WorldWideScience

Sample records for southern ocean iron

  1. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the

  2. Organic complexation of iron in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boye, Marie; Berg, Constant M.G. van den; Jong, Jeroen T.M. de; Leach, Harry; Croot, Peter; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2001-01-01

    The chemical speciation of iron was determined in the Southern Ocean along a transect from 48 to 70°S at 20°E. Dissolved iron concentrations were low at 0.1–0.6 nM, with average concentrations of 0.25±0.13 nM. Organic iron complexing ligands were found to occur in excess of the dissolved iron

  3. Iron from melting glaciers fuels the phytoplankton blooms in Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean) : Iron biogeochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Laan, Patrick; Thuroczy, Charles-Edouard; De Baar, Hein J. W.; Mills, Matthew M.; van Dijken, Gert L.; van Haren, Hans; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved iron (DFe) and total dissolvable Fe (TDFe) were measured in January-February 2009 in Pine Island Bay, as well as in the Pine Island and Amundsen polynyas (Amundsen Sea, Southern Ocean). Iron (Fe) has been shown to be a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton growth, even in the productive

  4. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, C.S.; Schoemann, V.; Nichols, C.M.; Butler, E.C.V.; Boyd, P.W.; Nichols, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron

  5. Surface water iron supplies in the Southern Ocean sustained by deep winter mixing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tagliabue, A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of iron limit primary productivity across much of the Southern Ocean. At the basin scale, most dissolved iron is supplied to surfacewaters from subsurface reservoirs, because land inputs are spatially limited. Deep mixing in winter...

  6. Major deviations of iron complexation during 22 days of a mesoscale iron enrichment in the open Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boye, Marie; Nishioka, Jun; Croot, Peter L.; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2005-01-01

    The speciation of strongly chelated iron during the 22-day course of an iron enrichment experiment in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean deviates strongly from ambient natural waters. Three iron additions (ferrous sulfate solution) were conducted, resulting in elevated dissolved iron

  7. The effects of iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesseler, Ken O; Andrews, John E; Pike, Steven M; Charette, Matthew A

    2004-04-16

    An unresolved issue in ocean and climate sciences is whether changes to the surface ocean input of the micronutrient iron can alter the flux of carbon to the deep ocean. During the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment, we measured an increase in the flux of particulate carbon from the surface mixed layer, as well as changes in particle cycling below the iron-fertilized patch. The flux of carbon was similar in magnitude to that of natural blooms in the Southern Ocean and thus small relative to global carbon budgets and proposed geoengineering plans to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide in the deep sea.

  8. Response of bacterioplankton to iron fertilization of the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Kotakonda, Arunasri; Kapardar, Raj K.; Kankipati, Hara Kishore; Sreenivasa Rao, Pasupuleti; Sankaranarayanan, Pratibha Mambatta; Vetaikorumagan, Sundareswaran R.; Gundlapally, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Nagappa, Ramaiah; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2015-01-01

    Ocean iron fertilization is an approach to increase CO2 sequestration. The Indo-German iron fertilization experiment “LOHAFEX” was carried out in the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica in 2009 to monitor changes in bacterial community structure following iron fertilization-induced phytoplankton bloom of the seawater from different depths. 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed using metagenomic DNA from seawater prior to and after iron fertilization and the clones were sequenced for iden...

  9. Response of bacterioplankton to iron fertilization of the Southern Ocean, Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, S.K.; Kotakonda, A.; Kapardar, R.K.; Kankipati, H.K.; Rao, P.S.; Sankaranarayanan, P.M.; Vetaikorumagan, S.R.; Gundlapally, S.R.; Ramaiah, N.; Shivaji, S.

    Ocean iron fertilization is an approach to increase CO2 sequestration. The Indo-German iron fertilization experiment “LOHAFEX” was carried out in the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica in 2009 to monitor changes in bacterial community...

  10. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Trish J; Roudnew, Ben; Gill, Peter; Seymour, Justin; Seuront, Laurent; Johnson, Genevieve; Mitchell, James G; Smetacek, Victor

    2010-11-22

    The iron-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in regulating atmospheric CO(2) levels. Marine mammal respiration has been proposed to decrease the efficiency of the Southern Ocean biological pump by returning photosynthetically fixed carbon to the atmosphere. Here, we show that by consuming prey at depth and defecating iron-rich liquid faeces into the photic zone, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) instead stimulate new primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean. We estimate that Southern Ocean sperm whales defecate 50 tonnes of iron into the photic zone each year. Molar ratios of C(export):Fe(added) determined during natural ocean fertilization events are used to estimate the amount of carbon exported to the deep ocean in response to the iron defecated by sperm whales. We find that Southern Ocean sperm whales stimulate the export of 4 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year to the deep ocean and respire only 2 × 10(5) tonnes of carbon per year. By enhancing new primary production, the populations of 12 000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean act as a carbon sink, removing 2 × 10(5) tonnes more carbon from the atmosphere than they add during respiration. The ability of the Southern Ocean to act as a carbon sink may have been diminished by large-scale removal of sperm whales during industrial whaling.

  11. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Trish J.; Roudnew, Ben; Gill, Peter; Seymour, Justin; Seuront, Laurent; Johnson, Genevieve; Mitchell, James G.; Smetacek, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The iron-limited Southern Ocean plays an important role in regulating atmospheric CO2 levels. Marine mammal respiration has been proposed to decrease the efficiency of the Southern Ocean biological pump by returning photosynthetically fixed carbon to the atmosphere. Here, we show that by consuming prey at depth and defecating iron-rich liquid faeces into the photic zone, sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) instead stimulate new primary production and carbon export to the deep ocean. We estimate that Southern Ocean sperm whales defecate 50 tonnes of iron into the photic zone each year. Molar ratios of Cexport ∶Feadded determined during natural ocean fertilization events are used to estimate the amount of carbon exported to the deep ocean in response to the iron defecated by sperm whales. We find that Southern Ocean sperm whales stimulate the export of 4 × 105 tonnes of carbon per year to the deep ocean and respire only 2 × 105 tonnes of carbon per year. By enhancing new primary production, the populations of 12 000 sperm whales in the Southern Ocean act as a carbon sink, removing 2 × 105 tonnes more carbon from the atmosphere than they add during respiration. The ability of the Southern Ocean to act as a carbon sink may have been diminished by large-scale removal of sperm whales during industrial whaling. PMID:20554546

  12. Changes in the concentration of iron in different size fractions during an iron enrichment experiment in the open Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishioka, Jun; Takeda, Shigenobu; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Croot, Peter L.; Boye, Marie; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.

    2005-01-01

    An in situ iron enrichment experiment was carried out in the Southern Ocean Polar Frontal Zone and fertilized a patch of water within an eddy of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (EisenEx, Nov. 2000). During the experiment, a physical speciation technique was used for iron analysis in order to

  13. How deep is deep enough? Ocean iron fertilization and carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Popova, E. E.; Yool, A.; Srokosz, M.; Lampitt, R. S.; Blundell, J. R.

    2014-04-01

    Artificial ocean iron fertilization (OIF) enhances phytoplankton productivity and is being explored as a means of sequestering anthropogenic carbon within the deep ocean. To be considered successful, carbon should be exported from the surface ocean and isolated from the atmosphere for an extended period (e.g., the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's standard 100 year time horizon). This study assesses the impact of deep circulation on carbon sequestered by OIF in the Southern Ocean, a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll region known to be iron stressed. A Lagrangian particle-tracking approach is employed to analyze water mass trajectories over a 100 year simulation. By the end of the experiment, for a sequestration depth of 1000 m, 66% of the carbon had been reexposed to the atmosphere, taking an average of 37.8 years. Upwelling occurs predominately within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current due to Ekman suction and topography. These results emphasize that successful OIF is dependent on the physical circulation, as well as the biogeochemistry.

  14. The influence of UV irradiation on the photoreduction of iron in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, M J A; Fischer, AC; Kroon, JJ; Gerringa, LJA; Timmermans, KR; Wolterbeek, HT; de Baar, H J W

    2005-01-01

    An iron enrichment experiment, EisenEx, was performed in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during the Antarctic spring of 2000. Deck incubations of open ocean water were performed to investigate the influence of ultraviolet B (UVB: 280-315 nm) and ultraviolet A (UVA: 315-400 nm) on the

  15. Bioavailable iron in the Southern Ocean: the significance of the iceberg conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Tranter, Martyn; Tulaczyk, Slawek

    2008-05-30

    Productivity in the Southern Oceans is iron-limited, and the supply of iron dissolved from aeolian dust is believed to be the main source from outside the marine reservoir. Glacial sediment sources of iron have rarely been considered, as the iron has been assumed to be inert and non-bioavailable. This study demonstrates the presence of potentially bioavailable Fe as ferrihydrite and goethite in nanoparticulate clusters, in sediments collected from icebergs in the Southern Ocean and glaciers on the Antarctic landmass. Nanoparticles in ice can be transported by icebergs away from coastal regions in the Southern Ocean, enabling melting to release bioavailable Fe to the open ocean. The abundance of nanoparticulate iron has been measured by an ascorbate extraction. This data indicates that the fluxes of bioavailable iron supplied to the Southern Ocean from aeolian dust (0.01-0.13 Tg yr(-1)) and icebergs (0.06-0.12 Tg yr(-1)) are comparable. Increases in iceberg production thus have the capacity to increase productivity and this newly identified negative feedback may help to mitigate fossil fuel emissions.

  16. An iron budget during the natural iron fertilisation experiment KEOPS (Kerguelen Islands, Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chever

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Total dissolvable iron (TDFe was measured in the water column above and in the surrounding of the Kerguelen Plateau (Indian sector of the Southern Ocean during the KErguelen Ocean Plateau compared Study (KEOPS cruise. TDFe concentrations ranged from 0.90 to 65.6 nmol L−1 above the plateau and from 0.34 to 2.23 nmol L−1 offshore of the plateau. Station C1 located south of the plateau, near Heard Island, exhibited very high values (329–770 nmol L−1. Apparent particulate iron (Feapp, calculated as the difference between the TDFe and the dissolved iron measured on board (DFe represented 95±5% of the TDFe above the plateau, suggesting that particles and refractory colloids largely dominated the iron pool. This paper presents a budget of DFe and Feapp above the plateau. Lateral advection of water that had been in contact with the continental shelf of Heard Island seems to be the predominant source of Feapp and DFe above the plateau, with a supply of 9.7±3.6×106 and 8.3±11.6×103 mol d−1, respectively. The residence times of 1.7 and 48 days estimated for Feapp and DFe respectively, indicate a rapid turnover in the surface water. A comparison between Feapp and total particulate iron (TPFe suggests that the total dissolved fraction is mainly constituted of small refractory colloids. This fraction does not seem to be a potential source of iron to the phytoplankton in our study. Finally, when taking into account the lateral supply of dissolved iron, the seasonal carbon sequestration efficiency was estimated at 154 000 mol C (mol Fe−1, which is 4-fold lower than the previously estimated value in this area but still 18-fold higher than the one estimated during the other study of a natural iron fertilisation experiment, CROZEX.

  17. Southern Ocean deep-water carbon export enhanced by natural iron fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Raymond T; Salter, Ian; Sanders, Richard J; Lucas, Mike I; Moore, C Mark; Mills, Rachel A; Statham, Peter J; Allen, John T; Baker, Alex R; Bakker, Dorothee C E; Charette, Matthew A; Fielding, Sophie; Fones, Gary R; French, Megan; Hickman, Anna E; Holland, Ross J; Hughes, J Alan; Jickells, Timothy D; Lampitt, Richard S; Morris, Paul J; Nédélec, Florence H; Nielsdóttir, Maria; Planquette, Hélène; Popova, Ekaterina E; Poulton, Alex J; Read, Jane F; Seeyave, Sophie; Smith, Tania; Stinchcombe, Mark; Taylor, Sarah; Thomalla, Sandy; Venables, Hugh J; Williamson, Robert; Zubkov, Mike V

    2009-01-29

    The addition of iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions induces phytoplankton blooms that take up carbon. Carbon export from the surface layer and, in particular, the ability of the ocean and sediments to sequester carbon for many years remains, however, poorly quantified. Here we report data from the CROZEX experiment in the Southern Ocean, which was conducted to test the hypothesis that the observed north-south gradient in phytoplankton concentrations in the vicinity of the Crozet Islands is induced by natural iron fertilization that results in enhanced organic carbon flux to the deep ocean. We report annual particulate carbon fluxes out of the surface layer, at three kilometres below the ocean surface and to the ocean floor. We find that carbon fluxes from a highly productive, naturally iron-fertilized region of the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean are two to three times larger than the carbon fluxes from an adjacent high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll area not fertilized by iron. Our findings support the hypothesis that increased iron supply to the glacial sub-Antarctic may have directly enhanced carbon export to the deep ocean. The CROZEX sequestration efficiency (the amount of carbon sequestered below the depth of winter mixing for a given iron supply) of 8,600 mol mol(-1) was 18 times greater than that of a phytoplankton bloom induced artificially by adding iron, but 77 times smaller than that of another bloom initiated, like CROZEX, by a natural supply of iron. Large losses of purposefully added iron can explain the lower efficiency of the induced bloom(6). The discrepancy between the blooms naturally supplied with iron may result in part from an underestimate of horizontal iron supply.

  18. Photosynthetic Maximum Quantum Yield Increases Are an Essential Component of the Southern Ocean Phytoplankton Response to Iron

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael R. Hiscock; Veronica P. Lance; Amy M. Apprill; Robert R. Bidigare; Zackary I. Johnson; B. Greg Mitchell; Walker O. Smith; Richard T. Barber

    2008-01-01

    ... has not been clearly identified. The Southern Ocean iron enrichment experiment, an iron fertilization experiment in the waters closest to Antarctica, resulted in a 9-fold increase in chlorophyll (Chl...

  19. Response of bacterioplankton to iron fertilization of the Southern Ocean, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay K; Kotakonda, Arunasri; Kapardar, Raj K; Kankipati, Hara Kishore; Sreenivasa Rao, Pasupuleti; Sankaranarayanan, Pratibha Mambatta; Vetaikorumagan, Sundareswaran R; Gundlapally, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Nagappa, Ramaiah; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2015-01-01

    Ocean iron fertilization is an approach to increase CO2 sequestration. The Indo-German iron fertilization experiment "LOHAFEX" was carried out in the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica in 2009 to monitor changes in bacterial community structure following iron fertilization-induced phytoplankton bloom of the seawater from different depths. 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed using metagenomic DNA from seawater prior to and after iron fertilization and the clones were sequenced for identification of the major bacterial groups present and for phylogenetic analyses. A total of 4439 clones of 16S rRNA genes from ten 16S rRNA gene libraries were sequenced. More than 97.35% of the sequences represented four bacterial lineages i.e. Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes and confirmed their role in scavenging of phytoplankton blooms induced following iron fertilization. The present study demonstrates the response of Firmicutes due to Iron fertilization which was not observed in previous southern ocean Iron fertilization studies. In addition, this study identifies three unique phylogenetic clusters LOHAFEX Cluster 1 (affiliated to Bacteroidetes), 2, and 3 (affiliated to Firmicutes) which were not detected in any of the earlier studies on iron fertilization. The relative abundance of these clusters in response to iron fertilization was different. The increase in abundance of LOHAFEX Cluster 2 and Papillibacter sp. another dominant Firmicutes may imply a role in phytoplankton degradation. Disappearance of LOHAFEX Cluster 3 and other bacterial genera after iron fertilization may imply conditions not conducive for their survival. It is hypothesized that heterotrophic bacterial abundance in the Southern Ocean would depend on their ability to utilize algal exudates, decaying algal biomass and other nutrients thus resulting in a dynamic bacterial succession of distinct genera.

  20. A mesoscale phytoplankton bloom in the polar Southern Ocean stimulated by iron fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, P W; Watson, A J; Law, C S; Abraham, E R; Trull, T; Murdoch, R; Bakker, D C; Bowie, A R; Buesseler, K O; Chang, H; Charette, M; Croot, P; Downing, K; Frew, R; Gall, M; Hadfield, M; Hall, J; Harvey, M; Jameson, G; LaRoche, J; Liddicoat, M; Ling, R; Maldonado, M T; McKay, R M; Nodder, S; Pickmere, S; Pridmore, R; Rintoul, S; Safi, K; Sutton, P; Strzepek, R; Tanneberger, K; Turner, S; Waite, A; Zeldis, J

    2000-10-12

    Changes in iron supply to oceanic plankton are thought to have a significant effect on concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide by altering rates of carbon sequestration, a theory known as the 'iron hypothesis'. For this reason, it is important to understand the response of pelagic biota to increased iron supply. Here we report the results of a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the polar Southern Ocean, where the potential to sequester iron-elevated algal carbon is probably greatest. Increased iron supply led to elevated phytoplankton biomass and rates of photosynthesis in surface waters, causing a large drawdown of carbon dioxide and macronutrients, and elevated dimethyl sulphide levels after 13 days. This drawdown was mostly due to the proliferation of diatom stocks. But downward export of biogenic carbon was not increased. Moreover, satellite observations of this massive bloom 30 days later, suggest that a sufficient proportion of the added iron was retained in surface waters. Our findings demonstrate that iron supply controls phytoplankton growth and community composition during summer in these polar Southern Ocean waters, but the fate of algal carbon remains unknown and depends on the interplay between the processes controlling export, remineralisation and timescales of water mass subduction.

  1. Iron limitation modulates ocean acidification effects on southern ocean phytoplankton communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Clara J M; Hassler, Christel S; Payne, Christopher D; Tortell, Philippe D; Rost, Björn; Trimborn, Scarlett

    2013-01-01

    The potential interactive effects of iron (Fe) limitation and Ocean Acidification in the Southern Ocean (SO) are largely unknown. Here we present results of a long-term incubation experiment investigating the combined effects of CO2 and Fe availability on natural phytoplankton assemblages from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Active Chl a fluorescence measurements revealed that we successfully cultured phytoplankton under both Fe-depleted and Fe-enriched conditions. Fe treatments had significant effects on photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm; 0.3 for Fe-depleted and 0.5 for Fe-enriched conditions), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), and relative electron transport rates (rETR). pCO2 treatments significantly affected NPQ and rETR, but had no effect on Fv/Fm. Under Fe limitation, increased pCO2 had no influence on C fixation whereas under Fe enrichment, primary production increased with increasing pCO2 levels. These CO2-dependent changes in productivity under Fe-enriched conditions were accompanied by a pronounced taxonomic shift from weakly to heavily silicified diatoms (i.e. from Pseudo-nitzschia sp. to Fragilariopsis sp.). Under Fe-depleted conditions, this functional shift was absent and thinly silicified species dominated all pCO2 treatments (Pseudo-nitzschia sp. and Synedropsis sp. for low and high pCO2, respectively). Our results suggest that Ocean Acidification could increase primary productivity and the abundance of heavily silicified, fast sinking diatoms in Fe-enriched areas, both potentially leading to a stimulation of the biological pump. Over much of the SO, however, Fe limitation could restrict this possible CO2 fertilization effect.

  2. Iron Limitation Modulates Ocean Acidification Effects on Southern Ocean Phytoplankton Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Clara J. M.; Hassler, Christel S.; Payne, Christopher D.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Rost, Björn; Trimborn, Scarlett

    2013-01-01

    The potential interactive effects of iron (Fe) limitation and Ocean Acidification in the Southern Ocean (SO) are largely unknown. Here we present results of a long-term incubation experiment investigating the combined effects of CO2 and Fe availability on natural phytoplankton assemblages from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Active Chl a fluorescence measurements revealed that we successfully cultured phytoplankton under both Fe-depleted and Fe-enriched conditions. Fe treatments had significant effects on photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm; 0.3 for Fe-depleted and 0.5 for Fe-enriched conditions), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), and relative electron transport rates (rETR). pCO2 treatments significantly affected NPQ and rETR, but had no effect on Fv/Fm. Under Fe limitation, increased pCO2 had no influence on C fixation whereas under Fe enrichment, primary production increased with increasing pCO2 levels. These CO2-dependent changes in productivity under Fe-enriched conditions were accompanied by a pronounced taxonomic shift from weakly to heavily silicified diatoms (i.e. from Pseudo-nitzschia sp. to Fragilariopsis sp.). Under Fe-depleted conditions, this functional shift was absent and thinly silicified species dominated all pCO2 treatments (Pseudo-nitzschia sp. and Synedropsis sp. for low and high pCO2, respectively). Our results suggest that Ocean Acidification could increase primary productivity and the abundance of heavily silicified, fast sinking diatoms in Fe-enriched areas, both potentially leading to a stimulation of the biological pump. Over much of the SO, however, Fe limitation could restrict this possible CO2 fertilization effect. PMID:24278207

  3. Side effects and accounting aspects of hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean iron fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oschlies

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent suggestions to slow down the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide have included ocean fertilization by addition of the micronutrient iron to Southern Ocean surface waters, where a number of natural and artificial iron fertilization experiments have shown that low ambient iron concentrations limit phytoplankton growth. Using a coupled carbon-climate model with the marine biology's response to iron addition calibrated against data from natural iron fertilization experiments, we examine biogeochemical side effects of a hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean Iron Fertilization (OIF that need to be considered when attempting to account for possible OIF-induced carbon offsets. In agreement with earlier studies our model simulates an OIF-induced increase in local air-sea CO2 fluxes by about 73 GtC over a 100-year period, which amounts to about 48% of the OIF-induced increase in organic carbon export out of the fertilized area. Offsetting CO2 return fluxes outside the region and after stopping the fertilization at 1, 7, 10, 50, and 100 years are quantified for a typical accounting period of 100 years. For continuous Southern Ocean iron fertilization, the CO2 return flux outside the fertilized area cancels about 20% of the fertilization-induced CO2 air-sea flux within the fertilized area on a 100-yr timescale. This "leakage" effect has a radiative impact more than twice as large as the simulated enhancement of marine N2O emissions. Other side effects not yet discussed in terms of accounting schemes include a decrease in Southern Ocean oxygen levels and a simultaneous shrinking of tropical suboxic areas, and accelerated ocean acidification in the entire water column in the Southern Ocean at the expense of reduced globally-averaged surface-water acidification. A prudent approach to account for the OIF-induced carbon sequestration would account for global air-sea CO2 fluxes rather

  4. Side effects and accounting aspects of hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean iron fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschlies, A.; Koeve, W.; Rickels, W.; Rehdanz, K.

    2010-12-01

    Recent suggestions to slow down the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide have included ocean fertilization by addition of the micronutrient iron to Southern Ocean surface waters, where a number of natural and artificial iron fertilization experiments have shown that low ambient iron concentrations limit phytoplankton growth. Using a coupled carbon-climate model with the marine biology's response to iron addition calibrated against data from natural iron fertilization experiments, we examine biogeochemical side effects of a hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean Iron Fertilization (OIF) that need to be considered when attempting to account for possible OIF-induced carbon offsets. In agreement with earlier studies our model simulates an OIF-induced increase in local air-sea CO2 fluxes by about 73 GtC over a 100-year period, which amounts to about 48% of the OIF-induced increase in organic carbon export out of the fertilized area. Offsetting CO2 return fluxes outside the region and after stopping the fertilization at 1, 7, 10, 50, and 100 years are quantified for a typical accounting period of 100 years. For continuous Southern Ocean iron fertilization, the CO2 return flux outside the fertilized area cancels about 20% of the fertilization-induced CO2 air-sea flux within the fertilized area on a 100-yr timescale. This "leakage" effect has a radiative impact more than twice as large as the simulated enhancement of marine N2O emissions. Other side effects not yet discussed in terms of accounting schemes include a decrease in Southern Ocean oxygen levels and a simultaneous shrinking of tropical suboxic areas, and accelerated ocean acidification in the entire water column in the Southern Ocean at the expense of reduced globally-averaged surface-water acidification. A prudent approach to account for the OIF-induced carbon sequestration would account for global air-sea CO2 fluxes rather than for local fluxes into the fertilized area only. However, according to our model

  5. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-26

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization--an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below--as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios--may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

  6. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-01

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization-an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below-as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios-may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

  7. Dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean (Atlantic sector)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Laan, P.; Middag, R.; De Baar, H. J. W.; van Ooijen, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive dataset of dissolved iron (Fe) comprising 482 values at 22 complete vertical profiles along a 1 degrees latitudinal section at the Zero meridian. In addition a shorter high resolution (similar to 00 degrees 09') surface section of the southernmost part of the transect (66

  8. Volcanism, Iron, and Phytoplankton in the Heard and McDonald Islands Region, Southern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, M. F.; Arculus, R. J.; Bowie, A. R.; Chase, Z.; Robertson, R.; Trull, T. W.; Heobi in2016 v01 Shipboard Party, T.

    2016-12-01

    Phytoplankton supply approximately half of the oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, and iron supply limits the growth of phytoplankton in the anemic Southern Ocean. Situated entirely within the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean are Australia's only active subaerial volcanoes, Heard and McDonald islands (HIMI) on the central Kerguelen Plateau, a large igneous province. Widespread fields of submarine volcanoes, some of which may be active, extend for distances of up to several hundred kilometers from the islands. The predominantly eastward-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current sweeps across the central Kerguelen Plateau, and extensive blooms of phytoplankton are observed on the Plateau down-current of HIMI. The goal of RV Investigator voyage IN2016_V01, conducted in January/February 2016, is to test the hypothesis that hydrothermal fluids, which cool active submarine volcanoes in the HIMI region, ascend from the seafloor and fertilise surface waters with iron, thereby enhancing biological productivity beginning with phytoplankton. Significant initial shipboard results include: Documentation, for the first time, of the role of active HIMI and nearby submarine volcanoes in supplying iron to the Southern Ocean. Nearshore waters had elevated dissolved iron levels. Although biomass was not correspondingly elevated, fluorescence induction data indicated highly productive resident phytoplankton. Discovery of >200 acoustic plumes emanating from the seafloor and ascending up to tens of meters into the water column near HIMI. Deep tow camera footage shows bubbles rising from the seafloor in an acoustic plume field north of Heard Island. Mapping 1,000 km2 of uncharted seafloor around HIMI. Submarine volcanic edifices punctuate the adjacent seafloor, and yielded iron-rich rocks similar to those found on HIMI, respectively. Acoustic plumes emanating from some of these features suggest active seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  9. The effects of dilution and mixed layer depth on deliberate ocean iron fertilization: 1-D simulations of the southern ocean iron experiment (SOFeX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Doney, Scott C.

    To better understand the role of iron in driving marine ecosystems, the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) fertilized two surface water patches with iron north and south of the Antarctic Polar Front Zone (APFZ). Using 1-D coupled biological-physical simulations, we examine the biogeochemical dynamics that occurred both inside and outside of the fertilized patches during and shortly after the SOFeX field campaign. We focus, in particular, on three main issues governing the biological response to deliberate iron fertilization: the interaction among phytoplankton, light, macronutrient and iron limitation; dilution and lateral mixing between the fertilized patch and external, unfertilized waters; and the effect of varying mixed layer depth on the light field. At the patch south of the APFZ, sensitivity simulations with no dilution results in the maximum bloom magnitude, whereas dilution with external water extends the development of the north patch bloom by relieving silicon limitation. In model sensitivity studies for both sites, maximum chlorophyll concentration and dissolved inorganic carbon depletion inside the fertilized patches are inversely related to mixed layer depth, similar to the patterns observed across a number of iron fertilization field experiments. Our results suggest that Southern Ocean phytoplankton blooms resulting from natural or deliberate iron fertilization will tend to become iron-light co-limited unless the mixed layer depth is quite shallow.

  10. A tale of three islands: Downstream natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.; Yool, A.

    2016-05-01

    Iron limitation of primary productivity prevails across much of the Southern Ocean but there are exceptions; in particular, the phytoplankton blooms associated with the Kerguelen Plateau, Crozet Islands, and South Georgia. These blooms occur annually, fertilized by iron and nutrient-rich shelf waters that are transported downstream from the islands. Here we use a high-resolution (1/12°) ocean general circulation model and Lagrangian particle tracking to investigate whether inter-annual variability in the potential lateral advection of iron could explain the inter-annual variability in the spatial extent of the blooms. Comparison with ocean color data, 1998-2007, suggests that iron fertilization via advection can explain the extent of each island's annual bloom, but only the inter-annual variability of the Crozet bloom. The area that could potentially be fertilized by iron from Kerguelen was much larger than the bloom, suggesting that there is another primary limiting factor, potentially silicate, that controls the inter-annual variability of bloom spatial extent. For South Georgia, there are differences in the year-to-year timing of advection and consequently fertilization, but no clear explanation of the inter-annual variability observed in the bloom's spatial extent has been identified. The model results suggest that the Kerguelen and Crozet blooms are terminated by nutrient exhaustion, probably iron and or silicate, whereas the deepening of the mixed layer in winter terminates the South Georgia bloom. Therefore, iron fertilization via lateral advection alone can explain the annual variability of the Crozet bloom, but not fully that of the Kerguelen and South Georgia blooms.

  11. Present and Past Impact of Glacially Sourced Dust on Iron Fertilization of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenfelt, E. M.; Winckler, G.; Kaplan, M. R.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    An increase in iron-containing dust flux and a more efficient biological pump in the Southern Ocean have been associated with the CO2 drawdown and global cooling of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). While iron (Fe) mineralogy is known to affect Fe bioavailability through its impact on Fe solubility, there are limited studies investigating the importance of Fe mineralogy in dust fluxes to the Southern Ocean, and no previous studies investigating interactions between eukaryotic phytoplankton and particulate-phase Fe in natural dusts applicable to Southern Ocean environments. Since physically weathered bedrock becomes less soluble as it becomes weathered and oxidized, we hypothesized that glacially sourced dusts would contain more Fe(II)-rich primary minerals and would be more bioavailable than dusts from areas not impacted by glaciers. We used a series of natural dusts from Patagonia as the sole Fe source in incubation experiments with the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and evaluated Fe bioavailability using culture growth rates, cell density, and variable fluorescence. Monod curves were also used to evaluate the efficiency of the different particulates as sources of nutrient Fe. Using these Monod curves fit to growth rates plotted against particulate Fe concentrations, we observed that 1) Fe(II)-rich primary silicates were significantly more effective as an Fe source to diatoms than Fe(III)-rich oxides, that 2) Fe(II) content itself was responsible for the difference in Fe bioavailability/efficiency of the Fe nutrient source, and that 3) surface interactions with the particulates were important. In an effort to explore the possibility that Fe mineralogy impacted Fe bioavailability in past oceans, we will present our hypotheses regarding productivity and Fe mineralogy/bioavailability through the last glacial cycle.

  12. The next generation of iron fertilization experiments in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, V; Naqvi, S W A

    2008-11-13

    Of the various macro-engineering schemes proposed to mitigate global warming, ocean iron fertilization (OIF) is one that could be started at short notice on relevant scales. It is based on the reasoning that adding trace amounts of iron to iron-limited phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean will lead to blooms, mass sinking of organic matter and ultimately sequestration of significant amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in the deep sea and sediments. This iron hypothesis, proposed by John Martin in 1990 (Martin 1990 Paleoceanography 5, 1-13), has been tested by five mesoscale experiments that provided strong support for its first condition: stimulation of a diatom bloom accompanied by significant CO2 drawdown. Nevertheless, a number of arguments pertaining to the fate of bloom biomass, the ratio of iron added to carbon sequestered and various side effects of fertilization, continue to cast doubt on its efficacy. The idea is also unpopular with the public because it is perceived as meddling with nature. However, this apparent consensus against OIF is premature because none of the published experiments were specifically designed to test its second condition pertaining to the fate of iron-induced organic carbon. Furthermore, the arguments on side effects are based on worst-case scenarios. These doubts, formulated as hypotheses, need to be tested in the next generation of OIF experiments. We argue that such experiments, if carried out at appropriate scales and localities, will not only show whether the technique will work, but will also reveal a wealth of insights on the structure and functioning of pelagic ecosystems in general and the krill-based Southern Ocean ecosystem, in particular. The outcomes of current models on the efficacy and side effects of OIF differ widely, so data from adequately designed experiments are urgently needed for realistic parametrization. OIF is likely to boost zooplankton stocks, including krill, which could have a positive effect on

  13. Iron Speciation in Proximity to an Active Volcanic Hotspot, Kerguelen Plateau, Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, T.; Wuttig, K.; Chase, Z.; van der Merwe, P.; Townsend, A.; Bowie, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Low iron (Fe) concentrations limit biological productivity in over a third of the world's oceans. The Southern Ocean (SO) is the largest of these regions of Fe deficiency. However, within the Indian sector of the SO lays an oasis of relatively Fe rich waters overlaying the Kerguelen Plateau. At the southern part of the central Kerguelen plateau is an active volcanic hotspot, hosting two volcanically active islands, Heard and MacDonald (HIMI), the former of which is largely covered by glaciers. Waters in the region are subject to an intense mixing regime, caused by shallow bathymetry and the location of the plateau in the path of strong currents associated with the polar front. Fed by the Fe rich waters formed on the plateau, a plankton bloom on the order of thousands of square kilometres forms in the lee of the plateau annually each summer. Here we present dissolved iron (dFe), dissolved iron(II) (dFe(II)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) data from waters surrounding HIMI on the central Kerguelen Plateau collected on RV Investigator voyage IN2016_V01 in early 2016. Analysis was performed at sea using three separate flow injection - chemiluminescence instruments. Two broadly zonal transects revealed that dFe was present in limiting concentrations (island and accounted for up to 30% of the total dFe. We also observed an intense mixing regime homogenising short-lived Fe(II) and H2O2 species throughout the water column in shallow areas of the plateau. Our results revealed varying Fe speciation patterns between the islands indicating multiple Fe sources around HIMI, including reducing hydrothermal, sedimentary and glacial sources.

  14. The next generation of iron fertilization experiments in the southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Smetacek, V.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    Of the various macro-engineering schemes proposed to mitigate global warming, ocean iron fertilization (OIF) is one that could be started at short notice on relevant scales. It is based on the reasoning that adding trace amounts of iron to iron...

  15. Observation of consistent trends in the organic complexation of dissolved iron in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuróczy, C.E.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Organic complexation of dissolved iron (dFe) was investigated in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean in order to understand the distribution of Fe over the whole water column. The total concentration of dissolved organic ligands ([Lt]) measured by voltammetry ranged between 0.54 and 1.84 nEq

  16. Key role of organic complexation of iron in sustaining phytoplankton blooms in the Pine Island and Amundsen Polynyas (Southern Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuroczy, Charles-Edouard; Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Laan, Patrick; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Mills, Matthew M.; Van Dijken, Gert L.; De Baar, Hein J. W.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2012-01-01

    Primary productivity in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean) is among the highest in Antarctica. The summer phytoplankton bloom in 2009 lasted for > 70 days in both the Pine Island and Amundsen Polynyas. Such productive blooms require a large supply of nutrients, including the trace metal iron (Fe).

  17. Natural iron fertilization of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean by continental shelf sources of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Schoemann, V.; Lannuzel, D.; Croot, P.; de Baar, H.; Tison, J.-L.

    2012-01-01

    In large parts of the Southern Ocean, primary production is limited due to shortage of iron (Fe). We measured vertical Fe profiles in the western Weddell Sea, Weddell-Scotia Confluence, and Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), showing that Fe is derived from benthic Fe diffusion and sediment

  18. Iron fertilization and the structure of planktonic communities in high nutrient regions of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéguiner, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    In this review article, plankton community structure observations are analyzed both for artificial iron fertilization experiments and also for experiments dedicated to the study of naturally iron-fertilized systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean in the POOZ (Permanently Open Ocean Zone) and the PFZ (Polar Frontal Zone). Observations made in natural systems are combined with those from artificially perturbed systems, in order to evaluate the seasonal evolution of pelagic communities, taking into account controlling factors related to the life cycles and the ecophysiology of dominant organisms. The analysis considers several types of planktonic communities, including both autotrophs and heterotrophs. These communities are spatially segregated owing to different life strategies. A conceptual general scheme is proposed to account for these observations and their variability, regardless of experiment type. Diatoms can be separated into 2 groups: Group 1 has slightly silicified fast growing cells that are homogeneously distributed in the surface mixed layer, and Group 2 has strongly silicified slowly growing cells within discrete layers. During the growth season, Group 1 diatoms show a typical seasonal succession of dominant species, within time windows of development that are conditioned by physical factors (light and temperature) as well as endogenous specific rhythms (internal clock), and biomass accumulation is controlled by the availability of nutrients. Group 1 diatoms are not directly grazed by mesozooplankton which is fed by protozooplankton, linking the microbial food web to higher trophic levels. Instead, successive dominant species of Group 1 are degraded via bacterial activity at the end of their growth season. Organic detritus fragments feed protozooplankton and mesozooplankton. The effective silicon pump leads to the progressive disappearance of silicic acid in surface waters. In contrast, Group 2 is resistant to grazing

  19. The effects of natural iron fertilisation on deep-sea ecology: the Crozet Plateau, Southern Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, George A; Billett, David S M; Bett, Brian J; Holtvoeth, Jens; FitzGeorge-Balfour, Tania; Fisher, Elizabeth H; Cross, Ian; Shannon, Roger; Salter, Ian; Boorman, Ben; King, Nicola J; Jamieson, Alan; Chaillan, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The addition of iron to high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic waters stimulates phytoplankton, leading to greater primary production. Large-scale artificial ocean iron fertilization (OIF) has been proposed as a means of mitigating anthropogenic atmospheric CO(2), but its impacts on ocean ecosystems below the photic zone are unknown. Natural OIF, through the addition of iron leached from volcanic islands, has been shown to enhance primary productivity and carbon export and so can be used to study the effects of OIF on life in the ocean. We compared two closely-located deep-sea sites (∼400 km apart and both at ∼4200 m water depth) to the East (naturally iron fertilized; +Fe) and South (HNLC) of the Crozet Islands in the southern Indian Ocean. Our results suggest that long-term geo-engineering of surface oceanic waters via artificial OIF would lead to significant changes in deep-sea ecosystems. We found that the +Fe area had greater supplies of organic matter inputs to the seafloor, including polyunsaturated fatty acid and carotenoid nutrients. The +Fe site also had greater densities and biomasses of large deep-sea animals with lower levels of evenness in community structuring. The species composition was also very different, with the +Fe site showing similarities to eutrophic sites in other ocean basins. Moreover, major differences occurred in the taxa at the +Fe and HNLC sites revealing the crucial role that surface oceanic conditions play in changing and structuring deep-sea benthic communities.

  20. Microzooplankton community associated with phytoplankton blooms in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaki, Urania; Georges, Clément; Genitsaris, Savvas; Monchy, Sébastien

    2015-07-01

    The spatial and temporal community composition of microzooplankton (dinoflagellates and ciliates) was assessed in the Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean) during the KEOPS2 cruise in early spring (October-November) 2011. This naturally iron-fertilized region was characterized by a complex mesoscale circulation resulting in a patchy distribution of phytoplankton blooms. Collectively, 97 morphospecies of dinoflagellates and ciliates belonging to 41 genera were identified by microscopy, and 202 Alveolata-related OTUs (operational taxonomical units) were retrieved with tag-pyrosequencing. Microscopy and pyrosequencing data were in accordance, in that diatom-consuming dinoflagellates were the most enhanced taxa in the blooms. Dinoflagellates also showed significant positive relationships with phytoplankton pigments, while no major differences were found in the ciliate abundances inside and outside the blooms. Cluster analysis showed clear differences in the phytoplankton and microzooplankton community structures between the iron-fertilized and HNLC (high nutrient low chlorophyll) waters, and between the blooms, concerning their location and the fertilization mechanisms. These results were combined with the rates of primary production and mesozooplankton consumption determined for the study area. The potential role of dinoflagellates and ciliates as phytoplankton consumers and as prey for mesozooplankton was then evaluated. Overall, heterotrophic dinoflagellates were probably the most important group of phytoplankton grazers, and a potential food source for copepods. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Modelled estimates of spatial variability of iron stress in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Ryan-Keogh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean is characterized by markedly different frontal zones with specific seasonal and sub-seasonal dynamics. Demonstrated here is the effect of iron on the potential maximum productivity rates of the phytoplankton community. A series of iron addition productivity versus irradiance (PE experiments utilizing a unique experimental design that allowed for 24 h incubations were performed within the austral summer of 2015/16 to determine the photosynthetic parameters αB, PBmax and Ek. Mean values for each photosynthetic parameter under iron-replete conditions were 1.46 ± 0.55 (µg (µg Chl a−1 h−1 (µM photons m−2 s−1−1 for αB, 72.55 ± 27.97 (µg (µg Chl a−1 h−1 for PBmax and 50.84 ± 11.89 (µM photons m−2 s−1 for Ek, whereas mean values under the control conditions were 1.25 ± 0.92 (µg (µg Chl a−1 h−1 (µM photons m−2 s−1−1 for αB, 62.44 ± 36.96 (µg (µg Chl a−1 h−1 for PBmax and 55.81 ± 19.60 (µM photons m−2 s−1 for Ek. There were no clear spatial patterns in either the absolute values or the absolute differences between the treatments at the experimental locations. When these parameters are integrated into a standard depth-integrated primary production model across a latitudinal transect, the effect of iron addition shows higher levels of primary production south of 50° S, with very little difference observed in the subantarctic and polar frontal zone. These results emphasize the need for better parameterization of photosynthetic parameters in biogeochemical models around sensitivities in their response to iron supply. Future biogeochemical models will need to consider the combined and individual effects of iron and light to better resolve the natural background in primary production and predict its response under a changing climate.

  2. Deep carbon export from a Southern Ocean iron-fertilized diatom bloom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smetacek, V.; Klaas, C.; Strass, V.H.; Assmy, P.; Montresor, M.; Cisewski, B.; Savoye, N.; Webb, A.; d'Ovidio, F.; Arrieta, J.M.; Bathmann, U.; Bellerby, R.; Berg, G.M.; Croot, P.; Gonzalez, S.; Henjes, J.; Herndl, G.J.; Hoffmann, L.J.; Leach, H.; Losch, M.; Mills, M.M.; Neill, C.; Peeken, I.; Röttgers, R.; Sachs, O.; Sauter, E.; Schmidt, M.M.; Schwarz, J.; Terbrüggen, A.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.

    2012-01-01

    Fertilization of the ocean by adding iron compounds has induced diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms accompanied by considerable carbon dioxide drawdown in the ocean surface layer. However, because the fate of bloom biomass could not be adequately resolved in these experiments, the timescales of

  3. Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments: Past–Present–Future with Introduction to Korean Iron Fertilization Experiment in the Southern Ocean (KIFES) Project

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Joo-Eun; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul; Macdonald, Alison M.; Yoon, Ho Il; Park, Ki-Tae; Yang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Lee, Jae Il; Lee, Min Kyung; Jung, Jinyoung; Park, Jisoo; Song, Jae-Min; Choi, Tae-Jun; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Il-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the industrial revolution, human activities have caused a rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, which have in turn been cited as the cause of a variety climate changes such as global warming and ocean acidification. Various approaches have been proposed to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The 'Martin (or Iron) Hypothesis' suggests that ocean iron fertilization (OIF) should be an efficient method for stimulating the biological pump in iron-limited high nutr...

  4. Photosynthetic maximum quantum yield increases are an essential component of the Southern Ocean phytoplankton response to iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, Michael R; Lance, Veronica P; Apprill, Amy M; Bidigare, Robert R; Johnson, Zackary I; Mitchell, B Greg; Smith, Walker O; Barber, Richard T

    2008-03-25

    It is well established that an increase in iron supply causes an increase in total oceanic primary production in many regions, but the physiological mechanism driving the observed increases has not been clearly identified. The Southern Ocean iron enrichment experiment, an iron fertilization experiment in the waters closest to Antarctica, resulted in a 9-fold increase in chlorophyll (Chl) concentration and a 5-fold increase in integrated primary production. Upon iron addition, the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (phi(m)) rapidly doubled, from 0.011 to 0.025 mol C.mol quanta(-1). Paradoxically, this increase in light-limited productivity was not accompanied by a significant increase in light-saturated productivity (P(max)(b)). P(max)(b), maximum Chl normalized productivity, was 1.34 mg C.mg Chl(-1).h(-1) outside and 1.49 mg C.mg Chl(-1).h(-1) inside the iron-enriched patch. The importance of phi(m) as compared with P(max)(b) in controlling the biological response to iron addition has vast implications for understanding the ecological response to iron. We show that an iron-driven increase in phi(m) is the proximate physiological mechanism affected by iron addition and can account for most of the increases in primary production. The relative importance of phi(m) over P(max)(b) in this iron-fertilized bloom highlights the limitations of often-used primary productivity algorithms that are driven by estimates of P(max)(b) but largely ignore variability in phi(m) and light-limited productivity. To use primary productivity models that include variability in iron supply in prediction or forecasting, the variability of light-limited productivity must be resolved.

  5. The effects of natural iron fertilisation on deep-sea ecology: the Crozet Plateau, Southern Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A Wolff

    Full Text Available The addition of iron to high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC oceanic waters stimulates phytoplankton, leading to greater primary production. Large-scale artificial ocean iron fertilization (OIF has been proposed as a means of mitigating anthropogenic atmospheric CO(2, but its impacts on ocean ecosystems below the photic zone are unknown. Natural OIF, through the addition of iron leached from volcanic islands, has been shown to enhance primary productivity and carbon export and so can be used to study the effects of OIF on life in the ocean. We compared two closely-located deep-sea sites (∼400 km apart and both at ∼4200 m water depth to the East (naturally iron fertilized; +Fe and South (HNLC of the Crozet Islands in the southern Indian Ocean. Our results suggest that long-term geo-engineering of surface oceanic waters via artificial OIF would lead to significant changes in deep-sea ecosystems. We found that the +Fe area had greater supplies of organic matter inputs to the seafloor, including polyunsaturated fatty acid and carotenoid nutrients. The +Fe site also had greater densities and biomasses of large deep-sea animals with lower levels of evenness in community structuring. The species composition was also very different, with the +Fe site showing similarities to eutrophic sites in other ocean basins. Moreover, major differences occurred in the taxa at the +Fe and HNLC sites revealing the crucial role that surface oceanic conditions play in changing and structuring deep-sea benthic communities.

  6. Diatom resting spore ecology drives enhanced carbon export from a naturally iron-fertilized bloom in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Ian; Kemp, Alan E. S.; Moore, C. Mark; Lampitt, Richard S.; Wolff, George A.; Holtvoeth, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Southern Ocean Island systems sustain phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization that are important for the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide and serve as analogues for past and future climate change. We present data on diatom flux assemblages and the biogeochemical properties of sinking particles to explain the enhanced particulate organic carbon (POC) export fluxes observed in response to natural iron supply in the Crozet Islands region (CROZeX). Moored deep-ocean sediment traps (>2000 m) were located beneath a naturally fertilized island bloom and beneath an adjacent High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) control site. Deep-ocean carbon flux from the naturally-fertilized bloom area was tightly correlated (R = 0.83, n = 12, P fertilized bloom enhanced carbon flux and the resulting Si/C and Si/N ratios were 2.0-3.4-fold and 2.2-3.5-fold lower than those measured in the adjacent HNLC control area. The enhanced carbon export and distinctive stoichiometry observed in naturally fertilized systems is therefore largely not attributable to iron relief of open ocean diatoms, but rather to the advection and growth of diatom species characteristic of island systems and the subsequent flux of resting spores. Carbon export estimates from current natural iron fertilization studies therefore represent a highly specific response of the island systems chosen as natural laboratories and may not be appropriate analogues for the larger Southern Ocean response. The broader implications of our results emphasize the role of phytoplankton diversity and ecology and highlight the need for a species-centered approach in order to understand the regulation of biogeochemical fluxes.

  7. Iron fertilization enhanced net community production but not downward particle flux during the Southern Ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, P.; Loeff, M.M.R. van der.; Cassar, N.; Vandromme, P.; d'Ovidio, F.; Stemmann, L.; Rengarajan, R.; Soares, M.A.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Ebersbach, F.; Lampitt, R.S.; Sanders, R.; Barnett, B.A.; Smetacek, V.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    A closed eddy core in the Subantarctic Atlantic Ocean was fertilized twice with two tons of iron (as FeSO4), and the 300 km2 fertilized patch was studied for 39 days to test whether fertilization enhances downward particle flux...

  8. Uptake of leucine, chitin and iron by prokaryotic groups during spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization off Kerguelen Island (Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Fourquez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron and carbon are essential for microbial heterotrophic activity, but the bioavailability of these elements is low in surface waters of the Southern Ocean. Whether the access to iron and carbon differs among phylogenetic groups of prokaryotes is barely known. To address this question we used iron (55FeCl3, and the carbon compounds chitin (3H-Diacetylchitobiose and leucine (3H-leucine as model substrates in combination with MICRO-CARD-FISH during spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization off Kerguelen Island (KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study 2 - KEOPS2; October-November 2011. The application of probes at broad phylogenetic levels indicated an overall similar community composition in surface waters at the 8 investigated sites. The relative contributions of the prokaryotic groups to abundance revealed a strong positive relationship with their respective contributions to the leucine-active community (p0.05; r=0.26. These results suggest preferential uptake of iron and chitin by some prokaryotic groups. SAR11 and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB were the dominant contributors to the leucine-active community, while CFB and Archaea had the highest contributions to the chitin-active community. By contrast, Gammaproteobacteria, including SAR86, and CFB revealed the highest contributions to the iron-active community. We found several correlations between the group-specific fractions of active cells for a given substrate and most of them included CFB, pointing to the potential importance of microbial interactions for iron and carbon cycling in the Southern Ocean.

  9. Deep carbon export from a Southern Ocean iron-fertilized diatom bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetacek, Victor; Klaas, Christine; Strass, Volker H; Assmy, Philipp; Montresor, Marina; Cisewski, Boris; Savoye, Nicolas; Webb, Adrian; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Arrieta, Jesús M; Bathmann, Ulrich; Bellerby, Richard; Berg, Gry Mine; Croot, Peter; Gonzalez, Santiago; Henjes, Joachim; Herndl, Gerhard J; Hoffmann, Linn J; Leach, Harry; Losch, Martin; Mills, Matthew M; Neill, Craig; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Sachs, Oliver; Sauter, Eberhard; Schmidt, Maike M; Schwarz, Jill; Terbrüggen, Anja; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2012-07-18

    Fertilization of the ocean by adding iron compounds has induced diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms accompanied by considerable carbon dioxide drawdown in the ocean surface layer. However, because the fate of bloom biomass could not be adequately resolved in these experiments, the timescales of carbon sequestration from the atmosphere are uncertain. Here we report the results of a five-week experiment carried out in the closed core of a vertically coherent, mesoscale eddy of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, during which we tracked sinking particles from the surface to the deep-sea floor. A large diatom bloom peaked in the fourth week after fertilization. This was followed by mass mortality of several diatom species that formed rapidly sinking, mucilaginous aggregates of entangled cells and chains. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence-although each with important uncertainties-lead us to conclude that at least half the bloom biomass sank far below a depth of 1,000 metres and that a substantial portion is likely to have reached the sea floor. Thus, iron-fertilized diatom blooms may sequester carbon for timescales of centuries in ocean bottom water and for longer in the sediments.

  10. Iron fertilization enhanced net community production but not downward particle flux during the Southern Ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Patrick; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Cassar, Nicolas; Vandromme, Pieter; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Stemmann, Lars; Rengarajan, R.; Soares, Melena; González, Humberto E.; Ebersbach, Friederike; Lampitt, Richard S.; Sanders, Richard; Barnett, Bruce A.; Smetacek, Victor; Naqvi, S. Wajih A.

    2013-09-01

    closed eddy core in the Subantarctic Atlantic Ocean was fertilized twice with two tons of iron (as FeSO4), and the 300 km2 fertilized patch was studied for 39 days to test whether fertilization enhances downward particle flux into the deep ocean. Chlorophyll a and primary productivity doubled after fertilization, and photosynthetic quantum yield (FV/FM) increased from 0.33 to ≥0.40. Silicic acid (artificially fertilized bloom with very low diatom biomass. Net community production (NCP) inside the patch, estimated from O2:Ar ratios, averaged 21 mmol POC m-2 d-1, probably ±20%. 234Th profiles implied constant export of 6.3 mmol POC m-2 d-1 in the patch, similar to unfertilized waters. The difference between NCP and 234Th-derived export partly accumulated in the mixed layer and was partly remineralized between the mixed layer and 100 m. Neutrally buoyant sediment traps at 200 and 450 m inside and outside the patch caught mostly fertilization. Our data thus indicate intense flux attenuation between 100 and 200 m, and probably between the mixed layer and 100 m. We attribute the lack of fertilization-induced export to silicon limitation of diatoms and reprocessing of sinking particles by detritus feeders. Our data are consistent with the view that nitrate-rich but silicate-deficient waters are not poised for enhanced particle export upon iron addition.

  11. The effect of in situ iron addition on the sinking rates and export flux of Southern Ocean diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Anya M.; Nodder, Scott D.

    During the Southern Ocean Iron RElease Experiment (SOIREE), conducted in February 1999 at 61°S, 141°E in high nutrient, low chlorophyll waters south of the Polar Front, we measured the intrinsic sinking rates of diatoms at two depths inside and outside of an iron-fertilised patch. Overall, the sinking rates of the diatoms estimated by the SETCOL method (Bienfang, Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 38 (1981) 1289-1294 were significantly lower inside than outside the patch, and a time series of sinking rates (chlorophyll-based) indicated that the rates of cells >22 μm reduced to a minimum (0.47 m d -1) 8 days after the first in situ iron addition. A subsequent increase in sinking rates (chlorophyll-based) of >22 μm cells coincided with an increase in algal iron stress (based on diatom flavodoxin levels). The primary bloom species, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Nitzschia and Navicula sp. reduced their sinking rates most markedly within the patch, showing a decrease of up to 87% of initial rates, over the 13 days of the time series. In contrast, the very largest cells (>1 mm, Trichotoxon and Thalassiothrix) showed little change in sinking rate inside or outside the patch. Sinking rates of resident cells associated with a deep chlorophyll maximum (40-75 m) in and out of the patch also showed no significant sinking rate change upon iron addition. Given these results and the known longevity of the SOIREE bloom (at least 60 d), we infer that sinking rate reduction is an integral part of a species-specific bloom response to elevated Fe supply. We calculate that sinking losses of iron-saturated, unaggregated cells would have been ˜1% d -1. A 1% daily loss would have halved cell accumulation at the surface over 60 d, primarily via a reduction in growth potential.

  12. The transcriptional regulation of the glyoxylate cycle in SAR11 in response to iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Sara; Gálvez, María J; Molina, Veronica; Sarthou, Géraldine; Quéroué, Fabien; Blain, Stephane; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway that is present in all aerobic organisms and initiates the respiration of organic material. The glyoxylate cycle is a variation of the TCA cycle, where organic material is recycled for subsequent assimilation into cell material instead of being released as carbon dioxide. Despite the importance for the fate of organic matter, the environmental factors that induce the glyoxylate cycle in microbial communities remain poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the expression of isocitrate lyase, the enzyme that induces the switch to the glyoxylate cycle, of the ubiquitous SAR11 clade in response to natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean. The cell-specific transcriptional regulation of the glyoxylate cycle, as determined by the ratio between copy numbers of isocitrate lyase gene transcripts and isocitrate genes, was consistently lower in iron fertilized than in high-nutrient, low chlorophyll waters (by 2.4- to 16.5-fold). SAR11 cell-specific isocitrate lyase gene transcription was negatively correlated to chlorophyll a, and bulk bacterial heterotrophic metabolism. We conclude that the glyoxylate cycle is a metabolic strategy for SAR11 that is highly sensitive to the degree of iron and carbon limitation in the marine environment. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Microbial food web dynamics during spring phytoplankton blooms in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaki, U.; Lefèvre, D.; Georges, C.; Colombet, J.; Catala, P.; Courties, C.; Sime-Ngando, T.; Blain, S.; Obernosterer, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial food web dynamics were determined during the onset of several spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization off Kerguelen Island in the Southern Ocean (KEOPS2). The abundances of heterotrophic bacteria and heterotrophic nanoflagellates, bacterial heterotrophic production, bacterial respiration, and bacterial growth efficiency, were consistently higher in surface waters of the iron-fertilized sites than at the reference site in HNLC (high nutrient low chlorophyll) waters. The abundance of virus-like particles remained unchanged, but viral production increased by a factor of 6 in iron-fertilized waters. Bacterial heterotrophic production was significantly related to heterotrophic nanoflagellate abundance and viral production across all sites, with bacterial production explaining about 70 and 85%, respectively, of the variance of each in the mixed layer (ML). Estimated rates of grazing and viral lysis, however, indicated that heterotrophic nanoflagellates accounted for a substantially higher loss of bacterial production (50%) than viruses (11%). Combining these results with rates of primary production and export determined for the study area, a budget for the flow of carbon through the microbial food web and higher trophic levels during the early (KEOPS2) and the late phase (KEOPS1) of the Kerguelen bloom is provided.

  14. Ocean iron fertilization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    In 2009 and 2010, an Indo-German scientific expedition dusted the ocean with iron to stimulate the biological pump that captures atmosphereic carbon dioxide. Two onboard scientists tell the story of this controversial project. Besides raising...

  15. Ocean iron fertilization: why further research is needed

    OpenAIRE

    Güssow, Kerstin; Oschlies, Andreas; Proelss, Alexander; Rehdanz, Katrin; Rickels, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Despite large uncertainties in the fertilization efficiency, natural iron fertilization studies and some of the purposeful iron enrichment studies have demonstrated that Southern Ocean iron fertilization can lead to a significant export of carbon from the sea surface to the ocean interior. From an economic perspective the potential of ocean iron fertilization (OIF) is far from negligible in relation to other abatement options. Comparing the range of cost estimates to the range of estimates fo...

  16. Composition of diatom communities and their contribution to plankton biomass in the naturally iron-fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, Marine; Leblanc, Karine; Armand, Leanne K; Christaki, Urania; Georges, Clément; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Quéguiner, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    In the naturally iron-fertilized surface waters of the northern Kerguelen Plateau region, the early spring diatom community composition and contribution to plankton carbon biomass were investigated and compared with the high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) surrounding waters. The large iron-induced blooms were dominated by small diatom species belonging to the genera Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) and Thalassiosira, which rapidly responded to the onset of favorable light-conditions in the meander of the Polar Front. In comparison, the iron-limited HNLC area was typically characterized by autotrophic nanoeukaryote-dominated communities and by larger and more heavily silicified diatom species (e.g. Fragilariopsis spp.). Our results support the hypothesis that diatoms are valuable vectors of carbon export to depth in naturally iron-fertilized systems of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our results corroborate observations of the exported diatom assemblage from a sediment trap deployed in the iron-fertilized area, whereby the dominant Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) cells were less efficiently exported than the less abundant, yet heavily silicified, cells of Thalassionema nitzschioides and Fragilariopsis kerguelensis Our observations emphasize the strong influence of species-specific diatom cell properties combined with trophic interactions on matter export efficiency, and illustrate the tight link between the specific composition of phytoplankton communities and the biogeochemical properties characterizing the study area. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Iron Fertilization of the Southern Ocean: Regional Simulation and Analysis of C-Sequestration in the Ross Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Arrigo

    2012-03-13

    A modified version of the dynamic 3-dimensional mesoscale Coupled Ice, Atmosphere, and Ocean model (CIAO) of the Ross Sea ecosystem has been used to simulate the impact of environmental perturbations upon primary production and biogenic CO2 uptake. The Ross Sea supports two taxonomically, and spatially distinct phytoplankton populations; the haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica and diatoms. Nutrient utilization ratios predict that P. antarctica and diatoms will be driven to nitrate and phosphate limitation, respectively. Model and field data have confirmed that the Ross Sea is iron limited with only two-thirds of the macronutrients consumed by the phytoplankton by the end of the growing season. In this study, the CIAO model was improved to simulate a third macronutrient (phosphate), dissolved organic carbon, air-sea gas exchange, and the carbonate system. This enabled us to effectively model pCO2 and subsequently oceanic CO2 uptake via gas exchange, allowing investigations into the affect of alleviating iron limitation on both pCO2 and nutrient drawdown.

  18. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic ocean during the last ice age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martínez-García, Alfredo; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Anderson, Robert F; Straub, Marietta; Hodell, David A; Jaccard, Samuel L; Eglinton, Timothy I; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-01-01

    John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2...

  19. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean – Part 1: Seasonal dynamics of particulate organic carbon export from a moored sediment trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rembauville

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A sediment trap moored in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean provided an annual record of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes at 289 m. At the trap deployment depth, current speeds were typically low (~ 10 cm s−1 and primarily tidal-driven (M2 tidal component. Although advection was weak, the sediment trap may have been subject to hydrodynamical and biological (swimmer feeding on trap funnel biases. Particulate organic carbon (POC flux was generally low (−2 d−1, although two episodic export events (−2 d−1 were recorded. These increases in flux occurred with a 1-month time lag from peaks in surface chlorophyll and together accounted for approximately 40% of the annual flux budget. The annual POC flux of 98.2 ± 4.4 mmol m−2 yr−1 was low considering the shallow deployment depth but comparable to independent estimates made at similar depths (~ 300 m over the plateau, and to deep-ocean (> 2 km fluxes measured from similarly productive iron-fertilized blooms. Although undertrapping cannot be excluded in shallow moored sediment trap deployment, we hypothesize that grazing pressure, including mesozooplankton and mesopelagic fishes, may be responsible for the low POC flux beneath the base of the winter mixed layer. The importance of plankton community structure in controlling the temporal variability of export fluxes is addressed in a companion paper.

  20. Ocean fertilization with iron: effects on climate and air quality

    OpenAIRE

    Liss, Peter; Chuck, Adele; Bakker, Dorothee; Turner, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that iron fertilization can increase primary production and hence CO2 drawdown over a significant fraction of the oceans. What is less well established is the extent to which this leads to long-term sequestration of carbon to the deep oceans, and to feedbacks to the atmosphere arising from increased biological activity. In this note results for changes in trace gas concentrations during an iron addition experiment in the Southern Ocean are presented. They demonstrate that a c...

  1. Export fluxes in a naturally iron-fertilized area of the Southern Ocean - Part 2: Importance of diatom resting spores and faecal pellets for export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2015-06-01

    The biological composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low, but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom cells and the ratio of full to empty cells exerted a first-order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of the biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC flux that occurred during two very short export events of 80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, to larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally to large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose in this high-biomass, low-export (HBLE) environment that small but highly silicified and fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the intense grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. More generally our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  2. Pteropods in Southern Ocean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, B. P. V.; Pakhomov, E. A.; Hosie, G. W.; Siegel, V.; Ward, P.; Bernard, K.

    2008-09-01

    To date, little research has been carried out on pelagic gastropod molluscs (pteropods) in Southern Ocean ecosystems. However, recent predictions are that, due to acidification resulting from a business as usual approach to CO 2 emissions (IS92a), Southern Ocean surface waters may begin to become uninhabitable for aragonite shelled thecosome pteropods by 2050. To gain insight into the potential impact that this would have on Southern Ocean ecosystems, we have here synthesized available data on pteropod distributions and densities, assessed current knowledge of pteropod ecology, and highlighted knowledge gaps and directions for future research on this zooplankton group. Six species of pteropod are typical of the Southern Ocean south of the Sub-Tropical Convergence, including the four Thecosomes Limacina helicina antarctica, Limacina retroversa australis, Clio pyramidata, and Clio piatkowskii, and two Gymnosomes Clione limacina antarctica and Spongiobranchaea australis. Limacina retroversa australis dominated pteropod densities north of the Polar Front (PF), averaging 60 ind m -3 (max = 800 ind m -3) and 11% of total zooplankton at the Prince Edward Islands. South of the PF L. helicina antarctica predominated, averaging 165 ind m -3 (max = 2681 ind m -3) and up to >35% of total zooplankton at South Georgia, and up to 1397 ind m -3 and 63% of total zooplankton in the Ross Sea. Combined pteropods contributed pig ind -1 d -1), while those of L. helicina antarctica and C. pyramidata are in the upper range for all Southern Ocean zooplankton, in the latter species reaching 27,757 ng pig ind -1 d -1 and >40% of community grazing impact. Further research is required to quantify diet selectivity, the effect of phytoplankton composition on growth and reproductive success, and the role of carnivory in thecosomes. Life histories are a significant knowledge gap for Southern Ocean pteropods, a single study having been completed for L. retroversa australis, making population

  3. Iron from melting glaciers fuels phytoplankton blooms in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean): Phytoplankton characteristics and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, A.C.; Mills, M.M.; van Dijken, G.L.; Laan, P.; Thuróczy, C.-E.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Payne, C.D.; Visser, R.J.W.; Buma, A.G.J.; Arrigo, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    The phytoplankton community composition and productivity in waters of the Amundsen Sea and surrounding sea ice zone were characterized with respect to iron (Fe) input from melting glaciers. High Fe input from glaciers such as the Pine Island Glacier, and the Dotson and Crosson ice shelves resulted

  4. Iron Availability Influences Silicon Isotope Fractionation in Two Southern Ocean Diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia antarctica and a Coastal Diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Meyerink

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The fractionation of silicon (Si isotopes was measured in two Southern Ocean diatoms (Proboscia inermis and Eucampia Antarctica and a coastal diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana that were grown under varying iron (Fe concentrations. Varying Fe concentrations had no effect on the Si isotope enrichment factor (ε in T. pseudonana, whilst E. Antarctica and P. inermis exhibited significant variations in the value of ε between Fe-replete and Fe-limited conditions. Mean ε values in P. inermis and E. Antarctica decreased from (± 1SD −1.11 ± 0.15‰ and −1.42 ± 0.41 ‰ (respectively under Fe-replete conditions, to −1.38 ± 0.27 ‰ and −1.57 ± 0.5 ‰ (respectively under Fe-limiting conditions. These variations likely arise from adaptations in diatoms arising from the nutrient status of their environment. T. pseudonana is a coastal clone typically accustomed to low Si but high Fe conditions whereas E. Antarctica and P. inermis are typically accustomed to High Si, High nitrate low Fe conditions. Growth induced variations in silicic acid (Si(OH4 uptake arising from Fe-limitation is the likely mechanism leading to Si-isotope variability in E. Antarctica and P. inermis. The multiplicative effects of species diversity and resource limitation (e.g., Fe on Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms can potentially alter the Si-isotope composition of diatom opal in diatamaceous sediments and sea surface Si(OH4. This work highlights the need for further in vitro studies into intracellular mechanisms involved in Si(OH4 uptake, and the associated pathways for Si-isotope fractionation in diatoms.

  5. Modeling phytoplankton blooms and carbon export production in the Southern Ocean : dominant controls by light and iron in the Atlantic sector in Austral spring 1992

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancelot, C; Hannon, E; Becquevort, S; Veth, C.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    The high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) conditions of the Southern Ocean were explored with an ecological model (SWAMCO) describing the cycling of C, N, P, Si and Fe through different, aggregated, chemical and biological compartments of the plankton ecosystem. The structure of the model was chosen

  6. Arctic and Southern Ocean Sea Ice Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly sea ice concentration for Arctic (1901 to 1995) and Southern oceans (1973 to 1990) were digitized on a standard 1-degree grid (cylindrical projection) to...

  7. Southern Ocean - South African cooperative research programme.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SANCOR

    1979-05-01

    Full Text Available South African research in the Southern Ocean has already produced some important and illuminating results. Most of these efforts, however, were of an individual and uncoordinated nature. Due to increasing interest in the ocean- in South Africa...

  8. Zooplankton Gut Passage Mobilizes Lithogenic Iron for Ocean Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katrin; Schlosser, Christian; Atkinson, Angus; Fielding, Sophie; Venables, Hugh J; Waluda, Claire M; Achterberg, Eric P

    2016-10-10

    Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton, but low concentrations limit primary production and associated atmospheric carbon drawdown in large parts of the world's oceans [1, 2]. Lithogenic particles deriving from aeolian dust deposition, glacial runoff, or river discharges can form an important source if the attached iron becomes dissolved and therefore bioavailable [3-5]. Acidic digestion by zooplankton is a potential mechanism for iron mobilization [6], but evidence is lacking. Here we show that Antarctic krill sampled near glacial outlets at the island of South Georgia (Southern Ocean) ingest large amounts of lithogenic particles and contain 3-fold higher iron concentrations in their muscle than specimens from offshore, which confirms mineral dissolution in their guts. About 90% of the lithogenic and biogenic iron ingested by krill is passed into their fecal pellets, which contain ∼5-fold higher proportions of labile (reactive) iron than intact diatoms. The mobilized iron can be released in dissolved form directly from krill or via multiple pathways involving microbes, other zooplankton, and krill predators. This can deliver substantial amounts of bioavailable iron and contribute to the fertilization of coastal waters and the ocean beyond. In line with our findings, phytoplankton blooms downstream of South Georgia are more intensive and longer lasting during years with high krill abundance on-shelf. Thus, krill crop phytoplankton but boost new production via their nutrient supply. Understanding and quantifying iron mobilization by zooplankton is essential to predict ocean productivity in a warming climate where lithogenic iron inputs from deserts, glaciers, and rivers are increasing [7-10]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Observing System for the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, L.; Schofield, O.; Wahlin, A.; Constable, A.; Swart, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean is fundamental to the operation of the Earth system, as it plays a central role in global climate and planetary-scale biogeochemical cycles. The Southern Ocean is changing rapidly, and the critical need to observe and understand the Southern Ocean is well established; however, the harsh conditions and remote location have led to it being the most under-sampled region of the world. Sustained observations are required to detect, interpret, and respond to the physical, chemical, and biological changes that are, and will continue to be measured. The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) is an international initiative with the mission to integrate the global assets and efforts of the international community to enhance data collection, provide access to datasets, and guide the development of strategic-sustained-multidisciplinary science in the Southern Ocean. This presentation will provide an update on SOOS implementation activities, key products and tools, and data management efforts.

  10. A Southern Ocean mode of multidecadal variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Bars, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326165150; Viebahn, J. P.; Dijkstra, H. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467

    2016-01-01

    A 250 year simulation of a strongly eddying global version of the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) model reveals a new mode of intrinsic multidecadal variability, the Southern Ocean Mode (SOM), with a period of 40-50 year. The peak-to-peak difference in the global ocean heat content within a

  11. Dissolved aluminium in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middag, R.; van Slooten, C.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Laan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved aluminium (Al) occurs in a wide range of concentrations in the world oceans. The concentrations of Al in the Southern Ocean are among the lowest ever observed. An all-titanium CTD sampling system makes it possible to study complete deep ocean sections of Al and other trace elements with

  12. South African southern ocean research programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SASCAR

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available This document describes the South African National Antarctic Research Programme's (SANARP) physical, chemical and biological Southern Ocean research programme. The programme has three main components: ecological studies of the Prince Edward Islands...

  13. Major differences of bacterial diversity and activity inside and outside of a natural iron-fertilized phytoplankton bloom in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nyree J; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Zemb, Olivier; Lebaron, Philippe

    2008-03-01

    One of the first comparisons of a natural iron fertilized bloom with a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) site was undertaken during the Kerguelen ocean and plateau compared study (KEOPS) cruise. To understand better the bacteria-phytoplankton relationship in the context of natural iron fertilization, bacterial diversity and activity was investigated in the bloom and in the adjacent HNLC region by 16S rDNA clone libraries and by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Both libraries were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and the Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides group. Cluster analysis at 99% sequence similarity yielded several microdiverse clusters and revealed striking differences between the two libraries. In the bloom, the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were the Roseobacter NAC11-7 cluster, SAR92 and a Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides cluster related to the agg58 group, whereas in the HNLC region, SAR11, Roseobacter RCA and Polaribacter dominated. SSCP analysis of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA revealed contrasting dynamics of three different Roseobacter OTUs. Roseobacter NAC11-7 and NAC11-6 had higher relative abundances and activities in the bloom compared with the HNLC site and NAC11-6 was only detected at the decline of the bloom concomitant with a shift in phytoplankton composi tion. In contrast, Roseobacter RCA was relatively abundant and active both inside and outside of the bloom. These results suggest that the different OTUs within the Roseobacter group represent functional groups that each play an important role in the cycling of carbon.

  14. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  15. Combined Effects of Atmospheric and Seafloor Iron Fluxes to the Glacial Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Juan; Somes, Christopher J.; Nickelsen, Levin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Changes in the ocean iron cycle could help explain the low atmospheric CO2 during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Previous modeling studies have mostly considered changes in aeolian iron fluxes, although it is known that sedimentary and hydrothermal fluxes are important iron sources for today's ocean. Here we explore effects of preindustrial-to-LGM changes in atmospheric dust, sedimentary, and hydrothermal fluxes on the ocean's iron and carbon cycles in a global coupled biogeochemical-circulation model. Considering variable atmospheric iron solubility decreases LGM surface soluble iron fluxes compared with assuming constant solubility. This limits potential increases in productivity and export production due to surface iron fertilization, lowering atmospheric CO2 by only 4 ppm. The effect is countered by a decrease in sedimentary flux due to lower sea level, which increases CO2 by 15 ppm. Assuming a 10 times higher iron dust solubility in the Southern Ocean, combined with changes in sedimentary flux, we obtain an atmospheric CO2 reduction of 13 ppm. The high uncertainty in the iron fluxes does not allow us to determine the net direction and magnitude of variations in atmospheric CO2 due to changes in the iron cycle. Our model does not account for changes to iron-binding ligand concentrations that could modify the results. We conclude that when evaluating glacial-interglacial changes in the ocean iron cycle, not only surface but also seafloor fluxes must be taken into account.

  16. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  17. Iron-Virus Interactions in the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnain, C. C.; Buck, K. N.; Breitbart, M.

    2016-02-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient in the oceans, with the sub-nanomolar concentrations found in open ocean surface waters often insufficient for supporting biological activity. More than 99.9% of dissolved iron is bound to organic ligands, yet identifying the sources of these ligands in seawater remains a major challenge. A significant portion of iron-binding ligands fall into the colloidal fraction, which is operationally defined as the fraction collected between a 0.02 µm and a 0.45 µm filter. Among the organic ligands in this fraction persists an extremely abundant biological candidate: viruses. On average there are 107 viruses per milliliter of seawater, most of which are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). The impact of viruses on ocean biogeochemistry is often evoked purely through the act of lysing hosts and very few studies have considered the geochemical potential of the viral particles themselves. Recent work in non-marine model systems has revealed the presence of iron atoms within the structure of diverse phages infecting Escherichia coli. Combined with the small size and sheer abundance of phages in the oceans, the inclusion of iron in phage structures would translate into a major factor for cycling of this important trace metal. In addition, iron is so critical for growth that bacteria have evolved multiple uptake systems for assimilating iron, such as siderophores. Certain outer membrane proteins serve a dual function in siderophore uptake and as a phage receptor, suggesting that some of the strategies utilized for iron acquisition make bacteria vulnerable to phage infection. Given the constant arms race between bacteria and phages to develop resistance and counter-resistance, respectively, it is not surprising that phage would have evolved to utilize critical regions of surface-exposed proteins which are indispensable for bacterial growth as receptors. The research presented here explores the potential of marine phages to serve as iron

  18. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Alfredo; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Anderson, Robert F; Straub, Marietta; Hodell, David A; Jaccard, Samuel L; Eglinton, Timothy I; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-03-21

    John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). In a sediment core from the Subantarctic Atlantic, we measured foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct ice age nitrate consumption, burial fluxes of iron, and proxies for productivity. Peak glacial times and millennial cold events are characterized by increases in dust flux, productivity, and the degree of nitrate consumption; this combination is uniquely consistent with Subantarctic iron fertilization. The associated strengthening of the Southern Ocean's biological pump can explain the lowering of CO2 at the transition from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions as well as the millennial-scale CO2 oscillations.

  19. Pigments, elemental composition (C, N, P, and Si), and stoichiometry of particulate matter in the naturally iron fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Blain, S.; Ras, J.; Cornet-Barthaux, V.; Hélias Nunige, S.; Quéguiner, B.

    2014-10-01

    The particulate matter distribution and phytoplankton community structure of the iron-fertilized Kerguelen region were investigated in early austral spring (October-November 2011) during the KEOPS2 cruise. The iron-fertilized region was characterized by a complex mesoscale circulation resulting in a patchy distribution of particulate matter. Integrated concentrations over 200 m ranged from 72.2 to 317.7 mg m-2 for chlorophyll a 314 to 744 mmol m-2 for biogenic silica (BSi), 1106 to 2268 mmol m-2 for particulate organic carbon, 215 to 436 mmol m-2 for particulate organic nitrogen, and 29.3 to 39.0 mmol m-2 for particulate organic phosphorus. Three distinct high biomass areas were identified: the coastal waters of Kerguelen Islands, the easternmost part of the study area in the polar front zone, and the southeastern Kerguelen Plateau. As expected from previous artificial and natural iron-fertilization experiments, the iron-fertilized areas were characterized by the development of large diatoms revealed by BSi size-fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment signatures, whereas the iron-limited reference area was associated with a low biomass dominated by a mixed (nanoflagellates and diatoms) phytoplankton assemblage. A major difference from most previous artificial iron fertilization studies was the observation of much higher Si : C, Si : N, and Si : P ratios (0.31 ± 0.16, 1.6 ± 0.7 and 20.5 ± 7.9, respectively) in the iron-fertilized areas compared to the iron-limited reference station (0.13, 1.1, and 5.8, respectively). A second difference is the patchy response of the elemental composition of phytoplankton communities to large scale natural iron fertilization. Comparison to the previous KEOPS1 cruise also allowed to address the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton bloom over the southeastern plateau. From particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate organic nitrogen (PON), and BSi evolutions, we showed that the elemental composition

  20. Pigments, elemental composition (C, N, P, Si) and stoichiometry of particulate matter, in the naturally iron fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Blain, S.; Ras, J.; Cornet-Barthaux, V.; Hélias Nunige, S.; Quéguiner, B.

    2014-06-01

    The particulate matter distribution and phytoplankton community structure of the iron-fertilized Kerguelen region were investigated in early austral spring (October-November 2011) during the KEOPS2 cruise. The iron-fertilized region was characterized by a complex mesoscale circulation resulting in a patchy distribution of particulate matter. Integrated concentrations over 200 m ranged from 72.2 to 317.7 mg m-2 for chlorophyll a, 314 to 744 mmol m-2 for biogenic silica (BSi), 1106 to 2268 mmol m-2 for particulate organic carbon, 215 to 436 mmol m-2 for particulate organic nitrogen, and 29.3 to 39.0 mmol m-2 for particulate organic phosphorus. Three distinct high biomass areas were identified: the coastal waters of Kerguelen Islands, the easternmost part of the study area in the Polar Front Zone, and the southeastern Kerguelen Plateau. As expected from previous artificial and natural iron-fertilization experiments, the iron-fertilized areas were characterized by the development of large diatoms revealed by BSi size-fractionation and HPLC pigment signatures, whereas the iron-limited reference area was associated to a low biomass dominated by a mixed (nanoflagellates and diatoms) phytoplankton assemblage. A major difference from previous artificial iron fertilization studies was the observation of much higher Si : C, Si : N, and Si : P ratios (respectively 0.31 ± 0.16, 1.6 ± 0.7 and 20.5 ± 7.9) in the iron-fertilized areas compared to the iron-limited reference station (respectively 0.13, 1.1, 5.8). A second difference is the patchy response of the elemental composition of phytoplankton communities to large scale natural iron fertilization. Comparison to the previous KEOPS1 cruise also allowed to address the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton bloom over the southeastern plateau. From POC, PON, and BSi evolutions, we showed that the elemental composition of the particulate matter also varies at the seasonal scale. This temporal evolution followed changes of the

  1. Accounting aspects of ocean iron fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Rickels, Wilfried; Rehdanz, Katrin; Oschlies, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Diminishing emission budgets and increasing risks of catastrophic damages from climate change require analyses of rapid response options including geoengineering options such as ocean iron fertilization (OIF). To decide whether or not OIF might be such an option an assessment of its potential as an abatement option as well as its possible side effects is required. To explore the potential of OIF knowledge on the change of carbon stocks over time is needed. However, economic aspects including ...

  2. Response of bacteria and phytoplankton from a subtropical front location Southern Ocean to micronutrient amendments ex-situ

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Jain, A.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, R.K.; Verma, R.; Bhat, M.; Mesquita, A.; Nadkarni, A.; D`Souza, S.E.; Ahmed, T.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.

    that the bacterial community composition in the 14    subarctic Pacific, the Southern Ocean, and the California coastal upwelling region scarcely changed after iron infusions, although their abundance and production increased. Arrieta et al. (2004) also reported...

  3. Source of the Magnetic Susceptibility Variations in Southern Ocean Sediments Over the Last Glacial Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, B.; Thompson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the sources, mineralogy and rates of iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have global impact and significance, by influencing plankton growth rates and nutrient take-up in this, the largest of the high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the world ocean. Iron 'fertilization' in the Southern Ocean may increase rates of carbon export production and thus the ocean uptake flux of atmospheric CO2, and also diminish the northward flow of residual nutrients to the extra-polar ocean, especially the HNLC regions of the Pacific. Changes in Southern Ocean export production may contribute to global climate change over glacial-interglacial timescales. The key sources of iron for the Southern Ocean are reported to be windblown dust and sedimentary supply; their relative significance an issue of much long-standing debate. Links between aeolian dust fluxes to the Southern Ocean and to the Antarctic ice cores have been proposed for the Scotia Sea region of the Southern Ocean, downwind from the South American land mass. Regional downcore variations in the magnetic susceptibility of sediments from the Scotia Sea show remarkable similarity to variations in dust concentration and flux in East Antarctic ice cores (with glacial stages characterised by increases in ice dust and sediment magnetic susceptibility). Indeed, the strength of the ice dust/sediment magnetism correlations (r ~ 0.7) provides a pragmatic basis for use of the sedimentary magnetic susceptibility records as a chronostratigraphic proxy, a boon in the carbonate-free deep-sea sediments of the Southern Ocean. However, the source and causal basis of the sediment magnetism/ice dust co-variations remain controversial; aeolian dust, bacterial magnetite and wind-driven current transport of marine sediment have all been invoked as possible key sources. Here, we use magnetic and isotopic methods to resolve this debate, and identify and quantify the sources of magnetic material to the Scotia Sea for the last

  4. Climatically driven fluctuations in Southern Ocean ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Eugene J; Trathan, Philip N; Watkins, Jon L; Reid, Keith; Meredith, Michael P; Forcada, Jaume; Thorpe, Sally E; Johnston, Nadine M; Rothery, Peter

    2007-12-22

    Determining how climate fluctuations affect ocean ecosystems requires an understanding of how biological and physical processes interact across a wide range of scales. Here we examine the role of physical and biological processes in generating fluctuations in the ecosystem around South Georgia in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Anomalies in sea surface temperature (SST) in the South Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean have previously been shown to be generated through atmospheric teleconnections with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related processes. These SST anomalies are propagated via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current into the South Atlantic (on time scales of more than 1 year), where ENSO and Southern Annular Mode-related atmospheric processes have a direct influence on short (less than six months) time scales. We find that across the South Atlantic sector, these changes in SST, and related fluctuations in winter sea ice extent, affect the recruitment and dispersal of Antarctic krill. This oceanographically driven variation in krill population dynamics and abundance in turn affects the breeding success of seabird and marine mammal predators that depend on krill as food. Such propagating anomalies, mediated through physical and trophic interactions, are likely to be an important component of variation in ocean ecosystems and affect responses to longer term change. Population models derived on the basis of these oceanic fluctuations indicate that plausible rates of regional warming of 1oC over the next 100 years could lead to more than a 95% reduction in the biomass and abundance of krill across the Scotia Sea by the end of the century.

  5. The Future of Southern Ocean Observing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the Southern Ocean's role in global climate from seasonal to millennial timescales is evolving, with rapidly increasing recognition of the centrality of the Southern Ocean to Earth's heat, carbon, nutrient, and freshwater budgets, and of the impact of interactions between the ocean and the major ice shelves and grounded ice sheets of Antarctica, which have been decreasing in mass. Observations in this data-sparse and logistically remote region have never been so important, and many nations are rising to the challenge of supporting both experiments and long-term sustained observations. As illustrated in the figure from Meredith et al. (Current Op. Env. Sustain. 2013), autonomous in situ technologies are at the fore because of the difficulty and expense of sending ships year-round and because the crucial satellite remote sensing must be accompanied by in situ observations, including beneath sea ice and ice shelves. The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) has grown out of this recognized need for coordinated observations from the Antarctic coastline northward to the subtropics, from the bottom water production regions in coastal polynyas over the continental shelves, to the regions of interaction of warm ocean waters with Antarctic ice shelves, beneath the vast seasonal sea ice region, and in the hot spots of air-sea fluxes and cross-Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) mixing where the ACC interacts with topography and continental boundaries. The future includes international coordination and collaboration and strengthening of new and existing technologies, which include satellite observing, ice-enabled profiling floats, profiling from marine mammals, moored measurements in many strategic locations, glider and other autonomous operations in all regions, and drilling through floating ice shelves to measure the ocean waters below. Improved and consistent weather observations around the Antarctic coastlines will improve forecasting and reanalysis. Ice

  6. Plutonium in Southern Hemisphere ocean Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirose, K.; Aoyama, M.; Gastaud, J.

    2013-01-01

    Plutonium in seawater collected by the BEAGLE2003 cruise was determined using ICP- SF-MS and alpha spectrometry after Fe co-precipitation and radiochemical purification. Levels and distributions of dissolved plutonium activity concentrations in Southern Hemisphere ocean waters are summarized here......, including historical data. Pu-239 concentrations in surface water----of the central South Pacific (32.5 °S) in 2003 were around 1 mBq/m3. The 239Pu concentrations in the Indian Ocean surface waters (20°S) were similar to that in the South Pacific, whereas the 239Pu concentrations in the South Atlantic...... surface waters (30°S) were markedly lower than those in the South Pacific and Indian Oceans. The 239Pu vertical profile pattern was similar to that in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, although 239Pu concentrations in the deep South Pacific were significantly lower than those in the North Pacific. One...

  7. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Moore

    2008-05-01

    from sinking particles; and 3 an improved sedimentary source for dissolved iron. Most scavenged iron (90% is put on sinking particles to remineralize deeper in the water column. The model-observation differences are reduced with these modifications. The improved BEC model is used to examine the relative contributions of mineral dust and marine sediments in driving dissolved-iron distributions and marine biogeochemistry. Mineral dust and sedimentary sources of iron contribute roughly equally, on average, to dissolved iron concentrations. The sedimentary source from the continental margins has a strong impact on open-ocean iron concentrations, particularly in the North Pacific. Plumes of elevated dissolved-iron concentrations develop at depth in the Southern Ocean, extending from source regions in the SW Atlantic and around New Zealand. The lower particle flux and weaker scavenging in the Southern Ocean allows the continental iron source to be advected far from sources. Both the margin sediment and mineral dust Fe sources substantially influence global-scale primary production, export production, and nitrogen fixation, with a stronger role for the dust source. Ocean biogeochemical models that do not include the sedimentary source for dissolved iron, will overestimate the impact of dust deposition variations on the marine carbon cycle. Available iron observations place some strong constraints on ocean biogeochemical models. Model results should be evaluated against both surface and subsurface Fe observations in the waters that supply dissolved iron to the euphotic zone.

  8. Dietary iron overload in southern African rural blacks | Friedman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey conducted in rural southern African black subjects indicated that dietary iron overload remains a major health problem. A full blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum concentrations of iron, total iron-binding capacity, ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP), 1'-glutamyltransferase (GGn and serological screening ...

  9. Phytoplankton and pigment patterns across frontal zones in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwe, M.A.; Kattner, G.; van Oijen, T.; de Jong, J.T.M.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton distribution and concentrations of macronutrients and iron were studied in the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) and the eastern Weddell Gyre of the Southern Ocean, during austral autumn. HPLC analysis of algal pigments was combined with microscopy observations to assess algal distribution.

  10. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assmy, P.; Smetacek, V.; Klaas, C.; Henjes, J.; Strass, V.H.; Arrieta, J.M.; Bathmann, U.; Cisewski, B.; Fuchs, N.; Herndl, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is

  11. New Perspectives on Southern Ocean Frontal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The frontal structure of the Southern Ocean is investigated using a the Wavelet/Higher Order Statistics Enhancement (WHOSE) frontal detection method, introduced in Chapman (2014). This methodology is applied to 21 years of daily gridded sea-surface height (SSH) data to obtain daily maps of the locations of the fronts. By forming frontal occurrence frequency maps and then approximating these occurrence-maps by a superposition of simple functions, the time-mean locations of the fronts, as well as a measure of their capacity to meander, are obtained and related to the frontal locations found by previous studies. The spatial and temporal variability of the frontal structure is then considered. The number of fronts is found to be highly variable throughout the Southern Ocean, increasing (`splitting') downstream of large bathymetric features and decreasing (`merging') in regions where the fronts are tightly controlled by the underlying topography. In contrast, frontal meandering remains relatively constant. Contrary to many previous studies, little no southward migration of the fronts over the 1993-2014 time period is found, and there is only weak sensitivity to atmospheric forcing related to SAM or ENSO. Finally, the implications of splitting and merging for the flux of tracers will be discussed.

  12. The Distribution of Dissolved Iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Middag, Rob; Laan, Patrick; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; van Aken, Hendrik M.; Schoemann, Veronique; de Jong, Jeroen T.M.; Baar, de Hein J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential trace element for marine life. Extremely low Fe concentrations limit primary production and nitrogen fixation in large parts of the oceans and consequently influence ocean ecosystem functioning. The importance of Fe for ocean ecosystems makes Fe one of the core chemical

  13. Ecology of southern ocean pack ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Andrew S; Thomas, David N

    2002-01-01

    Around Antarctica the annual five-fold growth and decay of sea ice is the most prominent physical process and has a profound impact on marine life there. In winter the pack ice canopy extends to cover almost 20 million square kilometres--some 8% of the southern hemisphere and an area larger than the Antarctic continent itself (13.2 million square kilometres)--and is one of the largest, most dynamic ecosystems on earth. Biological activity is associated with all physical components of the sea-ice system: the sea-ice surface; the internal sea-ice matrix and brine channel system; the underside of sea ice and the waters in the vicinity of sea ice that are modified by the presence of sea ice. Microbial and microalgal communities proliferate on and within sea ice and are grazed by a wide range of proto- and macrozooplankton that inhabit the sea ice in large concentrations. Grazing organisms also exploit biogenic material released from the sea ice at ice break-up or melt. Although rates of primary production in the underlying water column are often low because of shading by sea-ice cover, sea ice itself forms a substratum that provides standing stocks of bacteria, algae and grazers significantly higher than those in ice-free areas. Decay of sea ice in summer releases particulate and dissolved organic matter to the water column, playing a major role in biogeochemical cycling as well as seeding water column phytoplankton blooms. Numerous zooplankton species graze sea-ice algae, benefiting additionally because the overlying sea-ice ceiling provides a refuge from surface predators. Sea ice is an important nursery habitat for Antarctic krill, the pivotal species in the Southern Ocean marine ecosystem. Some deep-water fish migrate to shallow depths beneath sea ice to exploit the elevated concentrations of some zooplankton there. The increased secondary production associated with pack ice and the sea-ice edge is exploited by many higher predators, with seals, seabirds and whales

  14. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-27

    This paper investigates ballasting and remineralization controls of carbon sedimentation in the twilight zone (100-1000 m) of the Southern Ocean. Size-fractionated (<1 {micro}m, 1-51 {micro}m, >51 {micro}m) suspended particulate matter was collected by large volume in-situ filtration from the upper 1000 m in the Subantarctic (55 S, 172 W) and Antarctic (66 S, 172 W) zones of the Southern Ocean during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) in January-February 2002. Particles were analyzed for major chemical constituents (POC, P, biogenic Si, CaCO3), and digital and SEM image analyses of particles were used to aid in the interpretation of the chemical profiles. Twilight zone waters at 66 S in the Antarctic had a steeper decrease in POC with depth than at 55 S in the Subantarctic, with lower POC concentrations in all size fractions at 66 S than at 55 S, despite up to an order of magnitude higher POC in surface waters at 66 S. The decay length scale of >51 {micro}m POC was significantly shorter in the upper twilight zone at 66 S ({delta}{sub e}=26 m) compared to 55 S ({delta}{sub e}=81 m). Particles in the carbonate-producing 55 S did not have higher excess densities than particles from the diatom-dominated 66 S, indicating that there was no direct ballast effect that accounted for deeper POC penetration at 55 S. An indirect ballast effect due to differences in particle packaging and porosities cannot be ruled out, however, as aggregate porosities were high ({approx}97%) and variable. Image analyses point to the importance of particle loss rates from zooplankton grazing and remineralization as determining factors for the difference in twilight zone POC concentrations at 55 S and 66 S, with stronger and more focused shallow remineralization at 66 S. At 66 S, an abundance of large (several mm long) fecal pellets from the surface to 150 m, and almost total removal of large aggregates by 200 m, reflected the actions of a single or few zooplankton species capable of

  15. Seabird guano enhances phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatova, Olga; Wing, Stephen; Hoffmann, Linn; Jack, Lucy; Gault-Ringold, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Great congregations of seabirds in sub-Antarctic and Antarctic coastal areas result in delivery of nutrient-rich guano to marine ecosystems that potentially enhances productivity and supports biodiversity in the region. Guano-derived bio-available micronutrients and macronutrients might be utilized by marine phytoplankton for photosynthetic production, however, mechanisms and significance of guano fertilization in the Southern Ocean are largely understudied. Over austral summers of 2012 and 2013 we performed a series of guano-enrichment phytoplankton incubation experiments with water samples collected from three different water masses in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic waters of the Ross sea and sub-Antarctic waters offshore the Otago Peninsula, both showing iron limitation of phytoplankton productivity in summer, and in the subtropical frontal zone offshore from the Snares Islands, which is generally micronutrient-repleted. Samples were enriched with known concentrations of guano-derived nutrients. Phytoplankton biomass increased significantly in guano-treated samples during all three incubation experiments (7-10 fold increase), while remained low in control samples. This response indicates that seabird guano provides nutrients that limit primary production in the Southern Ocean and that these nutrients are readily taken up by phytoplankton. Guano additions were compared to Fe and Macronutrient treatments (both added in quantities similar to those in the guano treatment). Phytoplankton biomass increased significantly in response to the Macronutrient treatment in the subtropical frontal zone, however, the response had a smaller magnitude compared to the guano treatment (2.8 µgL-1 vs 5.2 µgL-1) ; there was no significant effect of Fe on phytoplankton growth. This suggests the potential importance of synergistic effects of nutrients in guano. Incubation with sub-Antarctic waters showed that Fe and Macronutrients might be equally important for enhancement of

  16. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin; Fiskal, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface....... Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling...... campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations>300 nM. At the boundary between...

  17. Characterization of Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Douglas B; Martiny, Adam C; Dupont, Christopher L; Halpern, Aaron L; Venter, J Craig

    2010-09-14

    Prochlorococcus describes a diverse and abundant genus of marine photosynthetic microbes. It is primarily found in oligotrophic waters across the globe and plays a crucial role in energy and nutrient cycling in the ocean ecosystem. The abundance, global distribution, and availability of isolates make Prochlorococcus a model system for understanding marine microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling. Analysis of 73 metagenomic samples from the Global Ocean Sampling expedition acquired in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans revealed the presence of two uncharacterized Prochlorococcus clades. A phylogenetic analysis using six different genetic markers places the clades close to known lineages adapted to high-light environments. The two uncharacterized clades consistently cooccur and dominate the surface waters of high-temperature, macronutrient-replete, and low-iron regions of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific upwelling and the tropical Indian Ocean. They are genetically distinct from each other and other high-light Prochlorococcus isolates and likely define a previously unrecognized ecotype. Our detailed genomic analysis indicates that these clades comprise organisms that are adapted to iron-depleted environments by reducing their iron quota through the loss of several iron-containing proteins that likely function as electron sinks in the photosynthetic pathway in other Prochlorococcus clades from high-light environments. The presence and inferred physiology of these clades may explain why Prochlorococcus populations from iron-depleted regions do not respond to iron fertilization experiments and further expand our understanding of how phytoplankton adapt to variations in nutrient availability in the ocean.

  18. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Mary W; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R; Garcia, Ana C; Roberts, Kathryn J; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W; Coale, Kenneth H

    2010-11-30

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell(-1) to 2 pg·cell(-1), comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m(-2)·d(-1)) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150-500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L(-1), levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO(2) and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent.

  19. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Mary W.; Bargu, Sibel; Coale, Susan L.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Garcia, Ana C.; Roberts, Kathryn J.; Sekula-Wood, Emily; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14 of the 26 stations analyzed for DA. Toxin ranged from 0.3 fg·cell−1 to 2 pg·cell−1, comparable with levels found in similar-sized cells from coastal waters. In the western subarctic, descent of intact Pseudo-nitzschia likely delivered significant amounts of toxin (up to 4 μg of DA·m−2·d−1) to underlying mesopelagic waters (150–500 m). By reexamining phytoplankton samples from SOFeX and IronEx II, we found substantial amounts of DA associated with Pseudo-nitzschia. Indeed, at SOFeX in the Antarctic Pacific, DA reached 220 ng·L−1, levels at which animal mortalities have occurred on continental shelves. Iron ocean fertilization also occurs naturally and may have promoted blooms of these ubiquitous algae over previous glacial cycles during deposition of iron-rich aerosols. Thus, the neurotoxin DA occurs both in coastal and oceanic waters, and its concentration, associated with changes in Pseudo-nitzschia abundance, likely varies naturally with climate cycles, as well as with artificial iron fertilization. Given that iron fertilization in iron-depleted regions of the sea has been proposed to enhance phytoplankton growth and, thereby, both reduce atmospheric CO2 and moderate ocean acidification in surface waters, consideration of the potentially serious ecosystem impacts associated with DA is prudent. PMID:21068374

  20. New Hampshire / Southern Maine Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Uses Atlas Project is an innovative partnership between the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) and NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource...

  1. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust has the potential to modify global climate by influencing the radiative balance of the atmosphere and by supplying iron and other essential limiting micronutrients to the ocean. The scarcity of iron limits marine productivity and carbon uptake in one-quarter of the world ocean where the concentration of major nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) is perennially high. The Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems. Paleoceanographic records from the Subantarctic Atlantic have revealed a remarkable correlation between phytoplankton productivity and aeolian iron flux during glacial periods supporting the iron fertilization hypothesis. In addition, a recent study has shown that peak glacial times and millennial cold events were nearly universally associated not only with increases in dust flux and export production, but also with an increase in nutrient consumption (the last indicated by higher foraminifera-bound δ15N) (Martinez-Garcia et al. 2014). This combination of changes is uniquely consistent with ice age iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Atlantic. The strengthening of the biological pump associated with the observed increase in Subantarctic nutrient consumption during the high-dust intervals of the last two ice ages can explain up to ~40 ppm of the CO2 decrease that characterizes the transitions from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions. However, the impact of iron fertilization in other sectors of the Southern Ocean characterized by lower ice age dust fluxes than the Atlantic remains unclear. A series of recently published records from the Subantarctic Pacific indicate that dust deposition and marine export production were three times higher during glacial periods than during interglacials (Lamy et al. 2014). Here we present new measurements of foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes in a sediment core located in the

  2. Phytoplankton composition and biomass across the southern Indian Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Louise; Henriksen, Peter; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton composition and biomass was investigated across the southern Indian Ocean. Phytoplankton composition was determined from pigment analysis with subsequent calculations of group contributions to total chlorophyll a (Chl a) using CHEMTAX and, in addition, by examination in the microscope...

  3. Marine phytoplankton and the changing ocean iron cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, D. A.; Boyd, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The availability of the micronutrient iron governs phytoplankton growth across much of the ocean, but the global iron cycle is changing rapidly due to accelerating acidification, stratification, warming and deoxygenation. These mechanisms of global change will cumulatively affect the aqueous chemistry, sources and sinks, recycling, particle dynamics and bioavailability of iron. Biological iron demand will vary as acclimation to environmental change modifies cellular requirements for photosynthesis and nitrogen acquisition and as adaptive evolution or community shifts occur. Warming, acidification and nutrient co-limitation interactions with iron biogeochemistry will all strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics. Predicting the shape of the future iron cycle will require understanding the responses of each component of the unique biogeochemistry of this trace element to many concurrent and interacting environmental changes.

  4. Inverse-model estimates of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pasquier

    2017-09-01

    Pg C yr−1 and 171.   ±  3.  Tmol Si yr−1. We diagnose the phosphorus and opal exports supported by aeolian, sedimentary, and hydrothermal iron. The geographic patterns of the export supported by each iron type are well constrained across the family of state estimates. Sedimentary-iron-supported export is important in shelf and large-scale upwelling regions, while hydrothermal iron contributes to export mostly in the Southern Ocean. The fraction of the global export supported by a given iron type varies systematically with its fractional contribution to the total iron source. Aeolian iron is most efficient in supporting export in the sense that its fractional contribution to export exceeds its fractional contribution to the total source. Per source-injected molecule, aeolian iron supports 3. 1  ±  0. 8 times more phosphorus export and 2. 0  ±  0. 5 times more opal export than the other iron types. Conversely, per injected molecule, sedimentary and hydrothermal iron support 2. 3  ±  0. 6 and 4.   ±  2.  times less phosphorus export, and 1. 9  ±  0. 5 and 2.   ±  1.  times less opal export than the other iron types.

  5. Inverse-model estimates of the ocean's coupled phosphorus, silicon, and iron cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Benoît; Holzer, Mark

    2017-09-01

    phosphorus and opal exports supported by aeolian, sedimentary, and hydrothermal iron. The geographic patterns of the export supported by each iron type are well constrained across the family of state estimates. Sedimentary-iron-supported export is important in shelf and large-scale upwelling regions, while hydrothermal iron contributes to export mostly in the Southern Ocean. The fraction of the global export supported by a given iron type varies systematically with its fractional contribution to the total iron source. Aeolian iron is most efficient in supporting export in the sense that its fractional contribution to export exceeds its fractional contribution to the total source. Per source-injected molecule, aeolian iron supports 3. 1 ± 0. 8 times more phosphorus export and 2. 0 ± 0. 5 times more opal export than the other iron types. Conversely, per injected molecule, sedimentary and hydrothermal iron support 2. 3 ± 0. 6 and 4. ± 2. times less phosphorus export, and 1. 9 ± 0. 5 and 2. ± 1. times less opal export than the other iron types.

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of Fe(II) and H2O2 during EisenEx, an open ocean mescoscale iron enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croot, Peter L.; Laan, Patrick; Nishioka, Jun; Strass, Volker; Cisewski, Boris; Boye, Marie; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Bellerby, Richard G.; Goldson, Laura; Nightingale, Phil; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of Fe(II) and H2O2 were carried out in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during EisenEx, an iron enrichment experiment. Iron was added on three separate occasions, approximately every 8 days, as a ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) solution. Vertical profiles of Fe(II) showed maxima

  7. Distribution of planktonic biogenic carbonate organisms in the Southern Ocean south of Australia: a baseline for ocean acidification impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Thomas W.; Passmore, Abraham; Davies, Diana M.; Smit, Tim; Berry, Kate; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2018-01-01

    restricted to subtropical and northern subantarctic waters. The cause of the strong southward decrease in PIC abundance in the Southern Ocean is not yet clear. The poleward decrease in pH is small, and while calcite saturation decreases strongly southward, it remains well above saturation ( > 2). Nitrate and phosphate variations would predict a poleward increase. Temperature and competition with diatoms for limiting iron appear likely to be important. While the future trajectory of coccolithophore distributions remains uncertain, their current low abundances suggest small impacts on overall Southern Ocean pelagic ecology.

  8. Recent changes in the ventilation of the southern oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Darryn W; Primeau, Francois; Devries, Tim; Holzer, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Surface westerly winds in the Southern Hemisphere have intensified over the past few decades, primarily in response to the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole, and there is intense debate on the impact of this on the ocean's circulation and uptake and redistribution of atmospheric gases. We used measurements of chlorofluorocarbon-12 (CFC-12) made in the southern oceans in the early 1990s and mid- to late 2000s to examine changes in ocean ventilation. Our analysis of the CFC-12 data reveals a decrease in the age of subtropical subantarctic mode waters and an increase in the age of circumpolar deep waters, suggesting that the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole has caused large-scale coherent changes in the ventilation of the southern oceans.

  9. Southern Ocean overturning, export production and climate variability over the past 1 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, S.; Hayes, C. T.; Martinez Garcia, A.; Galbraith, E. D.; Anderson, R. F.; Sigman, D. M.; Haug, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Recently developed XRF core-scanning methods permit paleoceanographic reconstructions on time-scales similar to ice core temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. We have investigated distribution of carbonate and biogenic barium (bioBa) - a proxy for integrated organic carbon export - in a sedimentary archive retrieved from the deep South Atlantic (ODP 1094, 53°S, 6°E, 2807 m) covering the past 1 Myr. These measurements are complemented with high-resolution, 230Th-normalized opal, bioBa and chlorin flux determinations spanning the last 150 kyrs. Our multi-proxy approach reveals that export production and biogenic carbonate preservation were tightly linked to atmospheric pCO2 reconstructions over the last 1 Myr. In particular, lukewarm interglacials (i.e. MIS 13-19) show generally lower organic matter export and reduced carbonate preservation when compared to more recent interglacials. This supports the critical contribution of Southern Ocean deglacial upwelling to modulate the partitioning of CO2 between the ocean interior and the atmosphere over the last million years, and immediately suggests that the moderate pCO2 increases during the lukewarm interglacials were due to a reduced dynamic range of Southern Ocean overturning. Changes in the vertical structure of the Southern Ocean water-column do not only prove to be crucial for the transitions from glacial to interglacial climate states. The decrease in upwelling following peak interglacial conditions leads the climate system to progressively converge towards colder, glacial conditions. Once a pCO2 threshold value of about 225 ppmv is reached, export production tends to stabilize around very low values, consistent with more strongly stratified conditions. This threshold also marks the abrupt inception of iron-rich mineral dust generation and deposition downwind of major South American dust sources, thereby catalyzing export production in the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, to the north

  10. Microphysics and Southern Ocean Cloud Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Daniel T.

    Global climate models (GCMs) change their cloud properties in the Southern Ocean (SO) with warming in a qualitatively consistent fashion. Cloud albedo increases in the mid-latitudes and cloud fraction decreases in the subtropics. This creates a distinctive 'dipole' structure in the SW cloud feedback. However, the shape of the dipole varies from model to model. In this thesis we discuss the microphysical mechanisms underlying the SW cloud feedback over the mid-latitude SO. We will focus on the negative lobe of the dipole. The negative SW cloud feedback in the mid-latitudes is created by transitions from ice to liquid in models. If ice transitions to liquid in mixed-phase clouds the cloud albedo increases because ice crystals are larger than liquid droplets and therefore more reflective for a constant mass of water. Decreases in precipitation efficiency further enhance this effect by decreasing sinks of cloud water. This transition is dependent on the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. Parameterizations vary wildly between models and GCMs disagree by up to 35 K on the temperature where ice and liquid are equally prevalent. This results in a wide spread in the model predictions of the increase in liquid water path (LWP, where the path is the vertically integrated mass of water) with warming that drives the negative optical depth cloud feedback. It is found that this disagreement also results in a wide array of climate mean-states as models that create liquid at lower temperatures have a higher mean-state LWP, lower ice water path (IWP), and higher condensed (ice and liquid) water path (CWP). This presents a problem in climate models. GCMs need to have a reasonable planetary albedo in their climate mean-state. We show evidence that GCMs have tuned cloud fraction to compensate for the variation in mid-latitude cloud albedo driven by the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. This tuning results in mid-latitude clouds that are both too few and too bright as well as a

  11. Slow-spreading submarine ridges in the South Atlantic as a significant oceanic iron source

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Saito, MA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of the micronutrient iron limit primary production and nitrogen fixation in large areas of the global ocean. The location and magnitude of oceanic iron sources remain uncertain, however, owing to a scarcity of data, particularly...

  12. Organic complexation of iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.; Schoemann, V.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the dissolved iron (DFe) binding organic ligands were determined during 3 Dutch GEOTRACES cruises covering the length of the West Atlantic Ocean. Adsorptive Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (AdDPCSV) with TAC as competing ligand was used to measure Fe binding

  13. Photochemical cycling of iron in the surface ocean mediated by microbial iron(III)-binding ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, K.; Rue, E. L.; Bruland, K. W.; Butler, A.

    2001-09-01

    Iron is a limiting nutrient for primary production in large areas of the oceans. Dissolved iron(III) in the upper oceans occurs almost entirely in the form of complexes with strong organic ligands presumed to be of biological origin. Although the importance of organic ligands to aquatic iron cycling is becoming clear, the mechanism by which they are involved in this process remains uncertain. Here we report observations of photochemical reactions involving Fe(III) bound to siderophores-high-affinity iron(III) ligands produced by bacteria to facilitate iron acquisition. We show that photolysis of Fe(III)-siderophore complexes leads to the formation of lower-affinity Fe(III) ligands and the reduction of Fe(III), increasing the availability of siderophore-bound iron for uptake by planktonic assemblages. These photochemical reactions are mediated by the α-hydroxy acid moiety, a group which has generally been found to be present in the marine siderophores that have been characterized. We suggest that Fe(III)-binding ligands can enhance the photolytic production of reactive iron species in the euphotic zone and so influence iron availability in aquatic systems.

  14. Southern Ocean coccolithophore biogeography - controlling factors and implications for global biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Cara; Vogt, Meike; Münnich, Matthias; Gruber, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Southern Ocean phytoplankton biogeography is important for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, silicate, and the transport of macronutrients to lower latitudes. With the discovery of the "Great Calcite Belt" (GBC), revealing an unexpectedly high prevalence of calcifying phytoplankton in the subtropical frontal region between 40-55°S, the relative importance of Southern Ocean coccolithophores for phytoplankton biomass, net primary productivity and the carbon cycle need to be revisited. Using a regional high-resolution model with an embedded ecosystem module (ROMS-BEC) for the Southern Ocean (24-78°S) that has been extended to include an explicit representation of coccolithophores, we assess the environmental drivers of Southern Ocean coccolithophore biogeography over the course of the growing season. We thereby focus on biotic interactions and the relative importance of top-down (grazing) versus bottom-up factors (light, nutrient, temperature) controlling growth and abundance. In our simulation, coccolithophores are an important member of the Southern Ocean phytoplankton community, contributing 13% to annually integrated net primary productivity south of 30°S. We estimate the integrated annual calcification rate to account for 40% of the satellite derived global estimate. Modeled coccolithophore biomass is highest in February and March in a latitudinal band between 40-55°S, when diatoms become heavily silicate limited. This region is characterized by a number of divergent fronts with a low Si:Fe ratio of waters supplied to the mixed layer, supporting an increased growth of coccolithophores at the expense of diatoms. We find top down controls to be the major control on the relative abundance of diatoms and coccolithophores in the Southern Ocean. We perform iron and silicate fertilization experiments to assess the effects of changed nutrient availability on coccolithophore abundance in the GCB. We find that changes in nutrient stoichiometry significantly alter

  15. The role of Southern Ocean processes in orbital and millennial CO 2 variations - A synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hubertus; Schmitt, Jochen; Lüthi, Dieter; Stocker, Thomas F.; Tschumi, Tobias; Parekh, Payal; Joos, Fortunat; Köhler, Peter; Völker, Christoph; Gersonde, Rainer; Barbante, Carlo; Le Floch, Martine; Raynaud, Dominique; Wolff, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in the reconstruction of atmospheric CO 2 records from Antarctic ice cores has allowed for the documentation of natural CO 2 variations on orbital time scales over the last up to 800,000 years and for the resolution of millennial CO 2 variations during the last glacial cycle in unprecedented detail. This has shown that atmospheric CO 2 varied within natural bounds of approximately 170-300 ppmv but never reached recent CO 2 concentrations caused by anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. In addition, the natural atmospheric CO 2 concentrations show an extraordinary correlation with Southern Ocean climate changes, pointing to a significant (direct or indirect) influence of climatic and environmental changes in the Southern Ocean region on atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. Here, we compile recent ice core and marine sediment records of atmospheric CO 2, temperature and environmental changes in the Southern Ocean region, as well as carbon cycle model experiments, in order to quantify the effect of potential Southern Ocean processes on atmospheric CO 2 related to these orbital and millennial changes. This shows that physical and biological changes in the SO are able to explain substantial parts of the glacial/interglacial CO 2 change, but that none of the single processes is able to explain this change by itself. In particular, changes in the Southern Ocean related to changes in the surface buoyancy flux, which in return is controlled by the waxing and waning of sea ice may favorably explain the high correlation of CO 2 and Antarctic temperature on orbital and millennial time scales. In contrast, the changes of the position and strength of the westerly wind field were most likely too small to explain the observed changes in atmospheric CO 2 or may even have increased atmospheric CO 2 in the glacial. Also iron fertilization of the marine biota in the Southern Ocean contributes to a glacial drawdown of CO 2 but turns out to be limited by other factors than the total

  16. The distribution of dissolved iron in the West Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J A; Middag, Rob; Laan, Patrick; Gerringa, Loes J A; van Aken, Hendrik M; Schoemann, Véronique; de Jong, Jeroen T M; de Baar, Hein J W

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential trace element for marine life. Extremely low Fe concentrations limit primary production and nitrogen fixation in large parts of the oceans and consequently influence ocean ecosystem functioning. The importance of Fe for ocean ecosystems makes Fe one of the core chemical trace elements in the international GEOTRACES program. Despite the recognized importance of Fe, our present knowledge of its supply and biogeochemical cycle has been limited by mostly fragmentary datasets. Here, we present highly accurate dissolved Fe (DFe) values measured at an unprecedented high intensity (1407 samples) along the longest full ocean depth transect (17,500 kilometers) covering the entire western Atlantic Ocean. DFe measurements along this transect unveiled details about the supply and cycling of Fe. External sources of Fe identified included off-shelf and river supply, hydrothermal vents and aeolian dust. Nevertheless, vertical processes such as the recycling of Fe resulting from the remineralization of sinking organic matter and the removal of Fe by scavenging still dominated the distribution of DFe. In the northern West Atlantic Ocean, Fe recycling and lateral transport from the eastern tropical North Atlantic Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) dominated the DFe-distribution. Finally, our measurements showed that the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), the major driver of the so-called ocean conveyor belt, contains excess DFe relative to phosphate after full biological utilization and is therefore an important source of Fe for biological production in the global ocean.

  17. An Integrative Approach to Understand a Rich Ecosystem in the Southern Ocean From Carbon to Top Predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotté, C.; d'Ovidio, F.; Behagle, N.; Roudaut, G.; Brehmer, P.; Bost, C. A.; Guinet, C.; Cherel, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Large parts of the Southern Ocean waters are rich in macronutrients, but blooms of phytoplankton occur in a patchy and localized way. This is in part due to the presence of sources of limiting micronutrients scattered along the continental breaks, whose inputs are stirred into the open ocean very inhomogeneously. At the highest levels of ecosystems, top predators reveal areas of ecological importance where no other information is available on the underpinning trophic web. A dramatic example of this situation is provided by the region around Kerguelen archipelago, in the Southern Indian Ocean. Here, the high nutrient, low iron waters transported eastward by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current encounter the iron-rich Kerguelen shelf break. As a consequence, a plume of high chlorophyll water develops east of the plateau, extending from the shelf break for hundreds of kms into the open ocean, and strongly modulated by the intense mesoscale activity. Large populations of top predators use this area to forage during the summer periode, despite very scarce knowledge on their micronektonic prey and on mid-trophic oragnisms. By combining in campaign data, satellite observations, and biologging, we adopt an end-to-end approach and describe the mechanisms by which the ocean physics impacts the regional biogeochemistry firstly by redistributing iron-rich coastal waters into the open ocean, and then by focusing on the trophic interactions. We consider in particular the role of mesoscale eddies and submesoscale fronts, whose temporal dynamics resonates with biological processes and organises the variability of ecosystems.

  18. Efficiency of carbon removal per added iron in ocean iron fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, Hein J. W.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Laan, Patrick; Timmermans, Klaas R.

    2008-01-01

    The major response to ocean iron fertilization is by large diatoms, which at Fe-replete ambient seawater show an optimum C:Fe elemental ratio of similar to 23 000 and a higher ratio of similar to 160 000 or more under Fe-limited conditions. The efficiency of CO2 drawdown during the several weeks of

  19. Petasaria heterolepis (Prymnesiaceae) from the southern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, S.; Mohan, R.; Gazi, S.; Shetye, S.; Jafar, S.A.

    Sea surface and sub-surface (0-110m) water samples were collected from the Southern Indian Ocean between 39�S and 65�S (along ~48�E and 57.3�E) during the austral summer of 2010 which yielded Petasaria heterolepis Out of the two known P heterolepis...

  20. Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKay, R.; Naish, T.; Carter, L.; Riesselman, C.; Dunbar, R.; Sjunneskog, C.; Winter, D.; Sangiorgi, F.; Warren, C.; Pagani, M.; Schouten, S.; Willmot, V.; Levy, R.; DeConto, R.; Powell, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL

  1. Environmental and Climatological Evolution of the early Paleogene Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Through application of palynological and organic geochemical tools, this thesis provides a detailed image of the early Paleogene greenhouse-icehouse transition of the Southern Ocean. The organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) zonation for a large part of the early Paleogene may serve as guide

  2. Killer whales ( Orcinus orca ) at Marion Island, Southern Ocean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) were studied using data obtained on an opportunistic basis between 1973 and 1996 at Marion Island (46°54'S, 37°45'E) in the Southern Indian Ocean. A clear seasonal pattern of occurrence with the main peak between October and December was evident. Most killer whales were observed ...

  3. Banding of seabirds in the Southern Ocean has been undertaken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    and the South African Prince Edward Islands, 1 068 km apart in the Southern Ocean. Most movements of banded birds (57) have ... two, one of which was dead, at Prince Edward Island). Age-class at banding is unknown for one .... Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs), perhaps by way of a joint Plan of Action (FAO 2001); ...

  4. Insular endemism in Recent Southern Ocean benthic Ostracoda from Marion Island: palaeozoogeographical and evolutionary implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dingle, R.V.

    2002-01-01

    benthic ostracods, subantarctic, endemism, insularity, Marion Island, Southern Ocean, colonisation, quaternary, eyes, ocular-rejuvenation, dormant genes, evolution......benthic ostracods, subantarctic, endemism, insularity, Marion Island, Southern Ocean, colonisation, quaternary, eyes, ocular-rejuvenation, dormant genes, evolution...

  5. Planktonic blooms from the Patagonian Shelf to the Open Waters of the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Y. H.; Combes, V.; Matano, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    The Patagonian shelf hosts some of the largest chlorophyll-a blooms of the Southern Ocean. Previous studies have shown that several physical processes, including shelfbreak upwelling and tidal mixing, as well as nutrient loads from continental and groundwater discharges and aeolian dust deposition can sustain these blooms. The vigorous exchanges of mass between the deep ocean and the Patagonian shelf are also thought to be an important source of micro-nutrients for the fertilization of the Southern Ocean, the main reason why the Atlantic basin dominates the primary productivity cycle of the subpolar region. We have developed a high-resolution, coupled ecosystem/iron/circulation model to quantitatively examine the physical and bio-chemical processes underlying Patagonia's chlorophyll-a blooms and the interaction between this shelf and the deep ocean.

  6. Impact of Icebergs on Net Primary Productivity in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang-Ye; Hou, Shugui

    2017-04-01

    Productivity in the Southern Ocean (SO) is iron-limited, and supply of iron dissolved from aeolian dust is believed to be the main source from outside the marine environment. However, recent studies show that icebergs could provide comparable amount of bioavailable iron to the SO as aeolian dust. In addition, small scale areal studies suggest increased concentrations of chlorophyll, krill, and seabirds surrounding icebergs. Based on previous research, this study aims to examine whether iceberg occurrence has a significant impact on marine productivity at the scale of the SO, using remote sensing data of iceberg occurrences and ocean net primary productivity (NPP) covering the period 2002-2014. The impacts of both large and small icebergs are examined in four major ecological zones of the SO: the continental shelf zone (CSZ), the seasonal ice zone (SIZ), the permanent open ocean zone (POOZ) and the polar front zone (PFZ). We found that both large and small icebergs have an observable positive impact on NPP, but their impacts vary in different zones. Small icebergs on average increase NPP in most iron deficient zones: by 21% for the SIZ, 16% for the POOZ, and 12% for the PFZ, but have relatively small effect in the CSZ where iron is supplied from melt water and sediment input from the continent. Large icebergs on average increase the NPP by about 10%. Their impacts are stronger at higher latitudes, where they are more concentrated. From 1992-2014, there is a significant increasing trend for both small and large icebergs. The increase was most rapid in the early 2000s, and has levelled off since then. As the climate continues to warm, the Antarctic Ice Sheet is expected to experience increased mass loss as a whole, which could lead to more icebergs in the region. Based on our study, this could result in higher level of NPP in the SO as a whole, providing a negative feedback for global warming.

  7. Exploring the link between micro-nutrients and phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean during the 2007 austral summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel eHassler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bottle assays and large-scale fertilisation experiments have demonstrated that, in the Southern Ocean, iron often controls the biomass and the biodiversity of primary producers. To grow, phytoplankton need numerous other trace metals (micronutrients required for the activity of key enzymes and other intracellular functions. However, little is known of the potential these other trace elements have to limit the growth of phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. This study investigates the link between the distribution of several micronutrients (Zn, Co, Cu, Cd, Ni and phytoplankton from samples collected during the SAZ-Sense oceanographic expedition (RV Aurora Australis, Jan.–Feb. 2007. Larger phytoplankton are usually associated with lower diffusive supply and higher micronutrient requirement; for this reason, the delineation between phytoplankton larger than 10 µm and those with a size ranging from 0.8–10 µm was made. In addition, different species of phytoplankton may have different requirements to sustain their growth; the phytoplankton biodiversity here was inferred using biomarker pigments. This study, therefore, attempts to elucidate whether micronutrients other than iron need to be considered as parameters for controlling the phytoplankton growth in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean. Understanding of the parameters controlling phytoplankton is paramount, as it affects the functioning of the Southern Ocean, its marine resources and ultimately the global carbon cycle.

  8. Contribution of topographically generated submesoscale turbulence to Southern Ocean overturning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaozhou; Thompson, Andrew F.; Flexas, Mar M.; Sprintall, Janet

    2017-11-01

    The ocean's global overturning circulation regulates the transport and storage of heat, carbon and nutrients. Upwelling across the Southern Ocean's Antarctic Circumpolar Current and into the mixed layer, coupled to water mass modification by surface buoyancy forcing, has been highlighted as a key process in the closure of the overturning circulation. Here, using twelve high-resolution hydrographic sections in southern Drake Passage, collected with autonomous ocean gliders, we show that Circumpolar Deep Water originating from the North Atlantic, known as Lower Circumpolar Deep Water, intersects sloping topography in narrow and strong boundary currents. Observations of strong lateral buoyancy gradients, enhanced bottom turbulence, thick bottom mixed layers and modified water masses are consistent with growing evidence that topographically generated submesoscale flows over continental slopes enhance near-bottom mixing, and that cross-density upwelling occurs preferentially over sloping topography. Interactions between narrow frontal currents and topography occur elsewhere along the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which leads us to propose that such interactions contribute significantly to the closure of the overturning in the Southern Ocean.

  9. Ocean sea-ice modelling in the Southern Ocean around Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An eddy-resolving coupled ocean sea-ice modelling is carried out in the Southern Ocean region (9∘–78∘E; 51∘–71∘S) using the MITgcm. The model domain incorporates the Indian Antarctic stations, Maitri (11.7∘E; 70.7∘S) and Bharati (76.1∘E; 69.4∘S). The realistic simulation of the surface variables, namely, sea ...

  10. Planktonic foraminiferal biogeography in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean: Contribution from CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilland, Julie; Fabri-Ruiz, Salomé; Koubbi, Philippe; Monaco, Claire Lo; Cotte, Cédric; Hosie, Graham W.; Sanchez, Sophie; Howa, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Southern Ocean-Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey, the oceanic regions around Crozet and Kerguelen Islands were investigated in February-March 2013. Living planktonic Foraminifera (LPF) were collected in the upper mixed layer with a CPR along a 2160 nautical mile sea transect that crossed main hydrological fronts in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. In the SO-CPR database, mean total abundances of Foraminifera occurring during late austral summer are highly variable at an inter-annual scale, from 10 to 250 ind.m-3, representing 10-40% of the total zooplankton abundance, respectively. In the Southern Ocean, major inter-annual changes in zooplankton community structure were already reported. In this study, we describe the large scale distributional pattern of individual planktonic foraminiferal species living in near-surface waters of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, and we attempt to explain why major spatial variability in relative species abundances occurs during a late austral summer. In February-March 2013, LPF total abundances recorded between 42.86°S and 56.42°S ranged from 0 to a maximum of 258 ind.m-3. In the Open Ocean Zone, the LPF community was composed of four major species (Globigerinita uvula, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Globigerina bulloides). Generally, LPF total abundances are supposed to mirror primary production induced by hydrological fronts or induced by topography near Crozet and Kerguelen Islands. However, during late austral summer 2013, high foraminiferal abundances in the upper mixed layer did not always match the pattern of near-surface primary production (high Chl-a concentration areas delineated from satellite imagery). Low LPF standing stocks in late austral summer in the Southern Ocean contrasted with the presence of high densities of heavily silicified diatoms. This suggests that the late bloom

  11. A biologically relevant method for considering patterns of oceanic retention in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mao; Corney, Stuart P.; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Klocker, Andreas; Sumner, Michael; Constable, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Many marine species have planktonic forms - either during a larval stage or throughout their lifecycle - that move passively or are strongly influenced by ocean currents. Understanding these patterns of movement is important for informing marine ecosystem management and for understanding ecological processes generally. Retention of biological particles in a particular area due to ocean currents has received less attention than transport pathways, particularly for the Southern Ocean. We present a method for modelling retention time, based on the half-life for particles in a particular region, that is relevant for biological processes. This method uses geostrophic velocities at the ocean surface, derived from 23 years of satellite altimetry data (1993-2016), to simulate the advection of passive particles during the Southern Hemisphere summer season (from December to March). We assess spatial patterns in the retention time of passive particles and evaluate the processes affecting these patterns for the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Our results indicate that the distribution of retention time is related to bathymetric features and the resulting ocean dynamics. Our analysis also reveals a moderate level of consistency between spatial patterns of retention time and observations of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) distribution.

  12. Observations of frozen skin of southern ocean from multifrequency scanning microwave radiometer (MSMR) onboard oceansat - 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, N.; Bhandari, S.; Dash, M.; Pandey, P.; Khare, N.

    Encircling the Antarctic, Southern Ocean connects all the three oceans of the world with fastest current system found anywhere in the world. The region is thermally very stable and is covered with ice, which has a strong seasonal variability. The sea ice pulsates annually with seasonal migration varying from 4 million square kilometer to 20 million square kilometer during summer and winter respectively. This has strong influence on energy balance of the ocean-ice-atmosphere system, and hence on atmospheric general circulation affecting weather and climate. Sea ice also works as an insulator thus inhibiting the energy flux between ocean and atmosphere. It also influences the ecosystem of the southern ocean, which has rich fish resources with global economic values such as krill and tooth fish. During winter Krill survives on algae found at the under side of the sea ice. The southern ocean is known to have high nutrition but low concentration of chlorophyll-a, which is a proxy of the phytoplankton. It is now understood that iron is the limiting factor as has been shown by various iron fertilization experiments. Passive microwave radiometry from space has been extensively used for the study of sea ice types and concentration in the Arctic and the Antarctic regions. Since late 1970s, data from SMMR and SSM/I have been used to study trends in sea ice extent and area. We have further extended the above studies by using data from OCEANSAT - 1 MSMR. The data, acquired at 18 GHz (H) with 50 kilometer resolution and having a swath of 1360 kilometer and a repeat cycle of 2 days, was processed to generate the brightness temperature maps over the Antarctica for a period of 2 years and the results were analyzed in conjunction with those obtained earlier (since 1978) through the study of SMMR and SSM/I data. Besides strong seasonal variability, our analysis shows an increasing trend in the sea ice extent during the recent years and the rate appears to be accelerating contrary to

  13. Ocean Iron Fertilization in the Context of the Kyoto Protocol and the Post-Kyoto Process

    OpenAIRE

    Bertram, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Ocean iron fertilization is currently discussed as a potential measure to mitigate climate change by enhancing oceanic CO2 uptake. Its mitigation potential is not yet well explored, and carbon offsets generated through iron fertilization activities could currently not be traded on regulated carbon markets. Still, commercial interests in ocean iron fertilization already exist, which underlines the need to investigate a possible regulatory framework for it. To this end, I first discuss importan...

  14. Krill excretion boosts microbial activity in the Southern Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Arístegui

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill are known to release large amounts of inorganic and organic nutrients to the water column. Here we test the role of krill excretion of dissolved products in stimulating heterotrophic bacteria on the basis of three experiments where ammonium and organic excretory products released by krill were added to bacterial assemblages, free of grazers. Our results demonstrate that the addition of krill excretion products (but not of ammonium alone, at levels expected in krill swarms, greatly stimulates bacteria resulting in an order-of-magnitude increase in growth and production. Furthermore, they suggest that bacterial growth rate in the Southern Ocean is suppressed well below their potential by resource limitation. Enhanced bacterial activity in the presence of krill, which are major sources of DOC in the Southern Ocean, would further increase recycling processes associated with krill activity, resulting in highly efficient krill-bacterial recycling that should be conducive to stimulating periods of high primary productivity in the Southern Ocean.

  15. Modulation of the Southern Ocean cadmium isotope signature by ocean circulation and primary productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Alderkamp, A.C.; Middag, R.; Laan, P.; Feldmann, H.; Andreae, M.O.

    2011-01-01

    The High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) Southern Ocean plays a key role in regulating the biological pump and the global carbon cycle. Here we examine the efficacy of stable cadmium (Cd) isotope fractionation for detecting differences in biological productivity between regions. Our results show

  16. Bioavailability of organically bound Fe to model phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hassler

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is known to be mostly bound to organic ligands and to limit primary productivity in the Southern Ocean. It is thus important to investigate the bioavailability of organically bound Fe. In this study, we used four phytoplankton species of the Southern Ocean (Phaeocystis sp., Chaetoceros sp., Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Thalassiosira antarctica Comber to measure the influence of various organic ligands on Fe solubility and bioavailability. Short-term uptake Fe:C ratios were inversely related to the surface area to volume ratios of the phytoplankton. The ratio of extracellular to intracellular Fe is used to discuss the relative importance of diffusive supply and uptake to control Fe bioavailability. The effect of excess organic ligands on Fe bioavailability cannot be solely explained by their effect on Fe solubility. For most strains studied, the bioavailability of Fe can be enhanced relative to inorganic Fe in the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides whereas it was decreased in presence of hydroxamate siderophore and organic amine. For Thalassiosira, iron bioavailability was not affected by the presence of porphyrin, catecholate siderophore and saccharides. The enhancement of Fe bioavailability in presence of saccharides is presented as the result from both the formation of bioavailable (or chemically labile organic form of Fe and the stabilisation of Fe within the dissolved phase. Given the ubiquitous presence of saccharides in the ocean, these compounds might represent an important factor to control the basal level of soluble and bioavailable Fe. Results show that the use of model phytoplankton is promising to improve mechanistic understanding of Fe bioavailability and primary productivity in HNLC regions of the ocean.

  17. Connecting tropical climate change with Southern Ocean heat uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yen-Ting; Xie, Shang-Ping; Deser, Clara; Kang, Sarah M.

    2017-09-01

    Under increasing greenhouse gas forcing, climate models project tropical warming that is greater in the Northern than the Southern Hemisphere, accompanied by a reduction in the northeast trade winds and a strengthening of the southeast trades. While the ocean-atmosphere coupling indicates a positive feedback, what triggers the coupled asymmetry and favors greater warming in the northern tropics remains unclear. Far away from the tropics, the Southern Ocean (SO) has been identified as the major region of ocean heat uptake. Beyond its local effect on the magnitude of sea surface warming, we show by idealized modeling experiments in a coupled slab ocean configuration that enhanced SO heat uptake has a profound global impact. This SO-to-tropics connection is consistent with southward atmospheric energy transport across the equator. Enhanced SO heat uptake results in a zonally asymmetric La-Nina-like pattern of sea surface temperature change that not only affects tropical precipitation but also has influences on the Asian and North American monsoons.

  18. Topographic enhancement of vertical turbulent mixing in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayek, A.; Ferrari, R.; Merrifield, S.; Ledwell, J. R.; St Laurent, L.; Garabato, A. Naveira

    2017-03-01

    It is an open question whether turbulent mixing across density surfaces is sufficiently large to play a dominant role in closing the deep branch of the ocean meridional overturning circulation. The diapycnal and isopycnal mixing experiment in the Southern Ocean found the turbulent diffusivity inferred from the vertical spreading of a tracer to be an order of magnitude larger than that inferred from the microstructure profiles at the mean tracer depth of 1,500 m in the Drake Passage. Using a high-resolution ocean model, it is shown that the fast vertical spreading of tracer occurs when it comes in contact with mixing hotspots over rough topography. The sparsity of such hotspots is made up for by enhanced tracer residence time in their vicinity due to diffusion toward weak bottom flows. The increased tracer residence time may explain the large vertical fluxes of heat and salt required to close the abyssal circulation.

  19. Solubility of iron and other trace elements in rainwater collected on the Kerguelen Islands (South Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heimburger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The soluble fraction of aerosols that is deposited on the open ocean is vital for phytoplankton growth. It is believed that a large proportion of this dissolved fraction is bioavailable for marine biota and thus plays an important role in primary production, especially in HNLC oceanic areas where this production is limited by micronutrient supply. There is still much uncertainty surrounding the solubility of atmospheric particles in global biogeochemical cycles and it is not well understood. In this study, we present the solubilities of seven elements (Al, Ce, Fe, La, Mn, Nd, Ti in rainwater on the Kerguelen Islands, in the middle of the Southern Indian Ocean. The solubilities of elements exhibit high values, generally greater than 70%, and Ti remains the least soluble element. Because the Southern Indian Ocean is remote from its dust sources, only a fraction of smaller aerosols reaches the Kerguelen Islands after undergoing several cloud and chemical processes during their transport, resulting in a drastic increase in solubility. Finally, we deduced an average soluble iron deposition flux of 27 ± 6 μg m−2 d−1 (~0.5 μmol m−2 d−1 for the studied oceanic area, taking into account a median iron solubility of 82% ± 18%.

  20. Towards accounting for dissolved iron speciation in global ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tagliabue

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The trace metal iron (Fe is now routinely included in state-of-the-art ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry models (OGCBMs because of its key role as a limiting nutrient in regions of the world ocean important for carbon cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange. However, the complexities of the seawater Fe cycle, which impact its speciation and bioavailability, are simplified in such OGCBMs due to gaps in understanding and to avoid high computational costs. In a similar fashion to inorganic carbon speciation, we outline a means by which the complex speciation of Fe can be included in global OGCBMs in a reasonably cost-effective manner. We construct an Fe speciation model based on hypothesised relationships between rate constants and environmental variables (temperature, light, oxygen, pH, salinity and assumptions regarding the binding strengths of Fe complexing organic ligands and test hypotheses regarding their distributions. As a result, we find that the global distribution of different Fe species is tightly controlled by spatio-temporal environmental variability and the distribution of Fe binding ligands. Impacts on bioavailable Fe are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding which Fe species are bioavailable and how those species vary in space and time. When forced by representations of future ocean circulation and climate we find large changes to the speciation of Fe governed by pH mediated changes to redox kinetics. We speculate that these changes may exert selective pressure on phytoplankton Fe uptake strategies in the future ocean. In future work, more information on the sources and sinks of ocean Fe ligands, their bioavailability, the cycling of colloidal Fe species and kinetics of Fe-surface coordination reactions would be invaluable. We hope our modeling approach can provide a means by which new observations of Fe speciation can be tested against hypotheses of the processes present in governing the ocean Fe cycle in an

  1. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmy, Philipp; Smetacek, Victor; Montresor, Marina; Klaas, Christine; Henjes, Joachim; Strass, Volker H; Arrieta, Jesús M; Bathmann, Ulrich; Berg, Gry M; Breitbarth, Eike; Cisewski, Boris; Friedrichs, Lars; Fuchs, Nike; Herndl, Gerhard J; Jansen, Sandra; Krägefsky, Sören; Latasa, Mikel; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Scharek, Renate; Schüller, Susanne E; Steigenberger, Sebastian; Webb, Adrian; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2013-12-17

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is the major hub of oceanic nutrient distribution, selective silicon sequestration there limits diatom blooms elsewhere and consequently the biotic carbon sequestration potential of the entire ocean. We investigated this paradox in an in situ iron fertilization experiment by comparing accumulation and sinking of diatom populations inside and outside the iron-fertilized patch over 5 wk. A bloom comprising various thin- and thick-shelled diatom species developed inside the patch despite the presence of large grazer populations. After the third week, most of the thinner-shelled diatom species underwent mass mortality, formed large, mucous aggregates, and sank out en masse (carbon sinkers). In contrast, thicker-shelled species, in particular Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, persisted in the surface layers, sank mainly empty shells continuously, and reduced silicate concentrations to similar levels both inside and outside the patch (silica sinkers). These patterns imply that thick-shelled, hence grazer-protected, diatom species evolved in response to heavy copepod grazing pressure in the presence of an abundant silicate supply. The ecology of these silica-sinking species decouples silicon and carbon cycles in the iron-limited Southern Ocean, whereas carbon-sinking species, when stimulated by iron fertilization, export more carbon per silicon. Our results suggest that large-scale iron fertilization of the silicate-rich Southern Ocean will not change silicon sequestration but will add carbon to the sinking silica flux.

  2. Mesoscale and submesoscale variability in Drake Passage, Southern Ocean: observations from ocean gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. F.; Flexas Sbert, M.; Sprintall, J.; Viglione, G.; Ruan, X.; Erickson, Z. K.

    2016-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the most energetic regions of the global ocean. Its unique environment, characterized by strong, equivalent barotropic zonal flows and the outcropping of a broad range of density classes with outcrop, means that its mesoscale and submesoscale characteristics may be very different from other regions of the ocean. Observations of the Southern Ocean's subsurface velocity and density structure at mesoscale and submesoscale resolution are extremely limited. Here we present results deriving from observations collected by ocean gliders across two years. The first deployment, carried out during austral summer 2014-2015, used two gliders to focus on the interaction between the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with the continental shelf and slope of the Antarctic Peninsula. Across three months of observations, we show that there are abrupt changes in mixed layer depths, eddy formation process and lateral surface buoyancy gradients occur across the Shackleton Fracture Zone (SFZ). We will also present recent observations from two ocean gliders deployed in southern Drake Passage in austral fall and winter, 2016 (May through August). These gliders completed multiple meridional transects across Drake Passage, including crossings of both the Polar Front and the Subantarctic Front. The gliders were flown in parallel for most of the mission with a spatial separation of approximately 10 km, permitting a three-dimensional calculation of buoyancy gradients in the upper 1000 m at submesoscale resolution. Preliminary results show that stratification and velocity structures indicative of submesoscale instabilities are strongly localized by the position of the ACC's frontal currents. Thin intrusions with vertical scales as small as 20 m as also pervasive in these frontal regions. This data set will be used to characterize the type and frequency of submesoscale instabilities that occur in winter when mixed layer depths are between 100 and

  3. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavenia Ratnarajah

    Full Text Available The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas.

  4. The biogeochemical role of baleen whales and krill in Southern Ocean nutrient cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Bowie, Andrew R; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M; Nicol, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The availability of micronutrients is a key factor that affects primary productivity in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the Southern Ocean. Nutrient supply is governed by a range of physical, chemical and biological processes, and there are significant feedbacks within the ecosystem. It has been suggested that baleen whales form a crucial part of biogeochemical cycling processes through the consumption of nutrient-rich krill and subsequent defecation, but data on their contribution are scarce. We analysed the concentration of iron, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, phosphorus and carbon in baleen whale faeces and muscle, and krill tissue using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Metal concentrations in krill tissue were between 20 thousand and 4.8 million times higher than typical Southern Ocean HNLC seawater concentrations, while whale faecal matter was between 276 thousand and 10 million times higher. These findings suggest that krill act as a mechanism for concentrating and retaining elements in the surface layer, which are subsequently released back into the ocean, once eaten by whales, through defecation. Trace metal to carbon ratios were also higher in whale faeces compared to whale muscle indicating that whales are concentrating carbon and actively defecating trace elements. Consequently, recovery of the great whales may facilitate the recycling of nutrients via defecation, which may affect productivity in HNLC areas.

  5. Increased dust deposition in the Pacific Southern Ocean during glacial periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Frank; Gersonde, Rainer; Winckler, Gisela; Esper, Oliver; Jaeschke, Andrea; Kuhn, Gerhard; Ullermann, Johannes; Martinez-Garcia, Alfredo; Lambert, Fabrice; Kilian, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Dust deposition across the Southern Ocean plays a critical role for marine biological production through iron fertilization and is supposed to control a significant fraction of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 changes. However, in the Pacific, the largest Southern Ocean sector, reliable sediment records are sparse and climate models mostly indicate low dust deposition both for modern times and the last glacial maximum. Here, we present comprehensive data-sets of dust supply based on the analysis of sediment records recently retrieved across the Pacific Southern Ocean. The shape and glacial/interglacial pattern of lithogenic sediment input records in the western and central sector reveals strong similarities to dust records from Antarctica and the South Atlantic. Though our new data document substantial sediment redistribution, glacial dust mass accumulation rates corrected for sediment focusing exceed interglacial values by a factor of ~3. The first-order changes in Subantarctic biological productivity largely follow increased dust supply during glacials. Taken together our new sediment records document a substantial glacial dust supply from Australian and New Zealand sources to the Pacific SO sector eastward to at least 125°W. Such enhancement of dust supply is consistent with stronger aridity in Australia and a glacial dust source in New Zealand. Although the most likely dust source for the South Pacific is Australia/New Zealand, the glacial/interglacial pattern and timing of lithogenic sediment deposition is similar to dust records from Antarctica and the South Atlantic dominated by Patagonian sources. These similarities imply large-scale common climate forcings such as latitudinal shifts of the southern westerlies and regionally enhanced glaciogenic dust mobilization in New Zealand and Patagonia.

  6. The Impact of Fish and the Commercial Marine Harvest on the Ocean Iron Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Allison R Moreno; Haffa, Arlene L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, bioavailable iron limits marine primary production in about one third of the ocean. This lack of iron availability has implications in climate change because the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by phytoplankton requires iron. Using literature values for global fish biomass estimates, and elemental composition data we estimate that fish biota store between 0.7-7 × 10(11) g of iron. Additionally, the global fi...

  7. Effects of whaling on the structure of the Southern Ocean food web: insights on the "krill surplus" from ecosystem modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Surma

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the ecological plausibility of the "krill surplus" hypothesis and the effects of whaling on the Southern Ocean food web using mass-balance ecosystem modelling. The depletion trajectory and unexploited biomass of each rorqual population in the Antarctic was reconstructed using yearly catch records and a set of species-specific surplus production models. The resulting estimates of the unexploited biomass of Antarctic rorquals were used to construct an Ecopath model of the Southern Ocean food web existing in 1900. The rorqual depletion trajectory was then used in an Ecosim scenario to drive rorqual biomasses and examine the "krill surplus" phenomenon and whaling effects on the food web in the years 1900-2008. An additional suite of Ecosim scenarios reflecting several hypothetical trends in Southern Ocean primary productivity were employed to examine the effect of bottom-up forcing on the documented krill biomass trend. The output of the Ecosim scenarios indicated that while the "krill surplus" hypothesis is a plausible explanation of the biomass trends observed in some penguin and pinniped species in the mid-20th century, the excess krill biomass was most likely eliminated by a rapid decline in primary productivity in the years 1975-1995. Our findings suggest that changes in physical conditions in the Southern Ocean during this time period could have eliminated the ecological effects of rorqual depletion, although the mechanism responsible is currently unknown. Furthermore, a decline in iron bioavailability due to rorqual depletion may have contributed to the rapid decline in overall Southern Ocean productivity during the last quarter of the 20th century. The results of this study underscore the need for further research on historical changes in the roles of top-down and bottom-up forcing in structuring the Southern Ocean food web.

  8. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1–2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle. PMID:27911777

  9. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1-2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  10. The SOOS Data Portal, providing access to Southern Oceans data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Roger; Finney, Kim; Blain, Peter; Taylor, Fiona; Newman, Louise; Meredith, Mike; Schofield, Oscar

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) is an international initiative to enhance, coordinate and expand the strategic observations of the Southern Oceans that are required to address key scientific and societal challenges. A key component of SOOS will be the creation and maintenance of a Southern Ocean Data Portal to provide improved access to historical and ongoing data (Schofield et al., 2012, Eos, Vol. 93, No. 26, pp 241-243). The scale of this effort will require strong leveraging of existing data centres, new cyberinfrastructure development efforts, and defined data collection, quality control, and archiving procedures across the international community. The task of assembling the SOOS data portal is assigned to the SOOS Data Management Sub-Committee. The information infrastructure chosen for the SOOS data portal is based on the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au). The AODN infrastructure is built on open-source tools and the use of international standards ensures efficiency of data exchange and interoperability between contributing systems. OGC standard web services protocols are used for serving of data via the internet. These include Web Map Service (WMS) for visualisation, Web Feature Service (WFS) for data download, and Catalogue Service for Web (CSW) for catalogue exchange. The portal offers a number of tools to access and visualize data: - a Search link to the metadata catalogue enables search and discovery by simple text search, by geographic area, temporal extent, keyword, parameter, organisation, or by any combination of these, allowing users to gain access to further information and/or the data for download. Also, searches can be restricted to items which have either data to download, or attached map layers, or both - a Map interface for discovery and display of data, with the ability to change the style and opacity of layers, add additional data layers via OGC Web Map Services, view animated timeseries datastreams

  11. Pleistocene atmospheric CO2 change linked to Southern Ocean nutrient utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, M.; Diz, P.; Hall, I. R.; Zahn, R.

    2011-12-01

    Biological uptake of CO2 by the ocean and its subsequent storage in the abyss is intimately linked with the global carbon cycle and constitutes a significant climatic force1. The Southern Ocean is a particularly important region because its wind-driven upwelling regime brings CO2 laden abyssal waters to the surface that exchange CO2 with the atmosphere. The Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) is a CO2 sink and also drives global primary productivity as unutilized nutrients, advected with surface waters from the south, are exported via Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) as preformed nutrients to the low latitudes where they fuel the biological pump in upwelling areas. Recent model estimates suggest that up to 40 ppm of the total 100 ppm atmospheric pCO2 reduction during the last ice age were driven by increased nutrient utilization in the SAZ and associated feedbacks on the deep ocean alkalinity. Micro-nutrient fertilization by iron (Fe), contained in the airborne dust flux to the SAZ, is considered to be the prime factor that stimulated this elevated photosynthetic activity thus enhancing nutrient utilization. We present a millennial-scale record of the vertical stable carbon isotope gradient between subsurface and deep water (Δδ13C) in the SAZ spanning the past 350,000 years. The Δδ13C gradient, derived from planktonic and benthic foraminifera, reflects the efficiency of biological pump and is highly correlated (rxy = -0.67 with 95% confidence interval [0.63; 0.71], n=874) with the record of dust flux preserved in Antarctic ice cores6. This strongly suggests that nutrient utilization in the SAZ was dynamically coupled to dust-induced Fe fertilization across both glacial-interglacial and faster millennial timescales. In concert with ventilation changes of the deep Southern Ocean this drove ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange and, ultimately, atmospheric pCO2 variability during the late Pleistocene.

  12. Stable Composition of the Nano- and Picoplankton Community during the Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiment LOHAFEX

    KAUST Repository

    Thiele, Stefan

    2014-11-17

    The iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX was conducted in a cold-core eddy in the Southern Atlantic Ocean during austral summer. Within a few days after fertilization, a phytoplankton bloom developed dominated by nano- and picoplankton groups. Unlike previously reported for other iron fertilization experiments, a diatom bloom was prevented by iron and silicate co-limitation. We used 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity of these morphologically similar cell types within the nano- and picoplankton and microscopically enumerated dominant clades after catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes. In addition to Phaeocystis, members of Syndiniales group II, clade 10–11, and the Micromonas clades ABC and E made up a major fraction of the tag sequences of the nano- and picoplankton community within the fertilized patch. However, the same clades were also dominant before the bloom and outside the fertilized patch. Furthermore, only little changes in diversity could be observed over the course of the experiment. These results were corroborated by CARD-FISH analysis which confirmed the presence of a stable nano- and picoplankton community dominated by Phaeocystis and Micromonas during the entire course of the experiment. Interestingly, although Syndiniales dominated the tag sequences, they could hardly be detected by CARD-FISH, possibly due to the intracellular parasitic life style of this clade. The remarkable stability of the nano- and picoplankton community points to a tight coupling of the different trophic levels within the microbial food web during LOHAFEX.

  13. Stable composition of the nano- and picoplankton community during the ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Stefan; Wolf, Christian; Schulz, Isabelle Katharina; Assmy, Philipp; Metfies, Katja; Fuchs, Bernhard M

    2014-01-01

    The iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX was conducted in a cold-core eddy in the Southern Atlantic Ocean during austral summer. Within a few days after fertilization, a phytoplankton bloom developed dominated by nano- and picoplankton groups. Unlike previously reported for other iron fertilization experiments, a diatom bloom was prevented by iron and silicate co-limitation. We used 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity of these morphologically similar cell types within the nano- and picoplankton and microscopically enumerated dominant clades after catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes. In addition to Phaeocystis, members of Syndiniales group II, clade 10-11, and the Micromonas clades ABC and E made up a major fraction of the tag sequences of the nano- and picoplankton community within the fertilized patch. However, the same clades were also dominant before the bloom and outside the fertilized patch. Furthermore, only little changes in diversity could be observed over the course of the experiment. These results were corroborated by CARD-FISH analysis which confirmed the presence of a stable nano- and picoplankton community dominated by Phaeocystis and Micromonas during the entire course of the experiment. Interestingly, although Syndiniales dominated the tag sequences, they could hardly be detected by CARD-FISH, possibly due to the intracellular parasitic life style of this clade. The remarkable stability of the nano- and picoplankton community points to a tight coupling of the different trophic levels within the microbial food web during LOHAFEX.

  14. Early summer southern China rainfall variability and its oceanic drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijing; Ren, Hong-Chang; Zuo, Jinqing; Ren, Hong-Li

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall in southern China reaches its annual peak in early summer (May-June) with strong interannual variability. Using a combination of observational analysis and numerical modeling, the present study investigates the leading modes of this variability and its dynamic drivers. A zonal dipole pattern termed the southern China Dipole (SCD) is found to be the dominant feature in early summer during 1979-2014, and is closely related to a low-level anomalous anticyclone over the Philippine Sea (PSAC) and a Eurasian wave-train pattern over the mid-high latitudes. Linear regressions based on observations and numerical experiments using the CAM5 model suggest that the associated atmospheric circulation anomalies in early summer are linked to decaying El Niño-Southern Oscillation-like sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the tropical Pacific, basin-scale SST anomalies in the tropical Indian Ocean, and meridional tripole-like SST anomalies in the North Atlantic in the previous winter to early summer. The tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean SST anomalies primarily exert an impact on the SCD through changing the polarity of the PSAC, while the North Atlantic tripole-like SST anomalies mainly exert a downstream impact on the SCD by inducing a Eurasian wave-train pattern. The North Atlantic tripole-like SST anomalies also make a relatively weak contribution to the variations of the PSAC and SCD through a subtropical teleconnection. Modeling results indicate that the three-basin combined forcing has a greater impact on the SCD and associated circulation anomalies than the individual influence from any single oceanic basin.

  15. No iron fertilization in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, K M; McManus, J F; Anderson, R F; Ren, H; Sigman, D M; Winckler, G; Fleisher, M Q; Marcantonio, F; Ravelo, A C

    2016-01-28

    The equatorial Pacific Ocean is one of the major high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions in the global ocean. In such regions, the consumption of the available macro-nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate is thought to be limited in part by the low abundance of the critical micro-nutrient iron. Greater atmospheric dust deposition could have fertilized the equatorial Pacific with iron during the last ice age--the Last Glacial Period (LGP)--but the effect of increased ice-age dust fluxes on primary productivity in the equatorial Pacific remains uncertain. Here we present meridional transects of dust (derived from the (232)Th proxy), phytoplankton productivity (using opal, (231)Pa/(230)Th and excess Ba), and the degree of nitrate consumption (using foraminifera-bound δ(15)N) from six cores in the central equatorial Pacific for the Holocene (0-10,000 years ago) and the LGP (17,000-27,000 years ago). We find that, although dust deposition in the central equatorial Pacific was two to three times greater in the LGP than in the Holocene, productivity was the same or lower, and the degree of nitrate consumption was the same. These biogeochemical findings suggest that the relatively greater ice-age dust fluxes were not large enough to provide substantial iron fertilization to the central equatorial Pacific. This may have been because the absolute rate of dust deposition in the LGP (although greater than the Holocene rate) was very low. The lower productivity coupled with unchanged nitrate consumption suggests that the subsurface major nutrient concentrations were lower in the central equatorial Pacific during the LGP. As these nutrients are today dominantly sourced from the Subantarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean, we propose that the central equatorial Pacific data are consistent with more nutrient consumption in the Subantarctic Zone, possibly owing to iron fertilization as a result of higher absolute dust fluxes in this region. Thus, ice-age iron fertilization in the

  16. Hydrographic characteristics of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rathod, V.

    sector of the Southern Ocean Page 3 of 11 file://C:\\My Documents\\articles16.htm 2/11/05 using the relation obtained by the analysis of sea water samples following Winklers’ titration method. The correlation of CTD DO values and the values obtained... through Winklers’ titration method gave the following equation: DOWink = DOCTD * 1.184175 + 0.430365, with correlation coefficient, r = 0.99. The above relation was used for correcting the CTD DO values. The analyses of calcium and magnesium were...

  17. Rapid ocean-atmosphere response to Southern Ocean freshening during the last glacial period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Christian; Jones, Richard; Phipps, Steven; Thomas, Zoë; Hogg, Alan; Kershaw, Peter; Fogwill, Christopher; Palmer, Jonathan; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Hughen, Konrad; Staff, Richard; Grosvenor, Mark; Golledge, Nicholas; Rasmussen, Sune; Hutchinson, David; Haberle, Simon; Lorrey, Andrew; Boswijk, Gretel

    2017-04-01

    Contrasting Greenland and Antarctic temperature trends during the late last glacial period (60,000 to 11,703 years ago) are thought to be driven by imbalances in the rate of formation of North Atlantic and Antarctic Deep Water (the 'bipolar seesaw'), with cooling in the north leading the onset of warming in the south. Some events, however, appear to have occurred independently of changes in deep water formation but still have a southern expression, implying that an alternative mechanism may have driven some global climatic changes during the glacial. Testing these competing hypotheses is challenging given the relatively large uncertainties associated with correlating terrestrial, marine and ice core records of abrupt change. Here we exploit a bidecadally-resolved 14C calibration dataset obtained from New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) to undertake high-precision alignment of key climate datasets spanning 28,400 to 30,400 years ago. We observe no divergence between terrestrial and marine 14C datasets implying limited impact of freshwater hosing on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). However, an ice-rafted debris event (SA2) in Southern Ocean waters appears to be associated with dramatic synchronous warming over the North Atlantic and contrasting precipitation patterns across the low latitudes. Using a fully coupled climate system model we undertook an ensemble of transient meltwater simulations and find that a southern salinity anomaly can trigger low-latitude temperature changes through barotropic and baroclinic oceanic waves that are atmospherically propagated globally via a Rossby wave train, consistent with contemporary modelling studies. Our results suggest the Antarctic ice sheets and Southern Ocean dynamics may have contributed to some global climatic changes through rapid ocean-atmospheric teleconnections, with implications for past (and future) change.

  18. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  19. How well do global ocean biogeochemistry models simulate dissolved iron distributions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Aumont, Olivier; DeAth, Ros; Dunne, John P.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Galbraith, Eric; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Moore, J. Keith; Ridgwell, Andy; Sherman, Elliot; Stock, Charles; Vichi, Marcello; Völker, Christoph; Yool, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Numerical models of ocean biogeochemistry are relied upon to make projections about the impact of climate change on marine resources and test hypotheses regarding the drivers of past changes in climate and ecosystems. In large areas of the ocean, iron availability regulates the functioning of marine ecosystems and hence the ocean carbon cycle. Accordingly, our ability to quantify the drivers and impacts of fluctuations in ocean ecosystems and carbon cycling in space and time relies on first achieving an appropriate representation of the modern marine iron cycle in models. When the iron distributions from 13 global ocean biogeochemistry models are compared against the latest oceanic sections from the GEOTRACES program, we find that all models struggle to reproduce many aspects of the observed spatial patterns. Models that reflect the emerging evidence for multiple iron sources or subtleties of its internal cycling perform much better in capturing observed features than their simpler contemporaries, particularly in the ocean interior. We show that the substantial uncertainty in the input fluxes of iron results in a very wide range of residence times across models, which has implications for the response of ecosystems and global carbon cycling to perturbations. Given this large uncertainty, iron fertilization experiments based on any single current generation model should be interpreted with caution. Improvements to how such models represent iron scavenging and also biological cycling are needed to raise confidence in their projections of global biogeochemical change in the ocean.

  20. Zooplankton excretion metabolites stimulate Southern Ocean phytoplankton growth

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, A.

    2017-04-24

    Warming over Antarctica is leading to changes in the zooplankton communities inhabiting the Southern Ocean. It has been observed that zooplankton not only regulates phytoplankton through grazing, but also through the recycling of nutrients that are essential for phytoplankton growth. In this way, the effects of warming on zooplankton populations will change the amount or proportion at which recycled nutrients are restored. To estimate how the recycled nutrients released by zooplankton populations, dominated by krill (Euphausia superba), amphipods or copepods, affect the phytoplankton uptake and communities, we performed four incubation experiments: two close to the Antarctic Peninsula and two at the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our results showed a stimulating effect of the addition of metabolites on ammonia removal rates and on the net growth of phytoplankton communities, with different responses amongst the different phytoplankton groups. According to our results, phytoplankton net growth and community composition may be altered if this relevant source of nutrients is lost due to projected changes in the abundance or distribution of these zooplankton populations.

  1. Development of a southern oceanic air standard reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoderick, George C; Kelley, Michael E; Miller, Walter R; Brailsford, Gordon; Possolo, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    In 2009, the United States Congress charged the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with supporting climate change research. As part of this effort, the Gas Sensing Metrology Group at NIST began developing new gas standard mixtures for greenhouse gas mixtures relevant to atmospheric measurements. Suites of gravimetrically prepared primary standard mixtures (PSMs) were prepared at ambient concentration levels for carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a dry-air balance. In parallel, 30 gas cylinders were filled, by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in Wellington, New Zealand, to high pressure from pristine southern oceanic air at Baring Head, New Zealand, and shipped to NIST. Using spectroscopic instrumentation, NIST analyzed the 30 cylinder samples for mole fractions of CO2, CH4, and N2O. Certified values were assigned to these mixtures by calibrating the instrumentation with the PSM suites that were recently developed at NIST. These mixtures became NIST Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1721 Southern Oceanic Air and are certified for ambient mole fraction, the first of their kind for NIST. The relative expanded uncertainties corresponding to coverage intervals with 95% probability are no larger than 0.06% of the certified values, representing the smallest uncertainties to date ever assigned to an NIST gas SRM.

  2. A new primnoid genus (Anthozoa: Octocorallia from the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. López-González

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A new primnoid genus is here proposed based on the study of the type material of Primnoella gracilis Molander, 1929 and the abundant material collected during some recent Antarctic and Subantarctic cruises. The new genus, Arntzia, is compared with its closest primnoid genera, mainly Ainigmaptilon Dean and Primnoella Gray. Arntzia differs from other unbranched primnoids by a set of features such as its colonies of fleshy consistence, relatively low spicule density, polyps in whorls, fused basally, forming a common brood-chamber along the axial coenenchyme where oocytes develop, eight distalmost opercular scales larger than marginal or submarginal scales, two adaxial opercular scales smaller than the others, marginal scales in equal number to opercular, vertically aligned with opercular scales, not well-differentiated from the body scales below, and polyp body completely covered by scales, except for the proximal portion and basal part of the adaxial side. With the description of Arntzia, a total of 17 primnoid genera have been reported from the Southern Ocean (Antarctic and Subantarctic waters; moreover, 15 of them -50% of the total in the family- have been recorded exclusively in this area. Thus, the generic diversity of this family in the Southern Ocean should be considered remarkably high.

  3. The Importance of Kinetics and Redox in the Biogeochemical Cycling of Iron in the Surface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croot, Peter L.; Heller, Maija I.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that Iron (Fe) is a limiting element in many regions of the open ocean. Our current understanding of the key processes which control iron distribution in the open ocean have been largely based on thermodynamic measurements performed under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. Using this equilibrium approach, researchers have been able to detect and quantify organic complexing ligands in seawater and examine their role in increasing the overall solubility of iron. Our current knowledge about iron bioavailability to phytoplankton and bacteria is also based heavily on carefully controlled laboratory studies where it is assumed the chemical species are in equilibrium in line with the free ion association model and/or its successor the biotic ligand model. Similarly most field work on iron biogeochemistry generally consists of a single profile which is in essence a “snap-shot” in time of the system under investigation. However it is well known that the surface ocean is an extremely dynamic environment and it is unlikely if thermodynamic equilibrium between all the iron species present is ever truly achieved. In sunlit waters this is mostly due to the daily passage of the sun across the sky leading to photoredox processes which alter Fe speciation by cycling between redox states and between inorganic and organic species. Episodic deposition events, dry and wet, are also important perturbations to iron cycling as they bring in new iron to the system and alter the equilibrium between iron species and phases. Here we utilize new field data collected in the open ocean on the complexation kinetics of iron in the surface ocean to identify the important role of weak iron binding ligands (i.e., those that cannot maintain iron in solution indefinitely at seawater pH: αFeL biogeochemical cycling of iron in the ocean. PMID:22723797

  4. Oceanographic Research of Marine Hydrophysical Institute in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Artamonov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic stages of the oceanographic research carried out by Marine Hydrophysical Institute in the Southern ocean are considered. Each stage of the studies is illustrated by the schemes of expeditionary work; the most important results are presented. The oceanographic studies of Marine Hydrophysical Institute in the Southern ocean are shown to be developed in two basic directions: marine expeditionary research and analysis of the archival hydrometeorological data. Based on the results of expeditionary studies, the mechanisms of formation and variability of the water structure and circulation in the Antarctic coastal regions are described. Anomalies of hydrometeorological fields occurring along the route to Antarctica are assessed due to the measurements from the passing vessels. The archival hydrological and satellite data constitute a foundation for revealing the features of seasonal and interannual variability of the ocean surface temperature, fronts and sea ice in Antarctica. The effect of El Niño events on the interannual variation of the characteristics of Scotia Sea Front is revealed. It is shown that the formation of warm water positive anomaly areas in the tropical Pacific is caused by El Niño events. It’s accompanied by an appreciable displacement of the front to the south, by the weakening of its intensity and the decrease of temperature on the front axes. It is shown that maximum seasonal variation of the ice concentration is observed in the Weddell and Lazarev Seas. The ice in the Weddell, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Sea are shown to be exposed to the highest interannual variability.

  5. Nanoscale lignin particles as sources of dissolved iron to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Regina; von der Kammer, Frank; Jirsa, Franz; Süphandag, Altan; Krachler, Rudolf F.; Plessl, Christof; Vogt, Margret; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hofmann, Thilo

    2012-09-01

    Primary production in large areas of the open ocean is limited by low iron concentrations. Rivers are potential sources of iron to the ocean, however, riverine iron is prone to intense flocculation and sedimentation in the estuarine mixing zone. Here we report the detection of iron-rich nanoparticles in a typical peatland-draining creek which are resistant against salt-induced flocculation i.e., their behavior is in sharp contrast to the well-known behavior of Fe colloids in river waters. Sample fractionation by AsFlFFF (Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation) revealed that these powerful iron carriers are in the size range of only 0.5-3.0 nm hydrodynamic diameter. They were isolated from the water phase using solid phase extraction/gel permeation chromatography, and analyzed by a CuO oxidation/GC-MS method. Our results suggest that the particles consist mainly of lignin catabolites and that gymnosperm as well as angiosperm tissues are contributors to the seawater-resistant iron-bearing DOM. Lignin phenols, which have no autochthonous source in the ocean, have been nevertheless found in low concentrations throughout the entire Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans. It is therefore tempting to speculate that peatland-derived iron-bearing lignin particles may have a sufficiently long half-life in ocean waters to sustain iron concentration in extended regions of the ocean.

  6. Variability in the mechanisms controlling Southern Ocean phytoplankton bloom phenology in an ocean model and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Tyler; Long, Matthew C.; Kavanaugh, Maria T.; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C.

    2017-05-01

    A coupled global numerical simulation (conducted with the Community Earth System Model) is used in conjunction with satellite remote sensing observations to examine the role of top-down (grazing pressure) and bottom-up (light, nutrients) controls on marine phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean. Phytoplankton seasonal phenology is evaluated in the context of the recently proposed "disturbance-recovery" hypothesis relative to more traditional, exclusively "bottom-up" frameworks. All blooms occur when phytoplankton division rates exceed loss rates to permit sustained net population growth; however, the nature of this decoupling period varies regionally in Community Earth System Model. Regional case studies illustrate how unique pathways allow blooms to emerge despite very poor division rates or very strong grazing rates. In the Subantarctic, southeast Pacific small spring blooms initiate early cooccurring with deep mixing and low division rates, consistent with the disturbance-recovery hypothesis. Similar systematics are present in the Subantarctic, southwest Atlantic during the spring but are eclipsed by a subsequent, larger summer bloom that is coincident with shallow mixing and the annual maximum in division rates, consistent with a bottom-up, light limited framework. In the model simulation, increased iron stress prevents a similar summer bloom in the southeast Pacific. In the simulated Antarctic zone (70°S-65°S) seasonal sea ice acts as a dominant phytoplankton-zooplankton decoupling agent, triggering a delayed but substantial bloom as ice recedes. Satellite ocean color remote sensing and ocean physical reanalysis products do not precisely match model-predicted phenology, but observed patterns do indicate regional variability in mechanism across the Atlantic and Pacific.

  7. Deep-sea coral evidence for lower Southern Ocean surface nitrate concentrations during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingchen Tony; Sigman, Daniel M.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Adkins, Jess F.; Robinson, Laura F.; Hines, Sophia K.; Chai, Junyi; Studer, Anja S.; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Chen, Tianyu; Haug, Gerald H.

    2017-03-01

    The Southern Ocean regulates the ocean’s biological sequestration of CO2 and is widely suspected to underpin much of the ice age decline in atmospheric CO2 concentration, but the specific changes in the region are debated. Although more complete drawdown of surface nutrients by phytoplankton during the ice ages is supported by some sediment core-based measurements, the use of different proxies in different regions has precluded a unified view of Southern Ocean biogeochemical change. Here, we report measurements of the 15N/14N of fossil-bound organic matter in the stony deep-sea coral Desmophyllum dianthus, a tool for reconstructing surface ocean nutrient conditions. The central robust observation is of higher 15N/14N across the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 18-25 thousand years ago. These data suggest a reduced summer surface nitrate concentration in both the Antarctic and Subantarctic Zones during the LGM, with little surface nitrate transport between them. After the ice age, the increase in Antarctic surface nitrate occurred through the deglaciation and continued in the Holocene. The rise in Subantarctic surface nitrate appears to have had both early deglacial and late deglacial/Holocene components, preliminarily attributed to the end of Subantarctic iron fertilization and increasing nitrate input from the surface Antarctic Zone, respectively.

  8. A data assimilating model for estimating Southern Ocean biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdy, A.; Mazloff, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    A Biogeochemical Southern Ocean State Estimate (B-SOSE) is introduced that includes carbon and oxygen fields as well as nutrient cycles. The state estimate is constrained with observations while maintaining closed budgets and obeying dynamical and thermodynamic balances. Observations from profiling floats, shipboard data, underway measurements, and satellites are used for assimilation. The years 2008-2012 are chosen due to the relative abundance of oxygen observations from Argo floats during this time. The skill of the state estimate at fitting the data is assessed. The agreement is best for fields that are constrained with the most observations, such as surface pCO2 in Drake Passage (44% of the variance captured) and oxygen profiles (over 60% of the variance captured at 200 and 1000 m). The validity of adjoint method optimization for coupled physical-biogeochemical state estimation is demonstrated with a series of gradient check experiments. The method is shown to be mature and ready to synthesize in situ biogeochemical observations as they become more available. Documenting the B-SOSE configuration and diagnosing the strengths and weaknesses of the solution informs usage of this product as both a climate baseline and as a way to test hypotheses. Transport of Intermediate Waters across 32°S supplies significant amounts of nitrate to the Atlantic Ocean (5.57 ± 2.94 Tmol yr-1) and Indian Ocean (5.09 ± 3.06 Tmol yr-1), but much less nitrate reaches the Pacific Ocean (1.78 ± 1.91 Tmol yr-1). Estimates of air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes south of 50°S suggest a mean uptake of 0.18 Pg C/yr for the time period analyzed.

  9. Ice sheets as a significant source of highly reactive nanoparticulate iron to the oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkings, Jon R; Wadham, Jemma L; Tranter, Martyn; Raiswell, Rob; Benning, Liane G; Statham, Peter J; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Lee, Katherine; Telling, Jon

    2014-05-21

    The Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets cover ~ 10% of global land surface, but are rarely considered as active components of the global iron cycle. The ocean waters around both ice sheets harbour highly productive coastal ecosystems, many of which are iron limited. Measurements of iron concentrations in subglacial runoff from a large Greenland Ice Sheet catchment reveal the potential for globally significant export of labile iron fractions to the near-coastal euphotic zone. We estimate that the flux of bioavailable iron associated with glacial runoff is 0.40-2.54 Tg per year in Greenland and 0.06-0.17 Tg per year in Antarctica. Iron fluxes are dominated by a highly reactive and potentially bioavailable nanoparticulate suspended sediment fraction, similar to that identified in Antarctic icebergs. Estimates of labile iron fluxes in meltwater are comparable with aeolian dust fluxes to the oceans surrounding Greenland and Antarctica, and are similarly expected to increase in a warming climate with enhanced melting.

  10. Sea ice and climate feedbacks in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Rebecca; Feltham, Daniel; Holland, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Arctic sea ice is melting rapidly under the effects of climate change, but at the same time Antarctic sea ice is actually expanding overall. Understanding the reasons for this difference could provide significant insight into the workings of polar climate change. The behaviour of sea ice is not simple to understand because it is an integral part of the wider climate system, with many feedbacks affecting its evolution. For example, snow-covered sea ice is much more reflective than seawater, so if some ice is lost, the ice-ocean system will absorb more heat in summer, leading to further ice loss. There are several other important feedbacks, including examples associated with the insulating properties of sea ice, and the mixing of ocean heat up towards the surface as the ice forms. For example, during sea ice growth, the thickness of ice controls the growth rate, with the rate of growth decreasing as the ice thickens due to poorer heat conduction through the thick ice. On the other hand, increased melting of sea ice decreases the salinity of the mixed layer, therefore raising the freezing temperature of the seawater, making it easier to grow more sea ice. It is important to understand these feedbacks in the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica for many reasons. The changes in Antarctic sea ice over the last thirty years have a strong seasonal dependence, and the way that these changes grow in spring and decay in autumn suggests that feedbacks are strongly involved. The changes might ultimately be caused by winds, atmospheric warming, snowfall changes, etc., but we cannot understand these forcings without first untangling the feedbacks. A highly simplified coupled sea ice-mixed layer model has been developed to investigate the impact of feedbacks on the behaviour of sea ice in the Southern Ocean. The latest generation of climate models are very poor at modelling Antarctic sea ice. Solving this problem is of crucial importance to predicting the response of Antarctic

  11. XBT Fall-rate study in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, N.; Mata, M. M.; Azevedo, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have observed a more prominent warming of the Southern Ocean when compared to other ocean regions of the world in response to global climate change. However, the vast majority of available temperature data for that region is composed by eXpendable BathyTermographers profiles (XBTs). These probes are not equipped with a pressure sensor and thus do not measure depth directly. Depth is inferred by a fall-rate equation offered by the manufacturer that does not seem to adequately represent the extremely cold and high viscosity conditions of the region. Probes fall slower than expected and thus lead to an overestimation in heat content for those areas. In this study, a set of 850 collocated XBT (DB/T7 type) and CTD stations obtained from World Ocean Database (2013) and separated by a maximum distance of 12.5 nm and 10 hours is used. Those pairs are used to identify and quantify the depth errors in the XBT's temperature profiles, proposing a regional equation correction able to represent the peculiarities of the region. Hanawa et al. (1995) and Cheng et al. (2014) correction methods were applied to the dataset, with the latter producing better results. For the pairs in Drake Passage (151), South of Africa (244) and South of Tasmania (455), we found the ideal A coefficients to change by -0.88%, -1.4% and -2.2% from the original values, respectively. When a temperature profile is more homogeneous, there is no significant change if different values of B are used, which was proven to be true since they were .0021 for Drake Passage and .0020 for the other chokings. The ideal fall-rate equation for the Southern Ocean was determined using all pairs, being defined as instead of the proposed by the manufacturer. Overall, the results further support the hypothesis of a regional dependence of the XBT fall-rate on water temperature, and suggest the need of developing a bias correction scheme specific for the polar regions.

  12. Extraordinarily high biomass benthic community on Southern Ocean seamounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, R E; Adkins, J; Fallon, S J; Gowlett-Holmes, K; Althaus, F; Williams, A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a previously unknown assemblage of seamount-associated megabenthos that has by far the highest peak biomass reported in the deep-sea outside of vent communities. The assemblage was found at depths of 2-2.5 km on rocky geomorphic features off the southeast coast of Australia, in an area near the Sub-Antarctic Zone characterised by high rates of surface productivity and carbon export to the deep-ocean. These conditions, and the taxa in the assemblage, are widely distributed around the Southern mid-latitudes, suggesting the high-biomass assemblage is also likely to be widespread. The role of this assemblage in regional ecosystem and carbon dynamics and its sensitivities to anthropogenic impacts are unknown. The discovery highlights the lack of information on deep-sea biota worldwide and the potential for unanticipated impacts of deep-sea exploitation.

  13. Tropical teleconnections via the ocean and atmosphere induced by Southern Ocean deep convective events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gunn, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    The current generation (CMIP5) of Earth System Models (ESMs) shows a huge variability in their ability to represent Southern Ocean (SO) deep-ocean convection and Antarctic Bottom Water, with a preference for open-sea convection in the Weddell and Ross gyres. A long control simulation in a coarse 3o resolution ESM (the GFDL CM2Mc model) shows a highly regular multi-decadal oscillation between periods of SO open sea convection and non-convective periods. This process also happens naturally, with different frequencies and durations of convection across most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al, 2014). Here we assess the impact of SO deep convection and resulting sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on the tropical atmosphere and ocean via teleconnections, with a focus on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We combine analysis of our low-resolution coupled model with inter-model analysis across historical CMIP5 simulations. SST cooling south of 60S during non-convective decades triggers a stronger, northward shifted SH Hadley cell, which results in intensified northward cross-equatorial moist heat transport and a poleward shift in the ITCZ. Resulting correlations between the cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport and ITCZ location are in good agreement with recent theories (e.g. Frierson et al. 2013; Donohoe et al. 2014). Lagged correlations between a SO convective index and cross-equatorial heat transports (in the atmosphere and ocean), as well as various tropical (and ENSO) climate indices are analyzed. In the ocean realm, we find that non-convective decades result in weaker AABW formation and weaker ACC but stronger Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) formation, likely as a result of stronger SO westerlies (more positive SAM). The signals of AABW and AAIW are seen in the tropics on short timescales of years to decades in the temperature, heat storage and heat transport anomalies and also in deep and intermediate ocean oxygen. Most

  14. Stable composition of the nano- and picoplankton community during the ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Thiele

    Full Text Available The iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX was conducted in a cold-core eddy in the Southern Atlantic Ocean during austral summer. Within a few days after fertilization, a phytoplankton bloom developed dominated by nano- and picoplankton groups. Unlike previously reported for other iron fertilization experiments, a diatom bloom was prevented by iron and silicate co-limitation. We used 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity of these morphologically similar cell types within the nano- and picoplankton and microscopically enumerated dominant clades after catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH with specific oligonucleotide probes. In addition to Phaeocystis, members of Syndiniales group II, clade 10-11, and the Micromonas clades ABC and E made up a major fraction of the tag sequences of the nano- and picoplankton community within the fertilized patch. However, the same clades were also dominant before the bloom and outside the fertilized patch. Furthermore, only little changes in diversity could be observed over the course of the experiment. These results were corroborated by CARD-FISH analysis which confirmed the presence of a stable nano- and picoplankton community dominated by Phaeocystis and Micromonas during the entire course of the experiment. Interestingly, although Syndiniales dominated the tag sequences, they could hardly be detected by CARD-FISH, possibly due to the intracellular parasitic life style of this clade. The remarkable stability of the nano- and picoplankton community points to a tight coupling of the different trophic levels within the microbial food web during LOHAFEX.

  15. Stable Composition of the Nano- and Picoplankton Community during the Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiment LOHAFEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Isabelle Katharina; Assmy, Philipp; Metfies, Katja; Fuchs, Bernhard M.

    2014-01-01

    The iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX was conducted in a cold-core eddy in the Southern Atlantic Ocean during austral summer. Within a few days after fertilization, a phytoplankton bloom developed dominated by nano- and picoplankton groups. Unlike previously reported for other iron fertilization experiments, a diatom bloom was prevented by iron and silicate co-limitation. We used 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity of these morphologically similar cell types within the nano- and picoplankton and microscopically enumerated dominant clades after catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes. In addition to Phaeocystis, members of Syndiniales group II, clade 10–11, and the Micromonas clades ABC and E made up a major fraction of the tag sequences of the nano- and picoplankton community within the fertilized patch. However, the same clades were also dominant before the bloom and outside the fertilized patch. Furthermore, only little changes in diversity could be observed over the course of the experiment. These results were corroborated by CARD-FISH analysis which confirmed the presence of a stable nano- and picoplankton community dominated by Phaeocystis and Micromonas during the entire course of the experiment. Interestingly, although Syndiniales dominated the tag sequences, they could hardly be detected by CARD-FISH, possibly due to the intracellular parasitic life style of this clade. The remarkable stability of the nano- and picoplankton community points to a tight coupling of the different trophic levels within the microbial food web during LOHAFEX. PMID:25401706

  16. The impact of fish and the commercial marine harvest on the ocean iron cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R; Haffa, Arlene L M

    2014-01-01

    Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, bioavailable iron limits marine primary production in about one third of the ocean. This lack of iron availability has implications in climate change because the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by phytoplankton requires iron. Using literature values for global fish biomass estimates, and elemental composition data we estimate that fish biota store between 0.7-7 × 10(11) g of iron. Additionally, the global fish population recycles through excretion between 0.4-1.5 × 10(12) g of iron per year, which is of a similar magnitude as major recognized sources of iron (e.g. dust, sediments, ice sheet melting). In terms of biological impact this iron could be superior to dust inputs due to the distributed deposition and to the greater solubility of fecal pellets compared to inorganic minerals. To estimate a loss term due to anthropogenic activity the total commercial catch for 1950 to 2010 was obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Marine catch data were separated by taxa. High and low end values for elemental composition were obtained for each taxonomic category from the literature and used to calculate iron per mass of total harvest over time. The marine commercial catch is estimated to have removed 1-6 × 10(9) g of iron in 1950, the lowest values on record. There is an annual increase to 0.7-3 × 10(10) g in 1996, which declines to 0.6-2 × 10(10) g in 2010. While small compared to the total iron terms in the cycle, these could have compounding effects on distribution and concentration patterns globally over time. These storage, recycling, and export terms of biotic iron are not currently included in ocean iron mass balance calculations. These data suggest that fish and anthropogenic activity should be included in global oceanic iron cycles.

  17. Late Holocene diatom-based sea-surface temperature reconstruction from the Conrad Rise, Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Lisa; Mietinnen, Arto; Crosta, Xavier; Mohan, Rahul

    2017-04-01

    The Southern Ocean plays an important role in the global climate system. The temperature and sea ice extent alter the latitudinal temperature gradient of the Southern Ocean, which can be transferred to the atmosphere resulting in changes in the southern westerly winds. The temperature, sea ice and wind variations are also factors influencing Antarctic Bottom Water formation, which is a control on the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Therefore conditions in the Southern Ocean may influence the climate in the northern and southern hemispheres. The Southern Ocean and North Atlantic were connected during the Last Glacial during Dansgaard-Oeschger events, when variations in ocean circulation caused a bipolar seesaw of temperatures. For the Holocene there is less evidence for a bipolar seesaw, although recent research shows concurrent, opposite trends in ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and in the Southern Ocean. Further reconstructions are required from the Southern Ocean in particular to enable greater understanding of how the temperature and sea ice varied during the Holocene. The OCTEL project (Ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere teleconnections between the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic during the Holocene) aims to investigate the ocean, atmosphere and sea-ice teleconnections for the Holocene using new, high resolution records from both the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic. We here present initial results from diatom analysis conducted on a sediment core from the Southern Ocean, sampled from the Conrad Rise (54˚ 16.04'S, 39˚ 45.98'W). The preliminary results highlight a dominance of diatom species Fragilariopsis kerguelensis and Thalassiosira lentiginosa, with lower abundances of Thalassiothrix antarctica and Thalassiosira gracilis among others, which suggests an open ocean setting close to the polar front. The diatom data will be converted to quantitative reconstructions of summer sea surface temperature and sea ice presence using the

  18. Iron solubility driven by speciation in dust sources to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, A.W.; Crusius, J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Bostick, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Although abundant in the Earths crust, iron is present at trace concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in approximately 40% of the ocean. Current literature suggests that aerosols are the primary external source of iron to offshore waters, yet controls on iron aerosol solubility remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that iron speciation (oxidation state and bonding environment) drives iron solubility in arid region soils, glacial weathering products (flour) and oil combustion products (oil fly ash). Iron speciation varies by aerosol source, with soils in arid regions dominated by ferric (oxy)hydroxides, glacial flour by primary and secondary ferrous silicates and oil fly ash by ferric sulphate salts. Variation in iron speciation produces systematic differences in iron solubility: less than 1% of the iron in arid soils was soluble, compared with 2-3% in glacial products and 77-81% in oil combustion products, which is directly linked to fractions of more soluble phases. We conclude that spatial and temporal variations in aerosol iron speciation, driven by the distribution of deserts, glaciers and fossil-fuel combustion, could have a pronounced effect on aerosol iron solubility and therefore on biological productivity and the carbon cycle in the ocean. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  19. Southern Ocean fronts from the Greenwich meridian to Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Igor M.; Gordon, Arnold L.

    1996-02-01

    distinguished in the Indian Ocean between 31° and 38°S. The front marks the southern boundary of the subtropical salty, warm water pool of the central South Indian Ocean. The NSTF location is coincident with the position of the wind convergence between westerlies and easterlies, suggesting the possible wind-driven frontogenesis.

  20. Coastal zone color scanner pigment concentrations in the Southern Ocean and relationships to geophysical surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, J. C.; McClain, C. R.; Sullivan, C. W.; Ryan, J. P.; Leonard, C. L.

    1993-02-01

    The spatial and seasonal distributions of phytoplankton pigment concentration over the entire southern ocean have been studied for the first time using the coastal zone color scanner historical data set (from October 1978 through June 1986). Enhanced pigment concentrations are observed between 35°S and 55°S throughout the year, with such enhanced regions being more confined to the south in the austral summer and extending further north in the winter. North and south of the polar front, phytoplankton blooms (>1 mg/m3) are not uniformly distributed around the circumpolar region. Instead, blooms appear to be located in regions of ice retreat (or high melt areas) such as the Scotia Sea and the Ross Sea, in relatively shallow areas (e.g., the Patagonian and the New Zealand shelves), in some regions of Ekman upwelling like the Tasman Sea, and near areas of high eddy kinetic energy such as the Agulhas retroflection. Among all features examined by regression analysis, bathymetry appears to be the one most consistently correlated with pigments (correlation coefficient being about -0.3 for the entire region). The cause of negative correlation with bathymetry is unknown but is consistent with the observed abundance of iron in shallow areas in the Antarctic region. It is also consistent with resuspension of phytoplankton cells by wind-induced mixing, especially in shallow waters. On the other hand, in the deep ocean (especially at latitudes nutrients may be limiting), upwelling induced by topographic features may cause resupply of nutrients to the surface and shoaling of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Low pigment values are common at low latitudes and in regions of high wind stress, where deep mixing and net loss of surface pigment occur. Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, and silicate) are found to correlate significantly with pigments when the entire southern ocean is considered, but south of 55°S the correlation is poor, probably because the Antarctic waters are not

  1. Dissolved iron in the Arctic Ocean : Important role of hydrothermal sources, shelf input and scavenging removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M. B.; Laan, P.; Middag, R.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Bakker, K.

    2012-01-01

    Arctic Ocean waters exchange with the North Atlantic, and thus dissolved iron (DFe) in the Arctic has implications for the global Fe cycle. We present deep water (>250 m) DFe concentrations of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov Basins). The DFe concentration in the deep waters

  2. Dissolved iron in the Arctic Ocean: Important role of hydrothermal sources, shelf input and scavenging removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, M.B.; Laan, P.; Middag, R.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Bakker, K.

    2012-01-01

    Arctic Ocean waters exchange with the North Atlantic, and thus dissolved iron (DFe) in the Arctic has implications for the global Fe cycle. We present deep water (>250 m) DFe concentrations of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov Basins). The DFe concentration in the deep waters

  3. New Hampshire / Southern Maine Ocean Uses Atlas: Fishing sector

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Uses Atlas Project is an innovative partnership between the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) and NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource...

  4. New Hampshire / Southern Maine Ocean Uses Atlas: Industrial sector

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Uses Atlas Project is an innovative partnership between the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) and NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource...

  5. New Hampshire / Southern Maine Ocean Uses Atlas: Dominant and Aggregates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Uses Atlas Project is an innovative partnership between the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) and NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource...

  6. New Hampshire and Southern Maine Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Uses Atlas Project is an innovative partnership between the Coastal Response Research Center (CRRC) and NOAA's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource...

  7. Phytoplankton community structure is influenced by seabird guano enrichment in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatova, O. A.; Wing, S. R.; Hoffmann, L. J.; Wing, L. C.; Gault-Ringold, M.

    2017-05-01

    Phytoplankton biomass, productivity and community structure are strongly influenced by differences in nutrient concentrations among oceanographic water masses. Changes in community composition, particularly in the distribution of cell sizes, can result in dramatic changes in the energetics of pelagic food webs and ecosystem function in terms of biogeochemical cycling and carbon sequestration. Here we examine responses of natural phytoplankton communities from four major water masses in the Southern Ocean to enrichment from seabird guano, a concentrated source of bioactive metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and macronutrients (N, P), in a series of incubation experiments. Phytoplankton communities from sub-tropical water, modified sub-tropical water from the Snares Island wake, sub-Antarctic water and Antarctic water from the Ross Sea, each showed dramatic changes in community structure following additions of seabird guano. We observed particularly high growth of prymnesiophytes in response to the guano-derived nutrients within sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical frontal zones, resulting in communities dominated by larger cell sizes than in control incubations. Community changes within treatments enriched with guano were distinct, and in most cases more extensive, than those observed for treatments with additions of macronutrients (N, P) or iron (Fe) alone. These results provide the first empirical evidence that seabird guano enrichment can drive significant changes in the structure and composition of natural phytoplankton communities. Our findings have important implications for understanding the consequences of accumulation of bioactive metals and macronutrients within food webs and the role of seabirds as nutrient vectors within the Southern Ocean ecosystem.

  8. Antarctic climate, Southern Ocean circulation patterns, and deep water formation during the Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Claire E.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Bohaty, Steven M.; Hammond, Samantha J.

    2017-07-01

    We assess early-to-middle Eocene seawater neodymium (Nd) isotope records from seven Southern Ocean deep-sea drill sites to evaluate the role of Southern Ocean circulation in long-term Cenozoic climate change. Our study sites are strategically located on either side of the Tasman Gateway and are positioned at a range of shallow (Climatic Optimum and is associated with documented cooling across the study region and increased export of Antarctic deep waters, highlighting the complexity and importance of Southern Ocean circulation in the greenhouse climate of the Eocene.

  9. Temperature and upwelling / downwelling irradiance data from drifting buoy in the Southern Oceans as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study/Southern Ocean (JGOFS/Southern Ocean) project, from 1994-12-25 to 1998-06-28 (NODC Accession 9900183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and upwelling / downwelling irradiance data were collected using drifting buoy in the Southern Oceans from December 25, 1994 to June 28, 1998. Data were...

  10. Uncertainty in projections of Southern Ocean carbon uptake and acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, Nicole; Hauri, Claudine

    2017-04-01

    We investigate projections of carbon uptake and the associated acidification of the Southern Ocean over 2006-2080 using output from two ensembles of the Community Earth System Model run under business as usual (RCP8.5) and mitigation (RCP4.5) emission scenarios. On basin-wide and regional scales we observe a rapid onset of aragonite undersaturation in surface waters by mid-century that may be detrimental to calcareous organisms. An analysis of variance reveals that the speed of transition from supersaturation to undersaturation is driven almost entirely by emission scenario, as internal variability in saturation depth across ensemble members is small. Regional differences are observed in the timing and magnitude of aragonite saturation state changes. In the Patagonian Shelf region, undersaturation of the top 200m of the water column is observed by 2080 regardless of emission scenario. Whereas, in the Weddell Sea, saturation state is significantly different between the two emission scenarios by 2080, and undersaturation of the surface waters is "avoidable" if we follow RCP4.5, rather than RCP8.5.

  11. A linkage between Asian dust, dissolved iron and marine export production in the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongxiang; Zhao, Tianliang; Song, Lianchun; Fang, Xiaomin; Yin, Yan; Deng, Zuqin; Wang, Suping; Fan, Shuxian

    2011-08-01

    Iron-addition experiments have revealed that iron supply exerts controls on biogeochemical cycles in the ocean and ultimately influences the Earth's climate system. The iron hypothesis in its broad outlines has been proved to be correct. However, the hypothesis needs to be verified with an observable biological response to specific dust deposition events. Plankton growth following the Asian dust storm over Ocean Station PAPA (50°N, 145°W) in the North Pacific Ocean in April 2001 was the first supportive evidence of natural aeolian iron inputs to ocean; The data were obtained through the SeaWiFS satellite and robot carbon explorers by Bishop et al. Using the NARCM modeling results in this study, the calculated total dust deposition flux was 35 mg m -2 per day in PAPA region from the dust storm of 11-13 April, 2001 into 0.0615 mg m -2 d -1 (about 1100 nM) soluble iron in the surface layer at Station PAPA. It was enough for about 1100 nM to enhance the efficiency of the marine biological pump and trigger the rapid increase of POC and chlorophyll. The iron fertilization hypothesis therefore is plausible. However, even if this specific dust event can support the iron fertilization hypothesis, long-term observation data are lacking in marine export production and continental dust. In this paper, we also conducted a simple correlation analysis between the diatoms and foraminifera at about 3000 m and 4000 m at two subarctic Pacific stations and the dust aerosol production from China's mainland. The correlation coefficient between marine export production and dust storm frequency in the core area of the dust storms was significantly high, suggesting that aerosols generated by Asian dust storm are the source of iron for organic matter fixation in the North Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that there could be an interlocking chain for the change of atmospheric dust aerosol-soluble iron-marine export production.

  12. Oceanic and coastal dissolved iron observations from 1978-01-01 to 2004-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0067344)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Keith Moore observational dissolved Iron database. Moore expanded the original iron database complied by Parekh et al. (2005. The complete dataset with references to...

  13. Atmospheric iron deposition in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and its adjacent marginal seas: The importance of coal burning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Yi‐Chiu; Chen, Jen‐Ping; Ho, Tung‐Yuan; Tsai, I‐Chun

    2015-01-01

    ...‐burning fly ashes deposited in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas. Particular attention was paid to the high iron content of fly ashes emitted from steel and iron plants burning coals...

  14. Supply of Soluble Iron from Combustion and Dust Sources to the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailable iron (Fe) from atmospheric particle is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton. Global models have been used to deduce atmospheric iron supply to the ocean, but uncertainty in the deposition flux remains large, which can influence the air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and thus radiative forcing significantly. Here, a global chemical transport model is used to investigate the effect of aerosol emissions from ship plumes on iron solubility in particles from the combustion and dust sources. The emission data sets for combustion-generated aerosols such as those from biomass and fossil fuel burnings are taken from the emission inventory. The iron from combustion sources such as biomass and fossil fuels burning is readily released into solutions in aerosols assuming constant iron solubility (i.e., the mass fraction of dissolved to total iron). In contrast, the emissions of dust are calculated on-line, based on the surface wind speed and soil wetness from the GMAO assimilated meteorological fields. Further, the iron solubility dynamically changes from that in the originally emitted dust aerosols (which is 0.45%) due to reactions with acidic species. The model results reveal that the oil combustion from shipping mainly contributes to high iron solubility at low mass concentration observed over the high latitude North Atlantic Ocean. The model results suggest that the combustion source from ships contributes to a significant deposition of soluble iron to the high latitude oceans in the Northern Hemisphere. Due to continuing growth in global shipping and no regulations regarding particles emissions, the input of bioavailable iron from ship plumes is likely to increase in a future warmer climate when oceanic primary production may be more dependent on the nutrient input from atmospheric aerosols.

  15. Southern Ocean origin for the resumption of Atlantic thermohaline circulation during deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Gregor; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2003-07-31

    During the two most recent deglaciations, the Southern Hemisphere warmed before Greenland. At the same time, the northern Atlantic Ocean was exposed to meltwater discharge, which is generally assumed to reduce the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water. Yet during deglaciation, the Atlantic thermohaline circulation became more vigorous, in the transition from a weak glacial to a strong interglacial mode. Here we use a three-dimensional ocean circulation model to investigate the impact of Southern Ocean warming and the associated sea-ice retreat on the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. We find that a gradual warming in the Southern Ocean during deglaciation induces an abrupt resumption of the interglacial mode of the thermohaline circulation, triggered by increased mass transport into the Atlantic Ocean via the warm (Indian Ocean) and cold (Pacific Ocean) water route. This effect prevails over the influence of meltwater discharge, which would oppose a strengthening of the thermohaline circulation. A Southern Ocean trigger for the transition into an interglacial mode of circulation provides a consistent picture of Southern and Northern hemispheric climate change at times of deglaciation, in agreement with the available proxy records.

  16. Phytoplankton chemotaxonomy in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during late summer 2009

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, M-J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A chemotaxonomic investigation of surface phytoplankton was undertaken on a research cruise to the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during late austral summer 2009. Based on pigment signatures, several distinct regions emerged that were...

  17. Ecological biogeography of southern ocean islands: species-area relationships, human impacts, and conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chown, S.L.; Gremmen, N.J.M.; Gaston, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have concluded that southern ocean islands are anomalous because past glacial extent and current temperature apparently explain most variance in their species richness. Here, the relationships between physical variables and species richness of vascular plants, insects, land and

  18. Secondary calcification of planktic foraminifera from the Indian sector of Southern ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, R.; Shetye, S.; Tiwari, M.; AnilKumar, N.

    This study focused on planktic foraminifera in plankton tows and surface sediments from the western Indian sector of Southern Ocean in order to evaluate the potential foraminiferal secondary calcification and/or dissolution in the sediment...

  19. Southern Ocean Climate and Sea Ice Anomalies Associated with the Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.; Comiso, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    The anomalies in the climate and sea ice cover of the Southern Ocean and their relationships with the Southern Oscillation (SO) are investigated using a 17-year of data set from 1982 through 1998. We correlate the polar climate anomalies with the Southern Oscillation index (SOI) and examine the composites of these anomalies under the positive (SOI > 0), neutral (0 > SOI > -1), and negative (SOI oscillating climate anomalies that are closely linked to the SO. Within these sectors, positive (negative) phases of the SOI are generally associated with lower (higher) sea-level pressure, cooler (warmer) surface air temperature, and cooler (warmer) sea surface temperature in these sectors. Associations between these climate anomalies and the behavior of the Antarctic sea ice cover are clearly evident. Recent anomalies in the sea ice cover that are apparently associated with the SOI include: the record decrease in the sea ice extent in the Bellingshausen Sea from mid- 1988 through early 199 1; the relationship between Ross Sea SST and ENSO signal, and reduced sea ice concentration in the Ross Sea; and, the shortening of the ice season in the eastern Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, far western Weddell Sea, and the lengthening of the ice season in the western Ross Sea, Bellingshausen Sea and central Weddell Sea gyre over the period 1988-1994. Four ENSO episodes over the last 17 years contributed to a negative mean in the SOI (-0.5). In each of these episodes, significant retreats in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Sea were observed providing direct confirmation of the impact of SO on the Antarctic sea ice cover.

  20. Effects of climate change and fisheries bycatch on Southern Ocean seabirds: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Rolland, Virginie; Jenouvrier, S.; Nevoux, Marie; Delord, Karine; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Over the last century, major climate changes and intense human exploitation of natural living resources have occurred in the Southern Ocean, potentially affecting its ecosystems up to top marine predators. Fisheries may also directly affect seabirds through bycatch and additional food resources provided by discards. The past 20 yr of research has seen an increasing number of studies investigating the effects of climate change and fisheries activities on Southern Ocean seabirds. Here, we revie...

  1. Iron control on global productivity: an efficient inverse model of the ocean's coupled phosphate and iron cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, B.; Holzer, M.; Frants, M.

    2016-02-01

    We construct a data-constrained mechanistic inverse model of the ocean's coupled phosphorus and iron cycles. The nutrient cycling is embedded in a data-assimilated steady global circulation. Biological nutrient uptake is parameterized in terms of nutrient, light, and temperature limitations on growth for two classes of phytoplankton that are not transported explicitly. A matrix formulation of the discretized nutrient tracer equations allows for efficient numerical solutions, which facilitates the objective optimization of the key biogeochemical parameters. The optimization minimizes the misfit between the modelled and observed nutrient fields of the current climate. We systematically assess the nonlinear response of the biological pump to changes in the aeolian iron supply for a variety of scenarios. Specifically, Green-function techniques are employed to quantify in detail the pathways and timescales with which those perturbations are propagated throughout the world oceans, determining the global teleconnections that mediate the response of the global ocean ecosystem. We confirm previous findings from idealized studies that increased iron fertilization decreases biological production in the subtropical gyres and we quantify the counterintuitive and asymmetric response of global productivity to increases and decreases in the aeolian iron supply.

  2. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín

    2016-01-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global...... zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean....

  3. Iron-light colimitation in a global ocean biogeochemical model and the sensitivity of oceanic CO2 uptake to dust deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelsen, L.; Oschlies, A.

    2012-12-01

    The iron hypothesis of glacial-interglacial cycles states that glacial increases in the deposition of dust enhanced the concentrations of the micronutrient iron in the ocean where it triggered phytoplankton growth and thus CO2 uptake. Indeed, iron fertilization experiments find that phytoplankton needs iron in particular for nitrate uptake, light harvesting, synthesis of chlorophyll and in the electron transport chain of photosynthesis. Previous global biogeochemical models used to extrapolate results from local culture and field experiments have suggested that the sensitivity of ocean biogeochemistry to changes in dust deposition is too low to account for the observed glacial-interglacial changes of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here we show that this sensitivity is increased significantly when iron-light colimitation, i.e. the impact of iron on light harvesting capabilities and chlorophyll synthesis, is explicitly considered in a global biogeochemical ocean model. Iron-light colimitation increases the shift of export production to higher latitudes at high dust deposition and amplifies iron limitation at low dust deposition. Our results suggest that iron fertilization by increased dust deposition may explain a substantially larger portion of the observed past CO2 variability than thought previously. Our results emphasize the role of iron as a key limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in the ocean, with a high potential for changes in oceanic iron supply affecting the global carbon cycle and climate.

  4. Fish from the Southern Ocean: biodiversity, ecology and conservation challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Vacchi

    2015-11-01

    Living and functioning at subzero temperatures implied important adaptations, including freezing avoidance by antifreeze glycoproteins ( AFGPs. Among the system-wide adaptive traits holding major ecological implications, the acquisition of secondary pelagicism in some species (plesiomorphically devoid of swim-bladder is a major. In those notothenioids, lipid deposition and reduced ossification allowed to achieve partial or full neutral buoyancy, and enabled expansion into semi-pelagic, pelagic, and cryopelagic habitats. Such an impressive ecological expansion has allowed several notothenioids to play a primary role in the Antarctic marine ecosystems. On the other side, their fine adaptation to the environment, might expose these fishes to risks that need to be properly considered and addressed. For instance, a relationship between the Antarctic silverfish (Pleuragramma antarctica, a key species in the coastal Antarctic ecosystem and the sea-ice, has recently been assessed, thus making this species potentially threatened by the ongoing climatic change, with implications for the whole ecosystem. In addition, some Antarctic fish, such as toothfishes (Dissostichus eleginoides and Dissostichus mawsoni are primary targets of industrial fish harvesting in the SO. To increase and update the scientific knowledge on these species is mandatory in order to improve the management of Antarctic marine resources, in response to the increasing international request of exploitation. This task is presently being conducted by CCAMLR (Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, along with fighting the illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU fishing and with the establishment of MPAs (Marine Protected Areas in various sectors of the Southern Ocean.

  5. Impacts of Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling on Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Newman, Paul; Pawson, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Climate in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) has undergone significant changes in recent decades. These changes are closely linked to the shift of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) towards its positive polarity, which is driven primarily by Antarctic ozone depletion. There is growing evidence that Antarctic ozone depletion has significant impacts on Southern Ocean circulation change. However, it is poorly understood whether and how ocean feedback might impact the SAM and climate change in the SH atmosphere. This outstanding science question is investigated using the Goddard Earth Observing System Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Chemistry Climate Model(GEOS-AOCCM).We perform ensemble simulations of the recent past (1960-2010) with and without the interactive ocean. For simulations without the interactive ocean, we use sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations produced by the interactive ocean simulations. The differences between these two ensemble simulations quantify the effects of atmosphere-ocean coupling. We will investigate the impacts of atmosphere-ocean coupling on stratospheric processes such as Antarctic ozone depletion and Antarctic polar vortex breakup. We will address whether ocean feedback affects Rossby wave generation in the troposphere and wave propagation into the stratosphere. Another focuson this study is to assess how ocean feedback might affect the tropospheric SAM response to Antarctic ozone depletion

  6. Preliminary climatology and improved modelling of south Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean mid-latitude cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Bruce W.; Leslie, Lance M.

    2004-08-01

    The intense mid-latitude cyclones that traverse the southern waters of the Indian Ocean, between South Africa and southwestern Western Australia, are among the strongest depressions found anywhere in the world, outside tropical waters. Near-surface winds that exceed storm force (i.e. 24 m/s or 48 knots), and central pressures of 960 hPa and lower, are relatively common for these systems. They pose a constant threat to both open ocean and coastal shipping, and regularly generate severe weather over the populated southwestern corner of Australia. Large ocean waves and swell produce extensive coastal inundation and erosion.There were two main aims in this study. The first aim was to develop a preliminary climatology of these intense mid-latitude cyclones, for the region 20-60 °S, 30-130 °E. The climatology, which is the first that we are aware of for this notoriously data-sparse region, is based largely upon satellite observations, particularly scatterometer data, and is supplemented by ship, buoy and all available land observations. The climatology revealed that, historically, the frequency and intensity of the mid-latitude cyclones in this domain have been significantly underestimated. This underestimation has resulted in analyses that have serious flaws, and the resultant operational forecasts provided to the duty forecasters in the regional forecast centre located in Perth, Western Australia, are of highly variable quality. A number of other climatological features of these storms are discussed in this article.The second aim was to identify the factors that can contribute to a significant improvement in model forecasts of these storms. So far, there have been very few studies of explosively developing cyclones over this part of the world. Results are presented here from a series of high-resolution numerical simulations of an intense cool season Southern Ocean cyclone that developed in 2003, using the HIRES numerical weather prediction model developed by L

  7. Hydrographic and productivity characteristics along 45 degrees E longitude in the southwestern Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean during austral summer 2004

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jasmine, P.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Madhu, N.V.; AshaDevi, C.R.; Alagarsamy, R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Jayan, Z.; Sanjeevan, V.N.; Sahayak, S.

    During the austral summer 2004, an intensive multidisciplinary survey was carried out in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean to study the main hydrographic features and the associated productivity processes. This sector includes...

  8. Transport and scavenging of Pu in surface waters of the Southern Hemisphere Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaud, J.; Povinec, P.P.; Aoyama, M.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of 239Pu in Atlantic and Indian Ocean waters about four decades after their main injection from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests is discussed. Recent data obtained in the framework of the SHOTS (Southern Hemisphere Ocean Tracer Studies) projects are evaluated and compared...

  9. Interactions of dissolved CO2 with cadmium isotopes in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baar, Henricus; van Heuven, Steven; Abouchami, Wafa; Xue, Zichen; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Rehkamper, Mark; Middag, Rob; van Ooijen, J.

    Here we report the first ever observations of a strong correlation in ocean surface waters of the dissolved δ114Cd with dissolved CO2. This is observed in the Southern Ocean along the 0°W meridian in both the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Weddell Gyre, as well as in the Weddell Sea proper,

  10. Ocean acidification affects iron speciation during a coastal seawater mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Breitbarth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rising atmospheric CO2 is acidifying the surface ocean, a process which is expected to greatly influence the chemistry and biology of the future ocean. Following the development of iron-replete phytoplankton blooms in a coastal mesocosm experiment at 350, 700, and 1050 μatm pCO2, we observed significant increases in dissolved iron concentrations, Fe(II concentrations, and Fe(II half-life times during and after the peak of blooms in response to CO2 enrichment and concomitant lowering of pH, suggesting increased iron bioavailability. If applicable to the open ocean this may provide a negative feedback mechanism to the rising atmospheric CO2 by stimulating marine primary production.

  11. Rock Magnetic Record of the Middle Miocene Climatic Transition at ODP Site 747, Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrajevitch, A.; Roberts, A. P.; Kodama, K.

    2013-12-01

    ODP Site 747, located on the central Kerguelen Plateau, contains a compete record of the Middle Miocene Climatic Transition (MMCT) - a major cooling event that followed the warm mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum and culminated in an 'icehouse' climate regime. Because of its unusually well preserved and rich foraminiferal assemblages, the MMCT interval at Site 747 has been a focus of several high-resolution paleoclimatic studies that have effectively established this sequence as a reference for the Southern Ocean. Major changes in species abundances across the MMCT are conventionally interpreted to reflect changes in water temperature and salinity. Our XRF and rock magnetic study reveals a good correlation between terrigenous input (likely from local volcanic sources) and the abundances of the dominant planktonic foraminiferal species. Such a correlation suggests that nutrient flux (iron fertilization) played a significant role in controlling microplankton communities during the MMCT at Site 747. Concentration-dependent rock magnetic parameters appear to be a useful proxy for nutrient flux in this pelagic marine environment.

  12. Zooplankton Atlas of the Southern Ocean: The SCAR SO-CPR Survey (1991-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, David J.; Hosie, Graham W.; Kitchener, John A.; Takahashi, Kunio T.; Hunt, Brian P. V.

    2010-08-01

    The SCAR Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey produces one of the largest and most accessed zooplankton data sets in the world. These data serve as a reference for other Southern Ocean monitoring programmes such as those run by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the developing Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). It has been instrumental in providing baseline data on zooplankton composition, communities, and distribution patterns on the ocean basin scale. The SO-CPR Survey is publishing the first detailed geographical atlas of the near-surface Southern Ocean zooplankton. This atlas is based on 22,553 CPR samples collected from 1991 to 2008 from voyages operated by Australia, Japan, Germany, New Zealand, USA and Russia. The Atlas documents the distribution and abundance of the 50 most abundant zooplankton taxa amongst the 200+ taxa sampled. The maps are printed in alphabetical order of the genera within each taxon and nomenclature is based on the Register of Antarctic Marine Species (RAMS) developed by the SCAR Marine Biodiversity Information Network (SCAR-MarBIN). The SO-CPR Atlas will operate as a ready reference to researchers interested in the distribution of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean, for example knowing the distribution of grazers in relation to phytoplankton production or the availability of prey for higher predators.

  13. The impact of fish and the commercial marine harvest on the ocean iron cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison R Moreno

    Full Text Available Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, bioavailable iron limits marine primary production in about one third of the ocean. This lack of iron availability has implications in climate change because the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by phytoplankton requires iron. Using literature values for global fish biomass estimates, and elemental composition data we estimate that fish biota store between 0.7-7 × 10(11 g of iron. Additionally, the global fish population recycles through excretion between 0.4-1.5 × 10(12 g of iron per year, which is of a similar magnitude as major recognized sources of iron (e.g. dust, sediments, ice sheet melting. In terms of biological impact this iron could be superior to dust inputs due to the distributed deposition and to the greater solubility of fecal pellets compared to inorganic minerals. To estimate a loss term due to anthropogenic activity the total commercial catch for 1950 to 2010 was obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Marine catch data were separated by taxa. High and low end values for elemental composition were obtained for each taxonomic category from the literature and used to calculate iron per mass of total harvest over time. The marine commercial catch is estimated to have removed 1-6 × 10(9 g of iron in 1950, the lowest values on record. There is an annual increase to 0.7-3 × 10(10 g in 1996, which declines to 0.6-2 × 10(10 g in 2010. While small compared to the total iron terms in the cycle, these could have compounding effects on distribution and concentration patterns globally over time. These storage, recycling, and export terms of biotic iron are not currently included in ocean iron mass balance calculations. These data suggest that fish and anthropogenic activity should be included in global oceanic iron cycles.

  14. THE CD ISOTOPE SIGNATURE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J.; Middag, R.; de Baar, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Feldmann, H.; Raczek, I.

    2009-12-01

    The availability of micronutrients can limit and control plankton ecosystems, notably in the Southern Ocean which plays a major role in regulating the CO2 biological pump. Cadmium has a nutrient-like distribution in seawater - it is directly incorporated into living plankton in the upper water column and re-mineralised at depth. The nutritional role of Cd (Price and Morel, 1990) makes it a potentially useful tracer of biological productivity. We report Cd concentration and Cd stable isotope data obtained using a double-spike TIMS method on seawater samples collected during the Zero and Drake Passage cruise (ANTXXIV-III, IPY-GEOTRACES 2008). Four vertical profiles were collected from 40 to 70°S across the Polar Front using the ultra-clean Titan frame (De Baar et al., 2008), providing a record of changes in biological productivity from the Subantarctic to the Antarctic region. Data from two profiles from the SE Atlantic (47.66°S, 4.28W) and Drake Passage (55.13°S, 65.53°W) obtained on 1 litre-sized samples are presented. Both profiles show a increase in Cd concentration with depth, with noticeably higher concentrations in the SE Atlantic. Cd and PO4 are positively correlated with distinct slopes for the two profiles. The Cd isotope data are expressed as ɛ112/110Cd relative to our JMC Mainz standard (± 8ppm, 2SD, N=17). ɛ112/110Cd values show a continuous decrease with increasing depth and a significant shift towards heavier values in the upper 400m at both stations resolvable outside analytical error (2SE ≤ 20ppm). The sense of Cd isotope fractionation confirms previous findings of uptake of “light” Cd by phytoplankton in the upper water column (Lacan et al., 2006; Ripperger et al., 2007; Schmidt et al., 2009). Most important is the evidence for a distinctive heavier Cd isotope signature in AASW relative to AAIW. This result demonstrates that different water masses carry distinct Cd isotopic compositions reflecting changes in Cd uptake by phytoplankton

  15. Dietary iron rural blacks overload In southern African

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... This finding was ascribed to the fact that traditional brews are not only associated with alcohol- induced hepatic damage but are also a very rich source of ... liver/,J glucose intolerance;4 scurvy and osteoporosis;5 and possibly oesophageal carcinoma.6. There is also evidence to suggest that iron overload ...

  16. Southern Ocean circulation changes across the last deglaciation: contribution from Marion-Dufresne cruises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Elisabeth; Siani, Giuseppe; Mazaud, Alain; Paterne, Martine; deVries, Tim; Jaccard, Samuel; Waelbroeck, Claire; Crosta, Xavier; Isguder, Gulay; Dewilde, Fabien; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Skinner, Luke; Kissel, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    The last deglaciation is marked by rapid climatic events linked to large reorganizations of the deep ocean circulation. To decipher the role of the Southern Ocean in these deep circulation changes requires reconstructing the evolution of its stratification and its zonal behavior during the last deglaciation from high resolution, well dated records. Furthermore, nowadays the connection between atmosphere and the deep ocean occurs through the Southern Ocean, and it might had a leading role in the evolution of atmospheric CO2 concentrations across the deglaciation. However, establishing a precise chronology for marine sediment records in high latitudes is a difficult task, as it requires the determination of radiocarbon surface water age changes. It has been possible to retrieve high sedimentation rate cores during Indian and Pacific oceanographic cruises, particularly PACHIDERME and INDIEN SUD expeditions. We pre. We aim at tying these marine records to terrestrial records, using tephra deposited in marine and terrestrial region in the different sector of the Southern Ocean when it is possible. This work is in progress within a French-Swedish project. We will present results at different depth from South West Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean and from the Indian sector. A precise chronology in the Indian sector requires to first establish the tephrochronology of Kerguelen Islands that is under progress. We compare these new records with previously published records of the Atlantic and Pacific sectors. It indicates that upwelling events drive radiocarbon changes in waters above 2500 m depth and increases in atmospheric CO2. Oceanic circulation changes are not synchroneous at deeper depth between 2500 and 4000 m depth. Southern Ocean temperature and vertical mixing increases occurs synchroneously with temperature increase above the Antarctic and atmospheric CO2 increases within error of marine and Ice chronologies, while the ACC current intensity decrease (or

  17. The Impact of the Ozone Hole on the Salinity of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. L.; Polvani, L. M.; Abernathey, R. P.; Smith, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Observations have revealed systematic changes in the temperature andsalinity of the Southern Ocean since 1960. These trends reflect theevolving exchange of heat and momentum between atmosphere and ocean andare, in part, driven by anthropogenic emissions. The key question is:which emissions are most important, greenhouse gases or ozone depletingsubstances? We answer this question using CESM-WACCM, a comprehensiveclimate model with interactive stratospheric chemistry, coupled tostate-of-the-art land, ocean and sea-ice components. We find that thechanges in Southern Ocean temperature South of 60S are primarily due tothe presence of a seasonal ozone hole, and between 60S and 40S thetrends are driven in equal measure by ozone depletion and all otherforcings combined. Furthermore, we demonstrate substantial changes inthe model's ocean salinity, and show that these are greatly enhanced byformation of the ozone hole, a fact that has not been previously reported.

  18. A comparison of iron limitation of phytoplankton in natural oceanic waters and laboratory media conditioned with EDTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Timmermans, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    The solubility of iron in oxic waters is so low that iron can be a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton growth in the open ocean. In order to mimic low iron concentrations in algal cultures, Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used. The presence of EDTA enables culture experiments to be

  19. Glacial to Interglacial Changes in Southern Ocean Water Mass Geometry, the ACC, and the Southern Westerlies at Drake Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninnemann, U. S.

    2008-12-01

    Resolving ocean and atmospheric variability in the Drake Passage region is crucial for advancing our understanding of the role of the Southern Ocean in affecting ocean and climate change. Modeling studies suggest that altering the position or strength of the Southern Westerly Winds (SWW) and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) relative to the Drake Passage could play a central role in driving observed glacial-interglacial changes in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide and the global ocean circulation. The records of past ocean-atmosphere changes contained in sediment archives provide a natural testing ground for these hypotheses. Here we present high-resolution benthic and planktonic foraminiferal δ13C and δ18O records from new sediment cores recovered along both meridional (IMAGES PACHIDERME cruise onboard the R/V Marion Dufresne of IPEV) and zonal (IPY PALEODRAKE cruise) transects. Together with existing Southern Ocean cores, the new records provide constraints on the vertical and spatial gradients in surface and bottom water properties necessary to portray changes in the position of water masses and frontal systems relative to Drake Passage and Southern Chile. Our initial planktonic δ18O results over the last deglaciation show a greater magnitude change in the northern Drake Passage (2.0‰) and along the Chilean margin (2.5‰) than is generally observed in records which are either south or far to the North of the Subantarctic Front (SAF) today. These results are consistent in both sign and magnitude with a northward shift in the Subantarctic Front and an increase in the flux of polar and supbolar water northward along the coast of Chile during the glaciation. In addition, the large glacial decrease (>1.5‰) in benthic foraminiferal (C. wuellerstorfi) δ13C values in core MD07-3128 (52S, 1032m) suggests that the boundary between intermediate water (relatively high δ13C) and circumpolar deep water (low δ13C) was shifted northward (or

  20. Southern Ocean Predicted Seafloor Topography Poster - MGG9

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 36 by 48 inch full color poster is MGG Report 9. In many areas of the global ocean, the depth of the seafloor is not well known because survey lines by ships...

  1. Long-term decline in krill stock and increase in salps within the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Angus; Siegel, Volker; Pakhomov, Evgeny; Rothery, Peter

    2004-11-04

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and salps (mainly Salpa thompsoni) are major grazers in the Southern Ocean, and krill support commercial fisheries. Their density distributions have been described in the period 1926-51, while recent localized studies suggest short-term changes. To examine spatial and temporal changes over larger scales, we have combined all available scientific net sampling data from 1926 to 2003. This database shows that the productive southwest Atlantic sector contains >50% of Southern Ocean krill stocks, but here their density has declined since the 1970s. Spatially, within their habitat, summer krill density correlates positively with chlorophyll concentrations. Temporally, within the southwest Atlantic, summer krill densities correlate positively with sea-ice extent the previous winter. Summer food and the extent of winter sea ice are thus key factors in the high krill densities observed in the southwest Atlantic Ocean. Krill need the summer phytoplankton blooms of this sector, where winters of extensive sea ice mean plentiful winter food from ice algae, promoting larval recruitment and replenishing the stock. Salps, by contrast, occupy the extensive lower-productivity regions of the Southern Ocean and tolerate warmer water than krill. As krill densities decreased last century, salps appear to have increased in the southern part of their range. These changes have had profound effects within the Southern Ocean food web.

  2. Iron-binding ligands in the southern California Current System: mechanistic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randelle M Bundy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The distributions of dissolved iron and organic iron-binding ligands were examined in water column profiles and deckboard incubation experiments in the southern California Current System (sCCS along a transition from coastal to semi-oligotrophic waters. Analysis of the iron-binding ligand pool by competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-ACSV using multiple analytical windows (MAWs revealed three classes of iron-binding ligands present throughout the water column (L1-L3, whose distributions closely matched those of dissolved iron and nitrate. Despite significant biogeochemical gradients, ligand profiles were similar between stations, with surface minima in strong ligands (L1 and L2, and relatively constant concentrations of weaker ligands (L3 down to 500 m. A phytoplankton grow-out incubation, initiated from an iron-limited water mass, showed dynamic temporal cycling of iron-binding ligands. A biological iron model was able to capture the patterns of the strong ligands in the grow-out incubation relatively well with only the microbial community as a biological source. An experiment focused on remineralization of particulate organic matter showed production of both strong and weak iron-binding ligands by the heterotrophic community, supporting a mechanism for in-situ production of both strong and weak iron-binding ligands in the subsurface water column. Photochemical experiments showed a variable influence of sunlight on the degradation of natural iron-binding ligands, providing some evidence to explain differences in surface ligand concentrations between stations. Patterns in ligand distributions between profiles and in the incubation experiments were primarily related to macronutrient concentrations, suggesting microbial remineralization processes might dominate on longer time-scales over short-term changes associated with photochemistry or phytoplankton growth.

  3. Fluxes and distribution of dissolved iron in the eastern (sub-) tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Steigenberger, S.; Powell, C.F.; van Haren, H.; Patey, M.D.; Baker, A.R.; Achterberg, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aeolian dust transport from the Saharan/Sahel desert regions is considered the dominant external input of iron (Fe) to the surface waters of the eastern (sub-) tropical North Atlantic Ocean. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the sources of dissolved Fe (DFe) and quantified DFe fluxes to the

  4. Subglacial biochemical weathering and transport drove fertilization in the Southern Ocean during Antarctic temperature maxima and NH Heinrich events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisia, S.; Augustinus, P. M.; Hellstrom, J.; Borsato, A.; Drysdale, R.; Weyrich, L.; Cooper, A.; Johnston, V. E.; Cotte, M.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in bioproductivity in the subantarctic region have been observed to coincide with episodes of significant iceberg discharge in the North Atlantic (Heinrich events), thus linking iron delivery to the Southern Ocean (SO) with abrupt climate changes in the Northern Hemisphere. Whilst upwelling has been proposed as a likely source of bioavailable iron during Heinrich events, it is well known that, today, subglacial metabolic pathways under limited carbon supply may accumulate divalent iron, which could have been mobilized and delivered to the SO during full glacial conditions. This alternative hypothesis remains largely untested for the SO because of the difficulties in accessing palaeoenvironmental archives from beneath the Antarctic ice sheets. We present a record of the subglacial production and fate of nutrients from calcite crusts formed beneath a tributary of the Rennick outlet glacier (East Antarctic Ice Sheet, EAIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum. Chemistry, stratigraphy and preliminary ancient DNA characterization of the microbial consortium of 27- to 17-kyr-old calcites suggest that bioweathering released iron in hypoxic pools of local basal meltwater. Anaerobic methane oxidising microbes released bicarbonate and sulfuric acid in the isolated pockets, which facilitated local weathering of the amphibolite rock. During episodes of channelized flow, identified by clast-rich microsparites, and which have ages near-commensurate with Antarctic Isotope Maximum2 (AIM2) and Heinrich event 2, ferrous iron may have been mobilized and transported subglacially to the ice shelf. The calcites formed during this phase preserve evidence of microbes using sulfite dehydrogenase, which explains the accumulation of sulfate in the calcite. Our data thus indicate that subglacial processes contributed to SO productivity increases at the time of Heinrich event 2, ultimately leading to drawdawn of atmospheric carbon dioxide at millennial scale.

  5. Ocean iron fertilization - Moving forward in a sea of uncertainty

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Buesseler, K.O.; Doney, S.C.; Karl, D.M.; Boyd, P.W.; Caldeira, K.; Chai, F.; Coale, K.H.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Falkowski, P.G.; Johnson, K.S.; Lampitt, R.S.; Michaels, A.F.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.; Takeda, S.; Watson, A.J.

    assessment of ecological impacts from bacteria and biogeochemistry to fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. • Characterization of changes to oxygen distributions, biophysical climate feed- backs, and cycling of non-CO2 greenhouse gases, such as methane, nitrous..., better ecosystem parame- terization, inclusion of other greenhouse gases, and improved iron biogeochemistry. • Analysis of the costs, benefits, and impacts of OIF relative to other climate and carbon mitigation schemes and to the impacts of global change...

  6. Application of sediment core modelling to interpreting the glacial-interglacial record of Southern Ocean silica cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ridgwell

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Sediments from the Southern Ocean reveal a meridional divide in biogeochemical cycling response to the glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Neogene. South of the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, biogenic opal is generally much more abundant in sediments during interglacials compared to glacials. To the north, an anti-phased relationship is observed, with maximum opal abundance instead occurring during glacials. This antagonistic response of sedimentary properties provides an important model validation target for testing hypotheses of glacial-interglacial change against, particularly for understanding the causes of the concurrent variability in atmospheric CO2. Here, I illustrate a time-dependent modelling approach to helping understand climates of the past by means of the mechanistic simulation of marine sediment core records. I find that a close match between model-predicted and observed down-core changes in sedimentary opal content can be achieved when changes in seasonal sea-ice extent are imposed, whereas the predicted sedimentary response to iron fertilization on its own is not consistent with sedimentary observations. The results of this sediment record model-data comparison supports previous inferences that the changing cryosphere is the primary driver of the striking features exhibited by the paleoceanographic record of this region.

  7. Viral effects on bacterial respiration, production and growth efficiency: Consistent trends in the Southern Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Findji, Osana; Malits, Andrea; Lefèvre, Dominique; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Lemée, Rodolphe; Weinbauer, Markus G.; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the potential effects of viruses on bacterial respiration (BR), production (BP) and growth efficiency (BGE), experiments were performed using natural microbial communities from the coastal Mediterranean Sea, from a typical high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region in the Southern Ocean and from a naturally iron (Fe)-fertilized algal bloom above the Kerguelen Plateau (Southern Ocean). Seawater was sequentially filtered and concentrated to produce a bacterial concentrate, a viral concentrate and a virus-free ultrafiltrate. The combination of all three fractions served as treatments with active viruses. Heating or microwaving was used to inactivate viruses for the control treatments. Despite the differences in the initial trophic state and community composition of the study sites, consistent trends were found. In the presence of active viruses, BR was stimulated (up to 113%), whereas BP and BGE were reduced (up to 51%). Our results suggest that viruses enhance the role of bacteria as oxidizers of organic matter, hence as producers of CO 2, and remineralizers of CO 2, N, P and Fe. In the context of Fe-fertilization, this has important implications for the final fate of organic carbon in marine systems.

  8. Application of sediment core modelling to interpreting the glacial-interglacial record of Southern Ocean silica cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgwell, A.

    2007-07-01

    Sediments from the Southern Ocean reveal a meridional divide in biogeochemical cycling response to the glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Neogene. South of the present-day position of the Antarctic Polar Front in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, biogenic opal is generally much more abundant in sediments during interglacials compared to glacials. To the north, an anti-phased relationship is observed, with maximum opal abundance instead occurring during glacials. This antagonistic response of sedimentary properties provides an important model validation target for testing hypotheses of glacial-interglacial change against, particularly for understanding the causes of the concurrent variability in atmospheric CO2. Here, I illustrate a time-dependent modelling approach to helping understand climates of the past by means of the mechanistic simulation of marine sediment core records. I find that a close match between model-predicted and observed down-core changes in sedimentary opal content can be achieved when changes in seasonal sea-ice extent are imposed, whereas the predicted sedimentary response to iron fertilization on its own is not consistent with sedimentary observations. The results of this sediment record model-data comparison supports previous inferences that the changing cryosphere is the primary driver of the striking features exhibited by the paleoceanographic record of this region.

  9. The hydrography and dynamics of the ocean environment of the Prince Edward Islands (Southern Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, I. J.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.

    2002-11-01

    The Prince Edward Islands lie in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean at 47°S and 38°E. They lie in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), between the Subantarctic Front (SAF) to the north and the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) to the south. Two extensive hydrographic surveys (MOES 2 and MIOS 2) have been carried out to establish for the first time the mesoscale hydrography and dynamics of the oceanic surroundings of these islands. During the MOES 2, the SAF was deflected northward around the islands, while the APF lay south of the survey grid and south of the islands. Water masses in the region changed gradually from Subantarctic Surface Water (SASW) to Antarctic Surface Water (AASW) on crossing the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ). Downstream of the islands, a wake, resulting in the generation of broad meanders, was formed. As a consequence, water masses, in particular warm SASW, were displaced from north of the SAF across the PFZ, while cooler waters, which have been modified in the transitional band of the PFZ, were displaced northwards. In contrast, during MIOS 2, the surface expression of the SAF formed an intensive frontal band. On approaching the islands, the SAF split into two branches, with a branch deflected northwards around the islands, while a second branch meandered southward. In the downstream region, an intense cold eddy consisting of AASW was observed within the PFZ, displacing the SAF northwards. South of this eddy, a warm patch of SASW water was encountered, its position possibly controlled by the meandering SAF. Evidence from both these surveys demonstrates that the ACC exhibits high degrees of mesoscale variability in the vicinity of the Prince Edward Islands. The displacement of the SAF in both instances was apparent, resulting in the advection or the entrapment of neighbouring water masses into and across the PFZ. The speed of the incident current on approaching the islands may play a role in the degree of mesoscale mixing downstream

  10. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea-ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrassin, J-B; Hindell, M; Rintoul, S R; Roquet, F; Sokolov, S; Biuw, M; Costa, D; Boehme, L; Lovell, P; Coleman, R; Timmermann, R; Meijers, A; Meredith, M; Park, Y-H; Bailleul, F; Goebel, M; Tremblay, Y; Bost, C-A; McMahon, C R; Field, I C; Fedak, M A; Guinet, C

    2008-08-19

    Polar regions are particularly sensitive to climate change, with the potential for significant feedbacks between ocean circulation, sea ice, and the ocean carbon cycle. However, the difficulty in obtaining in situ data means that our ability to detect and interpret change is very limited, especially in the Southern Ocean, where the ocean beneath the sea ice remains almost entirely unobserved and the rate of sea-ice formation is poorly known. Here, we show that southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) equipped with oceanographic sensors can measure ocean structure and water mass changes in regions and seasons rarely observed with traditional oceanographic platforms. In particular, seals provided a 30-fold increase in hydrographic profiles from the sea-ice zone, allowing the major fronts to be mapped south of 60 degrees S and sea-ice formation rates to be inferred from changes in upper ocean salinity. Sea-ice production rates peaked in early winter (April-May) during the rapid northward expansion of the pack ice and declined by a factor of 2 to 3 between May and August, in agreement with a three-dimensional coupled ocean-sea-ice model. By measuring the high-latitude ocean during winter, elephant seals fill a "blind spot" in our sampling coverage, enabling the establishment of a truly global ocean-observing system.

  11. Cloud amount/frequency, SALINITY and other data from ORION, FUJI II and other platforms in the Southern Oceans, Indian Ocean and other waters from 1950-01-04 to 1989-03-16 (NODC Accession 9200239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Serial data in this accession was collected in Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) as part of Global Ocean Data Archeaology and Rescue (GODAR) project...

  12. Implication of eolian delivery and accumulation of highly reactive iron to the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. K.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Iron, although abundant in the Earth's crust, is present at low concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton. Eolian dust (loess) is a major source of this micronutrient, and its deposition has important implications for the global CO2 budget. In this study, we explore distributions of potentially bioreactive Fe, the soluble fraction required by phytoplankton for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation, in deep-sea sediments in the North and South Atlantic Oceans. We used a state-of-the-art Fe speciation technique to characterize Fe inputs from different source regions, specifically North Africa and Patagonia to address the patterns and implications across glacial-interglacial time scales. In many open-ocean regions the input of new iron to the surface waters is dominated by the atmospheric deposition of soluble iron in eolian dusts. Multiple records have shown dust accumulation is correlated with glacial-interglacial cycles - glacial periods are substantially dustier. Furthermore, the delivery of eolian dust to the North and South Atlantic Oceans are from two very different source regions and soil types. We analyzed IODP cores from these two regions and our preliminary data shows similar pattern of iron distribution from both the North and South Atlantic Oceans. To date we have found no simple global pattern of bioavailable iron distribution during glacial and interglacial periods. We have analyzed a range of size distributions to isolate the dust-dominated fraction and the data shows no size effects in bioavailable form of iron distribution. We will explore the role of deep-water dust dissolution and sedimentary redox implications and its role on the bioreactive Fe record in marine cores.

  13. Assessing the internal consistency of the CARINA database in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lo Monaco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical ancillary data from previously not publicly available cruises were retrieved and recently merged to a new data base, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. The initial North Atlantic project, an international effort for ocean carbon synthesis, was extended to include the Arctic Mediterranean Seas (Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas and all three sectors of the Southern Ocean. Of a total of 188 cruises, 37 cruises are part of the Southern Ocean. The present work focuses on data collected in the Indian sector (20° S–70° S; 30° E–150° E. The Southern Indian Ocean dataset covers the period 1992–2004 and includes seasonal repeated observations. Parameters including salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2, total alkalinity (TA, oxygen, nitrate, phosphate and silicate were examined for cruise-to-cruise and overall consistency. In addition, data from an existing, quality controlled data base (GLODAP were introduced in the CARINA analysis to improve data coverage in the Southern Ocean. A global inversion was performed to synthesize the information deduced from objective comparisons of deep measurements (>1500 m at nearby stations (generally <220 km. The corrections suggested by the inversion were allowed to vary within a fixed envelope, thus accounting for ocean interior variability. The adjustments applied to CARINA data and those recommended for GLODAP data, in order to obtain a consistent merged dataset, are presented and discussed. The final outcome of this effort is a new quality controlled data base for TCO2 and other properties of the carbon system that can now be used to investigate the natural variability or stability of ocean chemistry and the accumulation of anthropogenic carbon. This data product also offers an important new synthesis of seasonal to decadal observations to validate ocean biogeochemical models in a region where available historical data were very

  14. Factors influencing the dissolved iron input by river water to the open ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Krachler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of natural metal chelators on the bio-available iron input to the ocean by river water was studied. Ferrous and ferric ions present as suspended colloidal particles maintaining the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater at the continental boundary. However, we might argue that different iron-binding colloids become sequentially destabilized in meeting progressively increasing salinities. By use of a 59Fe tracer method, the partitioning of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured with high accuracy in mixtures of natural river water with artificial sea water. The results show a characteristic sequence of sedimentation. Various colloids of different stability are removed from a water of increasing salinity, such as it is the case in the transition from a river water to the open sea. However, the iron transport capacities of the investigated river waters differed greatly. A mountainous river in the Austrian Alps would add only about 5% of its dissolved Fe load, that is about 2.0 µg L-1 Fe, to coastal waters. A small tributary draining a sphagnum peat-bog, which acts as a source of refractory low-molecular-weight fulvic acids to the river water, would add approximately 20% of its original Fe load, that is up to 480 µg L-1 Fe to the ocean's bio-available iron pool. This points to a natural mechanism of ocean iron fertilization by terrigenous fulvic-iron complexes originating from weathering processes occurring in the soils upstream.

  15. Phenotypic plasticity of southern ocean diatoms: key to success in the sea ice habitat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Sackett

    Full Text Available Diatoms are the primary source of nutrition and energy for the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Microalgae, including diatoms, synthesise biological macromolecules such as lipids, proteins and carbohydrates for growth, reproduction and acclimation to prevailing environmental conditions. Here we show that three key species of Southern Ocean diatom (Fragilariopsis cylindrus, Chaetoceros simplex and Pseudo-nitzschia subcurvata exhibited phenotypic plasticity in response to salinity and temperature regimes experienced during the seasonal formation and decay of sea ice. The degree of phenotypic plasticity, in terms of changes in macromolecular composition, was highly species-specific and consistent with each species' known distribution and abundance throughout sea ice, meltwater and pelagic habitats, suggesting that phenotypic plasticity may have been selected for by the extreme variability of the polar marine environment. We argue that changes in diatom macromolecular composition and shifts in species dominance in response to a changing climate have the potential to alter nutrient and energy fluxes throughout the Southern Ocean ecosystem.

  16. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from PROFESSOR SIEDLECKI in the Southern Oceans from 1977-01-01 to 1978-12-31 (NODC Accession 9600122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Serial data in this accession was collected in Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) in Polish Antarctic stations as part of Global Ocean Data...

  17. The influence of historical climate changes on Southern Ocean marine predator populations: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Jane L; Emmerson, Louise M; Miller, Karen J

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean ecosystem is undergoing rapid physical and biological changes that are likely to have profound implications for higher-order predators. Here, we compare the long-term, historical responses of Southern Ocean predators to climate change. We examine palaeoecological evidence for changes in the abundance and distribution of seabirds and marine mammals, and place these into context with palaeoclimate records in order to identify key environmental drivers associated with population changes. Our synthesis revealed two key factors underlying Southern Ocean predator population changes; (i) the availability of ice-free ground for breeding and (ii) access to productive foraging grounds. The processes of glaciation and sea ice fluctuation were key; the distributions and abundances of elephant seals, snow petrels, gentoo, chinstrap and Adélie penguins all responded strongly to the emergence of new breeding habitat coincident with deglaciation and reductions in sea ice. Access to productive foraging grounds was another limiting factor, with snow petrels, king and emperor penguins all affected by reduced prey availability in the past. Several species were isolated in glacial refugia and there is evidence that refuge populations were supported by polynyas. While the underlying drivers of population change were similar across most Southern Ocean predators, the individual responses of species to environmental change varied because of species specific factors such as dispersal ability and environmental sensitivity. Such interspecific differences are likely to affect the future climate change responses of Southern Ocean marine predators and should be considered in conservation plans. Comparative palaeoecological studies are a valuable source of long-term data on species' responses to environmental change that can provide important insights into future climate change responses. This synthesis highlights the importance of protecting productive foraging grounds

  18. Consistency of cruise data of the CARINA database in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hoppema

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Initially a North Atlantic project, the CARINA carbon synthesis was extended to include the Southern Ocean. Carbon and relevant hydrographic and geochemical ancillary data from cruises all across the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean were released to the public and merged into a new database as part of the CARINA synthesis effort. Of a total of 188 cruises, 37 cruises are part of the Southern Ocean, including 11 from the Atlantic sector. The variables from all Southern Ocean cruises, including dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2, total alkalinity, oxygen, nitrate, phosphate and silicate, were examined for cruise-to-cruise consistency in one collective effort. Seawater pH and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs are also part of the database, but the pH quality control (QC is described in another Earth System Science Data publication, while the complexity of the Southern Ocean physics and biogeochemistry prevented a proper QC analysis of the CFCs. The area-specific procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data (i.e. secondary QC, are briefly described here for the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Data from an existing, quality controlled database (GLODAP were used as a reference for our computations – however, the reference data were included into the analysis without applying the recommended GLODAP adjustments so the corrections could be independently verified. The outcome of this effort is an internally consistent, high-quality carbon data set for all cruises, including the reference cruises. The suggested corrections by the inversion analysis were allowed to vary within a fixed envelope, thus accounting for natural variability. The percentage of cruises adjusted ranged from 31% (for nitrate to 54% (for phosphate depending on the variable.

  19. The Effects of Interactive Stratospheric Chemistry on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Climate Change in an AOGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Newman, Paul; Pawson, Steven; Waugh, Darryn

    2014-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion has played a dominant role in driving Antarctic climate change in the last decades. In order to capture the stratospheric ozone forcing, many coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) prescribe the Antarctic ozone hole using monthly and zonally averaged ozone field. However, the prescribed ozone hole has a high ozone bias and lacks zonal asymmetry. The impacts of these biases on model simulations, particularly on Southern Ocean and the Antarctic sea ice, are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of using interactive stratospheric chemistry instead of prescribed ozone on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate change in an AOGCM. We compare two sets of ensemble simulations for the 1960-2010 period using different versions of the Goddard Earth Observing System 5 - AOGCM: one with interactive stratospheric chemistry, and the other with prescribed monthly and zonally averaged ozone and 6 other stratospheric radiative species calculated from the interactive chemistry simulations. Consistent with previous studies using prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations, the interactive chemistry runs simulate a deeper Antarctic ozone hole and consistently larger changes in surface pressure and winds than the prescribed ozone runs. The use of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model in this study enables us to determine the impact of these surface changes on Southern Ocean circulation and Antarctic sea ice. The larger surface wind trends in the interactive chemistry case lead to larger Southern Ocean circulation trends with stronger changes in northerly and westerly surface flow near the Antarctica continent and stronger upwelling near 60S. Using interactive chemistry also simulates a larger decrease of sea ice concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of using interactive chemistry in order to correctly capture the influences of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate

  20. The post-2002 global surface warming slowdown caused by the subtropical Southern Ocean heating acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2017-04-01

    The warming rate of global mean surface temperature slowed down during 1998-2012. Previous studies pointed out role of increasing ocean heat uptake during this global warming slowdown, but its mechanism remains under discussion. Our numerical simulations, in which wind stress anomaly in the equatorial Pacific is imposed from reanalysis data, suggest that subsurface warming in the equatorial Pacific took place during initial phase of the global warming slowdown (1998-2002), as previously reported. It is newly clarified that the Ekman transport from tropics to subtropics is enhanced during the later phase of the slowdown (after 2002) and enhanced subtropical Ekman downwelling causes accelerated heat storage below depth of 700 m in the subtropical Southern Ocean, leading to the post-2002 global warming slowdown. Observational data of ocean temperature also support this scenario. This study provides clear evidence that deeper parts of the Southern Ocean play a critical role in the post-2002 warming slowdown.

  1. The Southern Ocean deep sea: first insights into biodiversity and biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Brix, S.; Brökeland, W.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa1. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique environmen......Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa1. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique...

  2. Southern Ocean acidification: a tipping point at 450-ppm atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ben I; Matear, Richard J

    2008-12-02

    Southern Ocean acidification via anthropogenic CO(2) uptake is expected to be detrimental to multiple calcifying plankton species by lowering the concentration of carbonate ion (CO(3)(2-)) to levels where calcium carbonate (both aragonite and calcite) shells begin to dissolve. Natural seasonal variations in carbonate ion concentrations could either hasten or dampen the future onset of this undersaturation of calcium carbonate. We present a large-scale Southern Ocean observational analysis that examines the seasonal magnitude and variability of CO(3)(2-) and pH. Our analysis shows an intense wintertime minimum in CO(3)(2-) south of the Antarctic Polar Front and when combined with anthropogenic CO(2) uptake is likely to induce aragonite undersaturation when atmospheric CO(2) levels reach approximately 450 ppm. Under the IPCC IS92a scenario, Southern Ocean wintertime aragonite undersaturation is projected to occur by the year 2030 and no later than 2038. Some prominent calcifying plankton, in particular the Pteropod species Limacina helicina, have important veliger larval development during winter and will have to experience detrimental carbonate conditions much earlier than previously thought, with possible deleterious flow-on impacts for the wider Southern Ocean marine ecosystem. Our results highlight the critical importance of understanding seasonal carbon dynamics within all calcifying marine ecosystems such as continental shelves and coral reefs, because natural variability may potentially hasten the onset of future ocean acidification.

  3. Enhancement and inhibition of iron photoreduction by individual ligands in open ocean seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, MJA; Gerringa, LJA; Carolus, VE; Velzeboer, [No Value; de Baar, HJW; Gerringa, Loes J.A.; Carolus, Vicky E.; Velzeboer, Ilona; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Byrne, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, we investigated the effect of five individual Fe-binding ligands: phaeophytin, ferrichrome, desferrioxamine B (DFOB), inositol hexaphosphate (phytic acid), and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) on the Fe(II) photoproduction using seawater of the open Southern Ocean. Addition of

  4. The Soundscape of the Southern Ocean – How Quiet and how Loud can Nature be?

    OpenAIRE

    Kindermann, Lars; Boebel, Olaf; van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Ocean around the Antarctic continent provides some of the most extreme environmental conditions on earth which shape also the unique underwater soundscape. The area probably contains the most quiet locations within the world's oceans but is also stage for some of the loudest natural events. It is still relatively void of anthropogenic noise and is one of the most important feeding grounds for great whales. However, comparatively little acoustic data exists from this region so far...

  5. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide transport in the Southern Ocean driven by Ekman flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T; Woloszyn, M; Mazloff, M

    2010-01-07

    The Southern Ocean, with its large surface area and vigorous overturning circulation, is potentially a substantial sink of anthropogenic CO(2) (refs 1-4). Despite its importance, the mechanism and pathways of anthropogenic CO(2) uptake and transport are poorly understood. Regulation of the Southern Ocean carbon sink by the wind-driven Ekman flow, mesoscale eddies and their interaction is under debate. Here we use a high-resolution ocean circulation and carbon cycle model to address the mechanisms controlling the Southern Ocean sink of anthropogenic CO(2). The focus of our study is on the intra-annual variability in anthropogenic CO(2) over a two-year time period. We show that the pattern of carbon uptake is correlated with the oceanic vertical exchange. Zonally integrated carbon uptake peaks at the Antarctic polar front. The carbon is then advected away from the uptake regions by the circulation of the Southern Ocean, which is controlled by the interplay among Ekman flow, ocean eddies and subduction of water masses. Although lateral carbon fluxes are locally dominated by the imprint of mesoscale eddies, the Ekman transport is the primary mechanism for the zonally integrated, cross-frontal transport of anthropogenic CO(2). Intra-annual variability of the cross-frontal transport is dominated by the Ekman flow with little compensation from eddies. A budget analysis in the density coordinate highlights the importance of wind-driven transport across the polar front and subduction at the subtropical front. Our results suggest intimate connections between oceanic carbon uptake and climate variability through the temporal variability of Ekman transport.

  6. IMOS: How seals are changing the way we monitor the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, R.; McMahon, C.; Jonsen, I.; Goldsworthy, S.; Hindell, M.; Hoenner, X.; Thums, M.

    2016-02-01

    IMOS (Integrated Marine Observing System) operates a wide range of ocean observing equipment throughout Australia's coastal waters and also the open oceans. This fully integrated, national system, covers physical, chemical and biological ocean sciences forming the basis for robust and informed study of the worlds oceans. Of particular interest in understanding global climate processes is the Southern Ocean (SO), but studying this remote region is difficult and most observations are collected during the short ice-free summer when the region is accessible. Through Winter and Spring it is extremely difficult to collect biophysical ocean information in the Southern Ocean. The importance of good observations from this region, the home of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the largest current system in the world, which connects water masses from the global ocean basins cannot be over emphasised. IMOS through the Australian Animal Tracking and Monitoring System (AATAMS) has made important inroads into collecting otherwise hard to obtain observations from the SO by using CTD bio-loggers to monitor coastal and oceanic movements of marine animals from the Australian mainland as far south as the Antarctic continent. In particular seals equipped with satellite-linked CTD tags have provided unique temporal and spatial coverage of the Southern Ocean. This includes extensive data from the Antarctic continental slope and shelf regions during the winter months, which is outside the conventional areas of Argo autonomous floats and ship-based studies. Over 75,000 temperature and salinity profiles have been collected from 20-140 °E, between the Kerguelen archipelago and Prydz Bay Antarctica. These data offer invaluable new insights into the water masses, oceanographic processes and provides a vital tool for oceanographers seeking to advance our understanding of this key component of the global ocean climate. Here we present an overview of the IMOS database of hydrographic (i

  7. Optical Measurements and Modeling to Estimate Concentrations and Fluxes of Organic Matter in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Mitchell, B. Greg; Marra, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project was a collaboration between two Principal Investigators, Dr. Dariusz Stramski and Dr. Greg Mitchell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego. Our overall goal was to conduct optical measurements and modeling to estimate concentrations of organic matter in the Southern Ocean in support of the U.S. JGOFS Process Study in this region. Key variables and processes of high relevance to accomplish the JGOFS goals include time and space resolution of phytoplankton pigments, particulate organic carbon, and the formation and export of organic carbon. Our project focused on establishing the fundamental relationships for parameterization of these variables and processes in terms of the optical properties of seawater, and developing understanding of why the Southern Ocean differs from other low-latitude systems, or has differentiation within. Our approach builds upon historical observations that optical properties provide a useful proxy for key reservoirs of organic matter such as chlorophyll alpha (Chl) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, which are of relevance to the JGOFS objectives. We carried out detailed studies of in situ and water sample optical properties including spectral reflectance, absorption, beam attenuation, scattering, and backscattering coefficients. We evaluated the ability to estimate Chl from the spectral reflectance (ocean color) in the Southern Ocean. We examined relationships between the ocean optical properties and particulate organic carbon. We developed, for the first time, an algorithm for estimating particulate organic carbon concentration in the surface ocean from satellite imagery of ocean color. With this algorithm, we obtained maps of POC distribution in the Southern Ocean showing the seasonal progression of POC in the austral spring-summer season. We also developed a semianalytical reflectance model for the investigated polar waters based on our field measurements of absorption

  8. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart G of... - Boundaries of the Statistical Reporting Area in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Boundaries of the Statistical Reporting Area in the Southern Ocean 1 Figure 1 to Subpart G of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL... in the Southern Ocean EC01JY91.072 ...

  9. Astronomically-induced Mid-Brunhes Transition in the Southern and Deep Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiuzhen

    2013-04-01

    The interglacials after 430 ka (ka: 1000 years) ago were characterized by warmer climates and higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations than the interglacials before, but the cause of this climatic transition (the so-called Mid-Brunhes Event, MBE) is unknown. Based on model simulations, my results show that, in response to insolation changes only, feedbacks between sea ice, temperature, evaporation and salinity caused vigorous pre-MBE Antarctic Bottom Water formation and Southern Ocean ventilation. My results also show that strong Westerlies increased the pre-MBE overturning in the Southern Ocean via an increased latitudinal insolation gradient created by changes in eccentricity during austral winter and in obliquity during austral summer. The stronger bottom water formation led to a cooler deep ocean during the older interglacials. These insolation-induced differences in the deep-sea temperature and in the Southern Ocean ventilation between the more recent interglacials and the older ones were not expected, because there is no straightforward visible systematic difference in the astronomical parameters between the interglacials before and after 430 ka ago. Rather than being a real "event", the apparent MBE (i.e. the difference in the interglacial intensity before and after 430 ka BP) appears in my results to come from the complex response of the climate system to the astronomical and insolation forcings prevailing before and after 430 ka BP. This does not mean that nothing could have happened between MIS-13 and MIS-11 which might have amplified such difference. Given the important roles of the Southern and Deep Oceans on the carbon cycle, these findings are a first step towards understanding the magnitude change of the interglacial CO2 concentration around 430 ka. Reference: Yin Q.Z., 2013. Insolation-induced Mid-Brunhes Transition in the Southern and Deep Oceans. Nature, DOI 10.1038/nature11790. Acknowledgement: This work is supported by the European Research Council

  10. Revisiting Ocean Color algorithms for chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon in the Southern Ocean using biogeochemical floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haëntjens, Nils; Boss, Emmanuel; Talley, Lynne D.

    2017-08-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) ecosystem plays a key role in the carbon cycle by sinking a major part (43%) of the ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2, and being an important source of nutrients for primary producers. However, undersampling of SO biogeochemical properties limits our understanding of the mechanisms taking place in this remote area. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project has been deploying a large number of autonomous biogeochemical floats to study the SO (as of December 2016, 74 floats out of 200 have been deployed). SOCCOM floats measurements can be used to extend remote sensing chlorophyll a (chl a) and particulate organic carbon (POC) products under clouds or during the polar night as well as adding the depth dimension to the satellite-based view of the SO. Chlorophyll a concentrations measured by a sensor embedded on the floats and POC concentrations derived from backscattering coefficients were calibrated with samples collected during the floats' deployment cruise. Float chl a and POC were compared with products derived from observations of MODIS and VIIRS sensors. We find the Ocean Color Index (OCI) global algorithm to agree well with the matchups (within 9%, on average, for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and 12%, on average, for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua (MODIS)). SO-specific algorithms estimating chl a are offset by ˜45% south of the Sea Ice Extent Front (˜60°S). In addition, POC estimates based on floats agree well with NASA's POC algorithm.

  11. Diatom Transcriptional and Physiological Responses to Changes in Iron Bioavailability across Ocean Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R. Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in iron (Fe bioavailability influence diatom physiology and community composition, and thus have a profound impact on primary productivity and ecosystem dynamics. Iron limitation of diatom growth rates has been demonstrated in both oceanic and coastal waters of the Northeast Pacific Ocean and is predicted to become more pervasive in future oceans. However, it is unclear how the strategies utilized by phytoplankton to cope with low Fe bioavailability and resupply differ across these ocean provinces. We investigated the response of diatom communities to variable Fe conditions through incubation experiments performed in the Fe mosaic of the California Upwelling Zone and along a natural Fe gradient in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Through coupling gene expression of two dominant diatom taxa (Pseudo-nitzschia and Thalassiosira with biological rate process measurements, we provide an in-depth examination of the physiological and molecular responses associated with varying Fe status. Following Fe enrichment, oceanic diatoms showed distinct differential expression of gene products involved in nitrogen assimilation, photosynthetic carbon fixation, and vitamin production compared to diatoms from low-Fe coastal sites, possibly driven by the chronic nature of Fe stress at the oceanic site. Genes of interest involved in Fe and N metabolism additionally exhibited divergent expression patterns between the two diatom taxa investigated, demonstrating that diverse diatoms may invoke alternative strategies when dealing with identical changes in their environment. We report here several mechanisms used distinctly by coastal or oceanic diatom communities as well as numerous taxa-specific strategies for coping with Fe stress and rearranging nutrient metabolism following Fe enrichment.

  12. Distribution, abundance and ecological relevance of pelagic fishes in the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; de Putte, Anton P. Van; Siegel, Volker; Pakhomov, Evgeny A.; Van Franeker, Jan A.; Meesters, Hugo W. G.; Volckaert, Filip A. M.

    2008-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of larval and postlarval fishes was investigated in the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean, in March and April 2004. The upper 200 m of the water column were sampled with an 8 m(2) rectangular midwater trawl at 93 stations. The larval species community clustered in a diverse

  13. Biogeochemical cycling of cadmium isotopes in the Southern Ocean along the Zero Meridian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Middag, R.; Vance, D.; Zhao, Y.; Klunder, M.; Mezger, K.; Feldmann, H.; Andreae, M.O.; Bowie, Andrew Ross

    2014-01-01

    We present depth profiles of Cd isotopes and concentrations from the Southern Ocean at four stations in the Atlantic sector along the Greenwich Meridian (47 degrees S to 68 degrees S) located across the main Antarctic frontal zones and productivity belt. The vertical profiles of Cd concentration

  14. Biogeochemical cycling of zinc and its isotopes in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Vance, D.; Abouchami, W.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Rehkamper, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report Zn concentration and isotope data for seawater samples from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, collected during the IPY/GEOTRACES ANT-XXIV/III cruise along the Greenwich Zero Meridian. Data are reported for the full depth range of the water column at three stations, as well as a

  15. Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1A from reduced Southern Ocean overturning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, N R; Menviel, L; Carter, L; Fogwill, C J; England, M H; Cortese, G; Levy, R H

    2014-09-29

    During the last glacial termination, the upwelling strength of the southern polar limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation varied, changing the ventilation and stratification of the high-latitude Southern Ocean. During the same period, at least two phases of abrupt global sea-level rise--meltwater pulses--took place. Although the timing and magnitude of these events have become better constrained, a causal link between ocean stratification, the meltwater pulses and accelerated ice loss from Antarctica has not been proven. Here we simulate Antarctic ice sheet evolution over the last 25 kyr using a data-constrained ice-sheet model forced by changes in Southern Ocean temperature from an Earth system model. Results reveal several episodes of accelerated ice-sheet recession, the largest being coincident with meltwater pulse 1A. This resulted from reduced Southern Ocean overturning following Heinrich Event 1, when warmer subsurface water thermally eroded grounded marine-based ice and instigated a positive feedback that further accelerated ice-sheet retreat.

  16. Wandering whales? : Relationships between baleen whales and the sea ice environment in the Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmans, Bas

    2017-01-01

    Each austral summer large baleen whales migrate into the Southern Ocean to feed on krill. The melting of sea ice leads to algal blooms which allow rapid growth and development of krill. In order to predict how baleen whales will respond to long-term changes in the physical environment, we need to

  17. Accumulation status of persistent organochlorines in albatrosses from the North Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruge, K S; Watanabe, M; Tanaka, H; Tanabe, S

    2001-01-01

    Current status of contamination by persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and chlordane compounds (CHLs) were examined in 61 individuals belonging to eight albatross species collected from the North Pacific and the Southern Ocean. Generally high OC concentrations were found in albatrosses from the North Pacific than those from the Southern Oceans. Black-footed albatrosses had noticeably high PCBs and DDTs concentrations with mean values of 92 and 33 micrograms/g wet weight in subcutaneous fat, respectively. Among the other OCs, concentration of CHLs was higher than that of HCB in North Pacific albatrosses. HCHs accumulation was the lowest among all the OCs analyzed. Species-specific differences were observed for HCB, CHLs and DDTs in some species in the Southern Ocean. No significant difference of gender and age-related accumulation was observed in total OCs. However, PCB concentrations were higher in mature birds than those from immature ones in the Southern Ocean. Species-specific accumulation patterns of OCs in albatrosses were closely related with their feeding, migration, age and geographical ranges.

  18. Short-term photoacclimation effects on photoinhibition of phytoplankton in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, A.C.; Garcon, V.; de Baar, H.J.W.; Arrigo, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed whether short-term photoacclimation responses of natural phytoplankton populations in the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean) were affecting protection from photodamage as cells are mixed up to the surface from depth. To this end, we measured phytoplankton fluorescence characteristics and

  19. Coccolith distribution patterns in South Atlantic and Southern Ocean surface sediments in relation to environmental gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckel, B.; Baumann, K.-H.; Henrich, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the coccolith compositions of 213 surface sediment samples from the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean were analysed with respect to the environmental parameters of the overlying surface waters. From this data set, the abundance patterns of the main species and their ecological affi...

  20. Biological oceanography across the Southern Indian Ocean – basinscale trends in the zooplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasdottir, Sigrun; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Borg, Christian Marc Andersen

    2013-01-01

    We present a study on the protozooplankton 45 mm and copepods larger than 50 mm at a series of contrasting stations across the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO). Numerically, over 80% of the copepod community across the transect was less than 650 mm in size, dominated by nauplii, and smaller copepods, ...

  1. Cetacean surveys in the Southern Ocean using icebreaker-supported helicopters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheidat, M.; Friedlaender, A.; Kock, K.H.; Lehnert, L.; Boebel, O.; Roberts, J.; Williams, R.

    2011-01-01

    Cetaceans in the Southern Ocean are potentially impacted by anthropogenic activities, such as direct hunting or through indirect effects of a reduced sea ice due to climate change. Knowledge on the distribution of cetacean species in this area is important for conservation, but the remoteness of the

  2. Exposing XBT bias in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hutchinson, KA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrographic data from three research cruises, occupying the GoodHope line in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, are used to identify and quantify Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) temperature biases. A set of 148 collocated XBT and CTD...

  3. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Franeker, van J.A.; Cisewski, B.; Leach, H.; Putte, van de A.P.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Bathmann, U.; Wolff, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0–2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  4. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wirn J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  5. First insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, A.; Gooday, A.J.; Brandao, S.N.; Mesel, de I.G.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique environmental

  6. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  7. The impact of ENSO on Southern African rainfall in CMIP5 ocean atmosphere coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieppois, Bastien; Rouault, Mathieu; New, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We study the ability of 24 ocean atmosphere global coupled models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) to reproduce the teleconnections between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Southern African rainfall in austral summer using historical forced simulations, with a focus on the atmospheric dynamic associated with El Niño. Overestimations of summer rainfall occur over Southern Africa in all CMIP5 models. Abnormal westward extensions of ENSO patterns are a common feature of all CMIP5 models, while the warming of the Indian Ocean that happens during El Niño is not correctly reproduced. This could impact the teleconnection between ENSO and Southern African rainfall which is represented with mixed success in CMIP5 models. Large-scale anomalies of suppressed deep-convection over the tropical maritime continent and enhanced convection from the central to eastern Pacific are correctly simulated. However, regional biases occur above Africa and the Indian Ocean, particularly in the position of the deep convection anomalies associated with El Niño, which can lead to the wrong sign in rainfall anomalies in the northwest part of South Africa. From the near-surface to mid-troposphere, CMIP5 models underestimate the observed anomalous pattern of pressure occurring over Southern Africa that leads to dry conditions during El Niño years.

  8. Factors limiting heterotrophic bacterial production in the southern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Van Wambeke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of potential factors limiting bacterial growth was investigated along vertical and longitudinal gradients across the South Eastern Pacific Gyre. The effects of glucose, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate additions on heterotrophic bacterial production (using leucine technique were studied in parallel in unfiltered seawater samples incubated under natural daily irradiance. The enrichments realized on the subsurface showed three types of responses. From 141° W (Marquesas plateau to approx 125° W, bacteria were not bottom-up controlled, as confirmed by the huge potential of growth in non-enriched seawater (median of enhancement factor×39 in 24 h. Within the Gyre (125° W–95° W, nitrogen alone stimulated leucine incorporation rates (median×4.2, but rapidly labile carbon (glucose became a second limiting factor (median×37 when the two elements were added. Finally from the border of the gyre to the Chilean upwelling (95° W–73° W, labile carbon was the only factor stimulating heterotrophic bacterial production. Interaction between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterial communities and the direct versus indirect effect of iron and macronutrients on bacterial production were also investigated in four selected sites: two sites on the vicinity of the Marquesas plateau, the centre of the gyre and the Eastern border of the gyre. Both phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria were limited by availability of nitrogen within the gyre, but not by iron. Iron limited phytoplankton at Marquesas plateau and at the eastern border of the gyre. However 48 h enrichment experiments were not sufficient to show any clear limitation of heterotrophic bacteria within Marquesas plateau and showed a limitation of these organisms by labile carbon in the eastern border of the Gyre.

  9. Oceans around Southern Africa and regional effects of global change

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lutjeharms, JRE

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Current proper.32 This does not imply that no water from the eastern side of the island of Madagascar reaches the AgulhasCurrent,butthatthiswaterdoesnotcomefromtheEast Madagascar Current itself. It is possible that rings and filaments of this water reach... in the South West In- dian Ocean subgyre.31 The contribution through the Mozambique Channel is small by comparison. It seems that the southernlimboftheEastMadagascarCurrent?anotherpoten- tial contributory ? makes no significant contribution to the Agulhas...

  10. Accelerated warming of the Southern Ocean and its impacts on the hydrological cycle and sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiping; Curry, Judith A

    2010-08-24

    The observed sea surface temperature in the Southern Ocean shows a substantial warming trend for the second half of the 20th century. Associated with the warming, there has been an enhanced atmospheric hydrological cycle in the Southern Ocean that results in an increase of the Antarctic sea ice for the past three decades through the reduced upward ocean heat transport and increased snowfall. The simulated sea surface temperature variability from two global coupled climate models for the second half of the 20th century is dominated by natural internal variability associated with the Antarctic Oscillation, suggesting that the models' internal variability is too strong, leading to a response to anthropogenic forcing that is too weak. With increased loading of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere through the 21st century, the models show an accelerated warming in the Southern Ocean, and indicate that anthropogenic forcing exceeds natural internal variability. The increased heating from below (ocean) and above (atmosphere) and increased liquid precipitation associated with the enhanced hydrological cycle results in a projected decline of the Antarctic sea ice.

  11. Shearwater foraging in the Southern Ocean: the roles of prey availability and winds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Raymond

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sooty (Puffinus griseus and short-tailed (P. tenuirostris shearwaters are abundant seabirds that range widely across global oceans. Understanding the foraging ecology of these species in the Southern Ocean is important for monitoring and ecosystem conservation and management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tracking data from sooty and short-tailed shearwaters from three regions of New Zealand and Australia were combined with at-sea observations of shearwaters in the Southern Ocean, physical oceanography, near-surface copepod distributions, pelagic trawl data, and synoptic near-surface winds. Shearwaters from all three regions foraged in the Polar Front zone, and showed particular overlap in the region around 140 degrees E. Short-tailed shearwaters from South Australia also foraged in Antarctic waters south of the Polar Front. The spatial distribution of shearwater foraging effort in the Polar Front zone was matched by patterns in large-scale upwelling, primary production, and abundances of copepods and myctophid fish. Oceanic winds were found to be broad determinants of foraging distribution, and of the flight paths taken by the birds on long foraging trips to Antarctic waters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The shearwaters displayed foraging site fidelity and overlap of foraging habitat between species and populations that may enhance their utility as indicators of Southern Ocean ecosystems. The results highlight the importance of upwellings due to interactions of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with large-scale bottom topography, and the corresponding localised increases in the productivity of the Polar Front ecosystem.

  12. A euxinic southern North Atlantic Ocean during the Cenomanian/Turonian oceanic anoxic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.

    1998-01-01

    During mid-Cretaceous times large amounts of organic carbon (Corg) became sequestered in black shales', possibly due to oceanic anoxic events' characterized by the development of an extended oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Here, we provide the first direct evidence for an open ocean OMZ in the

  13. More losers than winners in a century of future Southern Ocean seafloor warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Meijers, Andrew J. S.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The waters of the Southern Ocean are projected to warm over the coming century, with potential adverse consequences for native cold-adapted organisms. Warming waters have caused temperate marine species to shift their ranges poleward. The seafloor animals of the Southern Ocean shelf have long been isolated by the deep ocean surrounding Antarctica and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, with little scope for southward migration. How these largely endemic species will react to future projected warming is unknown. By considering 963 invertebrate species, we show that within the current century, warming temperatures alone are unlikely to result in wholesale extinction or invasion affecting Antarctic seafloor life. However, 79% of Antarctica's endemic species do face a significant reduction in suitable temperature habitat (an average 12% reduction). Our findings highlight the species and regions most likely to respond significantly (negatively and positively) to warming and have important implications for future management of the region.

  14. Observing System Simulation Experiments for an array of autonomous biogeochemical profiling floats in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenkovich, Igor; Haza, Angelique; Gray, Alison R.; Dufour, Carolina O.; Garraffo, Zulema

    2017-09-01

    This study uses Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to examine the reconstruction of biogeochemical variables in the Southern Ocean from an array of autonomous profiling floats. In these OSSEs, designed to be relevant to the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observation and Modeling (SOCCOM) project, the simulated floats move with oceanic currents and sample dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon. The annual mean and seasonal cycle of these fields are then reconstructed and compared to the original model fields. The reconstruction skill is quantified with the reconstruction error (RErr), defined as the difference between the reconstructed and actual model fields, weighted by a local measure of the spatiotemporal variability. The square of the RErr is small (exception of the seasonal cycle in parts of the Indo-Atlantic, and that doubling this number to 300 results in a very modest increase in the reconstruction skill for dissolved oxygen.

  15. Influence of measurement uncertainties on soluble aerosol iron over the oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Meskhidze, N.; Johnson, M S; D. Hurley; Dawson, K

    2015-01-01

    The atmospheric supply of dust iron (Fe) plays a crucial role in the Earth's biogeochemical cycle and is of specific importance as a micronutrient in the marine environment. Observations show several orders of magnitude variability in the fractional solubility of Fe in dust aerosols, making it hard to assess the role of mineral dust for global ocean biogeochemical Fe cycle. In this study we compare the operational solubility of dust aerosol Fe associated with one of the flo...

  16. Closing history of the southern Tianshan oceanic basin, western China: an oblique collisional orogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuming; Lu, Huafu; Jia, Dong; Cai, Dongsheng; Wu, Shimin

    1999-02-01

    The Tianshan (Tien Shan) Range is an important Paleozoic collisional orogenic belt and the key to understand the central Asia tectonic evolution. This paper integrates our research results with the existing Chinese and international literature on sedimentology, geochemistry, isotopic geochronology, paleontonology and paleomagnetism of the Tianshan and Tarim regions to propose that the oblique collision may have played an important role in the late Paleozoic closing of the southern Tianshan oceanic basin. As a result of the Sinian (latest Proterozoic, younger than 800 Ma) continental extension and rifting process, the Tarim and Yili blocks separated from their parent continent in the Late Cambrian-Ordovician. The southern Tianshan oceanic crusts between the two blocks subducted northward beneath the southern margin of the Yili block in the Silurian. During the Devonian-Early Carboniferous, the Tarim block rapidly drifted to the north and rotated about 46° clockwise. This process induced the collision of the Yili micro-continent with the eastern segment (present geographical position) of the Tarim continent in the Late Devonian, and the southern Tianshan oceanic crust evolved to be a west-facing remnant oceanic basin. During the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian, the Tarim block, located within an almost constant latitude range, rotated about 26° clockwise with respect to the Yili micro-continent, which ultimately closed the remnant oceanic basin in a `scissors-like' manner from east to west and completed the Tarim-Yili collision. Subsequent A-type subduction of the Tarim continental crust and lithosphere-scale sinistral shearing generated a magmatic arc on the southern margin of the Tarim-Yili suture zone. The Late Permian-Early Triassic clastics deposited in a peripheral foreland basin developed above the arc.

  17. Thorium isotopes tracing the iron cycle at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Christopher T.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.; McGee, David; Anderson, Robert F.; Weisend, Rachel; Morton, Peter L.

    2015-11-01

    The role of iron as a limiting micronutrient motivates an effort to understand the supply and removal of lithogenic trace metals in the ocean. The long-lived thorium isotopes (232Th and 230Th) in seawater can be used to quantify the input of lithogenic metals attributable to the partial dissolution of aerosol dust. Thus, Th can help in disentangling the Fe cycle by providing an estimate of its ultimate supply and turnover rate. Here we present time-series (1994-2014) data on thorium isotopes and iron concentrations in seawater from the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA. By comparing Th-based dissolved Fe fluxes with measured dissolved Fe inventories, we derive Fe residence times of 6-12 months for the surface ocean. Therefore, Fe inventories in the surface ocean are sensitive to seasonal changes in dust input. Ultrafiltration results further reveal that Th has a much lower colloidal content than Fe does, despite a common source. On this basis, we suggest Fe colloids may be predominantly organic in composition, at least at Station ALOHA. In the deep ocean (>2 km), Fe approaches a solubility limit while Th, surprisingly, is continually leached from lithogenic particles. This distinction has implications for the relevance of Fe ligand availability in the deep ocean, but also suggests Th is not a good tracer for Fe in deep waters. While uncovering divergent behavior of these elements in the water column, this study finds that dissolved Th flux is a suitable proxy for the supply of Fe from dust in the remote surface ocean.

  18. A unified history of the ocean around southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Colin; Master, Sharad

    2010-05-01

    The movement with respect to Africa of the hotspot marked by present-day Bouvet island is extrapolated backward in time to a position in the Lower Limpopo Valley at the time of the Karoo-Ferrar basalt event (183 Ma). In a tight reconstruction of the Precambrian fragments of Gondwana at this time, the triangular gap that remains between South Africa's Precambrian, that of Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and the eastward-extrapolated front of the Cape Fold Belt we fill with the Precambrian fragments of South Patagonia and the Falkland Islands. We postulate that the 183 Ma mantle upwelling produced a triple junction-type fracture marked by the alignments of the Lebombo, the SE margin of the Zimbabwe craton and the giant Botswana dyke swarm (178 Ma) that was rather quickly followed by the expulsion of the South Patagonia terranes from the Gondwana assembly along the alignment of the Falklands-Agulhas Fault Zone (FAFZ) as a transform margin. The space created was filled with igneous material akin to the present day Afar triangle. The magma supply generated not only oceanic crust but also overlying igneous deposits, much probably erupted subaerially. These developed progressively into the Falklands Plateau, the Mozambique Plains, the Mozambique Rise and the Explora Wedge of Antarctica. Not until the early Cretaceous did the growth of normal ocean crust start to exceed the ability of the declining mantle plume to cover the new ocean crust in a confined space with subaerial deposits that substantially thickened otherwise ‘oceanic' crust. When Antarctica and Africa began to separate before about 167 Ma, the future Mozambique Rise moved with Antarctica until, at about 125 Ma, a modest ridge reorganization east of Africa left Madagascar and the Mozambique Rise as part of the Africa Plate. An increasing westerly component to the movement of Antarctica against Africa preceded the initial opening of the South Atlantic and the fusing of the South Patagonia terranes with the

  19. Paleomagnetism, rock magnetism and opaque mineralogy of iron ore deposits from southern Mexico and their implications for quantitative modelling of magnetometric data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva-Valdivia, L.M.; Fucugauchi, Urrutia, J.; Bohnel, H.; Moran Zenteno, D.J. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1990-06-01

    Paleomagnetism, Rock Magnetism and Opaque Mineralogy of Iron Ore Deposits from Southern Mexico and Their Implications for Quantitative Modelling of Magnetometric Data. The tectonic history of the Pacific continental margin is critical for understanding their mineral deposits. The margin presents intrusive and volcanic activity characteristic of magmatic arcs of subduction zones, which are genetically related with deposits of Cu, Fe, Mo, Au, and Ag. Although the tectonic history has been complex, involving oblique plate subduction, lateral movements, accretion of magmatic arcs and oceanic plateaux, and lateral displacements of major blocks, the mineral deposits are spatially distributed along elongated belts that roughly follow the margin. The authors have conducted paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and petrological studies of the iron ore deposits to investigate genesis, magnetic mineralogy, stratigraphic relationships, metamorphism, and applications on quantitative modelling of magnetometric data. The remanent magnetization and susceptibility data are necessary for interpretation of magnetic anomalies. The results permit a comparison of the mineral deposits along the continental margin.

  20. Glacial to Holocene detrital flux and sediment provenance variations in the South Atlantic Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, T. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Robinson, L. F.; McManus, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    Reconstructing input fluxes of detrital silicate material to the ocean through time provides insight into past atmospheric and ocean circulation pathways as well as the interaction between terrestrial and marine biogeochemical systems. The pathway of detrital input to the ocean can occur by a variety of mechanisms including riverine, aeolian, and ice rafting. Its provenance and flux may vary temporally. Constraining these inputs to the Southern Ocean is particularly important because productivity is limited by the lack of essential micronutrients such as Fe that are supplied by detritus. In this study we have combined 230Th-normalised detrital and mass fluxes with Pb, Nd and Sr isotope data measured on the silicate detrital phase as a tracer of sediment provenance to the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean. The data presented compares the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene, from a transect of core sites that span the Subtropical Front in the north to the Southern Antarctic Polar Front. The latitudinal transect for the Holocene shows clearly defined sediment provinces that grade from predominately cratonic-derived-sediment at the northern sites, to a greater proportion of sediment with a mantle-derived chemical signature in the south. The northern signal is identified as silicate detritus sourced from southern Africa and a sediment component that may be derived from the North Atlantic. The sediment at the southern sites is derived primarily from the Scotia arc. The detrital flux decreases with distance away from the African continent towards Antarctica. Thus the Holocene pattern of sediment flux and provenance matches the known sediment source pathways and oceanic circulation in this region. The glacial flux and provenance is significantly different to the modern. There is no systematic pattern in the glacial detrital flux, unlike during the Holocene. In the northern sites, the detrital flux is similar to the Holocene at the shallower site (2000 mbsl), but

  1. Distinct trends in the speciation of iron between the shallow shelf seas and the deep basins of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuróczy, C.-E.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; Klunder, M.; Laan, P.; Le Guitton, M.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The speciation of iron was investigated in three shelf seas and three deep basins of the Arctic Ocean in 2007. The dissolved fraction (<0.2 mu m) and a fraction < 1000 kDa were considered here. In addition, unfiltered samples were analyzed. Between 74 and 83% of dissolved iron was present in the

  2. Variability of SeaWiFs chlorophyll- a in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean: Strong topographic effects and weak seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Oh, Im-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Yoo, Sinjae

    2010-04-01

    This study examined 11-year (1997-2008) weekly and monthly time series of satellite-observed ocean color to understand the dominant temporal and spatial patterns of chlorophyll- a in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Using empirical orthogonal function analysis and k-means classification, we classified the study area into eight regions, which were in good accordance with the oceanographic and topographic features. Examination of the chlorophyll- a time series in each region revealed that contrary to our expectation, regular seasonal phytoplankton blooms were observed only in a limited area. Of the eight regions, only two showed typical seasonal blooms, and one showed weak seasonality, whereas other regions exhibited irregular seasonal blooms of variable duration. We attribute the absence of regularity in seasonal blooms to relatively shallow winter mixing, which would prevent entrainment of limiting micronutrients such as iron and silicate. In the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, topographic effects and sea ice may be the most important factors controlling primary productivity. In the South Georgia region, chlorophyll- a showed a significant correlation with geostrophic current velocity, indicating that topographic effects depend on the interaction of current strength and topographic structure. Interannual variability of the surface chlorophyll in some regions also revealed longer periodicity (˜6 years). The periodicity seemed to be related to El Niño-Southern Oscillation and to sea-ice dynamics influenced by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  3. Observed southern upper-ocean warming over 2005-2014 and associated mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovel, William; Terray, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    The climate system is gaining heat owing to increasing concentration of greenhouse gases due to human activities. As the world’s oceans are the dominant reservoir of heat in the climate system, an accurate estimation of the ocean heat content change is essential to quantify the Earth’s energy budget and global mean sea level rise. Based on the mean estimate of the three Argo gridded products considered, we provide a decadal ocean heat content estimate (over 2005-2014), down to 2000 m, of 0.76 ± 0.14 W m-2 and its spatial pattern since 2005 with unprecedented data coverage. We find that the southern hemisphere explains 90% of the net ocean heat uptake located around 40°S mainly for the Indian and Pacific oceans that corresponds to the center of their subtropical gyres. We find that this rapid upper ocean warming is linked to a poleward shift of mean wind stress curl enhancing Ekman pumping for the 45°S-60°S band. Therefore, the increase of Ekman pumping steepens the isopycnal surface and can enhance heat penetration into the deeper layers of the ocean. We also highlight a relative consistency between the year-to-year net top-of-the-atmosphere flux inferred by satellite measurements and the ocean heating rates (correlation coefficient of 0.53). We conclude that there is no strong evidence of missing energy in the climate system because of remaining large uncertainties in the observing system.

  4. Widespread iron-rich conditions in the mid-Proterozoic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planavsky, Noah J; McGoldrick, Peter; Scott, Clinton T; Li, Chao; Reinhard, Christopher T; Kelly, Amy E; Chu, Xuelei; Bekker, Andrey; Love, Gordon D; Lyons, Timothy W

    2011-09-07

    The chemical composition of the ocean changed markedly with the oxidation of the Earth's surface, and this process has profoundly influenced the evolutionary and ecological history of life. The early Earth was characterized by a reducing ocean-atmosphere system, whereas the Phanerozoic eon (less than 542 million years ago) is known for a stable and oxygenated biosphere conducive to the radiation of animals. The redox characteristics of surface environments during Earth's middle age (1.8-1 billion years ago) are less well known, but it is generally assumed that the mid-Proterozoic was home to a globally sulphidic (euxinic) deep ocean. Here we present iron data from a suite of mid-Proterozoic marine mudstones. Contrary to the popular model, our results indicate that ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(2+)-rich) conditions were both spatially and temporally extensive across diverse palaeogeographic settings in the mid-Proterozoic ocean, inviting new models for the temporal distribution of iron formations and the availability of bioessential trace elements during a critical window for eukaryotic evolution. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  5. A 3D parameterization of iron atmospheric deposition to the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Krol, Maarten C.; van Noije, Twan P. C.; Le Sager, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition of trace constituents, both of natural and anthropogenic origin, can act as a nutrient source into the open ocean and affect marine ecosystem functioning and subsequently the exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the global ocean. Dust is known as a major source of nutrients to the global ocean, but only a fraction of these nutrients is released in soluble form that can be assimilated by the ecosystems. Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient that significantly modulates gross primary production in High-Nutrient-Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) oceans, where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production is limited by Fe scarcity. The global atmospheric Fe cycle is here parameterized in the state-of-the-art global Earth System Model EC-Earth. The model takes into account the primary emissions of both insoluble and soluble Fe, associated with dusts and combustion processes. The impact of atmospheric acidity on mineral solubility is parameterized based on updated experimental and theoretical findings, and model results are evaluated against available observations. The link between the soluble Fe atmospheric deposition and anthropogenic sources is also investigated. Overall, the response of the chemical composition of nutrient containing aerosols to atmospheric composition changes is demonstrated and quantified. This work has been financed by the Marie-Curie H2020-MSCA-IF-2015 grant (ID 705652) ODEON (Online DEposition over OceaNs: Modeling the effect of air pollution on ocean bio-geochemistry in an Earth System Model).

  6. Wind increase over cooling Southern Ocean driven by tropical warming and polar ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. P.; Fan, T.; Deser, C.

    2014-12-01

    Changing winds over the Southern Ocean have had dramatic impacts on Antarctic sea ice extent, anthropogenic heat and carbon uptake by the ocean, and the contribution of the Antarctic ice sheet to global sea level rise. An overall intensification of the surface westerly winds has been attributed to several different forcings, including stratospheric ozone depletion, greenhouse gasses, and tropical sea surface temperatures (SSTs). However, the relative roles of these drivers have not been well quantified. Reconciling previous explanations, here we show that a combination of tropical SSTs and stratospheric ozone loss largely explains the magnitude, regional patterns, and seasonality of observed lower tropospheric zonal wind trends over the Southern Ocean. We evaluate multiple ensembles of atmospheric model simulations, with each ensemble forced by one or a combination of drivers. Considering all months of the year, tropical SSTs are the largest contributor to observed zonal wind trends over 40°S-80°S. In austral summer, tropical SSTs and stratospheric ozone loss have contributed approximately equally to near-surface wind trends. The tropical contribution in austral summer is associated with tropics-wide warming, which has been moderated in recent decades by a prevalence of La-Niña events. The relative phasing of natural variability with anthropogenic forcing is therefore essential for understanding and predicting Southern Ocean climate change.

  7. Physical and chemical data collected from bottle casts in the Pacific Ocean and the Southern Oceans from ALBA and other platforms from 18 November 1962 to 04 May 1990 (NODC Accession 0000413)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the Pacific Ocean and the Southern Oceans from ALBA, LIRA, TAMGA and other platforms from 18 November...

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1994-02-19 to 1994-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0144242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144242 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  9. Holocene Southern Ocean surface temperature variability west of the Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevenell, A E; Ingalls, A E; Domack, E W; Kelly, C

    2011-02-10

    The disintegration of ice shelves, reduced sea-ice and glacier extent, and shifting ecological zones observed around Antarctica highlight the impact of recent atmospheric and oceanic warming on the cryosphere. Observations and models suggest that oceanic and atmospheric temperature variations at Antarctica's margins affect global cryosphere stability, ocean circulation, sea levels and carbon cycling. In particular, recent climate changes on the Antarctic Peninsula have been dramatic, yet the Holocene climate variability of this region is largely unknown, limiting our ability to evaluate ongoing changes within the context of historical variability and underlying forcing mechanisms. Here we show that surface ocean temperatures at the continental margin of the western Antarctic Peninsula cooled by 3-4 °C over the past 12,000 years, tracking the Holocene decline of local (65° S) spring insolation. Our results, based on TEX(86) sea surface temperature (SST) proxy evidence from a marine sediment core, indicate the importance of regional summer duration as a driver of Antarctic seasonal sea-ice fluctuations. On millennial timescales, abrupt SST fluctuations of 2-4 °C coincide with globally recognized climate variability. Similarities between our SSTs, Southern Hemisphere westerly wind reconstructions and El Niño/Southern Oscillation variability indicate that present climate teleconnections between the tropical Pacific Ocean and the western Antarctic Peninsula strengthened late in the Holocene epoch. We conclude that during the Holocene, Southern Ocean temperatures at the western Antarctic Peninsula margin were tied to changes in the position of the westerlies, which have a critical role in global carbon cycling.

  10. Spatial distributions of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities have been resilient to long-term surface warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Geraint A; Ward, Peter; Thorpe, Sally E

    2018-01-01

    The biogeographic response of oceanic planktonic communities to climatic change has a large influence on the future stability of marine food webs and the functioning of global biogeochemical cycles. Temperature plays a pivotal role in determining the distribution of these communities and ocean warming has the potential to cause major distributional shifts, particularly in polar regions where the thermal envelope is narrow. We considered the impact of long-term ocean warming on the spatial distribution of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities through examining plankton abundance in relation to sea surface temperature between two distinct periods, separated by around 60 years. Analyses considered 16 dominant mesozooplankton taxa (in terms of biomass and abundance) in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, from net samples and in situ temperature records collected during the Discovery Investigations (1926-1938) and contemporary campaigns (1996-2013). Sea surface temperature was found to have increased significantly by 0.74°C between the two eras. The corresponding sea surface temperature at which community abundance peaked was also significantly higher in contemporary times, by 0.98°C. Spatial projections indicated that the geographical location of community peak abundance had remained the same between the two eras despite the poleward advance of sea surface isotherms. If the community had remained within the same thermal envelope as in the 1920s-1930s, community peak abundance would be 500 km further south in the contemporary era. Studies in the northern hemisphere have found that dominant taxa, such as calanoid copepods, have conserved their thermal niches and tracked surface isotherms polewards. The fact that this has not occurred in the Southern Ocean suggests that other selective pressures, particularly food availability and the properties of underlying water masses, place greater constraints on spatial distributions in this region. It

  11. Evolution of surface and deep water conditions in the Antarctic Southern Ocean across the MPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenfratz, A. P.; Jaccard, S.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Vance, D.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Kleiven, H. F.; Haug, G. H.

    2016-12-01

    The mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT; 1.25-0.7 Myr) marked a fundamental change in the periodicity of the climate cycles, shifting from a 41-kyr to a high-amplitude, asymmetric 100-kyr cycle without any noticeable change in orbital forcing. Hypotheses to explain the MPT involve non-linear responses to orbital forcing, changes in glacial dynamics and internal changes in the carbon cycle. Specifically, a decrease in pCO2 during peak ice age conditions and the associated global cooling has been proposed as one of the possible triggers for the MPT. Previous results have indicated that the Southern Ocean provides a coherent two-part mechanism for the timing and amplitude of the glacial/interglacial pCO2 variations. However, there is still much uncertainty and debate regarding the response of the Antarctic Southern Ocean biogeochemistry to changes invoked for the MPT, and its contribution to the proposed pCO2 variations. Here, we show 1.5 Myr-long records of export production, and planktonic (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma) and benthic (Melonis pompilioides) foraminiferal stable isotopes and trace metals from ODP Site 1094 retrieved from the Atlantic sector of the Antarctic Southern Ocean (53.2°S, 5.1°E, 2807m). While glacial planktonic δ18O increases across the MPT, glacial Mg/Ca-derived SST decrease later, around 700 ka, when glacial atmospheric pCO2 has already dropped. As glacial export production that is crucially related to micronutrients upwelled from the subsurface ocean remains unchanged across the past 1.5 Myr, it seems that cooling of the glacial surface ocean did not significantly alter the stability of the water column. Furthermore, paired measurements of benthic δ18O and Mg/Ca enables the determination of seawater δ18O of the deep ocean, which allows us to estimate changes in the density gradient and the salinity of the deep water.

  12. On the fast response of the Southern Ocean to changes in the zonal wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Webb

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Model studies of the Southern Ocean, reported here, show that the Antarctic Circumpolar Current responds within two days to changes in the zonal wind stress at the latitudes of Drake Passage. Further investigation shows that the response is primarily barotropic and that, as one might expect, it is controlled by topography. Analysis of the results show that the changes in the barotropic flow are sufficient to transfer the changed surface wind stress to the underlying topography and that during this initial phase baroclinic processes are not involved.

    The model results also show that the Deacon Cell responds to changes in the wind stress on the same rapid time scale. It is shown that the changes in the Deacon Cell can also be explained by the change in the barotropic velocity field, an increase in the zonal wind stress producing an increased northward flow in shallow regions and southward flow where the ocean is deep. This new explanation is unexpected as previously the Deacon Cell has been thought of as a baroclinic feature of the ocean.

    The results imply that where baroclinic processes do appear to be involved in either the zonal momentum balance of the Southern Ocean or the formation of the Deacon Cell, they are part of the long term baroclinic response of the ocean's density field to the changes in the barotropic flow.

  13. The Impact of the Ozone Hole on the Temperature and Salinity of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. L.; Polvani, L. M.; Abernathey, R. P.; Smith, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Observations have revealed systematic changes in the temperature and salinity of the Southern Ocean since 1960. These trends reflect the evolving exchange of heat and momentum between atmosphere and ocean and are, in part, driven by anthropogenic emissions. The key question is: which emissions are most important, greenhouse gases or ozone depleting substances? We answer this question using CESM-WACCM, a comprehensive climate model with interactive stratospheric chemistry, coupled to state-of-the-art land, ocean and sea-ice components. In accord with recent observations, the model reproduces the recent warming and freshening of the upper 1000m of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, employing an ensemble of single forcing integrations allows us to attribute a third of the changes in temperature and salinity to the presence of a seasonal ozone hole. While the warming is caused by a local change in the surface energy budget, the trend in salinity results from a combination of melting sea-ice and changing ocean transport.

  14. Investigating the complex relationship between in situ Southern Ocean pCO2 and its ocean physics and biogeochemical drivers using a nonparametric regression approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, W

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective in this paper is to investigate the use of a non-parametric model approach to model the relationship between oceanic carbon dioxide (pCO(sub2)) and a range of biogeochemical in situ variables in the Southern Ocean, which influence its...

  15. Developing a test-bed for robust research governance of geoengineering: the contribution of ocean iron biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Bressac, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    Geoengineering to mitigate climate change has long been proposed, but remains nebulous. Exploration of the feasibility of geoengineering first requires the development of research governance to move beyond the conceptual towards scientifically designed pilot studies. Fortuitously, 12 mesoscale (approx. 1000 km2) iron enrichments, funded to investigate how ocean iron biogeochemistry altered Earth's carbon cycle in the geological past, provide proxies to better understand the benefits and drawbacks of geoengineering. The utility of these iron enrichments in the geoengineering debate is enhanced by the GEOTRACES global survey. Here, we outline how GEOTRACES surveys and process studies can provide invaluable insights into geoengineering. Surveys inform key unknowns including the regional influence and magnitude of modes of iron supply, and stimulate iron biogeochemical modelling. These advances will enable quantification of interannual variability of iron supply to assess whether any future purposeful multi-year iron-fertilization meets the principle of `additionality' (sensu Kyoto protocol). Process studies address issues including upscaling of geoengineering, and how differing iron-enrichment strategies could stimulate wide-ranging biogeochemical outcomes. In summary, the availability of databases on both mesoscale iron-enrichment studies and the GEOTRACES survey, along with modelling, policy initiatives and legislation have positioned the iron-enrichment approach as a robust multifaceted test-bed to assess proposed research into climate intervention. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  16. Studies on the nutrient distribution in the Southern Ocean waters along the 45 degrees E transect

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajakumar, A.; Alagarsamy, R.; Khare, N.; Saraswat, R.; Subramaniam, M.M.

    ) is located at approximately 42-43° S latitude in central south Indian Ocean4. _______________ 3Present address: Ministry of Earth Sciences, Block # 12, CGO Complex, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110 003 India RAJKUMAR et al: NUTRIENT DISTRIBUTION...-103. 13 Nelson D M, DeMaster D J & Smith W O, Cycling of organic carbon and biogenic silica in the Southern Ocean: Estimates of water-column and sedimentary fluxes on the Ross Sea Continental Shelf, J. Geophy. Res., 101 (1996) 519-532. 14 Weisse T...

  17. King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Stenseth, Nils C; Park, Young-Hyang; Pradel, Roger; Grémillet, David; Gendner, Jean-Paul; Le Maho, Yvon

    2008-02-19

    Seabirds are sensitive indicators of changes in marine ecosystems and might integrate and/or amplify the effects of climate forcing on lower levels in food chains. Current knowledge on the impact of climate changes on penguins is primarily based on Antarctic birds identified by using flipper bands. Although flipper bands have helped to answer many questions about penguin biology, they were shown in some penguin species to have a detrimental effect. Here, we present for a Subantarctic species, king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), reliable results on the effect of climate on survival and breeding based on unbanded birds but instead marked by subcutaneous electronic tags. We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Niño Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote sea-surface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26 degrees C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions.

  18. Revision of Leucothoe (Amphipoda, Crustacea from the Southern Ocean: a cosmopolitanism concept is vanishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traudl Krapp-Schickel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the 125 currently recognized species of the panoceanic genus Leucothoe, L. antarctica was described in 1888 from the Antarctic seas, but was soon synonymized with the so-called cosmopolitan Leucothoe spinicarpa Abildgaard, which was cited from the Southern Ocean about 70 times since this first record. After erecting a new Antarctic species again only in 1983, “morphological variants” were observed and discussed. In this paper, we revalidate the first defined Antarctic species (Leucothoe antarctica, redescribe the second one (L. orkneyi, describe 5 new Southern Ocean species (L. campbelli sp. nov., L. longimembris sp. nov., L. macquariae sp. nov., L. merletta sp. nov. and L. weddellensis sp. nov. and provide a key to all Antarctic and sub-Antarctic species.

  19. New Perspectives on Frontal Variability in the Southern Ocean Using a Local Identification Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    The frontal structure of the Southern Ocean is investigated using a sophisticated frontal detection methodology, the Wavelet/Higher Order Statistics Enhancement (WHOSE) method, introduced in \\cite{Chapman2014}. This methodology is applied to 21 years of daily gridded sea-surface height (SSH) data to obtain daily maps of the locations of the fronts. By forming `heat-maps' of the frontal occurrence frequency and then approximating these heat-maps by a superposition of simple functions, the time-mean locations of the fronts, as well as a measure of their capacity to meander, are obtained and related to the frontal locations found by previous studies. The spatial and temporal variability of the frontal structure is then considered. The number of fronts is found to be highly variable throughout the Southern Ocean, increasing (`splitting') downstream of large bathymetric features and decreasing (`merging') in regions where the fronts are tightly controlled by the underlying topography. In contrast, frontal meanderi...

  20. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín

    2016-01-01

    zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.......Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global...... biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs): six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic procaryotes. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit...

  1. Environmental forcing and Southern Ocean marine predator populations: effects of climate change and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trathan, P N; Forcada, J; Murphy, E J

    2007-12-29

    The Southern Ocean is a major component within the global ocean and climate system and potentially the location where the most rapid climate change is most likely to happen, particularly in the high-latitude polar regions. In these regions, even small temperature changes can potentially lead to major environmental perturbations. Climate change is likely to be regional and may be expressed in various ways, including alterations to climate and weather patterns across a variety of time-scales that include changes to the long interdecadal background signals such as the development of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Oscillating climate signals such as ENSO potentially provide a unique opportunity to explore how biological communities respond to change. This approach is based on the premise that biological responses to shorter-term sub-decadal climate variability signals are potentially the best predictor of biological responses over longer time-scales. Around the Southern Ocean, marine predator populations show periodicity in breeding performance and productivity, with relationships with the environment driven by physical forcing from the ENSO region in the Pacific. Wherever examined, these relationships are congruent with mid-trophic-level processes that are also correlated with environmental variability. The short-term changes to ecosystem structure and function observed during ENSO events herald potential long-term changes that may ensue following regional climate change. For example, in the South Atlantic, failure of Antarctic krill recruitment will inevitably foreshadow recruitment failures in a range of higher trophic-level marine predators. Where predator species are not able to accommodate by switching to other prey species, population-level changes will follow. The Southern Ocean, though oceanographically interconnected, is not a single ecosystem and different areas are dominated by different food webs. Where species occupy different positions in

  2. Atmospheric research in Southern Africa and Indian Ocean: a South Africa-France bilateral collaborative programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sivakumar, V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available conference proceeding ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH IN SOUTHERN AFRICA AND INDIAN OCEAN : A SOUTH AFRICA – FRANCE BILATERAL COLLABORATIVE PROGRAMME V. Sivakumar1,2 and R. Delmas3 1 South Africa Coordinator, Department of Geography, Geoinformatics..., Universite de la Reunion, Saint Denis, La Reunion, France. svenkataraman@csir.co.za 1. INTRODUCTION In the present context of global changes, atmospheric and climatic research should be more organized in the framework of international...

  3. A Roadmap for Antarctic and Southern Ocean Science for the Next Two Decades and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennicutt, M. C., II

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Antarctic and Southern Ocean science is vital to understanding natural variability, the processes that govern global change and the role of humans in the Earth and climate system. The potential for new knowledge to be gained from future Antarctic science is substantial. Therefore, the international Antarctic community came together to 'scan the horizon' to identify the highest priority scientific questions that researchers should aspire to answer in the next two decades and beyond. Wide consultation was a fundamental principle for the development of a collective, international view of the most important future directions in Antarctic science. From the many possibilities, the horizon scan identified 80 key scientific questions through structured debate, discussion, revision and voting. Questions were clustered into seven topics: i) Antarctic atmosphere and global connections, ii) Southern Ocean and sea ice in a warming world, iii) ice sheet and sea level, iv) the dynamic Earth, v) life on the precipice, vi) near-Earth space and beyond, and vii) human presence in Antarctica. Answering the questions identified by the horizon scan will require innovative experimental designs, novel applications of technology, invention of next-generation field and laboratory approaches, and expanded observing systems and networks. Unbiased, non-contaminating procedures will be required to retrieve the requisite air, biota, sediment, rock, ice and water samples. Sustained year-round access to Antarctica and the Southern Ocean will be essential to increase winter-time measurements. Improved models are needed that represent Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in the Earth System, and provide predictions at spatial and temporal resolutions useful for decision making. A co-ordinated portfolio of cross-disciplinary science, based on new models of international collaboration, will be essential as no scientist, programme or nation can realize these aspirations alone.

  4. An overview of Southern Ocean zooplankton data: abundance, biomass, feeding and functional relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Angus; Ward, Peter; Hunt, B.P.V.; Pakhomov, E.A.; Hosie,G.W.

    2012-01-01

    There is an enormous amount of data on Southern Ocean (SO) zooplankton, mostly on their distribution with a minority addressing rate processes. This review aims to summarise these data and show where it resides, to assist SO food-web modellers or those with limited specialist knowledge of SO zooplankton. First, a brief overview is provided of the diversity and basic biology of SO zooplankton, with an emphasis on abundance, distribution and feeding. Second, advice is provided on the uses, stre...

  5. Observations of high droplet number concentrations in Southern Ocean boundary layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chubb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud physics data collected during the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO campaigns provide a snapshot of unusual wintertime microphysical conditions in the boundary layer over the Southern Ocean. On 29 June 2011, the HIAPER sampled the boundary layer in a region of pre-frontal warm air advection between 58 and 48° S to the south of Tasmania. Cloud droplet number concentrations were consistent with climatological values in the northernmost profiles but were exceptionally high for wintertime in the Southern Ocean at 100–200 cm−3 in the southernmost profiles. Sub-micron (0.06  < D <  1 µm aerosol concentrations for the southern profiles were up to 400 cm−3. Analysis of back trajectories and atmospheric chemistry observations revealed that while conditions in the troposphere were more typical of a clean remote ocean airmass, there was some evidence of continental or anthropogenic influence. However, the hypothesis of long-range transport of continental aerosol fails to explain the magnitude of the aerosol and cloud droplet concentration in the boundary layer. Instead, the gale force surface winds in this case (wind speed at 167 m above sea level was  > 25 m s−1 were most likely responsible for production of sea spray aerosol which influenced the microphysical properties of the boundary layer clouds. The smaller size and higher number concentration of cloud droplets is inferred to increase the albedo of these clouds, and these conditions occur regularly, and are expected to increase in frequency, over windy parts of the Southern Ocean.

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1996-03-17 to 1996-05-20 (NODC Accession 0116640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116640 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1993-02-06 to 1993-03-18 (NCEI Accession 0143944)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143944 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-01-04 to 2011-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0143947)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143947 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2008-12-26 to 2009-01-30 (NODC Accession 0110254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110254 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-12-14 to 2006-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108159 includes Surface underway data collected from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2010-11-28 to 2011-02-05 (NODC Accession 0108155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108155 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2009-02-03 to 2009-03-03 (NODC Accession 0110379)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110379 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from MIRAI in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2012-11-28 to 2013-01-04 (NCEI Accession 0143950)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143950 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  14. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, PAR Sensor and other instruments from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-16 to 2008-01-27 (NCEI Accession 0143932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143932 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  15. Meltwater Induced Changes in Micronutrient Availability and Productivity in the Southern Ocean During LGM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, T.; Robinson, R. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Wilkinson, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Southern Ocean plays an important role in the CO2 air-sea balance and have regulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. Increased productivity resulting from higher nutrient deposition over Antarctica could have contributed to lower the atmospheric CO2 content during ice ages. Although Fe-fertilization has been observed in waters of present Southern Ocean, there is still a lack of convincing evidence for such events in the past. Nutrients supply and consumption were reconstructed by analyzing the Zn incorporated in diatom frustules and diatom-bound δ 15N from sedimentary core RC13-259 from the Antarctic sector of the South Atlantic (54°S, 5°W). These data evidence for the first time a greater availability of westerlies-driven micronutrients to phytoplankton during the LGM. These changes in concert with higher nitrate consumption are resulting from massive meltwater discharge to the Southern Ocean. The widespread presence of meltwaters and free-drifting icebergs may have stimulated nutrient drawdown contributing in turn to the sequestration of CO2 during glacial times.

  16. High storage rates of anthropogenic CO_{2} in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akihiko; Kumamoto, Yu-ichiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichi

    2017-04-01

    Using high-quality data for CO2-system and related properties collected 17 years apart through international observation programs, we examined decadal-scale increases of anthropogenic CO2 along a zonal section at nominal 62˚ S ranging from 30˚ E to 160˚ E in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. In contrast to previous studies, increases of anthropogenic CO2 were largest (> 9.0 μmol kg-1) in Antarctic Bottom Water, where little storage of anthropogenic CO2 has been reported. Significant increases of anthropogenic CO2 in bottom and/or deep waters were detected through the section, although they became reduced in magnitude and depth range west of 110˚ E. Vertical distributions of anthropogenic CO2 showed significant positive correlations with decadal-scale changes in CFC-12, a proxy of circulation and ventilation, meaning that the distributions were mainly controlled by physical processes. Comparison of increases of anthropogenic CO2 between calculation methods with and without total alkalinity presented differences of increases of anthropogenic CO2west of 50˚ E. This is probably because decreases in production of particulate inorganic carbons in the Southern Ocean. The highest storage rate of anthropogenic CO2 was estimated to be 1.1 ± 0.6 mol m-2 a-1 at longitudes 130˚ -160˚ E. The results highlight storage rates higher than ever reported in the Southern Ocean, where very low storage of anthropogenic CO2 has been evidenced.

  17. Cytotoxic activity of marine sponge extracts from the sub-Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth K. Olsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, marine invertebrates, especially sponges, have proven to be a valuable source of new and/or bioactive natural products that have the potential to be further developed as lead compounds for pharmaceutical applications. Although marine benthic invertebrate communities occurring off the coast of South Africa have been explored for their biomedicinal potential, the natural product investigation of marine sponges from the sub-Antarctic Islands in the Southern Ocean for the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites has been relatively unexplored thus far. We report here the results for the biological screening of both aqueous and organic extracts prepared from nine specimens of eight species of marine sponges, collected from around Marion Island and the Prince Edward Islands in the Southern Ocean, for their cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines. The results obtained through this multidisciplinary collaborative research effort by exclusively South African institutions has provided an exciting opportunity to discover cytotoxic compounds from sub-Antarctic sponges, whilst contributing to our understanding of the biodiversity and geographic distributions of these cold-water invertebrates. Therefore, we acknowledge here the various contributions of the diverse scientific disciplines that played a pivotal role in providing the necessary platform for the future natural products chemistry investigation of these marine sponges from the sub- Antarctic Islands and the Southern Ocean.

  18. Southern Ocean ventilation and bottom water formation driven by Weddell Sea polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinlaender, Jonathan; Nisancioglu, Kerim; Smedsrud, Lars Henrik

    2017-04-01

    A distinct feature of the last glacial period, are the abrupt temperature fluctuations in Greenland associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger events and a similar but opposite response in Antarctica. The prevailing hypothesis behind this inter-hemispheric coupling, points to changes in deep water formation as the main driver, thus highlighting the pivotal role of the high latitude oceans in global climate. Bottom water formation through open-ocean deep convection in an Antarctic polynya, a large open water area inside the winter sea ice cover, provide a potential mechanism to trigger such changes in ocean circulation. In this study, an ocean-sea ice only version of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) is explored and shows strong open-ocean deep convection associated with large polynyas in the Weddell Sea. This provides us with an opportunity to test (1) how internal ocean dynamics can trigger abrupt changes in sea-ice cover and (2) how these polynyas affect the overturning circulation through changes in bottom water formation. During the 1,000 year long free-running simulation two polynyas are observed. We show, that the polynya is caused by subsurface warming leading to a gradual weakening of the surface stratification which destabilizes the whole water column and eventually triggers deep convective overturning. This mixes up relatively warm deep water causing extensive melt of sea ice in the Weddell Sea, while cold and fresh surface water sinks to the bottom. Consequently, the polynya leads to extensive bottom water formation and increase in the northward flow of Antarctic Bottom Water, while the southward flow of North Atlantic Deep Water is reduced. Finally, our results suggest that a decrease in the temperature of warm deep water in the Weddell Sea leads to cessation of open-ocean deep convection. This raises the question if open-ocean deep convection associated with polynyas in the Southern Ocean could be a realistic feature in a cold, glacial climate.

  19. Tropical systems from the southwest Indian Ocean making landfall over the Limpopo River Basin, southern Africa: a historical perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malherbe, J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study provides perspective on the contribution of landfalling tropical systems (cyclones, depressions, storms and lows) from the southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO) towards rainfall over the eastern interior of southern Africa, over the period 1948...

  20. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis wind products with in situ wave glider wind observations in the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmidt, KM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wave Glider (WG) deployments in the Southern Ocean with the intent to determine which blended satellite or reanalysis product best represents the magnitude and variability of the observed wind field. Results show that the ECMWF reanalysis product...

  1. Antarctic lakes suggest millennial reorganizations of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brenda L; Denton, George H; Fountain, Andrew G; Hendy, Chris H; Henderson, Gideon M

    2010-12-14

    The phasing of millennial-scale oscillations in Antarctica relative to those elsewhere in the world is important for discriminating among models for abrupt climate change, particularly those involving the Southern Ocean. However, records of millennial-scale variability from Antarctica dating to the last glacial maximum are rare and rely heavily on data from widely spaced ice cores, some of which show little variability through that time. Here, we present new data from closed-basin lakes in the Dry Valleys region of East Antarctica that show high-magnitude, high-frequency oscillations in surface level during the late Pleistocene synchronous with climate fluctuations elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere. These data suggest a coherent Southern Hemisphere pattern of climate change on millennial time scales, at least in the Pacific sector, and indicate that any hypothesis concerning the origin of these events must account for synchronous changes in both high and temperate latitudes.

  2. Scatterometer-derived Southern Ocean mesoscale cyclone activity over the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, D.; Simmonds, I.; Keay, K.

    2010-08-01

    Mesoscale cyclones (or mesocyclones) play an important role in the weather and climate of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-to-high latitudes. However, the relatively small size and short lifetime of these systems, combined with the lack of available conventional data in this region, means that we have a poor understanding of their climatological characteristics. In this study, the University of Melbourne cyclone finding algorithm was applied to relatively high resolution scatterometer-derived surface pressure fields in order to produce a decade-long (1999-2008) climatology of mesocyclone activity over the Southern Ocean. The frequency of mesocyclone activity was found to be highest just to the north of the sea-ice zone, reaching a maximum over the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas (ABS) and off the coast of Wilkes Land, while the southern Indian Ocean was associated with systems of the largest depth, intensity and mean surface fluxes of momentum and mechanical energy. Maximum wind speed data indicated that SH polar lows may be more frequent than the current literature suggests, while strong positive trends identified in mesocyclone frequency over the ABS may represent a contributing factor to the rapid warming observed in that region over recent years. Partial correlation analyses indicated a link between mesocyclone frequency and the Southern Annular Mode.

  3. Scatterometer-derived Southern Ocean mesoscale cyclone activity over the last decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irving, D; Simmonds, I; Keay, K, E-mail: damien.irving@csiro.a [School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Mesoscale cyclones (or mesocyclones) play an important role in the weather and climate of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-to-high latitudes. However, the relatively small size and short lifetime of these systems, combined with the lack of available conventional data in this region, means that we have a poor understanding of their climatological characteristics. In this study, the University of Melbourne cyclone finding algorithm was applied to relatively high resolution scatterometer-derived surface pressure fields in order to produce a decade-long (1999-2008) climatology of mesocyclone activity over the Southern Ocean. The frequency of mesocyclone activity was found to be highest just to the north of the sea-ice zone, reaching a maximum over the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas (ABS) and off the coast of Wilkes Land, while the southern Indian Ocean was associated with systems of the largest depth, intensity and mean surface fluxes of momentum and mechanical energy. Maximum wind speed data indicated that SH polar lows may be more frequent than the current literature suggests, while strong positive trends identified in mesocyclone frequency over the ABS may represent a contributing factor to the rapid warming observed in that region over recent years. Partial correlation analyses indicated a link between mesocyclone frequency and the Southern Annular Mode.

  4. The White Ocean hypothesis: a late Pleistocene Southern Ocean governed by Coccolithophores and driven by phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Abel Flores

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Paleoproductivity is a critical component in past ocean biogeochemistry, but accurate reconstructions of productivity are often hindered by limited integration of proxies. Here, we integrate geochemical (phosphorus and micropaleontological proxies at millennial timescales, revealing that the coccolithophore record in the Subantarctic zone of the South Atlantic Ocean is driven largely by variations in marine phosphorus availability. A quantitative micropaleontological and geochemical analysis carried out in sediments retrieved from ODP Site 1089 (Subantarctic Zone reveals that most of the export productivity in this region over the last 0.5 my was due to coccolithophores. Glacial periods were generally intervals of high productivity, with productivity reaching a peak at terminations. Particularly high productivity was observed at Termination V and Termination IV, events that are characterized by high abundance of coccolithophores and maxima in the phosphorus/titanium and strontium/titanium records. We link the increase in productivity both to regional oceanographic phenomena, i.e., the northward displacement of the upwelling cell of the Antarctic divergence when the ice-sheet expanded, and to the increase in the inventory of phosphorus in the ocean due to enhanced transfer of this nutrient from continental margins during glacial lowstands in sea level. The Mid-Brunhes interval stands out from the rest of the record, being dominated by the small and highly-calcified species Gephyrocapsa caribbeanica that provides most of the carbonate in these sediments. This likely represents higher availability of phosphorus in the surface ocean, especially in mesotrophic and oligotrophic zones. Under these condition, some coccolithophore species developed an r-strategy (opportunistic species; growth rate maximized resulting in the bloom of G. caribbeanica. These seasonal blooms of may have inducedwhite tides similar to those observed today in Emiliania huxleyi.

  5. Ecosystem studies in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean undertaken by the training vessel Umitaka-maru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteki, Masato; Odate, Tsuneo; Hosie, Graham W.; Takahashi, Kunio T.; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Tanimura, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    This special issue provides an overview of the ten voyages undertaken by the Umitaka-maru from the austral summers of 2002/2003 to 2014/2015 to promote the next phase of study of the ecosystems in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean. The voyages by the Umitaka-maru have mainly targeted three areas in the Indian Ocean sector: off Dumont d'Urville Base (France, 140°E transect), off Casey Station (Australia, 110°E transect), and off Syowa Station (Japan, north of Lützow Holm Bay). The findings of Umitaka-maru's research on the krill-independent food web, animal assemblages, community structure and distribution patterns from the epipelagic to the deeper waters provide invaluable information for elucidating the material cycle and predicting future ecosystem changes. Further studies on assessing the influence of sea ice on food webs in the water column are required, which will provide crucial information for predicting ecosystem changes as a result of projected sea ice changes in the near future.

  6. The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean - A new Map of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, J.; Schenke, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) is an expert group of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) since the XXVIII SCAR Conference held on 30th July 2004 in Bremen Germany and a regional Mapping project of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean (GEBCO) operated under the joint auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) (of UNESCO) and the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). The objective of IBCSO was to produce a first seamless bathymetric grid for the area south of latitude 60° S covering the area of the Antarctic Treaty. The IBCSO is going to be a benefit for scientific purposes. These include (a) interpretation of seabed geology, (b) the building of habitat models and maps, and (c) mapping and tracing of deep ocean current pathways. In addition the IBCSO is going to serve as database for the development of new Electronic Nautical Charts (ENC) in the Southern Ocean to improve the safety of navigation in Antarctic waters. As the first version of the IBCSO grid is close to be released, so is the corresponding map. It is proposed to present the latest draft version, or even the final version, of the new IBCSO map. Besides the map itself, the process to achieve the first version of the IBCSO grid and map is going to be presented. This includes a description of the datasets used to create the map and a rough explanation of the working steps to generate the first grid version of the IBCSO.

  7. Increasing vertical mixing to reduce Southern Ocean deep convection in NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, C.; Ridley, J. K.; Calvert, D.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.

    2015-03-01

    Most CMIP5 models unrealistically form Antarctic Bottom Water by open ocean deep convection in the Weddell and Ross Seas. To identify the triggering mechanisms leading to Southern Ocean deep convection in models, we perform sensitivity experiments on the ocean model NEMO forced by prescribed atmospheric fluxes. We vary the vertical velocity scale of the Langmuir turbulence, the fraction of turbulent kinetic energy transferred below the mixed layer, and the background diffusivity and run short simulations from 1980. All experiments exhibit deep convection in the Riiser-Larsen Sea in 1987; the origin is a positive sea ice anomaly in 1985, causing a shallow anomaly in mixed layer depth, hence anomalously warm surface waters and subsequent polynya opening. Modifying the vertical mixing impacts both the climatological state and the associated surface anomalies. The experiments with enhanced mixing exhibit colder surface waters and reduced deep convection. The experiments with decreased mixing are warmer, open larger polynyas and have deep convection across the Weddell Sea until the simulations end. Extended experiments reveal an increase in the Drake Passage transport of 4 Sv each year deep convection occurs, leading to an unrealistically large transport at the end of the simulation. North Atlantic deep convection is not significantly affected by the changes in mixing parameters. As new climate model overflow parameterisations are developed to form Antarctic Bottom Water more realistically, we argue that models would benefit from stopping Southern Ocean deep convection, for example by increasing their vertical mixing.

  8. Southern Ocean monthly wave fields for austral winters 1985-1988 by Geosat radar altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josberger, E.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    Four years of monthly averaged wave height fields for the austral winters 19851988 derived from the Geosat altimeter data show a spatial variability of the scale of 500-1000 km that varies monthly and annually. This variability is superimposed on the zonal patterns surrounding the Antarctic continent and characteristic of the climatology derived from the U.S. Navy [1992] Marine Climatic Atlas of the World. The location and the intensity of these large-scale features, which are not found in the climatological fields, exhibit strong monthly and yearly variations. A global underestimation of the climatological mean wave heights by more than l m is also found over large regions of the Southern Ocean. The largest monthly averaged significant wave heights are above 5 m and are found during August of every year in the Indian Ocean, south of 40??S. The monthly wave fields show more variability in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans than in the Indian Ocean. The Seasat data from 1978 and the Geosat data from 1985 and 1988 show an eastward rotation of the largest wave heights. However, this rotation is absent in 1986 and 1987; the former was a year of unusually low sea states, and the latter was a year of unusually high sea states, which suggests a link to the El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation event of 1986. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Low densities of drifting litter in the African sector of the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter G; Musker, Seth; Rink, Ariella

    2014-12-15

    Only 52 litter items (>1cm diameter) were observed in 10,467 km of at-sea transects in the African sector of the Southern Ocean. Litter density north of the Subtropical Front (0.58 items km(-2)) was less than in the adjacent South Atlantic Ocean (1-6 items km(-2)), but has increased compared to the mid-1980s. Litter density south of the Subtropical Front was an order of magnitude less than in temperate waters (0.032 items km(-2)). There was no difference in litter density between sub-Antarctic and Antarctic waters either side of the Antarctic Polar Front. Most litter was made of plastic (96%). Fishery-related debris comprised a greater proportion of litter south of the Subtropical Front (33%) than in temperate waters (13%), where packaging dominated litter items (68%). The results confirm that the Southern Ocean is the least polluted ocean in terms of drifting debris and suggest that most debris comes from local sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in the C, N, and P cycles by the predicted salps-krill shift in the southern ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz, Miquel; Almeda, Rodrigo; Duarte, Carlos M.; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Lasternas, Sebastien; Agustí, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic carbon requirements and excretion rates of three major zooplankton groups in the Southern Ocean were studied in February 2009. The research was conducted in the framework of the ATOS research project as part of the Spanish contribution to the International Polar Year. The objective was to ascertain the possible consequences of the predicted zooplankton shift from krill to salps in the Southern Ocean for the cycling of biogenic carbon and the concentration and stoichiometry of di...

  11. CHANGES IN THE C, N AND P CYCLES BY THE PREDICTED SALPS-KRILL SHIFT IN THE SOUTHERN OCEAN.

    OpenAIRE

    Miquel eAlcaraz; Rodrigo eAlmeda; Carlos Manuel Duarte; Burkhard eHorstkotte; Sebastien eLasternas; Susana eAgustí

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic carbon requirements and excretion rates of three major zooplankton groups in the Southern Ocean were studied in February 2009. The research was conducted in the framework of the ATOS research project as part of the Spanish contribution to the International Polar Year. The objective was to ascertain the possible consequences of the predicted zooplankton shift from krill to salps in the Southern Ocean for the cycling of biogenic carbon and the concentration and stoichiometry of di...

  12. Inter-annual variability in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) density at South Georgia, Southern Ocean: 1997 - 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Fielding, Sophie; Watkins, Jonathan L.; Trathan, Philip N.; Enderlein,Peter; Waluda, Claire M.; Stowasser, Gabriele; Tarling, Geraint A.; Eugene J. Murphy

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) are a key species in Southern Ocean ecosystems, maintaining very large numbers of predators, and fluctuations in their abundance can affect the overall structure and functioning of the ecosystems. The interannual variability in the abundance and biomass of krill was examined using a 17-year time-series of acoustic observations undertaken in the Western Core Box (WCB) survey area to the northwest of South Georgia, Southern Ocean. Krill targets were identifie...

  13. Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, M.; Mohan, R.; Meloth, T.; Naik, S.S.; Sudhakar, M.

    SCIENCE, VOL. 100, NO. 6, 25 MARCH 2011 881 *For correspondence. (e-mail: manish@ncaor.org) Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean Manish Tiwari 1...: Carbon isotopes, foraminifera, oxygen iso- topes, Southern Ocean. PLANKTIC foraminifera thrive in various environments of the upper water column and are sensitive to changes occurring in the temperature, salinity, nutrients, food availability...

  14. A new species of Marumomysis (Mysidacea: Mysidae: Erythropini from the benthos of the Bellingshausen Sea (Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos San Vicente

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A new mysid species, Marumomysis Antarctica n. sp., is described from specimens sampled with a suprabenthic sled in the Bellingshausen Sea (Southern Ocean. The new mysid is characterised by the small eyes lacking visual elements and with a long horn projecting anteriodorsally, the trilobate labrum and the shape and armature of the endopod of the uropod and telson. This new species is the first Marumomysis species described from the benthos (1320-1895 m depth of the Southern Ocean.

  15. Sea-ice transport driving Southern Ocean salinity and its recent trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, F. Alexander; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Frenger, Ivy; Kern, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Recent salinity changes in the Southern Ocean are among the most prominent signals of climate change in the global ocean, yet their underlying causes have not been firmly established. Here we propose that trends in the northward transport of Antarctic sea ice are a major contributor to these changes. Using satellite observations supplemented by sea-ice reconstructions, we estimate that wind-driven northward freshwater transport by sea ice increased by 20 ± 10 per cent between 1982 and 2008. The strongest and most robust increase occurred in the Pacific sector, coinciding with the largest observed salinity changes. We estimate that the additional freshwater for the entire northern sea-ice edge entails a freshening rate of -0.02 ± 0.01 grams per kilogram per decade in the surface and intermediate waters of the open ocean, similar to the observed freshening. The enhanced rejection of salt near the coast of Antarctica associated with stronger sea-ice export counteracts the freshening of both continental shelf and newly formed bottom waters due to increases in glacial meltwater. Although the data sources underlying our results have substantial uncertainties, regional analyses and independent data from an atmospheric reanalysis support our conclusions. Our finding that northward sea-ice freshwater transport is also a key determinant of the mean salinity distribution in the Southern Ocean further underpins the importance of the sea-ice-induced freshwater flux. Through its influence on the density structure of the ocean, this process has critical consequences for the global climate by affecting the exchange of heat, carbon and nutrients between the deep ocean and surface waters.

  16. Seasonal in situ observations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal over the temperate oceans of the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, S. J.; Selleck, P. W.; Galbally, I. E.; Keywood, M. D.; Harvey, M. J.; Lerot, C.; Helmig, D.; Ristovski, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The dicarbonyls glyoxal and methylglyoxal have been measured with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) cartridges and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), optimised for dicarbonyl detection, in clean marine air over the temperate Southern Hemisphere (SH) oceans. Measurements of a range of dicarbonyl precursors (volatile organic compounds, VOCs) were made in parallel. These are the first in situ measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal over the remote temperate oceans. Six 24 h samples were collected in summer (February-March) over the Chatham Rise in the south-west Pacific Ocean during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) voyage in 2012, while 34 24 h samples were collected at Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station in the late winter (August-September) of 2011. Average glyoxal mixing ratios in clean marine air were 7 ppt at Cape Grim and 23 ppt over Chatham Rise. Average methylglyoxal mixing ratios in clean marine air were 28 ppt at Cape Grim and 10 ppt over Chatham Rise. The mixing ratios of glyoxal at Cape Grim are the lowest observed over the remote oceans, while mixing ratios over Chatham Rise are in good agreement with other temperate and tropical observations, including concurrent Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. Methylglyoxal mixing ratios at both sites are comparable to the only other marine methylglyoxal observations available over the tropical Northern Hemisphere (NH) ocean. Ratios of glyoxal : methylglyoxal > 1 over Chatham Rise but water absorption or the use of an inappropriate normalisation reference value in the retrieval algorithm. This study provides much-needed data to verify the presence of these short-lived gases over the remote ocean and provide further evidence of an as yet unidentified source of both glyoxal and also methylglyoxal over the remote oceans.

  17. Temporal variability of dissolved iron species in the mesopelagic zone at Ocean Station PAPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallenberg, Christina; Ross, Andrew R. S.; Davidson, Ashley B.; Stewart, Gillian M.; Cullen, Jay T.

    2017-08-01

    Deposition of atmospheric aerosols to the surface ocean is considered an important mechanism for the supply of iron (Fe) to remote ocean regions, but direct observations of the oceanic response to aerosol deposition are sparse. In the high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) subarctic Pacific Ocean we observed a dissolved Fe and Fe(II) anomaly at depth that is best explained as the result of aerosol deposition from Siberian forest fires in May 2012. Interestingly, there was no evidence of enhanced dFe concentrations in surface waters, nor was there a detectable phytoplankton bloom in response to the suspected aerosol deposition. Dissolved Fe (dFe) and Fe(II) showed the strongest enhancement in the subsurface oxygen deficient zone (ODZ), where oxygen concentrations residence time of aerosol particles in surface waters and possible scavenging loss of dFe. Aerosol toxicity and/or dominance of particle scavenging over dissolution of Fe in the upper water column may have contributed to the lack of a strong phytoplankton response.

  18. Late Pliocene Changes in Abyssal Southern Ocean Ventilation: New Insights from the Subantarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, L. M.; Hendy, I. L.; Moore, T. C.; Lyle, M. W.

    2008-12-01

    New stable isotope records from subantarctic southeast Pacific cores MV0502-4JC (50°20'S, 148°08'W, 4286m) and ELT 25-11 (50°02'S, 127°31'W, 3969m) suggest that the late Pliocene climate transition (LPCT) at ~2.75 Ma marked a dramatic increase in cold, poorly ventilated water in the deepest portion of the Southern Ocean. This conclusion is based on a striking vertical stable isotopic gradient that developed between MV0502-4JC and shallower South Atlantic ODP Site 704 (46°52'S, 7°5'E, 2532 m) in the late Pliocene, a sharp contrast to the comparable benthic δ13C and δ18O values recorded at the two sites during the late Miocene. Similar to existing shallower records from the South Atlantic, benthic stable isotope records from MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11 record a significant decrease in δ13C accompanied by an increase in δ18O in the Late Pliocene. While the δ13C decrease and δ18O increase recorded at the South Atlantic sites appears to represent the onset of a glacial pattern of oxygen isotope enrichment and reduced deep water ventilation in the Southern Ocean, the transition in MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11 signals a far more dramatic shift in conditions at abyssal depths. First, the benthic δ13C shift appears to be more extensive and prolonged in the deep subantarctic Pacific than in the South Atlantic, and second, the δ13C decrease was accompanied by an equally dramatic increase in benthic δ18O that stands out amongst other deep sea records prior to the late Pleistocene. In MV0502-4JC these δ13C and δ18O shifts amount to -1.05‰ and +1.1‰, respectively, over the period ~2.7 to 1.9 Ma (9.6-7.3 MBSF) and are followed by a dramatic return of the benthic δ13C values to pre-LPCT values after ~1.7 Ma that is also recorded in the planktonic record. These benthic δ13C and δ18O shifts likely indicate the accumulation of an ever-larger percentage of cold, poorly-ventilated AABW in the abyssal Southern Ocean during the late Pliocene, probably due to sea ice

  19. Recent transfer of an iron-regulated gene from the plastid to the nuclear genome in an oceanic diatom adapted to chronic iron limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber Stefan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the importance and widespread occurrence of iron limitation in the contemporary ocean is well documented, we still know relatively little about genetic adaptation of phytoplankton to these environments. Compared to its coastal relative Thalassiosira pseudonana, the oceanic diatom Thalassiosira oceanica is highly tolerant to iron limitation. The adaptation to low-iron conditions in T. oceanica has been attributed to a decrease in the photosynthetic components that are rich in iron. Genomic information on T. oceanica may shed light on the genetic basis of the physiological differences between the two species. Results The complete 141790 bp sequence of the T. oceanica chloroplast genome [GenBank: GU323224], assembled from massively parallel pyrosequencing (454 shotgun reads, revealed that the petF gene encoding for ferredoxin, which is localized in the chloroplast genome in T. pseudonana and other diatoms, has been transferred to the nucleus in T. oceanica. The iron-sulfur protein ferredoxin, a key element of the chloroplast electron transport chain, can be replaced by the iron-free flavodoxin under iron-limited growth conditions thereby contributing to a reduction in the cellular iron requirements. From a comparison to the genomic context of the T. pseudonana petF gene, the T. oceanica ortholog can be traced back to its chloroplast origin. The coding potential of the T. oceanica chloroplast genome is comparable to that of T. pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, though a novel expressed ORF appears in the genomic region that has been subjected to rearrangements linked to the petF gene transfer event. Conclusions The transfer of the petF from the cp to the nuclear genome in T. oceanica represents a major difference between the two closely related species. The ability of T. oceanica to tolerate iron limitation suggests that the transfer of petF from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome might have contributed to the

  20. Carbon demand, utilization, and metabolic diversity of bacterioplankton in the frontal regimes of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnan, K.P.; Sinha, R.K.; Nair, S.; Noronha, S.B.; Chacko, R.; Anilkumar, N.

    Bacterial production, respiration and metabolic diversity were measured up to 120 m depth in the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF) and Polar Fronts I and II (PFI and PFII) of the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean during 2010 Austral Summer...

  1. Linking small-scale circulation dynamics with large-scale seasonal production (phytoplankton) in the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nicholson, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the seasonal and intra-seasonal (daily to weekly) changes of the upper ocean and the impact on the primary production in the Southern Ocean is key to better understanding the sensitivities of the global carbon cycle....

  2. Comparisons of The Habitat Utilization Of Top Predators In The Southern Ocean And The North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D. P.; Robinson, P.; Huckstadt, L. E.; Crocker, D. E.; Goebel, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Northern and Southern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, M. leonina) separated some 4 MYA. While these congeners are physiologically very similar and thus have the potential to forage in similar ways they inhabit very different habitats. While southern elephant seals (SES) are distributed throughout the southern ocean, northern elephant seals (NES) are limited to the Northeast Pacific Ocean and range over lower latitudes than SES. In order to compare and contrast the physiological capability and response to different habitats we compared the foraging behavior of 167 adult female northern elephant seals (Año Nuevo and San Benitos Islands) and 55 southern elephant seals (Livingston Island, Antarctic Peninsula) using satellite telemetry and dive recorders. As expected both species carried out very similar dive depths (NES 509m ± 166 vs SES 345m±79) and dive durations (NES 23.0 min ± 6.7; SES 22.5 min ± 5.0). However, there were significant differences in their foraging pattern that we attribute to differences in the availability of continental shelf and suitable foraging habitat. While 85% of NES females foraged offshore, the dominant strategy for SES was benthic foraging on the continental shelf. Even with the differences in habitat, the fundamental components of their foraging patterns remained the same as when they foraged pelagically they both species relied on persistent large scale oceanographic features where mixing enhances productivity such as the North Pacific Transition zone (NES) and the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SES). Given the very different habitats and prey species consumed by these two species their overall foraging behavior is surprisingly similar suggesting that as a mesopelagic predator the elephant seal design is rather robust.

  3. Southern Ocean warming and Wilkes Land ice sheet retreat during the mid-Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Francesca; Bijl, Peter K; Passchier, Sandra; Salzmann, Ulrich; Schouten, Stefan; McKay, Robert; Cody, Rosemary D; Pross, Jörg; van de Flierdt, Tina; Bohaty, Steven M; Levy, Richard; Williams, Trevor; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2018-01-22

    Observations and model experiments highlight the importance of ocean heat in forcing ice sheet retreat during the present and geological past, but past ocean temperature data are virtually missing in ice sheet proximal locations. Here we document paleoceanographic conditions and the (in)stability of the Wilkes Land subglacial basin (East Antarctica) during the mid-Miocene (~17-13.4 million years ago) by studying sediment cores from offshore Adélie Coast. Inland retreat of the ice sheet, temperate vegetation, and warm oligotrophic waters characterise the mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; 17-14.8 Ma). After the MCO, expansion of a marine-based ice sheet occurs, but remains sensitive to melting upon episodic warm water incursions. Our results suggest that the mid-Miocene latitudinal temperature gradient across the Southern Ocean never resembled that of the present day. We demonstrate that a strong coupling of oceanic climate and Antarctic continental conditions existed and that the East Antarctic subglacial basins were highly sensitive to ocean warming.

  4. Changes in micronutrient supply to the surface Southern Ocean (Atlantic sector) across the glacial termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Allen, Claire S.

    2011-09-01

    Major deepwater masses upwell and reach the surface in the Southern Ocean, forming an important conduit supplying nutrients and micronutrients to the surface and playing a key role in the regulation of global climate through ocean-atmosphere gas exchange. Here, we reconstruct changes in micronutrient distribution in this region in response to past changes in upwelling, oceanic mixing, and sea-ice seasonality. We present two downcore (Zn/Si)opal records from the Scotia Sea and Drake Passage region, which we interpret in the context of micronutrient distribution in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean over the last glacial termination. Previous work shows that micronutrient availability in the surface waters in the South Atlantic appear to be controlled dominantly by upwelling and mixing of micronutrient rich deepwaters, which are additionally fuelled by the terrestrial sediment sources of the Scotia Arc and South Georgia. This is supported by our reconstructions, which show micronutrient availability to the west of the Scotia Arc and South Georgia are consistently lower than to the east over the last glacial termination due to downstream transport and mixing into surface waters of continentally derived material in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Micronutrient availability in this region was at a minimum from 20 to 25 ky BP, coinciding with maximum sea-ice coverage, and increased due to an expansion of the seasonal sea-ice zone and increased mixing of subsurface waters. Our findings are consistent with largely diminished upwelling of micronutrients during the maximum glacial extent, and reduced mixing due to the presence of persistent sea-ice. During the deglacial there was an increase in micronutrient availability, as well as other nutrients and inorganic carbon, within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current as a result of an increase in deep oceanic upwelling, mixing and strengthened zonal transport.

  5. Asthenosphere and lithosphere structure controls on early onset oceanic crust production in the southern South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taposeea, Chandra A.; Armitage, John J.; Collier, Jenny S.

    2017-10-01

    The southern South Atlantic has often been considered a classic example of continental break-up in the presence of a starting mantle plume. Evidence for a mantle plume includes the Paranà-Etendeka continental flood basalts, which are associated with the Rio Grande Rise and Walvis Ridge, and the wide-spread presence of seaward dipping reflectors and high-velocity lower-crustal bodies along the conjugate margins. Observations from seaward dipping reflector distributions suggested that lithospheric segmentation played a major role in the pattern of volcanism during break-up in this region, and consequent numerical modelling was used to test this. We tested this hypothesis ourselves by measuring the thickness of the earliest oceanic crust generated. This was done through the use of 37 measurements of initial oceanic crustal thickness from wide-angle and multichannel seismic profiles collected along the conjugate margins. These measurements show that at 450 km south of the Paranà-Etendeka flood basalts the oceanic crust is thicker than the global average at 11.7 km. Farther south the oceanic crust thins, reaching 6.1 km at a distance of 2300 km along-strike. Overall, the along-strike trend of oceanic crustal thickness is linear with a regression coefficient of 0.7 and little indication of segmentation. From numerical models representing extension of the lithosphere, we find that observed melt volumes are matched with the presence of a hot layer. If we assume this region of hot mantle has a thickness of 100 km, its excess temperature relative to the asthenosphere has to decrease from 200 to 50 °C, north to south. This decrease in temperature, also seen in published thermobarometry results, suggests that temperature was the primary control of volcanism during the opening of the southern South Atlantic.

  6. Quantitative mapping of particulate iron in an ocean dump using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, C. W.; Bahn, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    A remote sensing experiment was conducted at the industrial acid waste ocean dump site located approximately 38 n mi SE of Cape Henlopen, Delaware, to see if there was a relationship between aircraft remotely sensed spectral signatures and the iron concentration measured in the plume. Results are presented which show that aircraft remotely sensed spectral data can be used to quantify and map an acid waste dump in terms of its particulate iron concentration. A single variable equation using the ratio of band 2 (440-490 nm) radiance to band 4 (540-580 nm) radiance was used to quantify the acid plume and the surrounding water. The acid waste varied in age from freshly dumped to 3 1/2 hours old. Particulate iron concentrations in the acid waste were estimated to range up to 1.1 mg/liter at the 0.46 meter depth. A classification technique was developed to remove sunglitter-affected pixels from the data set.

  7. The impact on atmospheric CO2 of iron fertilization induced changes in the ocean's biological pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. McWilliams

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using numerical simulations, we quantify the impact of changes in the ocean's biological pump on the air-sea balance of CO2 by fertilizing a small surface patch in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the eastern tropical Pacific with iron. Decade-long fertilization experiments are conducted in a basin-scale, eddy-permitting coupled physical/biogeochemical/ecological model. In contrast to previous studies, we find that most of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC removed from the euphotic zone by the enhanced biological export is replaced by uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. Atmospheric uptake efficiencies, the ratio of the perturbation in air-sea CO2 flux to the perturbation in export flux across 100 m, integrated over 10 years, are 0.75 to 0.93 in our patch size-scale experiments. The atmospheric uptake efficiency is insensitive to the duration of the experiment. The primary factor controlling the atmospheric uptake efficiency is the vertical distribution of the enhanced biological production and export. Iron fertilization at the surface tends to induce production anomalies primarily near the surface, leading to high efficiencies. In contrast, mechanisms that induce deep production anomalies (e.g. altered light availability tend to have a low uptake efficiency, since most of the removed DIC is replaced by lateral and vertical transport and mixing. Despite high atmospheric uptake efficiencies, patch-scale iron fertilization of the ocean's biological pump tends to remove little CO2 from the atmosphere over the decadal timescale considered here.

  8. Humpback whale song on the Southern Ocean feeding grounds: implications for cultural transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen C Garland

    Full Text Available Male humpback whales produce a long, complex, and stereotyped song on low-latitude breeding grounds; they also sing while migrating to and from these locations, and occasionally in high-latitude summer feeding areas. All males in a population sing the current version of the constantly evolving display and, within an ocean basin, populations sing similar songs; however, this sharing can be complex. In the western and central South Pacific region there is repeated cultural transmission of song types from eastern Australia to other populations eastward. Song sharing is hypothesized to occur through several possible mechanisms. Here, we present the first example of feeding ground song from the Southern Ocean Antarctic Area V and compare it to song from the two closest breeding populations. The early 2010 song contained at least four distinct themes; these matched four themes from the eastern Australian 2009 song, and the same four themes from the New Caledonian 2010 song recorded later in the year. This provides evidence for at least one of the hypothesized mechanisms of song transmission between these two populations, singing while on shared summer feeding grounds. In addition, the feeding grounds may provide a point of acoustic contact to allow the rapid horizontal cultural transmission of song within the western and central South Pacific region and the wider Southern Ocean.

  9. Humpback whale song on the Southern Ocean feeding grounds: implications for cultural transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ellen C; Gedamke, Jason; Rekdahl, Melinda L; Noad, Michael J; Garrigue, Claire; Gales, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Male humpback whales produce a long, complex, and stereotyped song on low-latitude breeding grounds; they also sing while migrating to and from these locations, and occasionally in high-latitude summer feeding areas. All males in a population sing the current version of the constantly evolving display and, within an ocean basin, populations sing similar songs; however, this sharing can be complex. In the western and central South Pacific region there is repeated cultural transmission of song types from eastern Australia to other populations eastward. Song sharing is hypothesized to occur through several possible mechanisms. Here, we present the first example of feeding ground song from the Southern Ocean Antarctic Area V and compare it to song from the two closest breeding populations. The early 2010 song contained at least four distinct themes; these matched four themes from the eastern Australian 2009 song, and the same four themes from the New Caledonian 2010 song recorded later in the year. This provides evidence for at least one of the hypothesized mechanisms of song transmission between these two populations, singing while on shared summer feeding grounds. In addition, the feeding grounds may provide a point of acoustic contact to allow the rapid horizontal cultural transmission of song within the western and central South Pacific region and the wider Southern Ocean.

  10. Reconstructing the Late Pleistocene Southern Ocean biological pump using the vertical gradient of Cd/Ca in planktic and benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charidemou, Miros; Hall, Ian; Ziegler, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The Southern Ocean is a particularly important region in the global carbon cycle because its wind-driven upwelling regime brings CO2-rich deep waters to the ocean surface. However, outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere is ultimately determined by the efficiency of the soft-tissue biological pump which transfers carbon back into the deep sea. Biological productivity in the Southern Ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales is thought to be influenced by the availability of iron from terrestrial dust sources (Martin, 1990). However, the exact nature of the relationship between productivity and dust flux is still debated (Ziegler et al., 2013; Martinez-Garcia et al., 2014) and remains unclear for earlier times such as during the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT). Changes in the strength of the soft-tissue biological pump can be reconstructed with relative ease by measuring carbon isotopes in planktic and benthic foraminifera and quantifying the vertical gradient between them (Ziegler et al., 2013). Our ultimate aim is to use this technique to reconstruct changes in the biological pump in the Southern Ocean during the MPT, when a sharp rise in dust flux is observed in the sedimentary record (Martinez-Garcia et al., 2011). This will allow us to assess the contribution of changes in the Southern Ocean biological pump to the climatic reorganisation that occurred during the MPT. However, before the Δδ13C record is constructed for the MPT it is vital to confirm that this method is indeed a reliable proxy for the soft-tissue biological pump. Records of Δδ13C can be influenced by changes in the whole ocean inventory of δ13C, changes in circulation and changes in the degree of fractionation between the ocean and the atmosphere. The impact of inventory and circulation changes can be minimised by careful selection of study sites and by targeting foraminifera that live within specific water masses. However, deviations of Δδ13C from the biological signal could certainly

  11. Atmospheric delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.; Shi, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe) to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. Here, we interactively combined laboratory kinetic experiments with global aerosol modeling to more accurately quantify anthropogenic soluble Fe due to air pollution. We firstly examined Fe dissolution kinetics of African dust samples at acidic pH values with and without ionic species commonly found in aerosol water (i.e., sulfate and oxalate). We then constructed a new empirical scheme for Fe release from mineral dust due to inorganic and organic anions in aerosol water, by using acidity as a master variable. We implemented this new scheme and applied an updated mineralogical emission database in a global atmospheric chemistry transport model to estimate the atmospheric concentration and deposition flux of soluble Fe under preindustrial and modern conditions. Our improved model successfully captured the inverse relationship of Fe solubility and total Fe loading measured over the North Atlantic Ocean. However, our modeled Fe solubility was significantly lower than that deduced from observations over the South Atlantic east downwind from the Patagonian dust source regions. Our modeled Fe solubility for dry deposition over the Atlantic is in good agreement the measurement, while that for wet deposition is significantly lower than the measurement. Our model results suggest that human activities contribute to about half of the soluble Fe supply to a significant portion of the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere, while their contribution to oceans in the high latitude remains highly uncertain

  12. Waves in the Southern Ocean as observed by Sentinel1 synthetic aperture radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Sutherland, Peter; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the Earth system by regulating air-sea fluxes and moderating the global temperatures. These fluxes can be enhanced by the presence of waves, especially through the breaking of ice into floes which depends on the waves propagating across the ice. The paucity of adequate in-situ wave observations in ice covered seas limits our ability to understand wave-ice interactions. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery over sea ice appears consistent with a dominant modulation of the radar backscatter by velocity bunching (Ardhuin et al. GRL 2015). Because the presence of sea ice generally removes the blurring effects of short wave components, the SAR transformation is more simple than in the open ocean. This property makes it possible to retrieve phase-resolved maps of wave orbital velocities and wave spectra (Ardhuin et al., 2017 RSE). We can thus now use SAR imagery for scientific applications to wave-ice interactions. With the all-weather capabilities and extensive space-time coverage, the Sentinel1 constellation composed of two satellites (S1A & S1B) both equipped with SARs provides the opportunity to extract valuable wave observations in polar regions. Through the high resolution acquisition modes of S1A and S1B which cover the Southern Ocean in 20x20 km images with 4 m spatial resolution we are able to extract an large sample of wave observations. We analyzed more than 35,000 images in the Southern Ocean. Nearly 28% of the images contain wave features and 6% of the images contain well-imaged single wave systems (>2000 wave spectra), with a narrow directional distribution. This dataset of more than 2000 wave spectra is unique in the fact we cover the entire Southern Ocean sea ice with an unprecedented amount of observations. These observations support the idea that the attenuation of waves with periods longer than 10 s is dominated by dissipation processes with a limited effect of scattering. Dissipation rates are estimated from pairs

  13. Multi-elemental concentrations in the tissues of the oceanic squid Todarodes filippovae from Tasmania and the southern Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojadinovic, Jessica; Jackson, Christine H; Cherel, Yves; Jackson, George D; Bustamante, Paco

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates 14 elements (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V and Zn) in the tissues of the oceanic ommastrephid squid Todarodes filippovae from waters surrounding Île Amsterdam (southern Indian Ocean) and Tasmania (Australia). As for other cephalopod species, the digestive gland and branchial hearts showed the highest concentrations of many elements (Ag, Cd, Se, V and Zn, and Cr and Ni, respectively) highlighting their role in bioaccumulation and detoxification processes. With the exception of As and Hg, the muscles showed relatively low trace element concentrations. Squid size was positively correlated to Ag, As, Cd, Hg and Zn concentrations in Tasmanian squid and negatively correlated to all but Hg and Zn concentrations in Île Amsterdam squid. Furthermore, no differences in elemental concentrations were noted between sexes. There were, however, some differences between mated and non-mated females from Tasmania. Comparing elemental concentrations in squid from both islands, higher concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb and V in squid sampled in Île Amsterdam reflect different exposure conditions. When considering T. filippovae as a dietary resource for humans it should be noted that, given their Hg content, squids from Île Amsterdam are not recommended for consumption on a regular basis. Moreover, regardless of the squid's origin, digestive glands should be avoided as Cd and Hg concentrations were above the European Union authorized limits in these organs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Plankton Assemblage Estimated with BGC-Argo Floats in the Southern Ocean: Implications for Seasonal Successions and Particle Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, Mathieu; Briggs, Nathan; Ardyna, Mathieu; Uitz, Julia; Catala, Philippe; Penkerc'h, Cristophe; Poteau, Antoine; Claustre, Hervé; Blain, Stéphane

    2017-10-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) hosts plankton communities that impact the biogeochemical cycles of the global ocean. However, weather conditions in the SO restrict mainly in situ observations of plankton communities to spring and summer, preventing the description of biological successions at an annual scale. Here, we use shipboard observations collected in the Indian sector of the SO to develop a multivariate relationship between physical and bio-optical data, and, the composition and carbon content of the plankton community. Then we apply this multivariate relationship to five biogeochemical Argo (BGC-Argo) floats deployed within the same bio-geographical zone as the ship-board observations to describe spatial and seasonal changes in plankton assemblage. The floats reveal a high contribution of bacteria below the mixed layer, an overall low abundance of picoplankton and a seasonal succession from nano- to microplankton during the spring bloom. Both naturally iron-fertilized waters downstream of the Crozet and Kerguelen Plateaus show elevated phytoplankton biomass in spring and summer but they differ by a nano- or microplankton dominance at Crozet and Kerguelen, respectively. The estimated plankton group successions appear consistent with independent estimations of particle diameter based on the optical signals. Furthermore, the comparison of the plankton community composition in the surface layer with the presence of large mesopelagic particles diagnosed by spikes of optical signals provides insight into the nature and temporal changes of ecological vectors that drive particle export. This study emphasizes the power of BGC-Argo floats for investigating important biogeochemical processes at high temporal and spatial resolution.

  15. A Linear Decomposition of the Southern Ocean Thermohaline Structure in only two Modes with Application to Frontal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthenet, E.; Roquet, F.; Nerini, D.; Madec, G.

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean is a critical component of the World Ocean as it connects the three major ocean basins. Its thermohaline structure is deeply influenced by the presence of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), where water masses of the World Ocean are advected, transformed and redistributed to the other basins. It remains challenging to describe and visualize the complex 3D pattern of this circulation and its associated tracer distribution. Here, we propose an objective method for decomposing the Southern Ocean thermohaline structure. A principal component analysis (PCA, which is a variant of the EOF method) is applied directly on the shape of temperature and salinity profiles to determine the main spatial patterns of their variations. Using the Southern Ocean state estimate (SOSE), we determined the vertical modes describing the Southern Ocean thermohaline structure between 0 and 2000 m. We found that the two first modes explain more than 90% of the combined temperature-salinity variance, thus providing a surprisingly good approximation of the thermohaline properties in the Southern Ocean. The first mode (72% of total variance) describes accurately temperature variations, as well as surface and deep salinity variations. The second mode (20%) mostly improves salinity at 500 m in the region of Antarctic Intermediate Water formation. These two modes present circumpolar patterns that can be closely related with standard frontal definitions, especially for the ACC fronts (Subtropical, Subantarctic, Polar and Southern ACC fronts). By projecting hydrographic profiles on the SOSE-derived modes, it is possible to determine their position relative to the fronts. This provides a new, objective, way to define ACC fronts and spatial variability. The concept is successfully applied on the WOCE-SR3 hydrographic section. This method can also provide a useful metric to compare model outputs with available observations and to better assess heat and salt content changes.

  16. A hierarchical classification of benthic biodiversity and assessment of protected areas in the Southern Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda L Douglass

    Full Text Available An international effort is underway to establish a representative system of marine protected areas (MPAs in the Southern Ocean to help provide for the long-term conservation of marine biodiversity in the region. Important to this undertaking is knowledge of the distribution of benthic assemblages. Here, our aim is to identify the areas where benthic marine assemblages are likely to differ from each other in the Southern Ocean including near-shore Antarctica. We achieve this by using a hierarchical spatial classification of ecoregions, bathomes and environmental types. Ecoregions are defined according to available data on biogeographic patterns and environmental drivers on dispersal. Bathomes are identified according to depth strata defined by species distributions. Environmental types are uniquely classified according to the geomorphic features found within the bathomes in each ecoregion. We identified 23 ecoregions and nine bathomes. From a set of 28 types of geomorphic features of the seabed, 562 unique environmental types were classified for the Southern Ocean. We applied the environmental types as surrogates of different assemblages of biodiversity to assess the representativeness of existing MPAs. We found that 12 ecoregions are not represented in MPAs and that no ecoregion has their full range of environmental types represented in MPAs. Current MPA planning processes, if implemented, will substantially increase the representation of environmental types particularly within 8 ecoregions. To meet internationally agreed conservation goals, additional MPAs will be needed. To assist with this process, we identified 107 spatially restricted environmental types, which should be considered for inclusion in future MPAs. Detailed supplementary data including a spatial dataset are provided.

  17. Mega fire emissions in Siberia: potential supply of bioavailable iron from forests to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant amounts of carbon and nutrients are released to the atmosphere due to large fires in forests. Characterization of the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the intense fire emissions is crucial for assessing the atmospheric loadings of trace gases and aerosols. This paper discusses issues of the representation of forest fires in the estimation of emissions and the application to an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM. The potential contribution of forest fires to the deposition of bioavailable iron (Fe into the ocean is highlighted, with a focus on mega fires in eastern Siberia.

    Satellite products of burned area, active fire, and land cover are used to estimate biomass burning emissions in conjunction with a biogeochemical model. Satellite-derived plume height from MISR is used for the injection height of boreal forest fire emissions. This methodology is applied to quantify fire emission rates in each three-dimensional grid location in the high latitude Northern Hemisphere (>30° N latitude over a 5-yr period from 2001 to 2005. There is large interannual variation in forest burned area during 2001–2005 (13–49 × 103 km2 yr−1 which results in a corresponding variation in the annual emissions of carbon monoxide (CO (14–81 Tg CO y−1. Satellite observations of CO column from MOPITT are used to evaluate the model performance in simulating the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the fire emissions. The model results for CO enhancements due to eastern Siberian fires are in good agreement with MOPITT observations. These validation results suggest that the model using emission rates estimated in this work is able to describe the interannual changes in CO due to intense forest fires.

    Bioavailable iron is derived from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble iron from desert sources by anthropogenic pollutants (mainly sulfuric acid formed

  18. Mega fire emissions in Siberia: potential supply of bioavailable iron from forests to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.

    2011-06-01

    Significant amounts of carbon and nutrients are released to the atmosphere due to large fires in forests. Characterization of the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the intense fire emissions is crucial for assessing the atmospheric loadings of trace gases and aerosols. This paper discusses issues of the representation of forest fires in the estimation of emissions and the application to an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM). The potential contribution of forest fires to the deposition of bioavailable iron (Fe) into the ocean is highlighted, with a focus on mega fires in eastern Siberia. Satellite products of burned area, active fire, and land cover are used to estimate biomass burning emissions in conjunction with a biogeochemical model. Satellite-derived plume height from MISR is used for the injection height of boreal forest fire emissions. This methodology is applied to quantify fire emission rates in each three-dimensional grid location in the high latitude Northern Hemisphere (>30° N latitude) over a 5-yr period from 2001 to 2005. There is large interannual variation in forest burned area during 2001-2005 (13-49 × 103 km2 yr-1) which results in a corresponding variation in the annual emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) (14-81 Tg CO y-1). Satellite observations of CO column from MOPITT are used to evaluate the model performance in simulating the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the fire emissions. The model results for CO enhancements due to eastern Siberian fires are in good agreement with MOPITT observations. These validation results suggest that the model using emission rates estimated in this work is able to describe the interannual changes in CO due to intense forest fires. Bioavailable iron is derived from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble iron from desert sources by anthropogenic pollutants (mainly sulfuric acid formed from oxidation of SO2) and from direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion sources

  19. Delivery of anthropogenic bioavailable iron from mineral dust and combustion aerosols to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic soluble iron (Fe to the ocean has been suggested to modulate primary ocean productivity and thus indirectly affect the climate. A key process contributing to anthropogenic sources of soluble Fe is associated with air pollution, which acidifies Fe-containing mineral aerosols during their transport and leads to Fe transformation from insoluble to soluble forms. However, there is large uncertainty in our estimate of this anthropogenic soluble Fe. In this study, for the first time, we interactively combined laboratory kinetic experiments with global aerosol modeling to more accurately quantify anthropogenic soluble Fe due to air pollution. Firstly, we determined Fe dissolution kinetics of African dust samples at acidic pH values with and without ionic species commonly found in aerosol water (i.e., sulfate and oxalate. Then, by using acidity as a master variable, we constructed a new empirical scheme for Fe release from mineral dust due to inorganic and organic anions in aerosol water. We implemented this new scheme and applied an updated mineralogical emission database in a global atmospheric chemistry transport model to estimate the atmospheric concentration and deposition flux of soluble Fe under preindustrial and modern conditions. Our improved model successfully captured the inverse relationship of Fe solubility and total Fe loading measured over the North Atlantic Ocean (i.e., 1–2 orders of magnitude lower Fe solubility in northern-African- than combustion-influenced aerosols. The model results show a positive relationship between Fe solubility and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC/Fe molar ratio, which is consistent with previous field measurements. We estimated that deposition of soluble Fe to the ocean increased from 0.05–0.07 Tg Fe yr−1 in the preindustrial era to 0.11–0.12 Tg Fe yr−1 in the present day, due to air pollution. Over the high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC regions

  20. Regional differences in plastic ingestion among Southern Ocean fur seals and albatrosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter G; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Bester, Marthán N

    2016-03-15

    We provide data on regional differences in plastic ingestion for two Southern Ocean top predators: Arctocephalus fur seals and albatrosses (Diomedeidae). Fur seals breeding on Macquarie Island in the 1990s excreted small (mainly 2-5 mm) plastic fragments, probably derived secondarily from myctophid fish. No plastic was found in the scats of these seals breeding on three islands in the southwest Indian and central South Atlantic Oceans, despite myctophids dominating their diets at these locations. Compared to recent reports of plastic ingestion by albatrosses off the east coast of South America, we confirm that plastic is seldom found in the stomachs of Thalassarche albatrosses off South Africa, but found no Diomedea albatrosses to contain plastic, compared to 26% off South America. The reasons for such regional differences are unclear, but emphasize the importance of reporting negative as well as positive records of plastic ingestion by marine biota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of atmospheric greenhouse gases, orbital parameters, and southern ocean gateways: an idealized model study

    CERN Document Server

    Hertwig, Eileen; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A set of idealized experiments are performed to analyze the competing effects of declining atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the opening of an ocean gateway, and varying orbital parameters. These forcing mechanisms, which influence the global mean climate state, may have played a role for triggering climate transitions of the past (for example during the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition and the build-up of the Antarctic Ice Sheet). Sensitivity simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model are conducted to test these three forcings and their roles for the global climate. The simulations are carried out under idealized conditions to focus on the essentials. The combination of all three forcings triggers a climate transition which resembles the onset of the Antarctic glaciation. In particular, the temperatures in the southern high latitudes decrease and snow accumulates constantly. Moreover, the relative importance of each possible forcing is explored. All three of the mechanisms (atmosp...

  2. Southern Ocean areas of endemism: a reanalysis using benthic hydroids (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís P Miranda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The biogeographic history of the Southern Ocean (SO fauna is complex and poorly studied, especially the areas of endemism. We reanalyzed the data of Marques & Peña Cantero (2010, along with other geographical records of endemic benthic hydroids below 45°S. A Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE based on 5° latitude by 5° longitude matrix with 61 species resulted in eight areas of endemism. We discuss these results in the context of different hypotheses of the evolution of the SO fauna and previously proposed biogeography patterns.

  3. Long-Term Relationships between the Marine Environment, Krill and Salps in the Southern Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chung Il; Pakhomov, Evgeny; Atkinson,Angus; Siegel,Volker

    2010-01-01

    Long-term variations (1975–2002) in climatology of marine environmental parameters, Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, and the pelagic tunicate, Salpa thompsoni, were compared within the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean. Sea water temperature in the top 400 m increased at a rate of 0.020–0.030°C ⋅ yr−1, which was accompanied by the dissolved oxygen decline. Top 100 m water layer became fresher with lower concentrations of phosphates and nitrates, while at subsurface layers (200–400 m) b...

  4. Heavy metals in some parts of Antarctica and the southern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kureishy, T.W.; Sengupta, R.; Mesquita, A.; Sanzgiri, S.

    11/November 1993 Marine Polhaion Bulletin, Volume 26, No. I 1, pp. 651-652, 1993. Printed in Great Britain, 0025-326X/93 $6.00+0.00 © 1993 Pergamon Press Ltd Heavy Metals in Some Parts of Antarctica and the Southern Indian Ocean TARIQ W...(}ha, Qatar Though remote in its geographical location Antarctica is known to be indirectly affected by industrial and agricultural activities on other continents. This is evident in the concentrations of synthetic chemicals such as the organochlorine...

  5. Oceanography and the base of the pelagic food web in the southern Indian Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Processes governing productivity at the base of the pelagic food web of the southern Indian Ocean are influenced primarily by physical–chemical conditions with implications for the structure and function of the entire pelagic food web. Here, we report observations along a great circle transect from...... Cape Town, South Africa, to Broome in north western Australia. Primary production was tightly linked to water column stability and nutrient availability, with high productivity (1144 mg C m22 day21) in the sub-tropical convergence zone, and falling off by an order of magnitude in the sub-tropical gyre...

  6. Malacological survey in Phang-Nga Province, southern Thailand, pre- and post-Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Lohachit, Chantima; Harada, Masakazu; Chusongsang, Phiraphol; Chusongsang, Yupa

    2006-01-01

    Three malacological surveys were conducted in the Takua Pa District of Phang-Nga Province, southern Thailand, before and after the Indian Ocean Tsunami disaster. Twenty-nine species of fresh- and brackish-water snails were found, in which 10 species of freshwater snails were present, including live Pila polita; 8 species were of medical importance. Two brackish-water snails, Nerita articulata and Littorinopsis scabra, were absent after the tsunami disaster, while brackish-water Cerithidea cingulata and C. djadjariensis harbored 9 types of trematode cercariae.

  7. Seasonal evolution of net and regenerated silica production around a natural Fe-fertilized area in the Southern Ocean estimated with Si isotopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, I.; Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Quéguiner, B.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Elskens, M.; Navez, J.; Cardinal, D.

    2014-10-01

    A massive diatom bloom is observed each year in the surface waters of the naturally Fe-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau (Southern Ocean). We measured biogenic silica production and dissolution fluxes (ρSi and ρDiss, respectively) in the mixed layer in the vicinity of the Kerguelen Plateau during austral spring 2011 (KEOPS-2 cruise). We compare results from a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference station and stations with different degrees of iron enrichment and bloom conditions. Above the plateau biogenic ρSi are among the highest reported so far in the Southern Ocean (up to 47.9 mmol m-2 d-1). Although significant (10.2 mmol m-2 d-1 on average), ρDiss were generally much lower than production rates. Uptake ratios (ρSi : ρC and ρSi : ρN) confirm that diatoms strongly dominate primary production in this area. At the bloom onset, decreasing dissolution-to-production ratios (D : P) indicate that the remineralization of silica could sustain most of the low silicon uptake and that the system progressively shifts toward a silica production regime which must be mainly supported by new source of silicic acid. Moreover, by comparing results from the two KEOPS expeditions (spring 2011 and summer 2005), we suggest that there is a seasonal evolution of the processes decoupling Si and N cycles in the area. Indeed, the consumption of H4SiO4 standing stocks occurs only during the growing stage of the bloom when strong net silica production is observed, contributing to higher H4SiO4 depletion relative to NO3-. Then, the decoupling of H4SiO4 and NO3- is mainly controlled by the more efficient nitrogen recycling relative to Si. Gross Si : N uptake ratios were higher in the Fe-rich regions compared to the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area, likely due to different diatom communities. This suggests that the diatom responses to natural Fe fertilization are more complex than previously thought, and that natural iron fertilization over long timescales does not necessarily

  8. Seasonal evolution of net and regenerated silica production around a natural Fe-fertilized area in the Southern Ocean estimated from Si isotopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, I.; Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Quéguiner, B.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Elskens, M.; Navez, J.; Cardinal, D.

    2014-05-01

    A massive diatom-bloom is observed each year in the surface waters of the naturally Fe fertilized Kerguelen Plateau (Southern Ocean). We measured biogenic silica production and dissolution fluxes in the mixed layer in the vicinity of the Kerguelen Plateau during austral spring 2011 (KEOPS-2 cruise). We compare results from a High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll reference station and stations with different degrees of iron enrichment and bloom conditions. Above the Plateau biogenic silica production fluxes are among the highest reported so far in the Southern Ocean (up to 47.9 mmol m-2 d-1). Although significant (10.2 mmol m-2 d-1 in average), silica dissolution rates were generally much lower than production rates. Uptake ratios (Si:C and Si:N) confirm that diatoms strongly dominate the primary production in this area. At the bloom onset, decreasing dissolution to production ratios (D:P) indicate that the remineralization of silica could sustained most of the low silicon uptake and that the system progressively shifts toward a silica production regime which must be mainly supported by new source of silicic acid. Moreover, by comparing results from the two KEOPS-expeditions (spring 2011 and summer 2005), we suggest that there is a seasonal evolution on the processes decoupling Si and N cycles in the area. Indeed, the consumption of H4SiO4 standing stocks occurs only during the growing stage of the bloom when strong net silica production is observed, contributing to a higher H4SiO4 depletion relative to NO3-. Then, the decoupling between H4SiO4 and NO3- is mainly controlled by the more efficient nitrogen recycling relative to Si. Gross-Si:N uptake ratios were higher in the Fe-rich regions compared to the HNLC area, likely due to different diatoms communities. This suggests that the diatom responses to natural Fe fertilization are more complex than previously thought, and that natural iron fertilization over long time scales does not necessarily decrease Si:N uptake ratios

  9. Climate change and Southern Ocean ecosystems I: how changes in physical habitats directly affect marine biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Andrew J; Melbourne-Thomas, Jessica; Corney, Stuart P; Arrigo, Kevin R; Barbraud, Christophe; Barnes, David K A; Bindoff, Nathaniel L; Boyd, Philip W; Brandt, Angelika; Costa, Daniel P; Davidson, Andrew T; Ducklow, Hugh W; Emmerson, Louise; Fukuchi, Mitsuo; Gutt, Julian; Hindell, Mark A; Hofmann, Eileen E; Hosie, Graham W; Iida, Takahiro; Jacob, Sarah; Johnston, Nadine M; Kawaguchi, So; Kokubun, Nobuo; Koubbi, Philippe; Lea, Mary-Anne; Makhado, Azwianewi; Massom, Rob A; Meiners, Klaus; Meredith, Michael P; Murphy, Eugene J; Nicol, Stephen; Reid, Keith; Richerson, Kate; Riddle, Martin J; Rintoul, Stephen R; Smith, Walker O; Southwell, Colin; Stark, Jonathon S; Sumner, Michael; Swadling, Kerrie M; Takahashi, Kunio T; Trathan, Phil N; Welsford, Dirk C; Weimerskirch, Henri; Westwood, Karen J; Wienecke, Barbara C; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter; Wright, Simon W; Xavier, Jose C; Ziegler, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Antarctic and Southern Ocean (ASO) marine ecosystems have been changing for at least the last 30 years, including in response to increasing ocean temperatures and changes in the extent and seasonality of sea ice; the magnitude and direction of these changes differ between regions around Antarctica that could see populations of the same species changing differently in different regions. This article reviews current and expected changes in ASO physical habitats in response to climate change. It then reviews how these changes may impact the autecology of marine biota of this polar region: microbes, zooplankton, salps, Antarctic krill, fish, cephalopods, marine mammals, seabirds, and benthos. The general prognosis for ASO marine habitats is for an overall warming and freshening, strengthening of westerly winds, with a potential pole-ward movement of those winds and the frontal systems, and an increase in ocean eddy activity. Many habitat parameters will have regionally specific changes, particularly relating to sea ice characteristics and seasonal dynamics. Lower trophic levels are expected to move south as the ocean conditions in which they are currently found move pole-ward. For Antarctic krill and finfish, the latitudinal breadth of their range will depend on their tolerance of warming oceans and changes to productivity. Ocean acidification is a concern not only for calcifying organisms but also for crustaceans such as Antarctic krill; it is also likely to be the most important change in benthic habitats over the coming century. For marine mammals and birds, the expected changes primarily relate to their flexibility in moving to alternative locations for food and the energetic cost of longer or more complex foraging trips for those that are bound to breeding colonies. Few species are sufficiently well studied to make comprehensive species-specific vulnerability assessments possible. Priorities for future work are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Increasing vertical mixing to reduce Southern Ocean deep convection in NEMO3.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, C.; Ridley, J. K.; Calvert, D.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.

    2015-10-01

    Most CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) models unrealistically form Antarctic Bottom Water by open ocean deep convection in the Weddell and Ross seas. To identify the mechanisms triggering Southern Ocean deep convection in models, we perform sensitivity experiments on the ocean model NEMO3.4 forced by prescribed atmospheric fluxes. We vary the vertical velocity scale of the Langmuir turbulence, the fraction of turbulent kinetic energy transferred below the mixed layer, and the background diffusivity and run short simulations from 1980. All experiments exhibit deep convection in the Riiser-Larsen Sea in 1987; the origin is a positive sea ice anomaly in 1985, causing a shallow anomaly in mixed layer depth, hence anomalously warm surface waters and subsequent polynya opening. Modifying the vertical mixing impacts both the climatological state and the associated surface anomalies. The experiments with enhanced mixing exhibit colder surface waters and reduced deep convection. The experiments with decreased mixing give warmer surface waters, open larger polynyas causing more saline surface waters and have deep convection across the Weddell Sea until the simulations end. Extended experiments reveal an increase in the Drake Passage transport of 4 Sv each year deep convection occurs, leading to an unrealistically large transport at the end of the simulation. North Atlantic deep convection is not significantly affected by the changes in mixing parameters. As new climate model overflow parameterisations are developed to form Antarctic Bottom Water more realistically, we argue that models would benefit from stopping Southern Ocean deep convection, for example by increasing their vertical mixing.

  11. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  12. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  13. Temperature, salinity profiles and associated data collected in the Southern Oceans in support of the Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics project, 2001-04 to 2001-08 (NODC Accession 0001097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The overall goal of the U.S. Southern Ocean GLOBEC program is to elucidate circulation processes and their effect on sea ice formation and Antarctic krill (Euphausia...

  14. Determination of various types of labile atmospheric iron over remote oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Siefert, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe) is a major source of the micronutrient to the remote ocean. Most studies have focused on the total atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans while fewer studies have focused on the chemistry and chemical speciation of atmospheric Fe. This speciation of Fe in the atmosphere is critical to understanding the fraction of Fe that will be labile in surface waters after deposition and consequently has implications for the bioavailability of this atmospherically derived Fe. In this study, 24-hour aerosol samples were collected using a high-volume dichotomous virtual impactor (HVDVI) that collected coarse (Dp > 2.5 μm) and fine (Dpfractions on two 90-mm Teflon membrane filters, over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. A sequential aqueous extraction procedure using a pH 4.5 buffer solution and a chemical reductant (hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA)) was used to measure various labile Fe fractions. The extraction procedure was performed immediately after aerosol sample collection and used time series measurements of Fe(II) using long path length absorbance spectroscopy (LPAS) for analysis of Fe(II). The method measured both the quantities of labile Fe and also the dissolution and reduction kinetics of the labile Fe. Comparisons of HA-reducible Fe and photoreducible Fe concentrations were conducted on board and showed that both reduction processes had similar reduction kinetics and final Fe(II) concentrations during the initial 90 min. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for the increase in Fe(II) were 0.020 and 0.0076 min-1 for the photoreducible Fe extraction and HA-reduction extraction, respectively. This HA-reducible Fe amount could potentially be used to determine the maximum amount of labile atmospheric Fe that is deposited into the ocean.

  15. Transcriptomics of Iron Limitation in Phaeocystis antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Issak, Mariam Reyad Rizkallah

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton, the hidden trees of the ocean, are responsible for nearly half of global oxygen production. Phytoplankton growth and productivity in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions have been demonstrated to be limited by iron availability. One of the most important HNLC regions is the Southern Ocean, as it regulates Earth system climate due to its unique hydrography and consequently its phytoplankton assemblage drives the global carbon cycle. Iron fertilization experiments were con...

  16. Ventilation of the abyssal Southern Ocean during the late Neogene: A new perspective from the subantarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Lindsey M.; Hendy, Ingrid L.; Moore, Theodore C.; Lyle, Mitchell W.

    2009-09-01

    Benthic foraminiferal stable carbon isotope records from the South Atlantic show significant declines toward more "Pacific-like" values at ˜7 and ˜2.7 Ma, and it has been posited that these shifts may mark steps toward increased CO2 sequestration in the deep Southern Ocean as climate cooled over the late Neogene. We generated new stable isotope records from abyssal subantarctic Pacific cores MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11. The record from MV0502-4JC suggests that the Southern Ocean remained well mixed and free of vertical or interbasinal δ13C gradients following the late Miocene carbon shift (LMCS). According to the records from MV0502-4JC and ELT 25-11, however, cold, low δ13C bottom waters developed in the Southern Ocean in the late Pliocene and persisted until ˜1.7 Ma. These new data suggest that while conditions in the abyssal Southern Ocean following the LMCS were comparable to the present day, sequestration of respired CO2 may have increased in the deepest parts of the Southern Ocean during the late Pliocene, a critical period for the growth and establishment of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets.

  17. Developing integrated models of Southern Ocean food webs: Including ecological complexity, accounting for uncertainty and the importance of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E. J.; Cavanagh, R. D.; Hofmann, E. E.; Hill, S. L.; Constable, A. J.; Costa, D. P.; Pinkerton, M. H.; Johnston, N. M.; Trathan, P. N.; Klinck, J. M.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Daly, K. L.; Maury, O.; Doney, S. C.

    2012-09-01

    The Southern Ocean supports diverse and unique ecosystems that have been impacted by more than two centuries of exploitation and are now experiencing rapid changes in ocean temperature and seasonal ice cover due to climate warming. Understanding and projecting responses of Southern Ocean marine ecosystems to changing climate conditions and direct human impacts, such as fisheries, requires integrated ecosystem analyses at scales previously unexplored. Here we consider the main ecological and modelling challenges in predicting the responses of Southern Ocean ecosystems to change, and propose three interlinked focus areas that will advance the development of integrated models for Southern Ocean ecosystems. The first focus area is development of fundamental understanding of the factors that determine the structure and function of the food webs at multiple scales. Ecological research in the Southern Ocean is often centred on key species or localised systems, a tendency which is reflected in existing food web and ecosystem models. To build on this, a systematic analysis of regional food web structure and function is required. The second focus area is development of a range of mechanistic models that vary in their resolution of ecological processes, and consider links across physical scales, biogeochemical cycles and feedbacks, and the central role of zooplankton. These two focus areas underlie the third, which is development of methodologies for scenario testing across a range of trophic levels of the effects of past and future changes, which will facilitate consideration of the underlying complexity of interactions and the associated uncertainty. The complex nature of interactions determining Southern Ocean ecosystem structure and function will require new approaches, which we propose should be developed within a scale-based framework that emphasises both physical and ecological aspects.

  18. CLOUDS, AEROSOLS, RADIATION AND THE AIR-SEA INTERFACE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN: ESTABLISHING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert [University of Washington; Bretherton, Chris [University of Washington; McFarquhar, Greg [University of Illinois - Urbana; Protat, Alain [Bureau of Meteorology - Melbourne; Quinn, Patricia [NOAA PMEL; Siems, Steven [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jakob, Christian [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Alexander, Simon [Australian Antarctic Division; Weller, Bob [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

    2014-09-29

    A workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy was convened at the University of Washington to discuss the state of knowledge of clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction over the Southern Ocean and to identify strategies for reducing uncertainties in their representation in global and regional models. The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system and is a unique pristine environment, yet other than from satellite, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, radiation and the air-sea interface in this region. Consequently, much is unknown about atmospheric and oceanographic processes and their linkage in this region. Approximately 60 scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and senior researchers working in atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.S. and foreign universities and government laboratories, attended the Southern Ocean Workshop. It began with a day of scientific talks, partly in plenary and partly in two parallel sessions, discussing the current state of the science for clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction in the Southern Ocean. After the talks, attendees broke into two working groups; one focused on clouds and meteorology, and one focused on aerosols and their interactions with clouds. This was followed by more plenary discussion to synthesize the two working group discussions and to consider possible plans for organized activities to study clouds, aerosols and the air-sea interface in the Southern Ocean. The agenda and talk slides, including short summaries of the highlights of the parallel session talks developed by the session chars, are available at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/socrates/presentations/SouthernOceanPresentations/.

  19. Southern Oceans Near Real-Time Temperature Profile Data from the GTSPP project from 01 January 2001 to 31 December 2001 (NODC Accession 0000921)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected from XBT casts from the Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South). Data were collected from 01 January 2001 to 31 December 2001. Data were...

  20. Southern Oceans Near Real-Time Temperature Profile Data from the GTSPP project from 01 January 2002 to 31 December 2002 (NODC Accession 0000956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected from XBT casts from the Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South). Data were collected from 01 January 2002 to 31 December 2002. Data were...

  1. Temperature profile and nutrients data collected using bottle casts from the POLAR DUKE in the Southern Oceans from 02 January 1990 to 05 February 1990 (NODC Accession 0000887)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts in the Southern Oceans from the POLAR DUKE. Data were collected from 02 January 1990 to 05...

  2. NODC Standard Product: US Navy Geosat geophysical data records (GDRs) from the Southern Ocean 30-72 degrees south (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 9000189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains U.S. Navy Geodetic Satellite (GEOSAT) Geophysical data records from the Southern Oceans 60 to 70 degrees south. March 31, 1985 to September...

  3. The distribution of the standing crop of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean, 02 January 1932 to 18 October 1951 (NODC Accession 0000842)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using net casts in the Southern Ocean from the DISCOVERY II. Data were collected from 02 January 1932 to 18 October 1951. Data were...

  4. Zooplankton data collected by ELTANIN in Southern Oceans from zooplankton net casts; 13 October 1963 to 06 June 1968 (NODC Accession 9500111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts from ELTANIN in the Southern Oceans. Data were collected from 13 October 1963 to 06 June 1968 by National...

  5. Combined effects of iron and copper from atmospheric dry deposition on ocean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F. J.; Chen, Y.; Guo, Z. G.; Gao, H. W.; Mackey, K. R.; Yao, X. H.; Zhuang, G. S.; Paytan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition can provide nutrients and potential toxicants to marine ecosystem, hence affecting ocean net primary productivity (NPP). Nonetheless, the interactive effects of mixed aerosol components on phytoplankton have rarely been reported. Here we explored the combined effects of iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) on NPP over the East China Sea. In aerosol addition mesocosm experiments, phytoplankton growth was suppressed under high aerosol Cu but was increased when high Cu was accompanied by high Fe in aerosols. A time series of soluble aerosol Fe and Cu deposition was obtained and compared to regional chlorophyll a (Chl a) abundances from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Aqua. Strong positive correlations were observed between the dry flux ratios of soluble Fe/Cu and Chl a abundances in the large offshore area, whereas these variables were uncoupled in coastal regions where riverine input and upwelling dominated the biogeochemistry. Current work provides insight into the complex linkage between atmospheric deposition and marine productivity.

  6. Responses of marine phytoplankton in iron enrichment experiments in the northern North Sea and northeast Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Klaas R.; Gledhill, Martha; Nolting, Rob F.; Veldhuis, Marcel J.W.; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Berg, Constant M.G. van den

    1998-01-01

    Short-term iron enrichment experiments were carried out with samples collected in areas with different phytoplankton activity in the northern North Sea and northeast Atlantic Ocean in the summer of 1993. The research area was dominated by high numbers of pico-phytoplankton, up to 70,000 ml−1.

  7. Distinct trends in the speciation of iron between the shallow shelf seas and the deep basins of the Arctic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuroczy, C-E.; Gerringa, L. J. A.; Klunder, M.; Laan, P.; Le Guitton, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The speciation of iron was investigated in three shelf seas and three deep basins of the Arctic Ocean in 2007. The dissolved fraction ( 3 nM on the shelves and [TDFe] <2 nM in the Makarov Basin). A relative enrichment of particulate Fe toward the bottom was revealed at all stations, indicating Fe

  8. Water masses as a unifying framework for understanding the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Iudicone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific motivation for this study is to understand the processes in the ocean interior controlling carbon transfer across 30° S. To address this, we have developed a unified framework for understanding the interplay between physical drivers such as buoyancy fluxes and ocean mixing, and carbon-specific processes such as biology, gas exchange and carbon mixing. Given the importance of density in determining the ocean interior structure and circulation, the framework is one that is organized by density and water masses, and it makes combined use of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics. This is achieved through application to a global ice-ocean circulation model and an ocean biogeochemistry model, with both components being part of the widely-used IPSL coupled ocean/atmosphere/carbon cycle model.

    Our main new result is the dominance of the overturning circulation (identified by water masses in setting the vertical distribution of carbon transport from the Southern Ocean towards the global ocean. A net contrast emerges between the role of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW, associated with large northward transport and ingassing, and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, associated with a much smaller export and outgassing. The differences in their export rate reflects differences in their water mass formation processes. For SAMW, two-thirds of the surface waters are provided as a result of the densification of thermocline water (TW, and upon densification this water carries with it a substantial diapycnal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. For AAIW, principal formatin processes include buoyancy forcing and mixing, with these serving to lighten CDW. An additional important formation pathway of AAIW is through the effect of interior processing (mixing, including cabelling that serve to densify SAMW.

    A quantitative evaluation of the contribution of mixing, biology and gas exchange to the DIC evolution per water mass reveals that

  9. Salp/krill interactions in the Southern Ocean: spatial segregation and implications for the carbon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, E. A.; Froneman, P. W.; Perissinotto, R.

    Available data on the spatial distribution and feeding ecophysiology of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, and the tunicate, Salpa thompsoni, in the Southern Ocean are summarized in this study. Antarctic krill and salps generally display pronounced spatial segregation at all spatial scales. This appears to be the result of a clear biotopical separation of these key species in the Antarctic pelagic food web. Krill and salps are found in different water masses or water mass modifications, which are separated by primary or secondary frontal features. On the small-scale (salps are usually restricted to the specific water parcels, or are well segregated vertically. Krill and salp grazing rates estimated using the in situ gut fluorescence technique are among the highest recorded in the Antarctic pelagic food web. Although krill and salps at times may remove the entire daily primary production, generally their grazing impact is moderate (⩽50% of primary production). The regional ecological consequences of years of high salp densities may be dramatic. If the warming trend, which is observed around the Antarctic Peninsula and in the Southern Ocean, continues, salps may become a more prominent player in the trophic structure of the Antarctic marine ecosystem. This likely would be coupled with a dramatic decrease in krill productivity, because of a parallel decrease in the spatial extension of the krill biotope. The high Antarctic regions, particularly the Marginal Ice Zone, have, however, effective physiological mechanisms that may provide protection against the salp invasion.

  10. Year-round observations of carbon biomass and flux variability in the Southern Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, Todd

    2009-02-01

    Three Carbon Explorer (CE) floats profiling to kilometer depths in the Southern Ocean tracked dawn-dusk variations of mixing/stratification, particulate organic carbon (POC), and light scattering and sedimentation at 100, 250, and 800 m continuously from January 2002 to April 2003. Data were analyzed in conjunction with contemporaneous satellite winds and chlorophyll and derived subsurface light fields. The CE deployed at 66{sup o}S 172{sup o}W operated in the ice edge zone in absence of light. Two CEs deployed at 55{sup o}S 172{sup o}W recorded wintertime mixing to {approx}400 m, yet observed very different bloom dynamics and sedimentation the following spring. Four hypotheses are explored. The strongest is that shallow transient stratification of the deep winter mixed layer to shallower than photosynthetic critical depth occurred more frequently in the non-bloom/higher sedimentation case. The lower particle export to 800 m under the bloom was hypothesized to be due to higher interception of sinking carbon by a relatively starved over wintering zooplankton population. In the Southern Ocean surface phytoplankton biomass may counter indicate particle flux at kilometer depths.

  11. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Daniel T; Burrows, Susannah M; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P; Elliott, Scott M; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J; Hartmann, Dennis L

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties-ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration N d of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed N d. Enhanced N d is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in N d is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35(o) to 45(o)S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45(o) to 55(o)S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m(-2) over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  12. Bacterial community dynamics during polysaccharide degradation at contrasting sites in the Southern and Atlantic Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietz, Matthias; Wemheuer, Bernd; Simon, Heike; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Seibt, Maren A; Daniel, Rolf; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial degradation of polysaccharides is central to marine carbon cycling, but little is known about the bacterial taxa that degrade specific marine polysaccharides. Here, bacterial growth and community dynamics were studied during the degradation of the polysaccharides chitin, alginate and agarose in microcosm experiments at four contrasting locations in the Southern and Atlantic Oceans. At the Southern polar front, chitin-supplemented microcosms were characterized by higher fractions of actively growing cells and a community shift from Alphaproteobacteria to Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. At the Antarctic ice shelf, chitin degradation was associated with growth of Bacteroidetes, with 24% higher cell numbers compared with the control. At the Patagonian continental shelf, alginate and agarose degradation covaried with growth of different Alteromonadaceae populations, each with specific temporal growth patterns. At the Mauritanian upwelling, only the alginate hydrolysis product guluronate was consumed, coincident with increasing abundances of Alteromonadaceae and possibly cross-feeding SAR11. 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries indicated that growth of the Bacteroidetes-affiliated genus Reichenbachiella was stimulated by chitin at all cold and temperate water stations, suggesting comparable ecological roles over wide geographical scales. Overall, the predominance of location-specific patterns showed that bacterial communities from contrasting oceanic biomes have members with different potentials to hydrolyse polysaccharides. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. How Does the Antarctic Circumpolar Current Affect the Southern Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher; Sallée, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) in the Southern Ocean is investigated using hydrographic observations combined with satellite observations of sea-surface height. A three-dimensional (spatial and vertical) estimate of the isopycnal eddy-diffusivity in the Southern Ocean is obtained using the theory of Ferrari & Nikurashin (2010), that includes the influence of suppression of the diffusivity by the strong, time-mean flows. It is found that the eddy diffusivity is enhanced at depth, reaching a maximum at the "critical layer" near 1000m. The estimate of diffusivity is used with a simple diffusive parameterization to estimate the meridional eddy volume flux. Together with an estimate of the meridional Ekman transport and the time-mean meridional geostrophic transport, the eddy volume flux is used to reconstruct the time-mean overturning circulation. By comparing the reconstruction with, and without, suppression of the eddy diffusivity by the mean flow, the influence of the suppression on the overturning is illuminated. It is shown that the suppression of the eddy diffusivity results in a large reduction of interior eddy transports, and a more realistic eddy induced overturning circulation. We will also use a simple conceptual model is used to show that the MOC is influenced not only by the existence of enhanced diffusivity at depth, but also by the details of the vertical structure of the eddy diffusivity, such as the depth of the critical layer.

  14. The Radiative Impacts of Precipitating Ice on Arctic and Southern Ocean Sea Ice Simulations in GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. L. F.; Hong, Y.; Lee, W. L.; Wang, Y. H.; Liu, Y.; Richardson, M.; Yu, J. Y.; Suhas, E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Liu, G.

    2016-12-01

    Using the NCAR-CESM1 model and observations we show that a bias in sea-ice concentration is attributable to erroneous cloud-radiative interaction associated with the exclusion of downwelling long-wave heating from precipitating ice over Arctic and Southern Oceans. These biases resemble those in CMIP5 models which commonly exclude the radiative effects of precipitating ice. This missing radiative effects, in conjunction with overestimated surface albedo, leads to colder surface temperatures (TS), near surface-air temperatures (SAT) and the associated surface energy-budget adjustments. These biases in turn increases the sea-ice concentration in Arctic and Southern Oceans. The inclusion of the precipitating ice radiative effects reduces the negative model biases in surface radiative fluxes by more than 20 W m-2, TS and SAT by 2—4 K and positive sea-ice concentration by 30—40%, leading to a more realistic seasonal cycle compared with simulations lacking the snow-radiative effects. The findings have implications to the simulation of projection of changes associated with sea-ice in CMIP models.

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2002-11-24 to 2003-01-23 (NODC Accession 0108068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108068 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-02-19 to 2011-04-23 (NODC Accession 0109933)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109933 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NATHANIEL B. PALMER in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern...

  17. Enhanced productivity rather than enhanced preservation led to increased organic carbon burial in the euxinic southern proto North Atlantic Ocean during the Cenomanian/Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Pancost, R.D.; Nijenhuis, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    Three Cenomanian/Turonian (C/T, ∼93.5 Ma) black shale sections along a northeast-southwest transect in the southern part of the proto-North Atlantic Ocean were correlated by stable carbon isotope stratigraphy using the characteristic excursion in δ¹³C values of both bulk organic matter (OM) and

  18. Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaran, Flore; Stafford, Kathleen M; Branch, Trevor A; Gedamke, Jason; Royer, Jean-Yves; Dziak, Robert P; Guinet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp) are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda) populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia). Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

  19. Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Samaran

    Full Text Available Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia. Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

  20. Fluxes of biogenic carbon in the Southern Ocean: roles of large microphagous zooplankton1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fèvre, Jacques; Legendre, Louis; Rivkin, Richard B.

    1998-11-01

    The Southern Ocean is an extreme environment, where waters are permanently cold, a seasonal ice cover extends over large areas, and the solar energy available for photosynthesis is severely restricted, either by vertical mixing to considerable depths or, especially south of the Antarctic Circle, by prolonged seasonal periods of low or no irradiance. Such conditions would normally lead to low productivity and a water column dominated by recycling processes involving microbial components of pelagic communities but this does not seem to be the case in the Southern Ocean, where there is efficient export to large apex predators and deep waters. This paper investigates the role of large microphagous zooplankton (salps, krill, and some large copepods) in the partitioning of biogenic carbon among the pools of short- and long-lived organic carbon and sequestered biogenic carbon. Large microphagous zooplankton are able to ingest microbial-sized particles and thus repackage small, non-sinking particles into both metazoan biomass and large, rapidly sinking faeces. Given the wide spatio-temporal extent of microbial trophic pathways in the Southern Ocean, large zooplankton that are omnivorous or able to ingest small food particles have a competitive advantage over herbivorous zooplankton. Krill efficiently transfer carbon to a wide array of apex predators and their faecal pellets are exported to depth during occasional brief sedimentation episodes in spring time. Salps may be a significant link towards some fish (directly) and other apex predators (indirectly) and, at some locations (especially in offshore waters) and time, they may account for most of the downward flux of biogenic carbon. Large copepods are a trophic link towards fish and at least one whale species, and their grazing activity generally impedes the export of organic particles to depth. As a result, biogenic carbon is channelled mainly towards apex predators and episodically into the deep ocean. Without these

  1. Trace Gas Distributions and Correlations Observed In The Southern Ocean Atmosphere During the ORCAS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, E. L.; Schauffler, S.; Donets, V.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hills, A. J.; Stephens, B. B.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Gierach, M.

    2016-12-01

    The biologically productive waters of the Southern Ocean are potentially a significant source and sink for trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, relatively little is known about the variations and atmospheric vertical structures of trace gases in this region. During January/February, 2016, we participated in the O2/N2 Ratio and CO2 Airborne Southern Ocean (ORCAS) Study, an airborne mission that included the measurement of a wide range of trace gases. This presentation will focus on a selection of gases measured from the Whole Air Sampler and from an in-situ GC/MS system (TOGA). The gases measured by these instruments included a range of reactive halocarbons produced by marine organisms in the surface ocean (e.g., dimethyl sulfide, bromoform, methyl iodide), produced from marine surface photochemistry (e.g., methyl nitrate), and introduced to the region from long-range transport (e.g., chlorinated solvents, CFCs and HCFCs, non-methane hydrocarbons). Distributions of these gases should reflect the biological productivity of the region, the surface flux rates, and the rates of atmospheric transport and mixing. The concentrations of biogenic trace gases that we measured in the marine boundary layer showed significant regional differences in concentrations and different seasonal changes over the course of the experiment. Vertical profiles of biogenic trace gases could be related to the surface sources, exchange with the free troposphere, and the photochemical lifetime of the different gases. Because of the potential relationship of biogenic trace gases to biological productivity in the surface ocean, the measurements will be compared to distributions of chlorophyll a, as observed remotely from the GV aircraft and from satellites. For trace gases with a large interhemispheric gradient and primarily northern hemisphere source (e.g. mainly anthropogenic sources), atmospheric vertical profiles showed an average increase in mixing ratio with

  2. Penguins as bioindicators of mercury contamination in the southern Indian Ocean: geographical and temporal trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carravieri, Alice; Cherel, Yves; Jaeger, Audrey; Churlaud, Carine; Bustamante, Paco

    2016-06-01

    Penguins have been recently identified as useful bioindicators of mercury (Hg) transfer to food webs in the Southern Ocean over different spatial and temporal scales. Here, feather Hg concentrations were measured in adults and chicks of all the seven penguin species breeding in the southern Indian Ocean, over a large latitudinal gradient spanning Antarctic, subantarctic and subtropical sites. Hg was also measured in feathers of museum specimens of penguins collected at the same sites in the 1950s and 1970s. Our aim was to evaluate geographical and historical variations in Hg transfer to penguins, while accounting for feeding habits by using the stable isotope technique (δ(13)C, habitat; δ(15)N, diet/trophic level). Adult feather Hg concentrations in contemporary individuals ranged from 0.7 ± 0.2 to 5.9 ± 1.9 μg g(-1) dw in Adélie and gentoo penguins, respectively. Inter-specific differences in Hg accumulation were strong among both adults and chicks, and mainly linked to feeding habits. Overall, penguin species that feed in Antarctic waters had lower feather Hg concentrations than those that feed in subantarctic and subtropical waters, irrespective of age class and dietary group, suggesting different Hg incorporation into food webs depending on the water mass. While accounting for feeding habits, we detected different temporal variations in feather Hg concentrations depending on species. Notably, the subantarctic gentoo and macaroni penguins had higher Hg burdens in the contemporary rather than in the historical sample, despite similar or lower trophic levels, respectively. Whereas increases in Hg deposition have been recently documented in the Southern Hemisphere, future monitoring is highly needed to confirm or not this temporal trend in penguins, especially in the context of actual changing Hg emission patterns and global warming. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Oncoidal granular iron formation in the Mesoarchaean Pongola Supergroup, southern Africa: Textural and geochemical evidence for biological activity during iron deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J B; Beukes, N J; Gutzmer, J; Czaja, A D; Johnson, C M; Nhleko, N

    2017-11-01

    We document the discovery of the first granular iron formation (GIF) of Archaean age and present textural and geochemical results that suggest these formed through microbial iron oxidation. The GIF occurs in the Nconga Formation of the ca. 3.0-2.8 Ga Pongola Supergroup in South Africa and Swaziland. It is interbedded with oxide and silicate facies micritic iron formation (MIF). There is a strong textural control on iron mineralization in the GIF not observed in the associated MIF. The GIF is marked by oncoids with chert cores surrounded by magnetite and calcite rims. These rims show laminated domal textures, similar in appearance to microstromatolites. The GIF is enriched in silica and depleted in Fe relative to the interbedded MIF. Very low Al and trace element contents in the GIF indicate that chemically precipitated chert was reworked above wave base into granules in an environment devoid of siliciclastic input. Microbially mediated iron precipitation resulted in the formation of irregular, domal rims around the chert granules. During storm surges, oncoids were transported and deposited in deeper water environments. Textural features, along with positive δ(56) Fe values in magnetite, suggest that iron precipitation occurred through incomplete oxidation of hydrothermal Fe(2+) by iron-oxidizing bacteria. The initial Fe(3+) -oxyhydroxide precipitates were then post-depositionally transformed to magnetite. Comparison of the Fe isotope compositions of the oncoidal GIF with those reported for the interbedded deeper water iron formation (IF) illustrates that the Fe(2+) pathways and sources for these units were distinct. It is suggested that the deeper water IF was deposited from the evolved margin of a buoyant Fe(2+)aq -rich hydrothermal plume distal to its source. In contrast, oncolitic magnetite rims of chert granules were sourced from ambient Fe(2+)aq -depleted shallow ocean water beyond the plume. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The past, present and future distribution of a deep-sea shrimp in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenatul Basher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shrimps have a widespread distribution across the shelf, slope and seamount regions of the Southern Ocean. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity and adaptability in response to environmental change. We use species distribution models to predict changes in the geographic range of the deep-sea Antarctic shrimp Nematocarcinus lanceopes under changing climatic conditions from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present and to the year 2100. The present distribution range indicates a pole-ward shift of the shrimp population since the last glaciation. This occurred by colonization of slopes from nearby refugia located around the northern part of Scotia Arc, southern tip of South America, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, southern tip of the Campbell plateau and Kerguelen plateau. By 2100, the shrimp are likely to expand their distribution in east Antarctica but have a continued pole-ward contraction in west Antarctica. The range extension and contraction process followed by the deep-sea shrimp provide a geographic context of how other deep-sea Antarctic species may have survived during the last glaciation and may endure with projected changing climatic conditions in the future.

  5. The past, present and future distribution of a deep-sea shrimp in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basher, Zeenatul; Costello, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Shrimps have a widespread distribution across the shelf, slope and seamount regions of the Southern Ocean. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity and adaptability in response to environmental change. We use species distribution models to predict changes in the geographic range of the deep-sea Antarctic shrimp Nematocarcinus lanceopes under changing climatic conditions from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present and to the year 2100. The present distribution range indicates a pole-ward shift of the shrimp population since the last glaciation. This occurred by colonization of slopes from nearby refugia located around the northern part of Scotia Arc, southern tip of South America, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, southern tip of the Campbell plateau and Kerguelen plateau. By 2100, the shrimp are likely to expand their distribution in east Antarctica but have a continued pole-ward contraction in west Antarctica. The range extension and contraction process followed by the deep-sea shrimp provide a geographic context of how other deep-sea Antarctic species may have survived during the last glaciation and may endure with projected changing climatic conditions in the future.

  6. The oceanic segment of the southern Brazilian margin: Morpho-structural domains and their tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetto, Marcelo; Alkmim, Fernando F.; Szatmari, Peter; Mohriak, Webster U.

    A descriptive and evolutionary analysis of the main morpho-structural features of the oceanic domain of the southern portion of the Brazilian Continental Margin is supported by regional seismic profiles and potential field data from the Brazilian governmental LEPLAC (Plano de Levantamento da Plataforma Continental Brasileira) Project. The several morpho-structural elements can be differentiated, as for example: the dominant structural pattern of the acoustic basement, including extensional faulting and long-wavelength folding, crustal thickness changes, fracture zones location, distribution of volcanic centers, and development of wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors. Four broad distinct morpho-structural domains, separated by fracture zones and oceanic lineaments. Domain I is located south of the Porto Alegre Lineament; Domain II corresponds to the area between the Porto Alegre Lineament and the Rio Grande Fracture Zone; Domain III spans the area of the São Paulo Plateau; and Domain IV is located to the east of this plateau, towards the abyssal portions of the oceanic crust. These domains are defined by their distinct regional morphologic and structural characteristics. Sometimes these elements are well imaged in the seismic profiles, corroborated by gravity and magnetic anomalies, and eventually identified as prominent features at the sea bottom physiography. Using a multidisciplinary approach based on bathymetric maps, regional seismic interpretation, magnetic data analysis, and gravity models, this work attempts to characterize these elements in a descriptive and evolutionary view, identifying their role in the tectonic development of this portion of the South Atlantic.

  7. Export fluxes in a naturally fertilized area of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau: ecological vectors of carbon and biogenic silica to depth (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Blain, S.; Armand, L.; Quéguiner, B.; Salter, I.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical (particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, biogenic silica) and biological (diatoms and faecal pellets) composition of the material exported to a moored sediment trap located under the winter mixed layer of the naturally-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean was studied over an annual cycle. Despite iron availability in spring, the annual particulate organic carbon (POC) export (98.2 mmol m-2) at 289 m was low but annual biogenic silica export was significant (114 mmol m-2). This feature was related to the abundance of empty diatom frustules and the ratio of full : empty cell exerted a first order control in BSi : POC export stoichiometry of biological pump. Chaetoceros Hyalochaete spp. and Thalassiosira antarctica resting spores were found to be responsible for more than 60% of the annual POC that occurred during two very short export events (80%). The seasonal progression of faecal pellet types revealed a clear transition from small spherical shapes (small copepods) in spring, larger cylindrical and ellipsoid shapes in summer (euphausiids and large copepods) and finally large tabular shapes (salps) in autumn and winter. We propose that in this High Biomass, Low Export (HBLE) environment, small, highly silicified, fast-sinking resting spores are able to bypass the high grazing pressure and efficient carbon transfer to higher trophic levels that are responsible for the low fluxes observed the during the remainder of the year. Our study also provides a statistical framework linking the ecological succession of diatom and zooplankton communities to the seasonality of carbon and silicon export within an iron-fertilized bloom region in the Southern Ocean.

  8. Southern Ocean air-sea heat flux, SST spatial anomalies, and implications for multi-decadal upper ocean heat content trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamsitt, V. M.; Talley, L. D.; Mazloff, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean displays a zonal dipole (wavenumber one) pattern in sea surface temperature (SST), with a cool zonal anomaly in the Atlantic and Indian sectors and a warm zonal anomaly in the Pacific sector, associated with the large northward excursion of the Malvinas and southeastward flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). To the north of the cool Indian sector is the warm, narrow Agulhas Return Current (ARC). Air-sea heat flux is largely the inverse of this SST pattern, with ocean heat gain in the Atlantic/Indian, cooling in the southeastward-flowing ARC, and cooling in the Pacific, based on adjusted fluxes from the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE), a ⅙° eddy permitting model constrained to all available in situ data. This heat flux pattern is dominated by turbulent heat loss from the ocean (latent and sensible), proportional to perturbations in the difference between SST and surface air temperature, which are maintained by ocean advection. Locally in the Indian sector, intense heat loss along the ARC is contrasted by ocean heat gain of 0.11 PW south of the ARC. The IPCC AR5 50 year depth-averaged 0-700 m temperature trend shows surprising similarities in its spatial pattern, with upper ocean warming in the ARC contrasted by cooling to the south. Using diagnosed heat budget terms from the most recent (June 2014) 6-year run of the SOSE we find that surface cooling in the ARC is balanced by heating from south-eastward advection by the current whereas heat gain in the ACC is balanced by cooling due to northward Ekman transport driven by strong westerly winds. These results suggest that spatial patterns in multi-decadal upper ocean temperature trends depend on regional variations in upper ocean dynamics.

  9. Roles of wind stress and thermodynamic forcing in recent trends in Antarctic sea ice and Southern Ocean SST: An ocean-sea ice model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusahara, Kazuya; Williams, Guy D.; Massom, Robert; Reid, Phillip; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-11-01

    In contrast to a strong decrease in Arctic sea ice extent, overall Antarctic sea ice extent has modestly increased since 1979. Several hypotheses have been proposed for the net Antarctic sea ice expansion, including atmosphere/ocean circulation and temperature changes, sea ice-atmospheric-ocean feedback, increased precipitation, and enhanced basal meltwater from ice shelves. Concomitant with this positive trend in Antarctic sea ice, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the Southern Ocean south of approximately 45°S have cooled over this period. However, the mechanisms responsible for the Antarctic sea ice expansion and the SST cooling trend remain poorly defined. Here, we conduct comprehensive sensitivity experiments using a coupled ocean-sea ice model with a steady-state ice shelf component in order to investigate the main drivers of recent trends in Antarctic sea ice and SST over the Southern Ocean. The results suggest that Antarctic sea ice expansion is mostly explained by trends in the thermodynamic surface forcing, notably cooling and drying and a reduction in longwave radiation. Similarly, thermodynamic forcing is found to be the main driver of the zonal SST cooling trend. While apparently less influential on sea ice extent and SST, wind stress plays a key role in sea ice motion, thickening coastal sea ice, and thinning and decreasing the concentration of ice in mid-pack regions of the Amundsen-eastern Ross seas and 65-95°E in winter-spring. Furthermore, the model suggests that ocean-ice shelf interaction does not significantly influence the observed trends in Antarctic sea ice coverage and Southern Ocean SST in recent decades.

  10. The interdisciplinary marine system of the Amundsen Sea, Southern Ocean: Recent advances and the need for sustained observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Michael P.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Schofield, Oscar; Wåhlin, Anna; Newman, Louise; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The Southern Ocean exerts a profound influence on the functioning of the Earth System, in part because its location and unique bathymetric configuration enable direct linkages to the other major ocean basins (Ganachaud and Wunsch, 2000; Lumpkin and Speer, 2007). It is the site of the world's largest current system, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), which transfers waters and climatically/ecologically-important tracers between the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans (Rintoul et al., 2001). In addition to the strong horizontal connectivity, the ACC is also characterized by a vigorous overturning circulation, which upwells warm, nutrient-rich waters from intermediate depth to the surface, where they are modified by interactions with the atmosphere and cryosphere to form new water masses, some of which are lighter and others more dense (Marshall and Speer, 2012). This overturning circulation structures the Southern Ocean both horizontally and vertically, dictates the levels of its communication with the rest of the global ocean, and is a fundamental control on the sequestration of carbon from the atmosphere into the ocean interior (Sallée et al., 2012). In some locations, the upwelled waters can intrude onto the Antarctic shelves, supplying heat and nutrients to the shallower regions. This is believed to be especially effective in west Antarctica, where the southern edge of the ACC moves close to the shelf break (Martinson, 2011; Orsi et al., 1995; Thoma et al., 2008).

  11. Dense shelf water spreading from Antarctic coastal polynyas to the deep Southern Ocean: A regional circumpolar model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusahara, Kazuya; Williams, Guy D.; Tamura, Takeshi; Massom, Robert; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-08-01

    The spreading of dense shelf water (DSW) from Antarctic coastal margins to lower latitudes plays a vital role in the ocean thermohaline circulation and the global climate system. Through enhanced localized sea ice production in Antarctic coastal polynyas, cold and saline DSW is formed over the continental shelf regions as a precursor to Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). However, the detailed fate of coastal DSW over the Southern Ocean is still unclear. Here we conduct extensive passive tracer experiments using a circumpolar ocean-sea ice-ice shelf model to investigate pathways of the regional polynya-based DSW from the Antarctic margins to the deep Southern Ocean basins. In the numerical experiments, the Antarctic coastal margin is divided into nine regions, and a passive tracer is released from each region at the same rate as the local sea ice production. The modeled spatial distribution of the total concentration of the nine tracers is consistent with the observed AABW distribution and clearly demonstrates nine routes of the DSW over the Southern Ocean along its bottom topography. Furthermore, the model shows that while ˜50% of the total tracer is distributed northward from the continental shelf to the deep ocean, ˜7% is transported poleward beneath ice shelf cavities. The comprehensive tracer experiments allow us to estimate the contribution of local DSW to the total concentration along each of the pathways.

  12. An inter-comparison of six latent and sensible heat flux products over the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejiang Yu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The latent heat fluxes (LHF and sensible heat fluxes (SHF over the Southern Ocean from six different data sets are inter-compared for the period 1988–2000. The six data sets include three satellite-based products, namely, the second version of the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes data set (GSSTF-2, the third version of the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS-3 and the Japanese Ocean Fluxes Data Sets with Use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO; two global reanalysis products, namely, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–Department of Energy Reanalysis 2 data set (NCEP-2 and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40 Year Re-analysis data set (ERA-40; and the Objectively Analyzed Air–Sea Fluxes for the Global Oceans data set (OAFlux. All these products reveal a similar pattern in the averaged flux fields. The zonal mean LHF fields all exhibit a continuous increase equatorward. With an exception of HOAPS-3, the zonal mean SHF fields display a minimum value near 50°S, increasing both pole- and equatorward. The differences in the standard deviation for LHF are larger among the six data products than the differences for SHF. Over the regions where the surface fluxes are significantly influenced by the Antarctic Oscillation and the Pacific–South American teleconnection, the values and distributions of both LHF and SHF are consistent among the six products. It was found that the spatial patterns of the standard deviations and trends of LHF and SHF can be explained primarily by sea–air specific humidity and temperature differences; wind speed plays a minor role.

  13. Characterising cloud regimes associated with the Southern Ocean shortwave radiation bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, S.; Jakob, C.; Protat, A.

    2013-12-01

    The high-latitude Southern Ocean is the site of persistent cloud biases in GCMs. A deficit of shortwave cloud radiative effect especially between 50-65S causes an excess of absorbed shortwave radiation, which has been associated with other biases in the global circulation. Recent model evaluation studies have found that the shortwave radiation bias is potentially associated with low- and mid-level clouds in the cold-air part of extratropical cyclones and ahead of transient ridges. However a coherent description of the cloud properties and cloud processes most associated with the bias has not yet emerged. This study focuses on three cloud regimes that are most frequent in the area of the shortwave radiation bias during the austral summer. They are selected from the cloud regimes derived for the Southern Ocean from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud observations. We characterise the selected cloud regimes in terms of their meteorological conditions using the ECMWF Interim reanalysis. We also study their vertical macrophysical structure and microphysical properties based on active satellite observations using the DARDAR (raDAR/liDAR) combined CloudSat and CALIPSO data product. We find that two cloud regimes identified as mid-topped in the ISCCP based data set are associated with distinct meteorological processes. An optically thin mid-level top cloud regime is related to cold mid-levels, cold-air advection and moderate subsidence, while an optically thicker cloud regime is associated with a broader range of conditions resembling weak to moderate frontal events, with warm and moist mid-levels, moderate ascent and warm-air advection. The vertical cloud structure derived from DARDAR profiles show that both these regimes contain mostly low clouds, but both also include frequent occurrences of mid-level cloud. We use a clustering method to quantify the differences in microphysical properties between the regimes. We find that the optically

  14. Laterally spreading iron, humic-like dissolved organic matter and nutrients in cold, dense subsurface water of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Nanako; Kuma, Kenshi; Morita, Yuichirou; Sasayama, Ryouhei; Ooki, Atsushi; Kondo, Yoshiko; Obata, Hajime; Nishioka, Jun; Yamashita, Youhei; Nishino, Shigeto; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aoyama, Michio

    2014-10-27

    The location and magnitude of oceanic iron sources remain uncertain owing to a scarcity of data, particularly in the Arctic Ocean. The formation of cold, dense water in the subsurface layer of the western Arctic Ocean is a key process in the lateral transport of iron, macronutrients, and other chemical constituents. Here, we present iron, humic-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter, and nutrient concentration data in waters above the continental slope and shelf and along two transects across the shelf-basin interface in the western Arctic Ocean. We detected high concentrations in shelf bottom waters and in a plume that extended in the subsurface cold dense water of the halocline layer in slope and basin regions. At σθ = 26.5, dissolved Fe, humic-like fluorescence intensity, and nutrient maxima coincided with N* minima (large negative values of N* indicate significant denitrification within shelf sediments). These results suggest that these constituents are supplied from the shelf sediments and then transported laterally to basin regions. Humic dissolved organic matter probably plays the most important role in the subsurface maxima and lateral transport of dissolved Fe in the halocline layer as natural Fe-binding organic ligand.

  15. Morphological and physiological effects in proboscia alata (bacillariophyceae) grown under different light and CO2 conditions of the modern Southern ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstraten, Astrid; Timmermans, Klaas R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    The combined effects of different light and aqueous CO2 conditions were assessed for the Southern Ocean diatom Proboscia alata (Brightwell) Sundstrom in laboratory experiments. Selected culture conditions (light and CO2(aq)) were representative for the natural ranges in the modern Southern Ocean.

  16. Modulation of the Southern Africa precipitation response to the El Niño Southern Oscillation by the subtropical Indian Ocean Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Andrew; Funk, Chris; Zinke, Jens; Harrison, Laura

    2017-04-01

    The climate of Southern Africa, defined as the land area bound by the region 15°S-35°S; 12.5°E-42.5°E, during the December-March rainy season is driven by Indo-Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Subtropical Indian Ocean Dipole (SIOD). The observed December-March 1979-2014 Southern Africa precipitation during the four ENSO and SIOD phase combinations suggests that the phase of the SIOD can disrupt or enhance the Southern Africa precipitation response to ENSO. Here, we use a large ensemble of model simulations driven by global SST and ENSO-only SST to test whether the SIOD modifies the relationship between Southern Africa precipitation and ENSO. Since ENSO-based precipitation forecasts are used extensively over Southern Africa, an improved understanding of how other modes of SST variability modulate the regional response to ENSO is important. ENSO, in the absence of the SIOD, forces an equivalent barotropic Rossby wave over Southern Africa that modifies the regional mid-tropospheric vertical motions and precipitation anomalies. El Niño (La Niña) is related with high (low) pressure over Southern Africa that produces anomalous mid-tropospheric descent (ascent) and decreases (increases) in precipitation relative to average. When the SIOD and ENSO are in opposite phases, the SIOD compliments the ENSO-related atmospheric response over Southern Africa by strengthening the regional equivalent barotropic Rossby wave, anomalous mid-tropospheric vertical motions and anomalous precipitation. By contrast, when the SIOD and ENSO are in the same phase, the SIOD disrupts the ENSO-related atmospheric response over Southern Africa by weakening the regional equivalent barotropic Rossby wave, anomalous mid-tropospheric vertical motions and anomalous precipitation.

  17. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  18. Cloud condensation nuclei over the Southern Ocean: wind dependence and seasonal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, John L.; Keywood, Melita

    2017-04-01

    Multi-decadal observations of aerosol microphysical properties from regionally representative sites can be used to challenge regional or global numerical models that simulate atmospheric aerosol. Presented here is an analysis of multi-decadal observations at Cape Grim (Australia) that characterise production and removal of the background marine aerosol in the Southern Ocean marine boundary layer (MBL) on both short-term weather-related and underlying seasonal scales.A trimodal aerosol distribution comprises Aitken nuclei ( 350 nm) modes, with the Aitken mode dominating number concentration. Whilst the integrated particle number in the MBL over the clean Southern Ocean is only weakly dependent on wind speed, the different modes in the aerosol size distribution vary in their relationship with wind speed. The balance between a positive wind dependence in the coarse mode and negative dependence in the accumulation/CCN mode leads to a relatively flat wind dependence in summer and moderately strong positive wind dependence in winter. The changeover in wind dependence of these two modes occurs in a very small size range at the mode intersection, indicative of differences in the balance of production and removal in the coarse and accumulation/CCN modes.Whilst a marine biological source of reduced sulfur appears to dominate CCN concentration over the summer months (December to February), other components contribute to CCN over the full annual cycle. Wind-generated coarse-mode sea salt is an important CCN component year round and is the second-most-important contributor to CCN from autumn through to mid-spring (March to November). A portion of the non-seasonally dependent contributor to CCN can clearly be attributed to wind-generated sea salt, with the remaining part potentially being attributed to long-range-transported material. Under conditions of greater supersaturation, as expected in more convective cyclonic systems and their associated fronts, Aitken mode particles

  19. Marked phylogeographic structure of Gentoo penguin reveals an ongoing diversification process along the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Juliana A; Noll, Daly; Dantas, Gisele P M; Petry, Maria Virginia; Barbosa, Andrés; González-Acuña, Daniel; Le Bohec, Céline; Bonadonna, Francesco; Poulin, Elie

    2017-02-01

    Two main hypotheses have been debated about the biogeography of the Southern Ocean: (1) the Antarctic Polar Front (APF), acting as a barrier between Antarctic and sub-Antarctic provinces, and (2) the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), promoting gene flow among sub-Antarctic areas. The Gentoo penguin is distributed throughout these two provinces, separated by the APF. We analyzed mtDNA (HVR1) and 12 microsatellite loci of 264 Gentoo penguins, Pygoscelis papua, from 12 colonies spanning from the Western Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands (WAP) to the sub-Antarctic Islands (SAI). While low genetic structure was detected among WAP colonies (mtDNA Ф ST =0.037-0.133; microsatellite F ST =0.009-0.063), high differentiation was found between all SAI and WAP populations (mtDNA Ф ST =0.678-0.930; microsatellite F ST =0.110-0.290). These results suggest that contemporary dispersal around the Southern Ocean is very limited or absent. As predicted, the APF appears to be a significant biogeographical boundary for Gentoo penguin populations; however, the ACC does not promote connectivity in this species. Our data suggest demographic expansion in the WAP during the last glacial maximum (LGM, about 20kya), but stability in SAI. Phylogenetic analyses showed a deep divergence between populations from the WAP and those from the SAI. Therefore, taxonomy should be further revised. The Crozet Islands resulted as a basal clade (3.57Mya), followed by the Kerguelen Islands (2.32Mya) as well as a more recent divergence between the Falkland/Malvinas Islands and the WAP (1.27Mya). Historical isolation, local adaptation, and past climate scenarios of those Evolutionarily Significant Units may have led to different potentials to respond to climate changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Major Characteristics of Southern Ocean Cloud Regimes and Their Effects on the Energy Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, John M.; Jakob, Christian; Rossow, William B.; Tselioudis, George; Brown, Josephine

    2011-01-01

    Clouds over the Southern Ocean are often poorly represented by climate models, but they make a significant contribution to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, particularly in the shortwave portion of the energy spectrum. This study seeks to better quantify the organization and structure of Southern Hemisphere midlatitude clouds by combining measurements from active and passive satellite-based datasets. Geostationary and polar-orbiter satellite data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are used to quantify large-scale, recurring modes of cloudiness, and active observations from CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are used to examine vertical structure, radiative heating rates, and precipitation associated with these clouds. It is found that cloud systems are organized into eight distinct regimes and that ISCCP overestimates the midlevel cloudiness of these regimes. All regimes contain a relatively high occurrence of low cloud, with 79%of all cloud layers observed having tops below 3 km, but multiple-layered clouds systems are present in approximately 34% of observed cloud profiles. The spatial distribution of regimes varies according to season, with cloud systems being geometrically thicker, on average, during the austral winter. Those regimes found to be most closely associated with midlatitude cyclones produce precipitation the most frequently, although drizzle is extremely common in low-cloud regimes. The regimes associated with cyclones have the highest in-regime shortwave cloud radiative effect at the TOA, but the low-cloud regimes, by virtue of their high frequency of occurrence over the oceans, dominate both TOA and surface shortwave effects in this region as a whole.

  1. Algal pigment patterns in different watermasses of the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during fall 1987

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, Anita; Treguer, Paul J; Kraaij, Gijs W; Morvan, Jean

    1990-01-01

    During the autumn of 1987 a survey was carried out in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean in order to study phytoplankton community structure in relation to hydrological features. The positions of the boundary zones, determined by means of hydrological and chemical properties (especially

  2. Assessing the internal consistency of the CARINA data base in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Sabine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The CARINA project is aimed at gathering and providing secondary quality control checks on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and geochemical data from cruises all across the Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Ocean. In total the project gathered 188 cruises that were not previously available to the public. Of these 188 cruises, 37 are part of the Southern Ocean. Parameters from the Southern Ocean cruises, including total carbon dioxide (TCO2, total alkalinity, oxygen, nitrate, phosphate and silicate, were examined for cruise-to-cruise consistency. pH and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs are also part of the data base, but are not discussed here. This paper focuses on the quality control of the Southern Ocean data from the Pacific sector which consisted of 29 cruises of which 17 were included in a previous synthesis called GLODAP, 11 were new cruises from the CARINA dataset, and one cruise was included in GLODAP but was updated with new data and therefore also included in CARINA. The Pacific sector quality control procedures included crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data. The GLODAP data were included into the analysis as reference cruises but without applying the GLODAP recommended adjustments so the corrections could be independently verified. The outcome of this effort is an internally consistent, high-quality carbon data set for all cruises, including the reference cruises.

  3. Long-Term Relationships between the Marine Environment, Krill and Salps in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Il Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term variations (1975–2002 in climatology of marine environmental parameters, Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, and the pelagic tunicate, Salpa thompsoni, were compared within the Atlantic Sector of the Southern Ocean. Sea water temperature in the top 400 m increased at a rate of 0.020–0.030°C ⋅ yr−1, which was accompanied by the dissolved oxygen decline. Top 100 m water layer became fresher with lower concentrations of phosphates and nitrates, while at subsurface layers (200–400 m both salinity and nutrients showed small increasing trend. Unlike phosphates and nitrates, silicate concentrations decreased in the entire water column. Shorter-term water temperature dynamics closely correlated with the El Nino events expressed as the Southern Oscillation Index which in turn was linked to the propagation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Wave (ACW. The variations of sea-ice extent matched well the changes in both air and water temperatures. In general, abundance of krill and salps showed opposite to each other trends. Due to large area considered in this study, no significant relationships between abiotic factors and both krill and salps were found. However, our analysis demonstrated that krill abundance was greater in years with lower sea water temperature, greater sea-ice extent and higher nutrient concentration, while salps showed the opposite pattern.

  4. Southern Ocean Control of Glacial AMOC Stability and Dansgaard-Oeschger Interstadial Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, C.; Schmittner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Glacial periods exhibit abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) climatic oscillations that are thought to be linked to instabilities in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Great uncertainty remains regarding the dynamics of the DO cycle, as well as controls on the timing and duration of individual events. Using ice core data we show that the duration of warm (interstadial) periods is strongly correlated with Antarctic climate, and presumably with Southern Ocean (SO) temperature and the position of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) westerlies. We propose a SO control on AMOC stability and interstadial duration via the rate of Antarctic bottom water formation, meridional density/pressure gradients, Agulhas Leakage, and SO adiabatic upwelling. This hypothesis is supported by climate model experiments that demonstrate SO warming leads to a stronger AMOC that is less susceptible to freshwater perturbations. In the AMOC stability diagram, SO warming and strengthening of the SH westerlies both shift the vigorous AMOC branch toward higher freshwater values, thus raising the threshold for AMOC collapse. The proposed mechanism could provide a consistent explanation for several diverse observations, including maximum DO activity during intermediate ice volume/SH temperature, and successively shorter DO durations within each Bond cycle. It may further have implications for the fate of the AMOC under future global warming.

  5. Distribution, reproductive and energetic conditions of decapod crustaceans along the Scotia Arc (Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Lovrich

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on decapod distribution patterns and reproductive and energetic conditions were carried out along the islands and shallows of the Scotia Arc (Southern Ocean during the RV “Polarstern” LAMPOS expedition (ANT XIX/5 between April and May 2002. A clear biogeographic zonation was found. The Subantarctic Magellan-South Atlantic decapod fauna consisting of both “natant” (caridean and “reptant” (astacidean, anomuran, and brachyuran decapods appeared along the northern branch of the Scotia Arc to South Georgia, where Subantarctic and Antarctic faunas were found overlapping. An impoverished caridean shrimp fauna was found along the islands of the southern branch, from the South Sandwich Islands to the Antarctic Peninsula. Differences in the reproductive traits of the two most abundant species were detected. The reproductive cycle of Notocrangon antarcticus at South Georgia was more advanced than that at the South Orkney Islands, probably due to temperature differences between the two locations. Although the oogenesis and the reproductive cycle of Munida subrugosa seem to be in phase at Burdwood Bank and in the Beagle Channel, the oocyte number is probably lower at the former location. A new index was used to measure the energy devoted to reproduction by relating the energy contents of the egg mass/ovary plus hepatopancreas and the energy content of the whole body. This index revealed that the energy investment in reproduction was (1 independent of the sampling location, (2 species-specific, and (3 larger in caridean shrimps than in galatheid crabs.

  6. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in killer whales (Orcinus orca) from the Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Marie; Barrett-Lennard, Lance; Guinet, Christophe; Dangerfield, Neil; Ross, Peter S

    2009-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), are ubiquitous environmental contaminants of which significant concentrations are reported in upper trophic level animals. In 1998, we collected blubber biopsy samples (n=11) from killer whales (Orcinus orca) inhabiting the coastal waters around Possession Island, Crozet Archipelago, southern Indian Ocean, for contaminant analyses. Despite inhabiting an isolated region far removed from industrial activities, these killer whales can presently be considered among the most PCB-contaminated cetaceans in the southern hemisphere, with concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 20.5mg/kg lipid weight (lw). PCDD levels ranged from below the detection limit (5 ng/kg) to 77.1 ng/kg lw and PCDF levels from below the detection limit (7 ng/kg) to 36.1 ng/kg lw. Over 70% of our study animals had PCB concentrations which exceeded a 1.3mg/kg PCB threshold established for endocrine disruption and immunotoxicity in free-ranging harbour seals, suggesting that organic contaminants cannot be ruled out as an additional threat to this declining population.

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2014-12-30 to 2015-07-01 (NCEI Accession 0144343)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144343 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-01-02 to 2011-12-18 (NCEI Accession 0148767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148767 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2002-12-29 to 2003-11-30 (NCEI Accession 0144351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144351 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-01-02 to 2007-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0148773)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148773 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-30 to 2008-10-28 (NCEI Accession 0144348)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144348 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-12-30 to 2012-12-24 (NCEI Accession 0144349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144349 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0145200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0145200 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-01-02 to 2007-12-22 (NCEI Accession 0144528)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144528 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-01-02 to 2011-12-19 (NCEI Accession 0144354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144354 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2002-03-23 to 2002-12-23 (NCEI Accession 0148766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148766 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-01-01 to 2006-12-27 (NCEI Accession 0144535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144535 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2013-12-31 to 2014-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0144532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144532 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2002-03-07 to 2002-12-23 (NCEI Accession 0144356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144356 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2011-12-30 to 2012-12-23 (NCEI Accession 0148774)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148774 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-01-02 to 2006-12-26 (NCEI Accession 0148764)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148764 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2010-01-01 to 2011-12-19 (NCEI Accession 0148765)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148765 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2003-01-01 to 2003-12-29 (NCEI Accession 0148770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148770 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-31 to 2008-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0148763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148763 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  5. Water mass mixing shapes bacterial biogeography in a highly hydrodynamic region of the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Morales, Víctor; Ameneiro, Julia; Teira, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Even though compelling evidences indicate that marine microbes show biogeographic patterns, very little is known on the mechanisms driving those patterns in aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, bacterial community structure was examined in epipelagic waters of a highly hydrodynamic area of the Southern Ocean to gain insight into the role that biogeochemical factors and water mass mixing (a proxy of dispersal) have on microbial biogeography. Four water masses that converge and mix around the South Shetland Islands (northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula) were investigated. Bacterioplankton communities were water-mass specific, and were best explained by dispersal rather than by biogeochemical factors, which is attributed to the relatively reduced environmental gradients found in these cold and nutrient rich waters. These results support the notion that currents and water mixing may have a considerable effect in connecting and transforming different water bodies, and consequently, in shaping communities of microorganisms. Considering the multidimensional and dynamic nature of the ocean, analysis of water mass mixing is a more suitable approach to investigate the role of dispersal on the biogeography of planktonic microorganisms rather than geographical distance. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Importance of mesoscale eddies and mean circulation in ventilation of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenkovich, Igor; Garraffo, Zulema; Pennel, Romain; Fine, Rana A.

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the relative importance of the mean advection and mesoscale currents in the property exchange between the Southern Ocean mixed layer and downstream in the upper 2000 m; this exchange is referred to as ventilation. A new, highly efficient off-line tracer model employed here uses precalculated velocities to advect dynamically passive tracers. Two idealized tracers are considered: the Boundary Impulse Response (BIR) tracer, which helps to determine the ventilation pathways and time scales, and the Transient Surface Tracer (TST), which is relevant to transient atmospheric tracers. The importance of eddies is isolated by contrasting the control simulation with a simulation without mesoscale currents. The analysis reveals complex three-dimensional ventilation pathways, controlled by the interplay between the mean advection and eddy-induced spreading. The mean currents carry the tracers eastward within ACC and contribute to the formation of the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the South Pacific and South Atlantic. The main effect of eddies is to disperse tracers away from the mean pathways, and this dispersion acts to retain the BIR tracer in the Atlantic and Indian sectors and reduce the upstream influence of these regions on the South Pacific. In addition, the eddy-induced along-isopycnal spreading within ACC increases the ventilated depth and the inventory of TST. The results can be used to interpret distribution of tracers in the ocean in numerical simulations and observations.

  7. Southern Indian Ocean SST as a modulator for the progression of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Namendra Kumar; Rai, Shailendra; Mishra, Nishant

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the possibility of southern Indian Ocean (SIO) sea surface temperature (SST) as a modulator for the early phase of Indian summer monsoon and its possible physical mechanism. A dipole-like structure is obtained from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis which is similar to an Indian Ocean subtropical dipole (IOSD) found earlier. A subtropical dipole index (SDI) is defined based on the SST anomaly over the positive and negative poles. The regression map of rainfall over India in the month of June corresponding to the SDI during 1983-2013 shows negative patterns along the Western Ghats and Central India. However, the regression pattern is insignificant during 1952-1982. The multiple linear regression models and partial correlation analysis also indicate that the SDI acts as a dominant factor to influence the rainfall over India in the month of June during 1983-2013. The similar result is also obtained with the help of composite rainfall over the land points of India in the month of June for positive (negative) SDI events. It is also observed that the positive (negative) SDI delays (early) the onset dates of Indian monsoon over Kerala during the time domain of our study. The study is further extended to identify the physical mechanism of this impact, and it is found that the heating (cooling) in the region covering SDI changes the circulation pattern in the SIO and hence impacts the progression of monsoon in India.

  8. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75–200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude. PMID:26903274

  9. Factors regulating the Great Calcite Belt in the Southern Ocean and its biogeochemical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William M.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Rosengard, Sarah Z.; Bowler, Bruce C.; Drapeau, Dave T.; Garley, Rebecca; Lubelczyk, Laura C.; Mitchell, Catherine; Rauschenberg, Sara

    2016-08-01

    The Great Calcite Belt (GCB) is a region of elevated surface reflectance in the Southern Ocean (SO) covering 16% of the global ocean and is thought to result from elevated, seasonal concentrations of coccolithophores. Here we describe field observations and experiments from two cruises that crossed the GCB in the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the SO. We confirm the presence of coccolithophores, their coccoliths, and associated optical scattering, located primarily in the region of the subtropical, Agulhas, and Subantarctic frontal regions. Coccolithophore-rich regions were typically associated with high-velocity frontal regions with higher seawater partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2) than the atmosphere, sufficient to reverse the direction of gas exchange to a CO2 source. There was no calcium carbonate (CaCO3) enhancement of particulate organic carbon (POC) export, but there were increased POC transfer efficiencies in high-flux particulate inorganic carbon regions. Contemporaneous observations are synthesized with results of trace-metal incubation experiments, 234Th-based flux estimates, and remotely sensed observations to generate a mandala that summarizes our understanding about the factors that regulate the location of the GCB.

  10. Mechanisms of the Indian Ocean Dipole influence on El Niño/Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumo, Takeshi; Vialard, Jérome; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Jourdain, Nicolas; Dayan, Hugo; Suresh, Iyyappan

    2017-04-01

    Despite the tremendous socio-economic and environmental impacts of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), its forecasts at lead times longer than a few months remain challenging, as recently evidenced by the unexpected 2014-2015 El Niño sequence. Recent studies have suggested that negative (postive) Indian Ocean Dipole events may favour the development of El Niño (La Niña) events peaking one year later, hence possibly improving ENSO predictability and explaining ENSO biennal variability. These studies essentially show that this IOD influence on ENSO evolution is indeed robust in observations and most CMIP climate models. Accounting for the IOD influence in linear ENSO forecasts based on the tropical Pacific recharge-discharge process increases the explained variance by 10-30% at 14 months lead. This IOD influence on the ENSO forecast skill appears stronger than that of the Indian Ocean Basin-wide warming/cooling or ENSO itself. However, its underlying mechanisms are still debated. Here we use dedicated experiments from atmospheric and oceanic numerical models, and a conceptual approach based on the Pacific ocean linear response to a wind pulse, to investigate the mechanisms by which the IOD influences ENSO evolution. Our results suggest that: (1) the atmospheric bridge (through atmospheric teleconnections) dominates the oceanic bridge (through the Indonesian throughflow); (2) the temporal change of west Pacific zonal wind stress over a six month period (e.g. related to IOD demise) matters as much as the wind seasonal anomaly for the dynamical response of the equatorial Pacific; (3) the IOD eastern pole, and its demise, is the main driver of this wind change. The abrupt demise of the IOD eastern pole favours a fast temporal change of the zonal wind in the western Pacific between fall and winter-spring, thereby favouring ENSO phase transition. Revisiting statistical approaches by using relative sea surface temperature (i.e. with tropical mean removed) confirms

  11. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-17

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  12. Wide range of mercury contamination in chicks of southern ocean seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blévin, Pierre; Carravieri, Alice; Jaeger, Audrey; Chastel, Olivier; Bustamante, Paco; Cherel, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Using top predators as sentinels of the marine environment, Hg contamination was investigated within the large subantarctic seabird community of Kerguelen Islands, a remote area from the poorly known Southern Indian Ocean. Chicks of 21 sympatric seabirds presented a wide range of Hg concentrations, with the highest contaminated species containing ~102 times more feather Hg than the less contaminated species. Hence, Kerguelen seabirds encompass the whole range of chick feather Hg values that were previously collected worldwide in poorly industrialized localities. Using stable isotopes, the effects of foraging habitats (reflected by δ(13)C) and trophic positions (reflected by δ(15)N) on Hg concentrations were investigated. Species-related Hg variations were highly and positively linked to feather δ(15)N values, thus highlighting the occurrence of efficient Hg biomagnification processes within subantarctic marine trophic webs. By contrast, Hg contamination overall correlated poorly with feeding habitats, because of the pooling of species foraging within different isotopic gradients corresponding to distinct seabird habitats (benthic, pelagic, neritic and oceanic). However, when focusing on oceanic seabirds, Hg concentration was related to feather δ(13)C values, with species feeding in colder waters (lower δ(13)C values) south of Kerguelen Islands being less prone to be contaminated than species feeding in northern warmer waters (higher δ(13)C values). Within the context of continuous increase in global Hg emissions, Kerguelen Islands that are located far away from anthropogenic sources can be considered as an ideal study site to monitor the temporal trend of global Hg contamination. The present work helps selecting some seabird species as sentinels of environmental pollution according to their high Hg concentrations and their contrasted foraging ecology.

  13. Wide range of mercury contamination in chicks of southern ocean seabirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Blévin

    Full Text Available Using top predators as sentinels of the marine environment, Hg contamination was investigated within the large subantarctic seabird community of Kerguelen Islands, a remote area from the poorly known Southern Indian Ocean. Chicks of 21 sympatric seabirds presented a wide range of Hg concentrations, with the highest contaminated species containing ~102 times more feather Hg than the less contaminated species. Hence, Kerguelen seabirds encompass the whole range of chick feather Hg values that were previously collected worldwide in poorly industrialized localities. Using stable isotopes, the effects of foraging habitats (reflected by δ(13C and trophic positions (reflected by δ(15N on Hg concentrations were investigated. Species-related Hg variations were highly and positively linked to feather δ(15N values, thus highlighting the occurrence of efficient Hg biomagnification processes within subantarctic marine trophic webs. By contrast, Hg contamination overall correlated poorly with feeding habitats, because of the pooling of species foraging within different isotopic gradients corresponding to distinct seabird habitats (benthic, pelagic, neritic and oceanic. However, when focusing on oceanic seabirds, Hg concentration was related to feather δ(13C values, with species feeding in colder waters (lower δ(13C values south of Kerguelen Islands being less prone to be contaminated than species feeding in northern warmer waters (higher δ(13C values. Within the context of continuous increase in global Hg emissions, Kerguelen Islands that are located far away from anthropogenic sources can be considered as an ideal study site to monitor the temporal trend of global Hg contamination. The present work helps selecting some seabird species as sentinels of environmental pollution according to their high Hg concentrations and their contrasted foraging ecology.

  14. Rapid nitrification of wastewater ammonium near coastal ocean outfalls, Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Howard, Meredith D. A.; Beck, Carly D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mengel, Michael J.; Robertson, George L.

    2017-02-01

    In the southern California Bight (SCB), there has been a longstanding hypothesis that anthropogenic nutrient loading is insignificant compared to the nutrient loading from upwelling. However, recent studies have demonstrated that, in the nearshore environment, nitrogen (N) flux from wastewater effluent is equivalent to the N flux from upwelling. The composition of the N pool and N:P ratios of wastewater and upwelled water are very different and the environmental effects of wastewater discharges on coastal systems are not well characterized. Capitalizing on routine maintenance of the Orange County Sanitation District's ocean outfall, wherein a wastewater point source was ;turned off; in one area and ;turned on; in another for 23 days, we were able to document changes in coastal N cycling, specifically nitrification, related to wastewater effluent. A ;hotspot; of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrite (NO2-) occurred over the ocean outfall under normal operations and nitrification rates were significantly higher offshore when the deeper outfall pipe was operating. These rates were sufficiently high to transform all effluent NH4+ to nitrate (NO3-). The dual isotopic composition of dissolved NO3- (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) indicated that N-assimilation and denitrification were low relative to nitrification, consistent with the relatively low chlorophyll and high dissolved oxygen levels in the region during the study. The isotopic composition of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) recorded low δ15NPN and δ13CPN values around the outfall under normal operations suggesting the incorporation of ;nitrified; NO3- and wastewater dissolved organic carbon into POM. Our results demonstrate the critical role of nitrification in nitrogen cycling in the nearshore environment of urban oceans.

  15. Interannual surface variability of the Southern Pacific Ocean in relation to the SAM pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Menna, Milena; Falco, Pierpaolo; Poulain, Pierre Marie

    2017-04-01

    Drifter and satellite data are used to define the response of the Pacific Sector of the Southern Ocean (PSSO) to the large scale climatic pattern (Southern Annular Mode index - SAMI) in the period 1995-2015. The SAMI, defined as the mean sea level pressure difference between the 40° S and 65°S latitudes (Marshall et al., 2003), affects the eddy activity of the Southern Ocean and consequently the large-scale zonal transport in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC; Meredith and Hoggs, 2006; Hogg et al., 2014). Drifter data were primarily corrected for the wind-induced slip and currents (Ekman), then used to estimate annual values of the Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE) fields in bins of 2°x2° over the PSSO. Time series of the drifter EKEs were compared with the EKEs derived from altimeter data over the entire study area and with the temporal evolution of SAMI. A more quantitative evaluation of the surface eddy field response to the SAMI was performed counting the number and type (cyclonic or anticyclonic)of eddies produced in the whole PSSO and in correspondence of the Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF) and Polar Front (PF). The mean latitude of each front was determined using thermal criteria applied to a long time series of in situ XBT data collected by the Italian Antarctic Programme along the track between New Zealand and Antarctica from 1994 to 2016. Eddy counting was based on the results of the identification and tracking method performed by Chelton et al. (2011), retaining only those eddies with lifetimes of 4 weeks or longer. The drifter derived EKE shows a similar and quicker response to the SAMI variability with respect to the altimetry derived EKE; the time lag is of one year for drifters and of two years for the altimetry. Both the datasets reveal an anomalous behaviour of the EKE during the period 2003-2006. The SAMI variability induces a specific effect on the different frontal zones with changes in the number and type of eddy generated. Moreover the anomalous

  16. The monitoring of atmospheric mercury species in the Southern Indian Ocean at Amsterdam Island (38°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barret M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of oceans in the global cycle of mercury is still poorly characterized, mainly because of a lack a long-term data on atmospheric mercury concentrations in the remote Southern Ocean. In the frame of GMOS (Global Mercury Observation System, we present here the first results from a new monitoring station at Amsterdam Island in the Southern Indian Ocean. For the period January to April 2012, we recorded mean concentration of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and particulate-bounded mercury (PHg of 1.03 ng m−3, 0.37 and 0.34 pg m−3 respectively. While GEM concentrations showed little variations, RGM and PHg exhibited fast variations with alternation of value below the instrumental detection limit and maximum values up to 4 pg m−3.

  17. Rapid drawdown of Antarctica's Wordie Ice Shelf glaciers in response to ENSO/Southern Annular Mode-driven warming in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. C.; Gardner, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Here we investigate the largest acceleration in ice flow across all of Antarctica between ∼2008 InSAR and 2014 Landsat velocity mappings. This occurred in glaciers that used to feed into the Wordie Ice Shelf on the west Antarctic Peninsula, which rapidly disintegrated in ∼1989. Between 2008 and 2014, these glaciers experienced at least a threefold increase in surface elevation drawdown relative to the 2002-2008 time period. After ∼20 yrs of relative stability, it is unlikely that the ice shelf collapse played a role in the large response. Instead, we find that the rapid acceleration and surface drawdown is linked to enhanced melting at the ice-ocean boundary, attributable to changes in winds driven by global atmospheric circulation patterns, namely the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Southern Annular Mode (SAM), linking changes in grounded ice to atmospheric-driven ocean warming.

  18. Novel Methods for Optically Measuring Whitecaps Under Natural Wave Breaking Conditions in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, K. L.; Dierssen, H. M.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Balch, W. M.; Monahan, E. C.; Zappa, C. J.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.

    2016-02-01

    Breaking waves on the ocean surface mark areas of significant importance to air-sea flux estimates of gas, aerosols, and heat. Traditional methods of measuring whitecap coverage using digital photography can miss features that are small in size or do not show high enough contrast to the background. The geometry of the images collected captures the near surface, bright manifestations of the whitecap feature and miss a portion of the bubble plume that is responsible for the production of sea salt aerosols and the transfer of lower solubility gases. Here, a novel method for accurately measuring both the fractional coverage of whitecaps and the intensity and decay rate of whitecap events using above water radiometry is presented. The methodology was developed using data collected during the austral summer in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean under a large range of wind (speeds of 1 to 15 m s-1) and wave (significant wave heights 2 to 8 m) conditions as part of the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange experiment. Whitecap metrics were retrieved by employing a magnitude threshold based on the interquartile range of the radiance or reflectance signal for a single channel (411 nm) after a baseline removal, determined using a moving minimum/maximum filter. Breaking intensity and decay rate metrics were produced from the integration of, and the exponential fit to, radiance or reflectance over the lifetime of the whitecap. When compared to fractional whitecap coverage measurements obtained from high resolution digital images, radiometric estimates were consistently higher because they capture more of the decaying bubble plume area that is difficult to detect with photography. Radiometrically-retrieved whitecap measurements are presented in the context of concurrently measured meteorological (e.g., wind speed) and oceanographic (e.g., wave) data. The optimal fit of the radiometrically estimated whitecap coverage to the instantaneous wind speed, determined using ordinary least

  19. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  20. Developing an enhanced tropical cyclone data portal for the Southern Hemisphere and the Western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; de Wit, Roald; Atalifo, Terry; Prakash, Bipendra; Waqaicelua, Alipate; Kunitsugu, Masashi; Caroff, Philippe; Chane-Ming, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    Tropical cyclones are the most extreme weather phenomena which severely impact coastal communities and island nations. There is an ongoing research (i) on accurate analysis of observed trends in tropical cyclone occurrences, and (ii) how tropical cyclone frequency and intensity may change in the future as a result of climate change. Reliable historical records of cyclone activity are vital for this research. The Pacific Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning (PACCSAP) program is dedicated to help Pacific Island countries and Timor Leste gain a better understanding of how climate change will impact their regions. One of the key PACCSAP projects is focused on developing a tropical cyclone archive, climatology and seasonal prediction for the regions. As part of the project, historical tropical cyclone best track data have been examined and prepared to be subsequently displayed through the enhanced tropical cyclone data portal for the Southern Hemisphere and the Western Pacific Ocean. Data from the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) Nadi, Fiji and Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres (TCWCs) in Brisbane, Darwin and Wellington for 1969-1970 to 2010-2011 tropical cyclone seasons have been carefully examined. Errors and inconsistencies which have been found during the quality control procedure have been corrected. To produce a consolidated data set for the South Pacific Ocean, best track data from these four centres have been used. Specifically, for 1969-1970 to 1994-1995 tropical cyclone seasons, data from TCWCs in Brisbane, Darwin and Wellington have been used. In 1995, RSMC Nadi, Fiji has been established with responsibilities for issuing tropical cyclone warnings and preparing best track data for the area south of the equator to 25°S, 160°E to 120°W. Consequently, data from RSMC Nadi have been used as a primary source for this area, starting from the 1995-1996 tropical cyclone season. These data have been combined with the data from

  1. An assessment of the role of the k-e vertical mixing scheme in the simulation of Southern Ocean upper dynamics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boodhraj, K

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the work done by Reffrey, Calone and Bourdalle-Badie (2015) we implemented a one dimensional (1D) ocean physical model in the sub-Antarctic Southern Ocean using the Nucleus for the European Modelling of the Ocean(NEMO) model. The 1D model...

  2. REE signatures in 3.51 Ga BIF and Bedded Chert from Iron Ore Group, Singhbhum Craton, India: Implications for Paleoarchean Ocean Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Ghosh, G.

    2013-12-01

    The metasedimentary rock records in Archaean greenmstone belts provide primary information on evolution of the early Earth. The bedded cherts and BIFs in particular have been studied from Paleo-Mesoarchean greenstone belts for understanding the nature of the oceanic circulation and for the record of early life. However, scarcity of low-strained Paleo-Mesoarchean successions is a major impediment in this regard. The southern Iron Ore Group (SIOG) (3506.8 × 2.3 Ma, U-Pb SHRIMP on zircon by Mukhopadhyay et al., 2008) of the Singhbhum Craton, eastern India includes low-grade bimodal volcanics-ultramafics and BIF -bearing greenstone succession. The bedded chert and BIFs in this succession show significant stratigraphic variation that suggests a stratified ocean and availability of dissolved oxygen in deep-water regime. Bedded chert occurs interleaved with either metabasics or with the silicic volcanics in the lower part of the succession. BIF occurs only towards the top of the succession conformably overlying the silicic volcanics. The bedded cherts with REE and other trace element compositions such as Cu, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf pointing towards contributions from terrigenous or silicic as well as mafic volcanic sources. In contrast BIFs with very low alumina content and superchondritic Y/Ho ratios (36.2 to 40.1) indicate negligible inputs from terrigenous source and is comparable to cherts from Cenozoic ridges. REE-compositions of the bedded chert with respect to PAAS show a flat pattern with feeble positive Eu-anomaly and negligible negative Ce-anomaly. The REE patterns in BIF though similar but show much stronger positive Eu-anomaly and negative Ce-anomaly in comparison. Stratigraphic trend in the geochemical proxies from bedded cherts to BIF, thus record a relative increase in positive Eu-anomaly and decrease in Ce-anomaly. The increase in Eu-anomaly coincident with the BIF deposition up section is likely to suggest increase in in hydrothermal input and ridge spreading

  3. A review of Tertiary climate changes in southern South America and the Antarctic Peninsula. Part 1: Oceanic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    Oceanic conditions around southern South America and the Antarctic Peninsula have a major influence on climate patterns in these subcontinents. During the Tertiary, changes in ocean water temperatures and currents also strongly affected the continental climates and seem to have been controlled in turn by global tectonic events and sea-level changes. During periods of accelerated sea-floor spreading, an increase in the mid-ocean ridge volumes and the outpouring of basaltic lavas caused a rise in sea-level and mean ocean temperature, accompanied by the large-scale release of CO2. The precursor of the South Equatorial Current would have crossed the East Pacific Rise twice before reaching the coast of southern South America, thus heating up considerably during periods of ridge activity. The absence of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current before the opening of the Drake Passage suggests that the current flowing north along the present western seaboard of southern South American could have been temperate even during periods of ridge inactivity, which might explain the generally warm temperatures recorded in the Southeast Pacific from the early Oligocene to middle Miocene. Along the east coast of southern South America, water temperatures also fluctuated between temperate-cool and warm until the early Miocene, when the first incursion of temperate-cold to cold Antarctic waters is recorded. The cold Falkland/Malvinas Current initiated only after the middle Miocene. After the opening of the Drake Passage, the South Equatorial Current would have joined the newly developed, cold Antarctic Circumpolar Current on its way to Southern South America. During periods of increased sea-floor spreading, it would have contributed heat to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current that caused a poleward shift in climatic belts. However, periods of decreased sea-floor spreading would have been accompanied by diminishing ridge volumes and older, cooler and denser oceanic plates, causing global sea

  4. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D Rogers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp., stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae, bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more

  5. The Discovery of New Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Communities in the Southern Ocean and Implications for Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alex D.; Tyler, Paul A.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Copley, Jon T.; James, Rachael; Larter, Robert D.; Linse, Katrin; Mills, Rachel A.; Garabato, Alfredo Naveira; Pancost, Richard D.; Pearce, David A.; Polunin, Nicholas V. C.; German, Christopher R.; Shank, Timothy; Boersch-Supan, Philipp H.; Alker, Belinda J.; Aquilina, Alfred; Bennett, Sarah A.; Clarke, Andrew; Dinley, Robert J. J.; Graham, Alastair G. C.; Green, Darryl R. H.; Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Hepburn, Laura; Hilario, Ana; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Marsh, Leigh; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Reid, William D. K.; Roterman, Christopher N.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Thatje, Sven; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp.), stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae), bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more complex than

  6. Ocean Fertilization and Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2008-12-01

    It has been suggested that ocean fertilization could help diminish ocean acidification. Here, we quantitatively evaluate this suggestion. Ocean fertilization is one of several ocean methods proposed to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The basic idea of this method is to enhance the biological uptake of atmospheric CO2 by stimulating net phytoplankton growth through the addition of iron to the surface ocean. Concern has been expressed that ocean fertilization may not be very effective at reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and may produce unintended environmental consequences. The rationale for thinking that ocean fertilization might help diminish ocean acidification is that dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in the near-surface equilibrate with the atmosphere in about a year. If ocean fertilization could reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations, it would also reduce surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations, and thus diminish the degree of ocean acidification. To evaluate this line of thinking, we use a global ocean carbon cycle model with a simple representation of marine biology and investigate the maximum potential effect of ocean fertilization on ocean carbonate chemistry. We find that the effect of ocean fertilization on ocean acidification depends, in part, on the context in which ocean fertilization is performed. With fixed emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere, ocean fertilization moderately mitigates changes in ocean carbonate chemistry near the ocean surface, but at the expense of further acidifying the deep ocean. Under the SRES A2 CO2 emission scenario, by year 2100 simulated atmospheric CO2, global mean surface pH, and saturation state of aragonite is 965 ppm, 7.74, and 1.55 for the scenario without fertilization and 833 ppm, 7.80, and 1.71 for the scenario with 100-year (between 2000 and 2100) continuous fertilization for the global ocean (For comparison, pre-industrial global mean surface pH and saturation state of

  7. Toxic diatoms and domoic acid in natural and iron enriched waters of the oceanic Pacific

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mary W. Silver; Sibel Bargu; Susan L. Coale; Claudia R. Benitez-Nelson; Ana C. Garcia; Kathryn J. Roberts; Emily Sekula-Wood; Kenneth W. Bruland; Kenneth H. Coale; M. M. Morel

    2010-01-01

    ...°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II...

  8. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boiteau, Rene M; Mende, Daniel R; Hawco, Nicholas J; McIlvin, Matthew R; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N; Saito, Mak A; Sedwick, Peter N; DeLong, Edward F; Repeta, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    .... The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity...

  9. Silicon pool dynamics and biogenic silica export in the Southern Ocean inferred from Si-isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon isotopic signatures (δ30Si of water column silicic acid (Si(OH4 were measured in the Southern Ocean, along a meridional transect from South Africa (Subtropical Zone down to 57° S (northern Weddell Gyre. This provides the first reported data of a summer transect across the whole Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC. δ30Si variations are large in the upper 1000 m, reflecting the effect of the silica pump superimposed upon meridional water transfer across the ACC: the transport of Antarctic surface waters northward by a net Ekman drift and their convergence and mixing with warmer upper-ocean Si-depleted waters to the north. Using Si isotopic signatures, we determine different mixing interfaces: the Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, and thermoclines in the low latitude areas. The residual silicic acid concentrations of end-members control the δ30Si alteration of the mixing products and with the exception of AASW, all mixing interfaces have a highly Si-depleted mixed layer end-member. These processes deplete the silicic acid AASW concentration northward, across the different interfaces, without significantly changing the AASW δ30Si composition. By comparing our new results with a previous study in the Australian sector we show that during the circumpolar transport of the ACC eastward, the δ30Si composition of the silicic acid pools is getting slightly, but significantly lighter from the Atlantic to the Australian sectors. This results either from the dissolution of biogenic silica in the deeper layers and/or from an isopycnal mixing with the deep water masses in the different oceanic basins: North Atlantic Deep Water in the Atlantic, and Indian Ocean deep water in the Indo-Australian sector. This isotopic trend is further transmitted to the subsurface waters, representing mixing interfaces between the surface and deeper layers.

  10. Against the flow: evidence of multiple recent invasions of warmer continental shelf waters by a Southern Ocean brittle star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chester John Sands

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Ocean is anomalously rich in benthos. This biodiversity is native, mostly endemic and perceived to be uniquely threatened from climate- and anthropogenically- mediated invasions. Major international scientific effort throughout the last decade has revealed more connectivity than expected between fauna north and south of the worlds strongest marine barrier – the Polar Front (the strongest jet of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. To date though, no research has demonstrated any radiations of marine taxa out from the Southern Ocean, except at abyssal depths (where conditions differ much less. Our phylogeographic investigation of one of the most ubiquitous and abundant clades at high southern latitudes, the ophiuroids (brittlestars, shows that one of them, Ophiura lymani, has gone against the flow. Remarkably our genetic data suggest that O. lymani has successfully invaded the South American shelf from Antarctica at least three times, in recent (Pleistocene radiation. Many previous studies have demonstrated links within clades across the PF this is the first in which northwards directional movement of a shelf-restricted species is the only convincing explanation. Rapid, recent, regional warming is likely to facilitate multiple range shift invasions into the Southern Ocean, whereas movement of cold adapted fauna (considered highly stenothermal out of the Antarctic to warmer shelves has, until now, seemed highly unlikely.

  11. Explanations for Temperature Increases in the Northern and Southern Atlantic Ocean are Proposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimorelli, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Primarily, consider some background hypotheses in the first paragraph: Three Types of mechanisms for Stellar Origin, Formation and Evolution are hypothesized. The first type (A) is well known; whereas, the other two (B&C) are new and proposed herein. The type A process, the presently universally accepted process, consists of the three phases of gravitation, followed by accretion, followed by fragmentation. In a Type B process, a star originates as an expanded, modified, category 3 Black Hole (BH) [1], with none or little help from gravitation/accretion, that begins to radiate, and continues to grow into a star. In a Type C process, a star would originate from a combination of the mechanisms described above for Type B and A. This mechanism, Type C, is perhaps the most common type. This type starts as an expanded, modified, category 3 BH inside of a gas and dust cloud. This then serves as the nucleus that starts the subsequent gravitation/accretion process; however, it greatly accelerates the accretion/formation process as in a standard Type A process. This mechanism could then explain how some super-cluster complexes, which have been estimated would take 40 to 60 billion years to form, can occur in a universe of a much younger age, i.e. 13.7 billion years. Also, consider that the ratio of the 'surface area to volume' is greater in a relatively smaller sphere; which would cause that smaller body of limited energy to cool off'/down, faster; however to continue to grow. A suggested sequence to explain why the Northern (South Greenland) and Southern Regions of the Atlantic Ocean are getting warmer is proposed: As the earth grows, two things occur, among others [1]. It is hypothesized the earth is expanding, circumferentially, about 3 cm per year at the equator (1 cm in the Atlantic, and 2 cm in the Pacific), rather than just 1 cm at the center of the Atlantic, as is commonly accepted. The earth may be expanding at an even greater rate, longitudinally (north and south

  12. The role of zooplankton in the pelagic-benthic coupling of the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid B. Schnack-Schiel

    2005-12-01

    depths resuspended aggregates and single particles from shallow environments may constitute a considerable fraction of the “fresh” biogenic flux. Submarine canyons accelerate and cause more efficient transfer of energy to the deep-sea benthos. Both faecal pellets and aggregation increase the original sinking velocity of individual particles and reduce their residence time in the water column, thus creating rich organic mats over the seabed in shallow environments. In the Southern Ocean these rapid organic matter transfers are important since they allow the accumulation of highly nutritive material, which may fuel the benthos during the dark months due to constant resuspension by tidal currents. Several factors control the particle fluxes in the Southern Ocean, such as size and composition of phytoplankton blooms, currents, seasonality, depth, and ice coverage. Due to this complexity, despite many efforts there is still a long way to go before the pathway of this ecologically important link can be fully understood and described. Our knowledge of the pelagic-benthic coupling in the Magellan region is still extremely limited and offers many opportunities for future scientific research. The same holds true for the production of meroplanktonic larvae in the Southern Ocean.

  13. Late summer distribution and stoichiometry of dissolved N, Si and P in the Southern Ocean near Heard and McDonald Islands on the Kerguelen Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Z.; Bowie, A. R.; Blain, S.; Holmes, T.; Rayner, M.; Sherrin, K.; Tonnard, M.; Trull, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Indian Ocean is a naturally iron-fertilised region surrounded by iron-limited, High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll waters. The Heard Earth Ocean Biosphere Interaction (HEOBI) project sampled waters south of the Polar Front in the vicinity of Heard and McDonald Islands (HIMI) in January and February 2016. Fe fertilised waters over the plateau generally exhibited high phytoplankton biomass and photosynthetic competency (as in previous studies and satellite observations), but interestingly, phytoplankton biomass was low near HIMI, though photosynthetic competency was high. In plateau waters away from HIMI, silicic acid (Si) concentrations were strongly depleted in surface waters, averaging 3 μM, while nitrate concentrations were close to 25 μM. Relative to the remnant winter water, this represents an average seasonal drawdown of 32 μM Si and only 8 μM nitrate. Though absolute drawdown was lower at an HNLC reference site south of Heard Island, the drawdown ratio was similarly high (∆Si: ∆N 4-5). The average N:P drawdown ratio was 12, typical for a diatom-dominated system (Weber and Deutsch 2010). N:P drawdown was positively correlated with Si drawdown, perhaps indicative of an impact of Fe on both seasonal Si drawdown and diatom N:P uptake (Price 2005). In the well-mixed, shallow waters (McDonald Islands, despite the apparent lack of nutrient drawdown or biomass accumulation. Mixed layers deeper than the euphotic zone are one mechanism that retains these remineralization signatures and near the islands, tidal mixing also contributes.

  14. The importance of oceanographic fronts to marine birds and mammals of the southern oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, C. A.; Cotté, C.; Bailleul, F.; Cherel, Y.; Charrassin, J. B.; Guinet, C.; Ainley, D. G.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2009-10-01

    During the last 30 years, at-sea studies of seabirds and marine mammals in the oceans south of the Subtropical Front have described an association with major frontal areas. More recently, the advancement in microtechnology has allowed the tracking of individuals and investigations into how these marine predators actually use the frontal zones. In this review, we examine 1) the relative importance to apex predators of the different frontal zones in terms of spatial distribution and carbon flux; 2) the processes that determine their preferential use; and 3) how the mesoscale dynamics of frontal structures drive at-sea foraging strategies of these predators. We review published results from southern waters and place them in a broader context with respect to what has been learned about the importance of fronts in oceans farther north. Some fronts constitute important boundaries for seabird communities in southern waters. At a mesoscale the maximum values of seabird diversity and abundance correspond to the location of the main fronts. At-sea surveys show a strong curvilinear correlation between seabird abundance and sea surface temperatures. High mean species richness and diversity for whales and seabirds are consistently associated with the southern water mass boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Subtropical Front and the Subantarctic Front; in the case of the Polar Front mean seabird densities are more variable. At small-scales, variation in seabird occurrence has been directly related to the processes at fronts in a limited number of cases. A significant positive relation was found between some plankton feeding species and frontal temperature gradient-phytoplankton variables. Telemetric studies have revealed that several apex predators (penguins, albatrosses, seals) perform long, directed foraging trips either to the Subtropical front or Polar Front, depending on locality. Seabirds with low flight costs, such as albatrosses, are able to reach fronts at

  15. Ecology and biogeochemistry in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during austral spring: the first JGOFS expedition aboard RV ` Polarstern'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathmann, U. V.

    1998-11-01

    Investigations of phytoplankton spring bloom development and its biogeochemical impacts in different water masses of the Atlantic sector of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current were carried out during RV ` Polarstern' cruise ANT X/6 as part of the international Southern Ocean JGOFS programme. The regions investigated were the Polar Front region, the southern branch of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (sACC) and the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), between 48°S and 60°S along the 6°W meridian from 29 September to 30 November 1992. This paper summarises the major findings of the cruise and complements the paper of Smetacek et al. [Smetacek, V., Bathmann, U.V., de Baar, H.J.W., Lochte K., Rutgers van der Loeff, M.M., 1997a. Ecology and biochemistry of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current during austral spring: results of the JGOFS expedition ANT X/6 aboard RV `Polarstern'. Deep-Sea Res. II, 44, 1-21; Smetacek, V., de Baar, H.J.W., Bathmann, U.V., Lochte, K., Rutgers van der Loeff, M.M. (Eds.), 1997b. Ecology and Biogeochemistry of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current During Austral Spring: Southern Ocean JGOFS Cruise ANT X/6 of R.V. ` Polarstern'. Deep-Sea Res. II, 44, 519 pp.]. In the surface waters of all regions a recycling community with low biomass but high turnover rates was present. This had little impact on large scale biogeochemical cycles. Superimposed on this community were diatom blooms formed by large species in the region of the Polar Front. It was these massive diatom blooms that caused biogeochemical export to the deep ocean. Physical stability of the upper water layers was recognized as the most important factor in determining initiation and development of these blooms. Their growth was favoured by relatively high natural iron availability. Intrinsic factors in diatom life cycle and reproduction may have triggered the demise of blooms accompanied by massive sedimentation events. Feeding by larger zooplankton in general appeared minimal, except for the occurrence

  16. Southern Hemisphere anticyclonic circulation drives oceanic and climatic conditions in late Holocene southernmost Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Annette; Schefuß, Enno; Andò, Sergio; Cawthra, Hayley C.; Frenzel, Peter; Kugel, Martin; Meschner, Stephanie; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Zabel, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Due to the high sensitivity of southern Africa to climate change, a reliable understanding of its hydrological system is crucial. Recent studies of the regional climatic system have revealed a highly complex interplay of forcing factors on precipitation regimes. This includes the influence of the tropical easterlies, the strength of the southern hemispheric westerlies as well as sea surface temperatures along the coast of the subcontinent. However, very few marine records have been available in order to study the coupling of marine and atmospheric circulation systems. Here we present results from a marine sediment core, recovered in shallow waters off the Gouritz River mouth on the south coast of South Africa. Core GeoB18308-1 allows a closer view of the last ˜ 4 kyr. Climate sensitive organic proxies, like the distribution and isotopic composition of plant-wax lipids as well as indicators for sea surface temperatures and soil input, give information on oceanographic and hydrologic changes during the recorded time period. Moreover, the micropaleontology, mineralogical and elemental composition of the sediments reflect the variability of the terrigenous input to the core site. The combination of down-core sediment signatures and a catchment-wide provenance study indicate that the Little Ice Age ( ˜ 300-650 cal yr BP) was characterized by climatic conditions favorable to torrential flood events. The Medieval Climate Anomaly ( ˜ 950-650 cal yr BP) is expressed by lower sea surface temperatures in the Mossel Bay area and humid conditions in the Gouritz River catchment. These new results suggest that the coincidence of humid conditions and cooler sea surface temperatures along the south coast of South Africa resulted from a strengthened and more southerly anticyclonic circulation. Most probably, the transport of moisture from the Indian Ocean by strong subtropical easterlies was coupled with Agulhas Bank upwelling pulses, which were initiated by an increase in

  17. Processes controlling the Si-isotopic composition in the Southern Ocean and application for paleoceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fripiat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Southern Ocean biogeochemical processes have an impact on global marin