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Sample records for southwestern indian tribes

  1. Prevalence, Characteristics, and Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse in a Southwestern American Indian Tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Robert W.; Chester, Barbara; Rasmussen, Jolene K.; Jaranson, James M.; Goldman, David

    1997-01-01

    A study of 582 Southwestern American Indian Tribal members found that females were more likely to be sexually abused than males, intrafamilial members accounted for 78% of the reported abuse, sexually abused subjects were more likely to report behavioral problems, and sexually abused subjects were more likely to have psychiatric disorders.…

  2. Arizona Indian Tribes: Historical Notes. Sharing Ideas, Volume 7, Number 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Mamie, Comp.

    In 1971, 24 teachers attending summer school at Northern Arizona University reviewed hundreds of books on the history and culture of Southwestern American Indians. Since no one publication that dealt specifically with the historical and cultural background of Arizona Indian tribes could be found, they consolidated their notes into this resource…

  3. Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

    2008-10-22

    The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

  4. 34 CFR 300.21 - Indian and Indian tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian and Indian tribe. 300.21 Section 300.21 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF...

  5. Engaging Southwestern Tribes in Sustainable Water Resources Topics and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karletta Chief

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples in North America have a long history of understanding their societies as having an intimate relationship with their physical environments. Their cultures, traditions, and identities are based on the ecosystems and sacred places that shape their world. Their respect for their ancestors and ‘Mother Earth’ speaks of unique value and knowledge systems different than the value and knowledge systems of the dominant United States settler society. The value and knowledge systems of each indigenous and non-indigenous community are different but collide when water resources are endangered. One of the challenges that face indigenous people regarding the management of water relates to their opposition to the commodification of water for availability to select individuals. External researchers seeking to work with indigenous peoples on water research or management must learn how to design research or water management projects that respect indigenous cultural contexts, histories of interactions with settler governments and researchers, and the current socio-economic and political situations in which indigenous peoples are embedded. They should pay particular attention to the process of collaborating on water resource topics and management with and among indigenous communities while integrating Western and indigenous sciences in ways that are beneficial to both knowledge systems. The objectives of this paper are to (1 to provide an overview of the context of current indigenous water management issues, especially for the U.S. federally recognized tribes in the Southwestern United States; (2 to synthesize approaches to engage indigenous persons, communities, and governments on water resources topics and management; and (3 to compare the successes of engaging Southwestern tribes in five examples to highlight some significant activities for collaborating with tribes on water resources research and management. In discussing the engagement

  6. National Atlas, Indian tribes, cultures & languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, William C.

    1967-01-01

    Tribal distributions depicted on these maps (and on all other tribal maps covering a comparable area) are arbitrary at many points. Detailed knowledge of tribal areas was acquired at different times in different regions. For example, by the time knowledge was gained of the areas occupied by Plains tribes, many groups in the East had become extinct or had moved from their aboriginal locations. Some of these movements ultimately affected distributions on the Plains prior to reasonably detailed knowledge of Plains occupancy. Hence, it is not possible to approximate aboriginal areas of occupancy on a single map of continental scope. Furthermore, most groups did not occupy sharply defined areas, so that the delineation of territories is misleading.Distributions were derived, with slight modifications, from Indian tribes of North America (Driver and others, 1953), and boundaries within California were simplified after Languages, territories, and names of California Indian tribes (Heizer, 1966). According to the authors of these publications, the boundaries shown are those of the mid-17th century in the Southeast and the eastern part of the Northeast, the late 17th and early 18th centuries farther west in the Northeast, the late 18th and early 19th centuries in the Plains, the late 18th century in California, and the middle-to-late 19th century elsewhere. Even so, many compromises had to be made.

  7. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  8. 76 FR 28446 - Policy on Consultation With Indian Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... improved consultation with Indian Tribes to the extent that a conflict does not exist with laws or... processes with Indian Tribes to the extent that a conflict does not exist with applicable law or regulations... settlement negotiations, or matters undertaken in accordance with an administrative or judicial order where...

  9. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and..., concerning competitive cooperative agreement applications to establish Tribal Epidemiology Centers serving...

  10. 76 FR 72969 - Proclaiming Certain Lands as Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Proclaiming Certain Lands as Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Indian Tribe... acres, more or less, as the Fort Sill Apache Indian Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of... Apache Indian Reservation for the exclusive use of Indians entitled by enrollment or by tribal membership...

  11. 77 FR 56652 - Notice of Service Delivery Area Designation for the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    .... Seminole Tribe of Florida Broward, Fl, Collier, Fl, Miami- Dade, FL, Glades, FL, Hendry, FL. Seneca Nation... Service Delivery Area Designation for the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribe AGENCY: Indian Health Service... Wampanoag Indian Tribe. The SDA was established on December 22, 2008 and services were provided to eligible...

  12. Examining the Bicultural Ethnic Identity of Adolescents of a Northeastern Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carrie M.; Smirles, Kimberly Eretzian

    2005-01-01

    The history of northeastern tribes differs substantially from that of other tribes, as northeastern tribes have experienced a longer length of contact with settlers and more intermarriage with non-Indians, producing tribal members of various ethnic backgrounds. American Indians can be considered "bicultural" because they must adapt to two…

  13. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America, Part VI: [The Indian Tribes of Oklahoma (Ottawa-Wyandotte)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    As Part VI of a series of publications of American Indian tribal governmental documents, this volume contains charters, resolutions, constitutions, and by-laws of some of the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. Twenty-two such documents are included, representing the following tribes: Ottawa, Pawnee, Peoria, Ponca, Potawatomi, Sac and Fox, Seminole,…

  14. 77 FR 34981 - Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians-Liquor Control Ordinance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... consumption of liquor within the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians' Indian country. This Ordinance allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages within the jurisdiction of the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians.... 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713 (1983), the Secretary of the...

  15. 25 CFR 900.96 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... Property § 900.96 How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property? The Secretary shall not less than annually send to Indian tribes and tribal organizations a listing of...

  16. 25 CFR 900.40 - When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management standards and management systems evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Organization Management Systems General § 900.40 When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Indian tribe or tribal organization submits an initial contract proposal. (b) Management systems are...

  17. 78 FR 18623 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual... information collection, ``Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians, 25 CFR 115,'' OMB Control No. 1035...: [email protected] . Individuals providing comments should reference ``Trust Funds for Tribes and...

  18. 42 CFR 137.16 - What if more than 50 Indian Tribes apply to participate in self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... participate in self-governance? 137.16 Section 137.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.16 What if more than 50 Indian Tribes apply to participate in self-governance? The first Indian Tribes who apply and are...

  19. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troge, Michael [Little Bear Development Center, Oneida, WI (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  20. 76 FR 77549 - Colorado River Indian Tribes-Amendment to Health & Safety Code, Article 2. Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Colorado River Indian Tribes--Amendment to Health & Safety Code, Article 2... amendment to the Colorado River Tribal Health and Safety Code, Article 2. Liquor, Section 2-403(12). The... Indian Tribal Council adopted this amendment to the Colorado River Tribal Health and Safety Code, Article...

  1. 40 CFR 35.1605-9 - Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6... Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-9 Indian Tribe set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d). A Tribe meeting the requirements set forth at 40 CFR 130.6(d). ...

  2. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exterior boundaries of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation is the program administered by the Assiniboine and... Tribes' program application: (a) Incorporation by reference. The requirements set forth in the Fort Peck... submitted as part of the Fort Peck Tribes' application. (d) Program Description. The Program Description...

  3. 40 CFR 145.56 - Request by an Indian Tribe for a determination of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that a Tribe has met the prerequisites that make it eligible to assume a role similar to that of a State as provided by statute under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, or the Clean Air... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Indian Tribes § 145.56 Request by an...

  4. 25 CFR 900.103 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as excess or surplus government property? The Secretary shall furnish, not less than annually, to Indian tribes or tribal organizations...

  5. 42 CFR 137.21 - How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? 137.21 Section 137.21 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... How does an Indian Tribe demonstrate financial stability and financial management capacity? The Indian...

  6. 25 CFR 900.41 - How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems General § 900.41 How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records? The... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep...

  7. 42 CFR 137.132 - How does the Indian Tribe submit a final offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the Indian Tribe submit a final offer? 137.132 Section 137.132 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Final Offer § 137...

  8. 78 FR 35048 - Notice of Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ...: Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of the Special... approval for the collection of information for ``Trust Funds for Tribes and Individual Indians, 25 CFR 115... them to: [email protected] . Individuals providing comments should reference ``Trust Funds for...

  9. 25 CFR 900.51 - What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Property Management System Standards § 900.51 What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do? An Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management...

  10. 24 CFR 1000.506 - If the TDHE is the recipient, must it submit its monitoring evaluation/results to the Indian tribe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... it submit its monitoring evaluation/results to the Indian tribe? 1000.506 Section 1000.506 Housing... the recipient, must it submit its monitoring evaluation/results to the Indian tribe? Yes. The Indian tribe as the grant beneficiary must receive a copy of the monitoring evaluation/results so that it can...

  11. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, D. [Morse, Richard, and Weisenmiller, and Associates Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Busch, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Starrs, T. [Kelso, Starrs, and Associates LLC, Vashon, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  12. Diapycnal Diffusivities over the Southwestern Indian Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.

    2016-02-01

    The southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) Ridge stems from the South Atlantic and extends northeastward to Rodrigues Island. The deep trenches and fracture zones between the Crozet Basin and the Madagascar Basin provide the major passages for the deep and the bottom water to enter the Indian Ocean, which is also part of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) in the Indian Ocean. More than 70 CTD profiles have been conducted over the SWIO Ridge from 2010 up to now. Besides, a mooring was deployed about 2900 m below the sea surface for almost one year. Three Seaguard current meters, nine Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-pressure sensor, and one Sea-Bird Electronics Temperature-Conductivity-Pressure Sensor were mounted on the mooring. The diapycnal diffusivity over the SWIO Ridge is estimated with two methods, i.e., the Internal Wave Spectrum Method (GHP) which relies on the energy cascade due to wave interactions, and the Thorpe scale method. Large diffusivities on the order of 10-2 m2 s-1 are found over the rough ridges. Moreover, the temporal and spatial distributions of diapycnal diffusivities are presented and their physical relations with the fine structure of the bottom topography are analyzed in this study.

  13. 25 CFR 262.7 - Notice to Indian tribes of possible harm to cultural or religious sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... result in harm to, or destruction of, any site of religious or cultural importance. No further... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice to Indian tribes of possible harm to cultural or religious sites. 262.7 Section 262.7 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE...

  14. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were

  15. 77 FR 50128 - Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes; National Indian Health Outreach and Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Health Outreach and Education Cooperative Agreement Announcement Type: Limited Competition Catalog of... Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes on the National Indian Health Outreach and Education... announcement: ``Line Item 128 Health Education and Outreach funds,'' ``Health Care Policy Analysis and Review...

  16. 40 CFR 123.32 - Request by an Indian Tribe for a determination of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... determined that a Tribe has met the prerequisites that make it eligible to assume a role similar to that of a state as provided by statute under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, or the Clean Air... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS STATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 123.32 Request by an Indian...

  17. Oceanic and atmospheric influences on the variability of phytoplankton bloom in the southwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raj, R.P.; Peter, B.N.; Pushpadas, D.

    The phytoplankton bloom developed in the southwestern Indian Ocean during austral summer is unique in its occurrence. Interannual and intraannual variability of this large phytoplankton bloom were studied using satellite derived, model...

  18. 25 CFR 900.236 - May an Indian tribe elect to negotiate contract provisions on conflict of interest to take the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May an Indian tribe elect to negotiate contract provisions on conflict of interest to take the place of this regulation? 900.236 Section 900.236 Indians... Interest § 900.236 May an Indian tribe elect to negotiate contract provisions on conflict of interest to...

  19. Hydrologic evaluation and water-supply considerations for five Paiute Indian land parcels, Millard, Sevier, and Iron counties, southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Don; Stephens, D.W.; Conroy, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrologic resources in and adjacent to five parcels of land held in trust for the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah were evaluated. The land, located in southwestern Utah, is generally arid and has had only limited use for grazing. The parcels are located near the towns of Cove Fort, Joseph, Koosharem, and Kanarraville. On the basis of available geohydrologic and hydrologic data, water of suitable quality is locally available in the areas of all parcels for domestic, stock, recreation, and limited irrigation use. Developing this water for use on the parcels would potentially involve obtaining water rights, drilling wells, and constructing diversion structures. Surface water apparently is the most favorable source of supply available for the Joseph parcel, and groundwater apparently is the most favorable source of supply available for the other parcels. (USGS)

  20. 25 CFR 900.47 - When procuring property or services with self-determination contract funds, can an Indian tribe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT....47 When procuring property or services with self-determination contract funds, can an Indian tribe or... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When procuring property or services with self...

  1. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America. Part IIa: The Northern Plains. Occasional Publications in Anthropology, Ethnology Series, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    Part IIa of a series of publications consisting of American Indian tribal governmental documents, this volume contains charters, constitutions, and by-laws of Indian tribes in the Northern Plains (Montana and North Dakota). Documents are presented relative to the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation, the Blackfeet Tribe of the…

  2. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management Systems § 900.45 What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's... tribe or tribal organization. The system shall contain sufficient information to identify contract...-determination contract. (d) Budget controls. The financial management system shall permit the comparison of...

  3. Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-02-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

  4. 25 CFR 900.130 - What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Construction § 900.130 What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self-determination construction contract? 900.130 Section 900.130...

  5. 23 CFR 661.59 - What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support the project? 661.59 Section 661.59 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.59 What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not...

  6. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCourt, D. C.

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

  7. 25 CFR 900.9 - May the Secretary require an Indian tribe or tribal organization to submit any other information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... organization to submit any other information beyond that identified in § 900.8? 900.9 Section 900.9 Indians... Proposal Contents § 900.9 May the Secretary require an Indian tribe or tribal organization to submit any other information beyond that identified in § 900.8? No. ...

  8. 75 FR 26774 - Notice of Re-Designation of the Service Delivery Area for the Cowlitz Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Public Law 95-375, Extension of Federal Benefits to Pascua Yaqui Indians, Arizona, expresses..., Louisiana Grand Parish, LA,\\22\\ LaSalle Parish, LA, Rapides Parish, LA. Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico... Mexico. NM. Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida. Broward, FL, Collier, FL, Miami- Dade, FL, Hendry, FL...

  9. 78 FR 7448 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Spokane Tribe of Indians West Plains Casino...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ...; and (4) No Action/No Development. Environmental issues addressed in the FEIS include geology and soils... Bureau of Indian Affairs Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Spokane Tribe of Indians... of the Air force (Air Force) serving as cooperating agencies, intends to file a Final Environmental...

  10. Unusual HLA-B alleles in two tribes of Brazilian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belich, M P; Madrigal, J A; Hildebrand, W H; Zemmour, J; Williams, R C; Luz, R; Petzl-Erler, M L; Parham, P

    1992-05-28

    The Kaingang and Guarani are culturally and linguistically distinct tribes of southern Brazil. Like all Amerindian groups they show limited HLA polymorphism, which probably reflects the small founder populations that colonized America by overland migration from Asia 11,000-40,000 years ago. We find the nucleotide sequences of HLA-B alleles from the Kaingang and Guarani to be distinct from those characterized in caucasian, oriental and other populations. By comparison, the HLA-A and C alleles are familiar. These results and those reported in the accompanying paper on the Waorani of Ecuador reveal that a marked evolution of HLA-B has occurred since humans first entered South America. New alleles have been formed through recombination between pre-existing alleles, not by point mutation, giving rise to distinctive diversification of HLA-B in different South American Indian tribes.

  11. 42 CFR 137.18 - What criteria must an Indian Tribe satisfy to be eligible to participate in self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... eligible to participate in self-governance? 137.18 Section 137.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.18 What criteria must an Indian Tribe satisfy to be eligible to participate in self-governance? To be eligible to...

  12. Tools for healthy tribes: improving access to healthy foods in Indian country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Byrd, Randi R; Ramachandran, Gowri; Vu, Maihan; Ries, Amy; Bell, Ronny A; Evenson, Kelly R

    2012-09-01

    There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase's essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitive Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes-a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 25 CFR 900.124 - May the Indian tribe or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the Indian tribe or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract? 900.124 Section 900.124 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract? Yes. A grant agreement or a...

  14. 24 CFR 1000.336 - How may an Indian tribe, TDHE, or HUD challenge data or appeal HUD formula determinations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... formula determination in writing, setting forth the reasons for its decision. Pursuant to HUD's action... reasons for the decision. (4) Pursuant to resolution of the dispute: (i) If the Indian tribe or TDHE... determinations regarding Allowable Expense Level (AEL) and the inflation factor. (c) The challenge and the...

  15. 75 FR 62395 - Calculation of Annual Federal Medical Assistance Percentages for Indian Tribes for Use in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... comment period. SUMMARY: The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-351) directed HHS to establish assistance payment reimbursement rates for Indian Tribes, tribal... comment period to assist us in fully considering issues and developing policies. Please provide a...

  16. POTENTIAL OVERLOOKED ANALOGUES TO THE INDIAN OCEAN TSUNAMI IN THE WESTERN AND SOUTHWESTERN PACIFIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Walker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a more detailed examination of subducting margins of the Western and Southwestern Pacific, segments are found that are similar to the segment along the Indian Ocean that ruptured on 26 December 2004. Similarities are found in terms of hypocenter distributions and historical seismicity. The largest reported moment magnitudes in the Western and Southwestern Pacific since 1900 were an 8.5, an 8.4, and an 8.3. Should any substantially larger earthquakes occur along these segments or elsewhere in the Western or Southwestern Pacific, Civil Defense agencies in the Hawaiian Islands should be aware of any possible inadequacies in existing evacuation procedures for western and southern shores.

  17. Exercise Intervention Improves the Metabolic Profile and Body Composition of Southwestern American Indian Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Colip, Leslie; Burge, Mark R.; Sandy, Phillip; Ghahate, Donica; Bobelu, Jeanette; Faber, Thomas; Shah, Vallabh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose The Southwestern American Indian population carries a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity, placing this group at higher risk than the general population for developing early type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, likely impacting overall lifespan. This study aims to evaluate the impact of early lifestyle interventions which promote healthy eating and regular exercise on risk factors contributing to the development of the metabolic syndrome among the ado...

  18. Bibliography of Spanish and Southwestern Indian Cultures Library Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Mildred

    Compiled to encourage Spanish and Indian-speaking children to communicate meaningfully in English, the bibliography cites books that present a familiar environment and are about famous and successful members of their ethnic groups. The 239 books cited were published between 1926 and 1968. Some citations include annotations, suggested age groups,…

  19. Disordered Eating in Southwestern Pueblo Indians and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Janeanne T.; Harris, Mary B.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated incidence of eating disorders in Pueblo Indian and Hispanic high school students (N=95). Found no ethnic differences. Majority of girls reported wanting to lose weight, being worried about weight, and indulging in binge eating. Nine girls reported eating habits consistent with bulimia. Few boys indicated concerns about weight or…

  20. The astronomy of two Indian tribes: The Banjaras and the Kolams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahia, M. N.; Halkare, Ganesh; Menon, Kishore; Calamur, Harini

    2014-03-01

    We report field studies of the astronomical beliefs of two Indian tribes - the Banjaras and the Kolams. The Banjaras are an ancient tribe connected with the gypsies of Europe while the Kolams have been foragers until recently. They share their landscape with each other and also with the Gonds whose astronomy was reported previously (Vahia and Halkare, 2013). The primary profession of the Banjaras was trade, based on the large-scale movement of goods over long distances, but their services were taken over by the railways about one hundred years ago. Since then the Banjaras have begun the long journey to a sedentary lifestyle. Meanwhile, the Kolams were foragers until about fifty years ago when the Government of India began to help them lead a settled life. Here, we compare their astronomical beliefs of the Banjaras and the Kolams, which indicate the strong sense of identity that each community possesses. Our study also highlights their perspective about the sky and its relation to their daily lives. We show that apart from the absolute importance of the data on human perception of the sky, the data also reveal subtle aspects of interactions between physically co-located but otherwise isolated communities as well as their own lifestyles. We also show that there is a strong relationship between profession and perspective of the sky.

  1. 25 CFR 115.708 - How quickly will trust funds received by the Secretary on behalf of tribes or individual Indians...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How quickly will trust funds received by the Secretary on... BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Trust Fund Accounts: General Information § 115.708 How quickly will trust funds received...

  2. Triple Burden of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Indian Tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatriya, Gautam K; Acharya, Subhendu K

    2016-01-01

    Socio-cultural transitions among individuals from vulnerable groups introduce epidemiological transition, with a concomitant increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, obesity, and cardiovascular disease risks. An accepted conventional wisdom exists for Indian tribes that they are undernourished and away from lifestyle-related diseases. However, the extent of this triple burden affecting them is unknown. In this study, we assessed this triple burden among the 9 major tribes of India. During January 2011 to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 1066 men and 1090 women constituting a total of 2156 adults belonging to the 9 major tribal groups: Santals, Oraons, and Koras (West Bengal); Santals, Bhumijs, and Bathudis (Odisha); and Dhodias, Kuknas, and Chaudharis (Gujarat) to estimate the prevalence of the triple burden (undernutrition, overweight or obesity, and hypertension). A high prevalence of undernutrition and hypertension was observed among the Koras (51.9%and 10.6%, respectively), Bathudis (51.3% and 12.1%, respectively), and Oraons (49.6% and 16.5%, respectively). However, the prevalence of overweight and hypertension among the Bhumijs (17.7% and 14.7%, respectively), Dhodias (23.8% and 12.9%, respectively), Kuknas (15.8% and 11.3%, respectively), and Santals of West Bengal (12.2% and 11.8%, respectively) and Odisha (15% and 9.6%, respectively) was most alarming. The prevalence of overweight or obesity among the women was 10.9% and 1.5%, respectively, with 14.0% hypertensive women. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among the men was 14.8% and 1.7%, respectively, with 9.2% hypertensive men. Undernutrition was highly prevalent among men and women. However, data from the past 30 years on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and body mass index (BMI) revealed that the studied tribes were at a higher risk than the general Indian population. In addition, a vast gender disparity with relation to the disease and risk prevalence was observed. The

  3. Influence of Indian Ocean high pressure on streamflow variability over southwestern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqib Ur Rehman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available  The seasonal and interannual variability of the southwestern Australia streamflow was examined based on re-analysis dataset from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction / National Center for Atmospheric Research, plus monthly streamflow data from 17 meteorological stations obtained from the Department of Water of the Australian Water Resource Council (1976-2008. Significant findings reveal that since the middle of the last century, the early winter (May-August streamflow variability over southwestern Australia has been associated with variability in the intensity of the Indian Ocean high pressure (IOHP system, as well as the zonal movement of the high pressure system across the Indian Ocean. Of note, however, the emphasis in the previous studies has linked the ongoing winter drought in western Australia to changes in sea level pressure, both on a local basis and over larger areas. We introduce objective indices for the area-weighted pressure of the IOHP, and the IOHP area-weighted latitude (IOHLT and longitude (IOHLN positions. When the IOHP is shifted to the east, there is less streamflow in the southwestern Australian rivers that are examined in this study. The situation is reversed when the IOHP is shifted to the west, when there is more streamflow in the southwestern Australian rivers. The characteristics of the streamflow pattern are determined for the river catchment areas located around the coastal region over southwestern Australia using principal component analysis. The first principal component taken into consideration describes 84.43% of the total variance. The multiple correlation between the loading of the first principal component scores of the streamflow and the IOHP and IOHLN is 0.54, while the correlation between the southern oscillation index is 0.44. Centers of action indices explain 29% of the streamflow variability, while the southern oscillation index explains only of the 19% streamflow variability. This

  4. 78 FR 55737 - Notice of Service Delivery Area Designation for the Tejon Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ...). SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION: The IHS currently provides services under regulations in effect on September 15, 1987..., Kittitas, WA, Wahkiakum, WA.\\15\\ Crow Tribe of Montana Big Horn, MT, Carbon, MT, Treasure, MT,\\16\\ Yellowstone, MT, Big Horn, WY, Sheridan, WY. Crow Creek Sioux Tribe of the Crow Brule, SD, Buffalo, SD, Hand...

  5. 40 CFR 501.23 - Request by an Indian Tribe for a determination of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... prerequisites that make it eligible to assume a role similar to that of a state as provided by statute under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, or the Clean Air Act, then that Tribe need provide only...

  6. Source level estimation of two blue whale subspecies in southwestern Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaran, Flore; Guinet, Christophe; Adam, Olivier; Motsch, Jean-François; Cansi, Yves

    2010-06-01

    Blue whales produce intense, stereotypic low frequency calls that are particularly well suited for transmission over long distances. Because these calls vary geographically, they can be used to gain insight into subspecies distribution. In the Southwestern Indian Ocean, acoustic data from a triad of calibrated hydrophones maintained by the International Monitoring System provided data on blue whale calls from two subspecies: Antarctic and pygmy blue whales. Using time difference of arrival and least-squares hyperbolic methods, the range and location of calling whales were determined. By using received level of calls and propagation modeling, call source levels of both subspecies were estimated. The average call source level was estimated to 179+/-5 dB re 1 microPa(rms) at 1 m over the 17-30 Hz band for Antarctic blue whale and 174+/-1 dB re 1 microPa(rms) at 1 m over the 17-50 Hz band for pygmy blue whale. According to previous estimates, slight variations in the source level could be due to inter-individual differences, inter-subspecies variations and the calculation method. These are the first reported source level estimations for blue whales in the Indian Ocean. Such data are critical to estimate detection ranges of calling blue whales.

  7. 24 CFR 1000.28 - May a self-governance Indian tribe be exempted from the applicability of § 1000.26?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a self-governance Indian tribe be exempted from the applicability of § 1000.26? 1000.28 Section 1000.28 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY...

  8. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America; Part III: The Southwest (Apache--Mohave). Occasional Publications in Anthropology Ethnology Series No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    The Museum of Anthropology of the University of Northern Colorado (formerly known as Colorado State College) has assembled a large number of Indian tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to be reproduced as a series of publications. Included in this volume are the amended charter and constitution of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Dulce, New…

  9. 42 CFR 137.17 - May more than one Indian Tribe participate in the same compact and/or funding agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... criteria to participate in self-governance and accepts legal responsibility for all financial and... SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.17 May more than... participate in self-governance on their behalf. ...

  10. 25 CFR 900.129 - How do the Secretary and Indian tribe or tribal organization arrive at an overall fair and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fair and reasonable price for the project or part thereof. In order to enhance this communication, the... organization: (i) The Indian tribe or tribal organization and the Secretary may jointly explore methods of expanding the available funds through the use of contingency funds, advance payments in accordance with...

  11. Indians of the Central Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief history of Indian tribes in the states of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa is presented. Discussion centers around individual Indian tribes which are representative of early and modern Indian life in these states. Native tribes, nomadic tribes, and emigrant tribes are considered. A section devoted to Indians in these states today offers an…

  12. 78 FR 46985 - Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes; National Indian Health Outreach and Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... dissemination to HHS, Tribes, or the public. The awardee must comply with relevant Office of Management and... agendas with the Division of Diabetes Treatment Program (DDTP) and TLDC. i. The draft agenda will be... collaborative efforts to address issues associated with diabetes and obesity in AI/AN youth including food...

  13. 77 FR 10551 - Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation-Amendment to Liquor Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... possession, sale and consumption of liquor within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation. The land is located on trust land and this Code allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages... substance patented or not containing alcohol, spirits, wine, or beer, and all drinks of potable liquids and...

  14. The influence of perceived discrimination on health-related quality of life in an East Coast American Indian tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik; Muller, Clemma J; Samos, Markos W; Goldberg, Jack

    2013-11-01

    To examine the association of perceived discrimination and health-related quality of life using cross- sectional survey. We measured perceived discrimination using a nine-item discrimination scale and measured health-related quality of life with the mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scores of the Short Form-12 questionnaire. The sample was drawn from adult members of an East Coast American Indian Tribe. After adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, and smoking status, perceived discrimination scores greater than the sample median were associated with higher odds of poor mental functioning (odds ratio = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.03-4.91) but not with poor physical functioning (odds ratio = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.53-2.63). Our findings support results from previous studies linking perceived discrimination to worse mental health outcomes.

  15. American Education Policy Towards Indian Tribes (the End of the 18th – Beginning of 19th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelin Timur Vladimirovich-

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the policy of the first presidential administrations of the USA in relation to the Native Americans. The policy was established during the period of George Washington’s presidency. The key factor of this policy was the education of aboriginals, the inurement of skills necessary for the integration with white people. The development of trade relations between nations became the beginning of this process. Trade relations required competent management and special laws regulating the process of trade and intercourse with the Native Americans. Government trading houses (factories had to urge the process of civilization. The author shows the influence of the Enlightenment philosophy of Thomas Jefferson on his idea to educate the aboriginals. The close attention is paid not only to the political views of the third president of the USA, but also to his activity in the process of realizing the educational policy towards the Natives. Educational programs had a purpose to integrate aboriginal tribes into the US society. It was uneasy task and the government tried to find more constructive forms of working instead of common trade and intercourse acts with the Indians. The Louisiana Purchase gave new opportunities for developing the federal policy. Lewis and Clark explored the West and collected comprehensive information about its tribes, their habits and way of life. It was very useful for the government in its idea to civilize the indigenous peoples. The author studies the letters of Thomas Jefferson to some American politics and to the Natives, that the president wrote about his plans about the future of the American Indians. Revival movement of the Second Great Awaking found good allies for the US government. The author shows the role of protestant missionaries in the educational policy of the USA towards the Natives.

  16. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of proterozoic mafic dykes in north Kerala, southwestern Indian Shield - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, T.; Gopakumar, K.; Murali, A. V.; Mitchell, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Mafic dyke intrusions occur in three distinct orientations ( NNW-SSE and NW-SE and NE-SW) in north Kerala regions, the southwestern part of the Indian Shield. Dating of two NNW-SSE trending dykes by K-Ar method has yielded Middle Proterozoic ages (ca. 1660 Ma and ca. 1420 Ma respectively). Our initial geochemical results on these dyke rocks (0.65-0.15 wt pct K2O, 0.37-0.38 wt pct P2O5, 3.30-1.00 wt pct TiO2, 11-1 p.p.m. Rb, 250-90 p.p.m. Sr, 230-40 p.p.m. Ba, 160-40 p.p.m. Zr, and 30-10 x chondrite rare earth elemental abundances) indicate a transitional character between abyssal and plateau tholeiites. Petrogenetic modelling suggests that the dyke compositions have been derived by different degrees of partial melting of a heterogenous source mantle. The mantle sources with accessory amphibole and/or garnet, variably enriched in LREE and LIL elements, are compatible with the observed geochemical data.

  17. Five Indian Tribes of Eastern Oklahoma: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Dorothy; Bland, Anna

    The 18 lessons in this unit of study are intended to promote an awareness of the contribution of the American Indian to the development of Oklahoma and to preserve the culture and heritage of the American Indians of the state. Each lesson includes a concept (one-sentence statement of the main idea), background information, learning activities…

  18. Genetic Isolation among the Northwestern, Southwestern and Central-Eastern Indian Ocean Populations of the Pronghorn Spiny Lobster Panulirus penicillatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Fadry Abdullah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The pronghorn spiny lobster Panulirus penicillatus is a highly valuable species which is widely distributed in Indo-West Pacific and Eastern Pacific regions. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences (566–571 bp were determined to investigate the population genetic structure of this species in the Indian Ocean. In total, 236 adult individuals of Panulirus penicillatus were collected from five locations in the Indian Ocean region. Almost all individuals had a unique haplotype. Intrapopulation haplotype (h and nucleotide (π diversities were high for each locality, ranging from h = 0.9986–1.0000 and π = 0.031593–0.043441. We observed distinct genetic isolation of population located at the northwestern and southwestern edge of the species range. Gene flow was found within localities in the central and eastern region of the Indian Ocean, probably resulting from an extended planktonic larval stage and prevailing ocean currents.

  19. 25 CFR 115.809 - May a tribe recommend to OTFM how to invest the tribe's trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 115.809 Section 115.809 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.809 May a tribe recommend to OTFM how to invest the tribe's trust funds? Tribes...

  20. 75 FR 20608 - Notice of Re-Designation of the Service Delivery Area for the Cowlitz Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... Tribe. In this case, the Tribe estimates the current eligible population will be increased by 35... Cowlitz Clinic in Longview, Washington for their health care needs. It is estimated that members have a 40.... Brigham City Intermountain School \\4\\ Health Center, Utah. Burns Paiute Tribe of the Burns Paiute Harney...

  1. Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

    2004-12-01

    The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production

  2. Generic delimitations, biogeography and evolution in the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), endemic to Madagascar and the smaller islands of the western Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callmander, Martin W; Phillipson, Peter B; Plunkett, Gregory M; Edwards, Molly B; Buerki, Sven

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the most complete generic phylogenetic framework to date for the tribe Coleeae (Bignoniaceae), which is endemic to Madagascar and the other smaller islands in the western part of the Indian Ocean. The study is based on plastid and nuclear DNA regions and includes 47 species representing the five currently recognized genera (including all the species occurring in the western Indian Ocean region). Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses supported (i) the monophyly of the tribe, (ii) the monophyly of Phylloctenium, Phyllarthron and Rhodocolea and (iii) the paraphyly of Colea due to the inclusion of species of Ophiocolea. The latter genus was also recovered paraphyletic due to the inclusion of two species of Colea (C. decora and C. labatii). The taxonomic implications of the mutual paraphyly of these two genera are discussed in light of morphological evidence, and it is concluded that the two genera should be merged, and the necessary new nomenclatural combinations are provided. The phylogenetic framework shows Phylloctenium, which is endemic to Madagascar and restricted to dry ecosystems, as basal and sister to the rest of the tribe, suggesting Madagascar to be the centre of origin of this clade. The remaining genera are diversified mostly in humid ecosystems, with evidence of multiple dispersals to the neighboring islands, including at least two to the Comoros, one to Mauritius and one to the Seychelles. Finally, we hypothesize that the ecological success of this tribe might have been triggered by a shift of fruit-dispersal mode from wind to lemur. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Competition and Cooperation in the Southwestern Indian Ocean: The View From the Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Prospects in the Western Indian Ocean Island Bunge , F.M., ed. Indian Ocean: Five Island Countries. States. New York: UN Industrial Development...Programmes of France France: An Overview." Military Technology (May 1990): 34-37. Accasto, Mario . "The Marine Nationale.’ Defence Today Preston, Antony. "The

  4. The role of goal representations, cultural identity, and dispositional optimism in the depressive experiences of American Indian youth from a Northern Plains tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyser, Jason; Scott, Walter D; Readdy, Tucker; McCrea, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    American Indian researchers and scholars have emphasized the importance of identifying variables that promote resilience and protect against the development of psychopathology in American Indian youth. The present study examined the role of self-regulation, specifically goal characteristics (i.e., goal self-efficacy, goal specificity, intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation, and goal conflict) and dispositional optimism, as well as cultural identity and self-reported academic grades in the depressive experiences of American Indian youth from a North American plains tribe. One hundred and sixty-four participants (53% female) completed measures of goal representations, cultural identity, dispositional optimism, academic performance, and depressive symptoms. Results supported a model in which higher goal self-efficacy, American Indian cultural identity, grade point average, and dispositional optimism each significantly predicted fewer depressive symptoms. Moreover, grade point average and goal self-efficacy had both direct and indirect (through dispositional optimism) relationships with depressive symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of cognitive self-regulatory processes and cultural identity in the depressive experiences for these American Indian youth and may have implications for youth interventions attempting to increase resiliency and decrease risk for depressive symptoms.

  5. Evaluation of mercury in rainbow trout collected from Duck Valley Indian Reservation reservoirs, southwestern Idaho and northern Nevada, 2007, 2009, and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marshall L.; MacCoy, Dorene E.; Maret, Terry R.

    2015-07-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, analyzed mercury (Hg) concentration in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) collected from three reservoirs on the reservation (Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek) during sampling events in 2007, 2009, and 2013, to determine the risk of Hg exposure to Tribal members and the general public.

  6. 25 CFR 900.233 - When must an Indian tribe or tribal organization regulate its employees or subcontractors to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... its employees or subcontractors to avoid a personal conflict of interest? 900.233 Section 900.233 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT...

  7. Hydrologic and chemical data for selected thermal-water wells and springs in the Indian Bathtub area, Owyhee County, southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data collected during January through September 1989 from 86 thermal-water wells and 5 springs in the Indian Bathtub area, southwestern Idaho. The data include well and spring locations, well-construction and water level information, hydrographs of water levels in 9 wells, hydrographs of discharges in 4 springs, and chemical and isotopic analysis of water from 33 thermal-water wells and 5 springs. These data were collected as part of a continuing study to determine the cause or causes of decreased discharge at Indian Bathtub Spring and other thermal springs along Hot Creek.

  8. Results of test drilling and hydrologic monitoring in the Indian Bathtub area, Owyhee County, southwestern Idaho, January 1989 through September 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.W.; Jones, M.L.; Parliman, D.J.; Tungate, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the period January 1989 through September 1990 from eight test holes and selected thermal-water wells and springs in the Indian Bathtub area, southwestern Idaho. The data include completion, lithologic, and gamma logs for eight test holes, hydrographs of water levels in the test holes and ten other wells, hydrographs of discharges at four springs, and chemical and isotopic analyses of water from six of the test holes. These data were collected as part of a continuing study to determine the cause or causes of decreased discharge at Indian Bathtub Spring and other thermal springs along Hot Creek.

  9. Conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation area, South Dakota, water years 1980-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle W.; Putnam, Larry D.; LaBelle, Anneka R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers are the largest sources of groundwater on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and are used extensively for irrigation and public and domestic water supplies. To assess the potential for decreased water levels and discharge to streams in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers in southwestern South Dakota were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oglala Sioux Tribe. The study area includes most of the Pine Ridge Reservation in Jackson and Shannon Counties and Indian trust lands in Bennett County in southwestern South Dakota.

  10. 25 CFR 115.804 - Will we account to a tribe for those trust funds the tribe receives through direct pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will we account to a tribe for those trust funds the... OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts § 115.804 Will we account to a tribe for those trust funds the tribe receives through direct pay? No...

  11. 78 FR 49120 - Courts of Indian Offenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... tribes removed from the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the Wyandotte Tribe, the Choctaw... interim final rule published and effective on March 3, 2013, addressing the addition of two Indian tribes to the list of tribes with Courts of Indian Offenses (also known as CFR Courts), and deletion of five...

  12. 25 CFR 15.108 - If the decedent was not an enrolled member of a tribe or was a member of more than one tribe, who...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If the decedent was not an enrolled member of a tribe or... decedent was not an enrolled member of a tribe or was a member of more than one tribe, who prepares the...: (a) Was not an enrolled member of a tribe; or (b) Was a member of more than one tribe. ...

  13. 78 FR 40635 - Delegation of Authority to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe To Implement and Enforce National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... ``Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments'' (65 FR 67249, November 6, 2000), requires us to..., Insulation, Intergovernmental relations, Iron, Labeling, Lead, Lime, Metallic and nonmetallic mineral...

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doulas, Speros

    2007-01-01

    This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

  15. Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1997-11-01

    This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

  16. 25 CFR 115.810 - May a tribe directly invest and manage its trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribe directly invest and manage its trust funds... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.810 May a tribe directly invest and manage its trust funds? A tribe may apply to withdraw...

  17. Office of Human Development Services--Grants to Indian tribes for social and nutrition services. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-18

    The Administration on Aging (AoA), in the Office of Human Development Services, is issuing final regulations for a new program for older Indians authorized by Title VI of the Older Americans Act, as amended. The purpose of this program is to promote the delivery of social and nutrition services for older Indians comparable to the services provided through the State and Community Programs on Aging, under Title III of the Act. Eligible tribal organizations will be able to apply for direct funding to pay the costs of providing social and nutrition services to Indians at 60 and older, including the acquisition, alteration, or renovation of multipurpose senior centers.

  18. Availability and quality of ground water, southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Robert E.; Hutchinson, E. Carter; Hillier, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    Population growth and the potential development of subsurface mineral resources have increased the need for information on the availability and quality of ground water on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southern Ute Tribal Council, the Four Corners Regional Planning Commission, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, conducted a study during 1974-76 to assess the ground-water resources of the reservation. Water occurs in aquifers in the Dakota Sandstone, Mancos Shale, Mesaverde Group, Lewis Shale, Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, Fruitland Formation, Kirtland Shale, Animas and San Jose Formations, and terrace and flood-plain deposits. Well yields from sandstone and shale aquifers are small, generally in the range from 1 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum reported yields of 75 gallons per minute. Well yields from terrace deposits generally range from 5 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum yields of 50 gallons per minute. Well yields from flood-plain deposits are as much as 25 gallons per minute but average 10 gallons per minute. Water quality in aquifers depends in part on rock type. Water from sandstone, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers is predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type, whereas water from shale aquifers is predominantly a sodium bicarbonate type. Water from rocks containing interbeds of coal or carbonaceous shales may be either a calcium or sodium sulfate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water ranged from 115 to 7,130 milligrams per liter. Water from bedrock aquifers is the most mineralized, while water from terrace and flood-plain aquifers is the least mineralized. In many water samples collected from bedrock, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers, the concentrations of arsenic, chloride, dissolved solids, fluoride, iron, manganese, nitrate, selenium, and sulfate exceeded U.S. Public Health Service (1962) recommended limits for drinking water. Selenium in the ground water in excess of U

  19. Variability of carbonaceous aerosols, ozone and radon at Piton Textor, a mountain site on Reunion island (southwestern Indian Ocean)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhugwant, C.; Riviere, E.; Leveau, J. [Univ. de la La Reunion, Saint Denis (France). Lab. de Physique de l' Atmosphere; Keckhut, P. [CNRS, Verrieres-Le-Buisson (France). Service d' Aeronomie

    2001-11-01

    soundings. These assessments are confirmed by 5-day back trajectories, which show important seasonal shift in origin of air masses arriving in the lower troposphere of the south-western Indian Ocean.

  20. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Ray [Energy Controls Manager; Schubert, Eugene [Policy Analyst

    2014-08-15

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  1. [Nutritional status of children under 5 years of age in indian villages of the Parakaña tribe in Brazil's eastern Amazonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, S J; Menezes, R C

    1994-02-01

    The evolution of the nutritional status of children under 5 years of age living in two Indian settlements of the Parakanã tribe, Maroxewara and Paratininga, situated in the southeast of Pará State (Brazil), with less than 20 years of direct contact with our society, was studied. The main purpose of this study was to register the effects of the preventive and curative health activities of the "Parakanã Program" (created by an agreement between the National Indian Foundation- FUNAI and Northern Hydroelectric Project- ELETRONORTE), undertaken with the technical cooperation of the Tropical Medicine Center (Federal University of Pará). Anthropometric data were obtained in there cross-sectional studies (April 89; January 90 and October 91) for the purpose of evaluating the prevalence of malnutrition by means of Gomez's, Waterlow's and WHO criteria. The evolution of nutritional status was evaluated in the light of the rate of growth and accepting weight increments superior to those expected among well-nourished children as a goal. Seventy children (87.5% of all the 0-5 years-olds living there) were followed through throughout the studies. Prevalence of malnutrition was greater in Paranatinga than in Maroxewara, possibly because the former was more populous and had had longer inter-racial contact. Paranatinga's anthropometric indices (wt/age, ht/age and wt/ht) were the lower. Most of the severe forms of malnutrition were found there too. Children between six months and 2 years old were the most affected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Measles vaccine coverage and immune response in children of Caiabi and Metuktire Indian tribes living in malarial endemic area: Parque indígena do Xingu, Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindel, R; Baruzzi, R G; Souza, V A; Ferreira, A W; Avila, S L

    2001-07-01

    Measles vaccination efficiency was evaluated in children from two Indian tribes - Caiabi and Metuktire - living in the Amazon region, in the Parque Indigena do Xingu (PIX). The population sample, selected at random, made up 37 Caiabi and 28 Metuktire children, aged from 20-75 months (40%). For operational and epidemiological reasons, measles vaccine is given from 6 months of age. The average age of children when they received the vaccine was 11.5 months for the first dose and 20 months for the second. The search for IgG antibodies against measles virus and Plasmodium falciparum was made through immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Measles vaccine coverage has reached 60% at 12 months of age and 92% at 18 months, whereas post-vaccine serum conversion was 95% in Caiabi children (geometric mean of titres (GMT) 126) and 89% in Metuktire (GMT 109). The difference in GMT is not statistically significant. Seventy-three per cent of Caiabi children (GMT 101) and 100% of Metuktire children (GMT135) were plasmodium antibody positive, showing they had been exposed to malarial infection. Despite the differences detected, the immune response to measles vaccine was satisfactory in both groups, with a positive percentage consistent with that achieved in non-malarial areas in Americas. The results show the efficiency of a vaccination programme in an indigenous area despite the difficulties in reaching the villages and maintaining the cold chain, and also despite the malaria endemicity.

  3. New Cascadia subduction zone tsunami inundation modeling to guide relocation of coastal infrastucture for Indian tribes on the northern Washington coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, T. J.; LeVeque, R. J.; Adams, L. M.; Schelling, J.; Gonzalez, F. I.; Cakir, R.

    2015-12-01

    There have been advances in understanding the potential for great tsunamigenic earthquakes on the Cascadia Subduction Zone, motivating an effort to update the assessment of tsunami hazards on the Washington coast. Fine resolution (1/3 arc-second) digital elevation models (DEMs) of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and northern Olympic Peninsula have recently been made available, and coastal Indian tribes (Quinault, Hoh, and Quileute) have made plans to move important infrastructure out of their tsunami hazard zones. We have made numerical simulations of tsunamis incident on the Quinault, Hoh, Quileute, and Makah Reservations and adjacent coast with the GeoClaw numerical model [http://depts.washington.edu/clawpack/geoclaw/] for a local tsunami generated by a 9.1M Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake, designated L1 by Witter and others (DOGAMI Special Paper 43). This scenario is estimated to have `2% probability of nonexceedance in 50 years, which would be comparable to the International Building Code standard for seismic loading on structures of high importance, and provides appropriate guidance to the affected communities for siting of their significant infrastructure.

  4. Plasticity of trophic interactions among sharks from the oceanic south-western Indian Ocean revealed by stable isotope and mercury analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiszka, Jeremy J.; Aubail, Aurore; Hussey, Nigel E.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Caurant, Florence; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-02-01

    Sharks are a major component of the top predator guild in oceanic ecosystems, but the trophic relationships of many populations remain poorly understood. We examined chemical tracers of diet and habitat (δ15N and δ13C, respectively) and total mercury (Hg) concentrations in muscle tissue of seven pelagic sharks: blue shark (Prionace glauca), short-fin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus), scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), pelagic thresher shark (Alopias pelagicus), crocodile shark (Pseudocarcharias kamoharai) and silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), from the data poor south-western tropical Indian Ocean. Minimal interspecific variation in mean δ15N values and a large degree of isotopic niche overlap - driven by high intraspecific variation in δ15N values - was observed among pelagic sharks. Similarly, δ13C values of sharks overlapped considerably for all species with the exception of P. glauca, which had more 13C-depleted values indicating possibly longer residence times in purely pelagic waters. Geographic variation in δ13C, δ15N and Hg were observed for P. glauca and I. oxyrinchus. Mean Hg levels were similar among species with the exception of P. kamoharai which had significantly higher Hg concentrations likely related to mesopelagic feeding. Hg concentrations increased with body size in I. oxyrinchus, P. glauca and C. longimanus. Values of δ15N and δ13C varied with size only in P. glauca, suggesting ontogenetic shifts in diets or habitats. Together, isotopic data indicate that - with few exceptions - variance within species in trophic interactions or foraging habitats is greater than differentiation among pelagic sharks in the south-western Indian Ocean. Therefore, it is possible that this group exhibits some level of trophic redundancy, but further studies of diets and fine-scale habitat use are needed to fully test this hypothesis.

  5. 30 CFR 756.16 - Approval of the Hopi Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... land reclamation plan. 756.16 Section 756.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.16 Approval of the Hopi Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Hopi Tribe's...

  6. 25 CFR 170.122 - Can a tribe close a cultural access road?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe close a cultural access road? 170.122 Section... ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Use of Irr and Cultural Access Roads § 170.122 Can a tribe close a cultural access road? (a) A tribe with jurisdiction over a cultural...

  7. 25 CFR 170.461 - May a tribe approve plans, specifications, and estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribe approve plans, specifications, and estimates? 170.461 Section 170.461 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER... Facilities Review and Approval of Plans, Specifications, and Estimates § 170.461 May a tribe approve plans...

  8. 25 CFR 115.807 - Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 115.807 Section 115.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.807 Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds? Upon...

  9. 77 FR 53225 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Seminole Tribe of Florida Fee-to-Trust...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Seminole Tribe of Florida... (BIA) as lead agency, with the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Tribe), City of Coconut Creek (City), and... (DEIS) with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Seminole Tribe of Florida Fee-to...

  10. 25 CFR 115.815 - How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Withdrawing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.815 How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account? To request trust funds from a...

  11. 25 CFR 183.4 - How can the Tribe use the principal and income from the Trust Fund?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Trust Fund? 183.4 Section 183.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND AND SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE LEASE FUND Trust Fund Disposition Use of Principal and Income § 183.4 How can the Tribe use the...

  12. 77 FR 15122 - Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone- Ordinance Pursuant to United States Code, Legalizing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone-- Ordinance Pursuant to United States Code... Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians Ordinance Pursuant to Section 1161, Title 18 United States... jurisdiction of Te-Moak Western Shoshone Tribe's Colonies and Reservation, will increase the ability of the...

  13. 25 CFR 162.201 - Must agricultural land be managed in accordance with a tribe's agricultural resource management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tribe's agricultural resource management plan? 162.201 Section 162.201 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Must agricultural land be managed in accordance with a tribe's agricultural resource management plan... and objectives in any agricultural resource management plan developed by the tribe, or by us in close...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.27 - How does the Director select which Tribes in the applicant pool become self-governance Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... applicant pool become self-governance Tribes? 1000.27 Section 1000.27 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.27 How does the Director select which Tribes in the applicant pool become self-governance Tribes? The Director selects up...

  15. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    .... SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approved Compact between the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the State of... Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The compact authorizes the Seminole Tribe to operate slot... publishing notice that the Compact between the Seminole Tribe of Florida and the State of Florida is now in...

  16. Renewable energy in Indian country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    On June 25--27, 1995, at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, the Center for Resource Management (CRM), organized and sponsored a conference in conjunction with the Navajo Nation, EPA, and Bechtel Group, Inc., to deal with issues associated with developing renewable energy resources on Indian lands. Due to the remoteness of many reservation homes and the cost of traditional power line extensions, a large percentage of the Indian population is today without electricity or other energy services. In addition, while they continue to develop energy resources for export, seeing only minimal gain in their own economies, Indian people are also subject to the health and environmental consequences associated with proximity to traditional energy resource development. Renewable energy technologies, on the other hand, are often ideally suited to decentralized, low-density demand. These technologies--especially solar and wind power--have no adverse health impacts associated with generation, are relatively low cost, and can be used in applications as small as a single home, meeting power needs right at a site. Their minimal impact on the environment make them particularly compatible with American Indian philosophies and lifestyles. Unfortunately, the match between renewable energy and Indian tribes has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, coordinated effort to identify renewable energy resources located on Indian lands, to develop practical links between Indian people`s needs and energy producers, and to provide the necessary training for tribal leaders and members to plan, implement, and maintain renewable energy systems. Summaries of the presentations are presented.

  17. Tools for Healthy Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhacker, Sheila; Byrd, Randi R.; Ramachandran, Gowri; Vu, Maihan; Ries, Amy; Bell, Ronny A.; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing recognition that policymakers can promote access to healthy, affordable foods within neighborhoods, schools, childcare centers, and workplaces. Despite the disproportionate risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes among American Indian children and adults, comparatively little attention has been focused on the opportunities tribal policymakers have to implement policies or resolutions to promote access to healthy, affordable foods. This paper presents an approach for integrating formative research into an action-oriented strategy of developing and disseminating tribally led environmental and policy strategies to promote access to and consumption of healthy, affordable foods. This paper explains how the American Indian Healthy Eating Project evolved through five phases and discusses each phase’s essential steps involved, outcomes derived, and lessons learned. Using community-based participatory research and informed by the Social Cognitve Theory and ecologic frameworks, the American Indian Healthy Eating Project was started in fall 2008 and has evolved through five phases: (1) starting the conversation; (2) conducting multidisciplinary formative research; (3) strengthening partnerships and tailoring policy options; (4) disseminating community-generated ideas; and (5) accelerating action while fostering sustainability. Collectively, these phases helped develop and disseminate Tools for Healthy Tribes—a toolkit used to raise awareness among participating tribal policymakers of their opportunities to improve access to healthy, affordable foods. Formal and informal strategies can engage tribal leaders in the development of culturally appropriate and tribe-specific sustainable strategies to improve such access, as well as empower tribal leaders to leverage their authority toward raising a healthier generation of American Indian children. PMID:22898161

  18. 25 CFR 115.817 - How does OTFM disburse money to a tribe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does OTFM disburse money to a tribe? 115.817 Section... OTFM disburse money to a tribe? Upon receipt of all necessary documentation, OTFM will process the... designated by the tribe. If there are circumstances that preclude electronic payments, OTFM will mail a check...

  19. 25 CFR 170.300 - May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR transportation projects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR... Financing § 170.300 May tribes use flexible financing to finance IRR transportation projects? Yes. Tribes may use flexible financing in the same manner as States to finance IRR transportation projects, unless...

  20. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  1. Indians of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  2. 25 CFR 170.607 - Can a tribe use its allocation of IRR Program funds for contract support costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... costs? Yes. Contract support costs are an eligible item out of a tribe's IRR Program allocation and need... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use its allocation of IRR Program funds for contract support costs? 170.607 Section 170.607 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  3. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 78 FR 26384 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band) Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians Moapa Band of Paiute... Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota Round Valley Indian Tribes, Round Valley Reservation, California (previously listed as the Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation...

  5. 25 CFR 170.903 - Who notifies tribes of the transport of radioactive waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who notifies tribes of the transport of radioactive waste... INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Miscellaneous Provisions Hazardous and Nuclear Waste Transportation § 170.903 Who notifies tribes of the transport of radioactive waste? The Department of Energy (DOE) has...

  6. 30 CFR 756.18 - Required amendments to the Hopi Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.18 Section 756.18 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.18 Required amendments to the Hopi Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  7. 75 FR 41518 - Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish (Gun Lake) Tribe Liquor Control Ordinance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish (Gun Lake) Tribe Liquor Control Ordinance AGENCY... certification of the Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians (Gun Lake) Liquor Control Ordinance... Liquor Ordinance of the Gun Lake Tribe Liquor Control Ordinance reads as follows: Match-E-Be-Nash-She...

  8. 77 FR 47868 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the Bureau of Indian Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Band; White Earth Band) Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa... Reservation, South Dakota Round Valley Indian Tribes, Round Valley Reservation, California (previously listed as the Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation, California) Sac & Fox Nation of...

  9. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11

  10. 42 CFR 137.297 - If the environmental review procedures of a Federal agency are adopted by a Self-Governance Tribe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... agency are adopted by a Self-Governance Tribe, is the Self-Governance Tribe responsible for ensuring the... INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa...-Governance Tribe, is the Self-Governance Tribe responsible for ensuring the agency's policies and procedures...

  11. 25 CFR 115.816 - May a tribe's request for a withdrawal of trust funds from its trust account be delayed or denied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribe's request for a withdrawal of trust funds..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Withdrawing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.816 May a tribe's request for a withdrawal of trust funds from its trust...

  12. 25 CFR 115.814 - If a tribe withdraws money from its trust account for a particular purpose or project, may the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If a tribe withdraws money from its trust account for a particular purpose or project, may the tribe redeposit any money that was not used for its intended purpose... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust...

  13. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

  14. 25 CFR 170.136 - How can a tribe obtain funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.136 How can a tribe obtain funds? (a) To receive funding for programs that serve recreation, tourism, and...

  15. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: Watershed Restoration Projects: Annual Report, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    1999-10-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous US and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1998, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed

  16. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2013-09-26

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

  17. 25 CFR 170.926 - Can a tribe administer approved ERFO repairs under a self-determination contract or a self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe administer approved ERFO repairs under a self-determination contract or a self-governance agreement? 170.926 Section 170.926 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Relief § 170.926 Can a tribe administer approved ERFO repairs under a self-determination contract or a...

  18. 25 CFR 115.812 - Is a tribe responsible for its expenditures of trust funds that are not made in compliance with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....812 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.812 Is a tribe responsible for its expenditures of trust funds that are not made in compliance with statutory...

  19. A review of Chinese tribe Achilini (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Achilidae), with descriptions of Paracatonidia webbeda gen. & sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jian-Kun; Yang, Lin; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2015-12-02

    Planthoppers of the tribe Achilini (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Achilidae) from China, are reviewed. A key to the three genera of Chinese Achilini is given. A new genus and species of the tribe from southwestern China: Paracatonidia webbeda gen. & sp. nov., is described. A new genus and species record for China, Cixidia kasparyani Anufriev, is also given.

  20. Analysis of crimes committed against scheduled tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadse, Vivek P.; Akhil, P.; Anto, Christopher; Gnanasigamani, Lydia J.

    2017-11-01

    One of the curses to the society is a crime which has a deep impact on the society. Victims of crimes are the one who is impacted the most. All communities in the world are affected by crime and the criminal justice system, but largely impacted communities are the backward classes. There are many cases reported of crime committed against scheduled tribes from the year 2005 till date. This paper states the analysis of Crimes Committed against Scheduled Tribes in the year 2015 in various states and union territories in India. In this study, Multiple Linear regression techniques have been used to analyze the crimes committed against scheduled tribes’ community in India. This study compares the number of cases reported to the police station and rate of crime committed in different states in India. It also states the future prediction of the crime that would happen. It will also predict the number of cases of crime committed against the scheduled tribe that can be reported in future. The dataset which has been used in this study is taken from official Indian government repository for crimes which include different information of crimes committed against scheduled tribes in different states and union territories measured under the population census of the year 2011. This study will help different Indian states and union territory government to analyze and predict the future crimes that may occur and take appropriate measures against it before the actual crime would occur.

  1. A case of Spinocerebellar Ataxia from ethnic tribe of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayal Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the case of a 17-year-old girl belonging to an ethnic tribe (Bodo tribe of Assam, presenting with bilateral cerebellar signs and with history suggestive of an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, who was found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 7 on genetic testing. This case throws light on the probability of more such cases in the multi-ethnic society of the North-Eastern Indian states, which are not studied or reported till date.

  2. 25 CFR 163.35 - Indian forest land assistance account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... assistance accounts and shall provide the audit results of to the tribe(s). ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian forest land assistance account. 163.35 Section 163... REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.35 Indian forest land assistance account. (a) At the...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.382 - What may the Tribe's/Consortium's annual report on self-governance address?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-governance address? 1000.382 Section 1000.382 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... report on self-governance address? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's annual self-governance report may address... the programs and services funded under self-governance, summarized and annotated as the Tribe may deem...

  4. 25 CFR 183.5 - What documents must the Tribe submit to request money from the Trust Fund?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... from the Trust Fund? 183.5 Section 183.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND AND SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE LEASE FUND Trust Fund Disposition Clearance Requirements § 183.5 What documents must...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA. ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000...

  6. 25 CFR 170.301 - Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds or pay back loans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds... Financing § 170.301 Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds or pay back loans? (a) A tribe can use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds. (b) A tribe can use IRR Program funds to pay back...

  7. 25 CFR 166.311 - Is an Indian agricultural resource management plan required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is an Indian agricultural resource management plan....311 Is an Indian agricultural resource management plan required? (a) Indian agricultural land under... agricultural resource management plan developed by the tribe, or by us in close consultation with the tribe...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.220 - What regulations apply to self-governance Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What regulations apply to self-governance Tribes? 1000.220 Section 1000.220 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.220 What regulations apply to self-governance...

  9. Hydrographic and productivity characteristics along 45 degrees E longitude in the southwestern Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean during austral summer 2004

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jasmine, P.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Madhu, N.V.; AshaDevi, C.R.; Alagarsamy, R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Jayan, Z.; Sanjeevan, V.N.; Sahayak, S.

    During the austral summer 2004, an intensive multidisciplinary survey was carried out in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean to study the main hydrographic features and the associated productivity processes. This sector includes...

  10. Effects of the "Circle of Life" HIV-prevention program on marijuana use among American Indian middle school youths: a group randomized trial in a Northern Plains tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asdigian, Nancy L; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Keane, Ellen M; Mousseau, Alicia C; Kaufman, Carol E

    2016-12-29

    Early substance use threatens many American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, as it is a risk factor for maladaptive use and adverse health outcomes. Marijuana is among the first substances used by AI/AN youth, and its use becomes widespread during adolescence. Interventions that delay or reduce marijuana use hold the promise of curbing substance disorders and other health risk disparities in AI/AN populations. We evaluated the effectiveness of the Circle of Life (COL) program in reducing marijuana use among young AI adolescents. COL is a culturally tailored, theory-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted disease (STD) intervention shown to delay sexual initiation among AI youths. We conducted secondary analyses of data from a school-based group randomized trial conducted between 2006 and 2007 in all 13 middle schools on a rural, Northern Plains reservation (N = 635, 47% female). We used discrete-time survival analysis (DTSA) to assess COL effectiveness on risk of marijuana initiation among AI youths and latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) to evaluate effects on frequency of marijuana use over time. DTSA models showed that the overall risk of marijuana initiation was 17.3% lower in the COL group compared to the control group. No intervention effect on frequency of marijuana use emerged in LGCM analyses. COL is a multifaceted, culturally tailored, skills-based program effective in preventing marijuana uptake among AI youth.

  11. Environmental Protection in Indian Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's efforts to protect human health and the environment of federally recognized Indian tribes by supporting implementation of federal environmental laws consistent with the federal trust responsibility, and the government-to-government relationship.

  12. Geologic framework of pre-Cretaceous rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a discussion and summary of Jurassic and older rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico, and is based on analysis of geophysical logs and observations of outcrops. The Reservation, which is located in the northern San Juan Basin, has been the site of deposition of sediments for much of the Phanerozoic. Geologic times represented on the Reservation are the Precambrian, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary. Rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age have not been reported in this region. Thicknesses of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks range from about 750 feet (229 meters) on the Archuleta arch, east of the Reservation, to more than 8,300 feet (2,530 meters) just northwest of the Reservation. About 5,500 feet (1,676 meters) of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks occur in the central part of the Reservation, near Ignacio. At Ignacio the top of the Jurassic lies at a depth of 7,600 feet (2,316 meters) below the surface, which is composed of Tertiary rocks. As much as 2,500 feet (762 meters) of Tertiary rocks occur in the area. More than 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) of Cretaceous and younger rocks, and 15,600 feet (4,755 meters) of all Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks occur in the vicinity of the Reservation. In the early Paleozoic the area that includes the Southern Ute Reservation was on the stable western shelf of the craton. During this time sediments that compose the following shallow-marine clastic and carbonate rocks were deposited: the Upper Cambrian Ignacio Quartzite (0-150 feet; 0-46 meters), Upper Devonian Elbert Formation (50-200 feet; 15-61 meters), Upper Devonian Ouray Limestone (10-75 feet; 3-23 meters), and Mississippian Leadville Limestone (0-250 feet; 0-76 meters). Mixed carbonate and clastic deposition, which was punctuated by a unique episode of deposition of evaporite sediments, continued through

  13. 25 CFR 170.809 - Can a tribe perform road maintenance under a self-determination contract or self-governance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-determination contract or self-governance agreement? 170.809 Section 170.809 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... a tribe perform road maintenance under a self-determination contract or self-governance agreement? Yes. Any tribe may enter into a self-determination contract or self-governance agreement to conduct...

  14. 25 CFR 518.8 - Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation have a continuing duty to advise the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation... NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS SELF REGULATION OF CLASS II GAMING § 518.8 Does a tribe that holds a certificate of self-regulation have a continuing duty to...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.61 - Are other funds available to self-governance Tribes/Consortia for planning and negotiating with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are other funds available to self-governance Tribes... SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Other Financial... other funds available to self-governance Tribes/Consortia for planning and negotiating with non-BIA...

  16. Predator Force Structure Changes at Indian Springs Air Force Auxiliary Field, Nevada Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Santa Barbara City College Years of Experience: 20 Karen R. Foster, Cultural Resources, SAIC B.A., Anthropology, University of California at Irvine...Stanton Ely Shoshone Tribe, Chairperson, Victor McQueen , Sr. Fort Independence Indian Tribe, Chairperson Fort Mojave Tribe, Tribal Chairperson, The...Rodney Mike Ely Shoshone Tribe, Chairperson, The Honorable Alfred Stanton Ely Shoshone Tribe, Chairperson, Victor McQueen , Sr. Fort Independence

  17. 25 CFR 1000.398 - May a Tribe/Consortium invest funds received under a self-governance agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium invest funds received under a self-governance agreement? 1000.398 Section 1000.398 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... invest funds received under a self-governance agreement? Yes, self-governance funds may be invested if...

  18. 25 CFR 1200.4 - May tribes exercise increased direction over their trust funds and retain the protections of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... funds and retain the protections of Federal trust status? 1200.4 Section 1200.4 Indians OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN INDIANS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT General Provisions § 1200.4 May tribes exercise increased direction over their trust funds and...

  19. 25 CFR 1001.8 - Selection criteria for tribes/consortia to receive a negotiation grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... negotiation grant. 1001.8 Section 1001.8 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... negotiation grant. (a) Who may be selected to receive a negotiation grant? Any tribe/consortium that has been...-governance annual funding agreement is eligible to apply for a negotiation grant. Each year, we will publish...

  20. 77 FR 4731 - Review and Submittal of a Tribe's Facility License Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 559 RIN 3141-AA48 Review and Submittal of a Tribe's Facility License Information AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  1. pastoralist tribes in lower Omo Valley, Southwestern Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACIPH_Admin

    Results: Nine intestinal parasites were identified: Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia lamblia,. Iodamoeba buetschlii, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis and. Schistosoma mansoni. The difference in the rates of intestinal parasitic infection between Kara and ...

  2. pastoralist tribes in lower Omo Valley, Southwestern Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACIPH_Admin

    Abstract. Background: Survey of intestinal parasites provides information about the burden of parasites in a community and helps in making decisions for intervention. Nevertheless, such information on the communities living in the Lower. Omo Valley is scanty. Objective: To study the prevalence of intestinal parasitosis ...

  3. 48 CFR 252.226-7001 - Utilization of Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... governing body of any Indian tribe or entity established or recognized by the governing body of an Indian..., may rely on the representation of an Indian organization, Indian-owned economic enterprise, or Native... challenge to the representation of a subcontractor, the Contracting Officer will refer the matter to— (1...

  4. Indian Land Areas Judicially Established 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Geographic Data Committee — The data portrays the results of cases before the commission in which an Indian tribe proved its original tirbal occupancy of a tract within the continental United...

  5. 25 CFR 36.111 - Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board... tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards? A tribal governing body or local school board may waive some or all of the standards established by this part if the body...

  6. 25 CFR 170.135 - Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism, and trails program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.135 Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism... funds for recreation, tourism, and trails programs if the programs are included in the IRRTIP...

  7. $32 Million in EPA funds help Northwest and Alaska tribes protect communities' health, water, air and natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $32 million in funding for the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) capacity building grants to tribes and tribal consortia in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

  8. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  9. 25 CFR 518.12 - May a tribe request reconsideration by the Commission of a denial of a petition or a removal of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribe request reconsideration by the Commission of a denial of a petition or a removal of a certificate of self-regulation? 518.12 Section 518.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS SELF REGULATION OF CLASS II GAMING § 518.12 May a tribe request...

  10. 25 CFR 115.701 - What types of accounts are maintained for Indian trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Trust Fund Accounts: General Information § 115.701 What types of accounts are maintained for Indian trust funds? Indian trust funds are deposited in... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of accounts are maintained for Indian trust...

  11. 25 CFR 115.106 - Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assets of members of the Agua Caliente Band of Mission Indians. 115.106 Section 115.106 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.106 Assets of members of the Agua...

  12. 25 CFR 309.25 - How can an individual be certified as an Indian artisan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 309.25 Section 309.25 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROTECTION OF INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS PRODUCTS § 309.25 How can an individual be certified as an Indian artisan? (a) In... provided in section 107 of the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, Public Law 101-644, a tribe may not...

  13. 25 CFR 183.3 - Does the American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform Act of 1994 apply to this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform Act... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND AND SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE LEASE FUND Introduction § 183.3 Does the American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform...

  14. Prevalence and Risk for Negative Disability Outcomes Between American Indians-Alaskan Natives and Other Race-Ethnic Groups in the Southwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siordia, Carlos; Bell, Ronny A; Haileselassie, Shalom L

    2017-04-01

    In the USA, some race-ethnic minorities are unjustly relegated to the margins of society. As a consequence, these groups are more frequently found to have risk profiles associated with adverse health than individuals from the majority group (non-Hispanic Whites). Limited research has been devoted to investigating how American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) differ from other race-ethnic minorities and the majority group with regard to prevalence and risk for self-care, independent living, and ambulatory disabilities. Our investigation attempts to quantify both of these tracks by accounting for race-ethnic and poverty status. Our cross-sectional analysis used nationally representative data from the American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year (2009-2013) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) file to address this literature gap. We selected survey participants from the four states with the largest concentration of AIANs in the USA (Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Oklahoma). We used information on 2,428,233 individuals to generalize prevalence of and risk for disability to 49,994,332 individuals in the Southwest US. We found disability (self-reported) prevalence differed between our six race-ethnic groups in statistically significant and complex ways. Population-weighted logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, and citizenship found AIANs have a higher risk for disability than non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Asians, and Hispanics. In order to impact public health and build a more equitable society, efforts should continue to identify health disparities. Researchers should continue to advance conceptual frameworks on plausible causal mechanisms between markers of social stratification and disablement processes.

  15. Developing Relationships & Partnerships between Tribes and the State to Ensure Equitable Resources & Quality Education for Native American Students. State of New Mexico Tribal-State Indian Education Summit Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2005

    2005-01-01

    More than 300 tribal representatives and educators from across New Mexico met at Ohkay Owingeh on December 19, 2005, to discuss ways to improve education for American Indian students in New Mexico. The Summit was a collaborative effort by New Mexico's Office of Indian Affairs, Public Education Department, Higher Education Department, and tribal…

  16. The Influence of Sakai (Scythian Tribe in History and Shahnameh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Taheri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sakai ancient tribe has a fundamental role in the development of ancient history and myths of different nations, including Greeks, Iranians, Indians and Chinese. These invading and nomadic tribes in the beginning of the Aryan history, like other Aryan tribes, scattered in the east and west and south of residential world and though they were in an endless conflict with their neighbors they were finally overturned among them and only a name of Sakai remained in history. Due to the nature of wilderness, the research resources about their cultural affair are limited to their tombs of Kings and scattered references in chronicles of their neighbors. Study and research about the Sakais folk manner and their distribution indicates a common origin for Sakai tribes and the family of Zal and Rostam in Shahnameh, although the word of "Sagzi" is the only verbal evidence of link between family of Rostam and Sakai tribe. Furthermore some of their customs and life styles may be found in some stories of Shahnameh. Moreover, there are evidences of Soghdian documents discovered in China which imply that the Soghdians had a mediating role in the transmission of Sakais myths to the Iranian national epic.

  17. The Tribe of Educational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lily, Abdulrahman Essa

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the claim that the international academic community of educational technologies seems to have functioned in a "tribal" way, having formed themselves around tribe-like patterns. It therefore addresses the research question: What are these claimed tribe-like practices that such a community exhibits? This question is…

  18. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? 1000.336 Section 1000.336 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT...-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.336 Does the...

  19. 25 CFR 1200.30 - How does a tribe notify the Department if it wishes to return withdrawn funds to Federal trust...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... return withdrawn funds to Federal trust status? 1200.30 Section 1200.30 Indians OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN INDIANS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT Returning Tribal Funds to Trust § 1200.30 How does a tribe notify the Department if it wishes to return...

  20. 24 CFR 1003.510 - Indian preference requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN TRIBES AND ALASKA NATIVE VILLAGES Grant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian preference requirements...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director to...

  2. 25 CFR Appendix A to Part 1000 - Model Compact of Self-Governance Between the Tribe and the Department of the Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Tribe, under the authority of the Constitution and By-Laws of the Tribe (hereinafter referred to as the... commence and must remain in effect as provided by Federal law or agreement of the parties. Section 2... due process right under the Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968, 25 U.S.C. 1301, et seq., to protect all...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.50 - What must a Tribe/Consortium seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... submit in order to meet the planning phase requirements? 1000.50 Section 1000.50 Indians OFFICE OF THE... seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase requirements? A Tribe/Consortium must... the Tribe/Consortium is free from material audit exceptions. In order to meet this requirement, a...

  4. 25 CFR 101.24 - Loans for expert assistance for preparation and trial of Indian claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loans for expert assistance for preparation and trial of... preparation and trial of Indian claims. (a) Loans may be made to Indian tribes, bands and other identifiable... assistance of counsel, for the preparation and trial of claims pending before the Indian Claims Commission...

  5. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1979-1980 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1979-80 annual report reflects the Commission's efforts to act in a liaison capacity between tribes and state government and to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report describes 17 projects completed during…

  6. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1982 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1981-82 annual report reflects the Commission's efforts to improve communications, understanding and working relationships between tribes and state government to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report…

  7. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1981 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1980-81 annual report reflects the commission's efforts to act in a liaison capacity between tribes and state government to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report describes 18 projects completed during the…

  8. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  9. 77 FR 34986 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ..., Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Museum of the Plains Indian, Browning, MT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Indian Arts and Crafts Board..., Indian Arts and Crafts Board. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural...

  10. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  11. 42 CFR 137.246 - How does a Self-Governance Tribe retrocede a PSFA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does a Self-Governance Tribe retrocede a PSFA? 137.246 Section 137.246 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Retrocession § 137...

  12. 42 CFR 137.226 - How does a Self-Governance Tribe request a waiver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does a Self-Governance Tribe request a waiver? 137.226 Section 137.226 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Regulation Waiver...

  13. Report on Outreach Efforts and Analysis of Approach: A Pilot Project on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Philip A.

    The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Project of the Indian Health Service was designed to identify existing cases of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome among the American Indian tribes (Navajo, Apache, Ute and 19 Pueblo Tribes) in the Southwest, establish a referral system to identify these children for treatment, estimate the prevalence of the problem, and work…

  14. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  15. Monograph of the tribe Apostasieae (Orchidaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de E.F.

    1969-01-01

    This paper embraces a full taxonomic revision of the tribe Apostasieae. The introduction is followed by an ample discussion of the taxonomic position of the Apostasieae and the affinities within the tribe. The tribes Apostasieae and Cypripedieae are regarded as forming together the subfamily

  16. A synthesis of ethnohistorical materials concerning the administration of Federal Indian policy among the Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce Indian people: Working draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebow, E.B.; Younger, C.A.; Broyles, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    For the purposes of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe have been accorded the status of ''Affected Indian Tribe'' and have become party to the proceedings to determine a suitable location for the nation's first commercial waste repository. Each of the Tribes has expressed concerns about the suitability of the Hanford Site in eastern Washington. These concerns, in general, address the proposed repository's effects on traditional spiritual beliefs and cultural practices, on tribal sovereignty and the Tribes' right to self-government, on the natural resources under tribal management jurisdiction, and on the health and socioeconomic characteristics of the Tribes' reservation communities. The Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce have distinctive cultural traditions that may be adversely affected by activities related to the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Further, the Tribes enjoy a unique relationship with the federal government. Because of their distinctive cultures and governmental status, particular attention will be paid to expressed interests of the Tribes, and to ways in which these interests may be affected by the repository program. Monitoring is needed to describe current conditions among the Affected Tribes' populations, to describe BWIP site characterization activities affecting the Tribes, and to measure any changes in these conditions that may occur as a direct result of site characterization. This paper reports our first efforts at gathering historical information. It summarizes materials contained in two sources: the reports of field agents to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1854-1936), and the dockets of the Indian Claims Commission. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Southwestern Grassland Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulette L. Ford; Deborah U. Potter; Rosemary Pendleton; Burton Pendleton; Wayne A. Robbie; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview, and selected in-depth coverage, of the factors and processes that have formed, and continue to shape, our Southwestern grasslands. In general, this chapter looks at how distributions of grasslands are regulated by soils and climate, and modified by disturbance (natural and/or anthropogenic). The attendant ecological components of...

  18. Southwestern Pine Tip Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel T. Jennings; Robert E. Stevens

    1982-01-01

    The southwestern pine tip moth, Rhyacionia neomexicana (Dyar), injures young ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) in the Southwest, central Rockies, and midwestern plains. Larvae feed on and destroy new, expanding shoots, often seriously reducing terminal growth of both naturally regenerated and planted pines. The tip moth is especially damaging to trees on...

  19. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-01

    This fact sheet provides information on Tribes in the lower 48 states selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  20. Indian Projects Funded by EDA, August 26, 1965-September 30, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic Development Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Since 1967 the Economic Development Administration (EDA) has carried out an Indian program that emphasized economic development of Indian reservations and trust lands. In the past 12 years Indian tribes in 32 states have received community and industrial development grants to assist them in developing a viable economic base on their lands. Tribes…

  1. Implications of American Indian Gambling for Social Work Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1988 passage of the Indian Gaming and Regulatory Act (IGRA), American Indian tribal communities have rapidly opened up casinos. American Indian participation in recreational gambling has increased, resulting in an increase in problem and pathological gambling. However, increased revenues from gaming have significantly benefited tribes.…

  2. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix

    2013-05-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  3. 78 FR 68819 - Final NOAA Procedures for Government-to-Government Consultation With Federally Recognized Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Tribes to self-government and acknowledges that Indian Tribes exercise inherent sovereign powers over... ongoing communication and information sharing throughout the document. Response: NOAA agrees and has... or elevation mechanism for ensuring the requirements of the Handbook are followed by the Regional and...

  4. Indian TSA's: A Force for Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Assisting tribal governments in meeting the needs of their members, the Kiowa Tribe, the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, and the National Paralegal Institute sponsored the first Tribal Service Advisor training event this year (TSA's can represent clients at the administrative level in many legal and social welfare areas). (JC)

  5. Fostering Environmental Justice in Indian Country, Alaska, and for Indigenous Peoples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charge to the NEJAC to develop advice and recommendations for EPA about how the Agency can more effectively work with federally-recognized tribes, indigenous stakeholders, and other interested parties living within and outside Indian country

  6. Tobacco use and cardiovascular disease among American Indians: the strong heart study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eichner, June E; Wang, Wenyu; Zhang, Ying; Lee, Elisa T; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-01-01

    .... The Strong Heart Study is a prospective observational study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 13 American Indian tribes in Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota with 4,549 participants...

  7. Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing for Emergency Management-Related Public Health: Exploring the Experiences of Tribes and Counties in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, Maureen A

    2017-01-01

    Each American Indian tribe is unique in several ways, including in its relationships with local governments and risk for emergencies. Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) arrangements are encouraged between tribes and counties for emergency management-related population health, but researchers have not yet explored CJS experiences of tribes and counties for emergency management. This investigation used collaboration theory and a CJS spectrum framework to assess the scope and prevalence of tribe-county CJS arrangements for emergency management in California as well as preconditions to CJS. Mixed-methods survey results indicate that tribes and counties have varied CJS arrangements, but many are informal or customary. Preconditions to CJS include tribe-county agreement about having CJS, views of the CJS relationship, barriers to CJS, and jurisdictional strengths and weaknesses in developing CJS arrangements. Areas for public health intervention include funding programs that build tribal capacity in emergency management, reduce cross-jurisdictional disagreement, and promote ongoing tribe-county relationships as a precursor to formal CJS arrangements. Study strengths, limitations, and future directions are also discussed.

  8. 42 CFR 137.179 - May a Self-Governance Tribe make agreements with the Federal Records Centers regarding disclosure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a Self-Governance Tribe make agreements with... § 137.178? 137.179 Section 137.179 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE...

  9. 42 CFR 137.175 - Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to maintain a recordkeeping system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to maintain a recordkeeping system? 137.175 Section 137.175 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE...

  10. Entrepreneurial Business Development Through Building Tribes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus; Mattsson, Jan; Standing, Craig

    2015-01-01

    this single in-depth case study and a comprehensive literature review, a model is developed comprising the necessary components to succeed in tribe building efforts in social media. These components include social cohesion of the inner tribe (founders) in terms of vision, the creation of an icon (a......Understanding tribe development can be critical to the survival of entrepreneurial e-service ventures. This article presents findings on how a Swedish start-up industrial design company termed BETTER-DESIGN attempted to build a global presence by creating a tribe of followers on the web. From...

  11. Gut bacterial diversity of the tribes of India and comparison with the worldwide data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehingia, Madhusmita; Thangjam devi, Kanchal; Talukdar, Narayan C.; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, Nageshwar; Mande, Sharmila S.; Deka, Manab; Khan, Mojibur R.

    2015-01-01

    The gut bacteria exert phenotypic traits to the host but the factors which determine the gut bacterial profile (GBP) is poorly understood. This study aimed to understand the effect of ethnicity and geography on GBP of Mongoloid and Proto-Australoid tribes of India. Fecal bacterial diversity was studied in fifteen tribal populations representing four geographic regions (Assam, Telangana, Manipur and Sikkim) by DGGE followed by NGS analysis on Illumina MiSeq platform. Geography and diet had significant effect on GBP of the Indian tribes which was dominated by Prevotella. The effects were more prominent with lower taxonomic levels, indicating probable functional redundancy of the core GBP. A comparison with the worldwide data revealed that GBP of the Indian population was similar to the Mongolian population (Mongolia). The bacterial genera Faecalibacterium, Eubacterium, Clostridium, Blautia, Ruminococcus and Roseburia were found to be core genera in the representative populations of the world. PMID:26689136

  12. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined...

  13. 75 FR 52771 - Notice of Availability: Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ...) 2010 Indian Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program for Indian Tribes and Alaska Native... the ICDBG program is the development of viable Indian and Alaska Native communities, including the... Development agency link on the Grants.gov/Find Web site at http://www.grants.gov/search/agency.do . A link to...

  14. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  15. 76 FR 377 - Land Acquisitions; Cowlitz Indian Tribe of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... 147358. Parcel II That portion of the following described land lying West of the Westerly line of..., Range 1 East of the Willamette Meridian, Clark County, Washington. Except any portion lying within NW...

  16. 75 FR 55824 - Land Acquisitions; Nisqually Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..., Range 1 East, Willamette Meridian, lying northerly of the north right-of-way line of Yelm Highway SE and...\\NE\\1/4\\) of Section 33, of Township 18 North, Range 1 East, Willamette Meridian, lying northerly of...

  17. 78 FR 26802 - Land Acquisitions; Cowlitz Indian Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... land lying West of the Westerly line of Interstate 5, formerly known as Pacific Highway, in Section 9.... EXCEPT any portion lying within NW 31st Avenue. ALSO EXCEPT that portion thereof acquired by the State of...

  18. Variations of body physique in Santhals: an Indian tribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta; Malik, S L

    2010-06-01

    In order to assess sex differences in body physique in Santhals, a cross sectional sample of 800 adult Santhals (400 males and 400 females) was collected from West Bengal (India) using multistage cluster random sampling. The present study aims to explore the body physique of Santhals of West Bengal, where both males and females do backbreaking labor work. This type of research is rare in tribal communities, especially in India. Anthropometric Somatotyping, the method forwarded by Heath and Carter, is followed in the present study, which is a technique of rating human body physique and composition through anthropometric measurements. The results suggest that the Santhal males and females are predominately Mesomorphic in their body physique. Mean somatotype of Santhal males and females are 1.98-4.81-3.98 and 3.16-5.43-3.17 respectively. Variation among Santhal females is more than males in terms of their body physique. Males in general are linear and muscular, whereas females are lean to fatty, but muscular.

  19. 40 CFR 131.35 - Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... involving traditional Native American spiritual practices which involve, among other things, primary (direct... States government, notwithstanding the issuance of any patent, and including rights-of-way running... used by fish, other aquatic life and wildlife at any stage of their life history or activity. (e...

  20. Southwestern desert resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorson, William L.; van Riper, Charles; Schwalbe, Cecil R.

    2010-01-01

    The southwestern deserts stretch from southeastern California to west Texas and then south to central Mexico. The landscape of this region is known as basin and range topography featuring to "sky islands" of forest rising from the desert lowlands which creates a uniquely diverse ecology. The region is further complicated by an international border, where governments have caused difficulties for many animal populations. This book puts a spotlight on individual research projects which are specific examples of work being done in the area and when they are all brought together, to shed a general light of understanding the biological and cultural resources of this vast region so that those same resources can be managed as effectively and efficiently as possible. The intent is to show that collaborative efforts among federal, state agency, university, and private sector researchers working with land managers, provides better science and better management than when scientists and land managers work independently.

  1. 76 FR 39007 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act Regulations- Definition of “Indian Tribe”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ..., funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony. NAGPRA defines ``Indian tribe'' as... may assert claims for human remains and other cultural items; whether the NAGPRA requirements for...

  2. 75 FR 60810 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth... Reservation, South Dakota Round Valley Indian Tribes of the Round Valley Reservation, California Sac & Fox...

  3. Supysaua: A Documentary Report on the Conditions of Indian Peoples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974

    Given in this documentary report are 4 reports which discuss American Indian policy and practice in Brazil since 1970. They factually document what is happening to Brazilian Indian tribes in the name of "progress", "integration", and "growth". The articles are entitled: (1) "Genocide"; (2)…

  4. Native Nutrition--Northwest Indian Treatment Center Honors Culture to Heal the Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Elise

    2011-01-01

    The Northwest Indian Treatment Center runs a 45-day inpatient treatment program in Elma, Washington. The Squaxin Island Tribe created the program to address an unmet need for culturally based drug and alcohol treatment centers for Indian people who grew up on reservations. The program specializes in treating people with chronic relapse patterns…

  5. 78 FR 47135 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and... 20 RIN 1018-AY87 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain...) proposes special migratory bird hunting regulations for certain Tribes on Federal Indian reservations, off...

  6. "Color Me Healthy." Risk Reduction for Indian Children through Good Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Frances

    Life expectancy among certain American Indian tribes is only 50 years of age as compared with 74.6 years for the general population. Leading causes of death among Indian infants continue to be respiratory, digestive, infective, parasitic disease, and congenital malformations. Child obesity, dental caries, atherosclerosis, iron deficiency anemia,…

  7. Population structure of humpback whales from their breeding grounds in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Howard C; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S; Best, Peter B; Findlay, Ken P; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H; Bonatto, Sandro L; Kotze, Deon P G H; Meÿer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy

    2009-10-08

    Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern Indian Ocean, and Northern Indian Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern Indian Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern Indian Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region.

  8. Population Structure of Humpback Whales from Their Breeding Grounds in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S.; Best, Peter B.; Findlay, Ken P.; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J.; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Kotze, Deon P. G. H.; Meÿer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern Indian Ocean, and Northern Indian Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern Indian Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern Indian Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region. PMID:19812698

  9. Tribes of Users and System Developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Dingley

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective communication is essential for information systems development crossing functional, organisational and national boundaries. As organisations attempt to overcome cultural barriers to communication across the world, communication with colleagues across the corridor remains problematic; cultural barriers between departments remain unchallenged. This paper introduces the concepts of 'culture' and 'tribe' into the discussion of the relationship between business users and information systems developers. Previous research has focused on identifying specific barriers to user-systems developer communication and on ways of eliminating these barriers. In contrast, this paper suggests that much can be learnt through the recognition of cultural differences inherent to the differing roles of user and systems developer. Maintenance of cultural identity is essential to the individual if he/she is to function effectively as a member of his/her tribe, whether it is the 'tribe' of developers or the 'tribe' of users. Communication problems within the systems development process may be addressed by a mutual understanding of cultural differences between the 'tribes' of users and systems developers. This degree of understanding cannot be achieved by attempting to change, persuade or convert the other tribe. The problems of user-systems developer communication need to be addressed through effective communication which acknowledges the differing cultures.

  10. Cognitive Self-Regulation and Depression: Examining Academic Self-Efficacy and Goal Characteristics in Youth of a Northern Plains Tribe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Walter D.; Dearing, Eric; Reynolds, W. Rusty; Lindsay, Julie E.; Baird, Grayson L.; Hamill, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive self-regulatory processes and depression was examined in American Indian adolescents from a Northern Plains tribe. Students completed measures of negative life events, self-efficacy, goals, and depressive symptoms. Results indicated that academic self-efficacy was strongly associated with depression. Academic…

  11. Statement of Hubert Velarde, Jicarilla Apache Tribe to United States Commission on Civil Rights at Albuquerque Convention Center (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 14, 1972).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Hubert

    The statement by the President of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe emphasizes reservation problems that need to be examined. Presented at a 1972 Civil Rights Commission hearing on Indian Concerns, Velarde's statement listed employment, education, the administration of justice, water rights, and medical services as areas for investigation. (KM)

  12. A dated phylogeny of the palm tribe Chamaedoreeae supports Eocene dispersal between Africa, North and South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuenca, A.; Asmussen-Lange, C.A.; Borchsenius, Finn

    2008-01-01

    , followed by long distance dispersion to the Mascarene Islands in the late Miocene. The radiation of Hyophorbe could have taking place on islands in the Indian Ocean now submerged, but its former presence in Africa or Madagascar cannot be ruled out. At least two independent migrations between North......The palm tribe Chamaedoreeae reaches its higher diversity in Central America, however, its distribution ranges from the north eastern part of Mexico to Bolivia with a disjunction to the Mascarene Islands in the Indian Ocean. The disjunct distribution of Chamaedoreeae is generally considered...... a result of Gondwana vicariance and extinction from Africa and/or Madagascar. However, latitudinal migrations and their role in shaping the distribution of this tribe in the Americas have been largely overlooked. In this study we used seven plastid and two nuclear DNA regions to investigate...

  13. American Indian Adoption Program: An Ethnic Approach to Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodluck, Charlotte Tsoi; Eckstein, Florence

    1978-01-01

    Sponsored by the Jewish Family and Children's Service of Phoenix, Arizona, the program places American Indian adoptees with their natural extended families or with families of the same tribe. Personal contacts, publicity, and national child welfare organizations help locate homes. Ensuring the child's tribal inheritance rights is yet to be…

  14. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1983 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Intended to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, the 1983 annual report reflects the Commission's continued efforts to improve communications and understanding, and especially to strengthen working relationships between Arizona tribes and state government. The report…

  15. Cancer Incidence, Survival, and Mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horm, John W.; Burhansstipanov, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Overall cancer incidence among southwestern American Indians is less than half that of U.S. whites; Alaska Native and white rates are similar. However, both native groups have elevated rates for specific cancers (stomach, liver, and gallbladder), and Indians have low five-year survival rates. Data tables outline incidence, mortality, and survival…

  16. SEASON” IN SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA ' v .

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study evaluates the variability and severity of the 'Little Dry Season' (LDS) m southwestern Nigeria. Being an important climatic phenomenon that impacts agricultural practices in the West Africansub-region, a fore. ' knowledge of the LDS characteristics for any given year should enable farmers to plan With ...

  17. 76 FR 2703 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Big Sandy Rancheria Band of Western Mono Indians...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Big Sandy Rancheria Band of Western... Affairs (BIA) as lead agency, with the Big Sandy Rancheria Band of Western Mono Indians (Tribe) as a... and comment and announces the availability of copies of the document and the date, time and location...

  18. 78 FR 13888 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary... U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, that meet the definition... American individual. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that...

  19. Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, ter B.J.H.; Loureiro, A.A.; Lisboa, P.L.B.; Koek-Noorman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae). The wood anatomy of nearly all genera of the Guettardeae (Rubiaceae, Guettardoideae) has been examined, and in this respect the tribe is heterogeneous. Suggestions are made for a delimitation of the tribe. Guettarda, Bobea, Antirhea,

  20. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  1. Behaviour and habitat of the Indian Ocean amphibious blenny ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alticus monochrus Bleeker is an amphibious blenny that inhabits exposed and moderately exposed rocky shores of Mauritius and other islands of the southwestern Indian Ocean. It remains above the water line on moist or wet substrata over which it migrates vertically and/or horizontally with the tide. Rapid terrestrial ...

  2. 76 FR 33314 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... for which the TEC will have access to de- identified data from IHS Epidemiology Data Mart/National... and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Privacy Act protection. 4. Use of the IHS Epidemiology Data Mart... fill gaps in data needed for Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and Healthy People 2020...

  3. Southwestern Power Administration Update, October- December 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-12-01

    On October 29, 2004, Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) reached agreement on interim arrangements to be implemented after the October 31, 2004, expiration of the membership agreement between the two parties. According to Jim McDonald, Director of Southwestern’s Division of Customer Service, the interim agreement forged between Southwestern and SPP seeks to minimize impacts to SPP as well as to Southwestern and its customers while Southwestern and SPP work on a seams/coordination agreement to succeed the expired membership agreement.

  4. Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing for Emergency Management-Related Public Health: Exploring the Experiences of Tribes and Counties in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen A. Wimsatt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Each American Indian tribe is unique in several ways, including in its relationships with local governments and risk for emergencies. Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS arrangements are encouraged between tribes and counties for emergency management-related population health, but researchers have not yet explored CJS experiences of tribes and counties for emergency management. This investigation used collaboration theory and a CJS spectrum framework to assess the scope and prevalence of tribe–county CJS arrangements for emergency management in California as well as preconditions to CJS. Mixed-methods survey results indicate that tribes and counties have varied CJS arrangements, but many are informal or customary. Preconditions to CJS include tribe–county agreement about having CJS, views of the CJS relationship, barriers to CJS, and jurisdictional strengths and weaknesses in developing CJS arrangements. Areas for public health intervention include funding programs that build tribal capacity in emergency management, reduce cross-jurisdictional disagreement, and promote ongoing tribe–county relationships as a precursor to formal CJS arrangements. Study strengths, limitations, and future directions are also discussed.

  5. Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consulting, BB9 [BB9 Consulting; Director, Environmental

    2014-04-01

    The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribe’s natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

  6. Indian Juvenile Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Prevention. Hearings before the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H.R. 1156 to Coordinate and Expand Services for the Prevention, Identification, Treatment, and Follow-Up Care of Alcohol and Drug Abuse among Indian Youth, and for Other Purposes and H.R. 2624 to Authorize Programs for the Treatment and Prevention of Drug and Alcohol Abuse among Indian Juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

    Three hearings held in Arizona, New Mexico, and South Dakota provide individual statements and panel presentations on problems, programs, and proposals for prevention, identification, treatment, and follow-up care of alcohol and drug abuse among American Indian juveniles. The majority of witnesses are members of Indian tribes in the three…

  7. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  8. Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

  9. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  10. Brazil launches anti-AIDS campaign for Indians. Education and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-09

    Anthropologists are educating Indian tribes regarding methods of preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), particularly acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in a new Brazilian campaign. Estimates of the number of Indians who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vary because records do not categorize by race. While the National Indian Foundation (Funai) believes 20 of 320,000 Indians are infected, the Catholic Church's Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI) states that 11 Indians have died of AIDS since 1989, and that another 4 are HIV-positive. According to Pedro Chequer, campaign coordinator, the Indian population is at low risk, but highly vulnerable to the spread of HIV infection; each tribe has different sexual mores, which must be respected, and its own language, which requires educational materials in that language. Based on recent studies, 10-15% of Brazilian Indians are infected with some form of STD. Indians at high risk, those living near urban areas or having regular contact with mining and forestry workers, particularly the wildcat golddiggers known as "garimpeiros," are being targeted. The use of army personnel, who are often the only non-indigenous people in isolated areas of the Amazon, in the campaign is being considered. The Ministry of Heath is also promoting studies of Indian culture and an education campaign in 1310 schools, reaching 62,000 indigenous students and 2504 teachers.

  11. 42 CFR 137.231 - May a Self-Governance Tribe appeal the Secretary's decision to deny its request for a waiver of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a Self-Governance Tribe appeal the Secretary's decision to deny its request for a waiver of a regulation promulgated under section 517 of the Act ? 137.231 Section 137.231 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  12. Protein sequences clustering of herpes virus by using Tribe Markov clustering (Tribe-MCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamam, A.; Siswantining, T.; Febriyani, N. L.; Novitasari, I. D.; Cahyaningrum, R. D.

    2017-07-01

    The herpes virus can be found anywhere and one of the important characteristics is its ability to cause acute and chronic infection at certain times so as a result of the infection allows severe complications occurred. The herpes virus is composed of DNA containing protein and wrapped by glycoproteins. In this work, the Herpes viruses family is classified and analyzed by clustering their protein-sequence using Tribe Markov Clustering (Tribe-MCL) algorithm. Tribe-MCL is an efficient clustering method based on the theory of Markov chains, to classify protein families from protein sequences using pre-computed sequence similarity information. We implement the Tribe-MCL algorithm using an open source program of R. We select 24 protein sequences of Herpes virus obtained from NCBI database. The dataset consists of three types of glycoprotein B, F, and H. Each type has eight herpes virus that infected humans. Based on our simulation using different inflation factor r=1.5, 2, 3 we find a various number of the clusters results. The greater the inflation factor the greater the number of their clusters. Each protein will grouped together in the same type of protein.

  13. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program : Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Ronald L.; Woodward-Lilengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo J.

    1999-09-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) receives and reviews proposals to mitigate for fish and wildlife losses and refers approved measures to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding. The Northwest Power Act (Act) calls on the Council to include measures in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses. The Act further states that the Council may include in its Program measures that provide off-site mitigation--mitigation physically removed from the hydro project(s) that caused the need to mitigate. The Program includes a goal ''to recover and preserve the health of native resident fish injured by the hydropower system, where feasible, and, where appropriate, to use resident fish to mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the system.'' Among those recommended measures are off-site mitigation for losses of anadromous fisheries including the measure under analysis in this Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan, proposed by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. To meet the need for off-site mitigation for anadromous fish losses in the Columbia River Basin in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operations and maintenance of a trout production facility on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Measures for establishing a Coeur d'Alene fish production facility have been a part of the Council's Program since 1987. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility is intended to rear and release westslope cutthroat trout into rivers and streams with the express purpose of increasing the numbers of fish spawning, incubating and rearing in the natural environment. It will use the modern technology that hatcheries offer to overcome the mortality resulting from habitat degradation in lakes, rivers, and

  14. Snake venom antibodies in Ecuadorian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J; Yost, J A

    1981-10-01

    Serum samples from 223 Waorani Indians, a tribe in eastern Ecuador, were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to snake venom. Seventy-eight per cent were positive, confirming the highest incidence and mortality from snake bite poisoning yet recorded in the world. Most samples were positive for more than one venom antibody. Antibodies were found to venoms of Bothrops viper in 60% of positive cases, of Micrurus coral snake in 21%, and of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta, in 18%. Further studies are needed to determine whether high venom-antibody levels afford protection against further snake envenoming.

  15. "Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Karla

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the three-volume reference set, "Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts, and Sovereignty" published by ABC-CLIO. This reference work is edited by Donald Fixico, Arizona State University, and dedicated to the people of his tribes: (1) Shawnee; (2) Sac and Fox; (3) Seminole; and (4)…

  16. 77 FR 71439 - Regulatory and Administrative Waivers Granted for Public and Indian Housing Programs To Assist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ... Notice 2012-10 (Verification of Social Security Numbers (SSNs), Social Security (SS) and Supplemental... notification process as easy as possible. HUD will maintain information on the names of the PHAs, Indian tribes... Capital Fund Grants; including Replacement Housing Factor Fund grants), Choice Neighborhood, and HOPE VI...

  17. 77 FR 54451 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded.... SUMMARY: This rule prescribes special early-season migratory bird hunting regulations for certain tribes...: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of July 3, 1918 (40 Stat. 755; 16 U.S.C. 703 et seq.), authorizes...

  18. 76 FR 59298 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AX34 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting... migratory bird hunting regulations for certain tribes on Federal Indian reservations, off-reservation trust.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of July 3, 1918 (40 Stat. 755; 16 U.S.C. 703...

  19. 77 FR 46118 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ..., Washington, DC, and Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park Service... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, have completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the...

  20. Oil and Gas on Indian Reservations: Statistical Methods Help to Establish Value for Royalty Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Mary S.; Kadane, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Part of the history of oil and gas development on Indian reservations concerns potential underpayment of royalties due to under-valuation of production by oil companies. This paper discusses a model used by the Shoshone and Arapaho tribes in a lawsuit against the Federal government, claiming the Government failed to collect adequate royalties.…

  1. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Edmond J; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  2. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family, Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family, Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families, Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family, Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family, Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family. for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1. Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  3. Nez Perce Tribe Welcomes Wolves Back to Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reintroduce the gray wolf to central Idaho. The tribe does all the fieldwork with the wolves and shares their work with the public at the Wolf Education and Research Center, Winchester, Idaho. Despite opposition from ranchers and legislators, the wolf population is…

  4. Political Role of Tribes : Analysis of Tribalism, Islamism and Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Presentation 2, Yemen tribes [Arabic language]. Download PDF. Papers. Islamic Movement, the state and the clans [Arabic language]. Download PDF. Papers. Chapter 1 : range of economic, social and clan; book on elections and tribes in Jordan [Arabic language]. Download PDF. Papers. Introduction : book on elections ...

  5. Southwestern Power Administration annual site environmental report CY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report provides a synopsis of Southwestern Power Administration`s (Southwestern`s) effectiveness in managing its operations in an environmentally responsible manner. In CY 1997, the Office of Environmental, Safety, and Health was reorganized and incorporated into the Division of Acquisition and Property. The Division of Acquisition, Property, and Environmental Management maintains responsibility for development, oversight, and implementation of environmental programs. Senior Management at Southwestern has taken actions to increase environmental awareness throughout the organization. During CY 1997, (Southwestern) was not involved in any known programs or activities that had adverse impacts on the environment. The 1997 Environmental Appraisal, a portion of Southwestern`s Self-Assessment and Appraisal Program, indicated approximately 90% compliance with Southwestern`s written environmental programs. Southwestern continued to function throughout CY 1997 in an operations and maintenance posture with minor substation projects.

  6. Indigenous knowledge of zootherapeutic use among the Biate tribe of Dima Hasao District, Assam, Northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajem Betlu, Albert Lalduhawma

    2013-08-12

    The present study addresses the use of zootherapy in the traditional healthcare system of the Biate tribe of Dima Hasao district, Assam, India. It sought to identify the different species used for zootherapeutic use with the detailed methods of usages to create awareness and contribute to the conservation and sustainable utilization of the resources. 15 Biate villages within the district of Dima Hasao were surveyed through semi-structured questionnaires and informal interviews. Detailed information on the uses of each animal was recorded. Species were identified using standard literature. Fidelity level (FL) was calculated to demonstrate the percentage of respondents claiming the use of a certain animal for the same major purposes. The study documents 34 species for the treatment of about 34 different ailments. The largest number of species reported was mammals with17 species. Maximum number of species has been reported for the treatment of diabetes and its high fidelity levels warrants in-depth studies to establish its pharmacological activity. The usages documented herein are unique to the Biate tribe. Very often, these animals are hunted and sold openly at the local markets in the lure of quick money. A 300 gm live Gekko gecko may fetch a sum of 2,50,000 Indian Rupees (INR), and smoked meat of Hoolock hoolock cost approximately 250-300 INR per kg. Animals are also hunted for its hide. The unrestricted hunting of species like Capricornis sumatraensis has almost wiped out the population within the district. Some species are also reared as pets while some are used for display as a sign of expertise in hunting. The present study has documented the usage of at least 15 animals listed in the IUCN Red List. The study illustrates the in-depth knowledge of the Biate tribe on zootherapy. Systematic investigation to identify the active ingredient may lead to the development of new drugs, which would prompt protection of these valuable resources.

  7. Hardness of Potable Water in Southwestern Skane

    OpenAIRE

    Kos, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is concerned with water hardness in the municipal water supply systems. After a general overview of the health aspects of water hardness, this issue is discussed in the specific context of Southwestern Skane, Sweden.

  8. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    Dear Secretary Moniz: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2012. In FY 2012, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $195 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  9. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. In FY 2011, Southwestern delivered over 4.1 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas, generating $167 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  10. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-09-01

    Dear Secretary Chu: I am pleased to present the financial statements and operating data for Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. In FY 2010, Southwestern delivered nearly 7.6 billion kilowatt-hours of energy to its wholesale customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, and Oklahoma, generating $189 million in revenue. In fulfilling its mission to market and reliably deliver renewable Federal hydroelectric power, Southwestern maintains 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, substations, and communications sites, contributing to the reliability of the regional and National electric grid. Southwestern also actively partners with the Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southwestern’s customers, and other Federal power stakeholders to most effectively balance their diverse interests with Southwestern’s mission while continuing to maximize Federal assets to repay the Federal investment in the 24 hydropower facilities within Southwestern’s marketing region. Southwestern is proud of its past successes, and we look forward to continuing to serve the Nation’s energy needs in the future. Sincerely, Christopher M. Turner Administrator

  11. Menominee Tribe Links Gaming and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonelli, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The Menominee Gaming and Hospitality Institute (College of the Menominee Nation, WI) assists Indian people in mastering skills needed to operate their own gaming enterprises and to manage hotels or resorts. In addition to certificate and degree coursework, the institute is developing a computerized industry database and a product development…

  12. Wood anatomy of tribe Detarieae and comparison with tribe Caesalpinieae (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae) in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melandri, José Luis; de Pernía, Narcisana Espinoza

    2009-01-01

    We studied the wood anatomy of 29 species belonging to 10 genera of the tribe Detarieae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae and compare them with tribe Caesalpinieae. Detarieae is the largest of four tribes of Caesalpinioideae, with 84 genera, only eleven occur in Venezuela with species of timber importance. The specimens were collected in Venezuela and include wood samples from the collection of the Laboratorio de Anatomía de Maderas de la Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Ambientales de la Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela, and of the Forest Products Laboratory of the USDA Forest Service in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. The terminology and methodology used followed the IAWA List of Microscopic Features for Hardwood Identification of the IAWA Committee, 1989. Measurements from each specimen were averaged (vessel diameters, vessel element lengths, intervessels pit size, fibre lengths and ray height). The species of Detarieae can be separated using a combination of diagnostic features. Wood characters that provide the most important diagnosis and may be used in systematics of Detarieae include: intercellular axial canals, rays heterocellular, rays exclusively or predominantly uniseriate, prismatic crystals common in ray cells, irregular storied structure and fibre wall thickness. For comparative anatomy between Detarieae and Caesalpinieae: intercellular axial canals, heterocellular rays, rays exclusively or predominantly uniseriate, prismatic crystals common in ray cells (in Detarieae) and regular storied structure, fibres septate, fibre wall thick or very thick, rays homocellular, multiseriate rays and silica bodies (in Caesalpinieae). Axial parenchyma is typically a good diagnostic feature for Leguminosae, but not for Detarieae and Caesalpinieae comparisons.

  13. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  14. Three new brackish-water thalassocypridine species (Crustacea: Ostracoda: Paracyprididae) from the Ryukyu Islands, southwestern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Shimpei F; Kakui, Keiichi

    2016-09-21

    We describe three new species of brackish-water ostracods representing two genera in the ostracod tribe Thalassocypridini from mangrove forests in the Ryukyu Islands, subtropical southwestern Japan, and provide their barcoding sequences for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Mangalocypria ryukyuensis sp. nov. was found on Okinawa Island. We also found a Mangalocypria population on Ishigaki Island that was morphologically identical to M. ryukyuensis on Okinawa, but an individual differed by 4.7% in COI sequence (K2P distance) from an individual from Okinawa. This is the first record for Japan of a species in Mangalocypria. Paracypria longiseta sp. nov., obtained from Okinawa Island, is similar to Pontoparta hartmanni. Paracypria plumosa sp. nov. from Ishigaki Island is similar to Pa. adnata described from Yakushima Island, Japan. The COI genetic distance between individuals of Pa. longiseta and Pa. plumosa was roughly as large as that between either of these species and individuals in the Mangalocypria populations. Our study underscores that genera in Thalassocypridini may not represent natural groups, and that this tribe needs taxonomic revision.

  15. Ethnic pride, biculturalism, and drug use norms of urban American Indian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kulis, Stephen; Napoli, Maria; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This study examines how strength of ethnic identity, multiethnic identity, and other indicators of biculturalism relate to the drug use norms of urban American Indian middle school students. The article distinguishes categories of norms that may affect drug use. Regression analysis of self-reports by 434 American Indian seventh graders attending middle schools in a large southwestern U.S. city indicated that students who had a more intense sense of ethnic pride adhered more strongly to certai...

  16. A review of the tribes of Deltocephalinae (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Dietrich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The classification of the largest subfamily of leafhoppers, Deltocephalinae, including 38 tribes, 923 genera, and 6683 valid species, is reviewed and revised. An updated phylogeny of the subfamily based on molecular (28S, Histone H3 and morphological data and an expanded taxon sample (37 taxa not included in previous analyses is presented. Based on the results of these analyses and on the morphological examination of many representatives of the subfamily, the classification of the tribes and subtribes of Deltocephalinae is revised. Complete morphological descriptions, illustrations, lists of the included genera, and notes on their distribution, ecology, and important vector species are provided for the 38 recognized tribes and 18 subtribes. A dichotomous key to the tribes is provided. All names in the taxonomic treatments are hyperlinked to online resources for individual taxa which are supported by a comprehensive database for Deltocephalinae compiled using the taxonomic database software package 3I. The online functionality includes an interactive key to tribes and subtribes and advanced database searching options. Each taxon (subspecies through subfamily has a unique taxon webpage providing nomenclatural information, lists of included taxa, an automated description (if available, images (if available, distributional information, bibliographic references and links to outside resources. Some observations and trends regarding the history of taxonomic descriptions in Deltocephalinae are reported. Four new tribes are described: Bahitini tribe nov. (25 genera, Bonsapeiini tribe nov. (21 genera, Phlepsiini tribe nov. (4 genera, and Vartini tribe nov. (7 genera. The circumscription and morphological characterization of Scaphoideini Oman, 1943 (61 genera is substantially revised. Eleven new species are described: Acostemma stilleri sp. nov., Arrugada linnavuorii sp. nov., Drabescus zhangi sp. nov., Parabolopona webbi sp. nov., Goniagnathus emeljanovi

  17. Indian Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Tribal Partnerships Tribal Partnerships Tribal Leader Letters Urban Leader Letters Tribal Consultation Office of Tribal Self Governance Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes Urban ...

  18. Robinson Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan; Middletown Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Scotts Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Elem Indian Colony Strategic Energy Plan, Upperlake Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Big Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis and Associates LLC

    2008-08-01

    The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians is located in Lake County in Northern California. Similar to the other five federally recognized Indian Tribes in Lake County participating in this project, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians members are challenged by generally increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. Currently, Tribal decision makers lack sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribes have committed to the Lake County Tribal Energy Program, a multi Tribal program to be based at the Robinson Rancheria and including The Elem Indian Colony, Big Valley Rancheria, Middletown Rancheria, Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake and the Scotts Valley Pomo Tribe. The mission of this program is to promote Tribal energy efficiency and create employment opportunities and economic opportunities on Tribal Lands through energy resource and energy efficiency development. This program will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan for the Tribes based on Tribal specific plans that capture economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect Tribal cultural practices and traditions. The goal is to understand current and future energy consumption and develop both regional and Tribe specific strategic energy plans, including action plans, to clearly identify the energy options for each Tribe.

  19. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

    2014-10-01

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  20. Eleventh Amendment immunity in bankruptcy: breaking the Seminole Tribe barrier

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKenzie, Troy A

    2000-01-01

    McKenzie analyzes the limitations on bankruptcy court jurisdiction over claims involving states as a result of the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Eleventh Amendment in "Seminole Tribe v. Florida...

  1. Subsistence fishing methods of Nicobari tribes using traditional knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ravikumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nicobarese are one of the six aboriginal tribes inhabiting Andaman and Nicobar Islands. They account for over 95% of the total tribal population in the islands and majority of them inhabit at Car Nicobar, which is the capital of Nicobar district and popularly called as Coconut Island. The Nicobari tribes are hunters and gatherers who use their indigenous knowledge for exploitation of marine fishery resources using locally available materials. The common fishing methods in vogue are tamatu (trap, thanam kak (spear with rope chok/linreny kak (spear with rubber, kinyav (icthyotoxic seed, thakua kak (line, kel thakua kak (hand line, tamarotha thakua kak (long line, Hanak Inhal Kak (shore seine, Inruon thakua kak (troll line and Inhal (gill net. The Nicobari tribes have inherited the skill for designing and operating these gears from their forefathers. This paper summarises the traditional knowledge existing and commonly practiced among the Nicobari tribes for exploitation of marine fish at Car Nicobar.

  2. FY 2017 Hazardous Waste Management Grant Program for Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from federally-recognized tribes or intertribal consortia for the development and implementation of hazardous waste programs and for building capacity to address hazardous waste

  3. Reindeer breeding along the Finno-Ugric tribes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the reindeer breeding practices among the Finno-Urgic tribes located in the northern territories of the Soviet Union and frontier districts...

  4. Palynological studies in tribe Chlorideae (Poaceae) from salt range ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    , 2011. Pollen morphology of five species belonging to three genera of tribe Chlorideae (Poaceae) was examined by light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy. The studies showed that pollen in all species were ...

  5. Molecular phylogeny of tribe Stachydeae (Lamiaceae subfamily Lamioideae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmaki, Yasaman; Zarre, Shahin; Ryding, Olof

    2013-01-01

    subclades are congruent between the plastid and nuclear tree topologies, whereas their relative phylogenetic placements are often not. This level of plastid-nuclear incongruence suggests considerable impact of hybridization in the evolution of Stachydeae. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.......Although tribe Stachydeae (Lamiaceae) is considered monophyletic, relationships within the tribe are still poorly understood. The complexity of Stachydeae includes paraphyletic genera, considerable morphological plasticity, a range of ploidy levels, and presumably frequent natural hybridization. We...

  6. Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science - Vol 4, No 1 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive Cycle of Edible Echinoderms from the Southwestern Indian Ocean II. The Ssandfish Holothuria ... The Occurrence and Distribution of Dolphins in Zanzibar, Tanzania, with Comments on the Differences Between Two Species of Tursiops · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  7. A Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program for American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome: The Balance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elisa T.; Jobe, Jared B.; Yeh, Jeunliang; Ali, Tauqeer; Rhoades, Everett R.; Knehans, Allen W.; Willis, Diane J.; Johnson, Melanie R.; Zhang, Ying; Poolaw, Bryce; Rogers, Billy

    2012-01-01

    The Balance Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 American Indian (AI) participants with metabolic syndrome who reside in southwestern Oklahoma. Major risk factors targeted include weight, diet, and physical activity. Participants are assigned randomly to one of two groups, a guided or a…

  8. Molecular phylogeny of tribe Stachydeae (Lamiaceae subfamily Lamioideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaki, Yasaman; Zarre, Shahin; Ryding, Olof; Lindqvist, Charlotte; Bräuchler, Christian; Heubl, Günther; Barber, Janet; Bendiksby, Mika

    2013-12-01

    Although tribe Stachydeae (Lamiaceae) is considered monophyletic, relationships within the tribe are still poorly understood. The complexity of Stachydeae includes paraphyletic genera, considerable morphological plasticity, a range of ploidy levels, and presumably frequent natural hybridization. We performed parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of nuclear (ribosomal ITS) and plastid (trnL intron, trnL-trnF spacer, rps16 intron) DNA sequence data from a taxonomically and geographically broad sampling of the tribe to identify major evolutionary lineages and to test taxonomic hypotheses within this largest of all lamioid tribes. We included 143 accessions corresponding to 121 species, representing both Old and New World species, and all 12 recognized genera of tribe Stachydeae. Both nuclear and plastid data corroborate monophyly of the tribe, with Melittis as sister to all remaining Stachydeae. For the latter well-supported clade, we suggest the phylogenetic name Eurystachys. Within Eurystachys, although monophyly is supported by both nuclear and plastid data for several named and unnamed groups, the majority of recognized taxa appear to be para- or polyphyletic. The taxon compositions of most subclades are congruent between the plastid and nuclear tree topologies, whereas their relative phylogenetic placements are often not. This level of plastid-nuclear incongruence suggests considerable impact of hybridization in the evolution of Stachydeae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 40 CFR 745.327 - State or Indian Tribal lead-based paint compliance and enforcement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION... lead-based paint compliance and enforcement programs. (a) Approval of compliance and enforcement programs. A State or Indian Tribe seeking authorization of a lead-based paint program can apply for and...

  10. Welcome to the Land of the Navajo. A Book of Information about the Navajo Indians. Third Edition, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, J. Lee, Ed.; Watson, Editha L., Ed.

    Compiled and edited by the Museum and Research Department of the Navajo Tribe in 1972, the text provides information about the Navajo Indians and their vast reservation. Major areas covered include Navajo history and customs, religion, arts and crafts, Navajo tribal government and programs, Navajoland and places to go, 7 wonders of the Navajo…

  11. 24 CFR 576.43 - Reallocation of grant amounts; lack of approved consolidated plan-States, territories, and Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reallocation of grant amounts; lack of approved consolidated plan-States, territories, and Indian tribes. 576.43 Section 576.43 Housing... ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  12. 77 FR 46119 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ..., Washington, DC, and the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI AGENCY: National Park..., and the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, have completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation...

  13. 77 FR 34985 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... and the O'odham tribes. Furthermore, oral traditions that are documented for the Ak Chin Indian... agriculture of the settlement places the Snaketown site within the archeologically-defined Hohokam tradition, and within the Phoenix Basin local variant of that tradition. The occupation of the Snaketown site...

  14. 78 FR 14017 - Courts of Indian Offenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, the Wyandotte Tribe... established CFR Courts. The tribes to be removed from the list are the Seminole Nation, the Miami Tribe, the... forum. The Wyandotte Tribe of Oklahoma, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, the...

  15. The poisons and narcotics of the Amazonian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prance, G

    1999-01-01

    The indigenous tribes of the Amazonian rainforest have discovered a vast array of poisons and narcotics from the plant species which surround them. Examples are given from the author's personal experience of a variety of arrow poisons, fish poisons and narcotics used by six different tribes. There is a great variety of different plant species used for each category and no two tribes studied employ exactly the same array of plant species. This makes it important to survey a wide range of tribes and to document this information before it is too late as these people are fast losing their traditional culture. Several of the substances used by Amazonian Indians, such as curare and coca, have entered into western medicine and others such as rotenone, an ingredient of their fish poison, has become a useful insecticide. Further useful chemicals are likely to be discovered from ethnobotanical work among indigenous peoples and it is vital that any commercial gain from their knowledge be of direct benefit to these people in accordance with the rules of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

  16. Casuses of deforestation in southwestern Madagascar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casse, Thorkil; Milhøj, Anders; Ranaivoson, Socrate

    2004-01-01

    Causes of deforestation are discussed in the case of southwestern Madagascar. Distinction is made between direct and indirect causes. The article ends up with an estimation of the value of agricultural land vs. an estimation of benefits from utilisation of non-timber forest products......Causes of deforestation are discussed in the case of southwestern Madagascar. Distinction is made between direct and indirect causes. The article ends up with an estimation of the value of agricultural land vs. an estimation of benefits from utilisation of non-timber forest products...

  17. Coeur d’Alene Tribe Benewah Market Energy Efficiency Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, Tiffany [Coeur d' Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID (United States). Environmental Programs Office, Natural Resources Dept.; Alexie, James [Coeur d' Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID (United States); Nomee, Alfred [Coeur d' Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID (United States)

    2017-12-27

    .9% -Energy costs for the Market decreased by an estimated 11,620 dollars in one year due to this project. The Tribe has seen an increase in the cost of energy from Plummer Power and this was offset by the reduction in energy consumed. This estimate assumes that the Tribe would have consumed the same amount of energy as the prior year. -Maintenance costs are estimated to have decreased by $10,000 in just the one year since installation in contract repair and maintenance. The Tribe estimates that it has saved 24,000 dollars over a one-year time period in labor costs to maintain the older system. Due to having a more efficient store, with safer, more attractive display of food and lower energy and maintenance costs, the store is able to be more viable economically. The store has increased its sales and has been able to pass along operations and maintenance savings to its customers and employees. The Tribe hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony on February 28, 2017 at the Benewah Market with Chris Deschene, then Office of Indian Energy Director, as well as representatives from the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and Bonneville Power Administration. While the ribbon-cutting ceremony was going on, the Tribe’s media outlets covered the ceremony and placed information about the project on the Tribe’s Facebook page on two separate occasions. The Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s Natural Resources Department and the Tribe’s Development Corporation are thankful for the opportunity that the Benewah Market Energy Efficiency Project has afforded the Coeur d’Alene Tribal community. Without the U.S. Department of Energy’s Indian Energy Program funding and its dedicated staff, this project would not have been completed. This has been a lot of work for all parties involved but has provided benefits to thousands of people for many years to come.

  18. Costs of smoking and policy strategies for California American Indian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satter, Delight E; Roby, Dylan H; Smith, Lauren M; Avendano, Kathalena K; Kaslow, Jackie; Wallace, Steven P

    2012-04-01

    The cost of smoking has been explored for residents of the U.S. living in several states. Recent evidence has indicated that the prevalence and cost of smoking are associated with racial and ethnic groups. This study provides information on tobacco prevention and control for American Indians (AI) (American Indians refers to American Indians and Alaska Natives throughout this article. Where we use the term California tribe we specifically mean persons who are members of Indigenous tribes geographically located in the geographic area now known as the state of California.) and examines the relative impact of smoking by using behavioral and demographic characteristics in order to predict the economic cost on AIs. The analysis suggests that AIs smoke more frequently than other Californians, which results in higher health care costs, as well as morbidity and mortality due to high levels of tobacco related chronic disease. Based on these factors we urge tribes to exercise their sovereignty as governments and implement local tobacco control policy strategies. We call for public health action by community leaders in Indian country and nationwide. We must act now to protect future generations.

  19. Factors influencing woodlands of southwestern North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michele M. Girard; Harold Goetz; Ardell J. Bjugstad

    1987-01-01

    Literature pertaining to woodlands of southwestern North Dakota is reviewed. Woodland species composition and distribution, and factors influencing woodland ecosystems such as climate, logging, fire, and grazing are described. Potential management and improvement techniques using vegetation and livestock manipulation have been suggested.

  20. Geotechnical characteristics of some Southwestern Nigerian clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geotechnical characteristics of some southwestern Nigeria clays were evaluated with a view to determining their suitability for use as barrier soils in waste disposal sites. Clay soils (consisting of twenty disturbed and twenty undisturbed samples) were subjected to grain size, consistency limits and permeability tests.

  1. Geomorphic observations from southwestern terminus of Palghat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 4. Geomorphic observations from southwestern terminus of Palghat Gap, south India and their tectonic implications. Yogendra Singh Biju John G P Ganapathy Abhilash Abhilash George S Harisanth K S Divyalakshmi Sreekumari Kesavan. Volume 125 ...

  2. Timber resource of Missouri's Southwestern Ozarks, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold J. Ostrom; Jerold T. Hahn

    1974-01-01

    The third timber inventory of Missouri's Southwestern Ozarks Forest Survey Unit shows a substantial decline in the volumes of both growing stock and sawtimber between 1959 and 1972. Commercial forest area also declined substantially during the same period. Presented are highlights and statistics on forest area and timber volume, growth, mortality, ownership, and...

  3. Development Inequalities in Osun State, Southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the spatial inequality of development among thirty Local Government Areas of Osun State, Southwestern Nigeria. Based on the results of Principal Component Analysis and Logistic Regression applied to 45 indices of development in all the LGAs for year 2001, the paper identified four major ...

  4. (Francolinus francolinus) in Khouzestan Province, Southwestern Iran

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... Habitat destruction and indiscriminate hunting as well as agricultural pesticides are among the most crucial factors threatening the populations of these birds in Khouzestan Province, southwestern Iran. Using plot sampling, this study aims to investigate different vegetative factors including plant species,.

  5. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere...

  6. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  7. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Turner

    2008-07-11

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribe’s Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

  8. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCaire, Richard (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Nespelem, WA)

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  9. Distributed Denial of Service Tools, Trin00, Tribe Flood Network, Tribe Flood Network 2000 and Stacheldraht.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuolo, P. J.

    2000-02-14

    One type of attack on computer systems is know as a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. A DoS attack is designed to prevent legitimate users from using a system. Traditional Denial of Service attacks are done by exploiting a buffer overflow, exhausting system resources, or exploiting a system bug that results in a system that is no longer functional. In the summer of 1999, a new breed of attack has been developed called Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. Several educational and high capacity commercial sites have been affected by these DDoS attacks. A DDoS attack uses multiple machines operating in concert to attack a network or site. There is very little that can be done if you are the target of a DDoS. The nature of these attacks cause so much extra network traffic that it is difficult for legitimate traffic to reach your site while blocking the forged attacking packets. The intent of this paper is to help sites not be involved in a DDoS attack. The first tools developed to perpetrate the DDoS attack were Trin00 and Tribe Flood Network (TFN). They spawned the next generation of tools called Tribe Flood Network 2000 (TFN2K) and Stacheldraht (German for Barb Wire). These DDoS attack tools are designed to bring one or more sites down by flooding the victim with large amounts of network traffic originating at multiple locations and remotely controlled by a single client. This paper discusses how these DDoS tools work, how to detect them, and specific technical information on each individual tool. It is written with the system administrator in mind. It assumes that the reader has basic knowledge of the TCP/IP Protocol.

  10. Fossil nutlets of Boraginaceae from the continental Eocene of Hamada of Méridja (southwestern Algeria): The first fossil of the Borage family in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Sid Ahmed; Weigend, Maximilian; Mebrouk, Fateh; Chacón, Juliana; Bensalah, Mustapha; Ensikat, Hans-Jürgen; Adaci, Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    The Paleogene deposits of the Hamada of Méridja, southwestern Algeria, are currently dated as lower-to-middle Eocene in age based on fossil gastropods and charophytes. Here we report the presence of fruits that can be assigned to the Boraginaceae s.str., apparently representing the first fossil record for this family in Africa, shedding new light on the historical biogeography of this group. Microscopic studies of the fossil nutlets were carried out and compared to extant Boraginaceae nutlets, and to types reported in the literature for this family. The fossils are strikingly similar in general size and morphology, particularly in the finer details of the attachment scar and ornamentation, to nutlets of extant representatives of the Boraginaceae tribe Echiochileae, and especially the genus Ogastemma. We believe that these nutlets represent an extinct member of this lineage. The Ogastemma-like fossils indicate that the Echiochileae, which are most diverse in northern Africa and southwestern Asia, have a long history in this region, dating back to the Eocene. This tribe corresponds to the basal-most clade in Boraginaceae s.str., and the fossils described here agree well with an assumed African origin of the family and the Boraginales I, providing an important additional calibration point for dating the phylogenies of this clade. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  12. Indian Ledger Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  13. Male involvement in reproductive health among scheduled tribe: experience from Khairwars of central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kalyan B; Singh, Neeru; Chatterjee Saha, Uma; Roy, Jyotirmoy

    2007-01-01

    Indian tribal men's lack of participation in reproductive health not only damages their own health, but also contributes to the reproductive ill health of their female partners and children. In India the involvement of men in such matters is a new concept. There is a paucity of data particularly on Scheduled tribesmen's knowledge and the extent of their participation in reproductive health. This inhibits planning. The present study aims to understand the involvement of Scheduled tribesmen in reproductive health and the barriers to their involvement by generating a database from the Khairwar tribe of Central India. A door-to-door survey on knowledge, attitude and practice relating to aspects of reproductive health was conducted by canvassing a pre-designed interview schedule among 15-40 year old, currently married Khairwar males in the Sidhi district of Madhya Pradesh, India. As far as reproductive morbidity is concerned, only 17% of the respondents had heard of HIV/AIDS, and most had no proper knowledge of its transmission. Although 74% of the respondents had heard about reproductive tract infections, the majority of them were unaware of the mechanism of transmission and seriousness of the problem. The duel role of condoms, both as a method of family planning and a protective measure against sexually transmitted infections, was also unknown to them. Approximately 59% of the males were aware of family planning but only 13% were using any method (mostly female sterilization) at the time of survey. Their view on the ideal number of children (3.56) exceeded the actual number of children born and living. High infant and child mortality influenced their preference for higher fertility. Very few among them (29%) had knowledge of antenatal care. They expressed faulty knowledge, myths and unhelpful attitudes towards sexual health matters. The study revealed the male Scheduled tribe population's lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding male sexual health issues, the

  14. 25 CFR 1001.9 - Selection criteria for tribes/consortia seeking advance planning grant funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-governance tribe and needs advance funding in order to complete the planning phase requirement may apply... seeking a planning grant submit in order to meet the planning phase requirements? A tribe/consortium must... the tribe meets the requirement of being free from any material audit exception; (3) A proposal that...

  15. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's.... Copies of the approved Plan are available at the following locations: (a) Crow Tribal Council, Crow...

  16. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's... RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. Pursuant to 30 CFR 884.15, the Crow Tribe is required to submit to OSM by the date specified either a...

  17. The systematic wood anatomy of the Moraceae (Urticales) II. Tribe Dorstenieae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Topper, S.M.C.; Welle, ter B.J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The wood anatomy of the tribe Dorstenieae sensu Berg is described. Similarities and differences are discussed in relation to his concepts of the taxonomy of the tribe. Wood anatomically the tribe Dorstenieae is fairly homogeneous, Dorstenia deviating most in the juvenilistic composition of its rays,

  18. Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic Geology of Southwestern Mongolia

    OpenAIRE

    Bold, Uyanga

    2016-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic evolution of global climate, tectonics, ocean geochemistry, and biological diversification are recorded in stratigraphic successions globally. The rock record of southwestern Mongolia has potential to reveal additional constraints as it is in the early stages of exploration. It has been known for several years that Cryogenian passive margin sedimentation on the Zavkhan Terrane hosts evidence for Neoproterozoic glaciation, and that overlying early Cambrian stra...

  19. Reconstructing Indian-Australian phylogenetic link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar BN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An early dispersal of biologically and behaviorally modern humans from their African origins to Australia, by at least 45 thousand years via southern Asia has been suggested by studies based on morphology, archaeology and genetics. However, mtDNA lineages sampled so far from south Asia, eastern Asia and Australasia show non-overlapping distributions of haplogroups within pan Eurasian M and N macrohaplogroups. Likewise, support from the archaeology is still ambiguous. Results In our completely sequenced 966-mitochondrial genomes from 26 relic tribes of India, we have identified seven genomes, which share two synonymous polymorphisms with the M42 haplogroup, which is specific to Australian Aborigines. Conclusion Our results showing a shared mtDNA lineage between Indians and Australian Aborigines provides direct genetic evidence of an early colonization of Australia through south Asia, following the "southern route".

  20. EPA approves Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Water Quality Standards program Clean Water Act program a foundation for pollution control and watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    (2/18/15)- ATLANTA - The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (Tribe) in western North Carolina has been granted the authority by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to administer the Water Quality Standards program under the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  1. A Review of Stressors from the Built and Natural Environments Impacting American Indian Children’s Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposures to chemical and non-chemical stressors from children’s environments during early development may contribute to differences in their health and well-being outcomes. Children from American Indian tribes may have a disproportionate burden of these stressors from thei...

  2. Cultural impacts to tribes from climate change influences on forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrit Voggesser; Kathy Lynn; John Daigle; Frank K. Lake; Darren Ranco

    2013-01-01

    Climate change related impacts, such as increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, higher temperatures, extreme changes to ecosystem processes, forest conversion and habitat degradation are threatening tribal access to valued resources. Climate change is and will affect the quantity and quality of resources tribes depend upon to perpetuate their cultures and...

  3. Socio-cultural attitudes of Igbomina tribe toward marriage and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article namely: "Socio-cultural attitudes of Igbomina tribe toward marriage and abortion in Osun and Kwara states of Nigeria" by Adeleke Gbadebo Fatai has been updated with a new version bearing the author's current affiliation with significant editorial intervention. Abortion has been a social menace and its ...

  4. Review of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant from Iran (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Li, Wenjing; Nicolas, Vincent; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Hesami, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    The Iranian checklist of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is updated. In total, 13 species belonging to four genera ( Brumoides Chapin, 1965, Chilocorus Leach, 1815, Exochomus Redtenbacher, 1843, and Parexochomus Barovsky, 1922) are listed from Iran. An identification key to all genera and species currently known from Iran is presented along with illustrations of adult specimens and male genitalia.

  5. Anticestodal Efficacy of Folklore Medicinal Plants of Naga Tribes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moderate activity was recorded for the leaves of Clerodendrum colebrookianum, Lasia spinosa and Centella asiatica, while Curcuma longa, Cinnamomum cassia, Gynura angulosa, Lasia spinosa (stem) and Aloe vera revealed a negligible degree of anticestodal activity. Key Words: Anticestodal Efficacy, Naga Tribes, India, ...

  6. Ancient Embalming Techneques Amongst The Ogoni Tribe In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embalming is the art and science of temporary preserving human remains to forestall decomposition. It was first practiced by the ancient Egyptians dating back to 4000BC. This research was carried out to study the traditional method of embalmment by the Ogonis, a tribe in the Southern part of Nigeria. A total of 140 elders ...

  7. gene polymorphism among Gaddi tribe of Himachal Pradesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with livestock due to unfavourable change in environment. Materials and methods. Subjects. A total of 152 random ... migration; 7R–2R transition; Gaddis tribe; India. Journal of Genetics Vol. 93, Online ... 2003 High prevalence of rare dopamine receptor D4 alle- les in children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bee Tribe Anthidiini | Combey | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phylogenetic relationships among members of long tongue bee tribe Anthidiini (Megachilidae: Megachilinae) were investigated at the Department of Entomology and Wildlife, University of Cape Coast (Ghana) and the Agricultural Research Council, Pretoria (South Af-rica) from July, 2006 to May, 2007. Ten museums ...

  9. Herbal Remedies And Their Adverse Effects In Tem Tribe Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Africa, up to 80% of the population relies on herbal concoctions for their primarily health care. In Togo, western Africa, Tem tribe is a population with old knowledge of medicinal plants, however, still very little is known about their medical practices. The present study was conducted to access for the apprehension of ...

  10. Wood anatomy of tribe Detarieae and comparison with tribe Caesalpinieae (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Melandri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the wood anatomy of 29 species belonging to 10 genera of the tribe Detarieae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae and compare them with tribe Caesalpinieae. Detarieae is the largest of four tribes of Caesalpinioideae, with 84 genera, only eleven occur in Venezuela with species of timber importance. The specimens were collected in Venezuela and include wood samples from the collection of the Laboratorio de Anatomía de Maderas de la Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Ambientales de la Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela, and of the Forest Products Laboratory of the USDA Forest Service in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. The terminology and methodology used followed the IAWA List of Microscopic Features for Hardwood identification of the IAWA Committee, 1989. Measurements from each specimen were averaged (vessel diameters, vessel element lengths, intervessels pit size, fibre lengths and ray height. The species of Detarieae can be separated using a combination of diagnostic features. Wood characters that provide the most important diagnosis and may be used in systematics of Detarieae include: intercellular axial canals, rays heterocellular, rays exclusively or predominantly uniseriate, prismatic crystals common in ray cells, irregular storied structure and fibre wall thickness. For comparative anatomy between Detarieae and Caesalpinieae: intercellular axial canals, heterocellular rays, rays exclusively or predominantly uniseriate, prismatic crystals common in ray cells (in Detarieae and regular storied structure, fibres septate, fibre wall thick or very thick, rays homocellular, multiseriate rays and silica bodies (in Caesalpinieae. Axial parenchyma is typically a good diagnostic feature for Leguminosae, but not for Detarieae and Caesalpinieae comparisons. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (1-2: 303-319. Epub 2009 June 30.Se estudió la anatomía de la madera de 29 especies de 10 géneros de la tribu Detarieae, subfamilia Caesalpinioideae, enfocado hacia la

  11. Intra and intertribal genetic variation within a linguistic group: the Ge-speaking Indians of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F.M. (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil); Neel, J.V.; Gershowitz, H.; Migliazza, E.C.

    1977-09-01

    A total of 562 individuals living in four villages of two Brazilian Indian tribes (Cayapo and Kraho) was studied in relation to blood groups ABO, MNSs, P, Rh, Lewis, Duffy, Kidd and Diego; haptoglobin Gc, acid phosphatase and phosphoglucomutase types. These results were compared with those obtained previously among the Xavante, and the inhabitants of three other Cayapo villages, all of whom speak Ge languages; the ranges in gene frequencies observed in a representative series of South American Indians from all over the continent were also compiled. The Ge Indians are characterized by low frequencies of R/sup Z/, medium frequencies of R/sup 1/, R/sup 2/, R/sup 0/, or r, Jk/sup a/ and PGM/sup 1//sub 1/, and high frequencies of Gc/sup 2/ and ACP/sup A/ when compared with other South American tribes. Genetic distance analyses based on six loci indicate that the intratribal variability observed among Cayapo is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained among the Xavante and Kraho, being much less pronounced than those observed among the Yanomama and Makiritare. The intertribal differences within this linguistic group are much less pronounced than those encountered among tribes that speak more differentiated languages.

  12. Phylogenetics, biogeography, and staminal evolution in the tribe Mentheae (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Bryan T; Sytsma, Kenneth J

    2012-05-01

    The mint family (Lamiaceae) is the sixth largest family of flowering plants, with the tribe Mentheae containing about a third of the species. We present a detailed perspective on the evolution of the tribe Mentheae based on a phylogenetic analysis of cpDNA and nrDNA that is the most comprehensive to date, a biogeographic set of analyses using a fossil-calibrated chronogram, and an examination of staminal evolution. Data from four cpDNA and two nrDNA markers representing all extant genera within the tribe Mentheae were analyzed using the programs BEAST, Lagrange, S-DIVA, and BayesTraits. BEAST was used to simultaneously estimate phylogeny and divergence times, Lagrange and S-DIVA were used for biogeographical reconstruction, and BayesTraits was used to infer staminal evolution within the tribe. Currently accepted subtribal delimitations are shown to be invalid and are updated. The Mentheae and all five of its subtribes have a Mediterranean origin and have dispersed to the New World multiple times. The vast majority of New World species of subtribe Menthinae are the product of a single dispersal event in the mid-late Miocene. At least four transitions from four stamens to two stamens have occurred within Mentheae, once in the subtribe Salviinae, once in the subtribe Lycopinae, and at least twice in the subtribe Menthinae. Worldwide cooling trends probably played a large role in the diversification and present day distribution of the tribe Mentheae. Additional work is needed to ascertain relationships within some Mentheae genera, especially in the subtribe Menthinae.

  13. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  14. 78 FR 52538 - Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes; National Indian Health Outreach and Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... assesses content and participant knowledge learning and provide a certificate of completion for... requirements. c. Curriculum training must include an evaluation for content and participant knowledge learning... costs are not allowable. The available funds are inclusive of direct and appropriate indirect costs...

  15. 76 FR 709 - Guidelines for Awarding Clean Water Act Section 319 Base Grants to Indian Tribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... improved nutrient management or sediment control; or Z linear miles of eroded streambank needing... the Commodity Credit Corporation (pursuant to the implementation of the Environmental Quality...

  16. 78 FR 49533 - Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes; National Indian Health Outreach and Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... dissemination as well as for the inclusion of planning and technical assistance and health care recommendations...; veterans; disabled, etc.). Information Sharing The awardee shall develop, maintain, and disseminate...

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism among Gaddi tribe of Indian state of Himachal Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Simi; Thakur, Sunil; Kallur, Saraswathy Nava; Ghosh, Pradeep Kumar; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal; Vadlamudi, Raghavendra Rao

    2014-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism has been suggested to be positively associated with several disorders. Distribution of the mutant T-allele varies in ethnic and geographical populations of the world. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism in a transhumant (Gaddi) tribal population of Himachal Pradesh dwelling at high and middle altitude and exposed to strong ultraviolet radiation. A total of 486 samples (141 males and 345 females) were randomly enrolled from the individuals aged 25-75 years who were unrelated up to first cousin. Among Gaddis, genotype frequencies of CC, CT and TT were 67.90%, 27.78% and 4.32%, respectively. Among males and females distribution of genotype frequencies also followed a similar trend. The studied population was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (χ(2 )= 2.213, df = 1, p = 0.136). Frequency of mutant T-allele in the Gaddi population was found to be 0.183, which might be due to European ancestry, endogamous nature and selection.

  18. 77 FR 50121 - Office of Direct Service and Contracting Tribes National Indian Health Outreach and Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... training that will take place during the proposed project and who will be attending the training. g... project, please include the following information in their scope of work (or note if consultants... Health Outreach and Education Program Funding Opportunity Announcement Type: New Limited Competition...

  19. 75 FR 23289 - Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma Liquor Control Ordinance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... to be necessary; (6) To seek damages and collect civil fines imposed by the Tribal Gaming Commission... addition to any or all actual damages, administrative costs, court costs, and attorneys fees. (E... director of the applicant, has ever been convicted of a felony or a crime of moral turpitude as defined by...

  20. Samish Indian Nation Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christine Woodward; B. Beckley; K. Hagen

    2005-06-30

    The Tribes strategic energy planning effort is divided into three phases: (1) Completing an Energy Resource Assessment; (2) Developing a Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan; and (3) Preparing a Strategic Energy Implementation Plan for the Samish Homelands. The Samish Indian Nation developed a comprehensive Strategic Energy plan to set policy for future development on tribal land that consists of a long-term, integrated, systems approach to providing a framework under which the Samish Community can use resources efficiently, create energy-efficient infrastructures, and protect and enhance quality of life. Development of the Strategic Energy plan will help the Samish Nation create a healthy community that will sustain current and future generations by addressing economic, environmental, and social issues while respecting the Samish Indian Nation culture and traditions.

  1. Utilizing Traditional Storytelling to Promote Wellness in American Indian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    HODGE, FELICIA SCHANCHE; PASQUA, ANNA; MARQUEZ, CAROL A.; GEISHIRT-CANTRELL, BETTY

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing storytelling to transmit educational messages is a traditional pedagogical method practiced by many American Indian tribes. American Indian stories are effective because they present essential ideas and values in a simple, entertaining form. Different story characters show positive and negative behaviors. The stories illustrate consequences of behaviors and invite listeners to come to their own conclusions after personal reflection. Because stories have been passed down through tribal communities for generations, listeners also have the opportunity to reconnect and identify with past tribal realities. This article reports on a research intervention that is unique in promoting health and wellness through the use of storytelling. The project utilized stories to help motivate tribal members to once more adopt healthy, traditional lifestyles and practices. The authors present and discuss the stories selected, techniques used in their telling, the preparation and setting for the storytelling, and the involvement and interaction of the group. PMID:11776018

  2. The rare Chrysopidae (Neuroptera) of southwestern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canard, Michel; Letardi, Agostino; Thierry, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Quantitative surveys of the chrysopid fauna from southwestern Europe, namely the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, France south of 46° N, and the west-Mediterranean Islands, were analysed. A total of 56 species of Chrysopidae were reported, of which three species were abundant. These, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens, 1836) sensu lato, Dichochrysa prasina (Burmeister, 1839) and D. flavifrons (Brauer, 1850), comprised a large percentage of the specimens. For the rarer species, comments are made on their distributions, the enhanced geographic range of exotic ones, and on levels of endemism and stenotopy.

  3. (abstract) Geological Tour of Southwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Steven L.; Lang, Harold R.

    1993-01-01

    Nineteen Landsat Themic Mapper quarter scenes, coregistered at 28.5 m spatial resolution with three arc second digital topographic data, were used to create a movie, simulating a flight over the Guerrero and Mixteco terrains of southwestern Mexico. The flight path was chosen to elucidate important structural, stratigraphic, and geomorphic features. The video, available in VHS format, is a 360 second animation consisting of 10 800 total frames. The simulated velocity during three 120 second flight segments of the video is approximately 37 000 km per hour, traversing approximately 1 000 km on the ground.

  4. The instrumental climate history of southwestern Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doesken, N.J.; McKee, T.B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Instrumental observations of the climate of southwestern Colorado date back to about 1880. Climatic conditions since the late 19th century will be described with emphasis on temperatures, temperature ranges and observed precipitation. Typical seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation will be shown, and variations and apparent trends over time will be discussed. Drought characteristics will be described based on a standardized precipitation index developed for Colorado. Finally, brief comments on the challenge of collecting accurate and consistent long-term data will be given.

  5. Monitoring Fires in Southwestern Amazonia Rain Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. Foster; Schroeder, Wilfrid; Setzer, Alberto; de Los Rios Maldonado, Monica; Pantoja, Nara; Duarte, Alejandro; Marengo, Jose

    2006-06-01

    From mid-July to mid-October 2005, an environmental disaster unfolded in the trinational region of Madre de Dios, Peru; Acre, Brazil; and Pando, Bolivia (the MAP region), in southwestern Amazonia. A prolonged dry season and human-initiated fires resulted in smoke pollution affecting more than 400,000 persons, fire damage to over 300,000 hectares of rain forest, and over US$50 million of direct economic losses. Indicators suggest that anomalous drought conditions could occur again this year.

  6. Flow of water and sediments through Southwestern riparian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard F. DeBano; Peter F. Ffolliott; Kenneth N. Brooks

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes streamflow, sediment movement and vegetation interactions within riparian systems of the southwestern United States. Riparian systems are found in a wide range of vegetation types, ranging from lower elevation desert environments to high elevation conifer forests. The climatic, vegetative and hydrologic processes operating in the southwestern...

  7. Diversity and distribution of whiteflies in south-western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whiteflies (Aleyrodidae) are major pests of crops in southwestern Nigeria, yet there is scanty information on diversity and distribution of these economic species. Therefore, a study of diversity and distribution of whitefly fauna was carried out in southwestern Nigeria in wet and dry seasons, between May 2007 and June 2012.

  8. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  9. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, Tiffany L. [Coeur d' Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID (United States); Sorter, Andy [Coeur d' Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study (EEFS) is the culminating document that compiles the energy efficiency and building performance assessment and project prioritization process completed on 36 Tribally owned and operated facilities within Tribal lands. The EEFS contains sections on initial findings, utility billing analyses, energy conservation measures and prioritization and funding sources and strategies for energy project implementation.

  10. AHP 10: Rgyas bzang Tibetan Tribe Hunting Lore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bkra shis dpal 'bar བཀྲ་ཤིས་དཔལ་འབར།

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Yul shul (Yushu ngas bzang Tribe historically possessed a rich hunting tradition. Wildlife was hunted for food and other animal products. By 2007, hunting culture had diminished due to improvements in living conditions, wildlife protection laws, greater state control of wildlife product skin market and gun ownership, animal diseases, and the absence of such wildlife as wild yaks in local areas.

  11. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  12. Ethnobotany of MandailingTribe in Batang Gadis National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswarina Nasution

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Batang Gadis National Park (BGNP located in Bukit Barisan Mountains, Sumatera Utara. A Mandailing tribe  who lives around the BGNP, has the unique local knowledge, such as processing young stem of rattan (Calamus manan into pakkat (traditional food and use rimbang (Solanum torvum to neutralize toxins. These local knowledge could be lost because it only inherited orally from generation to generation. This study was aimed to reveal ethnobotany knowledge of Mandailing Tribe. The study was conducted in November 2015 in four villages around the BGNP, Sibanggor Jae, Hutabaringin Julu, Pastap Jae, and Botung Villages. Data were collected by interviewing informants in each village as well as the field survey through two approaches, emic and etic. A total of 262 plant species is used by Mandailing Tribe for subsistence and commercial needs. The highest utilization is for food  (106 species, followed by traditional medicines (81 species, firewood (29 species, building materials (35 species, and animal feed (25 species. People also used plant for household appliances, agricultural equipment, art materials, ropes and wrap, and pest control materials. Eme/rice (Oryza sativa have the highest Index of Cultural Significance (ICS values. The existence of this species is maintained for its local wisdom. Thus, involvement of  local  community will give great contribution to manage and conserve the BGNP area.

  13. Biology of the tribe Ambelanieae (apocynaceae). Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarucchi, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The tribe Ambelanieae consists of seventeen species of latex-bearing shrubs and trees in six genera found in the tropical lowlands of norther South America. The center of distribution as well as diversification for the Ambelanieae is the Rio Negro basin of Brazilian Amazonia. This study is based on field observations of representative species from five of the genera, supplemented by the examination of exsiccatae from the major herbaria of the world. The analysis includes a review of the taxonomic history, a presentation of a systematic treatment for the genera and species, and detailed discussions of morphology, anatomy, ecology, pollination, fruit dispersal, phenology, palynology, cytology, and biogeography. The first chromosome numbers for the tribe are reported, indicating that polyploidy occurs within the group. Pollen variability is demonstrated, not only among species of different genera but also within individual pollen samples. In reference to economic uses, some members of the tribe are suggested to hold promise for exploitation of usable latex, lightweight wood, and edible fruits. The presence of potentially important toxic and medicinal principles from several species is indicated by ethnopharmacological observations made in the northwest Amazon basin.

  14. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

    1993-10-01

    In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

  15. PIG FARMING PERFORMANCES OF THREE PAPUAN TRIBES: CASE STUDY OF BYAK, ONATE AND ARFAK TRIBES IN PAPUA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Iyai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to depict the pig farming performances of three different nativePapuan tribes, i.e. Byak, Onate and Arfak. Sites in Biak were taken from Samofa District. Sites in Yapenwere taken from South Yapen District comprised of Famboaman, Anotaurei, Mariadei and Mantembuvillages. Site in Manokwari was chosen at Sub-district of Wosi. Participatory research using interviewand observation was done towards 105 pig farmers. One-way analysis of variance and Pearson Chisquare(χ2 were used to analyse data. Several indicators tested were age, education, objectives ofrearing pigs, and species of pigs. The characteristics of pig farmers were similar. The variations of pigfarmers’ characteristics ware found in pigs’ rearing experience, animal number and litter size. Offeredfeeding on each physiological period was different. Similar finding were feeding sources and feedingprocess. Reproduction knowledge and their experience in farrowing management are similar amongstthe tribes. In general experiences and knowledge to prevent infectious diseases in general were similar.The three tribes have relatively similar in managing their pig farming systems.

  16. PIG FARMING PERFORMANCES OF THREE PAPUAN TRIBES: CASE STUDY OF BYAK, ONATE AND ARFAK TRIBES IN PAPUA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Iyai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to depict the pig farming performances of three different native Papuan tribes, i.e. Byak, Onate and Arfak. Sites in Biak were taken from Samofa District. Sites in Yapen were taken from South Yapen District comprised of Famboaman, Anotaurei, Mariadei and Mantembu villages. Site in Manokwari was chosen at Sub-district of Wosi. Participatory research using interview and observation was done towards 105 pig farmers. One-way analysis of variance and Pearson Chi-square (χ2 were used to analyse data. Several indicators tested were age, education, objectives of rearing pigs, and species of pigs. The characteristics of pig farmers were similar. The variations of pig farmers’ characteristics ware found in pigs’ rearing experience, animal number and litter size. Offered feeding on each physiological period was different. Similar finding were feeding sources and feeding process. Reproduction knowledge and their experience in farrowing management are similar amongst the tribes. In general experiences and knowledge to prevent infectious diseases in general were similar. The three tribes have relatively similar in managing their pig farming systems.

  17. No Security Without Us: Tribes and Tribalism in Al Anbar Province, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    tribal organization is disappearing in the urban setting, modern tribes maintain elements of tribal culture and retain the ability to mobilize...Faleh Jabar, “Shaykhs and Ideologues: Destruction and Reconstruction of Tribes under Patrimonial Totalitarianism in Iraq, 1968-1998,” in Tribes and...and the Albu Issa Tribe” (2006). Published electronically Jun. 2006. www.comw.org/warreport/fulltext/0709todd.pdf. 14 Philip Carl Salzman, Culture

  18. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen to the northern Indian Ocean from the Indian monsoonal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, V. R.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.; Hemalatha, K. P. J.; Rao, Y. V.

    2015-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were measured in 27 major and medium monsoonal estuaries along the Indian coast during southwest monsoon in order to understand the spatial variability in their concentrations and fluxes to the northern Indian Ocean. A strong spatial variability (~20-fold) in DOC and DON was observed in the Indian monsoonal estuaries due to variable characteristics of the catchment area and volume of discharge. It is estimated that the Indian monsoonal estuaries transport ~2.37 ± 0.47 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g) of DOC and ~0.41 ± 0.08 Tg of DON during wet period to the northern Indian Ocean. The Bay of Bengal receives 3 times higher DOC and DON (1.82 and 0.30 Tg, respectively) than the Arabian Sea (0.55 and 0.11 Tg). Catchment area normalized fluxes of DOC and DON were found to be higher in the estuaries located in the southwestern than the estuaries from other regions of India. It was attributed to relatively higher soil organic carbon, biomass carbon, and heavy rainfall in catchment areas of the rivers from the former region. It has been noticed that neither catchment area nor discharge volume of the river controls the fluxes of DOC and DON to the northern Indian Ocean. Since the total load of DOC and DON is strongly linked to the volume of discharge, alterations in the freshwater discharge due to natural or anthropogenic activities may have significant influence on organic matter fluxes to the Indian coastal waters and its impact on microbial food web dynamics needs further evaluation.

  19. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Editorial Board. Sadhana. Editor. N Viswanadham, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru. Senior Associate Editors. Arakeri J H, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru Hari K V S, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru Mujumdar P P, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru Manoj Kumar Tiwari, Indian Institute of Technology, ...

  20. Environmental Assessment for power marketing policy for Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) needs to renew expiring power sales contracts with new term (10 year) sales contracts. The existing contracts have been in place for several years and many will expire over the next ten years. Southwestern completed an Environmental Assessment on the existing power allocation in June, 1979 (a copy of the EA is attached), and there are no proposed additions of any major new generation resources, service to discrete major new loads, or major changes in operating parameters, beyond those included in the existing power allocation. Impacts from a no action plan, proposed alternative, and market power for less than 10 years are described.

  1. Study on climate change in Southwestern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zongxing

    2015-03-01

    Nominated by Chinese Academy of Sciences as an outstanding Ph.D. thesis. Offers a needed exploration of the temporal and spatial pattern of climate change in southwestern China. Explores the action mechanism among the large-scale atmospheric circulation system, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. Analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change from the aspects of morphology of the glacier, glacial mass balance and the process of hydrology. This thesis confirms many changes, including sharp temperature rise, interannual variability of precipitation, extreme climate events and significant decreases of sunshine duration and wind speed in southwestern China, and systemically explores the action mechanism between large-scale atmospheric circulation systems, the complicated topography, human activities and regional climate changes. This study also analyzes the response of glaciers to climate change so that on the one hand it clearly reflects the relationship between glacier morphologic changes and climate change; on the other, it reveals the mechanism of action of climate warming as a balance between energy and matter. The achievements of this study reflect a significant contribution to the body of research on the response of climate in cold regions, glaciers and human activities to a global change against the background of the typical monsoon climate, and have provided scientific basis for predictions, countermeasures against disasters from extreme weather, utilization of water and the establishment of counterplans to slow and adapt to climate change. Zongxing Li works at the Cold and Arid Region Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China.

  2. Ethical Challenges Inherent in the Evaluation of an American Indian/Alaskan Native Circles of Care Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, David A; Smith, Tyrone; Hunt, R Andrew

    2017-11-03

    This article provides first-person accounts of ethical issues inherent in an evaluation of the Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio (NAICCO) Circles of Care project. Circles of Care is a three-year, infrastructure development program funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) which is part of the federal Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The grant program is for American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) tribes and urban Indian communities and includes a strong emphasis on community engagement and community ownership. The Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio received a Circles of Care grant in the fifth cohort of the program. The first author (Project Evaluator) presents views that typically represent a western approach to evaluation, while the second author (Project Director) presents a Native perspective. Ethical issues are defined as well as the authors' efforts to address these concerns. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  3. The public health foundation of health services for American Indians & Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Everett R; Rhoades, Dorothy A

    2014-06-01

    The integration of public health practices with federal health care for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) largely derives from three major factors: the sovereign nature of AI/AN tribes, the sociocultural characteristics exhibited by the tribes, and that AI/ANs are distinct populations residing in defined geographic areas. The earliest services consisted of smallpox vaccination to a few AI/AN groups, a purely public health endeavor. Later, emphasis on public health was codified in the Snyder Act of 1921, which provided for, among other things, conservation of the health of AI/AN persons. Attention to the community was greatly expanded with the 1955 transfer of the Indian Health Service from the US Department of the Interior to the Public Health Service and has continued with the assumption of program operations by many tribes themselves. We trace developments in integration of community and public health practices in the provision of federal health care services for AI/AN persons and discuss recent trends.

  4. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry.

  5. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  6. Skin color variation in Orang Asli tribes of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Khai C; Ngu, Mee S; Reid, Katherine P; Teh, Mei S; Aida, Zamzuraida S; Koh, Danny Xr; Berg, Arthur; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Salleh, Hood; Clyde, Mahani M; Md-Zain, Badrul M; Canfield, Victor A; Cheng, Keith C

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation is a readily scorable and quantitative human phenotype, making it an excellent model for studying multifactorial traits and diseases. Convergent human evolution from the ancestral state, darker skin, towards lighter skin colors involved divergent genetic mechanisms in people of European vs. East Asian ancestry. It is striking that the European mechanisms result in a 10-20-fold increase in skin cancer susceptibility while the East Asian mechanisms do not. Towards the mapping of genes that contribute to East Asian pigmentation there is need for one or more populations that are admixed for ancestral and East Asian ancestry, but with minimal European contribution. This requirement is fulfilled by the Senoi, one of three indigenous tribes of Peninsular Malaysia collectively known as the Orang Asli. The Senoi are thought to be an admixture of the Negrito, an ancestral dark-skinned population representing the second of three Orang Asli tribes, and regional Mongoloid populations of Indo-China such as the Proto-Malay, the third Orang Asli tribe. We have calculated skin reflectance-based melanin indices in 492 Orang Asli, which ranged from 28 (lightest) to 75 (darkest); both extremes were represented in the Senoi. Population averages were 56 for Negrito, 42 for Proto-Malay, and 46 for Senoi. The derived allele frequencies for SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 in the Senoi were 0.04 and 0.02, respectively, consistent with greater South Asian than European admixture. Females and individuals with the A111T mutation had significantly lighter skin (p = 0.001 and 0.0039, respectively). Individuals with these derived alleles were found across the spectrum of skin color, indicating an overriding effect of strong skin lightening alleles of East Asian origin. These results suggest that the Senoi are suitable for mapping East Asian skin color genes.

  7. Skin color variation in Orang Asli tribes of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khai C Ang

    Full Text Available Pigmentation is a readily scorable and quantitative human phenotype, making it an excellent model for studying multifactorial traits and diseases. Convergent human evolution from the ancestral state, darker skin, towards lighter skin colors involved divergent genetic mechanisms in people of European vs. East Asian ancestry. It is striking that the European mechanisms result in a 10-20-fold increase in skin cancer susceptibility while the East Asian mechanisms do not. Towards the mapping of genes that contribute to East Asian pigmentation there is need for one or more populations that are admixed for ancestral and East Asian ancestry, but with minimal European contribution. This requirement is fulfilled by the Senoi, one of three indigenous tribes of Peninsular Malaysia collectively known as the Orang Asli. The Senoi are thought to be an admixture of the Negrito, an ancestral dark-skinned population representing the second of three Orang Asli tribes, and regional Mongoloid populations of Indo-China such as the Proto-Malay, the third Orang Asli tribe. We have calculated skin reflectance-based melanin indices in 492 Orang Asli, which ranged from 28 (lightest to 75 (darkest; both extremes were represented in the Senoi. Population averages were 56 for Negrito, 42 for Proto-Malay, and 46 for Senoi. The derived allele frequencies for SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 in the Senoi were 0.04 and 0.02, respectively, consistent with greater South Asian than European admixture. Females and individuals with the A111T mutation had significantly lighter skin (p = 0.001 and 0.0039, respectively. Individuals with these derived alleles were found across the spectrum of skin color, indicating an overriding effect of strong skin lightening alleles of East Asian origin. These results suggest that the Senoi are suitable for mapping East Asian skin color genes.

  8. Genetic uniqueness of the Waorani tribe from the Ecuadorian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, S.; Alfonso-Sánchez, M A; Valverde, L; SÁNCHEZ, D.; Zarrabeitia, M T; Odriozola, A.; Martínez-Jarreta, B; de Pancorbo, M M

    2012-01-01

    South America and especially the Amazon basin is known to be home to some of the most isolated human groups in the world. Here, we report on a study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the Waorani from Ecuador, probably the most warlike human population known to date. Seeking to look in more depth at the characterization of the genetic diversity of this Native American tribe, molecular markers from the X and Y chromosomes were also analyzed. Only three different mtDNA haplotypes were detected amo...

  9. The tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Figueroa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the occurrence of the tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru based on the collection at Museo de Historia Natural of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and on data provided in literature. Each species is presented with citations of its diagnosis, distribution and related comments. Peruvian Phanaeini includes 30 species in nine genera: Coprophanaeus, Dendropaemon, Gromphas, Oruscatus, Oxysternon, Phanaeus, Sulcophanaeus, Tetramereia and Megatharsis. Oruscatus davus is the only species distributed in the high Andes; Phanaeus lunaris and P. achilles occur in the northern arid zone shared by Peru and Ecuador; the remaining species are Amazonian.

  10. The Tribe Scymnini (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) From Sindh Province, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Perveen, Rukhsana; Naqvi, Arif-Un-Nisa; Ahmed, Khalil; Raza, Ghulam; Hussain, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Coccinellids are important natural enemies of aphids, scale insects, mealybugs, whiteflies, jassids and mites. They are being augmented or conserved for population reduction of different agricultural crop pests in the concept of Integrated Pest Management throughout the world. The genera and species in the tribe Scymnini known from Pakistan are revised and redescribed. Two genera including two subgenera and six species among which three species are newly reported, is therefore, a new addition to Coccinellid fauna of Pakistan. Keys to all taxa, descriptions of the higher taxa, species diagnoses, synonymies, and distribution records are included. PMID:26454480

  11. Indian concepts on sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffu...

  12. PATTERN OF CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTIONS, NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND OBESITY INDICES AMONG BAIGA AND GOND TRIBES OF MADHYA PRADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Saini, Kapoor AK, Satwanti Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian population is passing through a nutritional transition with a rise of non-communicable disease burden like cardiovascular disease. Aims: The overall aim was to provide detailed information on the current cardiovascular functions, nutritional status and obesity indices among Baiga and Gond tribes of Madhya Pradesh and to compare with other population groups in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 177 males of Baiga and Gond tribes of Madhya Pradesh ranging in range from 20-50 years. Stature, Weight, circumferences, skin fold thicknesses, body fat percentage and physiological measurement were taken. Obesity indices like body mass index (BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR, waist-height ratio (WHtR, grand mean thickness (GMT were computed. Cardiovascular functions were assessed by taking systolic (SBP and diastolic (DBP pressure, heart rate and pulse rate. Results: Gond males were found to be taller and heavier than Baiga males. Upper arm circumference, waist circumference, hip circumference and chest normal circumference were all found to be significantly higher among Gond males as compared to Baiga males. Among the adiposity measurements only the body mass index (BMI and Grand Mean Thickness were found to be more among Gond males as compared to Baiga males. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP, heart rate (HR, pulse rate (PR was found to have greater mean value among Gond males but the differences were found to be statistically non-significant. All India comparison on these variables has also been made. Conclusion: Subjects belonging to different population groups of India showed marked differences in different body dimensions, adiposity indices and cardiovascular functions. Gender differences were also seen with reference to adiposity measures.

  13. The first record of a Cretaceous dinosaur from southwestern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Cretaceous dinosaurs are recorded for the first time from southwestern Alaska by a series of three tracks found in Aniakchak National Monument. This trackway is in...

  14. Medicinal Plants Used by the Mandais - A Little Known Tribe of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mandais are a little known tribe of Bangladesh inhabiting the north central regions, particularly Tangail district of Bangladesh. Their population has been estimated to be less than 10,000 people. Although the tribe has for the most part assimilated with the mainstream Bengali-speaking population, they to some extent ...

  15. A new genus of the tribe Parahiraciini (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Issidae) from Hainan Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Rui; Qin, Daozheng; Wang, Yinglun

    2015-05-12

    A new issid genus in the tribe Parahiraciini (Hemiptera: Fulgoromorpha: Issidae) is erected for Fortunia jianfenglingensis Chen, Zhang et Chang, 2014 (China: Hainan). Male of the species is described and illustrated for the first time. A key for the 15 genera of Parahiraciini is provided. Morphological peculiarity and phylogenetic position of the new genus and the distribution of the tribe Parahiraciini are briefly discussed.

  16. 75 FR 66387 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... townsendii virginianus), Ozark big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii ingens), and gray bat (Myotis... Agencies, and Tribes in Managing White-Nose Syndrome in Bats; Draft National Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... assist States, Federal agencies, and tribes in managing white-nose syndrome in bats. This draft plan was...

  17. Revisiting the phylogeny of Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within Graphidaceae (lichenized Ascomycota: Ostropales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaphan Kraichak; Sittiporn Parnmen; Robert Lücking; Eimy Rivas Plata; Andre Aptroot; Marcela E.S. Caceres; Damien Ertz; Armin Mangold; Joel A. Mercado-Diaz; Khwanruan Papong; Dries Van der Broeck; Gothamie Weerakoon; H. Thorsten. Lumbsch; NO-VALUE

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated 3-locus molecular phylogeny of tribe Ocellularieae, the second largest tribe within subfamily Graphidoideae in the Graphidaceae. Adding 165 newly generated sequences from the mitochondrial small subunit rDNA (mtSSU), the nuclear large subunit rDNA (nuLSU), and the second largest subunit of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II (RPB2), we currently...

  18. Mechanistic Implications of Enhanced Editing by a HyperTRIBE RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weijin; Rahman, Reazur; Rosbash, Michael

    2017-11-10

    We previously developed TRIBE, a method for the identification of cell-specific RNA binding protein targets. TRIBE expresses an RBP of interest fused to the catalytic domain (cd) of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR and performs Adenosine-to-Inosine editing on RNA targets of the RBP. However, target identification is limited by the low editing efficiency of the ADARcd. Here we describe HyperTRIBE, which carries a previously characterized hyperactive mutation (E488Q) of the ADARcd. HyperTRIBE identifies dramatically more editing sites, many of which are also edited by TRIBE but at a much lower editing frequency. HyperTRIBE therefore more faithfully recapitulates the known binding specificity of its RBP than TRIBE. In addition, separating RNA binding from the enhanced editing activity of the HyperTRIBE ADAR catalytic domain sheds light on the mechanism of ADARcd editing as well as the enhanced activity of the HyperADARcd. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Medicinal formulations of a Kanda tribal healer – a tribe on the verge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kanda tribe is one of the lesser known small tribes of Bangladesh with an estimated population of about 1700 people (according to them), and on the verge ... Besides medicinal plants, the Kanda healer also used the body hairs of the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and bats (Pteropus giganteus giganteus) in one ...

  20. 77 FR 467 - Notice of Tribal Consultation Meetings Regarding How the Current SACWIS Regulations Affect Tribes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... a State or Tribe implements a comprehensive Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System... in building a child welfare information system in general and a SACWIS-type system specifically? (2... child welfare agencies, to determine if Tribes have sufficient flexibility and latitude to build...

  1. The systematic wood anatomy of the Moraceae (Urticales) I. Tribe Castilleae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Topper, S.M.C.; Welle, ter B.J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The wood anatomy of the tribe Castilleae sensu Berg is described. Similarities and differences are discussed in relation to his concepts of the taxonomy of the tribe. The wood anatomical variation does not enable to distinguish between Maquira, Perebea and Pseudolmedia. Antiaris, Castilla,

  2. 42 CFR 137.351 - Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit construction project progress and financial reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Roles of Self-Governance Tribe in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.351 Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to...

  3. Contribution to the study of longhorns from New Caledonia, VI. Revision of the tribe Amphoecini Breuning, 1951 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vives Edueard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the representatives of the tribe Amphoecini are revised. One new species, Amphoecus wanati sp. n., is described. The synonymy of A. metallicus and Cyananphoecus cyaneus is proposed. Finally, the New Zealand taxon, Gnomodes piceus, is moved from the tribe Aphneopini to the tribe Amphoecini.

  4. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's... RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. Revisions to the following provisions of the Crow Tribe's Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as submitted...

  5. Indian Arts in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A recent publication, "Indian Arts in Canada", examines some of the forces, both past and present, which are not only affecting American Indian artists today, but which will also profoundly influence their future. The review presents a few of the illustrations used in the book, along with the Introduction and the Foreword. (KM)

  6. Indian Ocean Rim Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wippel, Steffen

    Since the mid-1990s, the Indian Ocean has been experiencing increasing economic cooperation among its rim states. Middle Eastern countries, too, participate in the work of the Indian Ocean Rim Association, which received new impetus in the course of the current decade. Notably Oman is a very active...

  7. The Association of Panic Disorder, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Major Depression With Smoking in American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, Craig N; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Noonan, Carolyn; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Manson, Spero M; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-03-01

    Rates of cigarette smoking are disproportionately high among American Indian populations, although regional differences exist in smoking prevalence. Previous research has noted that anxiety and depression are associated with higher rates of cigarette use. We asked whether lifetime panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and major depression were related to lifetime cigarette smoking in two geographically distinct American Indian tribes. Data were collected in 1997-1999 from 1506 Northern Plains and 1268 Southwest tribal members; data were analyzed in 2009. Regression analyses examined the association between lifetime anxiety and depressive disorders and odds of lifetime smoking status after controlling for sociodemographic variables and alcohol use disorders. Institutional and tribal approvals were obtained for all study procedures, and all participants provided informed consent. Odds of smoking were two times higher in Southwest participants with panic disorder and major depression, and 1.7 times higher in those with posttraumatic stress disorder, after controlling for sociodemographic variables. After accounting for alcohol use disorders, only major depression remained significantly associated with smoking. In the Northern Plains, psychiatric disorders were not associated with smoking. Increasing psychiatric comorbidity was significantly linked to increased smoking odds in both tribes, especially in the Southwest. This study is the first to examine the association between psychiatric conditions and lifetime smoking in two large, geographically diverse community samples of American Indians. While the direction of the relationship between nicotine use and psychiatric disorders cannot be determined, understanding unique social, environmental, and cultural differences that contribute to the tobacco-psychiatric disorder relationship may help guide tribe-specific commercial tobacco control strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on

  8. Revision of Coprosma (Rubiaceae, tribe Anthospermeae in the Marquesas Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Wagner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During the preparation of the Vascular Flora of the Marquesas Islands three new species of Coprosma (Rubiaceae, tribe Anthospermeae have come to light and are described herein: C. fatuhivaensis W. L. Wagner & Lorence, C. meyeri W. L. Wagner & Lorence, and C. temetiuensis W. L. Wagner & Lorence. Descriptions, illustrations, conservation status, and specimen citations are provided. Amended descriptions of three previously described Marquesan Coprosma species are also provided as well as a key to the species, four of which fall into the Critically Endangered (CR and two into the Endangered (EN category. With the description of these the new species, Coprosma becomes the sixth largest lineage in the Marquesas Islands with six species after Psychotria (one lineage which has 9 spp., Cyrtandra (8 spp., Bidens (8 spp., and Melicope (7 spp., and Ixora (7 spp..

  9. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  10. The pyeTribe: Simultaneous eyetracking for economic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejarraga, Tomás; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Michael; Smedema, Daniel

    2016-10-28

    The recent introduction of inexpensive eyetrackers has opened up a wealth of opportunities for researchers to study attention in interactive tasks. No software package has previously been available to help researchers exploit those opportunities. We created "the pyeTribe," a software package that offers, among others, the following features: first, a communication platform between many eyetrackers to allow for simultaneous recording of multiple participants; second, the simultaneous calibration of multiple eyetrackers without the experimenter's supervision; third, data collection restricted to periods of interest, thus reducing the volume of data and easing analysis. We used a standard economic game (the public goods game) to examine the data quality and demonstrate the potential of our software package. Moreover, we conducted a modeling analysis, which illustrates how combining process and behavioral data can improve models of human decision-making behavior in social situations. Our software is open source.

  11. Seasonal mixed layer heat balance of the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Foltz, G.R.; Vialard, J.; PraveenKumar, B.; McPhaden, M.J.

    the remainder of the year. Vertical turbulent mixing, estimated as a residual in the heat balance, also undergoes a significant seasonal cycle. Cooling from this term is strongest in boreal summer, when surface wind and buoyancy forcing are strongest...

  12. Rare earth element studies of surficial sediments from the southwestern Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Higgs, N.C.

    into these sediments is suggested from the weak positive Eu/Eu anomaly. Shale-normalized (NASC) pattern along with La sub((n)/Yb sub((n) ratio suggest enrichment of heavy REE (HREE) relative to the light REE (LREE) with a negative Ce/Ce anomaly implying retention of a...

  13. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhany Munira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1% were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs. The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community.

  14. Nitrogen Fixation by Members of the Tribe Klebsielleae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahl, M. C.; Wilson, P. W.; Fife, M. A.; Ewing, W. H.

    1965-01-01

    Mahl, M. C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), P. W. Wilson, M. A. Fife, and W. H. Ewing. Nitrogen fixation by members of the tribe Klebsielleae. J. Bacteriol. 89:1482–1487. 1965.—Strains of species of the tribe Klebsielleae were tested for nitrogen fixation by inoculating actively growing cultures into side-arm flasks containing a medium with a growth-limiting quantity of combined nitrogen (25 μg of nitrogen per ml as ammonium sulfate). The flasks were evacuated, filled with pure N2, sealed, and placed on a shaker at 30 C. Growth was followed by optical-density measurements; maximal growth was obtained in 9 to 10 hr. Yeast extract was then added as a source of amino acids to shorten the induction time for the nitrogen-fixing enzymes. Fixation was determined either by estimating total nitrogen with a semimicro Kjeldahl technique or by exposing 20- to 22-hr-old samples to an atmosphere of N215 and helium for 5 hr and then analyzing the digested sample for N15 in a mass spectrometer. None of the 22 strains of the two Enterobacter (formerly Aerobacter) species fixed nitrogen; neither did any of eight strains of Serratia species that were tested. Of 31 strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 13 incorporated atmospheric nitrogen. Net nitrogen fixed ranged from 17 to 65 μg/ml. It is concluded that these facultative anaerobic, gram-negative, nitrogen-fixing rods should be placed in the genus Klebsiella pneumoniae. The nitrogen-fixing organism tentatively classified as Achromobacter N-4 should also be changed to K. pneumoniae strain N-4, because it has been found to be an anaerogenic strain of K. pneumoniae. PMID:14291584

  15. Indian concepts on sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  16. Indian concepts on sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality.

  17. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J.

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  18. Trends in Early Childhood Obesity in a Large Urban School District in the Southwestern United States, 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Andrea; Myers, Orrin; Scharmen, Thomas; Kinyua, Peter; Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes

    2016-06-02

    Although recent studies indicate that rates of childhood obesity and severe obesity may be declining, few studies have reported prevalence trends in early childhood or differences in trends across sociodemographic groups. The primary aim of this study was to report trends in prevalence of early childhood obesity and severe obesity 2007 through 2014 in a diverse, metropolitan school district in the southwestern United States and determine whether these trends vary by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and disability status. We analyzed height, weight and demographic data from 43,113 kindergarteners enrolled in a large, urban school district in the southwestern United States for 7 school years. Adjusted odds of obesity and severe obesity were calculated to assess changes in prevalence for non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, and American Indian students; free or reduced-price lunch participants and nonparticipants; and students with and without disabilities. To test for differences in obesity trends, interaction terms were added to the logistic regressions between school year and sex, race/ethnicity, free or reduced-price lunch participation, and disability status. The adjusted prevalence of both obesity (from 13.1% in 2007-2008 to 12.0% in 2013-20014) and severe obesity (from 2.4% in 2007-2008 to 1.2% in 2013-2014) declined overall. We found no significant interactions between the adjusted prevalence of obesity over time and any of the sociodemographic subgroups. Obesity prevalence declined more among American Indian students than among Hispanic or non-Hispanic white students. In this district, from 2007 through 2014, severe obesity decreased and obesity did not increase, overall and across all sociodemographic subpopulations for kindergarten students.

  19. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  20. Indian Ocean margins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    The most important biogeochemical transformations and boundary exchanges in the Indian Ocean seem to occur in the northern region, where the processes originating at the land-ocean boundary extend far beyond the continental margins. Exchanges across...

  1. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  2. A comparison of the prevalence and risk factors of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in two American Indian population samples and in a general population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Shay-Lee; Elias, Brenda; Enns, Murray W; Sareen, Jitender; Beals, Janette; Novins, Douglas K

    2014-02-01

    The current study aimed to examine whether the prevalence and risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts differ when comparing two American Indian reservation samples to the U.S. general population. Data were from the baseline nationally representative National Comorbidity Survey (N = 5,877) and the representative American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP; N = 3,084). Face-to-face interviews were conducted using the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview. American Indians from these Northern Plains and Southwest tribes appeared significantly less likely to have suicidal thoughts in their lifetime when compared with the general population, odds ratio (OR) of 0.49 (99% CI [0.36, 0.66]) and 0.36 (99% CI [0.25, 0.51]), respectively. However, members of the Northern Plains tribe were more likely to have attempted suicide in their lifetime compared with the general population (OR = 1.96, 99% CI [1.45, 2.65]). Suicide attempts without suicidal ideation were more common in the two American Indian samples than in the general population. In contrast, correlates of suicidal behavior appear quite similar when comparing the groups. Increased attention is needed to determine why rates of ideation and attempts may differ in American Indians when compared with the general population.

  3. Seven Global Goals. 2013 annual report, Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    For over 70 years, Southwestern has marketed and delivered reliable, renewable, and affordable hydropower, partnering with Federal power stakeholders and others in the industry to make sure the lights stay on. This kind of effective, efficient, and cost conscious operation is made possible only by hard work and dedication. Southwestern employees work individually and as a team to meet seven comprehensive agency goals that touch on all aspects of the agency’s operations. Dubbed the “Seven Global Goals” by Administrator Chris Turner, these objectives identify specific, measurable targets that support Southwestern’s mission and reinforce its responsibilities toward its customers and the Nation.

  4. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  5. Southwestern Avian Community Organization in Exotic Tamarix: Current Patterns and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. A. Walker

    2006-01-01

    Tamarisk (saltcedar: Tamarix), an invasive exotic tree native to the Eastern Hemisphere, is currently the dominant plant species in most southwestern riparian ecosystems at elevations below 1500 m. Tamarisk alters abiotic conditions and the floral composition of native southwestern riparian ecosystems and, in turn, affects native southwestern animal communities....

  6. The energy behind the power. Southwestern Power Administration 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This is the Southwestern Power Administration 1994 annual report. The topics of the report include a letter to the secretary; an overview including the mission statement, a description of the Southwestern Federal Power System, financial statement, performance measurements, national performance review; year in review, summary of results, financial and statistical data and the Southwestern Power Administration Organization.

  7. The structure and musculature of male terminalia in the tribe Xanthorhoini Pierce and related tribes (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Larentiinae), with particular reference to the Palaearctic and Australian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The musculature of the male genitalia was reviewed for the tribe Xanthorhoini and related tribes (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae). The genitalia morphology of males of 11 species was discussed and illustrated, and nine paired and unpaired genital muscles identified. Muscles m1, m2(10), m5(7), m6(5), m7(6), m8(3) and m21 have similar position in all species considered in the paper. Comparative morphology of the male terminalia and position of extensors of the valvae m3(2) and flexors m4 confirmed the previously uncertain separation of Euphyiini and Scotopterygini. Cataclysmini share musculature characters with the tribe Xanthorhoini. The generic affiliation of Xanthorhoe biriviata (Borkhausen) is questionable considering an unusual location of muscles m4. Generally, the places of attachment of the muscles m3(2) and m4 to the sclerites afford valuable characters for the higher classification of this group.

  8. 76 FR 22913 - Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance of the Paiute Tribe of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... to the peace, safety, morals, health or welfare of the Tribe, and/or is otherwise not in the best... 15. LIBERAL CONSTRUCTION Provisions of this Ordinance shall be liberally construed to achieve the...

  9. Las Vegas Paiute Tribe Snow Mountain Reservation Public Water Supply Improvement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public notice that EPA, Region 9, is considering providing grant funding to the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe in Clark County, Nevada for the Snow Mountain Water System Project, a water infrastructure improvement project.

  10. Substitution of some species-level names in the tribe Hygrotini Portevin, 1929 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fery, Hans

    2017-11-01

    Recently, Villastrigo et al. (2017b) published a new classification of the species of the tribe Hygrotini (subfamily Hydroporinae) based on a thorough phylogenetic investigation using molecular as well as morphological data (Villastrigo et al. 2017a).

  11. Quotidian of accompanying family members in an environment of care: the emergence of hospital tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia da Silva Santos Passos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Understand the quotidian relationships of accompanying family members in an environment of care, which are close to the metaphor of a tribe in hospital environment. METHODQualitative study with data gathered from semi-structured interviews and observations with 16 family members accompanying hospitalized individuals with dependence on self-care. Data were submitted to thematic analysis, and analyzed through the metaphor of "tribe" proposed by comprehensive sociology. RESULTS Family members build up social clusters around caring, where we find traits typical of tribes: emotional ambience; solidarity based on links of sympathy and mutual assistance; an affectual nebula in the process of interaction; a logic of fusion in tactile relations; and communion/religiosity in the process of connecting in a collective identity. CONCLUSION In the presence of tragedy, families build social clusters similar to tribes having care as a totem.

  12. Indian Health Service: Find Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Indian Health Service The Federal Health Program for American Indians and ... map can be used to find an Indian Health Service, Tribal or Urban Indian Health Program facility. This ...

  13. Different Gene Preferences of Maple Syrup Urine Disease in the Aboriginal Tribes of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Although the Taiwanese Austronesian Aboriginal tribes are considered to share a common origin, different gene preferences of MSUD were noted. The novel DBT mutation c.650-651insT was more prevalent than the deleted 4.7-kb heterozygote in the Amis population. The reported 4.7-kb deletion indicating a possible founder mutation may be preserved in the southern and eastern, but not in northern Aboriginal tribes of Taiwan.

  14. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  15. HEREDITARY BLINDNESS: A GENEALOGICAL STUDY AMONG AL-GHARAHIR, A JORDAN VALLEY TRIBE

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Mohanna Y.; El-Najjar, Mahmoud Y.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Hereditary diseases form an omnibus problem in Arab societies in general and in rural Arab societies in particular. Aim: Study of hereditary blindness and its relation to endogamous marriage among the Gharaghir tribe in the Jordan valley. Methodology: The researchers carried out a fieldwork among the Gharaghir tribe in Al-Sawalha (the northern valley region, Deir Alla, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan) using participant observation, and intensive focussed interviews, in addition to...

  16. The Doryctinae (Braconidae) of Costa Rica: genera and species of the tribe Heterospilini

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Marsh; Alexander Wild; James Whitfield

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive taxonomic study is presented for the four genera and 286 species of the doryctine tribe Heterospilini occurring in Costa Rica. The tribe is represented almost entirely by the 280 species of the genus Heterospilus Haliday. Keys for identification of the genera and species are provided and the genera and species are described and illustrated. An interactive key to the species of Heterospilus also was prepared using Lucid Builder. The following new genus and species are described...

  17. Study of crustal structure and geological implications of southwestern margin of Northeast India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Sowrav; Baruah, Santanu; Chopra, Sumer; Singh, Upendra K.; Gogoi, Bibhuti; Gohain, Himanata B.

    2017-10-01

    It is noticed that few geophysical studies have been carried out to decipher the crustal structure of southwestern part of the Northeast India comprising of Tripura fold belt and Bengal basin as compared to the Shillong plateau and the Brahmaputra basin. This region has a long history of seismicity that is still continuing. We have determined first-order crustal features in terms of Moho depths (H) and average VP/VS ratios (κ) using H-κ stacking technique. The inversion of receiver functions data yields near surface thick sedimentary layer in the Bengal basin, which is nearly absent in the Shillong plateau and Tripura fold belt. Our result suggests that the crust is thicker (38-45 km) in the Tripura fold belt region with higher shear-wave velocity in the lower crust than the Shillong plateau. The distribution of VP/VS ratio indicates heterogeneity throughout the whole region. While low to medium value of Poisson's ratio (1.69-1.75) indicates the presence of felsic crust in the Shillong plateau of the extended Indian Archean crust. The medium to high values of VP/VS ratio (> 1.780) in the Bengal basin and the Tripura fold belt region represent mafic crust during the formation of the Bengal delta and the Tripura fold belt creation in the Precambrian to the Permian age. The depth of the sediments in the Bengal basin is up to 8 km on its eastern margin, which get shallower toward its northeastern and southeastern margins.

  18. Assessment of Periodontal Status of Konda Reddy Tribe in Bhadrachalam, Khammam District, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naheeda; Asif, Shaik Mohammed; Padma, Madhavi; Paul, Arpita

    2015-06-01

    Though great strides have been taken globally in the fight against oral diseases, problems persist especially among poor, disadvantaged and socially marginalised communities like tribes. Konda Reddies are one of the most primitive tribes of Bhadrachalam who because of their isolation, inaccessibility to dental resources and lack of dental knowledge follow traditional methods of oral hygiene practices, which are found to be inadequate to maintain oral health. To assess the periodontal status of Konda reddy tribes residing in Bhadrachalam of Khammam district, India. Based on availability and accessibility the tribes were gathered using convenient sampling method. The total study population consisted of 500 subjects. Using a preformed Performa the oral hygiene practices and periodontal status was recorded using CPI index. The total study population was 500, comprising of 225 males and 275 females in the age group ranging from 20- >70 years. The mean number of sextants with healthy condition were 0.04±0.19; calculus 4.69±1.21; pockets 4-5 mm 0.91±0.91 and pockets >6mm 0.02±0.15. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal status was seen among the tribes. Under these circumstances, the implementation of a basic oral health care programme for these tribes is a high priority.

  19. The Chloroplast Genome of Hyoscyamus niger and a Phylogenetic Study of the Tribe Hyoscyameae (Solanaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Puerta, M. Virginia; Abbona, Cinthia Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The tribe Hyoscyameae (Solanaceae) is restricted to Eurasia and includes the genera Archihyoscyamus, Anisodus, Atropa, Atropanthe, Hyoscyamus, Physochlaina, Przewalskia and Scopolia. Even though the monophyly of Hyoscyameae is strongly supported, the relationships of the taxa within the tribe remain unclear. Chloroplast markers have been widely used to elucidate plant relationships at low taxonomic levels. Identification of variable chloroplast intergenic regions has been developed based on comparative genomics of chloroplast genomes, but these regions have a narrow phylogenetic utility. In this study, we present the chloroplast genome sequence of Hyoscyamus niger and make comparisons to other solanaceous plastid genomes in terms of gene order, gene and intron content, editing sites, origins of replication, repeats, and hypothetical open reading frames. We developed and sequenced three variable plastid markers from eight species to elucidate relationships within the tribe Hyoscyameae. The presence of a horizontally transferred intron in the mitochondrial cox1 gene of some species of the tribe is considered here a likely synapomorphy uniting five genera of the Hyoscyameae. Alternatively, the cox1 intron could be a homoplasious character acquired twice within the tribe. A homoplasious inversion in the intergenic plastid spacer trnC-psbM was recognized as a source of bias and removed from the data set used in the phylogenetic analyses. Almost 12 kb of plastid sequence data were not sufficient to completely resolve relationships among genera of Hyoscyameae but some clades were identified. Two alternative hypotheses of the evolution of the genera within the tribe are proposed. PMID:24851862

  20. Community-wise evaluation of rice beer prepared by some ethnic tribes of Tripura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanta Ghosh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tripura is inhabited by many indigenous communities having unique ethno-socio-cultural lifestyle with age-old rice beer brewing techniques using wild herbs and local rice varieties popularly known as chuwak or zu. The present study is focused on comparative evaluation of brewing methods and nutritional aspects of rice beer among Debbarma, Jamatia, Koloi, and Molsom tribes of Tripura. Sample ingredients and plant species are properly identified before reporting. Rice beer is also prepared in laboratory conditions for comparative studies of qualitative and quantitative aspects. Thirteen different plant species are used by these four tribes for preparation of starter cultures using soaked rice flour. Markhamia stipulate (Wall. Seem. is common to all communities for starter cake preparation. Litsea monopetala (Roxb. Pers. is used by all three communities except Jamatia. The use of Ananus comosus Mill. is common among Debbarma and Jamatia tribes, whereas that of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. is common among Molsom and Koloi tribes. However, Aporusa diocia (Roxb. Muell., Combretum indicum (L. DeFilipps., and Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck. are used only by Debbarma tribe for unique tangy flavor. The physicochemical properties of rice beer varied within tribes for its moisture content, carbohydrate content, reducing sugar, and alcohol percentage. The concentration of alcohol increases with aging and prolonged fermentation. The plants reported here are also reported for having nutritional and medicinal benefits for the metabolic stability in humans, which make the process more prospective for commercialization if a standard for maintaining a quality and associated risk can be determined.

  1. PlantTribes: a gene and gene family resource for comparative genomics in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, P. Kerr; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Müller, Kai F.; Field, Dawn; Altman, Naomi S.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2008-01-01

    The PlantTribes database (http://fgp.huck.psu.edu/tribe.html) is a plant gene family database based on the inferred proteomes of five sequenced plant species: Arabidopsis thaliana, Carica papaya, Medicago truncatula, Oryza sativa and Populus trichocarpa. We used the graph-based clustering algorithm MCL [Van Dongen (Technical Report INS-R0010 2000) and Enright et al. (Nucleic Acids Res. 2002; 30: 1575–1584)] to classify all of these species’ protein-coding genes into putative gene families, called tribes, using three clustering stringencies (low, medium and high). For all tribes, we have generated protein and DNA alignments and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees. A parallel database of microarray experimental results is linked to the genes, which lets researchers identify groups of related genes and their expression patterns. Unified nomenclatures were developed, and tribes can be related to traditional gene families and conserved domain identifiers. SuperTribes, constructed through a second iteration of MCL clustering, connect distant, but potentially related gene clusters. The global classification of nearly 200 000 plant proteins was used as a scaffold for sorting ∼4 million additional cDNA sequences from over 200 plant species. All data and analyses are accessible through a flexible interface allowing users to explore the classification, to place query sequences within the classification, and to download results for further study. PMID:18073194

  2. Utjecaj grčke tragedije na Drum Song: An Indian Trilogy Gwen Pharis Ringwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Žeravica

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gwen Pharis Ringwood (1910–1984 is one of the most eminent Canadian playwrights of the 20th century. In her drama Drum Song: An Indian Trilogy which consists of three parts: Maya (Lament for Harmonica, 1959, The Stranger (1971 and The Furies (1981 the author implements her knowledge of First Nations’ traditions and customs. Moreover, it is “in the lives of the Indian tribes [that] Gwen Ringwood had found an elemental struggle for survival that has produced conflicts comparable with those of Greek tragedy” (Perkyns 330. Such conflicts and elements characteristic of Greek tragedy find their place in this trilogy as well. Therefore, the aim of the paper is to analyse those elements, examine their function, the way and form in which they are presented in the trilogy. Keywords: Canada, drama, First Nations, Gwen Ringwood, tradition, tragedy, trilogy

  3. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Elliott

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects, three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology, six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years.

  4. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amy J; White Hat, Emily R; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-12-22

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years.

  5. Intestinal parasites in Iaualapiti indians from Xingu Park, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Santos Ferreira

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Brine flotation and gravity sedimentation coproscopical examinations were performed in stool samples from 69 of the 147 Iaualapiti Indians of the Xingu Park, Mato Grosso State, Brazil. Intestinal [arasites were present in 89.9% of the population examined. High rates of prevalence were found for some parasite species. Ancylostomidae, 82.6%; Enterobius vermicularis, 26.1%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 20.3%; and Entamoeba coli, 68.1%. Infection by Trichuris trichuria, Schistosoma mansoni, Taenia spp. and Hymenolepis nana was not detected. Helminth's prevalence in children aged one year or less was comparatively low (33.3%. Quantitative coproscopy was done in positive samples for Ascaris and Ancylostomidae and the results expressed in eggs per gram of feces (EPG. Quantitative results revealed that worm burdens are very low and overdispersed in this Indian tribe, a previously unreported fact.

  6. Timing of fluvial terrace formation and concomitant travertine deposition in the upper Sutlej River (Tirthapuri, southwestern Tibet) and paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Meyer, Michael C.; Gliganic, Luke A.; Hoffmann, Dirk L.; May, Jan-Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    Travertines are carbonates precipitated from hydrothermal springs and are relatively common on the Tibetan plateau and occur along tectonically active faults. The Karakoram fault system is an active strike-slip fault that extends from the Pamir into southwestern Tibet, where it controls the course of the upper Sutlej River and the occurrence of several hydrothermal springs, including the Tirthapuri hot springs. Multiple fluvial terraces that are partly capped by travertine are preserved in the Tirthapuri area. Four main fluvial terrace levels (labelled as T1 to T4 with increasing height above river) were identified and several meter-thick travertine platforms occur on the current river level as well as the T2 and T3 terraces. Sedimentological and petrographic observations suggest that the travertine platforms were deposited on active floodplains of the paleo- and modern Sutlej River, and preserved from fluvial erosion because travertine precipitation was immediately followed by vertical river-bed incision and thus terrace abandonment. Results of 230Th/U in combination with luminescence dating show that the deposition of travertine platform and river incision that led to the formation of T3 terrace (∼93 m above the Sutlej) took place at ca. 127.5 ka. The development of terrace T2 and overlying travertine platform (∼28 m above the Sutlej) occurred between ca. 10.0 and 8.8 ka. Fluvial incision has arrived at the modern level at least ca. 0.2 ka ago. Both the travertine deposition and major river incision are likely triggered by the intensified Indian summer monsoon and are linked to phases of maximum monsoon strength. During strong monsoon phases, a large quantity of moisture is transported into southwestern Tibet, activating hot springs and thus travertine precipitation, facilitating fluvial incision and stripping off sediments from the regional hill-slopes. At least over the last glacial cycle we suggest that the Tirthapuri travertine and associated fluvial

  7. Inclusive Education Practice in Southwestern Nigeria: A Situational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Samuel Olufemi; Adeyemi, Akinkunmi Oluwadamilare

    2015-01-01

    This study presented situational analysis of inclusive educational practice in southwestern Nigeria. The study employed descriptive survey research design. Samples of 131 teachers, 51 parents and 51 head teachers/principals were purposively selected from State Grammar School, Ipakodo Junior Grammar School, Methodist Grammar School, Ijokodo High…

  8. Holocene insect remains from south-western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøcher, Jens Jensenius; Bennike, Ole; Wagner, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Remains of plants and invertebrates from Holocene deposits in south-western Greenland include a number of insect fragments from Heteroptera and Coleoptera. Some of the finds extend the known temporal range of the species considerably back in time, and one of the taxa has not previously been found...... of terrestrial insects complement the scarce fossil Greenland record of the species concerned....

  9. The Role of the Navajo in the Southwestern Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert W.

    The role of the Navajo in development of the Southwest and the effects of southwestern development on the life of the Navajo are depicted. Some 91 pages of facts are pieced together from archaeological and linguistic research, from chronicles of Spanish conquistadores and their successors (or historical writings based on these documents), and from…

  10. Simulating the productivity of desert woody shrubs in southwestern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the southwestern U.S., many rangelands have converted from native grasslands to woody shrublands dominated by creosotebush (Larrea tridentate) and honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), threatening ecosystem health. Both creosotebush and mesquite have well-developed long root systems that allow t...

  11. Effects of fire management of southwestern natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. S. Krammes

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings is a collection of papers and posters presented at the Symposium on Effects of Fire Management of Southwestern Natural Resources held in Tucson, Arizona, November 15-17, 1988. Included are papers, poster papers and a comprehensive list of references on the effects of fire on: plant succession, cultural resources, hydrology, range and wildlife resources...

  12. Birds of Southwestern grasslands: Status, conservation, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michele Merola-Zwartjes

    2005-01-01

    In the Southwestern United States, the grassland avifauna is collectively composed of a mixture of species found primarily in desert grasslands, shortgrass steppe, wet meadows, and alpine tundra (as used here, desert grasslands incorporate both arid grasslands and desert shrub grasslands). Of these habitats, desert grasslands and shortgrass steppe are the most...

  13. Status of onchocerciasis in Teppi area, Southwestern Ethiopia, after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Status of onchocerciasis in Teppi area, Southwestern Ethiopia, after four years of ... Objective: To determine the status of the prevalence and intensity of onchocerciasis after four years of ivermectin distribution in ..... Bibliography on HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia and Ethiopians in the Diaspora: The 2009 Update 55. Ethiop J Health ...

  14. Prevalence of Infertility in Women in a Southwestern Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and common causes of infertility in women aged between 15 and 55 years was assessed in four hospital centers in Osun State, located in the SouthWestern part of Nigeria. A survey of a consecutive sample of 200 cases of infertility were carried out in four hospital centers with a total of 50 cases of infertility ...

  15. Eudynamis Minima, an apparently new Cuckoo from Southwestern New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van E.D.

    1911-01-01

    Only an adult male of this apparently new form of the genus Eudynamis has been collected near Bivak Island, in the Noord River, Southwestern New Guinea, at 9 January 1910 by the members of the last Lorentz-expedition to the snowy mountains. (Coll. Lorentz n°. 508). The plumage is black, glossed with

  16. Breeding biology of Lucy's Warbler in southwestern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott H. Stoleson; Roland S. Shook; Deborah M. Finch

    2000-01-01

    We found Lucy's Warblers breeding abundantly in mid-elevation broadleaf riparian forests in the lower Gila River valley of southwestern New Mexico. They arrived en masse in the third week of March. Patterns of singing suggested that Lucy's Warblers might raise two broods. Few were heard or seen after late July. Estimated population densities ranged from 1. 7...

  17. 2014 annual site environmental report, Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    Southwestern Power Administration’s Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) serves as the chief reporting mechanism for site environmental performance information within the Department of Energy and as a valuable resource for shared and collaborative environmental protection and performance information to Agency stakeholders and members of the public living near Southwestern Power Administration’s (Southwestern) facilities and transmission line rights-of-ways. This ASER meets the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.B. Southwestern’s key environmental involvement includes an emphasis on the protection of ecological resources which is effectively accomplished through environmental program elements such as protecting water resources, generation of clean hydropower energy, oil spill prevention practices, elimination of green-house gas emissions, and comprehensive project reviews to ensure the protection of living organisms, migratory birds, Federally threatened or endangered species, and historic or cultural resources. Southwestern continues to actively minimize effects to natural resources and strive for continual improvement in the area of environmental compliance and sustainability while achieving the agency mission to market and deliver Federal hydroelectric power.

  18. Strategic nutrient management of field pea in southwestern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highlands of southwestern Uganda account for the bulk of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) produced and consumed in the country. ... limiting nutrient, though the effect manifested in terms of the intensity of BNF indicators, followed by nitrogen, that manifested at later stages of crop growth influencing stover and grain yield.

  19. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. from the southwestern Alps (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Nel, Jacques; Fournier, François

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. is described from the southwestern Alps (France, Italy). It is closely related to M. nomadella (Zeller, 1868), with which it was hitherto confused. Literature records of M. nomadella from France and northwestern Italy refer to M. bronzella sp. n. The two speci...

  20. Dating Violence in South-Western Nigeria Tertiary Institutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined peace education as a means of curbing gap in knowledge and dating violence in South-western Nigeria tertiary institutions. Economic, social and psychological problems exert enormous pressures on students making them violent or docile in the face of challenges. These factors combine to make ...

  1. Analysis of Culex and Aedes mosquitoes in southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Amplification and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) by mosquitoes are driven by presence and number of viraemic/susceptible avian hosts. Methods: in order to predict risk of WNV infection to humans, we collected mosquitoes from horse stables in Lagos and Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria. The mosquitoes ...

  2. (ICTs) in research institute libraries in Southwestern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little attention has been paid to ICTs use at the level of libraries in Research Institutes in south western Nigeria. This study supplies insight into the current state of ICTs in libraries of Research Institutes in south-western Nigeria. The study adopted the survey research design, due to its extensive nature. The study population ...

  3. Parameters of nutrition in school girls in southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Fifteen secondary schools from the five local governments in Ibadan, Oyo State in south-western Nigeria. Subjects: One thousand six hundred and seventy five apparently healthy female students aged between nine and twenty three years. Results: One thousand six hundred and seventy three questionnaires were ...

  4. Motor Park Discourse in South-Western Nigeria: Relations among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines Motor Park Discourse in South-Western Nigeria with a view to presenting a cross-cultural and cross-linguistic perspective on the interrelations existing among the concepts of discourse, (group) ideology, and social identity as key interfaces of language practices. The aim is to isolate some of the ...

  5. Listenership of Radio Agricultural Broadcasts in Southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Adekoya Adegbenga; Olabode, Badiru Idris

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural broadcasts on radio play a major role in agricultural extension and rural development in Nigeria due to the low ratio of extension agents in relation to the farming population. The broadcasts have been on air for some time and therefore there is a need to investigate their acceptance among the rural dwellers in Southwestern Nigeria.…

  6. A review of maternal mortality at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective review of hospital maternal deaths at Jimma Hospital, Southwestern Ethiopia, covering the period from September 1990 to May 1999 was conducted with the objectives of determining the overall maternal mortality rate, observing trend of maternal mortality during the period, and identifying major causes of ...

  7. 78 FR 64494 - Southwestern Power Administration; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southwestern Power Administration; Notice of Filing Take notice that on... Administration Integrated System Rates for the period October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2017. Any person...

  8. Meat Preference and Meat Consumption Pattern of Southwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many factors have been identified as contributory to choices different consumers make in meeting their daily animal protein requirements, especially regarding their meat preference and consumption patterns. This survey was aimed at determining the meat preference and meat consumption pattern of Southwestern Nigeria ...

  9. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in southwestern ponderosa fine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen C. Hart; Paul C. Selmants; Sarah I. Boyle; Steven T. Overby

    2007-01-01

    Ponderosa pine forests of the southwestern United States were historically characterized by relatively open, parklike stands with a bunchgrass-dominated understory. This forest structure was maintained by frequent, low-intensity surface fires. Heavy livestock grazing, fire suppression, and favorable weather conditions following Euro-American settlement in the late 19th...

  10. Morphological pattern of endometrial biopsies in southwestern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endometrium remains the most sensitive indicator of ovarian function and endometrial biopsy is one of the diagnostic procedures in endometrial pathology. The current study was carried out to examine the morphological pattern of endometrial biopsies in Ibadan, South-western Nigeria and compare the results ...

  11. Silvics and silviculture in the southwestern pinyon-juniper woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried

    2004-01-01

    Southwestern pinyon-juniper and juniper woodlands cover large areas of the western United States. The woodlands have been viewed as places of beauty and sources of valuable resource products or as weed-dominated landscapes that hinder the production of forage for livestock. They are special places because of the emotions and controversies that encircle their management...

  12. The southwestern Maine fire area - four years later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne G. Banks; Myron D. Ostrander

    1952-01-01

    In November 1951 the southwestern Maine area that burned in 1947 was re-studied to find out how the 130,000-acre forest fire affected the local economy, and to find out how well the forest land is being re-stocked.

  13. Estimation of the lion ( Panthera leo ) population in the southwestern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A previous estimate of the lion (Panthera leo) population in the southwestern Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park (KTP) was made over 20 years ago. This together with increased fears regarding the viability of the population as a result of recent killings of roaming animals, an observed increase in non-violent mortalities during ...

  14. Hydrology of southwestern encinal oak ecosystems: A review and more

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried; Peter F. Ffolliott; Daniel G. Neary

    2007-01-01

    Information about the hydrology of oak ecosystems of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico is lacking (Lopes and Ffolliott 1992, Baker et al. 1995) even though the woodlands and savannas cover more than 31,000 square miles. These ecosystems generally are found between 4,000 and 7,300 feet in elevation. Precipitation occurs in the winter and summer and...

  15. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume IV. The environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Many Indian tribes own rich deposits of very valuable energy resources. Existing and proposed uses of these tribal resources range from limited development of small oil and gas fields to large-scale extraction and conversion of coal, uranium, and oil shale. The adverse environmental impacts of such projects may create a conflict between a tribe's environmental policies and its economic, employment, and other long-term goals. The purpose of this volume is to provide tribal decision makers with reference documents on the mechanisms that are available to resolve such conflicts. This report focuses on the role of existing environmental laws in enabling tribes to achieve the needed balance among its objectives. Over a dozen major Federal statutes have been enacted to achieve this purpose. One law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), provides procedures to ensure that environmental factors are included in the Federal decision-making process. Numerous other laws, such as the Clean Air Act, have been enacted to prevent or control any negative environmental impacts of actual projects. This volume documents the key provisions of the laws and regulations, and discusses their effectiveness in meeting total needs. Also, tribal options to strengthen these mechanisms are highlighted. Sections II and III report on the role of NEPA in tribal development decisions. Section IV reviews those laws and regulations that control project operations.

  16. Isoelectric focusing studies in Brazilian Indians--uncovering variation of ORM, AHSG and IF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, F M; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Black, F L; Suzuki, T

    1990-12-01

    Allele frequencies for the orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), orosomucoid 2 (ORM2), alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) and complement component I (IF) loci were studied in 393 individuals of three Brazilian Indian tribes. In the ORM1 locus only two alleles were observed among the Urubu-Kaapor, while five were found among the Pacaás Novos. The frequency of ORM1*1 was similar in these two tribes (0.734 and 0.715, respectively) but departed more markedly among the Parakanã (0.870). Variation for ORM2 locus was found among the Pacaás Novos only, with ORM2*3 being observed in just three individuals. A new variant (AHSG*PN) was found in the AHSG system. Frequency for AHSG*1 was unexpectedly low in the three tribes, especially, among the Pacaás Novos, where the prevalence (0.145) is the lowest considering other data reported thus far. For IF locus, variability was also restricted to only one trible (Urubu-Kaapor) and attributed to a new polymorphic allele, IF* A3.

  17. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Volumes & Issues. Volume 1. Issue 1. Dec 2017. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Current Issue : Vol. 1, Issue 1 · Current Issue Volume 1 | Issue 1. December 2017. Home; Volumes & Issues ...

  18. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series; Search. Search. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Title. Author. Keywords. Fulltext. Submit. Indian Academy of Sciences Conference Series. Current Issue : Vol. 1, Issue 1. Current Issue Volume 1 | Issue 1. December 2017. Home; Volumes & ...

  19. New recombinant HLA-B alleles in a tribe of South American Amerindians indicate rapid evolution of MHC class I loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, D I; McAdam, S N; Liu, X; Strang, C R; Milford, E L; Levine, C G; Garber, T L; Dogon, A L; Lord, C I; Ghim, S H

    1992-05-28

    Evidence suggests that the New World was colonized only 11,000-40,000 years ago by Palaeo-Indians. The descendants of these Palaeo-Indians therefore provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of selection on major histocompatibility complex class I genes over a short period. Here we analyse the class I alleles of the Waorani of South America and the Zuni of North America. Four of the Waorani HLA-B alleles were new functional variants which could be accounted for by intralocus recombination. In contrast, all of the Zuni HLA-A and -B molecules were present in caucasians and orientals. This suggests that the new Waorani HLA-B variants arose in South America. The description of four new HLA-B alleles in the Waorani and another five new HLA-B alleles from two other tribes of South American Amerindians indicates that the HLA-B locus can evolve rapidly in isolated populations. These studies underline the importance of gathering genetic data on endangered native human populations.

  20. "A Tribe Apart": Sexuality and Cancer in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moules, Nancy J; Estefan, Andrew; Laing, Catherine M; Schulte, Fiona; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Field, James C; Strother, Douglas

    This qualitative study employed hermeneutic phenomenology and narrative inquiry to examine the topic of sexuality and adolescents with cancer from the perspectives of survivors who had experienced cancer as adolescents. This investigation examined the potentially sensitive, disquieting, and often taboo issue of sexuality in the interest of optimizing wellness in young people, and, ultimately, in the health of adults. Understanding the adolescent body as a sensitive, sexual, and developing self can enrich our understanding of adolescent cancer and promote best health care and practices, examining ways that we might mitigate the long-term effects of arrested or delayed development of sexual identity. In this article, we discuss phase 1 of the study, which used hermeneutics as the method of inquiry. Findings included a general experience of adolescents having a sense of "losing themselves" while at the same time finding themselves in a new light. Other findings include the connection between sexuality, self, and identity; the unique "tribe" of adolescents with cancer; the necessity for sexuality to take a backseat to cancer; the changing mirror images from self and others; sexuality and fertility; and, ultimately, that sexuality is a relational experience.

  1. Snohomish RARE project update for Tulalip Tribes | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 due to anthropogenic emissions alters local atmospheric gas exchange rates in estuaries, causing alterations of the seawater carbonate system and reductions in pH broadly described as coastal acidification. These changes in marine chemistry have been demonstrated to negatively affect a variety of coastal and estuarine organisms. The naturally dynamic carbonate chemistry of estuaries driven by biological activity, hydrodynamic processes, and intensive biogeochemical cycling has led to uncertainty regarding the role of rising atmospheric CO2 as a driver in these systems, and the suggestion that altered atmospheric exchange may be relatively unimportant to estuarine biogeochemistry. In this presentation, we illustrate how rising atmospheric CO2 from 1765 through 2100 interacts with the observed local carbonate chemistry dynamics of a seagrass bed, and calculated how pHT, pCO2, and Ωaragonite respond. This presentation is part of an informal meeting with the Tulalip Tribes of Tulalip, WA to update them on the progress of the ORD/Region 10 RARE project in the Snohomish estuary to study drivers of coastal acidification. Multiple processes, including primary production and respiration, river runoff, cultural eutrophication, oceanic upwelling, and atmospheric exchange contribute to the characteristically dynamic carbonate conditions in these habitats, with potential interactions amongst these processes leading to coastal acidification. As a

  2. An overview of cytogenetics of the tribe Meliponini (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Mara Garcia; Lopes, Denilce Meneses; Campos, L A O

    2017-06-01

    The present study provides a comprehensive review of cytogenetic data on Meliponini and their chromosomal evolution. The compiled data show that only 104 species of stingless bees, representing 32 of the 54 living genera have been studied cytogenetically and that among these species, it is possible to recognize three main groups with n = 9, 15 and 17, respectively. The first group comprises the species of the genus Melipona, whereas karyotypes with n = 15 and n = 17 have been detected in species from different genera. Karyotypes with n = 17 are the most common among the Meliponini studied to date. Cytogenetic information on Meliponini also shows that although chromosome number, in general, is conserved among species of a certain genus, other aspects, such as chromosome morphology, quantity, distribution and composition of heterochromatin, may vary between them. This reinforces the fact that the variations observed in the karyotypes of different Meliponini groups cannot be explained by a single theory or a single type of structural change. In addition, we present a discussion about how these karyotype variations are related to the phylogenetic relationships among the different genera of this tribe.

  3. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... activities on Indian lands. This amendment allows for the extension of the current Tribal-State Class III.... Dated: August 2, 2011. Donald E. Laverdure, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs...

  4. 75 FR 55823 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... approved Tribal-State compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands.... Dated: September 2, 2010. Donald Laverdure, Deputy Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs. BILLING CODE...

  5. 77 FR 43110 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ...-State compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. This..., 2012. Donald E. Laverdure, Acting Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs. BILLING CODE 4310-4N-P ...

  6. 77 FR 45371 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...-State compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. This... 24, 2012. Donald E. Laverdure, Acting Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs. BILLING CODE 4310-4N-P ...

  7. 77 FR 41200 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The Compact between the... provisions of IGRA. Dated: July 6, 2012. Donald E. Laverdure, Acting Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs...

  8. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. This Amendment changes the... benefitting Tribal members. Dated: December 22, 2010. Donald Laverdure, Deputy Assistant Secretary--Indian...

  9. 75 FR 8108 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. On December 17, 2009, the Assistant Secretary--Indian... permitted to be played by the State. Dated: February 4, 2010. Donald Laverdure, Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  10. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... approved Tribal-State compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands.... Dated: September 20, 2012. Donald E. Laverdure, Acting Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs. BILLING CODE...

  11. Gallery | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Home; ·; About; ·; Speakers; ·; Schedule; ·; Gallery · Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences; Info for Participants; ·; Downloads; ·; Contact Us. © 2017 Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru.

  12. Southwestern Power Administration Annual Report 2004-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-01-01

    Confidence Commitment Cooperation These are words that spring to mind regarding Southwestern Power Administration’s performance during fiscal years (FY) 2004-2006 By offering innovative, customer-oriented service, working to improve system reliability and efficiency, and partnering with customers and other Federal power stakeholders, Southwestern has certainly exhibited all three of these qualities during these challenging yet productive years In fact, our cooperative working relationships were critical to our success during the severe and widespread drought conditions which prevailed throughout Southwestern’s marketing area for much of 2005-2006 When we proposed a temporary energy deferral program, our customers came on board by voluntarily taking less Federal hydropower than they were entitled to, enabling us to preserve system storage and fulfill our contract obligations during the crucial summer months of 2006 The U S Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also helped improve our drought situation by allowing Southwestern more operational flexibility on a regional level Despite the challenges this critical drought period presented, Southwestern remained committed to fulfilling our mission and strategic goals From FY 2004 through FY 2006, we marketed and delivered all available Federal hydropower while meeting and even exceeding the reliability standards of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Our Power Operations Training Center in Springfield, Missouri, was cited as an “Example of Excellence” during a NERC readiness audit in October 2006; and as we have every year since NERC began measuring, Southwestern far exceeded the accepted NERC compliance ratings for power system operations reliability Our commitment to excellence and accountability has kept our repayment goals on target as well Revenues were sufficient to repay all annual expenses and the required principal investment in the Federal hydropower facilities Furthermore, the original

  13. Population dynamics of caribou herds in southwestern Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Valkenburg

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The five naturally occurring and one transplanted caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti herd in southwestern Alaska composed about 20% of Alaska's caribou population in 2001. All five of the naturally occurring herds fluctuated considerably in size between the late 1800s and 2001 and for some herds the data provide an indication of long-term periodic (40-50 year fluctuations. At the present time, the Unimak (UCH and Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAP are recovering from population declines, the Northern Alaska Peninsula Herd (NAP appears to be nearing the end of a protracted decline, and the Mulchatna Herd (MCH appears to now be declining after 20 years of rapid growth. The remaining naturally occurring herd (Kilbuck has virtually disappeared. Nutrition had a significant effect on the size of 4-month-old and 10-month-old calves in the NAP and the Nushagak Peninsula Herd (NPCH and probably also on population growth in at least 4 (SAP, NAP, NPCH, and MCH of the six caribou herds in southwestern Alaska. Predation does not appear to be sufficient to keep caribou herds in southwestern Alaska from expanding, probably because rabies is endemic in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and is periodically transferred to wolves (Canis lupus and other canids. However, we found evidence that pneumonia and hoof rot may result in significant mortality of caribou in southwestern Alaska, whereas there is no evidence that disease is important in the dynamics of Interior herds. Cooperative conservation programs, such as the Kilbuck Caribou Management Plan, can be successful in restraining traditional harvest and promoting growth in caribou herds. In southwestern Alaska we also found evidence that small caribou herds can be swamped and assimilated by large herds, and fidelity to traditional calving areas can be lost.

  14. Specific climatic signals recorded in earlywood and latewood δ18O of tree rings in southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenling An

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Earlywood and latewood form during different parts of the growing season and therefore capture climate of distinct time intervals. Here we present a comparison of earlywood and latewood δ18O in tree rings from the Yulong Snowy Mountains of southwestern China, covering the period from 1902 to 2005. Earlywood and latewood δ18O exhibit different long-term behaviour obviously during the past century. Climate–response analysis indicates that the dominant parameters for earlywood δ18O are temperature and relative humidity during the early part of the monsoon season (May to July; however, for latewood, it is the moisture condition (precipitation and relative humidity from August to October. Sea-surface temperatures over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean have imprinted their different influences on the earlywood and latewood δ18O. The δ18O of source water were reconstructed from the earlywood and latewood δ18O. We found that the source of the water synthesised into earlywood was mainly contributed by current precipitation, while for latewood it is more complicated. The signals from the Indian Summer Monsoon and the East Asian Summer Monsoon are temporally superimposed (though differently on the source water of earlywood and latewood, as well as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation events.

  15. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... banking or percentage card games, and any devices or games authorized under State law to the State lottery...

  16. 77 FR 5566 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... devices, any banking or percentage card games, and any devices or games authorized under State law to the...

  17. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the agreement...

  18. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval of the Class...

  19. 78 FR 62650 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the...

  20. 78 FR 78377 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the...

  1. 78 FR 26801 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment...

  2. 78 FR 33435 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendments. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of an Agreement...

  3. 78 FR 17428 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class...

  4. 78 FR 54670 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Extension of the...

  5. 78 FR 11221 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming...

  6. 78 FR 54908 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class...

  7. 78 FR 44146 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Amended...

  8. 78 FR 15738 - Indian Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming...

  9. Indian Ocean Traffic: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Sharon Davidson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Like the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean has been a privileged site of cross-cultural contact since ancient times. In this special issue, our contributors track disparate movements of people and ideas around the Indian Ocean region and explore the cultural implications of these contacts and their role in processes that we would come to call transnationalization and globalisation. The nation is a relatively recent phenomenon anywhere on the globe, and in many countries around the Indian Ocean it was a product of colonisation and independence. So the processes of exchange, migration and cultural influence going on there for many centuries were mostly based on the economics of goods and trade routes, rather than on national identity and state policy.

  10. Recovery of deep-sea meiofauna after artificial disturbance in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Goltekar, N.R.; Gonsalves, S.; Ansari, Z.A.

    is defined as organisms passing through a 500 ? m sieves and retained on 45 ? m sieves. Statistical analysis was performed using the general linear model method of least squares, the T-test and the Mann-Whitney a-parametric test. One-way analysis... and Thiel (1987) and Ingole et al (1992) reported 90% and 70% of metazoan population from 0-2 cm sediment layer, respectively from Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin) and southwestern Indian Ocean (Rodrigues and Saya de Malha Bank). Thus, the physical...

  11. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmendra MEHTA; Naveen K MEHTA; Rajesh Kumar MEHTA

    2014-01-01

    In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them...

  12. A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Moore, Laurie A; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E

    2012-09-01

    Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

  13. Healing pathways: art therapy for American Indian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warson, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    There is a paucity of research addressing quality of life factors for American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors. Complementary forms of therapy, such as art therapy, are beginning to address quality of life factors through the "healing" arts for cancer survivors. The purpose of this mixed methods pilot was to explore the effects of culturally relevant art interventions on stress reduction for American Indian cancer survivors and their family members. Forty-six adult participants attended one of three workshops held within two settlements of the Coharie tribe and one southeastern urban tribal center. The data collected consisted of a pretest and posttest State-Trait Personality Inventory (STPI) and artwork resulting from three directed interventions. The artwork was analyzed using qualitative coding methods; however, the scores from the STPI were inconclusive because the inventory was determined to be culturally biased. While statistical significance was not achieved, the findings from qualitative coding reinforced a native concept of wellness focusing on the complex interaction between mind, body, spirit, and context. This pilot study also demonstrated how a community-driven approach was instrumental in the development of the overall workshop format. An expansion of the pilot study is also presented with preliminary results available in 2012.

  14. TRIBE TRITICEAE L. AND THE BIOCENOTIC MECHANISMS OF ADAPTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z. Moskalets

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cultural species in the process ontogenesis and phylogenesis to favorable and unfavorable environmental conditions produce a number of biological mechanisms (molecular genetic, physiological, biochemical, morphological, biocenotic, plants identification behind them reflects the degree of their ecological of adaptability, plasticity and stability. Studying the and comparison of morphological parameters and relations with consort-species and representatives of tribe Triticeae allowed to find out what plants differently realize their life potential. Which are based on structural and functional features biocenotic mechanisms that manifested in adaptive properties. On example cultural cereal species shows that the basic mechanisms of adaptability are: mechanisms of functional sustainability, morphological tolerance and ontogenetic avoidance. The first group is associated with functional parameters forming and manifestation life potential of plants (accumulation protein, accumulation gluten, duration assimilatory ability flag leaf; erection leaves the upper tier; depth of node tillering; strength of the stem, ie the, low penchant to lodging; total tillering plants; synchronicity growth of main stem; the intensity fading ear after full ripeness. The second group includes mechanisms of morphological tolerance (hairiness of leaves, stems; wax-colored bloom; plaza of leaf; type of bush; density head; beardedness; glossy coating of leaf, culm; glaucous color of leaf, culm; placing spicate of scales near granule; plant height. To mechanisms of ontogenetic avoidance relating such as mismatch of pathogen, phytophage and plant; photoperiodic sensitivity; duration interphase periods in particular florification, ripening; duration of vegetation period; duration of primary dormancy (latent period; multivariation of synontоgenesis; photoperiodic sensitivity. Knowing the biocenotic mechanisms formation of adaptability cultural species discloses up new

  15. Genetic uniqueness of the Waorani tribe from the Ecuadorian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, S; Alfonso-Sánchez, M A; Valverde, L; Sánchez, D; Zarrabeitia, M T; Odriozola, A; Martínez-Jarreta, B; de Pancorbo, M M

    2012-06-01

    South America and especially the Amazon basin is known to be home to some of the most isolated human groups in the world. Here, we report on a study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the Waorani from Ecuador, probably the most warlike human population known to date. Seeking to look in more depth at the characterization of the genetic diversity of this Native American tribe, molecular markers from the X and Y chromosomes were also analyzed. Only three different mtDNA haplotypes were detected among the Waorani sample. One of them, assigned to Native American haplogroup A2, accounted for more than 94% of the total diversity of the maternal gene pool. Our results for sex chromosome molecular markers failed to find close genetic kinship between individuals, further emphasizing the low genetic diversity of the mtDNA. Bearing in mind the results obtained for both the analysis of the mtDNA control region and complete mitochondrial genomes, we suggest the existence of a 'Waorani-specific' mtDNA lineage. According to current knowledge on the phylogeny of haplogroup A2, we propose that this lineage could be designated as subhaplogroup A2s. Its wide predominance among the Waorani people might have been conditioned by severe genetic drift episodes resulting from founding events, long-term isolation and a traditionally small population size most likely associated with the striking ethnography of this Amazonian community. In all, the Waorani constitute a fine example of how genetic imprint may mirror ethnopsychology and sociocultural features in human populations.

  16. Indian Siddis: African descendants with Indian admixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anish M; Tamang, Rakesh; Moorjani, Priya; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Kulkarni, Gururaj; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Mustak, Mohammed S; Bhaskar, L V K S; Reddy, Alla G; Gadhvi, Dharmendra; Gai, Pramod B; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2011-07-15

    The Siddis (Afro-Indians) are a tribal population whose members live in coastal Karnataka, Gujarat, and in some parts of Andhra Pradesh. Historical records indicate that the Portuguese brought the Siddis to India from Africa about 300-500 years ago; however, there is little information about their more precise ancestral origins. Here, we perform a genome-wide survey to understand the population history of the Siddis. Using hundreds of thousands of autosomal markers, we show that they have inherited ancestry from Africans, Indians, and possibly Europeans (Portuguese). Additionally, analyses of the uniparental (Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA) markers indicate that the Siddis trace their ancestry to Bantu speakers from sub-Saharan Africa. We estimate that the admixture between the African ancestors of the Siddis and neighboring South Asian groups probably occurred in the past eight generations (∼200 years ago), consistent with historical records. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A. [Coeur d' Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Program

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic

  18. EyeTribe Tracker Data Accuracy Evaluation and Its Interconnection with Hypothesis Software for Cartographic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Popelka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed research design is a progressive methodological discourse that combines the advantages of quantitative and qualitative methods. Its possibilities of application are, however, dependent on the efficiency with which the particular research techniques are used and combined. The aim of the paper is to introduce the possible combination of Hypothesis with EyeTribe tracker. The Hypothesis is intended for quantitative data acquisition and the EyeTribe is intended for qualitative (eye-tracking data recording. In the first part of the paper, Hypothesis software is described. The Hypothesis platform provides an environment for web-based computerized experiment design and mass data collection. Then, evaluation of the accuracy of data recorded by EyeTribe tracker was performed with the use of concurrent recording together with the SMI RED 250 eye-tracker. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that data accuracy is sufficient for cartographic research. In the third part of the paper, a system for connecting EyeTribe tracker and Hypothesis software is presented. The interconnection was performed with the help of developed web application HypOgama. The created system uses open-source software OGAMA for recording the eye-movements of participants together with quantitative data from Hypothesis. The final part of the paper describes the integrated research system combining Hypothesis and EyeTribe.

  19. EyeTribe Tracker Data Accuracy Evaluation and Its Interconnection with Hypothesis Software for Cartographic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelka, Stanislav; Stachoň, Zdeněk; Šašinka, Čeněk; Doležalová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    The mixed research design is a progressive methodological discourse that combines the advantages of quantitative and qualitative methods. Its possibilities of application are, however, dependent on the efficiency with which the particular research techniques are used and combined. The aim of the paper is to introduce the possible combination of Hypothesis with EyeTribe tracker. The Hypothesis is intended for quantitative data acquisition and the EyeTribe is intended for qualitative (eye-tracking) data recording. In the first part of the paper, Hypothesis software is described. The Hypothesis platform provides an environment for web-based computerized experiment design and mass data collection. Then, evaluation of the accuracy of data recorded by EyeTribe tracker was performed with the use of concurrent recording together with the SMI RED 250 eye-tracker. Both qualitative and quantitative results showed that data accuracy is sufficient for cartographic research. In the third part of the paper, a system for connecting EyeTribe tracker and Hypothesis software is presented. The interconnection was performed with the help of developed web application HypOgama. The created system uses open-source software OGAMA for recording the eye-movements of participants together with quantitative data from Hypothesis. The final part of the paper describes the integrated research system combining Hypothesis and EyeTribe.

  20. The I-Tribe Community Pharmacy Practice Model: professional pharmacy unshackled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Greg L; Waitzman, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    To describe a mechanism by which pharmacists could create a disruptive innovation to provide professional primary care services via a Web-based delivery model. Several obstacles have prevented pharmacists from using available technology to develop business models that capitalize on their clinical skills in primary care. Community practice has experienced multiple sustaining innovations that have improved dispensing productivity but have not stimulated sufficient demand for pharmacy services to disrupt the marketplace and provide new opportunities for pharmacists. Pharmacists are in a unique position to bridge the gap between demand for basic primary medical care and access to a competent medical professional. Building on the historic strengths of community pharmacy practice, modern pharmacists could provide a disruptive innovation in the marketplace for primary care by taking advantage of new technology and implementing the I-Tribe Community Pharmacy Practice Model (I-Tribe). This model would directly connect pharmacists to patients through an interactive, secure Web presence that would liberate the relationship from geographic restrictions. The I-Tribe is a disruptive innovation that could become the foundation for a vibrant market in pharmacist professional service offerings. The I-Tribe model could benefit society by expanding access to primary medical care while simultaneously providing a new source of revenue for community practice pharmacists. Entrepreneurial innovation through I-Tribe pharmacy would free pharmacists to become the care providers envisioned by the profession's thought leaders.