ones that people judge to be "natural", in accordance with the "DONSVIC" principle—the discovery of natural structures via information compression. The SP theory provides an interpretation for concepts and phenomena in several other areas, including "computing", aspects of mathematics and logic, the representation of knowledge, natural language processing, pattern recognition, several kinds of reasoning, information storage and retrieval, planning and problem solving, information compression, neuroscience and human perception and cognition. Examples include the parsing and production of language with discontinuous dependencies in syntax, pattern recognition at multiple levels of abstraction and its integration with part-whole relations, nonmonotonic reasoning and reasoning with default values, reasoning in Bayesian networks, including "explaining away", causal diagnosis, and the solving of a geometric analogy problem.

  19. A New Double Digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR Method for Simultaneous Bacteria DNA-Typing and Confirmation of Species: An Acinetobacter sp. Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojowska, Karolina; Krawczyk, Beata

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new ddLMS PCR (double digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR) method based on restriction site polymorphism upstream from the specific target sequence for the simultaneous identification and differentiation of bacterial strains. The ddLMS PCR combines a simple PCR used for species or genus identification and the LM PCR strategy for strain differentiation. The bacterial identification is confirmed in the form of the PCR product(s), while the length of the PCR product makes it possible to differentiate between bacterial strains. If there is a single copy of the target sequence within genomic DNA, one specific PCR product is created (simplex ddLMS PCR), whereas for multiple copies of the gene the fingerprinting patterns can be obtained (multiplex ddLMS PCR). The described ddLMS PCR method is designed for rapid and specific strain differentiation in medical and microbiological studies. In comparison to other LM PCR it has substantial advantages: enables specific species' DNA-typing without the need for pure bacterial culture selection, is not sensitive to contamination with other cells or genomic DNA, and gives univocal “band-based” results, which are easy to interpret. The utility of ddLMS PCR was shown for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, the genetically closely related and phenotypically similar species and also important nosocomial pathogens, for which currently, there are no recommended methods for screening, typing and identification. In this article two models are proposed: 3′ recA-ddLMS PCR-MaeII/RsaI for Acb complex interspecific typing and 5′ rrn-ddLMS PCR-HindIII/ApaI for Acinetobacter baumannii intraspecific typing. ddLMS PCR allows not only for DNA-typing but also for confirmation of species in one reaction. Also, practical guidelines for designing a diagnostic test based on ddLMS PCR for genotyping different species of bacteria are provided. PMID:25522278

  20. A new double digestion ligation mediated suppression PCR method for simultaneous bacteria DNA-typing and confirmation of species: an Acinetobacter sp. model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stojowska

    Full Text Available We have designed a new ddLMS PCR (double digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR method based on restriction site polymorphism upstream from the specific target sequence for the simultaneous identification and differentiation of bacterial strains. The ddLMS PCR combines a simple PCR used for species or genus identification and the LM PCR strategy for strain differentiation. The bacterial identification is confirmed in the form of the PCR product(s, while the length of the PCR product makes it possible to differentiate between bacterial strains. If there is a single copy of the target sequence within genomic DNA, one specific PCR product is created (simplex ddLMS PCR, whereas for multiple copies of the gene the fingerprinting patterns can be obtained (multiplex ddLMS PCR. The described ddLMS PCR method is designed for rapid and specific strain differentiation in medical and microbiological studies. In comparison to other LM PCR it has substantial advantages: enables specific species' DNA-typing without the need for pure bacterial culture selection, is not sensitive to contamination with other cells or genomic DNA, and gives univocal "band-based" results, which are easy to interpret. The utility of ddLMS PCR was shown for Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb complex, the genetically closely related and phenotypically similar species and also important nosocomial pathogens, for which currently, there are no recommended methods for screening, typing and identification. In this article two models are proposed: 3' recA-ddLMS PCR-MaeII/RsaI for Acb complex interspecific typing and 5' rrn-ddLMS PCR-HindIII/ApaI for Acinetobacter baumannii intraspecific typing. ddLMS PCR allows not only for DNA-typing but also for confirmation of species in one reaction. Also, practical guidelines for designing a diagnostic test based on ddLMS PCR for genotyping different species of bacteria are provided.

  1. Petroleum systems and hydrocarbon accumulation models in the Santos Basin, SP, Brazil; Sistemas petroliferos e modelos de acumulacao de hidrocarbonetos na Bacia de Santos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hung Kiang; Assine, Mario Luis; Correa, Fernando Santos; Tinen, Julio Setsuo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Estudos de Bacias]. E-mails: chang@rc.unesp.br; assine@rc.unesp.br; fscorrea@rc.unesp.br; jstinen@rc.unesp.br; Vidal, Alexandre Campane; Koike, Luzia [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos de Petroleo]. E-mails: vidal@ige.unicamp.br; luzia@iqm.unicamp.br

    2008-07-01

    The Santos Basin was formed by rifting process during Mesozoic Afro-American separation. Sediment accumulation initiated with fluvial-lacustrine deposits, passing to evaporitic stage until reaching marginal basin stages. The analysis of hydrocarbon potential of Santos Basin identified two petroleum systems: Guaratiba-Guaruja and Itajai-Acu-Ilhabela. The Guaratiba Formation is less known in the Santos Basin because of small number of wells that have penetrated the rift section. By comparison with Campos Basin, hydrocarbons are of saline lacustrine origin deposited in Aptian age. Analogous to Campos Basin the major source rock is of saline-lacustrine origin, which has been confirmed from geochemical analyses of oil samples recovered from the various fields. These analyses also identified marine source rock contribution, indicating the Itajai-Acu source rock went through oil-window, particularly in structural lows generated by halokynesis. Models of hydrocarbon accumulation consider Guaratiba Formacao as the major source rock for shallow carbonate reservoirs of Guaruja Formacao and for late Albian to Miocene turbidites, as well as siliciclastic and carbonate reservoirs of the rift phase. Migration occurs along salt window and through carrier-beds. The seal rock is composed of shales and limestones intercalated with reservoir facies of the post-rift section and by thick evaporites overlying rift section, especially in the deeper water. In the shallow portion, shale inter-tongued with reservoir rocks is the main seal rock. The hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the central-north portion of the basin is caused by overburden of a thick Senonian section. Traps can be structural (rollovers and turtle), stratigraphic (pinch-outs) and mixed origins (pinch-outs of turbidites against salt domes). (author)

  2. Gompertz-Makeham Life Expectancies: Expressions and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missov, Trifon; Lenart, Adam

    2013-01-01

    In a population of individuals, whose mortality is governed by a Gompertz–Makeham hazard, we derive closed-form solutions to the life-expectancy integral, corresponding to the cases of homogeneous and gamma-heterogeneous populations, as well as in the presence/absence of the Makeham term. Derived...... expressions contain special functions that aid constructing high-accuracy approximations, which can be used to study the elasticity of life expectancy with respect to model parameters. Knowledge of Gompertz–Makeham life expectancies aids constructing life-table exposures....

  3. Prediction error variance and expected response to selection, when selection is based on the best predictor - for Gaussian and threshold characters, traits following a Poisson mixed model and survival traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Holst; Korsgaard, Inge Riis; Jensen, Just

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we consider selection based on the best predictor of animal additive genetic values in Gaussian linear mixed models, threshold models, Poisson mixed models, and log normal frailty models for survival data (including models with time-dependent covariates with associated fixed...

  4. Assessment of In Vivo Antidiabetic Properties of Umbelliferone and Lupeol Constituents of Banana (Musa sp. var. Nanjangud Rasa Bale) Flower in Hyperglycaemic Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ramith; S Shirahatti, Prithvi; S, Nanjunda Swamy; Zameer, Farhan; Lakkappa Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura; M N, Nagendra Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Banana is an extensively cultivated plant worldwide, mainly for its fruit, while its ancillary product, the banana flower is consumed as a vegetable and is highly recommended for diabetics in the traditional Indian medicine system. This study is based on an investigation of the in vivo antihyperglycaemic activity of Umbelliferone (C1) and Lupeol (C2) isolated from the ethanol extract of banana flower (EF) in alloxan induced diabetic rat model. Diabetic rats which were administered with C1, C2 and EF (100 and 200 mg/kg b. wt.) for 4 weeks showed deterioration in fasting hyperglycaemia and reversal of abnormalities in serum/urine protein, urea and creatinine, when compared to the diabetic control group of rats. The diabetic group of rats fed with EF, C1 and C2 (100 mg/kg b. wt.) once daily, for a period of 28 days resulted in a significant reduction of diabetic symptoms viz., polyphagia, polydipsia, polyuria and urine sugar together with an improved body weight. HbA1c extent was reduced whereas levels of insulin and Hb were increased. Both the extract and compounds wielded positive impacts in diabetic rats by reversal of altered activities of hepatic marker enzymes viz., aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP); glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase); shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase); gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase) and pyruvate kinase. The characteristic diabetic complications such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia also significantly reverted to normal in the serum/liver of diabetic rats. Besides these, the treatment increased the activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the serum and liver. The histological observations revealed a marked regeneration of the β-cells in the drug treated diabetic rats. In conclusion, the present study illustrates that EF, C1 and C2 enhances the glycolytic activities, besides

  5. Misconceptions and false expectations in neutral evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS Y. VALENZUELA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutral evolution results from random recurrent mutation and genetic drift. A small part of random evolution, that which is related to protein or DNA polymorphisms, is the subject of the Neutral Theory of Evolution. One of the foundations of this theory is the demonstration that the mutation rate (m is equal to the substitution rate. Since both rates are independent of population size, they are independent of drift, which is dependent upon population size. Neutralists have erroneously equated the substitution rate with the fixation rate, despite the fact that they are antithetical conceptions. The neutralists then applied the random walk stochastic model to justify alleles or bases that were fixated or eliminated. In this model, once the allele or base frequencies reach the monomorphic states (values of 1.0 or 0.0, the absorbing barriers, they can no longer return to the polymorphic state. This operates in a pure mathematical model. If recurrent mutation occurs (as in biotic real systems fixation and elimination are impossible. A population of bacteria in which m=10-8 base mutation (or substitution/site/generation and the reproduction rate is 1000 cell cycle/year should replace all its genome bases in approximately 100,000 years. The expected situation for all sites is polymorphism for the four bases rather than monomorphism at 1.0 or 0.0 frequencies. If fixation and elimination of a base for more than 500,000 years are impossible, then most of the neutral theory is untenable. A new complete neutral model, which allows for recurrent substitutions, is proposed here based on recurrent mutation or substitution and drift alone. The model fits a binomial or Poisson distribution and not a geometric one, as does neutral theory.

  6. PRICE VOLATILITY, EXPECTATIONS AND MONETARY POLICY IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajimuda Olumide

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The study has as its objectives, to determine the influence of price volatility and price expectation in the rate of inflation as a measure of the price level. In addition, the study sought to evaluate ipso facto the extent to which monetary policy has influenced inflation by reducing price volatility and expectation towards zero. The study applied the maximum likelihood estimator in addition to the GARCH (p, q model to estimate the steady state model of inflation. As a measure of volatility, the conditional standard deviation for inflation was obtained from the GARCH model. Inflation expectation was solved using the Gauss-Siedel algorithm for forward-looking expectations with actual inflation series as start values. The VAR model was estimated to determine the impulse response functions and the variance decomposition using Cholesky decomposition so as to determine the response to monetary policy of inflation, its volatility and expectations. The study found that inflation expectation and price volatility not only influence the contemporaneous inflation, it also results in persistence in interest rate differential and monetary growth, thus compromising the objective of monetary policy. The study recommends that explicit anchoring of expectations and volatility ensure that monetary policy is forward-looking and that a symmetric inflation target strengthens intertemporal sustainability in monetary policy management. In addition, the behaviour of inflation ex post and the speed of convergence of inflation expectations should provide the basis for determining the most appropriate pulse of nominal interest rate in the economy which will keep inflation trajectory consistent with the growth of the economy.

  7. Continued usage of e-learning: Expectations and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Antonio de Melo Pereira; Anatália Saraiva Martins Ramos; Adrianne Paula Vieira de Andrade; Bruna Miyuki Kasuya de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the determinants of satisfaction and the resulting continuance intention use in e-learning context. The constructs of decomposed expectancy disconfirmation theory (DEDT) are evaluated from the perspective of users of a virtual learning environment (VLE) in relation to expectations and perceived performance. An online survey collected responses from 197 students of a public management course in distance mode. Structural equation modeling was operationalize...

  8. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoddousi, Parviz; Bahrami, Nima; Chileshe, Nicholas; Hosseini, M.Reza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM) approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) technique was deployed. The study reveals that the...

  9. An Sp1/Sp3 binding polymorphism confers methylation protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanis A Boumber

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of genes show aberrant DNA hypermethylation in cancer, yet little is known about the causes of this hypermethylation. We identified RIL as a frequent methylation target in cancer. In search for factors that influence RIL hypermethylation, we found a 12-bp polymorphic sequence around its transcription start site that creates a long allele. Pyrosequencing of homozygous tumors revealed a 2.1-fold higher methylation for the short alleles (P<0.001. Bisulfite sequencing of cancers heterozygous for RIL showed that the short alleles are 3.1-fold more methylated than the long (P<0.001. The comparison of expression levels between unmethylated long and short EBV-transformed cell lines showed no difference in expression in vivo. Electrophorectic mobility shift assay showed that the inserted region of the long allele binds Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors, a binding that is absent in the short allele. Transient transfection of RIL allele-specific transgenes showed no effects of the additional Sp1 site on transcription early on. However, stable transfection of methylation-seeded constructs showed gradually decreasing transcription levels from the short allele with eventual spreading of de novo methylation. In contrast, the long allele showed stable levels of expression over time as measured by luciferase and approximately 2-3-fold lower levels of methylation by bisulfite sequencing (P<0.001, suggesting that the polymorphic Sp1 site protects against time-dependent silencing. Our finding demonstrates that, in some genes, hypermethylation in cancer is dictated by protein-DNA interactions at the promoters and provides a novel mechanism by which genetic polymorphisms can influence an epigenetic state.

  10. Aspirin Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell and Tumor Growth and Downregulates Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Lee, Syng-Ook; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB). Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite. PMID:23110215

  11. Green Decision Making: Sustainable Transport and Systemic Planning (SP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    interests as regards the outcome represented by different group members. The process is guided by a facilitator and is assisted by an analyst, with the analyst providing ongoing, interactive modelling. This collective (man/machine) learning aims to lead to a final decision (or decision recommendation) about......) and soft (qualitative) operations research (OR) methods; especially the latter have a function as regards knowledge generation that relates to obtaining systemic insights. Furthermore, SP applies a process that drives group-based learning forward. The group should be formed with the different stakeholder...... the best alternative or course of action for the actual strategic planning problem. The flexibility of SP makes it adaptable to different problem types. The paper is disposed as follows: After the Introduction about green decision making, Section 2 presents five SP-perspectives, where each perspective...

  12. Identifying booms and busts in house prices under heterogeneous expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, W.; Demertzis, M.; Diks, C.; Hommes, C.; van der Leij, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce heterogeneous expectations in a standard housing market model linking housing rental levels to fundamental buying prices. Using quarterly data we estimate the model parameters for eight different countries, US, UK, NL, JP, CH, ES, SE and BE. We find that the data support heterogeneity

  13. Bubbles and crashes in house prices under heterogeneous expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, W.; Demertzis, M.; Diks, C.; Hommes, C.; van der Leij, M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce heterogeneous expectations in a standard housing market model linking housing rental levels to buying prices via imputed rents. The resulting model displays nonlinear aggregate price fluctuations around the fundamental value. For many parameter values the fundamental price is unstable,

  14. Identifying booms and busts in house prices under heterogeneous expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, W.; Demertzis, M.; Diks, C.; Hommes, C.; van der Leij, M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce heterogeneous expectations in a standard housing market model linking housing rental levels to fundamental buying prices. Using quarterly data we estimate the model parameters for eight dierent countries, US, UK, NL, JP, CH, ES, SE and BE. We find that the data support heterogeneity in

  15. Expectations of Malaysian Mothers for the Schooling of Their Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Linda J.; And Others

    A Rand study develops a model concerning mothers in Peninsular Malaysia's three major ethnic groups (Malay, Chinese, Indian), investigating relationships between their early life experiences and their expectations for education levels of their children. The model examines three of the women's early life experiences that are governed by their…

  16. Expectations, Performance, and Citizen Satisfaction with Urban Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Gregg G.

    2004-01-01

    The expectancy disconfirmation model has dominated private-sector research on customer satisfaction for several decades, yet it has not been applied to citizen satisfaction with urban services. The model views satisfaction judgments as determined--not just by product or service performance--but by a process in which consumers compare performance…

  17. Antioxidant capacity, polyphenol content and iron bioavailability from algae (Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp.) in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casal, Maria N; Ramírez, José; Leets, Irene; Pereira, Ana C; Quiroga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Marine algae are easily produced and are good sources of Fe. If this Fe is bioavailable, algae consumption could help to combat Fe deficiency and anaemia worldwide. The objective of the present study was to evaluate Fe bioavailability, polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity from three species of marine algae distributed worldwide. A total of eighty-three subjects received maize- or wheat-based meals containing marine algae (Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp.) in different proportions (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g) added to the water to prepare the dough. All meals administered contained radioactive Fe. Absorption was evaluated calculating radioactive Fe incorporation in subjects' blood. The three species of marine algae were analysed for polyphenol content and reducing power. Algae significantly increased Fe absorption in maize- or wheat-based meals, especially Sargassum sp., due to its high Fe content. Increases in absorption were dose-dependent and higher in wheat- than in maize-based meals. Total polyphenol content was 10.84, 18.43 and 80.39 gallic acid equivalents/g for Ulva sp., Porphyra sp. and Sargassum sp., respectively. The antioxidant capacity was also significantly higher in Sargassum sp. compared with the other two species analysed. Ulva sp., Sargassum sp. and Porphyra sp. are good sources of bioavailable Fe. Sargassum sp. resulted in the highest Fe intake due to its high Fe content, and a bread containing 7.5 g Sargassum sp. covers daily Fe needs. The high polyphenol content found in Sargassum sp. could be partly responsible for the antioxidant power reported here, and apparently did not affect Fe absorption.

  18. Who are you expecting? Biases in face perception reveal prior expectations for sex and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tamara Lea; Otsuka, Yumiko; Clifford, Colin Walter Giles

    2016-01-01

    A person's appearance contains a wealth of information, including indicators of their sex and age. Because first impressions can set the tone of subsequent relationships, it is crucial we form an accurate initial impression. Yet prior expectation can bias our decisions: Studies have reported biases to respond "male" when asked to report a person's sex from an image of their face and to place their age closer to their own. Perceptual expectation effects and cognitive response biases may both contribute to these inaccuracies. The current research used a Bayesian modeling approach to establish the perceptual biases involved when estimating the sex and age of an individual from their face. We demonstrate a perceptual bias for male and older faces evident under conditions of uncertainty. This suggests the well-established male bias is perceptual in origin and may be impervious to cognitive control. In comparison, the own age anchor effect is not operationalized at the perceptual level: The perceptual expectation is for a face of advanced age. Thus, distinct biases in the estimation of age operate at the perceptual and cognitive levels.

  19. Worker expectations of occupational health consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilz, R; Madan, I

    2014-04-01

    Worker beliefs and expectations influence their health and rehabilitation. However, little is known about worker expectations of occupational health (OH) consultations and if these are associated with their perceptions of health and work. To examine worker expectations of OH consultations, and whether the variability of worker expectations is associated with their perception of health and work and personal characteristics. A questionnaire on OH physicians' professional standards was developed from national guidance and validated by a survey of OH physicians. We explored 81 workers' expectations of professional standards along with their perception of health and work. Worker expectations were compared with the OH physician validation score. Associations of worker characteristics, their health and work perceptions and their expectations of professional standards were analysed by linear regression. Worker expectations of professional standards were lower when compared with the OH physician validation score (E = 3.9 versus 4.3, ΔE = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-0.66). Perceived manager support and work apprehension were associated with worker expectations (ΔE = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.29-0.86 for least versus most support; ΔE = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.41-1.36 for least versus highest apprehension). Job title, previous OH consultations and recovery expectations were not associated with worker expectations. Worker expectations of OH physicians' professional standards were lower than the standards set by national guidance as validated by the sampled OH physicians. Workers who felt more supported by their manager, and workers who were more apprehensive about the health impact of work had higher expectations of OH physicians' standards.

  20. [Study on the Visualization of the Biomass of Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp. Based on Hyperspectral Imaging Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu-lu; Wet, Xuan; Zhao, Yan-ru; Shao, Yong-ni; Qiu, Zheng-jun; He, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Effective cultivation of the microalgae is the key issue for microalgal bio-energy utilization. In nutrient rich culture conditions, the microalge have a fast growth rate, but they are more susceptible to environmental pollution and influence. So to monitor the the growth process of microalgae is significant during cultivating. Hyperspectral imaging has the advantages of both spectra and image analysis. The spectra contain abundant material quality signal and the image contains abundant spatial information of the material about the chemical distribution. It can achieve the rapid information acquisition and access a large amount of data. In this paper, the authors collected the hyperspectral images of forty-five samples of Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp., respectively. The average spectra of the region of interest (ROI) were extracted. After applying successive projection algorithm (SPA), the authors established the multiple linear regression (MLR) model with the spectra and corresponding biomass of 30 samples, 15 samples were used as the prediction set. For Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp., the correlation coefficient of prediction (r(pre)) are 0.950, 0.969 and 0.961, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for 0.010 2, 0.010 7 and 0.007 1, respectively. Finally, the authors used the MLR model to predict biomass for each pixel in the images of prediction set; images displayed in different colors for visualization based on pseudo-color images with the help of a Matlab program. The results show that using hyperspectral imaging technique to predict the biomass of Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. were better, but for the Isochrysis galbana visualization needs to be further improved. This research set the basis for rapidly detecting the growth of microalgae and using the microalgae as the bio-energy.

  1. Patients' expectations of osteopathic care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Vinette; Leach, C M Janine; Fawkes, Carol A; Moore, Ann P

    2015-10-01

    Research has shown that patients' expectations of health care and health-care practitioners are complex and may have a significant impact on outcomes of care. Little is known about the expectations of osteopathic patients. To explore osteopathic patients' expectations of private sector care. Focus groups and individual interviews with purposively selected patients; this was the qualitative phase of a mixed methods study, the final phase being a patient survey. A total of 34 adult patients currently attending for treatment at private osteopathic practices across the United Kingdom. Focus group discussions and individual interviews around expectations before, during and after osteopathic care. Thematic analysis of text data to identify topics raised by patients and to group these into broad themes. Many components of expectation were identified. A preliminary conceptual framework describing the way the therapeutic encounter is approached in osteopathy comprised five themes: individual agency, professional expertise, customer experience, therapeutic process and interpersonal relationship. The components of expectation identified in this phase of the study provided potential question topics for the survey questionnaire in the subsequent phase of the investigation. The model developed in this study may add a new perspective to existing evidence on expectations. Further research is recommended to test the findings both within private practice and the National Health Service. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Stock Market Expectations of Dutch Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Michael; van Rooij, Maarten; Winter, Joachim

    2011-04-01

    Despite its importance for the analysis of life-cycle behavior and, in particular, retirement planning, stock ownership by private households is poorly understood. Among other approaches to investigate this puzzle, recent research has started to elicit private households' expectations of stock market returns. This paper reports findings from a study that collected data over a two-year period both on households' stock market expectations (subjective probabilities of gains or losses) and on whether they own stocks. We document substantial heterogeneity in financial market expectations. Expectations are correlated with stock ownership. Over the two years of our data, stock market prices increased, and expectations of future stock market price changes also increased, lending support to the view that expectations are influenced by recent stock gains or losses.

  3. Stochastic Dominance under the Nonlinear Expected Utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinling Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1947, von Neumann and Morgenstern introduced the well-known expected utility and the related axiomatic system (see von Neumann and Morgenstern (1953. It is widely used in economics, for example, financial economics. But the well-known Allais paradox (see Allais (1979 shows that the linear expected utility has some limitations sometimes. Because of this, Peng proposed a concept of nonlinear expected utility (see Peng (2005. In this paper we propose a concept of stochastic dominance under the nonlinear expected utilities. We give sufficient conditions on which a random choice X stochastically dominates a random choice Y under the nonlinear expected utilities. We also provide sufficient conditions on which a random choice X strictly stochastically dominates a random choice Y under the sublinear expected utilities.

  4. Speed of vision depends on temporal expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Signe Allerup; Bundesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Temporal expectations play an important role in optimizing future perception and behavior, but the nature of the attentional processes affected by our expectations is still widely debated. To investigate effects of expectations on the speed of visual processing, we employed a cued single-letter r......Temporal expectations play an important role in optimizing future perception and behavior, but the nature of the attentional processes affected by our expectations is still widely debated. To investigate effects of expectations on the speed of visual processing, we employed a cued single......-letter recognition task with stimuli of varied durations terminated by pattern masks. To obtain an estimate of processing speed unconfounded by motor components, we used accuracy-based measures rather than reaction times. Eight healthy young subjects completed a total of 4,000 trials each. A symbolic cue...... measured the processing speed at times t [[gt

  5. Mental health expectancy--the European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, C; Ritchie, K; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy observed over the last decade has particular relevance for mental health conditions of old age, such as dementia. Although mental disorders have been estimated to be responsible for 60% of all disabilities, until recently population health indicators such as health...... expectancies have concentrated on calculating disability-free life expectancy based on physical functioning. In 1994, a European Network for the Calculation of Health Expectancies (Euro-REVES) was established, one of its aims being the development and promotion of mental health expectancies. Such indicators...... may have an important role in monitoring future changes in the mental health of populations and predicting service needs. This article summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the first European Conference on Mental Health Expectancy....

  6. Curcumin and synthetic analogs induce reactive oxygen species and decreases specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors by targeting microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhy, Shruti U; Kim, KyoungHyun; Larsen, Lesley; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines, and studies in this laboratory in bladder and pancreatic cancer cells show that curcumin downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of curcumin and several synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs in colon cancer cells. The effects of curcumin and synthetic analogs on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using standardized assays. The changes in Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analysed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a), miR-20a, miR-17-5p and ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 mRNA expression. The IC 50 (half-maximal) values for growth inhibition (24 hr) of colon cancer cells by curcumin and synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs of curcumin varied from 10 μM for curcumin to 0.7 μM for the most active synthetic piperidine analog RL197, which was used along with curcumin as model agents in this study. Curcumin and RL197 inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET), survivin, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and NFκB (p65 and p50). Curcumin and RL197 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione significantly attenuated curcumin- and RL197-induced growth inhibition and downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes. The mechanism of curcumin-/RL197-induced repression of Sp transcription factors was ROS-dependent and due to induction of the Sp repressors ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 and downregulation of microRNAs (miR)-27a, miR-20a and miR-17-5p that regulate these repressors. These results identify a new and highly potent

  7. Market mechanism and expectations in minority and majority games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Matteo

    2001-10-01

    We present a derivation of the minority game from a market mechanism. This shows that the minority nature of the interaction crucially depends on the expectation model of agents. The same market mechanism with different expectations leads indeed to the majority game. We study in detail the minority game without information and clarify the role of initial conditions on the dynamics. The stronger and the more heterogeneous the prior beliefs which agents hold on the best choice, the more efficient is the final stationary state. We also review the effect of market impact. Finally we discuss mixed minority-majority games in order to address the issue of whether the dynamics of the market satisfies the expectations of agents. We find that in both a minority and a majority game expectations are self-fulfilled.

  8. Status of Women in Society and Life Expectancy at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anica Novak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of the status of women in society over life expectancy at birth. Based on the data of some of the socio-economic variables for 187 countries worldwide, collected by the United Nations within United Nations Development Programme – Human Development Report, we developed a regression model of life expectancy factors. Through empirical testing of the three hypotheses which refer to different aspects of the status of women in society, we found that the employment ratio between women and men has a statistically significant negative impact on life expectancy at birth, which is, at least at first glance, unexpected. At the same time, the number of teenage births per 100 women aged 15–19 as well as gender inequality has a statistically significant negative impact on life expectancy at birth.

  9. Nature and determinants of customer expectations of service recovery in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasu, S; Rao, J

    1999-01-01

    Service recovery refers to the service provider's response to a dissatisfied customer. This article proposes a model of customer expectations of service recovery in health care services. The model discusses two types of service recovery expectations: will and should. An exploratory study indicates that industry reputation and personal experiences drive customers' "will-expectations" of service recovery while "should-expectations" can be explained via norm, fairness, social contract and hospitality theories.

  10. Estimation of Conditional Expected Value for Exponentially Autocorrelated Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Adam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Autocorrelation of signals and measurement data makes it difficult to estimate their statistical characteristics. However, the scope of usefulness of autocorrelation functions for statistical description of signal relation is narrowed down to linear processing models. The use of the conditional expected value opens new possibilities in the description of interdependence of stochastic signals for linear and non-linear models. It is described with relatively simple mathematical models with corresponding simple algorithms of their practical implementation.

  11. Accomplishments and plans of SP-100 program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    The SP-100 program is proceeding toward concept definitions for a space nuclear reactor which is safe and suitable for civilian and military applications. The selection of a specific design and demonstration of the base technologies was scheduled for the end of 1985, to be followed by engineering development and ground testing in 1986. The main current uses/users thus far anticipated are communications satellites, both military and civilian, radar (and possibly laser) surveillance and remote sensing systems, and manufacturing and other extensions of a space station growth scenario. The reactor will weigh no more than 3000 kg and must fit into the Orbiter bay with a payload and OTV. Three concepts are still under evaluation: a lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics; an in-core thermionic system with pumped sodium-potassium coolant; and a configuration with a Stirling engine to convert reactor heat into electricity. If the engineering analyses and base tests are successful, it is expected that the flight application phase can be reached by 1991 at the latest

  12. Pantoea rodasii sp. nov., Pantoea rwandensis sp. nov. and Pantoea wallisii sp. nov., isolated from Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Carrie L; Cleenwerck, Ilse; van der Westhuizen, Lorinda; Venter, Stephanus N; Coutinho, Teresa A; De Vos, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Several Gram-negative-staining, facultatively anaerobic bacterial isolates were obtained from Eucalyptus seedlings showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Colombia, Rwanda and South Africa. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing, together with partial gyrB sequencing, placed the isolates in the genus Pantoea and indicated that they constituted three novel species. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on partial sequences of gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD revealed Pantoea dispersa, Pantoea eucrina and Pantoea cypripedii as their closest phylogenetic relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization studies confirmed the classification of the new isolates as three novel species and phenotypic tests allowed them to be differentiated from their closest phylogenetic neighbours. The names Pantoea rodasii sp. nov. [type strain LMG 26273(T)=BD 943(T) (deposited with the Plant Pathogenic and Plant Protecting Bacteria Collection, South Africa)=BCC 581(T) (deposited with the Bacterial Culture Collection, Forestry and Agricultural Institute, South Africa)], Pantoea rwandensis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 26275(T)=BD 944(T)=BCC 571(T)) and Pantoea wallisii sp. nov. (type strain LMG 26277(T)=BD 946(T)=BCC 682(T)) are proposed.

  13. Test Expectancy and Memory for Important Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Catherine D.; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Prior research suggests that learners study and remember information differently depending upon the type of test they expect to later receive. The current experiments investigate how testing expectations impact the study of and memory for valuable information. Participants studied lists of words ranging in value from 1 to 10 points with the goal…

  14. Dissonant Feedback about Achievement and Teachers' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Carl J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates impact of achievement test results (N=285) on 13 sixth-grade teachers' expectations using hypotheses from cognitive dissonance theory. Shows teacher expectations changed very little as a result of feedback, and test results for both under- and overestimated students were rejected. (AH)

  15. AUDIT EXPECTATION GAP: AUDITORS IN UNENDING ROLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    Key Words: Expectation gap, Auditors, Shareholders, Self-regulation, Audit expectation. Introduction. The primary objective of ... dissatisfaction of companies' stakeholders, including shareholders, current and potential investors, creditors etc. ..... agreement with what the questionnaire seeks. In order to ensure reliability of ...

  16. Socioeconomic differences in health expectancy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Social differences in mortality rates reported in Denmark gave rise to the present study of health expectancy in different socioeconomic groups.......Social differences in mortality rates reported in Denmark gave rise to the present study of health expectancy in different socioeconomic groups....

  17. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What to Expect During a Colonoscopy Prep. Sedation. Procedure. Post-Procedure. This new educational video for GI patients, produced by the ACG Institute for Clinical Research and Education, ...

  18. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtkowiak, J.; Wild, V.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142

  19. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2003-01-01

    By indirect estimation of mortality from smoking and life table methods we estimated expected lifetime without musculoskeletal diseases among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers. We found that although life expectancy of a heavy smoker is 7 years shorter than that of a never smoker, heavy...

  20. 5 CFR 470.301 - Program expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program expectations. 470.301 Section 470.301 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PROJECTS Regulatory Requirements Pertaining to Demonstration Projects § 470.301 Program expectations. (a...

  1. Expectations as a key element in trusting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mette Apollo; Hansen, Uffe Kjærgaard; Conradsen, Maria Bosse

    Considering the need for a tangible focus for qualitative research on trusting, we propose that expectations to the behavior of others can provide that. By focusing on expectations, researchers can produce narrative descriptions that explains how trusting develops and changes. Then the key...

  2. Consumers' Attitudes and Their Inflation Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrmann, Michael; Pfajfar, Damjan; Santoro, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies consumers’ inflation expectations using micro-level data from the University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers. It shows that beyond the well-established socioeconomic factors such as income, age, or gender, inflation expectations are also related to respondents’ financial......, their bias shrinks by more than that of the average household in response to increasing media reporting about inflation....

  3. Grief Experiences and Expectance of Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowiak, Joanna; Wild, Verena; Egger, Jos

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is generally viewed as an unexpected cause of death. However, some suicides might be expected to a certain extent, which needs to be further studied. The relationships between expecting suicide, feeling understanding for the suicide, and later grief experiences were explored. In total, 142 bereaved participants completed the Grief…

  4. International Variations in Measuring Customer Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of customer expectations of library service quality and SERVQUAL as a measurement tool focuses on two studies: one that compared a survey of Chinese university students' expectations of service quality to New Zealand students; and one that investigated national culture as a source of attitudes to customer service. (Author/LRW)

  5. Video lottery: winning expectancies and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, Robert; Sévigny, Serge; Blaszczynski, Alexander; O'Connor, Kieron; Lavoie, Marc E

    2003-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of video lottery players' expectancies of winning on physiological and subjective arousal. Participants were assigned randomly to one of two experimental conditions: high and low winning expectancies. Participants played 100 video lottery games in a laboratory setting while physiological measures were recorded. Level of risk-taking was controlled. Participants were 34 occasional or regular video lottery players. They were assigned randomly into two groups of 17, with nine men and eight women in each group. The low-expectancy group played for fun, therefore expecting to win worthless credits, while the high-expectancy group played for real money. Players' experience, demographic variables and subjective arousal were assessed. Severity of problem gambling was measured with the South Oaks Gambling Screen. In order to measure arousal, the average heart rate was recorded across eight periods. Participants exposed to high as compared to low expectations experienced faster heart rate prior to and during the gambling session. According to self-reports, it is the expectancy of winning money that is exciting, not playing the game. Regardless of the level of risk-taking, expectancy of winning is a cognitive factor influencing levels of arousal. When playing for fun, gambling becomes significantly less stimulating than when playing for money.

  6. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP...... injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically....... The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation....

  7. Accounting for inertia in modal choices: some new evidence using a RP/SP dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Manca, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    proposed for both short and long RP panel datasets. We also explore new measures of inertia to test for the effect of “learning” (in the sense of acquiring experience or getting more familiar with) along the SP experiment and we disentangle this effect from the pure inertia effect. A mixed logit model...... effect is stable along the SP experiments. Inertia has been studied more extensively with panel datasets, but few investigations have used RP/SP datasets. In this paper we extend previous work in several ways. We test and compare several ways of measuring inertia, including measures that have been...... is used that allows us to account for both systematic and random taste variations in the inertia effect and for correlations among RP and SP observations. Finally we explore the relation between the utility specification (especially in the SP dataset) and the role of inertia in explaining current choices....

  8. Process optimization for the extraction of polyphenol from Malaysian brown seaweed, Sargassum sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Norra; Abdullah, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    The optimum extraction parameters of Malaysian brown seaweed, Sargassum sp. were determined by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Central Composite Face-centered Design (CCFD) was used to study the influence of extraction temperature (40-60°C), extraction time (60-180 minute) and liquid to solid ratio (20-40 mL/g) on total phenolic content (TPC) of Sargassum sp. dried extracts. The statistical analysis of the experiment indicated that extraction temperatue and time had significant effect on Sargassum sp. total phenolic contents (TPC). The CCFD showed that quadratic regression models were in good agreement with the experimental results with the coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.8066 for Sargassum sp. TPC. The extraction temperature of 40°C, extraction time of 180 minute and liquid-solid ratio of 40 mL/g were the most efficient for the extraction of polyphenols from Sargassum sp. dried powder.

  9. DISTRIBUSI Solen sp DI PERAIRAN KABUPATEN BANGKALAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ari Wahyuni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available DISTRIBUTION OF Solen sp IN BANGKALAN WATERSSolen sp potential needs to be developed on the island of Madura, particularly in Bangkalan. Solen sp utilization has increased which has the potential to overfishing. Therefore, this study aims to determine the density of Solen sp and their ecology in the waters Modung village, Modung District, Bangkalan. The experiment was conducted in April 2015 using the descriptive method. The materials used include Solen sp and physico-chemical parameters of the environment (temperature, salinity, pH, and substrate. The analyzes were conducted at the Laboratory of Marine Science, Department of Marine Sciences, Trunojoyo University of Madura by using the tool grabsampler, sieveshaker, and pipetting with gravimetric method. The analysis shows the range of values of temperature between 29-300C, salinity between 31-32 ppt, pH were 7.9-8.0 and the type of substrate in the form of sandy mud, as well as the density of Solen sp from 8-10 individuals/m2. All measurement results indicate normal conditions and in accordance with the sea water quality standard for marine life, which can be a suitable habitat for the growth and development of Solen sp. This condition is thought to affect the density of Solen sp.Keywords: Bangkalan, density, distribution, Solen sp, substrate.ABSTRAKPotensi Solen sp perlu dikembangkan di pulau Madura, khususnya di Kabupaten Bangkalan. Pemanfaatan Solen sp mengalami peningkatan sehingga berpotensi overfishing. Untuk itu, penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kepadatan Solen sp dan ekologinya di perairan desa Modung, Kecamatan Modung, Kabupaten Bangkalan. Penelitian dilaksanakan pada bulan April 2015 dengan metode deskriptif. Materi dan bahan yang digunakan diantaranya Solen sp dan parameter fisika-kimia lingkungan (suhu, salinitas, pH, dan substrat. Analisa dilakukan di Laboratorium Ilmu Kelautan, Program studi/Jurusan Ilmu Kelautan Universitas Trunojoyo Madura dengan menggunakan alat

  10. Learning to Learn: A Case for the Heterogeneous Expectations Hypothesis in Industrialized Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond W. Ng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A cobweb model is developed where the heterogeneous expectation hypothesis is examined. An agent’s heterogeneous expectation involves the development of a “higher ordered learning” process in which agents over time develop expectations that are consistent with rational expectations. In addition, as cob web models are production based systems, an agents’ heterogeneous expectations are influenced by a specialization of activities. The case of the industrialization of the U.S. hog-pork industry is used to illustrate the influence of these features on the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a modified cob-web model.

  11. Evaluation of the bioefficacy of a stabilized form of human growth hormone (SP-hGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S-B; Park, H; Koh, J; Lee, H; Kim, J

    2013-09-01

    Protein aggregation is a major obstacle in maintaining the stability of therapeutic proteins. In previous studies, fusion between a stabilizing peptide (SP) and human growth hormone (hGH) resulted in improved solubility and stability compared with hGH alone, although the bioactivity of the protein was not confirmed in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the bioefficacy of hGH and SP-hGH in vivo using a mouse model. Subcutaneous injections of 30 μg of hGH or SP-hGH were administered to 8-month-old female mice, twice a week for 14 weeks. Neither hGH nor SP-hGH significantly affected body weight or blood glucose levels compared with control mice. Interestingly, abdominal fat was significantly reduced in SP-hGH-treated mice compared with hGH-treated mice. While total cholesterol, HDL, and LDL levels were slightly higher in both groups, TG levels were significantly reduced in both SP-hGH and hGH-treated mice compared with control mice. IGF-1 levels in the liver were increased in both the SP-hGH and hGH groups, thereby inducing liver cell proliferation. These results suggest that SP fusion with hGH attained similar or improved bioefficacy compared with hGH alone. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Especificidad del hongo micorrizico (Rhizoctonia sp.) en Phalaenopsis sp., Cymbidium sp., Trichoceros antenifer, Oncidium excavatum, y Cyrtochilum sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Ordoñez, Silvia L.; Pillacela Zhunio, Dora Priscila; Salazar, Jazmín M.; Peña Tapia, Denisse Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Las orquídeas producen abundantes semillas pequeñas, careciendo de endospermo, cotiledones y sustancias de reserva para llevar a cabo su germinación. Es por esto que estratégicamente las semillas establecen una relación simbiótica con un hongo micorrízico que favorece a su germinación y desarrollo. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la especificidad del hongo micorrízico (Rhizoctonia sp.) en la germinación de cinco géneros de orquídeas. Se usaron dos medios de cultivo: 1) PhytamaxTM y...

  13. Do Expectancies for Reinforcement from Smoking Change After Smoking Initiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Neal; Schweizer, C. Amanda; Myers, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Expectancies are important predictors of smoking behavior. Recent research suggests that expectancies are not stable, and vary across internal and external states and levels of cigarette consumption. Expectancies may also vary between individuals as a function of temperamental characteristics such as behavioral undercontrol (BU). While pre-initiation expectancies have been linked to subsequent smoking behaviors, no study has assessed the effect of smoking initiation on expectancies. The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that both positive (PRE) and negative (NRE) reinforcement expectancies would increase following initiation, and that these changes would be moderated by BU. College students were interviewed 12–15 months apart. Those who initiated smoking between assessments (n = 69) were included in the present study. Linear mixed models showed a significant increase in PRE but not NRE from pre- to post-initiation. The relationship between NRE and time was moderated by BU, such that higher BU was associated with significantly larger post-initiation increases in NRE. Findings suggest that PRE and NRE change significantly following experience with smoking. Further, undercontrolled, impulsive individuals may be particularly vulnerable to smoking with the intention of alleviating aversive states. PMID:20822193

  14. Rodentibacter gen. nov including Rodentibacter pneumotropicus comb. nov., Rodentibacter heylii sp nov., Rodentibacter myodis sp nov., Rodentibacter ratti sp nov., Rodentibacter heidelbergensis sp nov., Rodentibacter trehalosifermentans sp nov., Rodentibacter rarus sp nov., Rodentibacter mrazii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikary, Sadhana; Nicklas, Werner; Bisgaard, Magne

    2017-01-01

    genomic comparison allowed the estimation of DNA–DNA renaturation. Rodentibacter heylii sp. nov. was proposed for a group that included the biovar Heyl of [ Pasteurella ] pneumotropica with the type strain ATCC 12555T (=CCUG 998T). A group was proposed as Rodentibacter ratti sp. nov., which included...

  15. Xylanolytic enzyme systems in Arthrobacter sp MTCC 5214 and Lactobacillus sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Jalal, T.

    The production of extracellular xylanolytic enzymes such as xylanase, alfa-L-arabinofuranosidase (alfa-l-AFase), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe) by marine Arthrobacter sp and Lactobacillus sp was investigated using different carbon sources Induction...

  16. Evaluation of antioxidant and cytotoxic properties of Cynobacteria, Limnothrix sp. and Leptolyngbya sp. from Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Vinothkumar, S.; Gupta, S.; Jasmin, C.; Joseph, V.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Nair, S.

    The hexane fractions of the marine cyanobacteria: Leptolyngbya sp. and Limnothrix sp., collected from Arabian Sea were found to display promising antioxidant properties than their ethyl acetate fraction during radical scavenging ABTS/DPPH assays (IC...

  17. Endoglucanase and xylanase production by Bacillus sp. AR03 in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hero, Johan S; Pisa, José H; Perotti, Nora I; Romero, Cintia M; Martínez, María A

    2017-07-03

    The behavior of three isolates retrieved from different cellulolytic consortia, Bacillus sp. AR03, Paenibacillus sp. AR247 and Achromobacter sp. AR476-2, were examined individually and as co-cultures in order to evaluate their ability to produce extracellular cellulases and xylanases. Utilizing a peptone-based medium supplemented with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), an increase estimation of 1.30 and 1.50 times was obtained by the co-culture containing the strains AR03 and AR247, with respect to enzyme titles registered by their individual cultivation. On the contrary, the extracellular enzymatic production decreased during the co-cultivation of strain AR03 with the non-cellulolytic Achromobacter sp. AR476-2. The synergistic behavior observed through the combined cultivation of the strains AR03 and AR247 might be a consequence of the consumption by Paenibacillus sp. AR247 of the products of the CMC hydrolysis (i.e., cellobiose and/or cello-oligosaccharides), which were mostly generated by the cellulase producer Bacillus sp. AR03. The effect observed could be driven by the requirement to fulfill the nutritional supply from both strains on the substrate evaluated. These results would contribute to a better description of the degradation of the cellulose fraction of the plant cell walls in nature, expected to an efficient utilization of renewable sources.

  18. Earning Management dan Expected Future Earning di Bursa Efek Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taofiq Rachmat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to applicated M-score to identify earning management in Indonesian corporation. This study also aims to analyst future earning condition from kind of group or sector of corporation which is indicated doing earning management. This study took a sample of 42 corporation using criteria about corporation which is had negatif information. The results of multiple linear regression analysis show that there is evidence that companies with an Earning Management detected earn lower future earnings (a study in Indonesian Stock Exchange Market, the ability of forecast changes in future earnings stems from its ability of predictive power of M-Score (Earning Management Detection Model. There is also, evidence that group companies which had “high attention” from Regulator earn lower expected future earnings. Based on the results of this study, the stake holder are advised to consider M-score to make judgement about financial reports.Keywords: earning management, expected future earning, indonesian stock exchange market, m-score, cross- sectional time-series dataAbstrak: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengkaji aplikasi M-Score untuk mengidentifikasi earning management pada korporasi di Indonesia. Penelitian ini juga bertujuan mengkaji kondisi expected future earning dari kelompok korporasi yang di informasikan terindikasi melakukan earning management. Penelitian ini mengambil sampel dari 42 korporasi dengan menggunakan kriteria korporasi yang memiliki informasi negatif. Hasil analisis regresi linier berganda menunjukkan terdapat bukti apabila korporasi yang terdeteksi earning management akan mendapatkan expected future earning yang rendah. Kemampuan memprediksi perubahan pada expected future earning didapat dari kemampuan prediksi yang kuat dari M-score (Model untuk mendeteksi adanya earning management. Penelitian menunjukkan bahwa ditemukan konglomerasi usaha yang mendapat pengawasan dari regulator mendapatkan

  19. Time Varying Market Integration and Expected Rteurns in Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, F.C.J.M.; de Roon, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    We use a simple model in which the expected returns in emerging markets depend on their systematic risk as measured by their beta relative to the world portfolio as well as on the level of integration in that market.The level of integration is a time-varying variable that depends on the market value

  20. News on Inflation and the Epidemiology of Inflation Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfajfar, D.; Santoro, E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper examines the nexus between news coverage on inflation and households' inflation expectations. In doing so, we test the epidemiological foundations of the sticky information model (Carroll, 2003, 2006). We use both aggregate and household-level data from the Survey Research

  1. News on inflation and the epidemiology of inflation expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfajfar, D.; Santoro, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the nexus between news coverage on inflation and households’ inflation expectations. In doing so, we test the epidemiological foundations of the sticky information model (Carroll 2003, 2006). We use both aggregate and household-level data from the Survey Research Center at the

  2. The Placebo Effect: Dissolving the Expectancy Versus Conditioning Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Williams, Steve; Podd, John

    2004-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the 2 main models of the placebo effect: expectancy theory and classical conditioning. A path is suggested to dissolving the theoretical impasse that has long plagued this issue. The key is to make a clear distinction between 2 questions: What factors shape placebo effects? and What learning mediates the…

  3. Memory for expectation-violating concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porubanova, Michaela; Shaw, Daniel; McKay, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    expectations and with intuitive concepts (e.g., ‘‘galloping pony’’, ‘‘drying orchid’’, or ‘‘convertible car’’), in both immediate recall, and delayed recognition tests. Importantly, concepts related to agents showed a memory advantage over concepts not pertaining to agents, but this was true only......Previous research has shown that ideas which violate our expectations, such as schema-inconsistent concepts, enjoy privileged status in terms of memorability. In our study, memory for concepts that violate cultural (cultural schema-level) expectations (e.g., ‘‘illiterate teacher’’, ‘‘wooden bottle...

  4. Patient expectancy and post-chemotherapy nausea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colagiuri, Ben; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    to determine the strength of the relationship between expectancy and post-chemotherapy nausea. METHODS: The findings from 17 relevant studies (n = 2,400) identified through systematic searches of Medline, PsycInfo, and Cinhal were analyzed using a combination of meta-analytic techniques. RESULTS: Overall......, there was a robust positive association between expectancy and post-chemotherapy nausea (ESr = 0.18, equivalent to Cohen's d = 0.35), suggesting that patients with stronger expectancies experience more chemotherapy-induced nausea. Although weaker associations were found in studies employing multivariate analysis...

  5. Outcome expectancies and gambling behavior among urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Emerson M; Whelan, James P; Meyers, Andrew W

    2010-03-01

    This project sought to identify adolescent outcome expectancies for gambling and to evaluate their relation to gambling behavior among a sample of urban adolescents. In a preliminary study, 50 outcome expectancies were identified on the basis of a literature review or generated after surveying 35 urban high school students. These expectancies were then administered to 1,076 urban high school students. Rates of at-risk and problem gambling were 14.6% and 12.7%, respectively. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed on randomly selected halves of the sample and identified 5 expectancy domains. In a structural equation model, material gain, negative affect, and positive self-evaluation displayed significant positive relations, and negative social consequences and parent disapproval displayed significant negative relations, to gambling behavior. The model explained 48% of the variance in gambling problems and 58% of the variance in gambling frequency. These results demonstrate the salience of gambling-related cognitions in understanding the gambling behavior among these at-risk youth and suggest that expectancies may be important prevention targets for this population.

  6. In defense of commitment: The curative power of violated expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra L; Lamarche, Veronica M; Gomillion, Sarah; Seery, Mark D; Kondrak, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    A new model of commitment defense in romantic relationships is proposed. It assumes that relationships afford a central resource for affirming meaning and purpose in the world. Consequently, violating expectations about the world outside the relationship can precipitate commitment defense inside the relationship. A meta-analysis of 5 experiments, 2 follow-up correlational studies, and a longitudinal study of the transition to first parenthood supported the model. Experimentally violating conventional expectations about the world (e.g., "hard work pays off") motivated less satisfied people to defensively affirm their commitment. Similarly, when becoming a parent naturalistically violated culturally conditioned gendered expectations about the division of household labor, less satisfied new mothers and fathers defensively affirmed their commitment from pre-to-post baby. The findings suggest that violating expected associations in the world outside the relationship motivates vulnerable people to set relationship their relationship right, thereby affirming expected associations in the relationship in the face of an unexpected world. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. First report of Anisakis sp. in Epinephelus sp. in East Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Annytha Ina Rohi Detha; Diana Agustiani Wuri; Julianty Almet; Yuni Riwu; Christin Melky

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The present research was conducted to identify the prevalence of Anisakis sp. as fish-borne zoonoses in Epinephelus sp. in territorial waters of East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Materials and methods: A total of 50 fish (Epinephelus sp.) were collected from Kupang Fish Market in East Nusa Tenggara. Identification of Anisakis sp. was performed based on morphological observations considering shape of ventriculus, boring tooth, and mucron using binocular microscope. Results: Prev...

  8. Enhanced Patient Expectant and Antiemetic Drug Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roscoe, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    ...; and writing abstracts, papers, and book chapters. The training also includes the design, implementation and analyses of a randomized controlled experiment examining the relationship between cancer patient expectations for experiencing chemotherapy...

  9. Anesthesia -- What to Expect (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anesthesia - What to Expect KidsHealth / For Teens / Anesthesia - What ... Operating Room After Surgery Print Different Kinds of Anesthesia If you're having any kind of procedure ...

  10. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Earn your CME from the convenience of your home or office by accessing ACG's web-based educational ... ACG Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During a Colonoscopy What ...

  11. What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Check out the ACG Blog Follow ACG on Twitter Patients ACG Home / Media / What to Expect During ... PATIENT CENTER SAP-MOC SELF-ASSESSMENT TEST ACG @Twitter ACG Blog About ACG ACG Store American College ...

  12. The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Changes in Young People's Expectations of Applying to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Jake

    2017-01-01

    A much larger proportion of English 14-year-olds expect to apply to university than ultimately make an application by age 21, but the proportion expecting to apply falls from age 14 onwards. In order to assess the role of socioeconomic status in explaining changes in expectations, this paper applies duration modelling techniques to the…

  13. Evaluating natural resource amenities in a human life expectancy production function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam C. Poudyal; Donald G. Hodges; J.M. Bowker; H.K. Cordell

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of natural resource amenities on human life expectancy. Extending theexisting model of the life expectancy production function, and correcting for spatial dependence, weevaluated the determinants of life expectancy using county level data. Results indicate that after controlling

  14. A Study of Relationship between Leader Behaviors and Subordinate Job Expectancies: A Path-Goal Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sikandar Hayyat Malik

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates relationship between leader behavior (directive, supportive, participative and achievement-oriented) of corporate managers and subordinates’ job expectancies using House (1974) Path-goal model of leadership. The results reveal thatleader behavior affects subordinates’ job expectancies. The situational factors (task structure, role ambiguity, stress, need for autonomy, locus of control, need for achievement and perception about abilities) affect subordinates’ job expect...

  15. Evaluating natural resource amenities in a human life expectancy production function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam C. Poudyal; Donald G. Hodges; J.M. Bowker; H.K. Cordell

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of natural resource amenities on human life expectancy. Extending the existing model of the life expectancy production function, and correcting for spatial dependence, we evaluated the determinants of life expectancy using county level data. Results indicate that after controlling for socio-demographic and economic factors, medical...

  16. Lipid Profile Remodeling in Response to Nitrogen Deprivation in the Microalgae Chlorella sp. (Trebouxiophyceae) and Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Ian L. D.; Bergamin, Amanda; Shears, Melanie J.; Dias, Daniel A.; Kentish, Sandra E.; Scales, Peter J.; Botté, Cyrille Y.; Callahan, Damien L.

    2014-01-01

    Many species of microalgae produce greatly enhanced amounts of triacylglycerides (TAGs), the key product for biodiesel production, in response to specific environmental stresses. Improvement of TAG production by microalgae through optimization of growth regimes is of great interest. This relies on understanding microalgal lipid metabolism in relation to stress response in particular the deprivation of nutrients that can induce enhanced TAG synthesis. In this study, a detailed investigation of changes in lipid composition in Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. in response to nitrogen deprivation (N-deprivation) was performed to provide novel mechanistic insights into the lipidome during stress. As expected, an increase in TAGs and an overall decrease in polar lipids were observed. However, while most membrane lipid classes (phosphoglycerolipids and glycolipids) were found to decrease, the non-nitrogen containing phosphatidylglycerol levels increased considerably in both algae from initially low levels. Of particular significance, it was observed that the acyl composition of TAGs in Nannochloropsis sp. remain relatively constant, whereas Chlorella sp. showed greater variability following N-deprivation. In both algae the overall fatty acid profiles of the polar lipid classes were largely unaffected by N-deprivation, suggesting a specific FA profile for each compartment is maintained to enable continued function despite considerable reductions in the amount of these lipids. The changes observed in the overall fatty acid profile were due primarily to the decrease in proportion of polar lipids to TAGs. This study provides the most detailed lipidomic information on two different microalgae with utility in biodiesel production and nutraceutical industries and proposes the mechanisms for this rearrangement. This research also highlights the usefulness of the latest MS-based approaches for microalgae lipid research. PMID:25171084

  17. Lipid profile remodeling in response to nitrogen deprivation in the microalgae Chlorella sp. (Trebouxiophyceae and Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J O Martin

    Full Text Available Many species of microalgae produce greatly enhanced amounts of triacylglycerides (TAGs, the key product for biodiesel production, in response to specific environmental stresses. Improvement of TAG production by microalgae through optimization of growth regimes is of great interest. This relies on understanding microalgal lipid metabolism in relation to stress response in particular the deprivation of nutrients that can induce enhanced TAG synthesis. In this study, a detailed investigation of changes in lipid composition in Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. in response to nitrogen deprivation (N-deprivation was performed to provide novel mechanistic insights into the lipidome during stress. As expected, an increase in TAGs and an overall decrease in polar lipids were observed. However, while most membrane lipid classes (phosphoglycerolipids and glycolipids were found to decrease, the non-nitrogen containing phosphatidylglycerol levels increased considerably in both algae from initially low levels. Of particular significance, it was observed that the acyl composition of TAGs in Nannochloropsis sp. remain relatively constant, whereas Chlorella sp. showed greater variability following N-deprivation. In both algae the overall fatty acid profiles of the polar lipid classes were largely unaffected by N-deprivation, suggesting a specific FA profile for each compartment is maintained to enable continued function despite considerable reductions in the amount of these lipids. The changes observed in the overall fatty acid profile were due primarily to the decrease in proportion of polar lipids to TAGs. This study provides the most detailed lipidomic information on two different microalgae with utility in biodiesel production and nutraceutical industries and proposes the mechanisms for this rearrangement. This research also highlights the usefulness of the latest MS-based approaches for microalgae lipid research.

  18. Cross-Sectional Dispersion of Firm Valuations and Expected Stock Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Danling

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops two competing hypotheses for the relation between the cross-sectional standard deviation of logarithmic firm fundamental-to-price ratios (``dispersion'') and expected aggregate returns. In models with fully rational beliefs, greater dispersion indicates greater risk and higher expected aggregate returns. In models with investor overconfidence, greater dispersion indicates greater mispricing and lower expected aggregate returns. Consistent with the behavioral models, the re...

  19. Student Expectations in the New Millennium

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Yee-Tak

    2006-01-01

    Higher education has experienced vast changes as a result of global political and economic developments. Cultural and social changes in the last decade have also added to the continuing evolution of higher education. These changes inevitably lead to changing expectations of students entering higher education. An adequate understanding of student expectations is crucial in ensuring a good fit between higher educational institutions and their students. This study attempts to carry out a bas...

  20. Expected Benefits of Voting and Voter Turnout

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J. Cebula; Garey C. Durden

    2007-01-01

    This empirical study seeks to identify key aggregate-level economic and non-economic determinants of the expected benefits from voting and hence aggregate voter turnout. A unique dimension of this study is the hypothesis that PAC (political action committee) election campaign contributions, e.g., to U.S. Senate races, may reduce the expected benefits of voting and hence voter turnout because the greater the growth of real PAC contributions, the greater the extent to which eligible voters may ...

  1. Evolution of non-expected utility preferences

    CERN Document Server

    Widekind, Sven von; Fandel, G

    2008-01-01

    The theory on the evolution of preferences deals with the endogenous formation of preference relations in strategic situations. It is related to the field of evolutionary game theory. In this book we analyze the role and the influence of general, possibly non-expected utility preferences in such an evolutionary setup. In particular, we demonstrate that preferences which diverge from von Neumann-Morgenstern expected utility may potentially prove to be successful under evolutionary pressures.

  2. Evidence for modifier genes that enhance the effect of the Pax-3 mutation, splotch-delayed (Sp{sup d}), on facial morphology: A model for studying the causes of variation of Waardenburg syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.W.; Morell, R.; Friedman, T.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is caused by autosomal dominant mutations of the gene coding for the PAX3 transcription factor. These mutations have variable penetrance and expressivity within and between families where they cause hypopigmentation, deafness and facially dysmorphic features. It has been suspected that changes of penetrance and expressivity in WS1 mutations are caused by familial variation in other loci which interact with or modify the expression of the PAX3 locus. Splotch mutations (Sp, Sp{sup d}, etc.) are the mouse homologs of WS1 mutations. Mutations in Pax-3 were first used to predict the map position and function of WS1 mutations. We now present morphometric evidence for alleles of modifier genes, originating from Mus spretus and segregating in an F{sub 1} backcross with Mus musculus, that modify the effects of Sp{sup d} on the structure of mouse facial bones. Variation caused by these mouse genes are precisely homologous to the familial variation we see in dystopia canthorum, the principal diagnostic feature of Waardenburg syndrome type I. The mouse modifier genes of Pax-3 identified by this analysis are now being mapped as a first step towards positional cloning human PAX3 modifier genes.

  3. Dynamic emotion perception and prior expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzafic, Ilvana; Martin, Andrew K; Hocking, Julia; Mowry, Bryan; Burianová, Hana

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions require the ability to rapidly perceive emotion from various incoming dynamic, multisensory cues. Prior expectations reduce incoming emotional information and direct attention to cues that are aligned with what is expected. Studies to date have investigated the prior expectancy effect using static emotional images, despite the fact that dynamic stimuli would represent greater ecological validity. The objective of the study was to create a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm to examine the influence of prior expectations on naturalistic emotion perception. For this purpose, we developed a dynamic emotion perception task, which consisted of audio-visual videos that carry emotional information congruent or incongruent with prior expectations. The results show that emotional congruency was associated with activity in prefrontal regions, amygdala, and putamen, whereas emotional incongruency was associated with activity in temporoparietal junction and mid-cingulate gyrus. Supported by the behavioural results, our findings suggest that prior expectations are reinforced after repeated experience and learning, whereas unexpected emotions may rely on fast change detection processes. The results from the current study are compatible with the notion that the ability to automatically detect unexpected changes in complex dynamic environments allows for adaptive behaviours in potentially advantageous or threatening situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estudo da erosão na microbacia do Ceveiro (Piracicaba, SP): I - Estimativa das taxas de perda de solo e estudo de sensibilidade dos fatores do modelo EUPS Erosion study in the Ceveiro Watershed (Piracicaba, SP).: I - Estimation o soil loss rates and sensitivity factor analysis of the USLE model

    OpenAIRE

    Mara de Andrade Marinho Weill; Gerd Sparovek

    2008-01-01

    A erosão acelerada do solo constitui um sério problema global de degradação de terras agrícolas. Por ser a pesquisa de erosão comumente cara e morosa, a utilização de modelos permite estimar a perda de solo em localidades e condições não diretamente representadas nos estudos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar a expectativa de erosão do solo em uma área intensivamente cultivada com cana-de-açúcar no município de Piracicaba (SP), como subsídio ao diagnóstico do uso atual das terras visando ...

  5. Expected performance of the ATLAS experiment detector, trigger and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.A.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atkinson, T.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.A.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.B.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.B.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.B.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bastos, J.; Bates, R.L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.B.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednar, P.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Bodine, B.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boeser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.S.L.; Booth, J.R.A.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; 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Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybin, A.M.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, D.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.; Schamov, A.G.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J.L.; 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Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjolin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.S.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T.D.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Strong, J.A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S.I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Sviridov, Yu.M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szczygiel, R.R.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taffard, A.T.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Tali, B.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G.P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.T.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Tevlin, C.M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, J.P.; Thomas, T.L.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Tovey, S.N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; 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Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A.V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinna, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction of tracks, leptons, photons, missing energy and jets is investigated, together with the performance of b-tagging and the trigger. The physics potential for a variety of interesting physics processes, within the Standard Model and beyond, is examined. The study comprises a series of notes based on simulations of the detector and physics processes, with particular emphasis given to the data expected from the first years of operation of the LHC at CERN.

  6. Are gaps in disability free life expectancies diminishing in Italy?

    OpenAIRE

    Frova, Luisa; Burgio, Alessandra; Battisti, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies gender differences in disability free life expectancy (DFLE), taking into account mortality and disability contributions. After analysing the types of disability that account for such differences, it goes on to examine temporal variability and age contributions to mortality and disability variation. The method used is an extension of Arriaga’s model proposed by Nusselder. In 2005, disability free life expectancy at age 30 was 46.23 years for men and 48.74 years for women, w...

  7. Preliminary SP-100/Stirling heat exchanger designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, P.; Tower, L.; Blue, B.; Dunn, P.

    1994-01-01

    Analytic modeling of several heat exchanger concepts to couple the SP-100 nuclear reactor lithium loop and the Space Stirling Power Convertor (SSPC) was performed. Four 25 kWe SSPC's are used to produce the required 100 kW of electrical power. This design work focused on the interface between a single SSPC and the primary lithium loop. Manifolding to separate and collect the four channel flow was not modeled. This work modeled two separate types of heat exchanger interfaces (conductive coupling and radiative coupling) to explore their relative advantages and disadvantages. The minimum mass design of the conductively coupled concepts was 18 kg or 0.73 kg/kWe for a single 25 kWe convertor. The minimum mass radiatively coupled concept was 41 kg or 1.64 kg/kWe. The direct conduction heat exchanger provides a lighter weight system because of its ability to operate the Stirling convertor evaporator at higher heat fluxes than those attainable by the radiatively coupled systems. Additionally the conductively coupled concepts had relatively small volumes and provide potentially simpler assembly. Their disadvantages were the tight tolerances and material joining problems associated with this refractory to superalloy interface. The advantages of the radiatively coupled designs were the minimal material interface problems

  8. Preliminary SP-100/Stirling heat exchanger designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, P.; Tower, L.; Dawson, R.; Blue, B.; Dunn, P.

    1993-12-01

    Analytic modeling of several heat exchanger concepts to couple the SP-100 nuclear reactor primary lithium loop and the Space Stirling Power Convertor (SSPC) was performed. Four 25 kWe SSPC's are used to produce the required 100 kW of electrical power. This design work focused on the interface between a single SSPC and the primary lithium loop. Manifolding to separate and collect the four channel flow was not modeled. This work modeled two separate types of heat exchanger interfaces (conductive coupling and radiative coupling) to explore their relative advantages and disadvantages. The minimum mass design of the conductively coupled concepts was 18 kg or 0.73 kg/kWe for a single 25 kWe convertor. The minimum mass radiatively coupled concept was 41 kg or 1.64 kg/kWe. The direct conduction heat exchanger provides a lighter weight system because of its ability to operate the Stirling convertor evaporator at higher heat fluxes than those attainable by the radiatively coupled systems. Additionally the conductively coupled concepts had relatively small volumes and provide potentially simpler assembly. Their disadvantages were the tight tolerances and material joining problems associated with this refractory to superalloy interface. The advantages of the radiatively coupled designs were the minimal material interface problems

  9. Specialised predation by Palpimanus sp. (Araneae: Palpimanidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is the first detailed report on the natural prey and the prey-capture tactics of a Palpimanus sp. from Entebbe (Uganda). Although this species fed occasionally on insects, its dominant prey in the field was other spiders, especially jumping spiders (Salticidae) and their eggs. Encounters between Palpimanus sp. and ...

  10. Astaxanthin Suppresses MPP+-Induced Oxidative Damage in PC12 Cells through a Sp1/NR1 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate astaxanthin (ATX neuroprotection, and its mechanism, on a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridine ion (MPP+-induced cell model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Mature, differentiated PC12 cells treated with MPP+ were used as an in vitro cell model. The MTT assay was used to investigate cell viability after ATX treatment, and western blot analysis was used to observe Sp1 (activated transcription factor 1 and NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1 protein expression, real-time PCR was used to monitor Sp1 and NR1 mRNA, and cell immunofluorescence was used to determine the location of Sp1 and NR1 protein and the nuclear translocation of Sp1. Results: PC12 cell viability was significantly reduced by MPP+ treatment. The expression of Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were increased compared with the control (p < 0.01. Following co-treatment with ATX and MPP+, cell viability was significantly increased, and Sp1 and NR1 mRNA and protein were decreased, compared with the MPP+ groups (p < 0.01. In addition, mithracycin A protected PC12 cells from oxidative stress caused by MPP+ by specifically inhibiting the expression of Sp1. Moreover, cell immunofluorescence revealed that ATX could suppress Sp1 nuclear transfer. Conclusion: ATX inhibited oxidative stress induced by MPP+ in PC12 cells, via the SP1/NR1 signaling pathway.

  11. Dental Status and Compression of Life Expectancy with Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Y; Aida, J; Watt, R G; Tsuboya, T; Koyama, S; Sato, Y; Kondo, K; Osaka, K

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether the number of teeth contributes to the compression of morbidity, measured as a shortening of life expectancy with disability, an extension of healthy life expectancy, and overall life expectancy. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A self-reported baseline survey was given to 126,438 community-dwelling older people aged ≥65 y in Japan in 2010, and 85,161 (67.4%) responded. The onset of functional disability and all-cause mortality were followed up for 1,374 d (follow-up rate = 96.1%). A sex-stratified illness-death model was applied to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 3 health transitions (healthy to dead, healthy to disabled, and disabled to dead). Absolute differences in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy, and life expectancy with disability according to the number of teeth were also estimated. Age, denture use, socioeconomic status, health status, and health behavior were adjusted. Compared with the edentulous participants, participants with ≥20 teeth had lower risks of transitioning from healthy to dead (adjusted HR, 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.50-0.68] for men and 0.70 [95% CI, 0.57-0.85] for women) and from healthy to disabled (adjusted HR, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.44-0.61] for men and 0.58 [95% CI, 0.49-0.68] for women). They also transitioned from disabled to dead earlier (adjusted HR, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.99-1.60] for men and 2.42 [95% CI, 1.72-3.38] for women). Among the participants aged ≥85 y, those with ≥20 teeth had a longer life expectancy (men: +57 d; women: +15 d) and healthy life expectancy (men: +92 d; women: +70 d) and a shorter life expectancy with disability (men: -35 d; women: -55 d) compared with the edentulous participants. Similar associations were observed among the younger participants and those with 1 to 9 or 10 to 19 teeth. The presence of remaining teeth was associated with a significant compression of morbidity: older Japanese adults' life expectancy with disability was

  12. Guide til gode spørgeskemaer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Henning

    Spørgeskemaundersøgelser bliver ofte brugt til at dokumentere forskellige forhold og begrunde politiske beslutninger. Men resultaterne kan være forbundet med stor usikkerhed. Det kræver omhu og stor sproglig formåen at udarbejde spørgeskemaer. Seniorforsker Henning Olsen har i flere år arbejdet med...... viden om, hvordan folk forstår sproglige meddelelser og genkalder sig informationer. I guiden behandles emner som fx styrende problemstillinger og spørgsmåls fokus og neutralitet, formulering af åbne eller lukkede spørgsmål og svarkategorier, tematiske spørgeforløb, aflastning af svarpersoners...

  13. STOCK MARKET CRASH AND EXPECTATIONS OF AMERICAN HOUSEHOLDS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUDOMIET, PÉTER; KÉZDI, GÁBOR; WILLIS, ROBERT J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper utilizes data on subjective probabilities to study the impact of the stock market crash of 2008 on households’ expectations about the returns on the stock market index. We use data from the Health and Retirement Study that was fielded in February 2008 through February 2009. The effect of the crash is identified from the date of the interview, which is shown to be exogenous to previous stock market expectations. We estimate the effect of the crash on the population average of expected returns, the population average of the uncertainty about returns (subjective standard deviation), and the cross-sectional heterogeneity in expected returns (disagreement). We show estimates from simple reduced-form regressions on probability answers as well as from a more structural model that focuses on the parameters of interest and separates survey noise from relevant heterogeneity. We find a temporary increase in the population average of expectations and uncertainty right after the crash. The effect on cross-sectional heterogeneity is more significant and longer lasting, which implies substantial long-term increase in disagreement. The increase in disagreement is larger among the stockholders, the more informed, and those with higher cognitive capacity, and disagreement co-moves with trading volume and volatility in the market. PMID:21547244

  14. STOCK MARKET CRASH AND EXPECTATIONS OF AMERICAN HOUSEHOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudomiet, Péter; Kézdi, Gábor; Willis, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    This paper utilizes data on subjective probabilities to study the impact of the stock market crash of 2008 on households' expectations about the returns on the stock market index. We use data from the Health and Retirement Study that was fielded in February 2008 through February 2009. The effect of the crash is identified from the date of the interview, which is shown to be exogenous to previous stock market expectations. We estimate the effect of the crash on the population average of expected returns, the population average of the uncertainty about returns (subjective standard deviation), and the cross-sectional heterogeneity in expected returns (disagreement). We show estimates from simple reduced-form regressions on probability answers as well as from a more structural model that focuses on the parameters of interest and separates survey noise from relevant heterogeneity. We find a temporary increase in the population average of expectations and uncertainty right after the crash. The effect on cross-sectional heterogeneity is more significant and longer lasting, which implies substantial long-term increase in disagreement. The increase in disagreement is larger among the stockholders, the more informed, and those with higher cognitive capacity, and disagreement co-moves with trading volume and volatility in the market.

  15. Great expectations: teaching ethics to medical students in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Kevin Gary; Fellingham, Robyn

    2014-12-01

    Many academic philosophers and ethicists are appointed to teach ethics to medical students. We explore exactly what this task entails. In South Africa the Health Professions Council's curriculum for training medical practitioners requires not only that students be taught to apply ethical theory to issues and be made aware of the legal and regulatory requirements of their profession, it also expects moral formation and the inculcation of professional virtue in students. We explore whether such expectations are reasonable. We defend the claim that physicians ought to be persons of virtuous character, on the grounds of the social contract between society and the profession. We further argue that since the expectations of virtue of health care professionals are reasonable, it is also sound reasoning to expect ethics teachers to try to inculcate such virtues in their students, so far as this is possible. Furthermore, this requires of such teachers that they be suitable role models of ethical practice and virtue, themselves. We claim that this applies to ethics teachers who are themselves not members of the medical profession, too, even though they are not bound by the same social contract as doctors. We conclude that those who accept employment as teachers of ethics to medical students, where as part of their contractual obligation they are expected to inculcate moral values in their students, ought to be prepared to accept their responsibility to be professionally ethical, themselves. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Listeria floridensis sp. nov., Listeria aquatica sp. nov., Listeria cornellensis sp. nov., Listeria riparia sp. nov. and Listeria grandensis sp. nov., from agricultural and natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Warchocki, Steven; Wright, Emily M; Allred, Adam F; Ahlstrom, Christina; Manuel, Clyde S; Stasiewicz, Matthew J; Burrell, Angela; Roof, Sherry; Strawn, Laura K; Fortes, Esther; Nightingale, Kendra K; Kephart, Daniel; Wiedmann, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Sampling of agricultural and natural environments in two US states (Colorado and Florida) yielded 18 Listeria-like isolates that could not be assigned to previously described species using traditional methods. Using whole-genome sequencing and traditional phenotypic methods, we identified five novel species, each with a genome-wide average BLAST nucleotide identity (ANIb) of less than 85% to currently described species. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and amino acid sequences of 31 conserved loci showed the existence of four well-supported clades within the genus Listeria; (i) a clade representing Listeria monocytogenes, L. marthii, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri and L. ivanovii, which we refer to as Listeria sensu stricto, (ii) a clade consisting of Listeria fleischmannii and two newly described species, Listeria aquatica sp. nov. (type strain FSL S10-1188(T) = DSM 26686(T) = LMG 28120(T) = BEI NR-42633(T)) and Listeria floridensis sp. nov. (type strain FSL S10-1187(T) = DSM 26687(T) = LMG 28121(T) = BEI NR-42632(T)), (iii) a clade consisting of Listeria rocourtiae, L. weihenstephanensis and three novel species, Listeria cornellensis sp. nov. (type strain TTU A1-0210(T) = FSL F6-0969(T) = DSM 26689(T) = LMG 28123(T) = BEI NR-42630(T)), Listeria grandensis sp. nov. (type strain TTU A1-0212(T) = FSL F6-0971(T) = DSM 26688(T) = LMG 28122(T) = BEI NR-42631(T)) and Listeria riparia sp. nov. (type strain FSL S10-1204(T) = DSM 26685(T) = LMG 28119(T) = BEI NR- 42634(T)) and (iv) a clade containing Listeria grayi. Genomic and phenotypic data suggest that the novel species are non-pathogenic. © 2014 IUMS.

  17. Testando empiricamente o CAPM condicional dos retornos esperados de carteiras dos mercados brasileiro, argentino e norte-americano Empirical test of the conditional CAPM model using expected returns of brazilian, argentine and north-american portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmo Tambosi Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nas últimas décadas, o modelo CAPM tem despertado grande interesse na comunidade científica. Apesar das críticas, o aprimoramento do CAPM estático, que dá origem a novos modelos dinâmicos, traz maior segurança para o investidor ao longo do ciclo de negócios. O CAPM e suas versões estáticas foram e são de grande importância em finanças. Nos dias de hoje, encontramos adaptações mais complexas do modelo CAPM, as quais nos permitem obter respostas sobre questões em finanças que por muito tempo permaneceram não solucionadas. Diante desse panorama e considerando toda essa grande discussão acerca da validade do CAPM, este trabalho procura apresentar as vantagens dos modelos condicionais em relação ao modelo estático. Para constatar tais fatos, estudar-se-ão os testes dos modelos condicionais (beta variando ao longo do tempo com e sem capital humano, que não são comumente estudados na literatura. Esses testes são convenientes para incorporar variâncias e co-variâncias que se alteram ao longo do tempo.The CAPM model has attracted great interest from the scientific community over the last decades. Despite criticism, improvement of the static CAPM has given origin to new dynamic models providing investors with more safety along the business cycles. The CAPM and the static versions continue to be of great importance in Finance and now more complex adaptations provide answers to some questions in finance for which solutions were not yet available. Therefore considering this situation and the discussion of CAPM validity, advantages of the conditional model were presented in relation to the static model. Tests of conditional models were studied where beta varies with time, COM E SEM CAPITAL HUMANO, which is not commonly studied in literature. These tests incorporate variances and covariances that change with time.

  18. Price Changes, Resource Adjustments and Rational Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    a decrease in prices through managers that anticipated the drop in demand and proactively lower selling prices and cut resources. Moreover, this study provides evidence for the moderating effect of managerial forecast accuracy on the relationship between demand uncertainty and cost elasticity. Findings show......This study investigates the relationship between the accuracy of managerial demand expectations, resource adjustment decisions and selling price changes. In line with rational expectation theory, it is argued that managers adjust resources and selling prices differently in response to expected...... compared to unexpected demand shocks. The association is tested using the empirical concept of cost stickiness. Cost stickiness arises as a consequence of asymmetric resource or price adjustments. Resource and price adjustments are termed asymmetric if the magnitude of change is different for increases...

  19. Successful expectant management of tubal heterotopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Baxi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Expectant management for tubal heterotopic pregnancy could be considered as a successful option in a symptom-free patient where the ectopic embryo has a limited craniocaudal length with no cardiac activity. We report the obstetric outcome after expectant management for a right tubal heterotopic pregnancy. Heterotopic pregnancy was first recognized at 6 weeks gestation in a 32-year-old salpingectomized woman with an 8-year history of subfertility who conceived after in utero transfer of three embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization. Expectant management and close ultrasonographic and clinical monitoring were done. The intrauterine pregnancy proceeded unremarkably. A cesarean section was performed for breech presentation, and it allowed the delivery of a healthy 2260-g male infant. The examination of the adnexa showed a pre-rupture of the right fallopian tube.

  20. Whites but Not Blacks Gain Life Expectancy from Social Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2017-10-16

    Background . Recent research suggests that the health gain from economic resources and psychological assets may be systematically larger for Whites than Blacks. Aim . This study aimed to assess whether the life expectancy gain associated with social contacts over a long follow up differs for Blacks and Whites. Methods . Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) Study, 1986-2011. The sample was a nationally representative sample of American adults 25 and older, who were followed for up to 25 years ( n = 3361). Outcome was all-cause mortality. The main predictor was social contacts defined as number of regular visits with friends, relatives, and neighbors. Baseline demographics (age and gender), socioeconomic status (education, income, and employment), health behaviors (smoking and drinking), and health (chronic medical conditions, obesity, and depressive symptoms) were controlled. Race was the focal moderator. Cox proportional hazard models were used in the pooled sample and based on race. Results . More social contacts predicted higher life expectancy in the pooled sample. A significant interaction was found between race and social contacts, suggesting that the protective effect of more social contacts is smaller for Blacks than Whites. In stratified models, more social contacts predicted an increased life expectancy for Whites but not Blacks. Conclusion . Social contacts increase life expectancy for White but not Black Americans. This study introduces social contacts as another social resource that differentially affects health of Whites and Blacks.