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Sample records for southeast atlantic continental

  1. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  2. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  3. Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  4. 77 FR 69596 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Advisory Panel for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Southeast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC321 Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Advisory Panel for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review Workshops AGENCY... (AP) for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species (HMS) Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

  5. Neotectonism along the Atlantic passive continental margin: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas W.

    1989-09-01

    An extensive body of geologic data including the modern state of stress, historical seismicity, surface and subsurface stratigraphy, numerical models of crustal deformation, surficial geomorphic systems, and historical precise leveling and tidal gauge records constrain the style and rate of neotectonic deformation for the Appalachians and Atlantic passive continental margin. There are two major styles of neotectonism in the eastern United States. The northeastern United States is dominated by isostatic uplift and northward migration of peripheral bulge collapse in response to deglaciation. This locally rapid, but decreasing rate of deformation is superimposed upon slower, long-term deformation along the Atlantic margin. Most of the long-term, continental margin deformation is attributed to lithospheric flexuring in response to sediment loading in sedimentary basins (especially the Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough), isostatic deformation in response to continental denudation and water loading of the shelf, and stress from far-field plate tectonic sources. Significant deformational features include an uplift anomaly near Cape Fear, N.C.; northward and southward tilting of the Coastal Plain into the Salisbury and Southeast Georgia Embayments respectively; seaward tilting of the Coastal Plain/Piedmont, and a complex pattern of postglacial uplift and later subsidence in the northeast. Estimates of vertical crustal velocities for similar locations vary over several orders of magnitude. Measurement interval bias and systematic leveling errors may account for some of the discrepancies. Evidence for periodic deformation in the eastern United States in substantial and it is possible that historic data indicate a period of accelerated deformation along the Atlantic continental margin.

  6. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  7. 76 FR 65700 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Advisory Panel for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Southeast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA776 Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Advisory Panel for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review Workshops AGENCY... Migratory Species (HMS) Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR) Workshops (this AP is also called the...

  8. Reassessment of stable continental regions of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic seismic-hazard assessments of the central and eastern United States (CEUS) require estimates of the size of the largest possible earthquake (Mmax). In most of the CEUS, sparse historical seismicity does not provide a record of moderate and large earthquakes that is sufficient to constrain Mmax. One remedy for the insufficient catalog is to combine the catalog of moderate to large CEUS earthquakes with catalogs from other regions worldwide that are tectonically analogous to the CEUS (stable continental regions, or SCRs). After the North America SCR, the largest contribution of earthquakes to this global SCR catalog comes from a Southeast Asian SCR that extends from Indochina to southeasternmost Russia. Integration and interpretation of recently published geological and geophysical results show that most of these Southeast Asian earthquakes occurred in areas exposing abundant alkaline igneous rocks and extensional faults, both of Neogene age (last 23 million years). The implied Neogene extension precludes classification of the areas as SCR crust. The extension also reduces the number of moderate and large Southeast Asian historical earthquakes that are available to constrain CEUS Mmax by 86 percent, from 43 to six.

  9. 76 FR 47564 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of SEDAR... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA618 Fisheries of the South Atlantic; Southeast... Division, and Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Participants include data collectors and database...

  10. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  11. Spatiotemporal relationships between earthquakes of the mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Atlantic continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolarinwa, Oluwaseyi J.

    The seismicity of the mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) was compared in space and time with the seismicity along the Atlantic continental margins of Europe, Africa, North America, the Carribean and South America in a bid to appraise the level of influence of the ridge push force at the MAR on the Atlantic coastal seismicity. By analyzing the spatial and temporal patterns of many earthquakes (along with the patterns in their stress directions) in diverse places with similar tectonic settings, it is hoped that patterns that might be found indicate some of the average properties of the forces that are causing the earthquakes. The spatial analysis of the dataset set used shows that areas with higher seismic moment release along the north MAR spatially correlate with areas with relatively lower seismic moment release along the north Atlantic continental margins (ACM) and vice versa. This inverse spatial correlation observed between MAR seismicity and ACM seismicity might be due to the time (likely a long time) it takes stress changes from segments of the MAR currently experiencing high seismic activity to propagate to the associated passive margin areas presently experiencing relatively low seismic activity. Furthermore, the number of Atlantic basin and Atlantic coast earthquakes occurring away from the MAR is observed to be independent of the proximity of earthquake's epicenters from the MAR axis. The effect of local stress as noted by Wysession et al. (1995) might have contributed to the independence of Atlantic basin and Atlantic coast earthquake proximity from the MAR. The Latchman (2011) observation of strong earthquakes on a specific section of the MAR being followed by earthquakes on Trinidad and Tobago was tested on other areas of the MAR and ACM. It was found that that the temporal delay observed by Latchman does not exist for the seismicity along other areas along the MAR and ACM. Within the time window used for this study, it appears that seismicity is occurring

  12. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Couto Di Tullio

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m and slope (1500m off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S. The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the

  13. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  14. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Deep sea sedimentation processes and geomorphology: Northwest Atlantic continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David; Campbell, Calvin; Gardner, Jim; Chaytor, Jason; Piper, David; Rebesco, Michele

    2017-04-01

    Deep-sea sedimentation processes impart a fundamental control on the morphology of the western North Atlantic continental margin from Blake Spur to Hudson Strait. This fact is illustrated by the variable patterns of cross-margin gradients that are based on extensive new multibeam echo-sounder data informed by subbottom profiler and seismic reflection data. Erosion by off-shelf sediment transport in turbidity currents creates gullies, canyons and channels and a steep upper slope. Amalgamation of these conduits produces singular channels and turbidite fan complexes on the lower slope, flattening slope-profile gradients. The effect is an exponentially decaying "graded" slope profile. Comparatively, sediment mass failure produces steeper upper slopes due to head scarp development and a wedging architecture to the lower slope as deposits thin in the downslope direction. This process results in either a "stepped" slope, and/or a significant downslope gradient change where MTDs pinch out. Large drift deposits created by geostrophic currents are developed all along the margin. Blake Ridge, Sackville Spur, and Hamilton Spur are large detached drifts on disparate parts of the margin. They form a linear "above grade" profile along their crests from the shelf to abyssal plain. Deeper portions of the US continental margin are dominated by the Chesapeake Drift and Hatteras Outer Ridge; both plastered elongate mounded drifts. Farther north, particularly on the Grand Banks margin, are plastered and separated drifts. These drifts form "stepped" slope profiles, where they onlap the margin. Trough-mouth fan complexes become more common along the margin with increasing latitude. Sediment deposition and retention, particularly those dominated by glacigenic debris flows, characterize these segments producing an "above grade" slope profile. Understanding these geomorphological consequences of deep sea sedimentation processes is important to extended continental shelf mapping in which

  16. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... comments on the EA. The EA can be found online at http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from...

  17. Community structure of harpacticoid copepods from the southeast continental shelf of India

    OpenAIRE

    K.G.M.T. Ansari; P.S Lyla; S. Ajmal Khan, et al.

    2013-01-01

    The study is the first attempt aiming to assess the composition and number of harpacticoid copepods in the southeast continental shelf of India (Bay of Bengal). 39 putative species of copepods were identified belongings to 29 genera in 17 families. Copepod density registered gradual decrease with increase in depth and sediment was sandy to silty nature. Principal Component Analysis (PCA), clearly documents significant variability within the abiotic variables with total variation of 92.9%. Cop...

  18. Spatial Distribution of Reef Fish Species along the Southeast US Atlantic Coast Inferred from Underwater Video Survey Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan M Bacheler

    Full Text Available Marine fish abundance and distribution often varies across spatial scales for a variety of reasons, and this variability has significant ecological and management consequences. We quantified the distribution of reef-associated fish species along the southeast United States Atlantic coast using underwater video survey samples (N = 4,855 in 2011-2014 to elucidate variability within species across space, depths, and habitats, as well as describe broad-scale patterns in species richness. Thirty-two species were seen at least 10 times on video, and the most commonly observed species were red porgy (Pagrus pagrus; 41.4% of videos, gray triggerfish (Balistes capriscus; 31.0%, black sea bass (Centropristis striata; 29.1%, vermilion snapper (Rhomboplites aurorubens; 27.7%, and red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus; 22.6%. Using generalized additive models, we found that most species were non-randomly distributed across space, depths, and habitats. Most rare species were observed along the continental shelf break, except for goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara, which was found on the continental shelf in Florida and Georgia. We also observed higher numbers of species in shelf-break habitats from southern North Carolina to Georgia, and fewer in shallower water and at the northern and southern ends of the southeast United States Atlantic coast. Our study provides the first broad-scale description of the spatial distribution of reef fish in the region to be based on fishery-independent data, reinforces the utility of underwater video to survey reef fish, and can help improve the management of reef fish in the SEUS, for example, by improving indices of abundance.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams - Atlantic Region NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Official Protraction Diagram (OPD) outlines in ESRI shapefile format. Atlantic Region OPDs are approximately 2 degrees wide by one degree...

  20. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains OCS block outlines in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic areas within an...

  1. The meiofauna : macrofauna ratio across the continental slope of the Goban Spur (north-east Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, E.; Van Averbeke, J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Meio- and macrofauna density and biomass were estimated at the OMEX-transect across the continental slope of the Goban Spur at water depths ranging from 208 to 4460 m in the north-east Atlantic. A linear increase in the ratio between meio- and macrofauna densities with increasing water depth was

  2. 76 FR 7226 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore NJ, DE, MD, and VA AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy... Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable energy initiative to accelerate responsible...

  3. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia AGENCY: Bureau...: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from-the-Start/Index.aspx . Authority: This NOA of... of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable energy initiative to...

  4. Early diagenesis of amino acids in NE Atlantic continental margin sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grutters, M.M.C.H.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis concentrates on early diagenesis of amino acids in sediments across the NE Atlantic continental slope. Early diagenesis comprises the degradation and transformation processes that take place during transport of amino acids through the water column and the early stages of burial in the

  5. Atlantic Offshore Seabird Dataset Catalog, Atlantic Coast and Outer Continental Shelf, from 1938-01-01 to 2013-12-31 (NODC Accession 0115356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several bureaus within the Department of Interior compiled available information from seabird observation datasets from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf into a...

  6. Oceanographic Time Series Data: Northeast Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series oceanographic data for the Northeast Atlantic outer continental shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or...

  7. Surface Drift in the South-East Atlantic Ocean | Wedepohl | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface drift in the South-East Atlantic Ocean is described using historical shipdrift data. The Benguela Current has a width of 200 km in the south and 750 km in the north. The mean speeds of the current vary from <11 cm.s-1 to a maximum of 23 cm.s-1. The highest current speeds occur during summer in the southern ...

  8. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1978-03-01

    The objectives of the project were to determine the physical/dynamical processes controlling/affecting the distribution of phytoplankton nutrients on the continental shelf in the South Atlantic Bight. The initial objectives were to determine the short term, i.e., 2 to 10 day and longer term flux of nutrients onto the continental shelf. This is clearly related to the more general problem of combined physical and biogenic control of phytoplankton nutrients. During the period from June, 1975 to March, 1978 the study of the continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight has been principally involved with a substantial, coordinated field effort. The success of the data acquisition phase of the program has now required an intensive data analysis phase which has been slowly increasing in effort. Emphasis is placed on the main phase of the field program, located in Onslow Bay, which has beel completed and the data are being analyzed. During the three-year period 20 cruises were made into the Carolina Capes area and samples were collected. A list is included of some 100 publications during the period.

  9. 75 FR 1753 - Fisheries of the Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Atlantic croaker and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Southeast Region. The SEDAR 20 Review Workshop will be an independent peer review of the products from... population conditions, and recommend research and monitoring needs. The product of the Review Workshop is a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  10. Freshwater diatom influx in intertropical Atlantic: Relationships with continental records from Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasse, Françoise; Stabell, Bjørg; Fourtanier, Elizabeth; van Iperen, Yolanda

    1989-09-01

    Diatom assemblages from modern West African rivers and from lacustrine sediments subjected to deflation represent the present-day sources of continental diatoms to the sea. Diatom productivity in large rivers is high, especially for the genus Melosira. Windblown diatoms derive mainly from the central and northern Sahara (summer dust plume) where saline chloride-water assemblages are widespread, or from the southern edge of the Sahara (winter dust plume) where Melosira-rich assemblages of dilute water predominate. Freshwater diatom peaks in Atlantic cores may reflect (1) phases of increased river influx, correlated with humid episodes on the continent or (2) phases of enhanced deflation and wind transport during arid episodes (the single hypothesis for fine sediments from mid-ocean sites). Genus Melosira dominates the freshwater assemblages of many modern and fossil marine samples, whatever the transport agent is. Therefore, it is not an accurate paleoclimate indicator by itself, but associated taxa may provide information on the environmental and geographical origin of the displaced diatoms. This tentative approach shows that freshwater diatoms in Atlantic cores may be a good tool for reconstructing paleoclimates and for establishing continent-ocean correlations if species analyses are made and if the continental distribution of the taxa encountered is considered.

  11. Continental margin radiography from a potential field and sediment thickness standpoint: the Iberian Atlantic Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalan, M.; Martos, Y. M.; Martin-Davila, J.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Carbo, A.; Druet, M.

    2015-07-01

    This study reviews the state of knowledge in the Iberian Atlantic margin. In order to do this, the margin has been divided into three provinces: the Galicia margin, the southern Iberian abyssal plain, and the Tagus abyssal plain. We have used potential field and sediment thickness data. This has allowed us to study the crust, setting limits for the continental crust domain, and the amplitude of the so-called ocean-continent transition, whose end marks the beginning of the oceanic crust. The study shows the continental crust in the Galician margin to be the widest, about 210 km in length, whilst the ocean-continent transition varies slightly in this province: between 65 km wide in the south and 56 km wide in the north. This result shows up some differences with the hypothesis of other authors. The situation in the southern Iberian abyssal plain is nearly the opposite. Its continental crust extends approximately 60 km, whilst the ocean-continent transition zone is 185 km long. The Tagus abyssal plain study shows a faster morphological evolution than the others, according with the amount of crustal thinning β, the ocean-continent transition domain spanning 100 km. These results support a transitional intermediate character for almost the whole Tagus plain, in contrary to what other authors have stated. (Author)

  12. The NSW Steam Trawl Fishery on the South-East Continental Shelf of Australia, 1915–1961

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Jacobsen, A. Lif

    2014-01-01

    that flathead biomass on the South-East Continental shelf was permanently reduced. The study furthermore reveals how the trawl industry was influenced by government policy, market conditions, war and fishing effort with little understanding of the marine resources which they relied on....... to 1961 is unfolded. This reveals that government initiatives played a surprisingly decisive role in founding and sustaining the industry. Also that early signs of depletion of stocks and overfishing happened within the first decade of the fishery and, in the case of flathead, overfishing was so severe...

  13. On the Influence of the Pacific and Atlantic Meridional Modes on Precipitation over the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Villarini, G.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific Meridional Mode (PMM) and the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) are the first Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) modes of sea surface temperature (SST) and surface wind fields in the Pacific and North Atlantic. PMM and AMM strongly modulate tropical cyclone activity in the western North Pacific and the North Atlantic, respectively. However, little is known about the role that PMM and AMM play in controlling precipitation across the continental United States. This study examines the impacts of PMM and AMM in terms of total and extreme precipitation. Analyses will be performed at the seasonal scale over the 1948-2015 period. The physical mechanisms responsible for such influences will also be presented.

  14. 78 FR 44150 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Final Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... Proposed Sale Notice (PSN) for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

  15. Evolutionary history of continental southeast Asians: "early train" hypothesis based on genetic analysis of mitochondrial and autosomal DNA data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinam, Timothy A; Hong, Lih-Chun; Phipps, Maude E; Stoneking, Mark; Ameen, Mahmood; Edo, Juli; Saitou, Naruya

    2012-11-01

    The population history of the indigenous populations in island Southeast Asia is generally accepted to have been shaped by two major migrations: the ancient "Out of Africa" migration ∼50,000 years before present (YBP) and the relatively recent "Out of Taiwan" expansion of Austronesian agriculturalists approximately 5,000 YBP. The Negritos are believed to have originated from the ancient migration, whereas the majority of island Southeast Asians are associated with the Austronesian expansion. We determined 86 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) complete genome sequences in four indigenous Malaysian populations, together with a reanalysis of published autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data of Southeast Asians to test the plausibility and impact of those migration models. The three Austronesian groups (Bidayuh, Selatar, and Temuan) showed high frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups, which originated from the Asian mainland ∼30,000-10,000 YBP, but low frequencies of "Out of Taiwan" markers. Principal component analysis and phylogenetic analysis using autosomal SNP data indicate a dichotomy between continental and island Austronesian groups. We argue that both the mtDNA and autosomal data suggest an "Early Train" migration originating from Indochina or South China around the late-Pleistocene to early-Holocene period, which predates, but may not necessarily exclude, the Austronesian expansion.

  16. Ocean-Continent Transition Structure of the Pelotas Magma-Rich Continental Margin, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Caroline; Kusznir, Nick; Roberts, Alan; Manatschal, Gianreto; McDermott, Ken

    2017-04-01

    Rifted continental margins in the southern South Atlantic are magma-rich showing well developed volcanic extrusives known as seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). Here we examine the magma-rich continental rifted margin of the Pelotas Basin, offshore Brazil. Deep seismic reflection data displays a large package of seaward dipping reflectors with an approximate width of 200 km and a varying thickness of 10 km to 17 km that have previously been interpreted as volcanic SDRs. We examine these SDRs to explore if they are composed predominantly of basaltic or sedimentary-volcaniclastic material. We also study the thickness of the crustal basement beneath the SDRs. Additionally we investigate if these SDRs are underlain by thin 'hyper-extended' continental crust or if they have been deposited on new magmatic basement. The answers to these questions are important in understanding the structure and formation processes of magma-rich continental margins. We use gravity inversion to investigate SDR composition by varying the proportion of basalt to sediments-volcaniclastics (basalt fraction) which determines the SDR densities in the gravity inversion. By matching the Moho depth and two-way travel time from gravity inversion and deep seismic reflection data, we determine the lateral variation in basalt fraction of the SDRs. Our analysis suggests: 1) There is an overall pattern of SDR basalt fraction and bulk density decreasing oceanward. This could be due to increasing sediment content oceanward or it could result from the change in basalt flows to hyaloclastites as water depth increases. 2) The SDR package can be split into two distinct sub packages based on the basalt fraction results, where the proximal side of each package has a higher basalt fraction and density. 3) The inner SDR package contains reflectors that bear a resemblance to the SDRs described by Hinz (1981) corresponding to syn-tectonic volcanic eruptions into an extensional basin, while the outer SDR package has

  17. Crustal structure of the Southeast Georgia embayment-Carolina trough: Preliminary results of a composite seismic image of a continental suture ( ) and a volcanic passive margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, J.A. Jr.; Stoffa, P.L.; Phillips, J.D. (Univ. of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Austin (USA)); Oh, Jinyong (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA)); Sawyer, D.S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA)); Purdy, G.M.; Reiter, E. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA)); Makris, J. (Universitaet Hamburg, Bundesstrasse, Hamburg (West Germany))

    1990-10-01

    New deep-penetration multichannel seismic reflection data, combined with refraction results and magnetics modeling, support a hypothesis that the Carolina trough is a Mesozoic volcanic passive margin exhibiting a seaward-dipping wedge and associated underplating. The structure of Carolina platform continental crust is consistent with the late Paleozoic continental collision that produced the Appalachians, but imbrication has had no obvious effect on shallower structures produced by Mesozoic extension and volcanism. The origin of prominent magnetic anomalies crossing the Southeast Georgia embayment can be explained by processes attending Mesozoic separation of Africa and North America, and is not related to a Paleozoic continental suture, as previously postulated.

  18. Algal Species and other data collected from photographs in Southeast Atlantic Ocean from 11 June 1991 to 22 March 1993 (NODC Accession 9300196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Algal species and other data were collected using photographs from swimmers/divers in Southeast Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 11 June 1991 to 22 March...

  19. Lithospheric thickness jumps at the S-Atlantic continental margins from satellite gravity data and modelled isostatic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Meysam; Schmeling, Harro; Haas, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Isostatic equilibrium is a good approximation for passive continental margins. In these regions, geoid anomalies are proportional to the local dipole moment of density-depth distributions, which can be used to constrain the amount of oceanic to continental lithospheric thickening (lithospheric jumps). We consider a five- or three-layer 1D model for the oceanic and continental lithosphere, respectively, composed of water, a sediment layer (both for the oceanic case), the crust, the mantle lithosphere and the asthenosphere. The mantle lithosphere is defined by a mantle density, which is a function of temperature and composition, due to melt depletion. In addition, a depth-dependent sediment density associated with compaction and ocean floor variation is adopted. We analyzed satellite derived geoid data and, after filtering, extracted typical averaged profiles across the Western and Eastern passive margins of the South Atlantic. They show geoid jumps of 8.1 m and 7.0 m for the Argentinian and African sides, respectively. Together with topography data and an averaged crustal density at the conjugate margins these jumps are interpreted as isostatic geoid anomalies and yield best-fitting crustal and lithospheric thicknesses. In a grid search approach five parameters are systematically varied, namely the thicknesses of the sediment layer, the oceanic and continental crusts and the oceanic and the continental mantle lithosphere. The set of successful models reveals a clear asymmetry between the South Africa and Argentine lithospheres by 15 km. Preferred models predict a sediment layer at the Argentine margin of 3-6 km and at the South Africa margin of 1-2.5 km. Moreover, we derived a linear relationship between, oceanic lithosphere, sediment thickness and lithospheric jumps at the South Atlantic margins. It suggests that the continental lithospheres on the western and eastern South Atlantic are thicker by 45-70 and 60-80 km than the oceanic lithospheres, respectively.

  20. Opening of the central Atlantic Ocean: Implications for geometric rifting and asymmetric initial seafloor spreading after continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biari, Y.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Sahabi, M.; Funck, T.; Benabdellouahed, M.; Schnabel, M.; Reichert, C.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Bronner, A.; Austin, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    Study of the deep structure of conjugate passive continental margins combined with detailed plate kinematic reconstructions can provide constraints on the mechanisms of rifting and formation of initial oceanic crust. In this study the central Atlantic conjugate margins are compared based on compilation of wide-angle seismic profiles from NW Africa Nova Scotian and U.S. passive margins. The patterns of volcanism, crustal thickness, geometry, and seismic velocities in the transition zone suggest symmetric rifting followed by asymmetric oceanic crustal accretion. Conjugate profiles in the southern central Atlantic image differences in the continental crustal thickness. While profiles on the eastern U.S. margin are characterized by thick layers of magmatic underplating, no such underplate was imaged along the African continental margin. In the north, two wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in exactly conjugate positions show that the crustal geometry of the unthinned continental crust and the necking zone are nearly symmetric. A region including seismic velocities too high to be explained by either continental or oceanic crust is imaged along the Canadian side, corresponding on the African side to an oceanic crust with slightly elevated velocities. These might result from asymmetric spreading creating seafloor by faulting the existing lithosphere on the Canadian side and the emplacement of magmatic oceanic crust including pockets of serpentinite on the Moroccan margin. After isochron M25, a large-scale plate reorganization might then have led to an increase in spreading velocity and the production of thin magmatic crust on both sides.

  1. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  2. The role of deep-water sedimentary processes in shaping a continental margin: The Northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David C.; Campbell, D.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Piper, D.J.W.; Chaytor, Jason; Rebesco, M.

    2017-01-01

    The tectonic history of a margin dictates its general shape; however, its geomorphology is generally transformed by deep-sea sedimentary processes. The objective of this study is to show the influences of turbidity currents, contour currents and sediment mass failures on the geomorphology of the deep-water northwestern Atlantic margin (NWAM) between Blake Ridge and Hudson Trough, spanning about 32° of latitude and the shelf edge to the abyssal plain. This assessment is based on new multibeam echosounder data, global bathymetric models and sub-surface geophysical information.The deep-water NWAM is divided into four broad geomorphologic classifications based on their bathymetric shape: graded, above-grade, stepped and out-of-grade. These shapes were created as a function of the balance between sediment accumulation and removal that in turn were related to sedimentary processes and slope-accommodation. This descriptive method of classifying continental margins, while being non-interpretative, is more informative than the conventional continental shelf, slope and rise classification, and better facilitates interpretation concerning dominant sedimentary processes.Areas of the margin dominated by turbidity currents and slope by-pass developed graded slopes. If sediments did not by-pass the slope due to accommodation then an above grade or stepped slope resulted. Geostrophic currents created sedimentary bodies of a variety of forms and positions along the NWAM. Detached drifts form linear, above-grade slopes along their crests from the shelf edge to the deep basin. Plastered drifts formed stepped slope profiles. Sediment mass failure has had a variety of consequences on the margin morphology; large mass-failures created out-of-grade profiles, whereas smaller mass failures tended to remain on the slope and formed above-grade profiles at trough-mouth fans, or nearly graded profiles, such as offshore Cape Fear.

  3. Relationship between radionuclides and sedimentological variables in the South Atlantic Continental Margin; Relacoes entre radionuclideos e variaveis sedimentologicas na Margem Continental do Atlantico Sul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Figueira, Rubens C.L., E-mail: paulo.alves.ferreira@usp.br, E-mail: rfigueira@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IO/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanografico

    2015-07-01

    There is a lack of information regarding marine radioactivity in sediments of the Continental Margin of the South Atlantic. {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K radioactivity and sedimentological variables were determined in superficial sediment samples. It was demonstrated that {sup 40}K is a good indicator for sediment granulometry, whilst {sup 137}Cs presents a good correlation with its chemical composition. Moreover, it was identified through the radiometric data the occurrence of input of allochtonous matter to the Brazilian southernmost compartment from the Rio de La Plata estuary, as previously reported in the literature. (author)

  4. Changing surface water conditions for the last 500ka in the Southeast Atlantic: Implications for variable influences of Agulhas leakage and Benguela upwelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrick, B.F.; McClymont, E.L.; Marret, F.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important component of global ocean circulation, as itincludes heat and salt transfer into the Atlantic through the Agulhas leakage as well as the highly productiveBenguela upwelling system. Here we reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from Ocean Drilling

  5. Cretaceous source rock characterization of the Atlantic Continental margin of Morocco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabour, H. (ONAREP, Rabat (Morocco))

    1993-02-01

    Characterization of the petroleum potential for the Atlantic margin of Morocco has been based primarily on limited, antiently acquired organic geochemical data. These indicate the area of drilling behind the paleoshelf edge to be only fair in organic carbon and C15+ extract values with predominantly terrestrial kerogen types. Recently acquired geochemical data obtained from relatively recent drilling both behind and beyond the paleoshelf edge indicate 4 depositional facies containing hydrogen rich amorphous kerogen assemblages. These are: (1) Lower to Mid Jurassic inner shelf facies probably deposited in algal rich lagoon-like, (2) Lower Cretaceous non marine coaly facies probably deposited in algal rich swamplike environments, (3) Middle Cretaceous facies characterized by restrited anoxic environment with sediments rich in marine kerogen types deposited under sluggish wather circulation, (4) Upper Cretaceous to Tertiary outer-shelf to Upper slope facies probably deposited under algal-rich upwelling systems. Of these, the Cretaceous facies is the most widespread and represents the best source rock potential characteristics. Correlation of these facies to recently acquired good quality seismic packages allows for extrapolation of probable organic facies distribution throughout the continental margin. This should enhance the hydrocarbon potential of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments both landward and seaward of the paleoshelf edge and thus permits refinement of strategies for hydrocarbon exploration in the area.

  6. Post-rift unroofing of the NW Africa passive continental margin during the Central Atlantic opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Many passive margins considered as being stable for long times, show however late uplift and exhumation at regional scale as assessed by low temperature geochronometry. A large amount of Lower Cretaceous terrigeneous sediments laid down in most of basins along the NW Africa continental margins indicate that a major episode of erosion occurred during early post-rift period in the Central Atlantic. AFT and (U-Th)/He dating performed, along a roughly >500 km N-S transect, on pre-Mesozoic basement rocks from Western Meseta to the Anti-Atlas (Morocco, NW Africa) document a fully unexpected widespread unroofing during the Middle-Late Jurassic to early Late Cretaceous, with AFT and (U-Th)/He ages ranging respectively between 120-170Ma and 115-165Ma. A well documented age cluster of 140±20Ma measured for the Moroccan Meseta, Atlas domains and Anti-Atlas belt designates those domains as potentially being the source areas of the detritic sediments considering the proximity of the depositional basins. Absence of major fault separating the Anti-Atlas from the rest of the Western African Craton during the Mesozoic suggests the unroofing region to extend further in Morocco, as far south as the Reguibat (Mauritania) or even New Guinea, documented by our investigation, and perhaps even further when confirmed by additional AFT and AHe data.

  7. Exploring the Elevated Water Vapor Signal Associated with Biomass Burning Aerosol over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Kristina; Redemann, Jens; Wood, Rob; Zuidema, Paquita; Flynn, Connor; LeBlanc, Samuel; Noone, David; Podolske, James; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Shinozuka, Yohei; hide

    2017-01-01

    The quantification of radiative forcing due to the cumulative effects of aerosols, both directly and on cloud properties, remains the biggest source of uncertainty in our understanding of the physical climate. How the magnitude of these effects may be modified by meteorological conditions is an important aspect of this question. The Southeast Atlantic Ocean (SEA), with seasonal biomass burning (BB) smoke plumes overlying a persistent stratocumulus cloud deck, offers a perfect natural observatory in which to study the complexities of aerosol-cloud interactions. The NASA ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS) campaign consists of three field deployments over three years (2016-2018) with the goal of gaining a better understanding of the complex processes (direct and indirect) by which BB aerosols affect clouds. We present results from the first ORACLES field deployment, which took place in September 2016 out of Walvis Bay, Namibia. Two NASA aircraft were flown with a suite of aerosol, cloud, radiation, and meteorological instruments for remote-sensing and in-situ observations. A strong correlation was observed between the aircraft-measured pollution indicators (carbon monoxide and aerosol properties) and atmospheric water vapor content, at all altitudes. Atmospheric reanalysis indicates that convective dynamics over the continent, near likely contribute to this elevated signal. Understanding the mechanisms by which water vapor covaries with plume strength is important to quantifying the magnitude of the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects in the region.

  8. On the Influence of Air Mass History on Low Cloud Properties in the Southeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, J.; Cermak, J.; Andersen, H.; Schwarz, K.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the impacts of air mass histories on cloud properties in the Southeast Atlantic (SEA) during the biomass burning season using geostationary satellite and reanalysis data. The understanding of clouds and their determinants at the process level is an important aspect of climate system research and estimates of the Earth's radiation budget. In this study cloud properties are observed not only as the result of local environmental conditions but as affected by external dynamics and spatial origins of air masses entering the study area.In order to clarify to what extent cloud properties are impacted by synoptical conditions of contrasting air masses, case studies are conducted using the temporally highly resolved SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) satellite, MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and ERA-Interim reanalysis products. The representativity of the case studies is tested within a cluster analysis of air mass trajectories during september 2004 to 2011 using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT). Results show that advected air masses of long distances are connected to marine cold air outbreaks leading to rapid changes of cloud properties in the otherwise thermodynamically stable SEA. Air mass history is found to be a relevant, but often overlooked determinant of cloud properties.Including information on air mass history in analyses leads to a better understanding of the physical processes behind observed cloud properties and promotes a more dynamical perspective on experimental and theoretical settings of aerosol-cloud interactions.

  9. Antarctic krill swarm characteristics in the Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Krafft, BA

    2012-09-28

    Knowledge about swarm dynamics and underlying causes is essential to understand the ecology and distribution of Antarctic krill Euphausia superba. We collected acoustic data and key environmental data continuously across extensive gradients in the little-studied Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. A total of 4791 krill swarms with swarm descriptors including swarm height and length, packing density, swimming depth and inter-swarm distance were extracted. Through multivariate statistics, swarms were categorized into 4 groups. Group 2 swarms were largest (median length 108 m and thickness 18 m), whereas swarms in both Groups 1 and 4 were on average small, but differed markedly in depth distribution (median: 52 m for Group 1 vs. 133 m for Group 4). There was a strong spatial autocorrelation in the occurrence of swarms, and an autologistic regression model found no prediction of swarm occurrence from environmental variables for any of the Groups 1, 2 or 4. Probability of occurrence of Group 3 swarms, however, increased with increasing depth and temperature. Group 3 was the most distinctive swarm group with an order of magnitude higher packing density (median: 226 ind. m−3) than swarms from any of the other groups and about twice the distance to nearest neighbor swarm (median: 493 m). The majority of the krill were present in Group 3 swarms, and the absence of association with hydrographic or topographic concentrating mechanisms strongly suggests that these swarms aggregate through their own locomotion, possibly associated with migration.

  10. An Overview of Aerosol Absorption Above Clouds over the Southeast Atlantic Ocean from Passive Satellite Imagery during September 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.

    2016-12-01

    The southeast Atlantic Ocean is key region to study the interactions of aerosols, clouds, and radiation. The ocean west of Africa is an upwelling region with low sea surface temperatures, which encourages the formation of stratocumulus clouds. During the dry monsoon season, biomass burning on the African continent, the largest consumption of biomass by fire in the world, produces huge amounts of smoke extending into the free troposphere. When this smoke is transported over the southeast Atlantic Ocean by favorable winds, it creates a natural laboratory to study the interaction of absorbing biomass burning aerosols, clouds and radiation. Smoke aerosols can have a strong local warming effect by absorbing shortwave radiation in constract to the global cooling effect of aerosols. However, this direct radiative effect is strongly dependent on the brightness of the underlying background, and changes from strong negative (cooling) over dark surfaces (ocean) to strong postive (warming) over clouds. This makes the instanteneous direct radiative effect (DRE) a highly senstive diagnostic for climate models, which do not reproduce the high values found in observations, and disagree on magnitude and even sign of the DRE. During September 2016, an international consortium of institutes have studied the southeast Atlantic using a combination of ground-based, air-borne and space-borne instruments, to improve our understanding of aerosol, clouds and radiation interactions. We present a satellite view of the smoke dispersion during the campaigns over the south Atlantic basin and Africa, and the direct effect of the smoke over clouds. Several techniques have been developed in past, which will be applied to passive satellite instruments like OMI and MODIS. These observations will provide an overview of the meteorological characteristics during the campaigns and a validation tool for the various in-situ and remote sensing observations obtained during the experiments.

  11. 13000 cal years upwelling variation in southwestern Atlantic (Brazil): continental paleoclima implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ana Luiza ALBUQUERQUE(1); Bruno TURCq(2); Abdel SIFEDDINE(1,2). (1) Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brazil. (2) LOCEAN, IRD/UPMC/CNRS/MNHN, Bondy, France. The Cabo Frio region as indicated by its name is a place of low SST due to a local upwelling triggered by the Northeast trade winds, the northward flow of cool South Atlantic Central Water and vortex of the Brazilian current in the upper warm Tropical Water. Paleoceanographic conditions during the last 13000 years have been reconstructed based on two cores collected on the outer shelf. The studied proxies included mineral and heavy metal quantification, bulk organic matter characteristics and planktonic foraminifera. A first phase of sedimentation between 13000 and 7000 cal BP is characterized by high mineral content probably due to the lower sea level. SST reconstruction indicate cool and highly variable temperatures that were probably not related to upwelling events made difficult by the low sea level but to lower regional SSTs. This is in good agreement with observations of continental climate dryer in southwest Brazil with intense events of precipitation. A second phase between 7000 and 3000 cal BP shows higher SST indicating few occurrences of upwelling. Its may be due to the decrease of South Atlantic Convergence Zone (ZCAS) intensity linked to the lower summer insolation and the reduced monsoonal flux at that time. On the adjacent continent the decrease monsoon is evidenced by low lake levels and poorly developed forests. The third and last phase, post 3000 cal BP, is characterized by the onset of upwelling events that may be related to an intensification of the South American Monsoon and of the ZCAS activity leading to an increase of Northeast winds during summer which is typically the upwelling season. On the continent this period was marked by forest development. The transition at 3000 yrs BP is very late compared to other Holocene Record. Paleoclimate model

  12. Initial Results From SABSOON: A Coastal Ocean Observatory on the South Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. R.; Seim, H. E.

    2002-12-01

    The coastal ocean observing system for the South Atlantic Bight off the SE U.S. is in an early stage of development. However, the existing time series of meteorological and oceanographic observations illustrate the potential multidisciplinary applications of these data. Here, we will first review the existing observing system assets for the region in terms of spatial distributions and the parameters measured, then provide examples of results from the South Atlantic Bight Synoptic Offshore Observational Network (SABSOON), a dataset that strongly complements physical and biogeochemical studies in the region. Among the physical studies has been an examination of a thirteen-month record of vertically resolved currents (35 m depth) for variations in tidal flow. A harmonic analysis was carried out on each month. Subsequent study focused on variability in the largest semi-diurnal constituent. Stratification is found to cause significant shifts in vertical shear, ellipticity, tidal phase and ellipse orientation. Estimates of bed stress and roughness length also vary in time and suggest that surface gravity waves are modulating the properties of the benthic boundary layer and impacting tidal current speed. A linearized, one-dimensional momentum balance was used to estimate the eddy viscosity necessary to explain the vertical current structure. Vertical structure of the eddy viscosity was also found to vary with stratification and maximum values range from 0.01 to 0.05 m2/s. Comparison of the observations during unstratified conditions with a one-dimensional model that includes a turbulence closure scheme confirms observational estimates of a roughness length of 2-10 cm, consistent with a strong influence of the surface gravity wave field on the benthic boundary layer. Such physical studies have important implications for studies of the continental shelf biogeochemistry. Along with physical data, bio-optical measurements from SABSOON and ocean color satellite imagery

  13. Paleogeographic constraints on continental-scale source-to-sink systems: Northern South America and its Atlantic margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajolet, Flora; Chardon, Dominique; Rouby, Delphine; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Roig, Jean-Yves; Loparev, Artiom; Coueffe, Renaud

    2017-04-01

    Our work aims at setting the evolving boundary conditions of erosion and sediments transfer, transit, and onshore-offshore accumulations on northern South America and along its Atlantic margins. Since the Early Mesozoic, the source-to-sink system evolved under the interplay of four main processes, which are (i) volcanism and arc building along the proto-Andes, (ii) long-term dynamics of the Amazon incratonic basin, (iii) rifting, relaxation and rejuvenation of the Atlantic margins and (iv) building of the Andes. We compiled information available from geological maps and the literature regarding tectonics, plate kinematics, magmatism, stratigraphy, sedimentology (including paleoenvironments and currents) and thermochronology to produce a series of paleogeographic maps showing the tectonic and kinematic framework of continental areas under erosion (sources), by-pass and accumulation (sinks) over the Amazonian craton, its adjacent regions and along its Atlantic margins. The maps also allow assessing the relative impact of (i) ongoing Pacific subduction, (ii) Atlantic rifting and its aftermath, and (iii) Atlantic slab retreat from under the Caribbean domain on the distribution and activity of onshore/offshore sedimentary basins. Stratigraphic and thermochronology data are also used to assess denudation / vertical motions due to sediment transfers and lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. This study ultimately aims at linking the sediment routing system to long-wavelength deformation of northern South America under the influence of mountain building, intracratonic geodynamics, divergent margin systems and mantle dynamics.

  14. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Natural Gas Wells - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains surface locations for oil and gas wells located in the Atlantic federal waters. All wells in the Atlantic Region were completed and abandoned...

  15. Assessment of submarine landslides hazard through geotechnical and rheological analysis of sediments on the French Atlantic continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toucanne, S.; Howlett, S.; Garziglia, S.; Silva Jacinto, R.; Courgeon, S.; Sabine, M.; Riboulot, V.; Marsset, B.

    2016-12-01

    In the aftermath of the devastating tsunami on the Japanese coast in 2011, a French multi-partnership project called TANDEM has been launched to assess the impact of tsunamis generated or propagated in the vicinity of French Channel and Atlantic coastlines. Tsunami are usually generated by earthquakes, but can also be triggered by submarine landslides. This study focuses on submarine landslides along the French Atlantic continental slope using data that were mainly collected in August 2015 during the GITAN cruise (R/V Pourquoi Pas?). Following geomorphological, geophysical and sedimentological analysis of the Bay of Biscay, efforts were oriented towards the determination of the sediment properties controlling landslide dynamics from in situ and laboratory measurements. Preliminary results show over 700 landslide scars on the French Atlantic continental slope, with most of them occurring between 400 and 1000m water depth and in canyon environments. The Plio-Quaternary sediments draping the majority of the Bay of Biscay are generally normally consolidated and composed of high plasticity clays. They show similar geomechanical properties throughout the area studied, with linear evolutions with depth and good reproducibility for rheological parameters such as Storage and Loss modulus. These similarities allow to extend geotechnical and rheological models to a regional scale in the Bay of Biscay. Our multi-disciplinary approach will provide the tools to assess continental slope failures and submarine landslides generation. Finally, we will aim to qualify and quantify the volumes and flow properties of sediment transported obtained through slope-stability modeling on SAMU-3D and rheology modelling on Nixes-SPH. These results will provide the TANDEM actors with the information necessary to simulate tsunami wave generation.

  16. Thermal history and evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin in northern Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Daniel; Karl, Markus; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2013-04-01

    From Permo-Carboniferous to Mid Jurassic northern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Orogen, Permo-Triassic collisional processes along the southern margin of Gondwana and eastern margin of Africa (Coward and Daly 1984, Daly et al. 1991), and the deposition of the Nama Group sediments and the Karoo megasequence. The lithostratigraphic units consist of Proterozoic and Cambrian metamorphosed rocks with ages of 534 (7) Ma to 481 (25) Ma (Miller 1983, Haack 1983), as well as Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks. The Early Jurassic Karoo flood basalt lavas erupted rapidly at 183 (1) Ma (Duncan et al. 1997). The Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts (132 (1) Ma) and mafic dike swarms mark the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic (Renne et al. 1992, Milner et al. 1995, Stewart et al. 1996, Turner et al. 1996). The "passive" continental margin in northern Namibia is a perfect location to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information on the influence of mantle processes on a longer time scale. The poster will provide first information on the long-term landscape evolution and thermochronological data. References Coward, M. P. and Daly, M. C., 1984. Crustal lineaments and shear zones in Africa: Their relationships to plate movements, Precambrian Research 24: 27-45. Duncan, R., Hooper, P., Rehacek, J., March, J. and Duncan, A. (1997). The timing and duration of the Karoo igneous event, southern Gondwana, Journal of Geophysical Research 102: 18127-18138. Haack, U., 1983. Reconstruction of the cooling history of the Damara Orogen by correlation of radiometric ages with geography and altitude, in H. Martin and F. W. Eder (eds), Intracontinental fold belts, Springer Verlag, Berlin, pp. 837-884. Miller, R. M., 1983. Evolution of the Damara Orogen, Vol. 11, Geological Society, South Africa Spec. Pub.. Milner, S. C., le Roex, A. P. and O'Connor, J. M., 1995. Age of Mesozoic igneous rocks in

  17. New constraints on the age and style of continental breakup in the South Atlantic from magnetic anomaly data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Jenny S.; McDermott, Carl; Warner, George; Gyori, Noemi; Schnabel, Michael; McDermott, Ken; Horn, Brian W.

    2017-11-01

    We present new constraints on the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean from a joint interpretation of marine magnetic anomaly grids and forward modelling of conjugate profiles. We use 45,000 km of recently collected commercial ship track data combined with 561,000 km of publically available data. The new data cover the critical ocean-continental transition zones and allow us to identify and downgrade some poorly navigated older ship tracks relied upon in earlier compilations. Within the final grids the mean cross-over error is 14 nT computed from 8,227 ship track intersections. The forward modelling used uniformly magnetised bodies whose shapes were constrained from coincident deep-seismic reflection data. We find the oldest magnetic anomalies to date from M10r (134.2 Ma, late Valanginian) north of the Falkland-Agulhas Fracture Zone and M3 (129.3 Ma, Barremian) south of the Rio Grande Fracture Zone. Hence, assuming the GPTS used is correct, continental breakup was contemporaneous with the Parana and Etendeka continental flood basalts. Many of the landward linear anomalies overlap seismically mapped Seaward Dipping Reflectors (SDRs). We interpret this to mean that a significant portion of the SDRs overlay crust formed by subaerial seafloor spreading. Here crustal accretion is envisaged to be similar to that at mid-ocean ridges, but sheet lava flows (that later form the SDRs) rather than pillow basalts form the extrusive component. Segmentation of the linear anomalies generated implies that this stage of continental breakup is organised and parallels the seafloor spreading centre that follows. Our results call into question the common assumption that at volcanic continental margins the first linear magnetic anomalies represent the start of conventional (submarine) oceanic crustal generation.

  18. Climatic changes in the subtropical Southeast Atlantic: the St. Helena Island Climate Index (1893-1999) [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistel, Rainer; Hagen, Eberhard; Grant, Keith

    2003-10-01

    The Benguela upwelling system in the subtropical Southeast Atlantic is subject to dramatic interannual fluctuations sometimes termed ‘Benguela Niño’ events. The South Atlantic Anticyclone (SAA) is assumed to be the responsible climatic ‘activity centre’ for the south-east trade winds driving the upwelling processes along the Namibian and South-west African coasts. Air temperature and humidity signals of this region, modulated by upwelling-controlled sea surface temperature (SST), are carried by the trades towards St. Helena Island. The island’s 1893-1999 century-long monthly weather records of temperature, pressure and rainfall have been assembled and homogenized. They exhibit trends for decreasing precipitation (10 mm/100 year), increasing air temperature (0.9 °C/100 year), and decreasing air pressure (0.6 hPa/100 year). Their first empirical orthogonal eigenfunction (EOF) covers 46% of the total variance; its associated temporal coefficient is proposed as a ‘St. Helena Island Climate Index (HIX)’. Austral winter HIX has a 42% correlation with a remotely sensed SST-derived Benguela upwelling index, called intense Benguela upwelling, for the time period 1982-1999. Not yet identified Benguela Niños (1895, 1905, 1912, 1916, 1946) and years of strong Benguela upwelling (1911, 1922, 1967, 1976) are newly suggested by the HIX.

  19. Southeast Atlantic upwelling intensity changes influencing late Miocene C4 plant expansion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommerskirchen, F.; Condon, T.; Mollenhauer, G.; Schefuß, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Late Miocene epoch (about 15 to 5 Myrs BP) is characterised by fundamental changes in Earth's climate system: turnovers in marine and terrestrial biota, sea-level variability, changes in surface- und deep-water circulations, and increase in upwelling intensities along the coasts [1,2]. During the transition period the Antarctic ice sheets expanded and were permanently established, while additionally ice volumes began to fluctuate [1]. Plants acting with the C4 concentrating mechanism of CO2 fixation for photosynthesis expanded nearly simultaneous at different places in the world, whereas the global CO2 levels exhibit no corresponding change [1,3]. However, C4 plants are also known to have a competitive advantage in habitats of higher temperature, light and fire intensities as well as of limited water supply, compared to the almost ubiquitous C3 plants. This study tries to give insights to Miocene climatic conditions in Southwest Africa and how these conditions may be linked to the C4 plant expansion. We focused on data from a sediment core of the Ocean Drilling Program (Leg 175, ODP 1085A), which span about 10 Myrs of the late Miocene. The core is situated in the Cape basin at the south-western African continental margin in the upwelling zone of the Benguela coastal current. The current brings cold, nutrient-rich waters from South Atlantic and the Antarctic circumpolar current to the surface water along the coast of Southwest Africa. Miocene sea surface temperatures (SST) were reconstructed by two indices, tetraether index (TEX86) and an alkenone based index (U37K'). Both trends exhibit a shift to cooler temperatures from around 27 to 18˚ C, but are different in rate and timing. Especially by TEX86 reconstructed SSTs exhibit a similar trend as found for ice volume changes shown by the δ18O curve [4]. These findings may reflect an intensification of the Benguela upwelling current during the late Miocene, probably in association with the formation of West

  20. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer... environmental effects of multiple Geological and Geophysical (G&G) activities in the Mid- and South Atlantic...-sonar surveys, electromagnetic surveys, geological and geochemical sampling, and remote sensing. The...

  1. Trophic Ecology and Movement Patters of Tiger Sharks (Galeocerdo Cuvier) off the Western North Atlantic Coastal and Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, G.; Edman, R.; Frazier, B.; Bubley, W.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the trophic dynamics and habitat utilization of apex predators is central to inferring their influence on different marine landscapes and to help design effective management plans for these animals. Tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) are abundant in shelf and offshore Gulf Stream waters of the western North Atlantic Ocean, and based on movements from individuals captured in Florida and Bahamas, seem to avoid coastal and shelf waters off South Carolina and Georgia. This contradicts reports of tiger sharks regularly being caught nearshore by anglers in these states, indicating that separate sub-populations may exist in the western North Atlantic. In the present study we captured Tiger Sharks in coastal waters off South Carolina in 2014 and 2015 in order to describe their movement patterns through acoustic and satellite tagging, and trophic dynamics through stable isotope analyses. Movement data show that these tiger sharks repeatedly visit particular inshore areas and mainly travel over the continental shelf, but rarely venture offshore beyond the continental shelf edge. Ongoing C and N stable isotope analyses of muscle, blood and skin tissues from adult and juvenile tiger sharks, as well as from potential prey species and primary producers, will help determine if their diets are based on inshore, shelf or offshore based food webs. Tiger sharks exploiting nearshore environments and shelf waters have much higher probabilities of interacting with humans than individuals occupying far offshore Gulf Stream habitats.

  2. Variability of interleaving structure of Atlantic Water during its propagation along the Eurasian basin (Arctic Ocean) continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurbas, Nataliya; Kuzmina, Natalia; Lyzhkov, Dmitry; Ostapchuk, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    In order to give detailed description of the interleaving structure in the Eurasian basin results of observations carried out during NABOS 2008 and Polarstern cruise in 1996 were analyzed. The study was focused on interleaving parameters (structure and vertical scale of intrusions) variability in the upper (150-300 meters) and intermediate (300-700 meters) layers of the ocean. Based on θ,S/θ,σ-diagrams (θ, S and σ are the potential temperature, salinity and potential density, correspondingly) analysis two main results were obtained. First of all it was shown that intrusive layers carried by the mean current along the Eurasian Basin continental margin become deeper relatively isopycnals and thus stimulate ventilation of pycnocline. Second, the area in Eurasian Basin thermocline was found where intrusive layers of large and small scale were absent. This distinctive feature can be explained by intensive mixing between two branches of Atlantic Water, one of which propagates along Eurasian basin continental margin and the other spreads across the basin due to large scale interleaving processes. Among others, one of the possible methods of integral estimation of Atlantic water masses heat and salt contents variations during their expansion along basin continental margin was proposed. Thus it is reasonable to assess variation of square under the θ(S)-diagrams, which illustrate the data obtained from two CTD-stations located on diametrically opposite sides of Eurasian Basin, taking 0.5°C isotherm as a reference value. For verification of the introduced approach the estimates of heat and salt contents variations were made by different methods. Detailed discussion of the results is presented. Work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant No 15-05-01479-a).

  3. Trichodesmium slicks associated with environmental conditions of continental shelf-break at the southwestern of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detoni, A. M. S.; Yunes, J. S., Sr.; Ciotti, Á. M.; Calil, P. H. R.; Tavano, V. M.

    2016-02-01

    Trichodesmium can accumulate high biomass, particularly in the oligotrophic regions of North and Tropical Atlantic, and North Pacific. Large Trichodesmium slicks have been reported in the South Atlantic as well, associated with the Brazil Currrent (BC) that flows southwards over the continental shelf-break. Regional variations of the width of the Brazilian continental shelf, as well as changes in the bottom topography, generate cyclonic and anti-cyclonic eddies as BC crosses the southeastern Brazil. Thus, the general conditions of the BC - characterized as a warm, saline and oligotrophic current - are expected to change not only with latitude but also by the influence of mesoscale instabilities. In this study, three oceanographic cruises were carried out to characterize the distribution of Trichodesmium along the southeastern Brazilian continental shelf-break and their relationship with temperature and upper layer nutrients concentrations. As in other oceanic regions, high concentrations of Trichodesmium (maximum 212.6 × 105 trichomes L-1) were observed in waters with temperatures between 22° C to 25° C, low nitrogen ( 0.08 μM), where wind speeds were low (Wind and hydrographic observations suggested that wind divergence at micro-regions (approximately 625 km2), as well as shelf-break dynamics can drive sporadic shelf-break upwelling, favouring Trichodesmium growth between 23° S to 28° S. Although shelf-break upwelling may occur along the entire domain of the BC flow, Trichodesmium densities were low at latitudes between 28° S to 33° S likely a result of the lower sea surface temperature.

  4. 75 FR 24883 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. ADDRESSES: The Data Workshop will be held at the Francis Marion Hotel, 387 King...; telephone: (843) 571-4366. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and Caribbean.... Participants for SEDAR Workshops and Assessment Process are appointed by the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic...

  5. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...-Program/Smart-from-the-Start/Index.aspx . Authority: This notice is published pursuant to 43 CFR 46.305...

  6. Causes and consequences of continental breakup in the South Atlantic: lessons learned from the SAMPLE program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, Robert B.

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 the SAMPLE program (www.spp-sample.de) provides a platform for research into the causes and effects of continental breakup and the evolution of passive margins. SAMPLE encompasses 28 projects from 13 German institutions and many international partnerships. The 6-year program will run through 2015. At the core of the program are observational studies that are interlinked by modelling projects examining the interplay of deep mantle dynamics, lithospheric stress fields, pre-rift fabric and melt-weaking on localizing rifting. Geophysics teams collect and integrate existing data from wide-angle seismic profiles, reprocessed multichannel seismics, as well as gravity, magnetics and heat-flow studies to construct self-consistent lithospheric-scale 3-D models along the conjugate margins. Key interests are variations in margin architecture, distribution of magmatic features and the evolution of sedimentary basins (subsidence and thermal histories). An exciting new contribution of SAMPLE geophysics is a linked set of seismic, seismologic and magnetotelluric experiments along the Walvis Ridge, including onshore NW Namibia and the Tristan da Cunha hotspot. In the deep mantle, we examine evidence from global seismic tomography for dramatic low seismic-velocity regions near the core-mantle boundary beneath southern Africa and their implications for dynamics in the deep Earth and the thermo-chemical nature of plumes. Petrologic studies focus on near-primary mantle melts represented by Mg-rich mafic dikes. Projects address the origin of magmas and crust-mantle interaction, and the environmental impact of mega-scale volcanism during breakup. Thermobarometry results from the African margin reveal a N-to-S decrease in mantle potential temperatures from 1520°C (N) to 1380° (S), which supports a thermal plume origin for excessive melt production in the north. Thermochronology data from both conjugate margins reveal complex and puzzling patterns in the denudation history

  7. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  8. {sup 137}Cs as tracer of the origin of allochthonous sediments in the Southeast Continental Margin of Brazil; {sup 137}Cs como tracador da origem de sedimentos aloctones na Margem Continental Sudeste do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo A.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.; FIgueira, Rubens C.L., E-mail: paulo.alves.ferreira@usp.br, E-mail: mahiques@usp.br, E-mail: rfigueira@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IO/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanografico; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The distribution of {sup 137}Cs, artificial radionuclide for which there is no current source, can inform on the origin and destination of sediments. This study analyzed about 60 samples of surface sediment to generate a model of spatial distribution of {sup 137}Cs in the Southeast Continental Margin of Brazil and surroundings for evaluating possible sediment sources for this region. The model showed that the levels of {sup 137}Cs in the southern compartment of the Southeast Brazilian Margin (south of Sao Sebastiao Island) are statistically similar to those of the Rio de la Plata river mouth region, indicating sediment entry due to the seasonal intrusion of the plume of Rio de la Plata, a phenomenon already studied by other authors.

  9. Y chromosome analysis of dingoes and southeast asian village dogs suggests a neolithic continental expansion from Southeast Asia followed by multiple Austronesian dispersals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Benjamin N; Brown, Sarah K; Stephens, Danielle; Pedersen, Niels C; Wu, Jui-Te; Berry, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Dogs originated more than 14,000 BP, but the location(s) where they first arose is uncertain. The earliest archeological evidence of ancient dogs was discovered in Europe and the Middle East, some 5-7 millennia before that from Southeast Asia. However, mitochondrial DNA analyses suggest that most modern dogs derive from Southeast Asia, which has fueled the controversial hypothesis that dog domestication originated in this region despite the lack of supporting archeological evidence. We propose and investigate with Y chromosomes an alternative hypothesis for the proximate origins of dogs from Southeast Asia--a massive Neolithic expansion of dogs from this region that largely replaced more primitive dogs to the west and north. Previous attempts to test matrilineal findings with independent patrilineal markers have lacked the necessary genealogical resolution and mutation rate estimates. Here, we used Y chromosome genotypes, composed of 29 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and 5 single tandem repeats (STRs), from 338 Australian dingoes, New Guinea singing dogs, and village dogs from Island Southeast Asia, along with modern European breed dogs, to estimate the evolutionary mutation rates of Y chromosome STRs based on calibration to the independently known age of the dingo population. Dingoes exhibited a unique haplogroup characterized by a single distinguishing SNP mutation and 14 STR haplotypes. The age of the European haplogroup was estimated to be only 1.7 times older than that of the dingo population, suggesting an origin during the Neolithic rather than the Paleolithic (as predicted by the Southeast Asian origins hypothesis). We hypothesize that isolation of Neolithic dogs from wolves in Southeast Asia was a key step accelerating their phenotypic transformation, enhancing their value in trade and as cargo, and enabling them to rapidly expand and replace more primitive dogs to the West. Our findings also suggest that dingoes could have arrived in Australia

  10. Marine and terrigenous lipids in southeast atlantic sediments (leg 175) as paleoenvironmental indicators: initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schefuss, E.; Versteegh, G.J.M.; Jansen, J.H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Lipid compositions of sediments recovered during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 175 in the eastern South Atlantic reflect a variety of oceanographic and climatological environments. Most of the identified lipids can be ascribed to marine sources, notably haptophytes,

  11. Evidence for effects of solar forcing and North Atlantic circulation on the climate of continental Scandinavia during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launonen, I.; Ojala, A.; Holmström, L.; Tiljander, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nearly 10 000-year-long varved sediment records from Lakes Nautajärvi and Korttajärvi, Finland, analyzed using digital image analysis techniques, provide evidence of climate and environment oscillation at multi-decadal to millennial timescales. We used two independent methods, the REDFIT periodogram analysis and the Posterior Singular Spectrum Analysis, to extract the periodic features of time series from clastic laminae and assess their statistical reliability. The analyses revealed that seasonal sediment fluxes correspond with environmental changes with significant periodicities of 1500-1800, 1000, 600-800, nearly 300, nearly 200, 150-170, nearly 90 and 47 years, showing variable coherency with different climate forcing factors and other palaeoproxy records in the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicate that the Holocene winter climate in continental Scandinavia was forced by a combination of several factors, at least by solar variability and the North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere circulation patterns, with a varying influence through time.

  12. NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer 2012 Field Season in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarke, A. D.; Lobecker, E.; Malik, M.; VerPlanck, N.

    2012-12-01

    The NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, jointly operated by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and the NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, is America's only federally managed ship dedicated solely to ocean exploration. The 2012 field season was spent exploring the northern Gulf of Mexico and the U.S. Atlantic continental shelf break and slope. In the Gulf of Mexico, mapping and remotely operated vehicle operations focused on the salt domes and canyons offshore Mississippi and Louisiana, and characterized several of the hundreds of seeps that were detected in the water column backscatter data collected with the ship's Kongsberg EM 302 multibeam sonar (30 kHz) during the 2011 field season. A team of NOAA and non-NOAA partners identified priority frontier areas along the continental shelf and slope between North Carolina and Cape Cod, mapping numerous canyons selected for focused mapping exploration in partnership with the North East Fisheries Science Center, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (a state level partnership between various states including NY, NJ, DE, MD, and VA), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Virginia Sea Grant. The 2012 mapping efforts built on data collected during the 2011 field season. Okeanos Explorer data were leveraged by NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow to conduct towed camera operations to ground truth multibeam backscatter data for deepwater coral habitat assessment. The Blake Ridge and Cape Fear Diapirs offshore North Carolina were a third focus of exploration operations. Seven 900 meter high cold seeps were discovered in the diapir province. Exploration incorporated WHOI's Sentry autonomous underwater vehicle and its full suite of mapping and oceanographic sensors were used to characterize six seep sites. All data collected by Okeanos Explorer are available via the NOAA public archives with metadata records within 60 to 90 days of the end of each cruise.

  13. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Massachusetts AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM..., and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative offshore Massachusetts. The purpose of the ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is to...

  14. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative offshore North Carolina. The ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is designed to identify areas that appear to be...

  15. Effects of energy-related activities on the Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B [ed.

    1975-01-01

    Sixteen papers were presented and are announced separately. Coastal waters, continental shelf geology and aquatic ecosystems are studied for modelling basic data for assessment of possible environmental impacts from offshore energy development. Sediment transport and wave phenomena are modelled for understanding water pollution transport and diffusion. (PCS)

  16. Development and application of a new comprehensive image-based classification scheme for coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Christopher

    The coastal (terrestrial) and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf show a unique biophysical succession of marine features from a highly urbanized, developed coastal region in the north (i.e. northern Miami-Dade County) to a protective marine sanctuary in the southeast (i.e. Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary). However, the establishment of a standard bio-geomorphological classification scheme for this area of coastal and benthic environments is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis and answer the research question of whether new parameters of integrating geomorphological components with dominant biological covers could be developed and applied across multiple remote sensing platforms for an innovative way to identify, interpret, and classify diverse coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf. An ordered manageable hierarchical classification scheme was developed to incorporate the categories of Physiographic Realm, Morphodynamic Zone, Geoform, Landform, Dominant Surface Sediment, and Dominant Biological Cover. Six different remote sensing platforms (i.e. five multi-spectral satellite image sensors and one high-resolution aerial orthoimagery) were acquired, delineated according to the new classification scheme, and compared to determine optimal formats for classifying the study area. Cognitive digital classification at a nominal scale of 1:6000 proved to be more accurate than autoclassification programs and therefore used to differentiate coastal marine environments based on spectral reflectance characteristics, such as color, tone, saturation, pattern, and texture of the seafloor topology. In addition, attribute tables were created in conjugation with interpretations to quantify and compare the spatial relationships between classificatory units. IKONOS-2 satellite imagery was determined to be the optimal platform for applying the hierarchical classification scheme

  17. Tropical South-East Atlantic response to ENSO as an ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to an El Niñoinduced drought, anomalous easterly flow over the Atlantic strengthens the cold tongue extending from Angola. How these climatic conditions affect fisheries abundance in the southern Benguela was investigated. Higher anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus catches tend to follow an El Niño event, and higher ...

  18. Deep Drilling Results in the Atlantic Ocean: Continental Margins and Paleoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    beds depositional conditions include 1) eventual have been ertlsd. Second, most DSDP boreholes reduction and stabilization of thermohaline that have...that abnormally thick ocean crust may be discoveries . The present shelf edge is about 20Ian typical of initial rifting stages of sea floor landward...The discovery of gas associated with continental margin separating the major basins. diapirs over the magnetic basement high (along the The relationship

  19. Continental and marine climate records from the Southeast Pacific as inferred from Radiolaria and pollen records from 0 to 90ka at ODP Site 1233

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisias, N. G.; Mix, A. C.; Weber, M.; Heusser, L.; Heusser, C. H.

    2004-12-01

    Site 1233 drilled during Leg 202 of the Ocean Drilling Program provides a detailed record of oceanographic and continental climate change in the Southeast Pacific and South American continent. Splits from over 500 samples from Site 1233 were used for detailed radiolarian and pollen species population analysis. Samples were taken at 20cm interval equivalent to temporal resolution of 200 to 400 years. In each sample splits used for pollen analysis abundances of 25 species were determined while in the splits used for radiolarian studies abundances of 41 species were evaluated. Age control is provided by 25 AMS 14C dates (Lamy et al., 2004). From detailed multivariate analysis of these data sets we state the following conclusions: 1) During the past 75kyr the region of the southern Chile coast is not directly influenced by polar water from the Antarctic region. 2) Changes in ocean conditions during this time interval reflect small north-south shifts in the south Pacific transition zone and its impact on the coastal waters of Chile. 3) The ocean and terrestrial climate records extracted from Site 1233 show remarkable similarities to each other as well as to temperature records from the Antarctic. These records suggest that climate variability during the past 75kyr in the Southeast Pacific is tightly coupled at periods longer than 3000 years and not linked directly to changes in the Northern Hemisphere and; 4) the marine and terrestrial climate records from Site 1233 studied here, show no phase shift in response suggesting that ocean/continental vegetation is much more tightly coupled with regional atmospheric changes as indicated by the Antarctic temperature proxy record while the results of Lamy et al., (2004) show a time lag between ocean responses and the Patagonian Ice Sheet suggesting possibly reflecting the long response time of ice versus continental vegetation and oceanic systems.

  20. Southeast Offshore Storage Resource Assessment (SOSRA): Evaluation of CO2 Storage Potential on the Continental Shelf from North Carolina to Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, J. H.; Knapp, C. C.; Brantley, D.; Lakshmi, V.; Howard, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Southeast Offshore Storage Resource Assessment (SOSRA) project is part of a major new program, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy for the next two and a half years, to evaluate the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico offshore margins of the United States for geologic storage capacity of CO2. Collaborating organizations include the Southern States Energy Board, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, University of South Carolina, Oklahoma State University, Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy, South Carolina Geological Survey, and Geological Survey of Alabama. Team members from South Carolina are focused on the Atlantic offshore, from North Carolina to Florida. Geologic sequestration of CO2 is a major research focus globally, and requires robust knowledge of the porosity and permeability distribution in upper crustal sediments. Using legacy seismic reflection, refraction, and well data from a previous phase of offshore petroleum exploration on the Atlantic margin, we are analyzing the rock physics characteristics of the offshore Mesozoic and Cenozoic stratigraphy on a regional scale from North Carolina to Florida. Major features of the margin include the Carolina Trough, the Southeast Georgia Embayment, the Blake Plateau basin, and the Blake Outer Ridge. Previous studies indicate sediment accumulations on this margin may be as thick as 12-15 km. The study will apply a diverse suite of data analysis techniques designed to meet the goal of predicting storage capacity to within ±30%. Synthetic seismograms and checkshot surveys will be used to tie well and seismic data. Seismic interpretation and geophysical log analysis will employ leading-edge software technology and state-of-the art techniques for stratigraphic and structural interpretation and the definition of storage units and their physical and chemical properties. This approach will result in a robust characterization of offshore CO2 storage opportunities, as well as a volumetric analysis that is

  1. Observations of the Surface Circulation over the Mid Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roarty, H.; Kohut, J. T.; Palamara, L. J.; Brown, W. S.; Seim, H.; Atkinson, L. P.; Smith, M. J.; Glenn, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    What is understood about the mean and seasonal flow off the Mid Atlantic Bight has been gathered with point measurements that span on average of a single year. The spatial structure and interannual variability of the flow can be resolved further. The mean and seasonal surface circulation of the Mid Atlantic Bight was measured using eight years of High Frequency radar data (2007-2014). The data was binned into seasonal and annual time frames and analyzed. The mean surface flow over the eight year study period is 3-6 cm/s down shelf and offshore to the south. There is an intensification seaward of the 50 m isobath to a speed 6-9 cm/s. When the water reaches Cape Hatteras to the south it is then advected towards the northeast by the Gulf Stream. The surface current asymptotes at 9 cm/s shoreward of the 100 m isobath, which matches the measurements of the Oleander Project. The data was compared on a seasonal cycle and the fall of 2009 displayed a surface current that was twice the magnitude of the eight-year record. The measurements show good agreement with the model of Lentz (2008) and help fill in the sparsity and unevenness of the acoustic current measurements.

  2. The effect of atmospheric variability at intra-seasonal time scale on the SST of the Southwestern Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simionato, Claudia; Clara, Moira Luz; Jaureguizar, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    The Southwestern Atlantic Continental Shelf is characterized by large SST variability which origin remains unknown. In this work, we use blended SST data provided by NOAA CoastWatch Program, which combine the information coming from infrared and microwave sensors to provide daily images of an intermediate spatial resolution (11 km) with a noise floor of less than 0.2 °C. The data base starts at the middle of 2002, when an increase in signal variance is observed due to the fact that the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer became available and as a consequence to its near all-weather coverage. Several years of observations are thus available, and even though the temporal and spatial resolution of these data is intermediate, they are reasonable for observing and characterizing the most significant patterns of SST variability in the (atmospheric) synoptic to intra-seasonal time scales, so as to help on understanding the physical processes which occur in the area and their forcing mechanisms. As we hypothesize that most of the variability in those time scales is wind forced, the study is complemented with the use of atmospheric observations -coming from remote sensing and reanalysis-. To perform the analysis, the long-term trend, inter-annual and seasonal variability are subtracted to the SST data to obtain the signal on intra-seasonal time scales. Then, Principal Components (EOF) analysis is applied to the data and composites of SST and several meteorological variables (wind, sea level pressure, air temperature, OLR, etc.) are computed for the days when the leading modes are active. It is found that the first three modes account for more than 70% of the variance. Modes 1 and 2 seem to be related to atmospheric waves generated in the tropical Pacific. Those waves, through atmospheric teleconnections, affect the SST on the southwestern South Atlantic Continental Shelf very rapidly. The oceanic anomalies exceed 0.7°C and are quite persistent. Mode 2 seems to be

  3. Thermal history and long-term evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin, Kaoko belt, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, D. P.; Glasmacher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    From Permo-Carboniferous to Mid Jurassic the Kaoko belt in northwestern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Sequence, Permo-Triassic collisional processes along the southern margin of Gondwana (Coward & Daly 1984), and the deposition of the Karoo Supergroup. The lithostratigraphic units consist of Proterozoic and Cambrian metamorphosed rocks with ages of 534 (7) Ma to 481 (25) Ma (Miller 1983), as well as Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks. The Early Jurassic Karoo flood basalt lavas erupted rapidly at 183 (1) Ma (Duncan et al. 1997). The Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts (132 (1) Ma) and mafic dike swarms mark the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic (Stewart et al. 1996). The 'passive' continental margin in northern Namibia is a perfect location to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information about the major processes controlling the landscape evolution in this region. The poster will present thermochronological data, t-T-models and exhumation rates for the Kaoko belt, NW Namibia. References Coward, M. P. and Daly, M. C., 1984. Crustal lineaments and shear zones in Africa: Their relationships to plate movements, Precambrian Research 24: 27-45. Duncan, R., Hooper, P., Rehacek, J., March, J. and Duncan, A., 1997. The timing and duration of the Karoo igneous event, southern Gondwana, Journal of Geophysical Research 102: 18127-18138. Miller, R. M., 1983. Evolution of the Damara Orogen, Vol. 11, Geological Society, South Africa Spec. Pub.. Stewart, K. S., Turner, S., Kelly, S., Hawkesworth, C. J., Kirstein, L. and Mantovani, M. S. M., 1996. 3D 40Ar-39Ar geochronology in the Paraná continental flood basalt province, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 143: 95-110.

  4. Bathymetric map of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford; Moody, John A.

    1984-01-01

    Lydonia Canyon is one of several large submarine canyons that indent the eastern U.S. Continental Shelf along the southern flank of Georges Bank (Index map).  This bathymetric map of the upper part of Lydonia Canyon (water depths shallower than about 2,00 m) was prepared as part of a study of the physical oceanography and geology of Lydonia Canyon (Butman and others, 1983; Twichell, 1983).  An accurate map of the canyon at a scale of at least 1:50,000 was needed for placement of current-meter morrings, for location of hydrographic and sediment sampling stations, and for interpretation of current-meter and geologic data. The map covers the area from 40°10'N. to 40°40'N. and from 67°28'W. to 67°50'W. 

  5. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. [Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaye, P.E.

    1979-08-01

    Samples and data from previous cruises were analyzed with a view to understanding those biological, chemical, and physical processes which affect energy-related pollutants in the marine environment of the continental margin. Two cruises designed to expand the sample base, measure the time variability of several transfer processes, and to test specific hypotheses on the mechanisms for processes which effect exchange of continental margin with open ocean waters were carried out. Progress was made in understanding the relative roles of nutrients and light in controlling the productivity of important primary biomass (and hence, particle) producers. Progress was also made in understanding the influences of phytoplankton populations on distribution of inorganic nutrients, dissolved oxygen and particulate organic matter. In addition, preliminary results from field work support the hypothesis that most diatom production on the shelf sinks to the bottom where it enters benthic food chains or provides seed populations for subsequent blooms. Radionuclides were studied in water columns and in sediments to develop an understanding of processes associated with suspended solids and with sediments as sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants. Major progress was made on the analysis of hydrographic data from all previous cruises and to evolve a comprehensive picture of the stratification of the waters of the New York Bight. The Co/sub 2/-H/sub 2/0 equilibration system required for the preparation of samples for oxygen isotope analysis was completed. Work has continued in the use of radon as a tracer of small scale water motions and mixing in the definition of the source function needed for modelling the data, in actual modelling of the data, and in defining the range of variability of the radon distributions. (JGB)

  6. Steam trawling on the south-east continental shelf of Australia. An environmental history of fishing, management and science in NSW, 1865 -1961

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A. Lif Lund

    2010-01-01

    scientific recommendations. The Second World War provided financial relief for the industry, as the Royal Australian Navy leased the ageing trawler fleet for minesweeping. After the war a complex system of overlapping State and Commonwealth authority evolved. Different management objectives and lack......As many of the world’s fish stocks are fully or over-exploited there is an urgent need for governments to provide robust fisheries management. However, governments are often slow to implement necessary changes to fisheries practices. The will to govern is an essential factor in successful marine...... resource management. Studies of historical documents from State and Commonwealth fisheries authorities involved in the steam trawl fishery on the south-east continental shelf of Australia illustrate different expressions of intentional management and how a more ecological responsible view has emerged...

  7. An Update on the Status of the Southeast Atlantic Coastal Ocean Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, H. E.

    2005-05-01

    As a consortium of largely academic institutions in the Southeast US, SEACOOS has been developing and implementing a pilot regional coastal ocean observing system. The four major components of SEACOOS, the observing subsystem, the modeling subsystem, the data management subsystem, and the extension and education subsystem, will be reviewed. In particular, the focus will be on identifying facets of the components that have worked well, those that have proved challenging, and current notions of best practices. Progress towards a near real-time depiction of coastal ocean circulation, and its application in support of search and rescue, spill response and fisheries recruitment studies, continues. The implications of the existing capabilities on needed areas of research and investment will be discussed.

  8. Monthly climatology of the continental shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Brian O.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Werner, Francisco E.; Seim, Harvey E.

    2003-08-01

    Monthly circulation of the South Atlantic Bight is diagnosed using a 3-D, shallow water, finite element model forced with monthly wind stress and hydrographic climatology. Temperature and salinity observations from the period 1950-1999 are objectively interpolated onto the model domain, and Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) wind velocities from 1975-1999 are used to prescribe the model surface wind stress. The resulting monthly temperature and salinity fields compare favorably to existing shelf climatology. River discharge maxima are evident in the spring temperature and salinity fields, and the rapid heating and cooling of the shelf are captured. The diagnostic circulation is largely wind-driven in the inner and mid-shelf, and the Gulf Stream is apparent in the solutions on the outer shelf. We present the monthly fields, including the temporal and spatial distribution of available hydrographic data, the regional COADS data that provide surface wind stress forcing, the objective analysis, and the model response to these forcings. The hydrographic and velocity fields provide best-prior-estimates of the circulation for data assimilation studies in the region, as well as initial conditions for process-oriented prognostic model studies in the Georgia coastal region.

  9. Radiolaria and pollen records from 0 to 50 ka at ODP Site 1233: Continental and marine climate records from the Southeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisias, N.G.; Heusser, L.; Heusser, C.; Hostetler, S.W.; Mix, A.C.; Weber, M.

    2006-01-01

    Site 1233 drilled during Leg 202 of the Ocean Drilling Program provides a detailed record of marine and continental climate change in the Southeast Pacific and South American continent. Splits from over 500 samples taken at 20 cm intervals for quantitative analysis of radiolarian and pollen populations yield a temporal resolution of 200-400 years. In each sample, 39 pollen taxa and 40 radiolarian species and genera were evaluated. Age control is provided by 25 AMS 14C dates [Lamy, F., Kaiser, J., Ninnemann, U., Hebbeln, D., Arz, H.W., Stoner, J., 2004. Science 304, 1959-1962]. Multivariate statistical analyses of these data allow us to conclude the following: (1) During the past 50 ka, the region of the central Chile coast is not directly influenced by polar water from the Antarctic region. (2) Changes in ocean conditions off central Chile during this time interval primarily reflect north-south shifts in the position of the South Pacific transition zone. (3) Changes in Chilean vegetation reflect comparable latitudinal shifts in precipitation and the position of the southern westerlies. (4) The first canonical variate of radiolarian and pollen records extracted from Site 1233 are remarkably similar to each other as well as to temperature records from the Antarctic, which suggests that marine and continental climate variability in the region is tightly coupled at periods longer than 3000 years. (5) The phase coupling of these climate records, which lead variations of continental erosion based on iron abundance at the same site, are consistent with a hypothesis that erosion is linked to relatively long (i.e, few thousand years) response times of the Patagonian ice sheet, and thus is not a direct indicator of regional climate. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiolaria and pollen records from 0 to 50 ka at ODP Site 1233: continental and marine climate records from the Southeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisias, Nicklas G.; Heusser, Linda; Heusser, Cal; Hostetler, Steven W.; Mix, Alan C.; Weber, Mysti

    2006-03-01

    Site 1233 drilled during Leg 202 of the Ocean Drilling Program provides a detailed record of marine and continental climate change in the Southeast Pacific and South American continent. Splits from over 500 samples taken at 20 cm intervals for quantitative analysis of radiolarian and pollen populations yield a temporal resolution of 200-400 years. In each sample, 39 pollen taxa and 40 radiolarian species and genera were evaluated. Age control is provided by 25 AMS 14C dates [Lamy, F., Kaiser, J., Ninnemann, U., Hebbeln, D., Arz, H.W., Stoner, J., 2004. Science 304, 1959-1962]. Multivariate statistical analyses of these data allow us to conclude the following: (1) During the past 50 ka, the region of the central Chile coast is not directly influenced by polar water from the Antarctic region. (2) Changes in ocean conditions off central Chile during this time interval primarily reflect north-south shifts in the position of the South Pacific transition zone. (3) Changes in Chilean vegetation reflect comparable latitudinal shifts in precipitation and the position of the southern westerlies. (4) The first canonical variate of radiolarian and pollen records extracted from Site 1233 are remarkably similar to each other as well as to temperature records from the Antarctic, which suggests that marine and continental climate variability in the region is tightly coupled at periods longer than 3000 years. (5) The phase coupling of these climate records, which lead variations of continental erosion based on iron abundance at the same site, are consistent with a hypothesis that erosion is linked to relatively long (i.e, few thousand years) response times of the Patagonian ice sheet, and thus is not a direct indicator of regional climate.

  11. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Analysis of Submarine Landslides and Canyons along the U.S. Atlantic Margin Using Extended Continental Shelf Mapping Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, J. D.; Brothers, D. S.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Hoy, S. K.; Baxter, C.; Andrews, B.

    2013-12-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies of the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise aim to understand the: 1) the role of submarine landslides in tsunami generation, and 2) the linkages between margin morphology and sedimentary processes, particularly in and around submarine canyon systems. Data from U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) and numerous subsequent mapping surveys have facilitated the identification and characterization of submarine landslides and related features in fine detail over an unprecedented spatial extent. Ongoing analysis of USGS collected piston cores, sub-bottom and multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles, and an extensive suite of legacy MCS data from two landslides, the Southern New England landslide zone and the Currituck Landslide, suggest that the most recent major landslide events are pre-Holocene, but that failures were complex and most likely multi-phase, at times resulting in extensive overlapping debris deposits. Piston core records plus visual observations of the seafloor from recent TowCam deployments and NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer ROV dives reveal ongoing development of colluvial wedge-style debris aprons at the base of scarps within these landslides, showing that these regions continue to evolve long after the initial failure events. Multibeam bathymetry data and MCS profiles along the upper slope reveal evidence for vertical fluid migration and possible seabed gas expulsion. These observations underscore the need to reevaluate the sources of pore fluid overpressure in slope sediments and their role in landslide generation. ECS and more recent multibeam mapping have provided the opportunity to investigate the full extent of submarine canyon morphology and evolution from Cape Hatteras up to the US-Canadian EEZ, which has led to better understanding of the important role of antecedent margin physiography on their development. Six submarine canyon systems along the margin (Veatch, Hydrographer, Hudson, Wilmington

  13. Winter- and summertime continental influences on tropospheric O3 and CO observed by TES over the western North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talbot

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The distributions of tropospheric ozone (O3 and carbon monoxide (CO, and the synoptic factors regulating these distributions over the western North Atlantic Ocean during winter and summer were investigated using profile retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES for 2004–2006. Seasonal composites of TES retrievals, reprocessed to remove the influence of the a priori on geographical and seasonal structure, exhibited strong seasonal differences. At the 681 hPa level during winter months of December, January and February (DJF the composite O3 mixing ratios were uniformly low (~45 ppbv, but continental export was evident in a channel of enhanced CO (100–110 ppbv flowing eastward from the US coast. In summer months June, July, and August (JJA O3 mixing ratios were variable (45–65 ppbv and generally higher due to increased photochemical production. The summer distribution also featured a channel of enhanced CO (95–105 ppbv flowing northeastward around an anticyclone and exiting the continent over the Canadian Maritimes around 50° N. Offshore O3-CO slopes were generally 0.15–0.20 mol mol−1 in JJA, indicative of photochemical O3 production. Composites for 4 predominant synoptic patterns or map types in DJF suggested that export to the lower free troposphere (681 hPa level was enhanced by the warm conveyor belt airstream of mid-latitude cyclones while stratospheric intrusions increased TES O3 levels at 316 hPa. A major finding in the DJF data was that offshore 681 hPa CO mixing ratios behind cold fronts could be enhanced up to >150 ppbv likely by lofting from the surface via shallow convection resulting from rapid destabilization of cold air flowing over much warmer ocean waters. In JJA composites for 3 map types showed that the general export pattern of the seasonal composites was associated with a synoptic pattern featuring the Bermuda High. However, weak cyclones and frontal troughs could enhance offshore 681 hPa CO

  14. The soil seed bank during Atlantic Forest regeneration in Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baider, C; Tabarelli, M; Mantovani, W

    2001-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the density and species composition of viable seeds buried in four stands of a tropical montane forest at Parque Estadual Intervales, Brazil. The objective was to understand: (1) how numbers and composition of the soil seed bank change as the forest regrows, and (2) how such changes affect the species available for regeneration if forests of different ages are cut down. In each forest stand (5, 18, 27-yr-old and a mature forest), 57 soil samples were collected (0-2.5 and 2.5-5 cm deep). Viable seed density of herbaceous species ranged between 11,003 seeds. m-2 (5-yr-old vegetation) and 482 (mature forest), and between 25 (5-yr-old vegetation) and 389 seeds. m-2 (mature forest) for woody plant species in the 0-5 cm soil layer, suggesting a decrease in seed stocks in the course of forest regeneration. Seeds buried in the 0-2.5 cm soil layer represented between 56.9% and 67.4% of all viable seeds. Most of the viable seeds belonged to weeds of Asteraceae, Poaceae, Malvaceae and Solanaceae. The results provide evidence that, in forests of different ages, the soil does not store seeds of the same key ecological groups involved in the regeneration of Atlantic forest. Allochthonous seeds from remaining patches of forest, as well as their vertebrate dispersers, are needed for forest regeneration since the soil seed bank does not store large seeds of shade-tolerant species.

  15. 78 FR 33897 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 2 (ATLW2) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts-- Final Sale...) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts... for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and...

  16. Exchange of phytoplankton across the continental shelf-slope boundary of the Middle Atlantic Bight during spring 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, Creighton D.

    A moored array of current meters, transmissometers and fluorometers was deployed off the Delmarva Peninsula, United States, from 8 February to 9 June 1988 to measure the exchange of particles, phytoplankton and water between the continental shelf and the slope sea. The measurements were made at the 90-m isobath and near the shelf-slope front, which is the natural physical boundary between the shelf- and slope-water. The highest standing stocks of phytoplankton (>4 mg Chl a l -1) occurred during April and May directly above the shelf-slope front. Although the shelf-slope front and associated phytoplankton populations made large cross-shelf excursions (>40 km), the vertically averaged advective transport of phytoplankton was onshore at the 90-m isobath. Compared with the estimated primary production on the inner shelf, the advective transport across the 90-m isobath was -2.60% ± 5.52% of the spring production, with the negative values indicating import. These calculations suggest that primary production occurring landward of the 90-m isobath is not exported laterally, as phytoplankton or phytodetritus, to the ocean basin. This places a limit on the possible export from the shelf, but does not exclude shelf export because roughly half the volume of shelf water from Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras lies in a thin surface wedge outside the 100-m isobath [ WRIGHT and PARKER (1976) Limnology and Oceanography, 21, 563-571]. Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Middle Atlantic Bight should acknowledge the limited exchange of phytoplankton between the inner and outer portions of the shelf.

  17. Thermal habitat constraints on zooplankton species associated with Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) on the US Northeast Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Kane, Joe; Hare, Jonathan A.; Lough, R. Gregory; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Nye, Janet A.

    2013-09-01

    The US Northeast Continental Shelf is experiencing a period of increasing temperature levels and range, which impacts the quantity of thermal habitats within the ecosystem. With increasing temperatures, the amount of warmer, surface water thermal habitats (16-27 °C) has increased while there has been a reciprocal decline in cooler water habitats (5-15 °C). These cooler water habitats are the most abundant and comprise the core habitats of the ecosystem. The coldest thermal habitats (1-4 °C), however, have increased slightly in amount or have remained constant, reflecting a discontinuity in the progression of warming along a latitudinal gradient. This discontinuity may be the result of recent changes in the circulation of water masses in the northern Gulf of Maine, potentially associated with the Labrador Current. The contraction of core thermal habitats appears to have had biological consequences on multiple trophic levels. In particular, two zooplankton species associated with the larval feeding of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, have declined in abundance in the same areas where cod populations have exhibited continually poor recruitment. The zooplankton species group Pseudocalanus spp., which is associated with winter-spawning cod, has declined on Georges Bank and in the Eastern Gulf of Maine. The zooplankton Centropages typicus has declined in the Gulf of Maine during late summer into fall, potentially affecting spring-spawning cod in that area. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that portions of the population complex of cod have lower reproductive output due to changes in zooplankton abundance, which we associate with the distribution of temperatures within the ecosystem.

  18. Thermal history, exhumation and long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin, Kaoko Belt, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Hackspacher, Peter C.; Schneider, Gabriele; Zentner, Henning; Karl, Markus

    2014-05-01

    After the Damara Orogeny at the end of the Neoproterozoic the Kaoko Belt in northwestern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Sequence, followed by the depositon of the Karoo Supergroup from Permo-Carboniferous to Early Cretaceous. The lithostratigraphic units consist of Late Proterozoic to Cambrian metamorphosed rocks and intrusive complexes of the Damara Group, with ages of 534 (7) Ma to 481 (25) Ma (Miller 1983), that are unconformably overlain by terrestrial deposits of the Karoo Supergroup (Stollhofen 1999), comprising two flood basalt events: the Karoo flood basalts, at 183 (1) Ma (Duncan et al. 1997), and the Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts, at 132 (1) Ma (Renne et al. 1996). The latter marking the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic. The "passive" continental margin along the Kaoko Belt in northern Namibia is a perfect location to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information about the major processes controlling the landscape evolution in this region. The poster/talk will present thermochronological data, t-T-models and exhumation rates for the Kaoko belt, NW Namibia. References Miller, R. M., 1983. Evolution of the Damara Orogen, Vol. 11, Geol. Soc., South Africa Spec. Pub.. Renne, P.R., Glen, J.M., Milner, S.C., Duncan, A.R., 1996. Age of Etendeka flood volcanism and associated intrusions in southwestern Africa, Geology 24 (7): 659- 662. Duncan, R., Hooper, P., Rehacek, J., March, J. and Duncan, A., 1997. The timing and duration of the Karoo igneous event, southern Gondwana, J. Geophys. Res. 102: 18127-18138. Stollhofen, H., 1999. Karoo Synrift-Sedimentation und ihre tektonische Kontrolle am entstehenden Kontinentalrand Namibias, Z.dt.geol.Ges. 149: 519-632.

  19. Ethnopharmacological survey among migrants living in the Southeast Atlantic Forest of Diadema, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Eliana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how people of diverse cultural backgrounds have traditionally used plants and animals as medicinal substances during displacements is one of the most important objectives of ethnopharmacological studies. An ethnopharmacological survey conducted among migrants living in the Southeast Atlantic Forest remnants (Diadema, São Paulo, Brazil is presented herein. Methods Ethnographical methods were used to select and interview the migrants, and botanical and zoological techniques were employed to collect the indicated resources. Results We interviewed five migrants who described knowledge on 12 animals and 85 plants. Only 78 plants were present in Diadema, they belong to 37 taxonomic families; 68 were used exclusively for medicinal purposes, whereas 10 were reported to be toxic and/or presented some restriction of use. These taxa were grouped into 12 therapeutic categories (e.g., gastrointestinal disturbances, inflammatory processes or respiratory problems based on the 41 individual complaints cited by the migrants. While the twelve animal species were used by the migrants to treat nine complaints; these were divided into six categories, the largest of which related to respiratory problems. None of the animal species and only 57 of the 78 plant species analysed in the present study were previously reported in the pharmacological literature; the popular knowledge concurred with academic findings for 30 of the plants. The seven plants [Impatiens hawkeri W. Bull., Artemisia canphorata Vill., Equisetum arvensis L., Senna pendula (Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. H.S. Irwin & Barneby, Zea mays L., Fevillea passiflora Vell. and Croton fuscescens Spreng] and the two animals (Atta sexdens and Periplaneta americana that showed maintenance of use among migrants during their displacement in Brazilian territory, have not been studied by pharmacologists yet. Conclusions Thus, they should be highlighted and focused in further pharmacology

  20. Changing surface water conditions for the last 500 ka in the Southeast Atlantic: Implications for variable influences of Agulhas leakage and Benguela upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Benjamin F.; McClymont, Erin L.; Marret, Fabienne; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important component of global ocean circulation, as it includes heat and salt transfer into the Atlantic through the Agulhas leakage as well as the highly productive Benguela upwelling system. Here we reconstruct sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1087 in the Southeast Atlantic to investigate surface ocean circulation patterns during the late Pleistocene (0-500 ka). The UK'37 index and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are used to reconstruct SSTs, δDalkenone is used to reconstruct changes in sea surface salinity, and mass accumulation rates of alkenones and chlorine pigments are quantified to detect changing marine export productivity. The greatest amplitude of SST warming precedes decreases in benthic δ18O and therefore occurs early in the transition from glacials to interglacials. The δDalkenone, as a salinity indicator, increases before SSTs, suggesting that the pattern of Agulhas leakage is more complex than suggested by SST proxies. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 10 shows an anomalous pattern: it is marked by a pronounced increase in chlorine concentration, which may be related to enhanced/expanded Benguela upwelling reaching the core site. We find no evidence of an absence of Agulhas leakage throughout the record, suggesting that there is no Agulhas cutoff even during MIS 10. Finally, the ODP Site 1087 record shows an increasing strength of Agulhas leakage towards the present day, which may have impacted the intensity of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. As a result, the new analyses from ODP Site 1087 demonstrate a complex interaction between influences of the Benguela upwelling and the Agulhas leakage through the late Pleistocene, which are inferred here to reflect changing circulation patterns in the Southern Ocean and in the atmosphere.

  1. National Assessment Of Shoreline Change: Part 2, Historical Shoreline Changes And Associated Coastal Land Loss Along The U.S. Southeast Atlantic Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert A.; Miller, Tara L.

    2005-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. This report on states comprising the Southeast Atlantic Coast (east Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina) represents the second in a series that already includes the Gulf of Mexico and will eventually include the Northeast Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. The report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results, provides explanations regarding the historical and present trends and rates of change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. Shoreline change evaluations are based on comparing three historical shorelines with a recent shoreline derived from lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) topographic surveys. The historical shorelines generally represent the following periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1970s, whereas the lidar shoreline is 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated using four shorelines (1800s to lidar shoreline), whereas short-term rates of change are calculated for the most recent period (1970s to lidar shoreline). The historical rates of change presented in

  2. Long-term subsidence, cooling, and exhumation history along the South Atlantic passive continental margin in NW-Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Salomon, Eric; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; Schneider, Gabi

    2017-04-01

    In northwestern Namibia the Kaoko Belt is one of the most important Precambrian crustal segments that have stored the subsidence, cooling, and exhumation history of Namibia since the Neoproterozoic. ZFT-ages, with ages between 292.7 (46.0) and 436.8 (45.9) Ma, are giving new insights on this early evolution. Paleozoic to Mesozoic sedimentary rocks of the Karoo Supergroup and the Lower Cretaceous volcanic rocks of the Etendeka sequence overlay the Proterozoic metamorphic and intrusive rocks (1). New apatite fission-track (AFT) ages range from 390.9 (17.9) Ma to 80.8 (6.0) Ma. Along the coast apatites of Proterozoic rock samples reveal the youngest ages. Further inland the ages increase significantly. In addition, rapid change of AFT-ages occurs on both sides of major thrust and shear zones. Using the oldest thermochronological data the revealed t-T paths indicate a long era of exhumation, starting at the end of the Pan-African Orogeny in the Neoproterozoic and continuing into the Permo-Carboniferous. The subsequent sedimentation of the Karoo Supergroup initiates a new era of subsidence until the end of Triassic (2).The subsequent period of denudation ends abruptly with the rapid deposition of the Etendeka basalts in the Early Cretaceous (3). The maximum thickness of the Etendeka volcanic suite has been estimated, using the apatite fission-track data, to about 3.2 (1.2) km. With the ongoing opening of the South Atlantic and the formation of the continental margin the Kaoko Belt went through a rapid cooling event starting 130 Ma and ending 80 Ma, at a mean rate of 0.034 km/Ma for the western, and 0.018 km/Ma for the northern and eastern Kaoko Belt. This cooling event was accompanied by a reactivation of major fault zones, like the Purros Mylonite Zone (4). Thereafter, stable conditions were established, with denudation rates generally lower than 0.010 km/Ma, until the Neogene, where a second cooling event led to increased exhumation rates around 0.042 km/Ma. The total

  3. 75 FR 22623 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220 and Geological and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... to determine relevant issues that should be considered in the environmental analysis of oil and gas... to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for proposed Mid-Atlantic Oil and Gas Lease Sale... South Atlantic OCS associated with renewable energy projects, oil and gas exploration, and marine...

  4. Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Future Suborbital Activities to Address Knowledge Gaps in Satellite and Model Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Piketh, S.; Formenti, P.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and may mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. Our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions in the SE Atlantic is hindered both by the lack of knowledge on aerosol and cloud properties, as well as the lack of knowledge about detailed physical processes involved. Most notably, we are missing knowledge on the absorptive and cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, including their vertical distribution relative to clouds, on the locations and degree of aerosol mixing into clouds, on the processes that govern cloud property adjustments, and on the importance of aerosol effects on clouds relative to co-varying synoptic scale meteorology. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling. Recent efforts to make full use of A-Train aerosol sensor synergies will be highlighted. We describe planned field campaigns in the region to address the existing knowledge gaps. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the five synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing some of the key aerosol and cloud properties and a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: NASA

  5. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Knowledge Gaps, Planned Observations to Address Them, and Implications for Global Climate Change Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Luna, B.; Abel, S.

    2015-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles, yet the fate of these particles and their influence on regional and global climate is poorly understood. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical Stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The stratocumulus "climate radiators" are critical to the regional and global climate system. They interact with dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and are mixed into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects. As emphasized in the latest IPCC report, the global representation of these aerosol-cloud interaction processes in climate models is one of the largest uncertainty in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling, and describe planned field campaigns in the region. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the following four synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: 1) ORACLES (Observations of Aerosols above Clouds and their interactions), a five-year investigation between 2015 and 2019 with three Intensive Observation Periods (IOP), recently funded by the NASA Earth-Venture Suborbital Program, 2) CLARIFY-2016 (Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Interactions and Forcing: Year 2016), a comprehensive observational and modeling programme funded by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and supported by the UK Met Office. 3) LASIC (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds), a funded

  6. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: South Carolina 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  7. Early-middle Eocene transition in calcareous nannofossil assemblages at IODP Site U1410 (Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, NW Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Carlotta; Agnini, Claudia; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2017-04-01

    The early-middle Eocene interval documents the shift from the warmest greenhouse conditions occurred during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 52-50 Ma) to the beginning of the cooling phase which led to the Oligocene icehouse regime. This important transition is well expressed as a reversal in the global oxygen and carbonate isotope trends (Zachos et al., 2001). Moreover, this interval was a time of remarkable transformation in the marine biosphere. Communities of calcareous nannoplankton, marine calcifying algae at the base of the oceans food chain, experienced transient and permanent profound changes. Calcareous nannofossil are regarded as remarkable tools both in biostratigraphy and paleoecology, with several taxa that show different responses to changes in physical parameters of surface waters. Here, we aim to document calcareous nannoplankton assemblage changes across the early-middle Eocene transition, in order to upset the biostratigraphic framework and to increase comprehension of how phytoplankton communities responded to paleoenvironmental changes at that time. The sedimentary successions recovered at IODP Site U1410 (Exp. 342; 41˚ 19.6987'N; 49˚ 10.1995'W, Norris et al., 2012) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge (NW Atlantic) offer an expanded record of the early-middle Eocene interval that is marked by an increase in accumulation rate related to sedimentation of clay-rich nannofossil oozes. Quantitative analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages was conducted, encompassing calcareous nannofossil Zones NP12 -NP15 or CNE4-CNE10 (Martini, 1971; Agnini et al., 2014). The study interval records the appearance and proliferation of Noelaerhabdaceae family (i.e, Reticulofenestra/Dictyococcites group), which can be considered one of the most significant shifts in the assemblage structure of the Paleogene. This change was probably favored by modifications in surface water chemistry. The middle Eocene clay-rich sediments contain well preserved

  8. Major early Eocene carbon cycle perturbations and changes in planktic foraminiferal assemblages from the southeast Atlantic Ocean (ODP Site 1263)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    On a paleoclimatic perspective the early Paleogene represents one of the most interesting and dynamic intervals of the Earth's history. Present record indicates that the Earth climate system reached its Cenozoic maximum peak of global warming and probably of pCO2 during the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, 49-53 Ma). Superimposed to the general trend, our planet experienced short-term ( 40-200 kyr) repeated peaks in global temperatures and major changes in the carbon cycle, known as hyperthermals. Great scientific interest has been focused on the early Paleogene hyperthermal events, given the assumed similarity with the current climatic scenario. Less attention has been dedicated to the EECO long lasting perturbation of extraordinary warming thus many characters of this interval still remain largely unconstrained, especially as for the biotic response. We present here results on early Eocene planktic foraminiferal analysis from the southeast Atlantic Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge, Leg 208) to explore possible relationship between changes in assemblages and carbon cycle perturbation. The time interval is of particular interest for an abrupt switch occurred at low-latitude of the northern hemisphere between two important calcifiers of the tropical-subtropical early Paleogene oceans, the genera Morozovella and Acarinina at the carbon isotopic excursion known as J event, at the EECO onset. Precisely, the relative abundance of Morozovella permanently decreased by at least half, along with a progressive decrease in the number of species. Concomitantly, Acarinina almost doubled its abundance and diversified. Site 1263 was located during the early Eocene at a latitude of 40° south therefore representing a temperate setting of southern hemisphere not yet explored for planktic foraminiferal changes. We document a permanent decrease in Morozovella abundance at the beginning of the EECO, although this decline is delayed by 165 kyr with respect to

  9. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale as modified from BLM memorandum 3310 #42 (722) and referred to therein as the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 58,300 sq km of shelf beneath water depths of less than 200 m and lies chiefly within the Georges Bank basin. The oldest sediments drilled or dredged on the bordering Continental Slope are sandstone, clay, and silt of Upper Cretaceous age. In Upper Cretaceous exposures, on Marthas Vineyard and nearby New England islands, the predominant lithology appears to be clay. About 125 km northeast of the eastern tip of Georges Bank, the Shell B-93 well penetrated clays and silts of Upper and Lower Cretaceous age above dense Jurassic carbonate rocks which overlie a basement of lower Paleozoic slate, schist, quartzite, and granite. Structurally, the Georges Bank basin is a westerly trending trough which opens to the west-southwest. Post-Paleozoic sediments are more than 8 km thick in parts of the basin. Major structural features appear to be directly related to basement structures. Local anticlines, probably caused by differential compaction over basement flexures and horst blocks or by later uplift along basement faults are reflected principally in Lower Cretaceous and older sediments, though some of these features continue upward to within 0.7 of a second (about 650 m) of the seafloor. Tertiary deposits in the Georges Bank basin are probably up to a kilometre thick and are made up of poorly consolidated sand, silt, and clay. The Cretaceous section is inferred to be up to 3.5 km thick and to be mainly clastics -- shale, siltstone, calcareous shale, changing to limestone in the lowest part of the system. Jurassic rocks in the deepest part of the basin appear to be about 3.6 to 4.0 km thick and probably consist mainly of dense carbonates. Potential source rocks in the Georges Bank basin may include organic-rich Cretaceous shale and carbonaceous Jurassic limestone. By analogy with the

  10. Continental outflow from the US to the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic during the NASA INTEX-NA Airborne Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Kim

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of continental outflow from the United States (US was examined using airborne measurements from NASA DC-8 flight 13 during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment – North America (INTEX-NA. Mixing ratios of methane (CH4 and carbon monoxide (CO at 8–11 km altitude over the North Atlantic were elevated to 1843 ppbv and 134 ppbv respectively, while those of carbon dioxide (CO2 and carbonyl sulfide (COS were reduced to 372.4 ppmv and 411 pptv respectively. In this region, urban and industrial influences were evidenced by elevated mixing ratios and good linear relationships between urban and industrial tracers compared to North Atlantic background air. Moreover, low mixing ratios and a good correlation between COS and CO2 showed a fingerprint of terrestrial uptake and minimal dilution during rapid transport over a 1–2 day time period. Analysis of synoptic conditions, backward trajectories, and photochemical aging estimates based on C3H8/C2H6 strongly suggested that elevated anthropogenic tracers in the upper troposphere of the flight region were the result of transport via convection and warm conveyor belt (WCB uplifting of boundary layer air over the southeastern US. This mechanism is supported by the similar slope values of linear correlations between long-lived (months anthropogenic tracers (e.g., C2Cl4 and CHCl3 from the flight region and the planetary boundary layer in the southeastern US. In addition, the aircraft measurements suggest that outflow from the US augmented the entire tropospheric column at mid-latitudes over the North Atlantic. Overall, the flight 13 data demonstrate a pervasive impact of US anthropogenic emissions on the troposphere over the North Atlantic.

  11. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change: a GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the U.S. southeast Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tara L.; Morton, Robert A.; Sallenger, Asbury H.

    2006-01-01

    The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the U.S. Southeast Atlantic Coast (Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina). These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates of shorelines and shoreline change rates can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the U.S. Southeast Atlantic Coast is the second in a series that already includes the Gulf of Mexico, and will eventually include the Pacific Coast, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are based on merging three historical shorelines with a modern shoreline derived from lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1970s. The most recent shoreline is derived from data collected over the period of 1997-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are simple end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change for the U.S. Southeast Atlantic Coast at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1401/ to get additional

  12. Observations of Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: First Results from the ORACLES Deployments in 2016 and 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Diner, D.; Van Harten, G.; Xu, F.; Cairns, B.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Segal Rozenhaimer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earths biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and often mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for regional and global climate change predictions.The low-level clouds in the SE Atlantic have limited vertical extent and therefore present favorable conditions for their exploration with remote sensing. On the other hand, the normal coexistence of BB aerosols and Sc clouds in the same scene also presents significant challenges to conventional remote sensing techniques. We describe first results from NASAs airborne ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols Above Clouds and Their IntEractionS) deployments in September 2016 and August 2017. We emphasize the unique role of polarimetric observations by two instruments, the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) and the Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager (AirMSPI), and describe how these instruments help address specific ORACLES science objectives. Initial assessments of polarimetric observation accuracy for key cloud and aerosol properties will be presented, in as far as the preliminary nature of measurements permits.

  13. National assessment of shoreline change—Summary statistics for updated vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2017-07-18

    Long-term rates of shoreline change for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic regions of the United States have been updated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change project. Additional shoreline position data were used to compute rates where the previous rate-of-change assessment only included four shoreline positions at a given location. The long-term shoreline change rates also incorporate the proxy-datum bias correction to account for the unidirectional onshore bias of the proxy-based high water line shorelines relative to the datum-based mean high water shorelines. The calculation of uncertainty associated with the long-term average rates has also been updated to match refined methods used in other study regions of the National Assessment project. The average rates reported here have a reduced amount of uncertainty relative to those presented in the previous assessments for these two regions.

  14. 78 FR 76643 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Proposed Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... grid) relative to the wind facility's generation at continuous full power operation at nameplate...

  15. 75 FR 16830 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration (G&G) on the Mid- and South Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Minerals Management Service Geological and Geophysical Exploration (G&G) on the Mid- and South Atlantic... surveys, sidescan-sonar surveys, electromagnetic surveys, geological and geochemical sampling, and remote...-LeasingDocument.pdf ) and MMS's Geological and Geophysical Exploration for Mineral Resources on the Gulf...

  16. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and North-Atlantic US outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, January 1978-July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Fitch, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    The species composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds on continental shelf waters from Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy were examined using ships-of-opportunity. Northern Fulmar, Cory's Shearwater, Greater Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Gannet, Red Phalarope, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Black-legged Kittiwake were the most abundant and common species. These species were ecologically dominant within the bird community in numbers and biomass. Georges Bank and Gulf of Marine regions generally had greatest estimates of standing stock and biomass; whereas, in the Middle Atlantic region these estimates were consistently lowest. Species diversity throughout the study area was greatest in spring and least in fall. Oceanic fronts at the continental shelf break and at Nantucket Shoals influenced the distribution of Wilson's Storm-Petrels and Red Phalaropes. Fishing activities were particularly important to Larus gull distribution. Fishes, squids, and crustaceans were the most important groups of prey items in diets of nine bird species. An oiled bird or pollution index was developed. According to the index, frequency of oiled birds was greatest in winter and spring, and gulls made up the majority of species with oiled plumages.

  17. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and north-Atlantic U. S. outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, September 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Burrell, G.C.

    1979-10-01

    The scope of the project was not changed since the last annual report, but the study area was extended south to Cape Hatteras. The objectives were to determine spatial and temporal distributions of marine birds in mid- and north-Atlantic U.S. continental shelf waters; to identify marine bird food habits and distribution of prey items; and (3) to develop a marine bird data retrieval bank. Data from 1978-79 indicated that Georges Bank and its adjacent waters support an abundant and diverse bird population throughout the year. Species composition changed seasonally but diversity usually remained high. In contrast, the mid-Atlantic Bight demonstrated only a seasonal importance to birds. In all areas surveyed greatest bird densities were found at upwellings and in association with fishing activities. A stomach contents analysis of specimens collected in August 1978 indicated that Cory's, Greater and Sooty Shearwaters were feeding on squid and fish. Great Black-backed and Herring Gulls were utilizing fish, insects, birds, and crustaceans. All MBO seabird data collected prior to July 1979 have been keypunched. No data retrieval programs were developed.

  18. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in the South-East Atlantic: first results from the ORACLES-2016 deployment and plans for future activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J. M.; Piketh, S.; Formenti, P.; Abel, S.

    2016-12-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and may mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for regional and global climate change predictions. Our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions in the SE Atlantic is severely limited. Most notably, we are missing knowledge on the absorptive and cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, including their vertical distribution relative to clouds, on the locations and degree of aerosol mixing into clouds, on the processes that govern cloud property adjustments, and on the importance of aerosol effects on clouds relative to co-varying synoptic scale meteorology. We describe first results from various synergistic, international research activities aimed at studying aerosol-cloud interactions in the region: NASA's airborne ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols Above Clouds and Their IntEractionS) deployment in August/September of 2016, the DoE's LASIC (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds) deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility to Ascension Island (June 2016 - October 2017), the ground-based components of CNRS' AEROCLO-sA (Aerosols Clouds and Fog over the west coast of southern Africa), and ongoing regional-scale integrative, process-oriented science efforts as part of SEALS-sA (Sea Earth Atmosphere Linkages Study in southern Africa). We expect to describe experimental

  19. Millennial climatic changes in US and European loess deposits: Links between continental, North Atlantic and Greenland records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, D.; Antoine, P.; Hatte, C.; Sima, A.

    2007-12-01

    Loess sequences are key deposits at mid-latitudes in N Hemisphere, where no other complete records of past climatic changes are available. US and European sequences are thus ideally located to contribute testing the impact of abrupt climatic changes, described from North Atlantic and Greenland, as modeled by Ganopolski and Rahmstorf (2001). We present a synthesis of our high-resolution investigations in both continents by focusing on MIS 3 and 2. We show that the dust sedimentation, which lead to the loess formation, did not happen regularly, but better followed the dust deposition in Greenland corresponding to strong variations in the atmospheric circulation. Indeed all studied sequences show the alternation of pure or laminated loess with paleosols corresponding to artic brown soils, tundra gleys or embryonic gleys. Thus using i) grain size studies, ii) OSL and AMS dates, iii) d13C and mollusk analyses, and iv) the stratigraphical schemes and ongoing modeling experiments, we show that N Hemisphere loess sequences recorded millennial climatic variations even though with differences from one side to the other of the North Atlantic: while the general climatic history is recorded, the magnitude of the eolian events indicates differences. For example the strong N Atlantic coolings events (HE), expressed in the grain size studies by coarser material in Europe, cannot be identified in the US Great Plains. On the contrary, DO events are recorded by paleosols corresponding to finer sedimentation or stops/reductions in the dust deposition as also observed in the Greenland ice-cores. We conclude that climate variability in Western Europe appears strongly correlated with that in the North Atlantic area, at timescales at least as fine as centuries, while partly in North America.

  20. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Meade, R.H.; Bond, G.C.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable amounts of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  1. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 26 August 1980- 01 March 1981 (NODC Accession 8100540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 26, 1980 to March 1, 1980. Data were submitted by Science...

  2. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 15 March 1981- 01 October 1981 (NODC Accession 8100718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from March 15, 1981 to October 1, 1981. Data were submitted by Science...

  3. Molecular Gut Content Profiling to Investigate the In Situ Grazing and Selectivity of Dolioletta gegenbauri in Summer Continental Shelf Intrusion Waters of the South Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, T. L.; Frazier, L.; Gibson, D. M.; Paffenhofer, G. A.; Frischer, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    Gelatinous metazooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs and it has been suggested that they may become increasingly important in the Future Ocean. However, largely due to methodological challenges and reliance on laboratory cultivation approaches, the in situ diet of zooplankton with complex life histories and diverse prey choices remains poorly investigated. This is particularly true for the gelatinous zooplankton including the pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri that form large blooms in productive subtropical continental shelf environments. To investigate the diet of D. gegenbauri we developed a molecular gut profiling approach based on the use of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) PCR blocker. Using a doliolid-specific PNA blocker, it was possible to enrich the amplification of prey and parasite DNA from whole animal DNA extracts of doliolids. Gut contents from the water column, wild and captive-fed doliolids were profiled after PNA-PCR by denaturing HPLC (dHPLC), clone library and next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. Studies were conducted during 5 summer cruises in the mid-shelf of the South Atlantic Bight. Comparison of gut profiles to available prey in the water column revealed evidence of prey selection towards larger prey species, including diatoms, dinoflagelletes and also metazoan prey that were likely captured as larvae and eggs. Wild-caught doliolids contained significantly more metazoan sequences than did the captive-fed doliolids. Ingestion of metazoan prey suggests that metazoans may contribute both the nutrition of doliolids and the potential role of doliolids as trophic cascade agents in continental shelf pelagic food webs.

  4. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research'sOkeanos Explorer Program 2014 Discoveries - U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobecker, E.; McKenna, L.; Sowers, D.; Elliott, K.; Kennedy, B.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA ShipOkeanos Explorer, the only U.S. federal vessel dedicated to global ocean exploration, made several important discoveries in U.S. waters of the North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico during the 2014 field season. Based on input received from a broad group ofmarine scientists and resource managers, over 100,000 square kilometers of seafloor and associated water column were systematically explored using advanced mapping sonars. 39 ROV diveswere conducted, leading to new discoveries that will further ourunderstanding of biologic, geologic, and underwater-cultural heritage secrets hidden withinthe oceans. In the Atlantic, season highlights include completion of a multi-year submarine canyons mapping effort of the continental shelf break from North Carolina to the U.S.-Canada maritime border;new information on the ephemerality of recently discovered and geographically extensive cold water seeps; and continued exploration of the New England Seamount chain; and mapping of two potential historically significant World War II wreck sites. In the Gulf of Mexico, season highlights includecompletion of a multi-year mapping effort of the West Florida Escarpment providing new insight into submarine landslides and detachment zones;the discovery of at least two asphalt volcanoes, or 'tar lilies'; range extensions of deep-sea corals; discovery of two potential new species of crinoids; identification of at least 300 potential cold water seeps; and ROV exploration of three historically significant19th century shipwrecks. In both regions, high-resolution mapping led to new insight into the geological context in which deep sea corals develop,while ROV dives provided valuable observations of deep sea coral habitats and their associated organisms, and chemosynthetic habitats. All mapping and ROV data is freely available to the public in usable data formats and maintained in national geophysical and oceanographic data archives.

  5. Sedimentary hydrocarbons and sterols in a South Atlantic estuarine/shallow continental shelf transitional environment under oil terminal and grain port influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bet, Rafael; Bícego, Marcia C; Martins, César C

    2015-06-15

    Sterols and hydrocarbons were determined in the surface sediments from the transitional environment between Paranaguá Bay and the shallow continental shelf in the South Atlantic to assess the sources of organic matter (OM) and the contamination status of an area exposed to multiple anthropogenic inputs. Total aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations were less than 10μgg(-1), which is typical of unpolluted sediments, and related to recent inputs from higher terrestrial plants. Total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ranged from

  6. Assessment of Canyon Wall Failure Process and Disturbance Gradients from Multibeam Bathymetry and Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Observations, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, J. D.; Demopoulos, A. W.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Quattrini, A.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last several years, canyons around Puerto Rico and along the U.S. Atlantic continental margin between Georges Bank and Cape Hatteras have been investigated using high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) dives utilizing the exploration vessels E/V Nautilus and NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. The imaging capabilities of these ROVs have provided the opportunity to begin to investigate the size of canyon wall failures, the processes responsible for their occurrence and to develop a conceptual framework for determining their relative age. Bed and formation scale lithologies exposed in the canyons and localized structural features (bedding planes, fracture planes, etc.) appear to be the primary control on the style of failures observed. Near vertical walls, sedimented benches, talus slopes, and canyon floor debris aprons were present in most canyons visited. Evidence of brittle failure over different spatial and temporal scales, physical abrasion by downslope moving flows, and bio-erosion in the form of burrows and surficial scrape marks provide insight into the modification processes active in these canyons. The level of colonization by sessile species (e.g., corals, sponges) on the canyon walls and displaced material, especially on substrates affected by failure and sediment bioturbation, provide a critical, but as yet, poorly understood chronological record of geologic processes within these systems. Therefore, comparison of the processes among these geologically, oceanographically, and ecologically different regions provides the opportunity to critically assess the wide range of drivers that control recolonization of sessile fauna influenced by continuous or episodic disturbances.

  7. Host specificity and experimental assessment of the early establishment of the mistletoe Phoradendron crassifolium (Pohl ex DC. Eichler (Santalaceae in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Aparecida Messias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mistletoe establishment relies heavily on a seed reaching a proper host plant. Small frugivorous birds usually disperse large numbers of mistletoe seeds. However, in the field, mistletoes are absent from some potential available hosts. We investigated whether the mistletoe Phoradendron crassifolium has some preferences for specific host trees in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in southeast Brazil. We surveyed 397 tree individuals of 50 species within 25 families. Seven of those species (14% bore P. crassifolium infections. Although prevalence at the individual level was low (11.6%, there were marked deviations in infection levels among species and families. Most (87% of the infections (40 of 46 occurred in species belonging to the families Anacardiaceae (Lithraea molleoides and Tapirira guianensis and Siparunaceae (Siparuna guianensis, which nevertheless accounted for only 26% of the potential individual hosts (103 of 397. We also performed an experiment simulating bird behavior. We inoculated 480 mistletoe seeds to the bark of four potential hosts in field, following the fate of the seeds for five months. No differences in host preference were observed. The low specificity detected at the local level was confirmed by a survey of exsiccata collected over the geographical distribution of the mistletoe, suggesting that P. crassifolium prevalence is more dependent on dispersal limitation than on mistletoe-host compatibility.

  8. Characterization of Ant Communities (Hymenoptera: Formicidae in Twigs in the Leaf Litter of the Atlantic Rainforest and Eucalyptus Trees in the Southeast Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora R. de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragments of Atlantic Rainforest and extensive eucalyptus plantations are part of the landscape in the southeast region of Brazil. Many studies have been conducted on litter ant diversity in these forests, but there are few reports on the nesting sites. In the present study, we characterized the ant communities that nest in twigs in the leaf litter of dense ombrophilous forests and eucalyptus trees. The colony demographics associated with the physical structure of the nest were recorded. In the eucalyptus forests, the study examined both managed and unmanaged plantations. During five months, all undecomposed twigs between 10 and 30 cm in length containing ants found within a 16-m2 area on the surface of the leaf litter were collected. A total of 307 nests and 44 species were recorded. Pheidole, Solenopsis, and Camponotus were the most represented genera. Pheidole sp.13, Pheidole sp.43 and Linepithema neotropicum were the most populous species. The dense ombrophilous forest and a eucalyptus plantation unmanaged contained the highest number of colonized twigs; these communities were the most similar and the most species rich. Our results indicate that the twigs are important resources as they help to maintain the litter diversity of dense rain forest and abandoned eucalypt crops.

  9. Metazoan fish parasites of Macrourus berglax Lacepède, 1801 and other macrourids of the North Atlantic: Invasion of the deep sea from the continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, H. W.; Klimpel, S.

    2008-01-01

    generalists that originated from the continental shelf. We propose that the parasite fauna of macrourids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge harbours a similar parasite fauna and infestation pattern than that of macrourids from other parts of the world Oceans.

  10. Growth and destruction of siliciclastic continental slopes: new insights from multi-resolution seismic reflection data along the US Atlantic passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, D. S.; Chaytor, J. D.; Ten Brink, U. S.; Hill, J. C.; Flores, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic reflection data along the southern New England, Hudson Apron and mid-Atlantic continental margins provide new insights into the processes that control slope depositional systems, and specifically, some of the preconditioning factors that lead to widespread mass wasting. The data include 2,500 line-km of high-resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) data mostly collected by the USGS and more than 10,000 line-km of lower-resolution, but deeper penetrating industry MCS profiles in these regions. For the first time, sequence stratigraphic interpretations from Ocean ODP Site 1073 [e.g., 1] have been extended to the north of Hudson Canyon, providing first-order age constraints on Pleistocene shelf and slope strata. Several packages that can be continuously traced from the outer shelf to the upper rise of the Hudson Apron east of the Hudson Canyon. This is one of few places along the margin where prograding Pleistocene sequences are preserved across the shelf, slope and upper rise. Farther east, the Pleistocene section contains pervasive evidence for retrogressive failure and landsliding (see companion abstract by Chaytor et al.). In several places, Pleistocene layers are truncated and failure planes appear to coincide with major sequence boundaries, suggesting that elevated pore pressures in this region are closely tied to lithologic boundaries linked to paleo sea level fluctuations. The density and size of failures increases along the lower slope where the physiography of an underlying pre-Pleistocene surface dramatically steepens, probably because the yield strength is more frequently exceeded there. High-resolution MCS data collected during a recent pilot survey on and around the Currituck submarine slide (US mid-Atlantic margin) show similar relationships between slope failure and seismic facies along the middle and lower slopes. Modern day slopes containing thick and spatially continuous Pleistocene sequences are likely to higher potential large

  11. Sensitivity analysis of a variability in rock thermal conductivity concerning implications on the thermal evolution of the Brazilian South Atlantic passive continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stippich, Christian; Krob, Florian; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Hackspacher, Peter Christian

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the research is to quantify the long-term evolution of the western South Atlantic passive continental margin (SAPCM) in SE-Brazil. Excellent onshore outcrop conditions and extensive pre-rift to post-rift archives between São Paulo and Laguna allow a high precision quantification of exhumation, and rock uplift rates, influencing physical parameters, long-term acting forces, and process-response systems. The research integrates published (Karl et al., 2013) and partly published thermochronological data from Brazil, and test lately published new concepts on causes of long-term landscape and lithospheric evolution in southern Brazil. Six distinct lithospheric blocks (Laguna, Florianópolis, Curitiba, Ilha Comprida, Peruibe and Santos), which are separated by fracture zones (Karl et al., 2013) are characterized by individual thermochronological age spectra. Furthermore, the thermal evolution derived by numerical modeling indicates variable post-rift exhumation histories of these blocks. In this context, we will provide information on the causes for the complex exhumation history of the Florianópolis, and adjacent blocks. Following up on our latest publication (Braun et al., 2016) regarding the effect of variability in rock thermal conductivity on exhumation rate estimates we performed a sensitivity analysis to quantify the effect of a differentiated lithospheric crust on the thermal evolution of the Florianópolis block versus exhumation rates estimated from modelling a lithospheric uniform crustal block. The long-term landscape evolution models with process rates were computed with the software code PECUBE (Braun, 2003; Braun et al., 2012). Testing model solutions obtained for a multidimensional parameter space against the real thermochronological and geomorphological data set, the most likely combinations of parameters, values, and rates can be constrained. References Braun, J., 2003. Pecube: A new finite element code to solve the 3D heat transport

  12. Carbonate system in the water masses of the Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during February and March 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dávila, M.; Santana-Casiano, J. M.; Fine, R. A.; Happell, J.; Delille, B.; Speich, S.

    2011-05-01

    Carbonate system variables were measured in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from South Africa to the southern limit of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) from February to March 2008. Eddies detached from the retroflection of the Agulhas Current increased the gradients observed along the fronts. Minima in the fugacity of CO2, fCO2, and maxima in pH on either side of the frontal zone were observed, noting that within the frontal zone fCO2 reached maximum values and pH was at a minimum. Vertical distributions of water masses were described by their carbonate system properties and their relationship to CFC concentrations. Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW) and Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) offered pHT,25 values of 7.56 and 7.61, respectively. The UCDW also had higher concentrations of CFC-12 (>0.2 pmol kg-1) as compared to deeper waters, revealing that UCDW was mixed with recently ventilated waters. Calcite and aragonite saturation states (Ω) were also affected by the presence of these two water masses with high carbonate concentrations. The aragonite saturation horizon was observed at 1000 m in the subtropical area and north of the Subantarctic Front. At the position of the Polar Front, and under the influence of UCDW and LCDW, the aragonite saturation horizon deepened from 800 m to 1500 m at 50.37° S, and reached 700 m south of 57.5° S. High latitudes proved to be the most sensitive areas to predicted anthropogenic carbon increase. Buffer coefficients related to changes in [CO2], [H+] and Ω with changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and total alkalinity (AT) offered minima values in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and UCDW layers. These coefficients suggest that a small increase in CT will sharply decrease the status of pH and carbonate saturation. Here we present data that suggest that south of 55° S, surface water will be under-saturated with respect to aragonite within the next few decades.

  13. Carbonate system in the water masses of the Southeast Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean during February and March 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. González-Dávila

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate system variables were measured in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean along a transect from South Africa to the southern limit of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC from February to March 2008. Eddies detached from the retroflection of the Agulhas Current increased the gradients observed along the fronts. Minima in the fugacity of CO2, fCO2, and maxima in pH on either side of the frontal zone were observed, noting that within the frontal zone fCO2 reached maximum values and pH was at a minimum.

    Vertical distributions of water masses were described by their carbonate system properties and their relationship to CFC concentrations. Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW and Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW offered pHT,25 values of 7.56 and 7.61, respectively. The UCDW also had higher concentrations of CFC-12 (>0.2 pmol kg−1 as compared to deeper waters, revealing that UCDW was mixed with recently ventilated waters. Calcite and aragonite saturation states (Ω were also affected by the presence of these two water masses with high carbonate concentrations. The aragonite saturation horizon was observed at 1000 m in the subtropical area and north of the Subantarctic Front. At the position of the Polar Front, and under the influence of UCDW and LCDW, the aragonite saturation horizon deepened from 800 m to 1500 m at 50.37° S, and reached 700 m south of 57.5° S. High latitudes proved to be the most sensitive areas to predicted anthropogenic carbon increase. Buffer coefficients related to changes in [CO2], [H+] and Ω with changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (CT and total alkalinity (AT offered minima values in the Antarctic Intermediate Water and UCDW layers. These coefficients suggest that a small increase in CT will sharply decrease the status of pH and carbonate saturation

  14. Syn- and post-rift anomalous vertical movements in the eastern Central Atlantic passive margin: a transect across the Moroccan passive continental margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charton, Remi; Bertotti, Giovanni; Arantegui, Angel; Luber, Tim; Redfern, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Traditional models of passive margin evolution suggesting generalised regional subsidence with rates decreasing after the break-up have been questioned in the last decade by a number of detailed studies. The occurrence of episodic km-scale exhumation well within the post-rift stage, possibly associated with significant erosion, have been documented along the Atlantic continental margins. Despite the wide-spread and increasing body of evidence supporting post-rift exhumation, there is still limited understanding of the mechanism or scale of these phenomena. Most of these enigmatic vertical movements have been discovered using low-temperature geochronology and time-temperature modelling along strike of passive margins. As proposed in previous work, anomalous upward movements in the exhuming domain are coeval with higher-than-normal downward movements in the subsiding domain. These observations call for an integrated analysis of the entire source-to-sink system as a pre-requisite for a full understanding of the involved tectonics. We reconstruct the geological evolution of a 50km long transect across the Moroccan passive margin from the Western Anti-Atlas (Ifni area) to the offshore passive margin basin. Extending the presently available low-temperature geochronology database and using a new stratigraphic control of the Mesozoic sediments, we present a reconstruction of vertical movements in the area. Further, we integrate this with the analysis of an offshore seismic line and the pattern of vertical movements in the Anti-Atlas as documented in Gouiza et al. (2016). The results based on sampled rocks indicate exhumation by circa 6km after the Variscan orogeny until the Middle Jurassic. During the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous the region was subsequently buried by 1-2km, and later exhumed by 1-2km from late Early/Late Cretaceous onwards. From the Permian to present day, the Ifni region is the link between the generally exhuming Anti Atlas and continually subsiding

  15. A regional assessment of potential environmental hazards to and limitations on petroleum development of the Southeastern United States Atlantic continental shelf, slope, and rise, offshore North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenoe, Peter; Coward, E.L.; Cashman, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    More than 11,000 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data, 325 km of mid-range sidescan-sonar data, and 500 km of long-range sidescan-sonar data were examined and used to construct an environmental geology map of the Continental Shelf, Slope, and Rise for the area of the U.S. Atlantic margin between lats. 32?N. and 37?N. Hardgrounds and two faults described in previous literature also are shown on the map. On the Continental Shelf, at least two faults, the Helena Banks fault and the White Oak lineament, appear to be tectonic in origin. However, a lack of historical seismicity associated with these faults indicates that they are probably not active at the present time. Hardgrounds are widely scattered but are most abundant in Onslow Bay. Although paleostream channels are common nearshore, they do not appear to be common on the central and outer shelf except off Albemarle Sound where extensive Pleistocene, Pliocene, and late Miocene channels extend across the shelf. Mobile bottom sediments are confined mainly to the shoals off Cape Romain, Cape Fear, Cape Lookout, and Cape Hatteras. Elsewhere the sand cover is thin, and older more indurated rocks are present in subcrop. No slope-instability features were noted on the Florida-Hatteras slope off North Carolina. The lack of features indicates that this slope is relatively stable. Evidence for scour by strong currents is ubiquitous on the northern Blake Plateau although deep-water reefs are sparse. The outer edge of the plateau is dominated by a major growth fault and numerous splay and antithetic faults. These faults are the product of salt tectonism in the Carolina trough and thus are not associated with seismicity. Displacements observed near the sea floor and breached diapirs offshore indicate that the main fault is still moving. Associated with the faults are collapse features that are interpreted to be caused by karst solution and cavernous porosity in Eocene and Oligocene limestones at depth. Major slumps

  16. Long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin along the Kaoko- and Damara Belts, NW-Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Daniel; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Hackspacher, Peter; Schneider, Gabriele; Salomon, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The Kaoko Belt in northwestern Namibia originates in the collision of the Rio de la Plata and Kongo Craton during the Pan-African Orogeny in the Neoproterozoic (1) and represents the northern arm of the Damara Orogen. NW-Namibias continental crust mainly consists of the NE-SW striking intracontinental branch of the Pan-African Damara mobile belt, which separates the Congo from the Kalahari craton. The Damara Orogen is divided into several tectonostratigraphic zones that are bounded by steeply dipping, ductile shear zones. These regional lineaments can be traced at least 150 km offshore (2). The lithostratigraphic units consist of Proterozoic and Cambrian metamorphosed rocks (534 (7) Ma - 481 (25) Ma (3) as well as Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks. From Permo-Carboniferous to Mid Jurassic northern Namibia was affected by deep erosion of the Damara Orogen, Permo-Triassic collisional processes along the southern margin of Gondwana and eastern margin of Africa (4), and the deposition of the Nama Group sediments and the Karoo megasequence (5). Between the Otjihorongo and the Omaruru Lineament-Waterberg Thrust early Mesozoic tectonic activity is recorded by coarse clastic sediments deposited within NE trending half-graben structures. The Early Jurassic Karoo flood basalt lavas erupted rapidly at 183±1 Ma (6). The Early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka flood basalts (132±1 Ma) and mafic dike swarms mark the rift stage of the opening of the South Atlantic (7). Early Cretaceous alkaline intrusions (137-124 Ma) occur preferentially along Mesozoic half-graben structures and are called the Damaraland Igneous Province (8). Late Cretaceous alkaline intrusions and kimberlite pipes occur in northern Namibia. Post Early Paleocene siliciclastic sedimentation in Namibia was largely restricted to a 150 km wide zone (9) and is represented by the Tsondab Sandstone Formation (~ 300 m thickness). The oldest part has an age of early Paleocene and the upper part span from middle Miocene

  17. Origins of late- Pleistocene coastal dune sheets, Magdalena and Guerrero Negro, from continental shelf low-stand supply (70-20 ka), under conditions of southeast littoral- and eolian-sand transport, in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Murillo-Jiménez, Janette M.; Stock, Errol; Price, David M.; Hostetler, Steve W.; Percy, David

    2017-10-01

    Shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (n = 11) in each of two large coastal dune sheets including the Magdalena (7000 km2) and Guerrero Negro (8000 km2) dune sheets, from the Pacific Ocean side of Baja California Sur, Mexico, have been analyzed for dune deposit age. The shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (∼2-10 m depth) include 11 new TL and 14C ages, and paleosol chronosequences, that differentiate cemented late Pleistocene dune deposits (20.7 ± 2.1 to 99.8 ± 9.4 ka) from uncemented Holocene dune deposits (0.7 ± 0.05 to at least 3.2 ± 0.3 ka). Large linear dune ridges (5-10 m in height) in the dune sheet interiors trend southeast and are generally of late Pleistocene age (∼70-20 ka). The late Pleistocene dune deposits reflect eolian transport of marine sand across the emerged continental shelf (30-50 km southeast distance) from low-stand paleo-shorelines (-100 ± 25 m elevation), which were locally oriented nearly orthogonal to modeled deep-water wave directions (∼300° TN). During the Holocene marine transgression, onshore and alongshore wave transport delivered remobilized shelf-sand deposits to the nearshore areas of the large dune sheets, building extensive barrier islands and sand spits. Submerged back-barrier lagoons generally precluded marine sand supply to dune sheet interiors in middle to late Holocene time, though exceptions occur along some ocean and lagoon shorelines. Reactivation of the late Pleistocene dune deposits in the dune sheet interiors lead to generally thin (1-3 m thickness), but widespread, covers of Holocene dune deposits (0.41 ± 0.05 to 10.5 ± 1.6 ka). Mechanical drilling will be required to penetrate indurated subsoil caliche layers to reach basal Pleistocene dune deposits.

  18. Horizontal and vertical distribution of Chaetognatha in the upper 1000 m of the western Sargasso Sea and the Central and South-east Atlantic.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pierrot-Bultsa, A.C.; Nair, V.R.

    The chaetognath abundance, species richness and bathymetric distribution in the upper 1000 m in two regions of the Atlantic Ocean is discussed based on samples collected on two cruises, one to the Sargasso Sea (Northwest Atlantic) on board the R/V R...

  19. Seabirds in marine habitats of southeast Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers seabirds in marine habitats of southeast Alaska. The methods, study areas (ocean, shelf break, continental shelf, and inland passage waters) and...

  20. Location of bottom photographs taken along the U.S. Atlantic East Coast as part of the Continental Margin Program (1963-1968, BPHOTOS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1962, Congress authorized the Continental Margin Program, a joint program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution...

  1. Continental and Marine Climate Records from Chile and the Southeast Pacific: Joint Pollen, Oxygen Isotope, and Radiolaria Records from ODP Sites 1233 and 1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, L.; Heusser, C.; McManus, J.; Mix, A.; Pisias, N.

    2004-12-01

    Rapidly-deposited sediments (1-3m/kyr) from ODP Site 1233 (41°0.005'S, 74°26.992'W, 838m water depth) document millennial-scale changes in the response of Chilean plant communities to atmospheric circulation in the southeast Pacific over the past 60ka. Pollen data from the upper 95m of Site 1234 (36°13.153'S, 73°40.902'W) replicate and extend the terrestrial record through the last glacial cycle (MIS 1-MIS5e), thus providing the first record of vegetation and climate from the last interglacial in temperate South America. Both Sites monitor a major discontinuity in Chilean climate - the transition between northern semi-arid, summer dry-winter wet climate and southern year-round, rainy, cool temperate climate. Downcore changes in diagnostic pollen from xeric and mesic vegetation (Lowland Deciduous Beech forest, Valdivian Evergreen Forest, and Subantarctic Evergreen Forest and Parkland) reflect frequent latitudinal shifts of the southern westerlies during MIS 2 and MIS 3. During most of the last glacial, cool, mesic rainforests composed of evergreen beech (Nothofagus dombeyi) and conifers, such as the endangered Prumnopitys andina, characterized coastal Chile. Late Pleistocene, intervals of heavy rainfall and lower temperatures inferred from expansion of Subantarctic Parkland correspond with regional glacial events, and the structure and variability of southern Chilean vegetation and climate correspond with changes in marine surface waters offshore and in Antarctic ice core data. In the last 140,000 years, only during MIS 5e was vegetation of southern Chile similar to that of the Holocene. At the MIS 6/5e transition, coeval with the rapid shift to light isotopic values, glacial vegetation was rapidly replaced by plant communities associated with Mediterranean climate. An increased prominence of halophytic vegetation suggests that MIS 5e was more arid and possibly warmer than MIS 1. Lowland Deciduous Beech Forest (N. obliqua) extended well into the interval of ice

  2. Structural framework, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology of the area of oil and gas lease Sale No. 49 on the U.S. Atlantic continental shelf and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, Robert E.; Hennessy, Jacqueline L.

    1980-01-01

    On September 23, 1977, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced the tentative selection of 136 tracts for Sale No. 49 of oil and gas leases in the Baltimore Canyon Trough on the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf and Slope. This report summarizes the geology and petroleum potential of the area. The Baltimore Canyon Trough is an elongate, seaward-opening sedimentary basin filled by as much as 14 km of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. The basin first formed under the New Jersey shelf and gradually spread west and south as the area subsided after the rifting that formed the Atlantic basin. Rocks of the Triassic and Jurassic Systems together are more than 8 km thick in a depocenter areally restricted to the northern part of the trough. Basal Jurassic rocks are apparently nonmarine sedimentary rocks bedded with evaporite deposits. Direct evidence that some salt is in the basal Jurassic section comes from the Houston Oil and Minerals 676-1 well, which penetrated salt at a depth of about 3.8 km. During the Middle and Late Jurassic, more open marine conditions prevailed than in the Early Jurassic, and carbonate banks and reefs formed discontinuously along the seaward side of the shelf. Sand flats likely occupied the central part of the shelf, and these probably graded shoreward into nonmarine red beds that accumulated in a bordering coastal plain. Thick nonmarine sands and silty shales of Late Jurassic age were deposited in what is now the nearshore and midshelf area. These sedimentary rocks probably grade into thick marine carbonate rocks near the present shelf edge. During the Cretaceous, less sediment accumulated (about 4 km) than during the Jurassic, and most was deposited during Early Cretaceous time. The Cretaceous units show two main trends through time-a diminishing rate of sediment accumulation and an increase in marine character of sediments. During the Middle and Late Cretaceous, calcareous sand and mud filled the basin, buried the shelf-edge reefs and

  3. Southeast Asia’s changing palaeogeography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.

    2009-01-01

    Geology provides the basis for understanding distributions of faunas and floras in Southeast Asia but only via a complex interplay of plate movements, palaeogeography, ocean circulation and climate. Southeast Asia grew incrementally by the addition of continental fragments, mainly rifted from

  4. Bacteriology data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS-Mid Atlantic Ocean) project, 05 November 1976 - 16 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7800207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 5, 1976 to August 16, 1977....

  5. Zooplankton data from zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 03 November 1976 - 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 3, 1976 to November 18,...

  6. Hydrodynamically-driven distribution of lanternfish larvae in the Southeast Brazilian Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Cláudia; Katsuragawa, Mario; Napolitano, Dante Campagnoli; Zani-Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Mattos, Rafael Augusto de; Silveira, Ilson Carlos Almeida da

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzes the influence of the Brazil Current and Ekman transport on the distribution of lanternfish larvae in the Southeast Brazilian Bight during summer and winter. Larvae of 19 taxa of lanternfish were identified, and Diaphus spp. and M. affine were the most abundant. Three water masses were present in the area: Coastal Water, Tropical Water and South Atlantic Central Water. Lanternfish larvae were associated with the Tropical Water in both seasons. During summer, species of Lampanyctinae were associated with the shallowest layers and Myctophinae in the deepest layers. In winter most species of both subfamilies were associated with intermediate depths, probably because greater mixing of water masses occurred at the surface and 100 m depth, limiting their distribution. During both cruises, the presence of lanternfish larvae in the continental shelf was related to the pattern of Tropical Water intrusion, which was mostly driven by the mesoscale activity of the Brazil Current and its interaction with the continental shelf.

  7. Long-term evolution of the western South Atlantic passive continental margin in a key area of SE Brazil revealed by thermokinematic numerical modeling using the software code Pecube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stippich, Christian; Krob, Florian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the research is to quantify the long-term evolution of the western South Atlantic passive continental margin (SAPCM) in SE-Brazil. Excellent onshore outcrop conditions and extensive pre-rift to post-rift archives between São Paulo and Laguna allow a high precision quantification of exhumation, and rock uplift rates, influencing physical parameters, long-term acting forces, and process-response systems. Research will integrate published1 and partly published thermochronological data from Brazil, and test lately published new concepts on causes of long-term landscape and lithospheric evolution in southern Brazil. Six distinct lithospheric blocks (Laguna, Florianópolis, Curitiba, Ilha Comprida, Peruibe and Santos), which are separated by fracture zones1 are characterized by individual thermochronological age spectra. Furthermore, the thermal evolution derived by numerical modeling indicates variable post-rift exhumation histories of these blocks. In this context, we will provide information on the causes for the complex exhumation history of the Florianópolis, and adjacent blocks. The climate-continental margin-mantle coupled process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenous and exogenous forces, which are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - passive continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Special emphasis will be given to the influence of long-living transform faults such as the Florianopolis Fracture Zone (FFZ) on the long-term topography evolution of the SAPCM's. A long-term landscape evolution model with process rates will be achieved by thermo-kinematic 3-D modeling (software code PECUBE2,3 and FastScape4). Testing model solutions obtained for a multidimensional parameter space against the real thermochronological and geomorphological data set, the most likely combinations of parameter rates, and values can be constrained. The

  8. Atlantic Offshore Seabird Dataset Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Several bureaus within the Department of Interior compiled available information from seabird observation datasets from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf into a...

  9. Links between the recruitment success of northern European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) and a regime shift on the NE Atlantic continental shelf

    KAUST Repository

    Goikoetxea, Nerea

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of northern European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) extends from the Bay of Biscay up to Norwegian waters. However, despite its wide geographical distribution, there have been few studies on fluctuations in the European hake populations. Marine ecosystem shifts have been investigated worldwide and their influence on trophic levels has been studied, from top predator fish populations down to planktonic prey species, but there is little information on the effect of atmosphere-ocean shifts on European hake. This work analyses hake recruitment success (recruits per adult biomass) in relation to environmental changes over the period 1978-2006 in order to determine whether the regime shift identified in several abiotic and biotic variables in the North Sea also affected the Northeast Atlantic shelf oceanography. Hake recruitment success as well as parameters such as the sea surface temperature, wind patterns and copepod abundance changed significantly at the end of the 1980s, demonstrating an ecological regime shift in the Northeast Atlantic. Despite the low reproductive biomass recorded during the last decades, hake recruitment success has been higher since the change in 1989/90. The higher productivity may have sustained the population despite the intense fishing pressure; copepod abundance, warmer water temperatures and moderate eastward transport were found to be beneficial. In conclusion, in 1988/89 the Northeast Atlantic environment shifted to a favourable regime for northern hake production. This study supports the hypothesis that the hydro-climatic regime shift that affected the North Sea in the late 1980s may have influenced a wider region, such as the Northeast Atlantic. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Continental United States Military Housing Inspections Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-24

    other family members. Balfour Beatty Communities owns and manages all of the privatized housing at NS Mayport, a total of 962 family housing units...and their dependents. Balfour Beatty Communities owns and manages all of the privatized housing at Fort Gordon, a total of 1,080 family housing...family housing12—and had received congressional approval to do so. However, at the time of our inspections, Balfour Beatty Communities disagreed

  11. Biodiversity of the deep-sea continental margin bordering the Gulf of Maine (NW Atlantic: relationships among sub-regions and to shelf systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen E Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-studied continental shelf region of the Gulf of Maine, fundamental questions regarding the diversity, distribution, and abundance of species living in deep-sea habitats along the adjacent continental margin remain unanswered. Lack of such knowledge precludes a greater understanding of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem and limits development of alternatives for conservation and management. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use data from the published literature, unpublished studies, museum records and online sources, to: (1 assess the current state of knowledge of species diversity in the deep-sea habitats adjacent to the Gulf of Maine (39-43°N, 63-71°W, 150-3000 m depth; (2 compare patterns of taxonomic diversity and distribution of megafaunal and macrofaunal species among six distinct sub-regions and to the continental shelf; and (3 estimate the amount of unknown diversity in the region. Known diversity for the deep-sea region is 1,671 species; most are narrowly distributed and known to occur within only one sub-region. The number of species varies by sub-region and is directly related to sampling effort occurring within each. Fishes, corals, decapod crustaceans, molluscs, and echinoderms are relatively well known, while most other taxonomic groups are poorly known. Taxonomic diversity decreases with increasing distance from the continental shelf and with changes in benthic topography. Low similarity in faunal composition suggests the deep-sea region harbours faunal communities distinct from those of the continental shelf. Non-parametric estimators of species richness suggest a minimum of 50% of the deep-sea species inventory remains to be discovered. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The current state of knowledge of biodiversity in this deep-sea region is rudimentary. Our ability to answer questions is hampered by a lack of sufficient data for many taxonomic groups, which is constrained by sampling biases, life

  12. The Apseudomorpha (Crustacea: Tanaidacea) of the Gulf of Cadiz and Horseshoe Continental Rise (NE Atlantic): A taxonomic review with new records, species, and ecological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquete, P; Cunha, M R

    2017-06-09

    The apseudomorphan tanaidaceans of the deep sea have been under-studied, especially in chemosynthetic habitats. A total of ten species present in the Gulf of Cadiz and the Horseshoe Continental Rise (SW off the Iberian Peninsula) are listed here, and new distribution data, ecological remarks and description of one new species of Atlantapseudes (Atlantapseudes curvatus sp. nov.) from recent research cruises are added. Pseudosphyrapus azorensis and Francapseudes uniarticulatus are recorded for the first time since the original descriptions. Notes on morphological development of Leviapseudes segonzaci and intraspecific variation of F. uniarticulatus are included, together with illustrations and descriptions of the material from the Gulf of Cadiz to complement previous descriptions.

  13. Benthic amphipods (Amphipoda: Gammaridea and Corophiidea) from the Mexican southeast sector of the Gulf of Mexico: checklist, new records and zoogeographic comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Ríos, Carlos E; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis

    2013-01-01

    The southeast region of the Gulf of Mexico is considered to be biologically important, because it is a connection and transition zone between the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, harboring great marine biodiversity. Nevertheless, benthic amphipods have been poorly studied in the Mexican southeast sector of the Gulf of Mexico with few studies listing species. The aim of this study is to provide an update checklist of species for the Mexican southeast sector (based on literature review and records from the present study) as well as a brief zoogeographical analysis for the Gulf of Mexico amphipod fauna, putting them in context with the fauna on the tropical western Atlantic. Fifty-five species were listed for the Mexican southeast sector; 36 of them showed a geographical extension to the Yucatan continental shelf representing 23 new records for the Mexican southeast sector, nine for the southeast region and four for the Gulf of Mexico. Based on the zoogeographical analysis, there is support of the application of Carolinian and Caribbean zoogeographic provinces to amphipods in the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin and lithosphere dynamic movement in Southern Brazil derived from zircon and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He and fission-track data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krob, Florian; Stippich, Christian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2016-04-01

    Passive continental margins are important geoarchives related to mantle dynamics, the breakup of continents, lithospheric dynamics, and other processes. The main concern yields the quantifying long-term lithospheric evolution of the continental margin between São Paulo and Laguna in southeastern Brazil since the Neoproterozoic. We put special emphasis on the reactivation of old fracture zones running into the continent and their constrains on the landscape evolution. In this contribution, we represent already consisting thermochronological data attained by fission-track and (U-Th-Sm)/He analysis on apatites and zircons. The zircon fission-track ages range between 108.4 (15.0) and 539.9 (68.4) Ma, the zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He ages between 72.9 (5.8) and 427.6 (1.8) Ma whereas the apatite fission-track ages range between 40.0 (5.3) and 134.7 (8.0) Ma, and the apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He ages between 32.1 (1.52) and 92.0 (1.86) Ma. These thermochronological ages from metamorphic, sedimentary and intrusive rocks show six distinct blocks (Laguna, Florianópolis, Curitiba, Ilha Comprida, Peruibe and Santos) with different evolution cut by old fracture zones. Furthermore, models of time-temperature evolution illustrate the differences in Pre- to post-rift exhumation histories of these blocks. The presented data will provide an insight into the complex exhumation history of the continental margin based on the existing literature data on the evolution of the Paraná basin in Brazil and the latest thermochronological data. We used the geological model of the Paraná basin supersequences (Rio Ivaí, Paraná, Gondwana I-III and Bauru) to remodel the subsidence and exhumation history of our consisting thermochronological sample data. First indications include a fast exhumation during the early Paleozoic, a slow shallow (northern blocks) to fast and deep (Laguna block) subduction from middle Paleozoic to Mesozoic time and a extremely fast exhumation during the opening of the South Atlantic

  15. Effects of cold-water corals on fish diversity and density (European continental margin: Arctic, NE Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea): Data from three baited lander systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, T. D.; Lavaleye, M.; Maiorano, P.; Bergman, M.; Capezzuto, F.; Cousins, N. J.; D'Onghia, G.; Duineveld, G.; Shields, M. A.; Sion, L.; Tursi, A.; Priede, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous photographic landers are a low-impact survey method for the assessment of mobile fauna in situations where methods such as trawling are not feasible or ethical. Three institutions collaborated through the CoralFISH project, each using differing lander systems, to assess the effects of cold-water corals on fish diversity and density. The Biogenic Reef Ichthyofauna Lander (BRIL, Oceanlab), Autonomous Lander for Biological Experiments (ALBEX, NIOZ) and the Marine Environment MOnitoring system (MEMO, CoNISMa) were deployed in four CoralFISH European study regions covering the Arctic, NE Atlantic and Mediterranean, namely Northern Norway (275-310 m depth), Belgica Mound Province (686-1025 m depth), the Bay of Biscay (623-936 m depth), and Santa Maria di Leuca (547-670 m depth). A total of 33 deployments were carried out in the different regions. Both the time of first arrival (Tarr) and the maximum observed number of fish (MaxN) were standardised between the different lander systems and compared between coral and reference stations as indicators of local fish density. Fish reached significantly higher MaxN at the coral stations than at the reference stations. Fish were also found to have significantly lower Tarr in the coral areas in data obtained from the BRIL and MEMO landers. All data indicated that fish abundance is higher within the coral areas. Fish species diversity was higher within the coral areas of Atlantic Ocean while in Northern Norway and Santa Maria di Leuca coral areas, diversity was similar at coral and reference stations but a single dominant species (Brosme brosme and Conger conger respectively) showed much higher density within the coral areas. Indicating that, while cold-water coral reefs have a positive effect on fish diversity and/or abundance, this effect varies across Europe's reefs.

  16. Long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive" continental margin in Eastern Argentina using apatite fission-track thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Sabrina; Kollenz, Sebastian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2015-04-01

    To understand the evolution of the "passive" continental margin in Argentina low temperature thermochronology is an appropriate method, which might lead to new insights in this area. The Tandilia System, also called Sierras Septentrionales, is located south of the Río de la Plato Craton in eastern Argentina in the state of Buenos Aires. North of the hills the Salado basin is located whereas the Claromecó basin is situated south of the mountain range. In contrary to most basins along the South American "passive" continental margin, the Tandilia-System and the neighbouring basins trend perpendicular to the coast line. The topography is fairly flat with altitudes up to 350 m. The igneous-metamorphic basement is pre-Proterozoic in age and build up of mainly granitic-tonalitic gneisses, migmatites, amphibolites, some ultramafic rocks and granitoid plutons. It is overlain by a series of Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks (Cingolani 2011), like siliciclastic rocks, dolostones, shales and limestones (Demoulin 2005). The aim of the study is to quantify the long-term landscape evolution of the "passive" continental margin in eastern Argentina in terms of thermal, exhumation and tectonic evolution. For that purpose, samples were taken from the basement of the Sierra Septentrionales and analyzed with the apatite fission-track method. Further 2-D thermokinematic modeling was conducted with the computer code HeFTy (Ketcham 2005; Ketcham 2007; Ketcham et al. 2009). Because there are different hypotheses in literature regarding the geological evolution of this area two different models were generated, one after Demoulin et al. (2005) and another after Zalba et al.(2007). All samples were taken from the Neoproterozoic igneous-metamorphic basement. Apatite fission-track ages range from 101.6 (9.4) to 228.9 (22.3) Ma, and, therefore, are younger than their formation age, indicating all samples have been thermally reset. Six samples accomplished enough confined

  17. Size and sex composition of two species of the genus Atlantoraja (Elasmobranchii, Rajidae caught by the bottom trawl fisheries operating on the Uruguayan continental shelf (southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyzed the spatial and seasonal variation of length distribution, sexual proportion and mature dominance for Atlantoraja cyclophora and A. castelnaui, at the Uruguayan continental shelf. There were significant differences in total length (TL composition between sexes, being females bigger than males for both species. Atlantoraja cyclophora showed a relatively uniform length distribution between inner and outer shelf. There were no major variations in the sex compositions and in the mature dominance between seasons, suggesting no temporal variation. Atlantoraja castelnaui showed a significant variation in its spatial and seasonal distribution. Individuals were smaller in inner shelf, pointing out the existence of juvenile zone in areas up to 50 m depth. A tendency to capture smaller individuals towards the end of the year was observed. In all seasons over 50% of females were caught below the estimated size at maturity, suggesting that this species is highly susceptible to exploitation.Neste trabalho foi analisada a variação espacial e temporal da distribuição de comprimento, proporções sexuais e dominância de maduros para Atlantoraja cyclophora e A. castelanui, na plataforma continental uruguaia. Houve diferenças significativas na distribução do comprimento total (TL entre os sexos, sendo as fêmeas maiores que os machos para ambas espécies. Atlantoraja cyclophora mostrou uma distribuição relativamente uniforme de comprimento entre a prataforma interna e externa. Não houviram grandes variações nas composições do sexo e na dominância de maduros entre as estações do ano, sugerindo que não ha variação temporal. Atlantoraja castelnaui mostrou uma variação significativa na sua distribuição espacial e sazonal. Os indivíduos foram menores na plataforma interna, apontando para a existência de uma zona de juvenis em áreas de até 50 m de profundidade. A tendência para a captura de indivíduos menores no

  18. Symposium on ecology and management of the continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Six papers discuss the history of research in marine biology and the development of mathematical models of continental shelf ecosystems. Details of studies of carbon flow analysis of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, pellagic ecosystem; coastal upwelling of nutrients associated with the slow flow of the California, Humbolt, Canary, and Benguela Currents of the Pacific Ocean; the ecology of the Hawaiian continental shelf; the Southeastern Atlantic continental shelf; and the ecology and management of coral reefs and organic banks of the southern Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico continental shelf.

  19. New records of Pennatulacea (Anthozoa: Octocorallia from the African Atlantic coast, with description of a new species and a zoogeographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. López-González

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A collection of pennatulaceans from ten cruises, acquired between 1982 and 1989 from off the western African coast comprises ca. 350 specimens of 13 species. One of the cruise is from the Gulf of Guinea and eight from the Southeast Atlantic. Fifty-four stations were sampled from depths of 91-1112 m. One previously undescribed species in the genus Stylatula is reported and described as new from samples collected from the Namibian continental shelf. Considering these collections, and previous records, the pennatulaceans in the western African region show biogeographic affinities with three geographic areas: West Africa (55.5% of the species, which comprises the Canary, Gulf of Guinea, and Benguela regions; the North Atlantic (3.7% of the species, which represents the more widespread Atlantic taxa; and Cape Endemic (7.4% of the species, which comprises the southern African region.

  20. Phytoplankton community structure in relation to hydrographic features along a coast-to-offshore transect on the SW Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islabão, C. A.; Mendes, C. R. B.; Detoni, A. M. S.; Odebrecht, C.

    2017-12-01

    The continental shelf in Southern Brazil is characterized by high biological productivity associated with horizontal and vertical density gradients due to the mixing of distinct water masses. Phytoplankton biomass and composition were evaluated in summer 2013 along an on-offshore transect off the mouth of the Patos Lagoon (Lat. 32°12S). Photosynthetic active radiation, temperature, salinity and fluorescence vertical profiles were carried out and Brünt-Väisäla frequency was estimated. Three water bodies were identified: the Subtropical Shelf Water along the entire transect, the Plata Plume Water on the middle shelf surface and the Tropical Water farther offshore. The water was sampled (N = 40) for the analyses of dissolved inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton cell density and composition. Phytoplankton present in the water was identified and quantified by the classical microscope sedimentation technique, complemented with CHEMTAX analysis of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment data. From the results obtained, chlorophyll a concentration was higher at both coastal stations (1.6-2.0 mg m-3) where the water column was homogeneous and diatoms dominated the stations. This group was replaced by dinoflagellates in stratified conditions on the shelf and farther offshore. Along the onshore-offshore gradient, two types of dinoflagellates were found: the peridinin-containing dinoflagellates Prorocentrum and Scrippsiella with a small contribution at the coastal stations, and the fucoxantin-containing small Gymnodiniales cells (phytoplankton communities and distribution on the shelf and in coastal waters off Southern Brazil in summer. Picoplankton cells (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus), recorded for the first time in the region under study, were predominant in the nutrient-poor and well-lit surface layers along the transect, indicating the importance of their low sedimentation rates (small size) and photo-adaptive strategies to survive on the upper layers

  1. Location of South Georgia and potential impact on early Pacific-Atlantic through flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, A.; Curtis, M.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant Cenozoic reconfigurations of global ocean circulation involved the initiation of Pacific to Atlantic exchange that led to the isolation of Antarctica by the Antarctica Circumpolar Current though the separation of South America and Antarctica and the opening of the Scotia Sea and Drake Passage. Whether significant Pacific to Atlantic through-flow was possible in the early Cenozoic has remained unclear because it is not certain where continental fragments such as South Georgia, a potential barrier, were located before seafloor spreading created the Scotia Sea. Establishing where South Georgia was located is also critical to reconstructing the Scotia arc and understanding its evolution. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and apatite thermochronometry are used to constrain the pre-drift location of South Georgia. Data from Cretaceous turbidites exposed on South Georgia are consistent with a former connection to the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin giving support to models that have argued for a pre- tectonic translation location southeast of Tierra del Fuego. Following an early phase of rock uplift, thermal history models of the apatite chronometry data indicate that the South Georgia continental fragment underwent burial related heating and was therefore not a significant topographic feature until it emerged c. 10-7 Ma coeval with the cessation of spreading at the West Scotia Ridge and collision between the South Georgia continental block and the Northeast Georgia Rise.

  2. Pan-Continental Droughts in North America over the Last Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Cook, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Regional droughts are common in North America, but pan-continental droughts extending across multiple regions, including the 2012 event, are rare relative to single-region events. Here, the tree-ring-derived North American Drought Atlas is used to investigate drought variability in four regions over the last millennium, focusing on pan-continental droughts. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), the central plains (CP), Southwest (SW), and Southeast (SE) regions experienced drier conditions and increased occurrence of droughts and the Northwest (NW) experienced several extended pluvials. Enhanced MCA aridity in the SW and CP manifested as multidecadal megadroughts. Notably, megadroughts in these regions differed in their timing and persistence, suggesting that they represent regional events influenced by local dynamics rather than a unified, continental-scale phenomena. There is no trend in pan-continental drought occurrence, defined as synchronous droughts in three or more regions. SW, CP, and SE (SW+CP+SE) droughts are the most common, occurring in 12 percent of all years and peaking in prevalence during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries; patterns involving three other regions occur in about 8 percent of years. Positive values of the Southern Oscillation index (La Nina conditions) are linked to SW, CP, and SE (SW+CP+SE) droughts and SW, CP, and NW (SW+CP+NW) droughts, whereas CP, NW, and SE (CP+NW+SE) droughts are associated with positive values of the Pacific decadal oscillation and Atlantic multidecadal oscillation. While relatively rare, pan-continental droughts are present in the paleo record and are linked to defined modes of climate variability, implying the potential for seasonal predictability. Assuming stable drought teleconnections, these events will remain an important feature of future North American hydroclimate, possibly increasing in their severity in step with other expected hydroclimate responses to increased greenhouse gas forcing.

  3. Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Home to beautiful jungles, booming industry, and age-old temples, Southeast Asia has become a confluence of ancient and modern life. This true-color image of mainland Southeast Asia was acquired on November 30, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The body of water in the upper righthand corner of the image is the Gulf of Tonkin. East and southeast of the gulf are the dark green jungles of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. The light brown Mekong River winds its way through the center of the Cambodian jungle and into southern Vietnam. The dark blue patch to the left of the river at the bottom of the image is the Tonle Sap. Literally translated to mean 'Great Lake,' the Tonle Sap is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia. During the rainy season from May to October, the lake will more than double in size growing from its wintertime extent of 3,000 square kilometers to over 7,500 square kilometers. North of the lake, approximately in the center of the image, is a saucer-shaped patch of reddish brown land known as the Khorat Plateau. Situated 90 to 200 meters above sea level in eastern Thailand, the dry plateau is mostly covered with farmland and savanna-type grasses and shrubs. Moving south again, the large body of light blue water at the bottom central portion of the image is the Gulf of Thailand. By switching to the full resolution image (250 meters per pixel) and following the Gulf of Thailand to its northernmost extent, one can see a pinkish beige patch of terrain covered by a faint latticework of fine lines. These are likely to be the network of roads that crisscross Bangkok and its surrounding suburbs and fertile farmland. The narrow strip of land to the east of the Gulf of Thailand is the Malay Peninsula. The body of water to the left of the peninsula is the Gulf of Martaban, which borders Myanmar (Burma). At the far upper lefthand corner of the image, the water has turned light brown from

  4. Exhumation history of the Serra do Mar, southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carina Siqueira-Ribeiro, Marli; Hackspacher, Peter; Stuart, Finlay M.

    2016-04-01

    The Serra do Mar (SM) mountain range located along the southeast Brazilian continental margin is characterized by a low-lying coastal plateau separated from the elevated inland plateau by a steep escarpment. This morphology is a result of reactivation of Precambrian shear zones since the break-up of the Western Gondwana and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean in Early Cretaceous (1). Previous Thermochronological data from southeast Brazilian highlands (2,3), indicates that the landscape evolution is associated with several distinct exhumation events. In order to clarify the intensity and duration of the post-break up tectonic processes that shaped the SM we have undertaken a low temperature thermochronology study of crystalline basement, from the plateaus and escarpments situated between south of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo state. Apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th/He) and (AHe) dating has been combined with geologic information to generate precise thermal histories and make initial attempts to quantify the amount of exhumation. AFT ages range from 145 to 53 Ma whereas preliminary AHe ages range from 75 to 37 Ma. Forward modeling using QTQt confirms Late Cretaceous-Paleogene cooling identified earlier (4,5) and identifies a distinct cooling phase in Neogene, between 30 and 10 Ma. Neogene cooling rapid caused exhumation of rocks 1 km through of the crust mainly in south portion of the SM in Rio de Janeiro state. (1) Almeida, 1976. An. Academia Bras de Cien 48 (suppl.), 15-(2) (2) Hackspacher et al. 2004. Gondwana Research,vol.2, 91-101. (3) Hiruma et al. 2010. Gondwana Research,18,674-687. (4) Siqueira-Ribeiro et al. 2011. Revista Bras. de Geomorfologia, 13, 3-14 (5) Cogné et al. 2012. Journal Geophysical Research, vol.117,1-16.

  5. Trends and variability in the sea surface height, sea surface temperature and wind stress curl in the South Atlantic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto da Silveira, Isabel; Ponzi Pezzi, Luciano; Buss de Souza, Ronald; Sennéchael, Nathalie; Provost, Christine

    2013-04-01

    Altimetry sea level anomalies (SLA), sea surface temperatures anomalies (SSTA) and wind stress curl (WSC) were analyzed and had their trends calculated and their variability studied for the South Atlantic ocean using the last 19 years of SALTO/DUACS altimeter data, ERSST data and ERA-INTERIM data. All data had their temporal resolution adjusted to the one of altimeter data. The trends were calculated between January, 1st 1993 and December, 31th 2011. The stronger and positive SLA trends occurred in the region of the Zapiola Ridge (14 mm/year) and in some places in the Drake Passage (10 mm/year). Negative trends were observed in the Southern part of Argentinian basin (-4 mm/year), next to the Confluence Brazil Malvinas (-8 mm/year) and to the southwest of the African coast (-6 mm/year). The SST trends were positive North of 40°S, and negative south of 60°S. They were also negative along the Argentinean continental slope along the path of the Malvinas Current. The WSC trend was also negative along the Argentine continental slope. In the Southeast Atlantic, the WSC trend had a zonal distribution with alternate signs. To understand the processes responsible for the trend patterns in the South Atlantic ocean, the high and the low frequencies were obtained applying successively a 25 week band pass filter followed by a 37 week band pass filter. The percentage of explained variance by the high frequency, low frequency and seasonal signals (hf/lf/ss) were compared for SLA, SSTA and WSC. The variance of SLA in the Southwestern Atlantic was explained by the proportion of (80%, 15%,5%), except along the Argentinean continental slope (15%, 50%, 35%), the inner part of the ZR (10%,65%,25%). The central part of the South Atlantic showed dominant low frequency variance (proportions of 15%, 80% and 5% (hf/lf/ss), respectively). The SSTA variance was dominated by the high frequency in the Uruguayan coast, around ZR, in the Drake Passage and in the Agulhas Leakage (60-80%), low

  6. Currents, attenuation, temperature, conductivity, and pressure in the North Atlantic Ocean on the New England Continental Slope from the RV OCEANUS from November 10th, 1982 through November 18th, 1984 (NODC Accession 0066097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A study of currents on the Continental Slope designed to describe the currents and to investigate the transport of sediment from the shelf to the slope. This work...

  7. Deep-water Drilliinae, Cochlespirinae and Oenopotinae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Turridae from the Campos Basin, southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Medeiros Andrade Figueira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Samples of a soft-bottom community from the continental slope of Campos Basin, off southeast Brazil, were obtained between 2001 and 2003 by the Research Vessel “Astro-Garoupa” with a 0.25 m2 box corer or by dredging with a Charcot dredge. A total of 177 samples were taken at depths ranging from 700 to 1950 m. Mollusks were present at all of the stations and among Gastropoda the Turridae showed the highest diversity. Within the family Cochlespirinae we found: Leucosyrinx tenoceras (Dall, 1889, L. verrillii (Dall, 1881, expanding the known distribution of the latter species farther south, and L.? subgrundifera (Dall, 1888, which is the first record of this species for the South Atlantic and the shallowest depth at which it has ever been found. Within the family Drilliinae we found Splendrillia centimata (Dall, 1889, also the first record of this species for the South Atlantic and its shallowest depth. Within the subfamily Oenopotinae we describe here three new species in the genus Oenopota Mörch, 1852: O. seraphina n. sp., O. diabula n. sp. and O. carioca n. sp.

  8. Geochemical tracing of Pacific-to-Atlantic upper-mantle flow through the Drake passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J A; Leat, P T; Barker, P F; Millar, I L

    2001-03-22

    The Earth's convecting upper mantle can be viewed as comprising three main reservoirs, beneath the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans. Because of the uneven global distribution and migration of ridges and subduction zones, the surface area of the Pacific reservoir is at present contracting at about 0.6 km2 x y(r-1), while the Atlantic and Indian reservoirs are growing at about 0.45 km2 x yr(-1) and 0.15 km2 x yr(-1), respectively. Garfunkel and others have argued that there must accordingly be net mantle flow from the Pacific to the Atlantic and Indian reservoirs (in order to maintain mass balance), and Alvarez further predicted that this flow should be restricted to the few parts of the Pacific rim (here termed 'gateways') where there are no continental roots or subduction zones that might act as barriers to shallow mantle flow. The main Pacific gateways are, according to Alvarez, the southeast Indian Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Drake passage. Here we report geochemical data which confirm that there has been some outflow of Pacific mantle into the Drake passage--but probably in response to regional tectonic constraints, rather than global mass-balance requirements. We also show that a mantle domain boundary, equivalent to the Australian-Antarctic discordance, must lie between the Drake passage and the east Scotia Sea.

  9. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects in Offshore Southeast Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinick, Charles [Dehlsen Associates, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2011-09-26

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progess to Investigate areas offshore southeast Florida that appeared most suitable for siting of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of southeast Florida.

  10. Continental Divide Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was created to show the proximity of the Continental Divide to the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail in New Mexico. This work was done as part...

  11. The branching of the Gulf Stream southeast of the Grand Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, W.; KäSe, R. H.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.

    1990-08-01

    During March-April 1987, 101 hydrographic stations were occupied on three sections spanning a triangle between the Azores (Faial), the southern tip of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, and Bermuda. Information on the near-surface processes in the interior of the triangle were obtained from 32 satellite-tracked buoys deployed during the cruise and a composite infrared image based on cloud-free NOAA 9 data during April 1987. The data were combined to analyze the eddy field and the branching of the Gulf Stream into the North Atlantic Current and the Azores Current. Calculations of mass transports through the legs of the triangle gave a total of 46 Sv supplied by the Gulf Stream, 31 Sv of which left the area as the North Atlantic Current and westwind drift north of the Azores. The remaining 14 Sv continued towards east-southeast as the Azores Current and southern recirculation. Additional conductivity-temperature-depth stations from a cruise in April 1986 into the same area allowed also study of the large-scale circulation within that triangle in deeper layers. The Azores Current appears as a baroclinic stream which reaches down to approximately 1000 m. Intensive mixing was observed at the continental slope of Newfoundland between water of the Labrador Current and the Gulf Stream (mixed water). Owing to cabbeling and consecutive convective mixing, this water penetrates down to 2000 m depth and creates horizontal density gradients to the surrounding Gulf Stream water, which intensifies the North Atlantic Current. This process is considered to be an important energy source for this current.

  12. Long-term landscape evolution of the southeast Brazilian highlands: comparison of two alkaline intrusions areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doranti Tiritan, Carolina; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2016-04-01

    The southeast Brazilian highlands records a long history of tectonic and magmatic events that were consequence of the South Atlantic Ocean opening. After the rifting process has ceased, an epeirogenic uplift of the continental crust has started in response to the drifting of the South American Platform over a thermal anomaly that accompanied an intense alkaline and basaltic magmatism. Related Late Cretaceous alkaline intrusions are distributed from the southeast Brazilian coast to the interior of the South American Platform. The landscape evolution is associated with several distinct exhumation events at the South American passive continental margin (Hackspacher 2004; Doranti et al, 2014). The present study intent providing insights on the behaviour of the coupled magmatic tectonic-erosional system, comparing thermochronological data from two alkaline intrusions, Poços de Caldas Alkaline Massif (PCAM) and São Sebastião Island (SSI). The PCAM is the biggest alkaline structure located in the interior of the continent, 300km from the coastline (Rio de Janeiro). The structure is formed as a caldera, covering over 800km2, intruding Precambrian basement around 83Ma, nepheline syenites, phonolites and tinguaites intruded in a continuous and rapid sequence lasting between 1 to 2 Ma. Meanwhile, the SSI (236km²) is located at the coast, 200 km southeast of the city of São Paulo and is characterized by an intrusion in Precambrian granitic-gnaissic rocks affected by the Panafrican/Brazilian Orogen. This crystalline basement is intruded by Early Cretaceous subalkaline basic and acid dykes, as well as by Late Cretaceous alkaline stocks (syenites) and dykes (basanite to phonolite). The Apatite Fission-Track ages for PCAM range from 333.3±27.6 to 94.0±13.7 Ma at the surrounded metamorphic basement area, and 76.8±10.9 to 48.7±10.7 Ma in the alkaline Massif. The older ages, are concentrated on the lower topography region (700 until 1200m) in the north side alkaline massif

  13. Reproductive cycle and population structure of the deep-water shrimp Aristeus antillensis A. Milne Edwards & Bouvier, 1909 (Decapoda: Aristeidae on southeast Brazilian continental slope Ciclo reproductivo y estructura poblacional del camarón de aguas profundas Aristeus antillensis A. Milne Edwards & Bouvier, 1909 (Decapoda: Aristeidae en el talud continental del sureste de Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo Pezzuto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The "alistado shrimp" (Aristeus antillensis is one of the targets of the trawling fleet operating since 2002 along the continental slope of the Brazilian Economic Exclusive Zone between 700 and 800 m depth. Catches of the species occur mainly in two small fishing grounds located on the east coast of Espirito Santo State (19-22°S. This paper aimed to obtain the first biological data for this species along the Brazilian coast. A total of 13,797 individuals were sampled aboard fishing vessels by observers on almost all fishing hauls, corresponding to 10 to 20% of the total catch recorded in the period. Males and females are sexually mature at 25.4 and 40.2 mm carapace length, respectively, based on an analysis of the proportions of individuals with fused petasma (males and spermatophores in the thelycum (females. The proportion of impregnated females was higher than 80% year round, suggesting a continuous reproductive cycle, although preliminary in-formation on gonadal development points to possible seasonal reproduction. In general, mature females, which attain larger sizes than males, domínate the catches (M:F = 0.12:1. However, populational groups including males and juveniles of both sexes occupy the fishing grounds in different periods of the year, probably reflecting migratory movements whose directions and driving forces are not completely understood yet. A depth-stratified population structure by sex and size is hypothesized.La gamba de aguas profundas Aristeus antillensis es uno de los recursos explotados por la flota de arrastre, que está operando desde el año 2002 en el talud continental de la Zona Econômica Exclusiva de Brasil, entre 700 y 800 m de profundidad. Las capturas de esta especie se realizan básicamente en dos pequeños fondos de pesca que se encuentran en la costa este de la región de Espirito Santo (19-22°S. Este trabajo tiene por objetivo obtener los primeros antecedentes biológicos de esta especie en la costa

  14. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  15. Diet of invasive lionfish on hard bottom reefs of the Southeast USA: insights from stomach contents and stable isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stomach contents and stable isotope analyses were used to determine the diet of lionfish in the warm-temperate hard bottom reef community in theSoutheast US Atlantic...

  16. Southeast Asia's changing palaeogeography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, R

    2009-01-01

    Geology provides the basis for understanding distributions of faunas and floras in Southeast Asia but only via a complex interplay of plate movements, palaeogeography, ocean circulation and climate...

  17. Freshly brewed continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  18. 78 FR 24148 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... Plan (FMP) to address the results of recent shark stock assessments for several shark species, including dusky sharks. In that notice, based on the 2010/2011 Southeast Data, Assessment and Review (SEDAR...

  19. Advection patterns and aerosol optical and microphysical properties by AERONET over south-east Italy in the central Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Santese

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol products by AERONET sun-sky radiometer measurements combined with air-mass backtrajectories were analyzed to identify source regions and pathways of air masses carrying aerosols to south-east Italy, and to determine the dependence of aerosol mean optical properties on advection patterns. Aerosol optical depth (AOD, fine mode fraction (η , single scattering albedo (SSA, asymmetry factor (g, and lidar ratio (Lr at 440 nm were used to characterize aerosol properties. The analysis of 5-day-backtrajectories ending in Lecce on south-east Italy and referring to 240 measurement days of the 2003–2004 years revealed that 32% of the measurement days were characterized by air masses coming from all continental European sources with the exception of Spain. 3% of the measurement days were characterized by air masses coming from both the Southern Mediterranean Sea and the Africa continent, and the Western Mediterranean, the Iberian Peninsula, and the Atlantic Ocean. 62% of the measurement days were characterized by mixed advection patterns. We found that AOD, SSA and g average values were not significantly dependent on air mass source regions. In contrast, η and Lr average values were quite affected by the air mass source region. AOD, &eta, SSA, g, and Lr average values, which were equal to 0.29±0.15, 0.93±0.03, 0.93±0.03, 0.67±0.03, and 72±20 sr, respectively indicated that the aerosol advected from all continental European sources with the exception of Spain, could be considered representative of "continental average aerosol", mostly made of water soluble and a small amount of soot and insoluble components. Polluted-desert dust particles characterized by AOD=0.29±0.05, η=0.72±0.05, SSA=0.94±0.03, g=0.69±0.02, Lr=56±13 sr, were advected over south-east Italy from the Southern Mediterranean Sea and the Africa continent. The Western Mediterranean, the Iberian Peninsula, and the

  20. U.S. Geological Survey program of offshore resource and geoenvironmental studies, Atlantic-Gulf of Mexico region, from September 1, 1976, to December 31, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, David W.; Needell, Sally W.

    1983-01-01

    acromagnetic data, and 39,000 km of gravity data, plus 10,000 samples and logs obtained from U.S. Geological Survey and industry drilling (for example, coreholes of the Atlantic Slope Program, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Deep Earth Sampling, Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Tests, and the Atlantic Margin Coring Program). A sedimentary section of Jurassic and Cretaceous age grades from terrigenous clastic rocks nearshore to carbonate rocks offshore; this section is part of an extensive buried bank-platform complex that could contain large reserves of natural gas and oil. The volume of sediment deposited offshore far exceeds the volume deposited onshore where extensive accumulations of oil, gas, and minerals have been found. Commercial exploratory drilling offshore thus far has been limited to the Baltimore Canyon Trough area off New Jersey, where at least two holes have found gas; leasing has taken place in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, where drilling was scheduled to begin in 1979, and is imminent in the Georges Bank area off New England. In addition, hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data obtained from the drilling studies have delineated freshwater-bearing submarine extensions of land aquifers that are important coastal ground-water resources. Hazards in the Georges Bank area include sand mobility associated with strong currents and storm-driven waves; high concentrations of suspended sediment in the water column that, when mixed with spilled oil, may sink to the bottom; and slumping along the upper slope. In the Baltimore Canyon, high sediment mobility accompanies major winter storms, and slumped material may cover as much as 20 percent of the upper slope. Potentially unstable slope areas are being studied in great detail to provide data on timing, triggering mechanisms, and rates of sediment movement. In the Southeast Georgia Embayment and Blake Plateau Basin, strong Gulf Stream flow poses a major problem to all offshore operations. In the Gulf o

  1. Haemoglobinopathies in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Winichagoon, Pranee

    2011-01-01

    In Southeast Asia ?-thalassaemia, ?-thalassaemia, haemoglobin (Hb) E and Hb Constant Spring (CS) are prevalent. The abnormal genes in different combinations lead to over 60 different thalassaemia syndromes, making Southeast Asia the locality with the most complex thalassaemia genotypes. The four major thalassaemic diseases are Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis (homozygous ?-thalassaemia 1), homozygous ?-thalassaemia, ?-thalassaemia/Hb E and Hb H diseases. ?-Thalassaemia, most often, occurs from gene ...

  2. Southeast Asia Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-23

    195010 JPRS-SEA-87-059 23 APRIL 1987 Dis iv ib ulion . ü r,limited TV A XZB; Southeast Asia Report FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE...87-059 23 APRIL 1987 SOUTHEAST ASIA REPORT CONTENTS INDONESIA Jakarta’s Position on Afghan Issue Praised (ANTARA NEWS BULLETIN, 17 Mar 87) 1...various dates) 91 Daily Worries About Overpopulation , Unemployment (Editorial; BAN MUANG, 26 Jan 87) 1°5 Briefs Smugglers to PRK ^J° Workers

  3. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

  4. Land-sea interface features of four estuaries on the South America Atlantic coast Características da interface continente-oceano de quatro estuários da zona costeira da America do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Bernardes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian coastal zone extends from 4º N to 34º S latitude and because of its long extension, the interface zone from continent to ocean includes a high diversity of geomorphologic and oceanographic characteristics. The rivers from the Northeast and East regions are marked by a typical unimodal seasonal flux patterns but with different amplitudes. As the climate indicates, the rivers from the Northeast are subject to an accentuated seasonal variability with an elevated input and flood pulses during the rainy season and low to negligible fluxes during the dry season. Small-scale rivers usually present typical torrential behaviour. In the humid eastern region, the unimodal seasonal cycle is dampened with a more constant input supply. Recently, some studies have shown that the material supply from rivers along the Northeast and Eastern coasts is diluted by surface tropical waters of oceanic currents and that the estuarine plume dispersal is restricted to a narrow coastal belt. However, human impacts of course mask or even override both natural hydrological cycles and CO2 emissions from terrestrial biomes, or depending on the nature of the human impact, can even increase extreme events. Henceforth this contribution addresses the typological, hydrological and biome diversity of the four estuarine systems fed and affected by the respective Amazon, São Francisco, Paraíba do Sul and Plata watersheds.A zona costeira brasileira se estende de 4º N a 34º S de latitude. Por causa de sua longa faixa de zona de interface do continente com o oceano, é encontrada uma grande diversidade nas características geomorfológicas e oceanográficas. Os rios das regiões nordeste e leste mostram um padrão de fluxo sazonal normalmente unimodal, mas diferentes em amplitude. Conforme o clima indica, os rios do nordeste estão sujeitos a uma acentuada variabilidade sazonal, com elevação da vazão em forma de pulsos de inundação durante a estação chuvosa e

  5. Going coastal: shared evolutionary history between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckworth, Byron V; Dawson, Natalie G; Talbot, Sandra L; Flamme, Melanie J; Cook, Joseph A

    2011-05-04

    Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species.

  6. Going coastal: shared evolutionary history between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves (Canis lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron V Weckworth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species.

  7. Going coastal: Shared evolutionary history between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves (canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckworth, B.V.; Dawson, N.G.; Talbot, S.L.; Flamme, M.J.; Cook, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many coastal species occupying the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest in North America comprise endemic populations genetically and ecologically distinct from interior continental conspecifics. Morphological variation previously identified among wolf populations resulted in recognition of multiple subspecies of wolves in the Pacific Northwest. Recently, separate genetic studies have identified diverged populations of wolves in coastal British Columbia and coastal Southeast Alaska, providing support for hypotheses of distinct coastal subspecies. These two regions are geographically and ecologically contiguous, however, there is no comprehensive analysis across all wolf populations in this coastal rainforest. Methodology/Principal Findings: By combining mitochondrial DNA datasets from throughout the Pacific Northwest, we examined the genetic relationship between coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolf populations and compared them with adjacent continental populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates complete overlap in the genetic diversity of coastal British Columbia and Southeast Alaska wolves, but these populations are distinct from interior continental wolves. Analyses of molecular variation support the separation of all coastal wolves in a group divergent from continental populations, as predicted based on hypothesized subspecies designations. Two novel haplotypes also were uncovered in a newly assayed continental population of interior Alaska wolves. Conclusions/Significance: We found evidence that coastal wolves endemic to these temperate rainforests are diverged from neighbouring, interior continental wolves; a finding that necessitates new international strategies associated with the management of this species. ?? 2011 This is an open-access article.

  8. Teaching Modern Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Williamson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching about Southeast Asia to undergraduates at an American liberal arts college presents several challenges. At my institution, it is the only course on the region in the curriculum; thus no preparation, and no follow-up. I have therefore struggled with the approach that I should take–pulled between a wish for students to gain an empirical understanding of Southeast Asian life, and a desire to have them learn the concepts and theories of critical inquiry. Obviously I am still learning how to successfully accomplish such an ambitious undertaking.

  9. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 May 1976 to 23 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7800105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  10. Deep-water Mangeliinae, Taraninae and Clathurellinae (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Conoidea: Turridae from the Campos Basin, southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Medeiros Andrade Figueira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available During the program “Environmental Characterization of the Campos Basin, RJ, Brazil”, from 2001 to 2003, samples were taken of soft bottoms from the continental slope of Campos Basin (off southeast Brazil by the Research Vessel “Astro-Garoupa” with a 0.25 m2 box corer or by dredging with a Charcot dredge; 117 stations with depths from 700 to 1950 m were sampled. There were molluscs in all samples, and among Gastropoda the Turridae showed the highest diversity. Here we present the results obtained for the subfamilies Mangeliinae, Taraninae and Clathurellinae. Two species were found within Mangeliinae: Benthomangelia cf. macra (Watson, 1881 and Benthomangelia enceladus n. sp. Within Taraninae only one undescribed species was found: Taranis tanata n. sp. Within Clathurellinae we found four species: Corinnaeturris leucomata (Dall, 1881, recorded for the first time in the South Atlantic; Corinnaeturris rhysa (Watson, 1881, extending its described depth range; Corinnaeturris angularis n. sp., Typhlomangelia nivalis (Lovén, 1846, expanding its known distribution farther south; and Drilliola pulchella (Verrill, 1880. The type material of Drilliola loprestiana (Calcara, 1841, previously considered lost, has been located and is illustrated here. Drilliola crispata (Cristofori and Jan, 1832 is considered to be a nomen dubium.

  11. IN NSUKKA, SOUTHEAST NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repeated outbreaks of Escherichia coli infection in pullets and laying birds in a poultry farm in. Nsukka, southeast Nigeria are reported. The outbreaks were recorded in four batches of birds; the initial cases occurring in birds 12 — 16 weeks of age while subsequent outbreaks were in birds 28—31 weeks of age.

  12. Literature of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, John M.

    This paper provides a brief description of the literature of Southeast Asia. This area, which embraces the region south of China and east of India, includes the modern nations of Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, The Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia. The earliest historical influence came from India around the beginnings of the…

  13. Breeding success of Cacicus haemorrhous (Linnaeus (Aves: Icteridae in different environments in an Atlantic Forest reserve in Southeast Brazil Sucesso reprodutivo de Cacicus haemorrhous (Linnaeus (Aves: Icteridae em diferentes ambientes de uma reserva de Mata Atlântica no sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Duca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Several factors, including the site where the colony was established and number of active nests can influence directly or indirectly the breeding success of colonial birds. The red-rumped cacique, Cacicus haemorrhous (Linnaeus, 1766, is a passerine (Icteridae that breeds in colonies in different environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the breeding success of red-rumped cacique in relation to three environments (lake edge, forest and swamp in which colonies were established in an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeast Brazil. Seven colonies from the three environments were monitored during the breeding season of 2001. Overall probability of nest survival was 40.5%. We found that colonies established in the swamp presented higher nest survival than the others and the ones in the lake edge had lower survival. Nest predation was the most important cause of nest failure, representing 46.5% of all nest losses. Other failure causes were abandonment and fall of nests, representing 6.6% and 6.1% of the losses, respectively. Red-rumped cacique had higher success breeding in colonies located in the swamp.Diversos fatores, incluindo os locais onde as colônias são estabelecidas e o número de ninhos ativos, podem exercer uma influência direta ou indireta no sucesso reprodutivo de aves que reproduzem em colônias. O Guaxe é uma espécie de Passeriformes (Icteridae que se reproduz em colônias situadas em diferentes ambientes. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o sucesso reprodutivo de Cacicus haemorrhous (Linnaeus, 1766 em relação a três ambientes (margem de lago, floresta e brejo onde são estabelecidas colônias em uma reserva de Mata Atlântica no sudeste do Brasil. Sete colônias foram monitoradas durante a estação reprodutiva de 2001 apresentando uma probabilidade de sobrevivência dos ninhos de 40,5%. As colônias estabelecidas em brejos apresentaram sucesso reprodutivo significativamente maior do que colônias estabelecidas

  14. Advective and Mixing Time Scales for Transport of Denmark Strait Overflow Water from the Labrador Sea to the Western Subtropical Atlantic Ocean Determined from 129I, CFC and Hydrographic Time Series Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M., Jr.; Smith, J.; Curry, R. G.; Yashayaev, I.; Azetsu-Scott, K.

    2016-02-01

    129I released to the North Sea from two nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is transported through the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean and is entering the deep North Atlantic, predominantly in dense Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW). CFCs enter the surface ocean and also become incorporated in DSOW. Measurements of temperature, salinity, CFCs and 129I have been made at least annually along WOCE/CLIVAR line AR7W in the Labrador Sea from the mid 1990s to present, along Line W extending from the continental slope southeast of Cape Cod toward Bermuda from 2003 to 2014, and along a single occupation of a line extending from Bermuda southeast across the Bermuda Rise in 2010. The measurements in the Labrador Sea were used as input to DSOW flowing from there to the subtropical western Atlantic Ocean. We compared the temporal changes along Line W to the temporal changes along the AR7W line and applied the boundary current model of Waugh and Hall (J. Phys. Oceanogr. 35,1538-1552, 2005) to the Line W and Bermuda Rise line observations to determine the transit time of DSOW transported to Line W in the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) and transported to the southeastern flank of Bermuda via interior flow paths. The lateral mixing time scale along these two flow paths was also estimated with this model. CFC-11 and 129I increase monotonically in the DSOW in the Labrador Sea and salinity oscillates on a 5-year cycle. The boundary current model reproduces all of these trends. The transit time and lateral mixing time constant for DSOW transported to Line W are 7 years (mean flow velocity of 2.1 cm/sec) and 3-6 years, respectively, and for DSOW transported to the southeast flank of Bermuda are 6-10 years and 2-5 years.

  15. Drought in the southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Clark; Martin Spetich; Zander Evans

    2008-01-01

    A historic drought gripped the Southeast region in 2007. It was the second driest year on record for the region, and rainfall in some areas including Alabama and North Carolina was the lowest on record for the last century. By the end of 2007, over a third of the region was classified in "exceptional" drought (the worst drought designation used by the U.S....

  16. Wilson cycle passive margins: Control of orogenic inheritance on continental breakup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kenni D.; Schiffer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rifts and passive margins often develop along old suture zones where colliding continents merged during earlier phases of the Wilson cycle. For example, the North Atlantic formed after continental break-up along sutures formed during the Caledonian and Variscan orogenies. Even though suc...... as igneous bodies. The latter is consistent with dipping sub-Moho reflectors often observed in passive margins....

  17. U.S. Coastal Relief Model - Southeast Atlantic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC's U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides the first comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone integrating offshore bathymetry with land topography into a...

  18. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  19. Calcareous fens in Southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael H. McClellan; Terry Brock; James F. Baichtal

    2003-01-01

    Calcareous fens have not been identified previously in southeast Alaska. A limited survey in southeast Alaska identified several wetlands that appear to be calcareous fens. These sites were located in low-elevation discharge zones that are below recharge zones in carbonate highlands and talus foot-slopes. Two of six surveyed sites partly met the Minnesota Department of...

  20. Southeast Asian Refugee Parent Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Mary M.

    This paper summarizes the findings of a descriptive research project conducted among Southeast Asian parents in an Oregon school district, and discusses the issue of fieldwork methodology among refugee populations. The district studied had a student population of 18,000 (kindergarten through grade 12), with Southeast Asian refugees accounting for…

  1. Southeast Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2004-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent southeast Alaska inventory and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). Southeast Alaska has about 22.9 million acres, of which two-thirds are vegetated. Almost 11 million acres are forest land and about 4 million acres have nonforest...

  2. Drifting buoy and other data from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 May 1977 to 07 January 1978 (NODC Accession 7800692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Bering Sea by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  3. Drifting buoy and other data from the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 October 1976 to 11 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Gulf of Alaska by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  4. Drifting buoy and other data from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 September 1975 to 25 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected from the Bering Sea by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  5. The continental lithosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina

    2009-01-01

    of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 360, 2475–2491.; Shapiro N.M., Ritzwoller M.H. 2002. Monte-Carlo inversion for a global shear velocity model of the crust and upper mantle. Geophysical Journal International 151, 1–18.] and lithospheric temperatures [Artemieva I.M., Mooney W.D., 2001. Thermal structure......The goal of the present study is to extract non-thermal signal from seismic tomography models in order to distinguish compositional variations in the continental lithosphere and to examine if geochemical and petrologic constraints on global-scale compositional variations in the mantle...... are consistent with modern geophysical data. In the lithospheric mantle of the continents, seismic velocity variations of a non-thermal origin (calculated from global Vs seismic tomography data [Grand S.P., 2002. Mantle shear-wave tomography and the fate of subducted slabs. Philosophical Transactions...

  6. The establishment of Atlantic Water transport as a topographically trapped slope current off Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Atlantic Water, with its origin in the western Atlantic, enters the Nordic Seas partly as a barotropic current following the continental slope. This water mass is carried across the Atlantic by the baroclinic North Atlantic Current (NAC. When the NAC meets the continental slope at the east side of the Atlantic, some of the transport is converted to barotropic transport over the slope before continuing northward. Here, we show that this baroclinic to barotropic conversion is in agreement with geostrophic theory. Historical observations show that the transport of the slope current increases significantly from the Rockall Channel (RC to the Faroe–Shetland Channel (FSC. Geostrophy predicts that with a northward decreasing buoyancy, baroclinic currents from the west will be transferred into northward topographically steered barotropic flow. We use hydrographic data from two sections crossing the continental slope, one located in the RC and another in the FSC, to estimate baroclinic and barotropic transport changes over the slope, within the framework of geostrophic dynamics. Our results indicate that ~1 Sv of the cross-slope baroclinic flow is mainly converted to northward barotropic transport above the 200–500m isobaths, which is consistent with observed transport changes between the RC and the FSC. Similar processes are also likely to occur further south, along the eastern Atlantic margin. This shows that AW within the slope current in the FSC is derived from both the eastern and the western Atlantic, in agreement with earlier studies of AW inflow to the Nordic Seas.

  7. Southeast Regional Experiment Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This is the final report of the Southeast Regional Experiment Station project. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), a research institute of the University of Central Florida (UCF), has operated the Southeast Regional Experiment Station (SE RES) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since September 1982. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) provides technical program direction for both the SE RES and the Southwest Regional Experiment Station (SW RES) located at the Southwest Technology Development Institute at Las Cruces, New Mexico. This cooperative effort serves a critical role in the national photovoltaic program by conducting system evaluations, design assistance and technology transfer to enhance the cost-effective utilization and development of photovoltaic technology. Initially, the research focus of the SE RES program centered on utility-connected PV systems and associated issues. In 1987, the SE RES began evaluating amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film PV modules for application in utility-interactive systems. Stand-alone PV systems began receiving increased emphasis at the SE RES in 1986. Research projects were initiated that involved evaluation of vaccine refrigeration, water pumping and other stand-alone power systems. The results of this work have led to design optimization techniques and procedures for the sizing and modeling of PV water pumping systems. Later recent research at the SE RES included test and evaluation of batteries and charge controllers for stand-alone PV system applications. The SE RES project provided the foundation on which FSEC achieved national recognition for its expertise in PV systems research and related technology transfer programs. These synergistic products of the SE RES illustrate the high visibility and contributions the FSEC PV program offers to the DOE.

  8. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from GYRE in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1977-05-05 to 1977-05-25 (NCEI Accession 7800460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This entry contains the results from the Outer Continental Shelf study (OCS) benchmark study in the North Atlantic which ran during the month of May 77 from the R/V...

  9. EC_Q03.TIF - U.S. Atlantic East Coast EEZ GLORIA sidescan-sonar data mosaic (3 of 23) (ACEA, 50 m, Clarke1866)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — From February to May 1987 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted five cruises to cover the U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)...

  10. EC_Q20.TIF - U.S. Atlantic East Coast EEZ GLORIA sidescan-sonar data mosaic (20 of 23) (ACEA, 50 m, Clarke1866)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — From February to May 1987 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted five cruises to cover the U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)...

  11. EC_Q14.TIF - U.S. Atlantic East Coast EEZ GLORIA sidescan-sonar data mosaic (14 of 23) (ACEA, 50 m, Clarke1866)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — From February to May 1987 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted five cruises to cover the U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)...

  12. EC_Q06.TIF - U.S. Atlantic East Coast EEZ GLORIA sidescan-sonar data mosaic (6 of 23) (ACEA, 50 m, Clarke1866)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — From February to May 1987 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted five cruises to cover the U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Miami, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the continental shelf off of Jacksonville, FL in the South Atlantic...

  14. US Geological Survey BLM/OCS Baltimore Canyon (Mid-Atlantic) Sediment Analyses (Samples collected 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains analytical data from samples acquired from the Baltimore Canyon (Mid-Atlantic) area of the Outer Continental Shelf, U.S. East Coast, by the...

  15. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from GILLISS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1977-05-05 to 1977-09-02 (NODC Accession 7800461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This entry contains the results from the Outer Continental Shelf Study (OCS) benchmark study in the North Atlantic which ran May 5 to September 2, 1977 from the R/V...

  16. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from GYRE in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1977-02-10 to 1977-03-07 (NODC Accession 7800459)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This entry contains the results from the Outer Continental Shelf Study (OCS) Benchmark Study in the North Atlantic which ran from February 10 to March 7, 1977 from...

  17. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1977-11-22 to 1977-12-04 (NODC Accession 7800462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This entry contains the results from the Outer Continental Shelf Study (OCS) benchmark study in the North Atlantic which ran November to December 1977 from the R/V...

  18. Hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Argentine Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, M.P.R.; Keeley M.L.; Maslanyj, M.P.; Urien, C.M.; Hoggs, S.L.

    1993-02-01

    A rift basin containing stratigraphic and structural closures is developed along the Argentine slope over a distance of some 1000 km and area of 50,000 km[sup 2] in potentially exploitable water depths of 200 to 1500 m. No wells exist on this part of the continental margin. Rifting began during the Late Triassic/Jurassic and ended in Early Cretaceous. The first marine seaways flooded the Rift alluvial plains and lake. In Hauterian-Barrenian time, low circulation marine conditions with oxygen deficiency prevailed up to Rio Grande/Walvis Ridge flooding in part the coastal pull-apart basins. A major marine transgression in the Maastrichtian formed a widespread seal over the entire shelf and slope area. Four play types were identified: (1) a major north-east trending elongate delta system sourced inland from the San Julien (N. Malvinas) Basin and deposited on the southern Patagonian shelf and rise, (2) reworked deltaic barrier sands accumulated along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge, (3) The Outer Basement Ridge, a major structural closure 400 km long, and (4) a series of margin-parallel rift systems in the offshore region between the 200 m and 1500 m isobaths. Regional seismic data and geological correlations suggest that oil prone source rocks are likely in the Middle and Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous formations. Source rocks are probably mature east and west of the Outer Basement Ridge and in the easterndepocenter of the Colorado Basin. Eastward migration from Jurassic age lacustrine source rocks in the Colorado Basin may have charged traps along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge. Westward directed migration from deeply buried Aptian age marine source rocks in the Atlantic basins has probably charged prospective stratigraphic and structural traps in a suite of coast-parallel grabens developed on the Argentine continental shelf and slope. The Argentine offshore region, therefore, offers significant encouragement as a productive hydrocarbon province.

  19. A harbinger of plate tectonics: a commentary on Bullard, Everett and Smith (1965) ?The fit of the continents around the Atlantic?

    OpenAIRE

    Dewey, John F.

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, geology was transformed by the paradigm of plate tectonics. The 1965 paper of Bullard, Everett and Smith was a linking transition between the theories of continental drift and plate tectonics. They showed, conclusively, that the continents around the Atlantic were once contiguous and that the Atlantic Ocean had grown at rates of a few centimetres per year since the Early Jurassic, about 160?Ma. They achieved fits of the continental margins at the 500 fathom line (approx. 900?m),...

  20. 2005 Atlantic Hurricanes Poster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2005 Atlantic Hurricanes poster features high quality satellite images of 15 hurricanes which formed in the Atlantic Basin (includes Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean...

  1. South Atlantic Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEFSC, in cooperation with the South Atlantic states, collects South Atlantic shrimp data from dealers and fishermen. These data are collected to provide catch,...

  2. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuidema, P [University of Miami; Chiu, C [University of Reading; Fairall, CW [NOAA - Environmental Technology Laboratory; Ghan, SJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kollias, P [Stony Brook University; McFarguhar, GM; Mechem, DB [University of Kansas; Romps, DM [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Wong, H; Yuter, SE [North Carolina State University; Alvarado, MJ [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.; DeSzoeke, SP; Feingold, G [NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory; Haywood, JM; Lewis, ER [Brookhaven National Laboratory; McComiskey, A [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Redemann, J [NASA - Ames Research Center; Turner, DD [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Wood, R [University of Washington; Zhu, P [Florida International University

    2015-12-01

    Southern Africa is the world’s largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth’s major subtropical stratocumulus decks. Global aerosol model results highlight that the largest positive top-of-atmosphere forcing in the world occurs in the southeast Atlantic, but this region exhibits large differences in magnitude and sign between reputable models, in part because of high variability in the underlying model cloud distributions. Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of shortwave-absorbing aerosol during transport, how much of the aerosol mixes into the cloudy boundary layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. In addition, the ability of the BB aerosol to absorb shortwave radiation is known to vary seasonally as the fuel type on land changes.

  3. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  4. Continental United States Hurricane Strikes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Continental U.S. Hurricane Strikes Poster is our most popular poster which is updated annually. The poster includes all hurricanes that affected the U.S. since...

  5. Southeast Asia Report. No. 1325

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-15

    former Bank Negara Governor Tun Is- mail Ali, former Finance Minister Tun Tan Siew Sin, bankers and mem- bers of the diplomatic corp. , The Prime...286100 JPRS 84128 15 August 1983 Southeast Asia Report No. 1325 19980609 126 <#*.. % %, FBIS FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE...34 ■" ’ ’ ’ ■ ■■■■ ■■ .i.i Approved for public release? . Distribution Unlimited „. /4$5" JPRS 84128 15 August 1983 Southeast Asia Report No. 1325

  6. Diurnal tides on the Barents Sea continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skagseth, Øystein; Albretsen, Jon

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of diurnal tides over the continental slope between the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea shelf are presented. Numerical 3D simulations, in agreement with field data, show strong cross-slope velocities and large vertical displacements of the interface between Atlantic Water and intermediate water over the slope. The striking correspondence between the prominent observed and modeled diurnal oscillations gives confidence that this is well represented by the model. This variability, interpreted as tidally induced diurnal period topographic waves, is confined to the diverging topography of the continental slope west of Tromsøflaket. The model results reveal highly variable magnitudes of the oscillations and the cross shelf currents in time, related to variable strength of the background flow, the Norwegian Atlantic Current. We suggest that the diurnal topographic wave can be an effective mechanism for cross slope exchange between the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea shelf, and important for benthic and pelagic biological processes on the shelf and slope.

  7. Biscayne aquifer, southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Howard; Hull, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Peak daily pumpage from the highly permeable, unconfined Biscayne aquifer for public water-supply systems in southeast Florida in 1975 was about 500 million gallons. Another 165 million gallons was withdrawn daily for irrigation. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily by local rainfall. Discharge is by evapotranspiration, canal drainage, coastal seepage, and pumping. Pollutants can enter the aquifer by direct infiltration from land surface or controlled canals, septic-tank and other drainfields, drainage wells, and solid-waste dumps. Most of the pollutants are concentrated in the upper 20 to 30 feet of the aquifer; public supply wells generally range in depth from about 75 to 150 feet. Dilution, dispersion, and adsorption tend to reduce the concentrations. Seasonal heavy rainfall and canal discharge accelerate ground-water circulation, thereby tending to dilute and flush upper zones of the aquifer. The ultimate fate of pollutants in the aquifer is the ocean, although some may be adsorbed by the aquifer materials en route to the ocean, and some are diverted to pumping wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Frugivory and habitat use by fruit-eating birds in a fragmented landscape of southeast Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pizo, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the movement of seeds transported by fruit-eating birds in an agricultural, fragmented landscape of the Atlantic forest of southeast Brazil, I asked which bird species are the main seed dispersers in such environment, and how they use the available habitats (small forest fragments, forest thickets, live fences, isolated trees, and active pastures) where they are most likely to drop the seeds they swallow the relative importance of fruit-eating birds as seed vectors was evaluate...

  9. 78 FR 65974 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Advisory Panel for Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Southeast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... and/or stock assessment methodologies for marine fish species. Members of the SEDAR Pool must have.... Meetings and meeting logistics will be determined according to the SEDAR Guidelines. All meetings are open...

  10. 76 FR 47563 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); South Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Assessment Workshop and (3) Review Workshop. The product of the Data Workshop is a data report which compiles... the Review Workshop. The product of the Review Workshop is a Consensus Summary documenting Panel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  11. Continental margin atmospheric climatology and sea level (Historical setting 1974--1975)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.; D' Amato, R.; Gabriel, C.; Sawyer, R.J. Jr.

    1978-02-01

    From the many continental shelf dynamics studies which have been made in the past decade, it has become increasingly apparent that a detailed analysis of continental margin waters can only be accomplished with an appreciation of the coastal meteorology. Fortunately, coastal meteorological and, in addition, coastal sea level data have been archived and thus provide coastal oceanographers with inexpensive, priceless and complimentary data sets. Past coastal sea level studies have demonstrated that these data contain not only tidal data but also sub-inertial frequency information which measurably details shelf reesponse to atmospheric forcing. Additionally, a particular region, such as the South Atlantic Bight, can be characterized by the statistics of the temporal spectra of both data sets as well by the alonshore coherences which may exist between stations. In this study, atmospheric wind and pressure have been examined and correlated with coastal sea level changes at various coastal stations along the South Atlantic Bight.

  12. Southeast Region Finfish Age Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set includes port samples of reef fish species collected from commercial and recreational fishery landings in the U.S. South Atlantic (NC - FL Keys). The data...

  13. Ozone in the Atlantic Ocean marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Boylan; Detlev Helmig; Samuel Oltmans

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In situ atmospheric ozone measurements aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the 2008 Gas-Ex and AMMA research cruises were compared with data from four island and coastal Global Atmospheric Watch stations in the Atlantic Ocean to examine ozone transport in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Ozone measurements made at Tudor Hill, Bermuda, were subjected to continental outflow from the east coast of the United States, which resulted in elevated ozone levels above 50 ppbv. Ozone measurem...

  14. Distribution and drift of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua ) eggs and larvae in Greenland offshore waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Hovgård, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Catches of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) eggs and larvae from 45 national and international ichthyoplankton surveys conducted in Greenland offshore waters during the period 1950 to 1984 have been compiled and re-analysed. Southeast and Southwest Greenland were identified as im- portant spawning are...

  15. A comparative study of Pleistocene phosphorites from the continental slope off western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; DileepKumar, M.; Cardinal, D.; Michard, A.; Borole, D.V.; Jacobs, E.; Natarajan, R.

    of Sedimentologists 945 INTRODUCTION Present-day phosphogenesis and phosphorite for- mation occur on the continental margins of Baja California, Peru–Chile and east Australia in the Pacific Ocean, Namibia and south-west Africa in the Atlantic Ocean and south... and the associated phosphate content of the phosphorites vary significantly from region to region. Phosphate particles in Baja California, Peru–Chile, east Australia and south-west Afri- can margins are of various types (friable to indurated phosphate nodules...

  16. China's Economic Engagement with Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Review of: China’s Economic Engagement with Southeast Asia: Indonesia / by John Lee. Trends in Southeast Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2013. Pp. 40. Paperback: $9.90/S$12.90. PDF available: http://www.iseas.edu.sg/documents/publication/Trends_2013-3.pdf......Review of: China’s Economic Engagement with Southeast Asia: Indonesia / by John Lee. Trends in Southeast Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2013. Pp. 40. Paperback: $9.90/S$12.90. PDF available: http://www.iseas.edu.sg/documents/publication/Trends_2013-3.pdf...

  17. Modeling the impact of changes in Atlantic sea surface temperature on the climate of West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Mojisola O.

    2017-04-01

    This study assesses the impacts of warming/cooling of the Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) on the climate of West Africa using Version 4.4 of Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.4) of International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy. The 1-2 K cooling and warming of the Atlantic SST both result in tripole temperature and precipitation change structure, having a northwest-southeast orientation over West Africa. Findings reveal that the responses of precipitation and temperature to the Atlantic SST cooling are opposite to those for the Atlantic SST warming and these responses intensify with increased warming/cooling of the Atlantic SST. The structure of the change in climate is attributed to the response of atmospheric/soil moisture gradient and orientation of orography in West Africa.

  18. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  19. The South Atlantic Coupled Variability and the South Atlantic Convergence Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardi, Rodrigo Jose

    The dominant mode of coupled variability over the South Atlantic Ocean is known as "South Atlantic Dipole" (SAD) and is characterized by a dipole in sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies with centers over the tropical and the extratropical South Atlantic. Previous studies have shown that variations in SST related to SAD modulate large-scale patterns of precipitation over the Atlantic Ocean. Here we show that variations in the South Atlantic SST are associated with changes in daily precipitation over eastern South America. This study is based on observational and regional atmospheric modeling. Rain gauge precipitation, satellite derived sea surface temperature and reanalysis data are used to investigate the variability of the subtropical and tropical South Atlantic and impacts on precipitation. SAD phases are assessed by performing Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis of sea level pressure and SST anomalies. We show that during neutral El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, SAD plays an important role in modulating cyclogenesis and the characteristics of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). Positive SST anomalies over the extratropical South Atlantic (SAD negative phase) are related to increased cyclogenesis near southeast Brazil as well as the migration of extratropical cyclones further north. As a consequence, these systems organize convection and increase precipitation over eastern South America. Numerical experiments forced with prescribed SST anomalies showed that even though the Atlantic SST affects the position of the cyclone associated with the SACZ, the atmospheric response and precipitation patters over land were opposite from the observational results. On the other hand, experiments forced with prescribed anomalous driving fields showed that the atmospheric component of SAD plays a significant role for the right position and intensity of precipitation associated with the SACZ. SAD negative anomalies provide the low-level and upper

  20. Marine fronts at the continental shelves of austral South America - Physical and ecological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acha, Eduardo M.; Mianzan, Hermes W.; Guerrero, Raúl A.; Favero, Marco; Bava, José

    2004-01-01

    Neritic fronts are very abundant in austral South America, covering several scales of space and time. However, this region is poorly studied from a systemic point of view. Our main goal is to develop a holistic view of physical and ecological patterns and processes at austral South America, regarding frontal arrangements. Satellite information (sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentration), and historical hydrographic data were employed to show fronts. We compiled all existing evidence (physical and biological) about fronts to identify regions defined by similar types of coastal fronts and to characterize them. Fronts in austral South America can be arranged in six zones according to their location, main forcing, key physical variables, seasonality, and enrichment mechanisms. Four zones, the Atlantic upwelling zone; the temperate estuarine zone; the Patagonian tidal zone and the Argentine shelf-break zone, occupy most of the Atlantic side. The Chile-Peru upwelling zone, on the Pacific, is the largest and best-known region. The Patagonian cold estuarine zone encompasses the tip of South America, connecting the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and remains poorly studied. When observed at a continental scale, the Pacific coast dominated by two large frontal zones appears simplest than the Atlantic coast in terms of frontal richness. The extension of the continental shelf in the Atlantic coast allows for the development of a great diversity of mesoscale fronts. Though frontal zones we defined are extensive areas of the continental shelves, fronts inside the zones are comparatively small areas. Even so, they play a paramount role in ecological processes, allowing for high biological production; offering feeding and/or reproductive habitats for fishes, squids, and birds; acting as retention areas for larvae of benthic species; and promoting establishment of benthic invertebrates that benefit from the organic production in the frontal area.

  1. Southeast Region Headboat Survey-Catch Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Region Headboat Survey (SRHS), administered by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) personnel based at...

  2. NCDC Southeast Federal Records Center Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — East Point, Georgia is the former location of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Southeast regional Federal Records Center (FRC). The southeast...

  3. {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po as tracers of particle transport mechanisms on continental margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radakovitch, O.; Heussner, S. [Perpignan Univ., 66 (France). Lab. de Sedimentologie et Geochimie Marines; Biscaye, P.; Abassi, A. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory

    1997-12-31

    The natural radionuclides {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb, members of the {sup 238}U decay chain, are particularly helpful to the understanding of particle transport processes in the ocean. These isotopes were analysed on sediment trap particles collected during 3 one-year experiments on continental margins. In the Bay of Biscay (Northeastern Atlantic) and in the Gulf of Lion (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea) both as part of the French ECOMARGE programme, and in the Middle Atlantic Bight (Northwestern Atlantic) as part of the SEEP programme. They yielded great insights into scenarios of particle transfer at each site, mainly based on the spatial and temporal distribution of {sup 210}Pb particulate concentrations and fluxes. (author) 11 refs.

  4. Economic growth and change in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2004-01-01

    This report focuses on economic trends since the 1970s in rural southeast Alaska. These trends are compared with those in the Nation and in nonmetropolitan areas of the country to determine the extent to which the economy in rural southeast Alaska is affected by regional activity and by larger market forces. Many of the economic changes occurring in rural southeast...

  5. Energy Survey Activities off Atlantic Coast Get Green Light From Obama Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-03-01

    The 27 February release of an environmental review of geological and geophysical (G&G) survey activities off the mid- and South Atlantic outer continental shelf is a key step toward potentially opening the area to oil and gas exploration, according to industry and environmental groups. That is a prospect industry groups favor and environmental groups say will harm marine life.

  6. 76 FR 51391 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts... wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative. The purpose of the ``Smart from the Start'' wind energy initiative is to...

  7. 76 FR 40925 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... Characterization Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland... online at: http://www.boemre.gov/offshore/RenewableEnergy/SmartFromTheStart.htm . Authority: This Notice... November 23, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced the ``Smart from the Start'' renewable...

  8. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean-potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size

  9. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - Potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size

  10. Climate Matters in Southeast Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    anshory

    Human Development Index (income, literacy, and life expectancy), poverty, and inequality. Finally, an index of overall climate change vulnerability for Southeast Asia is produced. We ranked the regions according to the index and consider those areas falling in the 4th quartile as the. Indonesia, 19 provinces in Cambodia, 17.

  11. Ice-rafting from the British-Irish ice sheet since the earliest Pleistocene (2.6 million years ago): implications for long-term mid-latitudinal ice-sheet growth in the North Atlantic region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thierens, M.; Pirlet, H.; Colin, C.; Latruwe, K.; Vanhaecke, F.; Lee, J.R.; Stuut, J.-B.; Titschaeck, J.; Titschack, J.; Huvenne, V.; Dorschel, B.; Wheeler, A.J.; Henriet, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere continental ice-sheet development is known to have profoundly affected the global climate system. Evidence for early continental glaciation is preserved in sediments throughout the North Atlantic Ocean, where ice-rafted detritus (IRD)

  12. Precipitation over eastern South America and the South Atlantic Sea surface temperature during neutral ENSO periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardi, Rodrigo J.; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Jones, Charles; Reboita, Michelle S.

    2014-03-01

    The dominant mode of coupled variability over the South Atlantic Ocean is known as "South Atlantic Dipole" (SAD) and is characterized by a dipole in sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies with centers over the tropical and the extratropical South Atlantic. Previous studies have shown that variations in SST related to SAD modulate large-scale patterns of precipitation over the Atlantic Ocean. Here we show that variations in the South Atlantic SST are associated with changes in daily precipitation over eastern South America. Rain gauge precipitation, satellite derived sea surface temperature and reanalysis data are used to investigate the variability of the subtropical and tropical South Atlantic and impacts on precipitation. SAD phases are assessed by performing Singular value decomposition analysis of sea level pressure and SST anomalies. We show that during neutral El Niño Southern Oscillation events, SAD plays an important role in modulating cyclogenesis and the characteristics of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone. Positive SST anomalies over the extratropical South Atlantic (SAD negative phase) are related to increased cyclogenesis near southeast Brazil as well as the migration of extratropical cyclones further north. As a consequence, these systems organize convection and increase precipitation over eastern South America.

  13. One-Dimensional Velocity Structure of the Crust in Fujian, Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Teng Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 12095 P-wave phase data were selected in this study from four NW-oriented and four NE-oriented explosion sounding survey lines conducted along the coast and midland of Southeast China during the years 2010 and 2012. The 1-D crust P-wave velocity model was obtained in the continental margin of Southeast China (Fujian Province using the travel time residual as the threshold and performing linear iterative inversion. This crust model includes 5 layers with the velocities being 5.04, 5.44, 6.06, 6.16, 6.39 km s-1, respectively, with the bottom depths being 0.23, 2.82, 6.44, 18.81, 30.42 km, respectively, and the uppermost mantle velocity being 8.08 km s-1. Compared with previous work the four P-wave phase data could effectively reflect the shallow and deep crust characteristics. The joint inversion method involves both the velocity and depth. The results in this paper could therefore be more reasonable and applicable than previous findings, with fairly good control in both the shallow and deep crusts. These findings have practical significance for compiling the earthquake travel time table and precisely locating earthquakes in this area. This work also provides an accurate preliminary model for subsequent 2-D and 3-D velocity structure inversions in the Southeast China (Fujian Province continental margin.

  14. A Holocene sea-level database for Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Maren; Mann, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Switzer, Adam; Horton, Benjamin P.; Lukman, Muhammad; Jompa, Jamaluddin; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-04-01

    The study of former relative sea-level (RSL) changes is essential to disentangle changes in sea level due to vertical land motion (e.g. tectonics, Glacial Isostatic Adjustment - GIA) and eustatic (e.g. ice equivalent sea level) causes. To study RSL changes at a regional scale it is essential that databases of sea-level indicators are produced following standardized protocols (Hijma et al., 2015). This has been already done in several regions (e.g. the US Atlantic coast, the Caribbean, or the Mediterranean (Engelhart and Horton, 2012) A database has been compiled for Southeast Asia but was limited in geographical extent and didn't include the influence of local process such as tidal range changes and compaction. Southeast Asia is highly vulnerable to relative sea level changes, as it is characterized by low-lying, densely populated islands and subsiding deltas. We present a database of Holocene sea-level histories in Southeast Asia and part of the Indo-Pacific from published and unpublished data, which has been evaluated and using a standardized protocol. We analyzed 526 sea level index points, defining their locations the height of former sea level and the age with their associated uncertainty. Radiocarbon ages were re-calibrated using Calib 7.0.0 / 7.1 (Stuiver et al., 2017) and the calibration curves Intcal13 or Marine13. In our database, we also indicated possible tectonic vertical land motion, and we present the results of GIA modelling for different areas in SE Asia. We also show regions of South East Asia and parts of the Indo-Pacific where there is an absence of data and where the collection of new RSL data is mostly needed.

  15. The onset of Walvis Ridge: Plume influence at the continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, T.; Jokat, W.; Ryberg, T.; Behrmann, J. H.; Haberland, C.; Weber, M.

    2017-10-01

    The opening of the South Atlantic is a classical example for a plume related continental breakup. Flood basalts are present on both conjugate margins as well as aseismic ridges connecting them with the current plume location at Tristan da Cunha. To determine the effect of the proposed plume head on the continental crust, we acquired wide-angle seismic data at the junction of the Walvis Ridge with the African continent and modelled the P-wave velocity structure in a forward approach. The profile extends 430 km along the ridge and continues onshore to a length of 720 km. Crustal velocities beneath the Walvis Ridge vary between 5.5 km/s and 7.0 km/s, a typical range for oceanic crust. The crustal thickness of 22 km, however, is approximately three times larger than of normal oceanic crust. The continent-ocean transition is characterized by 30 km thick crust with strong lateral velocity variations in the upper crust and a high-velocity lower crust (HVLC), where velocities reach up to 7.5 km/s. The HVLC is 100 to 130 km wider at the Walvis Ridge than it is farther south, and impinges onto the continental crust of the Kaoko fold belt. Such high seismic velocities indicate Mg-rich igneous material intruded into the continental crust during the initial rifting stage. However, the remaining continental crust seems unaffected by intrusions and the root of the 40 km-thick crust of the Kaoko belt is not thermally abraded. We conclude that the plume head did not modify the continental crust on a large scale, but caused rather local effects. Thus, it seems unlikely that a plume drove or initiated the breakup process. We further propose that the plume already existed underneath the continent prior to the breakup, and ponded melt erupted at emerging rift structures providing the magma for continental flood basalts.

  16. Constraining South Atlantic growth with seafloor spreading data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Diaz, Lucia; Eagles, Graeme

    2015-04-01

    The opening of the South Atlantic ocean is one of the most extensively researched problems in plate kinematics. Models of it have proliferated since Bullard, Everett and Smith published the first-ever computer-assisted reconstruction in the 60s. General agreement exists about ocean opening being the result of the northward propagating mid-Atlantic ridge, which implies a degree of intracontinental deformation. In view of this, modern studies assign this deformation to narrow deformation belts between large plate-like continental blocks in order to achieve best fits of the blocks' extended continental margins. The geological record of intracontinental deformation constrains the magnitude, orientation, and timing of block motion at very low resolution only. Similarly, the ages and shapes of the extended margins are not unanimously interpretable at high resolution. Aiming to avoid the uncertainties inherent in this approach, we model plate divergence as depicted by seafloor spreading data, and use this model as a context within which to interpret intracontinental tectonic motions. Our results show that it is possible to explain nearly all available oceanic kinematic data relating to the opening of the South Atlantic in terms of the divergence of only two plates, with seafloor spreading starting at 138 Ma. The motions leading to the assembly of South America by 123 Ma and Africa by 106 Ma are illustrated by an animated tectonic reconstruction. Furthermore, our model puts features such as the Vema Channel, Malvinas plate, NE Georgia Rise and Agulhas Plateau into context, explaining their formation and evolution within the process of divergence of the South American and African plates. Lastly, we examine the implications of our model in terms of the accommodation of spreading-related stresses within the continental interiors. We challenge the view of narrow deformation belts as the sole sites of stress accommodation by showing that such features may only account for

  17. Atlantic Salmon Telemetry Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Annual telemetry data are collected as part of specific projects (assessments within watersheds) or as opportunistic efforts to characterize Atlantic salmon smolt...

  18. GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) was the first major international experiment of the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP). It was conducted over...

  19. Cetaceans of the Atlantic Frontier, north and west of Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, C. R.; Pollock, C.; Cronin, C.; Taylor, S.

    2001-05-01

    Surveys carried out to the north and west of Scotland have recorded 15 species of cetacean between 1979 and 1998. These were fin whale ( Balaenoptera physalus) , sei whale ( B. borealis) , minke whale ( B. acutorostrata) , humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae) , sperm whale ( Physeter macrocephalus) , northern bottlenose whale ( Hyperoodon ampullatus) , Sowerby's beaked whale ( Mesoplodon bidens) , killer whale ( Orcinus orca) , long-finned pilot whale ( Globicephala melas) , Atlantic white-sided dolphin ( Lagenorhynchus acutus) , white-beaked dolphin ( L. albirostris) , Risso's dolphin ( Grampus griseus) , bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus) , common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) and harbour porpoise ( Phocoena phocoena) . Atlantic white-sided dolphin was the most abundant species in the region with a total of 6317 animals recorded. Harbour porpoise was the most frequently sighted cetacean species. The geographical distribution of sightings indicate that cetacean species have varying ecological requirements, with species such as sperm whale, pilot whale and white-sided dolphin favouring deep water off the continental shelf edge, while minke whale, white-beaked dolphin and harbour porpoise were apparently limited to the continental shelf. The diversity of species recorded in the region suggests that the Atlantic Frontier is an important habitat for cetaceans.

  20. Fennerosquilla heptacantha (Crustacea: Stomatopoda: Squillidae) in South Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucatelli, Débora

    2015-10-07

    Fennerosquilla is a monotypic genus that belongs to the family Squillidae, which has the highest generic diversity within Stomatopoda. This genus has been recorded in the north Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, between 105 and 458 m depth. The present specimen was collected during the project "Avaliação da Biota Bentônica e Planctônica na porção offshore das Bacias Potiguar e Ceará", in 2011, from the continental slope region of Brazil. In this expedition Fennerosquilla heptacantha was found at 178-193 m depth, and represents the first record of the species in the south Atlantic Ocean (Rio Grande do Norte State, northeastern Brazil), expanding the southern limit distribution. The specimen is the largest recorded, measuring 149 mm total length. The pigmentation zone on median region of telson and all diagnostic characters are still preserved and agree with the original description. Fennerosquilla heptacantha has a disjunct deep water distribution (more than 100 m) in the tropical western Atlantic, mostly along the continental slope.

  1. Testing Predictions of Continental Insulation using Oceanic Crustal Thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; Shorttle, Oliver; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The thermal blanketing effect of continental crust has been predicted to lead to elevated temperatures within the upper mantle beneath supercontinents. Initial break-up is associated with increased magmatism and the generation of flood basalts. Continued rifting and sea-floor spreading lead to a steady reduction of this thermal anomaly. Recently, evidence in support of this behaviour has come from the major element geochemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalts, which suggest excess rifting temperatures of ˜ 150 °C that decay over ˜ 100 Ma. We have collated a global inventory of ˜ 1000 seismic reflection profiles and ˜ 500 wide-angle refraction experiments from the oceanic realm. Data are predominantly located along passive margins, but there are also multiple surveys in the centres of the major oceanic basins. Oceanic crustal thickness has been mapped, taking care to avoid areas of secondary magmatic thickening near seamounts or later thinning such as across transform faults. These crustal thicknesses are a proxy for mantle potential temperature at the time of melt formation beneath a mid-ocean ridge system, allowing us to quantify the amplitude and duration of thermal anomalies generated beneath supercontinents. The Jurassic break-up of the Central Atlantic and the Cretaceous rifting that formed the South Atlantic Ocean are both associated with excess temperatures of ˜ 50 °C that have e-folding times of ˜ 50 Ma. In addition to this background trend, excess temperatures reach > 150 °C around the region of the Rio Grande Rise, associated with the present-day Tristan hotspot. The e-folding time of this more local event is ˜ 10 Ma, which mirrors results obtained for the North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland. In contrast, crustal thicknesses from the Pacific Ocean reveal approximately constant potential temperature through time. This observation is in agreement with predictions, as the western Pacific was formed by rifting of an oceanic plate. In summary

  2. Parasites as biological tags for stock identification of blackspot seabream, Pagellus bogaraveo, in Portuguese northeast Atlantic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Hermida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study the following parasites were selected as biological tags for the identification of blackspot seabream (Pagellus bogaraveo stocks in the northeast Atlantic: Diphterostomum vividum (Digenea: Zoogonidae, Anisakis simplex s.l., A. physeteris, Anisakis sp. PB-2010 (Nematoda: Anisakidae, and Bolbosoma sp. (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae. These parasite species point to the existence of three blackspot seabream stocks in the northeast Atlantic: one in the Azores region (ICES Area X, one in continental Portuguese shelf/slope waters (ICES Area IXa, and one in the waters around Madeira (sub-area 1.2 of FAO 34, central-eastern Atlantic.

  3. Malacofauna da plataforma continental portuguesa

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Jaime Alberto Jardim

    2009-01-01

    Este estudo tem como objectivo principal a identificação e caracterização da malacofauna da plataforma continental portuguesa. Baseia-se no estudo de 72 amostras de sedimentos colhidas em campanhas oceanográficas efectuadas ao longo da plataforma, de Caminha à Figueira da Foz e de Sagres a Vila Real de Santo António (incluindo alguns locais na Baía de Cádiz, Espanha). Foi recenseado um total de 1500 indivíduos, dos quais 1251 são representantes da classe Bivalvia, 201 ...

  4. The Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) is headquartered in Miami, FL. The SEFSC is responsible for scientific research on living marine resources that occupy...

  5. Quaternary phosphorites from the continental margin off Chennai, southeast India: Analogs of ancient phosphate stromatolites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, K.M.; Raju, D.S.N.

    . These are primary phosphate deposits and are similar to phosphate stratiform stromatolites. This is the first report of phosphate stratiform stromatolites during the Quaternary and modern times, and they provide a Quaternary analog for ancient phosphorites. Thin...

  6. Bivalve mollusk assemblages on São Paulo's northern continental shelf, southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Soares-Gomes

    Full Text Available Soft bottom bivalve mollusc assemblages were sampled along a depth gradient (10 to 100 m on the northern São Paulo shelf during the austral summer and winter. A one-way analysis of similarity permutation test revealed there was no seasonal difference in the structure of the bivalve assemblages in the area. A clustering analysis indicated 3 groups of stations corresponding to the bathymetric gradient. Both K-dominance curves and Shannon and Pielou indexes showed higher biological diversity and higher evenness for the shallower area. Most of the bivalves found were classified as suspension-feeders, co-occurring with deposit-feeder species, suggesting an absence of negative interactions between these trophic groups. Differences in the frequency of disturbance along the depth gradient caused by wave storms - more common in winter - and also by predation and anthropogenic activities, such as dredging of fishing boats and input of gross sewage, likely explain the higher diversity found on the inner shelf of Ubatuba.

  7. Southeast Asian Studies in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chou, Cynthia Gek Hua; Platt, Martin B.

    2012-01-01

    from this approach, this article calls for an examination of one important concept in innovative education, that is, context sensitive education. The case study of an annual joint Singapore-Denmark-America summer school programme to teach and study Southeast Asia in Context is discussed here.......As pressures mount to adopt new or alternative instructional delivery methods to achieve innovative education, there has been a strong orientation towards emphasising the need to integrate the latest technological applications to achieve the best in teaching and learning experiences. Moving away...

  8. Land-ocean tectonics (LOTs) and the associated seismic hazard over the Eastern Continental Margin of India (ECMI)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Murty, G.P.S.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.

    ) __________________________________________________________________________________ National Institute of Oceanography (C.S.I.R.), Regional Centre, 176, Lawson’s Bay, Visakhapatnam- 530017 India. e-mail: ksr@nio.org 1. Introduction Passive margins, also called as Atlantic type of margins, by definition are generally the sites..., Subrahmanyam AS, Murty GPS, Murthy KSR (2009) Tectonic significance of Gundlakamma river (Krishna Basin) over Eastern Continental Margin of India – A qualitative appraisal (Communicated to Current Science) Subrahmanya K (1996) Active Intraplate deformation...

  9. Continental reach: The Westcoast Energy story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, P. C.

    2002-07-01

    A historical account is given of the spectacular success that was Westcoast Energy Inc., a Canadian natural gas giant that charted a wilderness pipeline from natural gas fields in Canada's sub-arctic solitude. The beginning of the company is traced to an event in 1934 when near the bank of the Pouce Coupe River, close to the Alberta-British Columbia border, Frank McMahon, a solitary wildcatter and the eventual founder of the company, first sighted the fiery inferno of a runaway wildcat well, drilled by geologists of the Imperial Oil Company during their original search for the Canadian petroleum basin's motherlode. It was on this occasion in 1934 that McMahon first conceived a geological profile that connected the gas-bearing sandstone of Pouce Coupe with the reservoir rock of the biggest natural gas field of Alberta, and a pipeline from this sandstone storehouse across the rugged heart of British Columbia to Vancouver, and south into the United States. It took the better part of a quarter century to realize the dream of that pipeline which, in due course, turned out to be only the first step towards reaching the top rank of Canadian corporations in operational and financial terms, and becoming one of only a handful in terms of a story that became a Canadian corporate legend. By chronicling the lives and contributions of the company's founder and senior officials over the years, the book traces the company's meteoric rise from a gleam in its founder's eye to a cautious regional utility, and to the aggressive Canadian adventurer that went on to burst the boundaries of its Pacific Coast world, until the continental reach of its operations and interests run from Canada's Pacific shoreline to its Atlantic basins and Mexico's Campeche Bay to Alaska's Prudhoe Bay. The company's independent existence came to an end in 2002 when Westcoast Energy, by then a $15 billion operation, was acquired by Duke Energy Limited of North

  10. Continental Flood Basalt Chemistry, Age and Volcanic Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humler, E.; Doubre, C.; Doubre, C.

    2001-12-01

    We have compiled a large collection of published chemical analyses of the 11 known continental flood basalts of the last 250 millions years. Only basaltic lavas and some related basic intrusive rocks are considered to be representative of the major episodes. Differentiation trends exhibit varying amounts of scatter, the trends for SiO2, FeO, and TiO2 are quite well defined, have slopes of the same sign, and can be represented adaquately by straigth lines. In contrast, the trends of CaO, Al2O3 and Na2O are often poorly defined. There are clear differences in major element abundances between volcanic suites, particularly for elements with well defined slopes. The results of our regressions are generally consistent with those of Turner and Hawkesworth (1995), Peng et al (1994) and Lassister and DePaolo (1997), although some differences exist. Examination of the global data base shows that there are systematic global variations in continental flood basalt chemistry that correlate with age. Old CFB, such as the Central Atlantic and Karoo-Ferrar, show the following characteristics: low Na2O, TiO2 and FeO, high SiO2. In contrast, basalts associated with recent breakups such as Afar-Yemen and Ethiopia, show the opposite chemical trends. Between these old and young continental breakup, a continuum of compositions is observed. The observed chemical systematics suggest that basalts associated with old breakups are derived by larger extent of melting at shallower mean pressures of melt segregation. Estimating the original volumes of lava in flood basalt provinces is rendered difficult due to subsequent erosion, partial destruction during continental collisions or burial beneath passive margin sedimentation wedges. Many CFBs were erupted in geologically brief intervals (0.5 to 2 Ma) although some, notably the Siberian Traps and Brito-Arctic Province, were emplaced in two or more distinct phases separeted by quiescent intervals. Our calculated emplacement rate show correlation

  11. Atlantic menhaden adult tagging study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic menhaden are a schooling forage fish species, which are subject to a large commercial purse seine fishery. Atlantic menhaden are harvested for reduction...

  12. Recent changes in continentality and aridity conditions over the Middle East and North Africa region, and their association with circulation patterns

    KAUST Repository

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.

    2016-05-30

    A long-term (1960-2013) assessment of the variability of continentality and aridity conditions over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region was undertaken. Monthly gridded temperature and precipitation data from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) (TS3.22 version) were used to compute the Johansson Continentality Index (JCI) and the Marsz Oceanity Index (MOI). In addition, the De Martonne index and the Pinna index were employed to assess recent changes in aridity conditions. All indices revealed a statistically significant increase in continental influences over the region, particularly in the Nile Basin and the Fertile Crescent. For aridity, the results suggested a generally statistically insignificant increase, with the most rapid changes occurring over the most humid regions (i.e. the Ethiopian Highlands and the Fertile Crescent). In order to explain the observed changes in the continentality and aridity conditions, we assessed the relationship between aridity and continentality indices and a wide range of large-scale circulation patterns. Results indicate that the spatial variability of continentality (as well as aridity) was closely coupled with the Atlantic modes of variability, e.g. the Eastern Atlantic pattern and the Atlantic Meridional Mode, compared to those of the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. The results of this work highlight change processes in 2 important climate features in one of the hottest regions on Earth. Improving our understanding of the spatio-temporal characteristics of climate continentality and aridity has implications for a diversity of socio-political, economic, hydrological, and ecological activities in the MENA region.

  13. Promoting Entrepreneurship Research in Southeast Asia: Applying ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Promoting Entrepreneurship Research in Southeast Asia: Applying the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. Entrepreneurship has been a major driver of growth and job creation in Southeast Asia. However, there is little empirical research on entrepreneurial activity, innovation, and the types of policies which can promote ...

  14. China's Soft Power Diplomacy in Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyses the new geo-political and geo-economic strategic relationship between China and Southeast Asia. Is Chinese soft power encroachment into Southeast Asia creating greater stability, does it jeopardize US interests and what is the impact on the regime-types, economic restructuring,...

  15. Governance and Enterprise Restructuring in Southeast Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolov, Mico

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The research in this paper is to be focused on examining governance and enterprise restructuring in Southeast Europe (Western Balkans) transition economies. International organizations classify the following countries in Southeast Europe (Western Balkans): Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. Design/methodology/approach - The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has governance and enterprise restructuring as basic indicat...

  16. Southeast Asian Refugees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews the history, initial problems, and economic adjustment of Southeast Asian refugees residing in the United States today. Provides some figures on yearly arrivals from 1975 to 198l, national origin of the U.S. Southeast Asians, their current level of English proficiency, labor force participation, and percent of households on public…

  17. Thermochronological constraints on the Cambrian to recent geological evolution of the Argentina passive continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollenz, Sebastian; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.; Rossello, Eduardo A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Schad, Sabrina; Pereyra, Ricardo E.

    2017-10-01

    Passive continental margins are geo-archives that store information from the interplay of endogenous and exogenous forces related to continental rifting, post-breakup history, and climate changes. The recent South Atlantic passive continental margins (SAPCMs) in Brazil, Namibia, and South Africa are partly high-elevated margins ( 2000 m a.s.l.), and the recent N-S-trending SAPCM in Argentina and Uruguay is of low elevation. In Argentina, an exception in elevation is arising from the higher topography (> 1000 m a.s.l.) of the two NW-SE-trending mountain ranges Sierras Septentrionales and Sierras Australes. Precambrian metamorphic and intrusive rocks, and siliciclastic rocks of Ordovician to Permian age represent the geological evolution of both areas. The Sierras Australes have been deformed and metamorphosed (incipient - greenschist) during the Gondwanides Orogeny. The low-temperature thermochronological (LTT) data (Cenozoic South Atlantic geological evolution. Upper Carboniferous zircon (U-Th/He)-ages (ZHe) indicate the earliest cooling below 180 °C/1 Ma. Most of the ZHe-ages are of Upper Triassic to Jurassic age. The apatite fission-track ages (AFT) of Sierras Septentrionales and the eastern part of Sierras Australes indicate the South Atlantic rifting and, thereafter. AFT-ages of Middle to Upper Triassic on the western side of the Sierras Australes are in contrast, indicating a Triassic exhumation caused by the eastward thrusting along the Sauce Grande wrench. The corresponding t-T models report a complex subsidence and exhumation history with variable rates since the Ordovician. Based on the LTT-data and the numerical modelling we assume that the NW-SE-trending mountain ranges received their geographic NW-SE orientation during the syn- to post-orogenic history of the Gondwanides.

  18. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers.

  19. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  20. Full waveform tomography of the South Atlantic upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Lorenzo; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    We developed a full waveform tomography of the upper mantle beneath the South Atlantic region using an adjoint method. This required 5000 wavefield simulations and a total of 750 thousand CPU-hours. The 3D seismic structure thus retrieved can help us answering various key questions concerning the geodynamic evolution of the region: (1) How and to which extent does the South Atlantic plume system feed the asthenosphere in the oceanic basin and adjacent regions? (2) What are the current thermal states of the lithosphere below the Walvis Ridge and the Etendeka and Paraná continental flood basalts? (3) Is the asthenosphere thin or thick? (4) What is the characteristic planform of asthenospheric flow? (5) Is the prominent topographic gradient across the South Atlantic region from Africa to South America explicable solely in terms of lower mantle structure, or do we also find a systematic gradient in upper mantle heterogeneity across the ocean basin? Full waveform tomography allows us to exploit information from seismograms in a very efficient way. Our approach is thus well suited for regions with comparatively low data coverage such as the South Atlantic.

  1. Phylogeography of Rattus norvegicus in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Hingston

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Norway rats are a globally distributed invasive species, which have colonized many islands around the world, including in the South Atlantic Ocean. We investigated the phylogeography of Norway rats across the South Atlantic Ocean and bordering continental countries. We identified haplotypes from 517 bp of the hypervariable region I of the mitochondrial D-loop and constructed a Bayesian consensus tree and median-joining network incorporating all other publicly available haplotypes via an alignment of 364 bp. Three Norway rat haplotypes are present across the islands of the South Atlantic Ocean, including multiple haplotypes separated by geographic barriers within island groups. All three haplotypes have been previously recorded from European countries. Our results support the hypothesis of rapid Norway rat colonization of South Atlantic Ocean islands by sea-faring European nations from multiple European ports of origin. This seems to have been the predominant pathway for repeated Norway rat invasions of islands, even within the same archipelago, rather than within-island dispersal across geographic barriers.

  2. Coupling of equatorial Atlantic surface stratification to glacial shifts in the tropical rainbelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilho-Ramos, R C; Chiessi, C M; Zhang, Y; Mulitza, S; Kucera, M; Siccha, M; Prange, M; Paul, A

    2017-05-08

    The modern state of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation promotes a northerly maximum of tropical rainfall associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). For continental regions, abrupt millennial-scale meridional shifts of this rainbelt are well documented, but the behavior of its oceanic counterpart is unclear due the lack of a robust proxy and high temporal resolution records. Here we show that the Atlantic ITCZ leaves a distinct signature in planktonic foraminifera assemblages. We applied this proxy to investigate the history of the Atlantic ITCZ for the last 30,000 years based on two high temporal resolution records from the western Atlantic Ocean. Our reconstruction indicates that the shallowest mixed layer associated with the Atlantic ITCZ unambiguously shifted meridionally in response to changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning with a southward displacement during Heinrich Stadials 2-1 and the Younger Dryas. We conclude that the Atlantic ITCZ was located at ca. 1°S (ca. 5° to the south of its modern annual mean position) during Heinrich Stadial 1. This supports a previous hypothesis, which postulates a southern hemisphere position of the oceanic ITCZ during climatic states with substantially reduced or absent cross-equatorial oceanic meridional heat transport.

  3. 75 FR 11129 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Atlantic Mackerel, Butterfish, Atlantic Bluefish, Spiny...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... ; Mail or hand deliver to Daniel T. Furlong, Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council... Council by telephone (302) 674-2331. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Daniel T. Furlong, Mid-Atlantic...

  4. First amphibian magnetotelluric experiment at the passive continental margin in northern Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinos, G.; Weckmann, U.; Ritter, O.; Jegen, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    An amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) study across the passive continental margin of northern Namibia was conducted in December/January 2010/2011 and October/November 2011 to image the subsurface electrical conductivity structure. The MT experiment is part of the interdisciplinary SAMPLE project (South Atlantic Margin Processes and Links with onshore Evolution) which focusses on imaging and understanding processes related to rifting and the breakup history of the supercontinent Gondwana, in particular the opening of the South Atlantic and the post breakup evolution of the continental passive margins of Africa and South America. The onshore MT data were acquired in the Kaoko Mobile Belt at 167 sites in a ~140 km wide and ~260 km long EW extending corridor, from the Atlantic Ocean onto the Congo Craton. The Kaoko Mobile Belt is a transpressional strike slip orogen with NNW striking sinistral shear zones, folds and thrusts, which was formed during the Pan-African orogeny and the amalgamation of West Gondwana. This onshore network is extended offshore with MT measurements along 2 transects parallel and perpendicular to the Walvis Ridge - an approximately 3400km long seamount volcanic chain, trending NE-SW, from Africa to the Middle Atlantic Ridge, thought to be formed by the volcanic activity of the Tristan da Cunha Plume since the early Cretaceous. The onshore impedances and vertical magnetic transfer functions are generally of excellent quality but indicate significant three-dimensional structures in the crust and upper mantle, particularly in the Western Kaoko Zone, in the vicinity of the prominent shear zones. 2-D inversion of a sub-section of the entire data set, where two-dimensional modeling is consistent with the MT data revealed spatial correlations of a resistive zone and the Archean Congo Craton as well as of conductive structures and surface expressions of prominent faults.

  5. Fake artesunate in southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, P; Proux, S; Green, M; Smithuis, F; Rozendaal, J; Prakongpan, S; Chotivanich, K; Mayxay, M; Looareesuwan, S; Farrar, J; Nosten, F; White, N J

    2001-06-16

    Artesunate is a key antimalarial drug in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in southeast Asia. We investigated the distribution of counterfeit artesunate tablets by use of the validated, simple, and inexpensive Fast Red TR dye technique. We also aimed to identify distinguishing characteristics of the fake drugs. Of 104 shop-bought "artesunate" samples from Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, and Vietnam, 38% did not contain artesunate. Characteristics such as cost and physical appearance of the tablets and packaging reliably predicted authenticity. The illicit trade in counterfeit antimalarials is a great threat to the lives of patients with malaria. The dye test will assist national malaria control authorities in urgently needed campaigns to stop this murderous trade.

  6. Oroclines and paleomagnetism in Borneo and South-East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Charles S.

    2010-12-01

    Oroclinal bending of Borneo is interpreted to result from indentation and collision by the continental promontory of the Miri Zone-Central Luconia Province of northern Sundaland into southern Sundaland. The collision caused strong compression and uplift of the intervening Sibu Zone Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Rajang-Embaluh Group turbidite basin that was floored by oceanic crust of the Proto South China Sea. Timing of the collision is indicated by uplift of turbidite formations to be overlain by Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene carbonates and intrusion of tin-mineralised granites into the turbidites at the south-east maximum inflexion of the orocline, a region complicated by juxtaposition of both shallow and deep water formations. The oroclinal model, requiring clockwise rotation of the north-west limb, is given no support from the paleomagnetic data that instead demonstrate about 50° of Cenozoic anti-clockwise rotation. Unfortunately not a single outcrop of the strongly oroclinally bent Sibu Zone rocks was measured for paleomagnetism in the north-west limb. Limited support was given for the required anti-clockwise rotation in the north-east limb. Previous syntheses emphasised anti-clockwise rotation, or stable non-rotation of the greater Borneo region as a coherent entity, without any internal deformation. Such models have ignored the oroclinal shape defined by the areal geology of the island, known since early Dutch publications. The northern Thailand-Myanmar north-south-trending geology fabric results from indentation by a promontory of continental India at the Assam-Yunnan oroclinal syntaxis, resulting in paleomagnetically-determined clockwise rotation. The bend of Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra, from north-south changing to west-east towards Borneo in the south, remains difficult to model because of widespread remagnetisation.

  7. Mantle Calcium Dominates Continental Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Depaolo, D. J.; Bachmann, O.

    2009-12-01

    Trace element and isotopic compositions of continental igneous rocks are often used to model the generation and evolution of crustal magmas. Here we report new Ca isotopic measurements of crystal-poor (35%) rhyolites from the Oligocene San Juan Volcanic Field (SJVF) and Pliocene to Pleistocene tuffs from Yellowstone Caldera. Because both volcanic fields are located within the North American craton the extruded magmas could have assimilated old crustal source components with radiogenic Ca that would be clearly distinguishable from that of the mantle. New Ca data are also reported for two crustal xenoliths found within the 28.2 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) of the SJVF that yield ɛCa values of 3.8±0.6 (2 σ, n=3) and 7.5±0.4 (2 σ, n=3), respectively. The 40Ca excesses of these possible source rocks are due to long-term in situ 40K decay and suggest that they are Precambrian in age. In contrast to the excess radiogenic Ca signatures, most Cenozoic basalts and many silicic igneous rocks from Earth yield initial ɛCa values close to zero, which indicates that the 40Ca/44Ca ratio of the Earth’s mantle is well defined and virtually invariant at the resolution of our measurements. The crystal-rich FCT, inferred to result from batholith-scale remobilization of a shallow subvolcanic magma chamber, exhibits an ɛCai value of 0.32±0.02 (2 σ, n=5) that is indistinguishable from Ca in clinopyroxene from an ultramafic xenolith that has a mantle-like ɛCai value of -0.35±0.62 (2 σ, n=2). Simple mass balance calculations indicate that Ca in the FCT is greater than ~75% mantle derived. Similar mixing models based on published Nd data for the FCT that consider the range of possible crustal source components can deviate substantially from the Ca models. At face value the Nd data indicate that the FCT magma underwent significant crustal assimilation (i.e., at least ~10% and possibly ~75% of the Nd appears to have come from an enriched source component). So even in cases where a

  8. The morphostructure of the atlantic ocean floor its development in the meso-cenozoic

    CERN Document Server

    Litvin, V M

    1984-01-01

    The study of the topography and structure of the ocean floor is one of the most important stages in ascertaining the geological structure and history of development of the Earth's oceanic crust. This, in its turn, provides a means for purposeful, scientifically-substantiated prospecting, exploration and development of the mineral resources of the ocean. The Atlantic Ocean has been geologically and geophysically studied to a great extent and many years of investigating its floor have revealed the laws governing the structure of the major forms of its submarine relief (e. g. , the continental shelf, the continental slope, the transition zones, the ocean bed, and the Mid-Oceanic Ridge). The basic features of the Earth's oceanic crust structure, anomalous geophysical fields, and the thickness and structure of its sedimentary cover have also been studied. Based on the investigations of the Atlantic Ocean floor and its surrounding continents, the presently prevalent concept of new global tectonics has appeared. A g...

  9. Geology of the continental margin beneath Santa Monica Bay, Southern California, from seismic-reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.; Bohannon, R.G.; Sliter, R.W.; Calvert, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    We interpret seismic-reflection data, which were collected in Santa Monica Bay using a 70-in3 generator-injector air gun, to show the geologic structure of the continental shelf and slope and of the deep-water, Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins. The goal of this research is to investigate the earthquake hazard posed to urban areas by offshore faults. These data reveal that northwest of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the Palos Verdes Fault neither offsets the seafloor nor cuts through an undeformed sediment apron that postdates the last sea level rise. Other evidence indicates that this fault extends northwest beneath the shelf in the deep subsurface. However, other major faults in the study area, such as the Dume and San Pedro Basin Faults, were active recently, as indicated by an arched seafloor and offset shallow sediment. Rocks under the lower continental slope are deformed to differing degrees on opposite sides of Santa Monica Canyon. Northwest of this canyon, the continental slope is underlain by a little-deformed sediment apron; the main structures that deform this apron are two lower-slope anticlines that extend toward Point Dume and are cored by faults showing reverse or thrust separation. Southeast of Santa Monica Canyon, lower-slope rocks are deformed by a complex arrangement of strike-slip, normal, and reverse faults. The San Pedro Escarpment rises abruptly along the southeast side of Santa Monica Canyon. Reverse faults and folds underpinning this escarpment steepen progressively southeastward. Locally they form flower structures and cut downward into basement rocks. These faults merge downward with the San Pedro Basin fault zone, which is nearly vertical and strike slip. The escarpment and its attendant structures diverge from this strike-slip fault zone and extend for 60 km along the margin, separating the continental shelf from the deep-water basins. The deep-water Santa Monica Basin has large extent but is filled with only a thin (less than 1.5-km

  10. The geographic concentration of blue carbon in the continental US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R. A.; Hinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Salt water wetlands have the potential to be bought and sold as relatively rich reservoirs of carbon in the context of sequestration projects. However, little is known about the geographic distribution of this potential, and no coarse scale investigation has addressed this ecosystem service at the continental scale. Our objective was to determine blue carbon stocks and flux in coastal wetland soils in the United States and categorize the potential for projects by estuarine basin, state, and wetland type. We linked National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) data with the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) through spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System (GIS). We then calculated and mapped soil organic carbon across the continental US. Results were filtered by state, estuarine basin, wetland type, and accumulation rate, and ranking lists for each categorization were produced. The results showed that belowground carbon accumulation is concentrated in specific regions, with the richest and largest reservoirs in the Gulf and Atlantic southeastern estuaries, for example mangrove zones in Florida. Salt marshes on the southern Pacific Coast were relatively low in carbon due to small areas of coverage and the presence of sandy and inorganic soil. The geomorphic position of a wetland within a given estuary, for example on an exposed barrier island versus recessed towards inflowing headwaters, accounted for a greater degree of soil carbon variation than the wetland type, for example woody mangroves versus herbaceous marshes. The potential of a blue carbon sequestration project in relation to its location could be influential in determining wetland policy, conservation, and restoration in the coming decades.

  11. Mixing on a Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernys, Michael; Dhanak, Manhar

    2000-11-01

    Small scale turbulence measurements over a warm continental shelf during the passage of a cold front over the Eastern Florida coast are described. Over a 22 hour period microstructure velocity shear, conductivity, and temperature, together with background current profiles and CTD were measured using an autonomous underwater vehicle. The aim was to investigate the impact of the front on mixing in the shallow water column. Periodic CTD casts were taken from the boat and surface currents were measured from a shore fixed surface current radar system. The AUV surveyed the water column at 10m depth. A cold front appraoched the region 4/18/2000 with wind speeds of 3-6 m/s, originating from a westerly direction the ambient air temperature being 27^0C. Dissipation rates, O(10-6 W/kg) were measured, with good agreement of the shear spectra with the Nasmyth spectra. As the front progressed, the winds switched to a northerly direction and the air temperature dropped to 22^0C, lower dissipation rates, O(2 × 10-7 W/kg) were observed. The associated mixing rates and values of the flow Richardson number will be described.

  12. The impact of ENSO on the South Atlantic Subtropical Dipole Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Regina; Campos, Edmo; Haarsma, Reindert

    2015-04-01

    The impact of the El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the South Atlantic subtropical dipole mode (SASD) is investigated using both observations and model simulations. The SASD is the dominant mode of coupled ocean-atmosphere variability in the South Atlantic. This study focuses on austral summer, when both ENSO and SASD peak. We show that negative SASD events are associated with central Pacific El Niño events by triggering the Pacific-South America wave train (PSA). The latter resembles the 3rd leading mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere (PSA2) and causes a weakening and meridional shift of the South Atlantic subtropical high, which then generates the negative SASD events. On the other hand, a strengthening of the South Atlantic subtropical high related to central La Niña teleconnections causes positive SASD events. Our results show that the PSA2, triggered by central Pacific ENSO events, connects the tropical Pacific to the Atlantic. This connection is absent from eastern Pacific ENSO events, which appear to initiate the 2nd leading mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere (PSA1). It is for this reason that previous studies have found weak correlations between ENSO and SASD. These findings can improve the climate prediction of southeast South America and southern Africa since these regions are affected by sea surface temperature anomalies of both Pacific and Atlantic oceans.

  13. Glacial and oceanic history of the polar North Atlantic margins: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elverhøj, A.; Dowdeswell, J.; Funder, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The five-year PONAl'vl (polar North Atlantic l\\largin: Late Cenozoic Evolution) pr programme was launched by the European Science Foundation in 1989. Its aim was to study the major climate-driven environmental variations in the Norwegian-Greenland (also Nordic) Sea and its continental margins ove...... varying from 100,000 year glacial cycles to millennial-scale nuctuations. C(;, 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. 78 FR 59878 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Commercial Atlantic Aggregated Large Coastal Shark (LCS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Species; Commercial Atlantic Aggregated Large Coastal Shark (LCS), Atlantic Hammerhead Shark, Atlantic Blacknose Shark, and Atlantic Non-Blacknose Small Coastal Shark (SCS) Management Groups AGENCY: National... hammerhead sharks in the Atlantic region, and blacknose sharks and non-blacknose SCS in the Atlantic region...

  15. Southeast Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for alcids, shorebirds, waterfowl, diving birds, pelagic birds, gulls, and terns in Southeast Alaska. Points in this...

  16. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  17. Southeast Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, aquaculture sites, boat ramps, marinas, heliports, and log storage areas in Southeast Alaska. Vector...

  18. AFSC/ABL: Southeast Alaska Estuaries Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains trawl and seine catches from Southeast Alaskan estuaries sampled from 1995 to 2008. The data also include physical variables (temp, salinity,...

  19. Southeast US Historical Marine Mammal Stranding Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data on marine mammal strandings are collected by the Southeast Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Basic data on the location, species identification, animal...

  20. Southeast Economic Add-on 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Revealed preference models provide insights into recreational angler behavior and the economic value of recreational fishing trips. This data is for the Southeast...

  1. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  2. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  3. 2010 ARRA Lidar: 4 Southeast Counties (MI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Southeast Michigan LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task- Monroe, St. Clair, Macomb, and Livingston Counties SEMCOG CONTRACT:...

  4. Interannual surface salinity on Northwest Atlantic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodsky, Semyon A.; Reul, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Carton, James A.; Bryan, Frank O.

    2017-05-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) from the Aquarius and SMOS satellite missions displays a steady increase of ˜1 psu over the entire northwestern Atlantic shelf south of Nova Scotia during 2011-2015. Put in the context of longer ocean profile data, the results suggest that mixed layer salinity and temperature north of the Gulf Stream experience positively correlated shelf-wide interannual oscillations (1 psu/2°C). Salty and warm events occur coincident with anomalous easterly-southeasterly winds and Ekman transport counteracting the mean southwestward shelf currents. They are coincident with weakening of both branches of the Scotian Shelf Current (SSC), but only moderately correlate with shifts of the Gulf Stream North Wall. This suggests that salt advection by anomalous SSC acting on the mean salinity gradient is the primary driver regulating the transport of fresh/cold water from high latitudes. The advection mechanism imposes a connectedness of the larger-scale interannual variability in this region and its tie to atmospheric oscillations. In the second part, an analysis of 15 year-long numerical simulations is presented which show eight interannual salinity oscillations (positive and negative). Six of these are driven by horizontal advection by slow varying currents (>2 months), while two events are driven by horizontal eddy advection (<2 months). In line with observations, salt/warm model events correspond to anomalously weak SSC, correlate with southeasterly wind anomaly, and confirm that interannual horizontal salt advection drives interannual salinity. Indeed, vertical exchanges provide negative feedback, while interannual horizontal diffusion and the net surface salt flux anomalies are small.

  5. Fenologia de Psychotria nuda e P. Brasiliensis (Rubiaceae em uma área de Floresta Atlântica no sudeste do Brasil Phenology of Psychotria nuda and P. brasiliensis (Rubiaceae in an area of the Atlantic Forest, Southeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Medeiros de Almeida

    2000-12-01

    Psychotria são importantes recursos para espécies de aves de Floresta Atlântica.We compared two sympatric species of Psychotria (P. brasiliensis and P. nuda, regarding phenology and spatial distribution. The phenological events were associated with abiotic factors (rainfall, temperature and photoperiod and biotic factors (pollinators and frugivores. We carried out the study between August/1998 and July/1999 in an undisturbed area of the Atlantic Forest at Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro. We made phenological observations and also recorded the species visiting the flowers and eating the fruits of both plant species. The production of new leaves occurred from November/1998 to May/1999 for both species. There was a positive correlation between photoperiod, rainfall and temperature (climatological means and leafing period. The flowering period was between March and June for P. nuda and, April and July for P. brasiliensis. Psychotria nuda was visited mainly by males of an species of hummingbird, Thalurania glaucopis (Trochilidae (47,2%; n=682, while P. brasiliensis was visited by females (85,1%; n=1869 of this hummingbird species. Both species flowered in the same period, used the same pollinator, but may not compete for this resource, thus we rejected the "shared-pollinator" hypothesis. The fruiting period ocurred all year round for P. nuda and P. brasiliensis. Lipaugus lanioides, was the most frequent frugivore in P. brasiliensis. Psychotria nuda and P. brasiliensis had clumped distribution, apparently due to vegetative reproduction, mostly by P. nuda. This study suggests that both species of Psychotria are important resources for Atlantic Rain Forest bird species.

  6. Democracy and Human Rights in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, James; Ramcharan, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Southeast Asia has been undergoing a transition to more democratic forms of governance over the last two decades. The 2007 Charter of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) stated that henceforth ASEAN would pursue democratic forms of governance, the rule of law and the attendant fundamental human rights, which are the hallmark of liberal democratic states. This major normative evolution is one chapter of ASEAN’s post-Cold War efforts to deepen its members’ interactions in the eco...

  7. Exploration of the continental margins of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Siddiquie, H.N.; Hashimi, N.H.; Vora, K.H.; Pathak, M.C.

    impetus from sponsored surveys of other organizations, chiefly the oil industry, ports and harbours as well as industries disposing of their effluents in the marine environment. By now the entire western continental shelf and a large part...

  8. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  9. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  10. Diarrhoeal problems in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoto

    1982-09-01

    Diarrhoea up till now is still a major problem in Southeast Asia with high morbidity and mortality, particularly among children under 5 years of age, with the peak in children between 6 - 24 months. In Indonesia, in 1981, it was estimated that there are 60 million episodes with 300,000 - 500,000 deaths. In the Philippines, diarrhoea ranks as a second cause of morbidity (600 per 100,000 in 1974) and second cause of infant mortality (5 per 1,000 in 1974). In Thailand, in 1980, the morbidity rate was 524 per 100,000 and the mortality rate 14 per 100,000. In Malaysia, in 1976, diarrhoea was still ranking number 5 (3.1%) as a cause of total admission and number 9 (2.2%) as a cause of total deaths. In Singapore, diarrhoea still ranks number 3 as a cause of deaths (4% of total deaths). In Bangladesh, the overall attack rates imply a prevalence of 2.0% for the entire population, with the highest for under 5 groups i.e. 4.1%. The diarrhoea episode in rural population is 85.4%, 39% of them are children under 5. The most common enteropathogens found in all countries are rotavirus followed by Enterotoxigenic E. coli, Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and Campylobacter. Malnutrition and decline of giving breast-feeding play an important role in causing high morbidity, besides socio-economic, socio-cultural and poor environmental sanitation.

  11. Understanding the Southeast Asian haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Karthik K. R.; Baikie, T.; T, Mohan Dass E.; Huang, Y. Z.; Guet, C.

    2017-08-01

    The Southeast Asian region had been subjected to a drastic reduction in air quality from the biomass burnings that occurred in 2013 and 2015. The smoke from the biomass burnings covered the entire region including Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand, with haze particulate matter (PM) reducing the air quality to hazardous levels. Here we report a comprehensive size-composition-morphology characterization of the PM collected from an urban site in Singapore during the two haze events. The two haze events were a result of biomass burning and occurred in two different geographical source regions. We show the similarities and variations of particle size distribution during hazy and clear days during the two haze events. Sub-micron particles (composed of carbon (˜51%) and other elements pertaining to the earth’s crust. The complexity of the mixing state of the PM is highlighted and the role of the capture mode is addressed. We also present the morphological characterization of all the classified PM. The box counting method is used to determine the fractal dimensions of the PM, and the dimensionality varied for every classification from 1.79 to 1.88. We also report the complexities of particles and inconsistencies in the existing approaches to understand them.

  12. SOUTHEAST ASIA: HISTORY, MODERNITY, AND RELIGIOUS CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumanto Al Qurtuby

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia, with more than six hundred million populations, is home to millions of Buddhists, Muslims, Confucians, Protestants, Catholics, and now Pentecostals, as well as many followers of local religions and spiritual beliefs. Notwithstanding its great historical, political, cultural legacies, however, the region has long been neglected as a site for religious studies in the Western academia. Aiming at filling the gap in Asian and religious studies as well as exploring the richness of Southeast Asian cultures, this article discusses the dynamics, diversity, and complexity of Southeast Asian societies in their response to the region’s richly political, cultural, and religious traditions spanning from pre-modern era to modern one. The article also examines the “integrative revolutions” that shaped and reshaped warfare, state organization and economics of Southeast Asia, particularly in the pre-European colonial era. In addition, the work discusses the wave of Islamization, particularly since the nineteenth century, as well as the upsurge of religious resurgence that shift the nature of religiosity and the formation of religious groupings in the area. The advent of Islam, with some interventions of political regimes, had been an important cause for the decline of Hindu-Buddhist traditions in some areas of Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia, the coming of Pentecostalism has challenged the well-established mainstream Protestantism and Catholicism, especially in Indonesia and the Philippines. Keywords: history, modernity, religious change, Southeast Asia

  13. Estimation of continental 187Os/186Os values by using 187Os/186Os and 143Nd/144Nd ratios in marine manganese nodules

    OpenAIRE

    Turekian, Karl K.; Luck, Jean-Marc

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between 187Os/186Os and 143Nd/144Nd in different manganese nodule fields is used to determine the 187Os/186Os ratio of the continental terrains bounding the major ocean basins. The Atlantic Ocean drainages yield 187Os/186Os of about 11; the Pacific Ocean, between 25 and 36; and the western Indian Ocean, 20. By assuming a two-component continental crust composed of “ultramafic rocks” (high Os concentration, low 187Os/186Os) and “granite” with only radiogenic 187Os produced in ...

  14. Outer Continental Shelf Active Renewable Energy Leases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Active renewable energy leasing areas on the Atlantic OCS - currently Cape Wind offshore Cape Cod Massachusetts, Rhode Island / Massachusetts (RIMA), Delaware,...

  15. Continental growth seen through the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Delavault, Hélène; Cawood, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks and detrital minerals sample large areas of the continental crust, and they are increasingly seen as a reliable archive for its global evolution. This study presents two approaches to model the growth of the continental crust through the sedimentary archive. The first builds on the variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in global databases of detrital zircons. We show that uncertainty in the Hf isotope composition of the mantle reservoir from which new crust separated, in the 176Lu/177Hf ratio of that new crust, and in the contribution in the databases of zircons that experienced ancient Pb loss(es), adds some uncertainty to the individual Hf model ages, but not to the overall shape of the calculated continental growth curves. The second approach is based on the variation of Nd isotopes in 645 worldwide fine-grained continental sedimentary rocks with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter referred to as K. This dimensionless parameter relates the proportions of younger to older source rocks in the sediment, to the proportions of younger to older source rocks present in the crust from which the sediment was derived. We suggest that a Hadean/Archaean value of K = 1 (i.e., no preferential erosion), and that post-Archaean values of K = 4-6, may be reasonable for the global Earth system. Models built on the detrital zircon and the fine-grained sediment records independently suggest that at least 65% of the present volume of continental crust was established by 3 Ga. The continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the growth rate at 3 Ga. The period from > 4 Ga to 3 Ga is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (2.9-3.4 km3 yr- 1 on average), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated (and destroyed) at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (0

  16. Accretion of a Small Continental Fragment to a Larger Continental Plate: Mesozoic Ecuador as a Case-Study Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonne, H.

    2013-05-01

    Only a few regions on Earth are appropriate to study processes that have happened in deeper crustal levels during the accretion of a microplate to a larger continental plate. Ecuador is one of these regions where in middle Mesozoic times a small continental fragment collided with the South-American plate. Along the suture between both plates, which occurs close to the present volcanic belt of Ecuador, high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks developed. These rocks, which are metapelites, metabasites, and metagranitoids, record processes during the microcontinent-continent collision (Massonne and Toulkeridis, 2012, Int. Geol. Rev. 54). The pressures, determined for the HP rocks, were as high as 14 kbar at temperatures somewhat above 500°C. The HP stage was followed by slight heating at the early exhumation. Peak temperatures up to 560°C were reached at pressures ≥10 kbar. This HP metamorphism was caused by the collision of the microplate with the South-American plate resulting in crustal thickening. The ascent of the HP rocks occurred in an exhumation channel. Before the collision, an oceanic basin existed between these plates. Probably, it was narrow as eclogite bodies are lacking in the N-S trending HP belt of Ecuador. Such bodies, especially if the eclogites had experienced pressures in excess of 20 kbar, are markers of a collision of major continental plates in Phanerozoic times with originally extended oceanic basins between these plates. In a more global context, the narrow ocean between the microplate and the South American continent is assumed to have been the westernmost portion of the Neo-Tethys which had extended to completely separate the two major fragments of former Pangaea before the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean. This opening caused the closure of the narrow Neo-Tethys segment between the colliding microplate and the South American plate. This segment was bordered by E-W trending transform faults. A fault system (La Palma - El Guayabo fault

  17. Deep convective events influence ozone variability in southeast South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelin, B.; Carvalho, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    When tropospheric greenhouse gasses are deposited in the stratosphere (especially water vapor) the system chemically responds with incoming solar radiation to destroy ozone. As a result, these processes have a cooling effect on the stratosphere, and a warming effect in the troposphere. Areas in South America influenced by the South Atlantic Convergent Zone, the Chaco Low, and South American Low Level Jet are associated with large mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and are experiencing decreased ozone levels above 150 mb. Utilizing Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) V6 level 3 data from 2002 to 2016, deep convective events are identified in Southeast South America between 22°S - 36°S (Southern Brazil, Uruguay, Southern Paraguay and Northeast Argentina) and analyzed as a contributor to changes in the upper tropopause-lower stratosphere (UTLS) ozone during the austral spring. These events are established to identify the transport of tropospheric greenhouse gasses to the lower stratosphere (especially water vapor and methane) related to ozone loss between 150 - 10 mb due to direct injection above the cold point tropopause, determine UTLS temperature variations, and classify lower stratospheric hydration.

  18. Modernizing the Alliance: Southeast Europe between Lisbon and Washington

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Nakić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The end of the Cold War opened the space for developing new relationships in the international community that are conducive to creating global partnerships. Although Article 5 remains the brand of NATO, it is necessary to modernize the relationship between the U.S. and the EU as well as with other important actors in international relations such as the UN, OSCE, Russia and China. With changed international relations through past sixty years, the North Atlantic Alliance has changed itself simultaneously over decades. The Alliance passed through different stages of its own development – from the Cold War era to attempting to create a global partnership. Acting globally, there is a need for defining the legitimate operations outside the territory of Member States under International law. In this sense, Articles 4 and 7 have a special meaning. In fact, bearing in mind the mission of “old” and traditional NATO, the Lisbon Summit represents a major step toward completion of NATO’s post-Cold War transition, but also contributes to the process of building long-lasting peace and confidence in Southeast Europe.

  19. Continental shelves as potential resource of rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourret, Olivier; Tuduri, Johann

    2017-07-19

    The results of this study allow the reassessment of the rare earth elements (REE) external cycle. Indeed, the river input to the oceans has relatively flat REE patterns without cerium (Ce) anomalies, whereas oceanic REE patterns exhibit strong negative Ce anomalies and heavy REE enrichment. Indeed, the processes at the origin of seawater REE patterns are commonly thought to occur within the ocean masses themselves. However, the results from the present study illustrate that seawater-like REE patterns already occur in the truly dissolved pool of river input. This leads us to favor a partial or complete removal of the colloidal REE pool during estuarine mixing by coagulation, as previously shown for dissolved humic acids and iron. In this latter case, REE fractionation occurs because colloidal and truly dissolved pools have different REE patterns. Thus, the REE patterns of seawater could be the combination of both intra-oceanic and riverine processes. In this study, we show that the Atlantic continental shelves could be considered potential REE traps, suggesting further that shelf sediments could potentially become a resource for REE, similar to metalliferous deep sea sediments.

  20. Particle flux across the mid-European continental margin

    CERN Document Server

    Antia, A N; Peinert, R

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from particle flux studies using sediment trap and current meter moorings along a transect at the European continental margin at 49 degrees N within the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) project. Two moorings were placed, at the mid- and outer slope in water depths of 1500 and 3660 m, with traps at 600 and 1050 m and at 580, 1440 and 3220 m, respectively. Residual currents at the mid- slope follow the slope contour, whereas seasonal off-slope flow was registered at the outer slope. At 600 m on the slope fluxes are similar to those in the abyssal North Atlantic. The flux of all components (bulk dry weight, particulate organic and inorganic carbon, lithogenic matter and opal) increased with water depth. Highest fluxes were recorded at 1440 m at the outer slope, where off- slope residual currents mediate particle export. The injection of biogenic and lithogenic particles below the depth of winter mixing results in the export of particles from shallower waters. Calculated lateral fluxes of partic...

  1. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory conducts research to understand the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and processes of the...

  2. Heat Maps of Hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, and Smoking in the Continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Matthew Shane; Howard, George; de Los Campos, Gustavo; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Safford, Monika M; Levitan, Emily B; McClure, Leslie A

    2017-01-01

    Geographic variations in cardiovascular mortality are substantial, but descriptions of geographic variations in major cardiovascular risk factors have relied on data aggregated to counties. Herein, we provide the first description of geographic variation in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking within and across US counties. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline risk factor measurements and latitude/longitude of participant residence collected from 2003 to 2007 in the REGARDS study (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke). Of the 30 239 participants, all risk factor measurements and location data were available for 28 887 (96%). The mean (±SD) age of these participants was 64.8(±9.4) years; 41% were black; 55% were female; 59% were hypertensive; 22% were diabetic; and 15% were current smokers. In logistic regression models stratified by race, the median(range) predicted prevalence of the risk factors were as follows: for hypertension, 49% (45%-58%) among whites and 72% (68%-78%) among blacks; for diabetes mellitus, 14% (10%-20%) among whites and 31% (28%-41%) among blacks; and for current smoking, 12% (7%-16%) among whites and 18% (11%-22%) among blacks. Hypertension was most prevalent in the central Southeast among whites, but in the west Southeast among blacks. Diabetes mellitus was most prevalent in the west and central Southeast among whites but in south Florida among blacks. Current smoking was most prevalent in the west Southeast and Midwest among whites and in the north among blacks. Geographic disparities in prevalent hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking exist within states and within counties in the continental United States, and the patterns differ by race. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  4. Length and Time Scales in Continental Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B. R.; Bunge, H.

    2003-12-01

    Nonlinear feedback between continents and the mantle through thermal blanketing has long been surmised as a mechanism for continental drift and Wilson cycles. Paleomagnetism provides ample evidence for large scale (10,000 km) continental motion on time scales of several hundred million years, indicative of large scale mantle circulation. While much has been learned about the interactions between continents and mantle flow from analog and numerical modeling studies in two and three dimensions, a rigorous sensitivity study on the effects of continents in high resolution 3D spherical mantle convection models has yet to be pursued. As a result, a quantitative understanding of the scales of continental motion as they relate to relevant fluid dynamic processes is lacking. Here we focus on the effect of continental size. Continents covering 30% of the surface are representative of a supercontinent such as Pangea, smaller continents (10% of Earth's surface) are representative of present day Asia, and still smaller continents (3% of Earth's surface) are similar to present day Antarctica. These continents are introduced into simple end-member mantle flow regimes characterized by combinations of bottom or internal heating and uniform or layered mantle viscosity. We find that large scale mantle structure, and correspondingly the large scale displacement of continents, depends not only on mantle heating mode and radial viscosity structure, but also on continental size. Supercontinents promote heterogeneity on the largest scales (spherical harmonic degree one), especially when combined with strong bottom heating and a high viscosity lower mantle. Degree one heterogeneities in turn drive cyclical continental motion, with continents moving from the hot to the cold hemisphere on time scales of several hundred million years. Smaller continents are unable to initiate degree one convection. As a result, their motion is governed by shorter length and time scales. We apply these

  5. Oceanic heat pulses fueling moisture transport towards continental Europe across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, A.; Kaboth, S.; Hodell, D.; Zeeden, C.; Fiebig, J.; Friedrich, O.

    2018-01-01

    The mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; approx. 1.2-0.7 Ma), is characterized by growing Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and the shift from a 41 kyr to a 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cyclicity. Concomitant to the growth of large ice sheets, atmospheric and oceanic circulation pattern have changed. One key feature of the North Atlantic is the wind-driven Subtropical Gyre, a major provider of heat and moisture for continental Europe. Here, we investigate changes in the strength and spatial configuration of the Subtropical Gyre during the MPT and its impact on the continental moisture balance. To reconstruct Subtropical Gyre dynamics, we conducted paired δ18O and Mg/Ca analyses on the deep-dwelling foraminifera Globorotalia inflata from Iberian Margin Site U1385 yielding thermocline temperature (Ttherm) variability between 1400 and 500 ka at the eastern boundary of the Subtropical Gyre. Long-term trends of Ttherm at Site U1385 oppose the North Atlantic climatic evolution of progressively intensified glacials during the MPT. Particularly, glacials MIS 20 and 18 were marked by warm thermocline waters off Iberia. We infer that a southward shift of the (sub)polar front displaced the source region of thermocline waters within the Subtropical Gyre from high to mid-latitudes. In addition, a strong Mediterranean Outflow Water production during the MPT caused the advection of warm waters to Iberia. Humid conditions during MIS 20 and 18 in SE Europe indicate that atmospheric moisture derived from this warm water might have been advected deep into continental Europe and contributed to enhanced growth of Alpine glaciers.

  6. Deglacial changes in the strength of deep southern component water and sediment supply at the Argentine continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warratz, Grit; Henrich, Rüdiger; Voigt, Ines; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lantzsch, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    The deep southern component water (SCW), comprising Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), is a major component of the global oceanic circulation. It has been suggested that the deep Atlantic water mass structure changed significantly during the last glacial/interglacial cycle. However, deep SCW source-proximal records remain sparse. Here we present three coherent deep SCW paleocurrent records from the deep Argentine continental margin shedding light on deep water circulation and deep SCW flow strength in the Southwest Atlantic since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Based on increased sortable silt values, we propose enhanced deep SCW flow strength from 14 to 10 cal ka B.P. relative to the early deglacial/LGM and the Holocene. We propose a direct influence of deep northern component water (NCW) on deep SCW flow strength due to vertical narrowing of deep SCW spreading, concurrent with a migration of the high-energetic LCDW/AABW interface occupying our core sites. We suggest a shoaled NCW until 13 cal ka B.P., thereby providing space for deep SCW spreading that resulted in reduced carbonate preservation at our core sites. Increased carbonate content from 13 cal ka B.P. indicates that the NCW expanded changing deep water properties at our core sites in the deep Southwest Atlantic. However, southern sourced terrigenous sediments continued to be deposited at our core sites, suggesting that deep SCW flow was uninterrupted along the Argentine continental margin since the LGM.

  7. Post-stack migrated SEG-Y multi-channel seismic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in U.S. Atlantic Seaboard in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In summer 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 21-day geophysical program in deep water along the Atlantic continental margin by using R/V Marcus G. Langseth...

  8. Kinematic and thermal evolution of the Moroccan rifted continental margin: Doukkala-High Atlas transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouiza, M.; Bertotti, G.; Hafid, M.; Cloetingh, S.

    2010-10-01

    The Atlantic passive margin of Morocco developed during Mesozoic times in association with the opening of the Central Atlantic and the Alpine Tethys. Extensional basins formed along the future continental margin and in the Atlas rift system. In Alpine times, this system was inverted to form the High and Middle Atlas fold-and-thrust belts. To provide a quantitative kinematic analysis of the evolution of the rifted margin, we present a crustal section crossing the Atlantic margin in the region of the Doukkala Basin, the Meseta and the Atlas system. We construct a post-rift upper crustal section compensating for Tertiary to present vertical movements and horizontal deformations, and we conduct numerical modeling to test quantitative relations between amounts and distribution of thinning and related vertical movements. Rifting along the transect began in the Late Triassic and ended with the appearance of oceanic crust at 175 Ma. Subsidence, possibly related to crustal thinning, continued in the Atlas rift in the Middle Jurassic. The numerical models confirm that the margin experienced a polyphase rifting history. The lithosphere along the transect preserved some strength throughout rifting with the Effective Elastic Thickness corresponding to an isotherm of 450°C. A mid-crustal level of necking of 15 km characterized the pre-rift lithosphere.

  9. Cretaceous-Eocene provenance connections between the Palawan Continental Terrane and the northern South China Sea margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lei; Cao, Licheng; Qiao, Peijun; Zhang, Xiangtao; Li, Qianyu; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2017-11-01

    The plate kinematic history of the South China Sea opening is key to reconstructing how the Mesozoic configuration of Panthalassa and Tethyan subduction systems evolved into today's complex Southeast Asian tectonic collage. The South China Sea is currently flanked by the Palawan Continental Terrane in the south and South China in the north and the two blocks have long been assumed to be conjugate margins. However, the paleogeographic history of the Palawan Continental Terrane remains an issue of uncertainty and controversy, especially regarding the questions of where and when it was separated from South China. Here we employ detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and heavy mineral analysis on Cretaceous and Eocene strata from the northern South China Sea and Palawan to constrain the Late Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic provenance and paleogeographic evolution of the region testing possible connection between the Palawan Continental Terrane and the northern South China Sea margin. In addition to a revision of the regional stratigraphic framework using the youngest zircon U-Pb ages, these analyses show that while the Upper Cretaceous strata from the Palawan Continental Terrane are characterized by a dominance of zircon with crystallization ages clustering around the Cretaceous, the Eocene strata feature a large range of zircon ages and a new mineral group of rutile, anatase, and monazite. On the one hand, this change of sediment compositions seems to exclude the possibility of a latest Cretaceous drift of the Palawan Continental Terrane in response to the Proto-South China Sea opening as previously inferred. On the other hand, the zircon age signatures of the Cretaceous-Eocene strata from the Palawan Continental Terrane are largely comparable to those of contemporary samples from the northeastern South China Sea region, suggesting a possible conjugate relationship between the Palawan Continental Terrane and the eastern Pearl River Mouth Basin. Thus, the Palawan Continental

  10. Floods in Southeast Asia: A health priority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Torti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of all the natural disasters, floods are the most common in both developed and developing countries, accounting for approximately 40% of all natural disasters. Flooding has severe implications on human health before, during, and after the onset of a flood. Southeast Asia is a region that is especially prone to frequent and severe natural disasters. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations is comprised of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore and Myanmar. In this manuscript, I discuss why flooding is a problem is Southeast Asia and why I feel flooding warrants attention compared to other problems in the area due to the serious health impactions that arise as a result of flooding. I also explore why flooding warrants attention compared to other health concerns in the region.

  11. China, Southeast Asia, and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowell Dittmer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia has historically been a meeting point between East Asia and South Asia before Western colonialism opened the region to the West and to the winds of global modernization. Since Japan’s coercive decolonization during the Second World War, the dominant outside influences have come from the United States and from the People’s Republic of China. The post-Cold War era began with a withdrawal of both China’s and US power projection from Southeast Asia, facilitating the configuration of a triangular ménage à trios, with ASEAN expanding to include all of Southeast Asia and introducing a number of extended forums intended to socialize the rest of East Asia into the ASEAN way. The “rise of China” occurred within this friendly context, though beginning around 2010 its strategic implications began to appear more problematic with the mounting dispute over the issue of the South China Sea.

  12. China, Southeast Asia, and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Lowell Dittmer

    2016-01-01

    Southeast Asia has historically been a meeting point between East Asia and South Asia before Western colonialism opened the region to the West and to the winds of global modernization. Since Japan’s coercive decolonization during the Second World War, the dominant outside influences have come from the United States and from the People’s Republic of China. The post-Cold War era began with a withdrawal of both China’s and US power projection from Southeast Asia, facilitating the configuration o...

  13. Triassic - Jurassic kinematic relationships between the Gulf of Mexico, Central Atlantic Ocean, and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D. E.; Burke, K.; Hall, S. A.; Casey, J. F.

    2008-05-01

    Closing ocean basins along geomagnetic isochrons can be an objective method for analyzing reconstructed continental margins because, in general, tectonic extension at passive margins stops once new oceanic lithosphere is created. Holding Africa fixed, we close the South Atlantic Ocean to Chron M4 (126.6 Ma) and the Central Atlantic Ocean to Chron M40 (165.1 Ma). In this configuration, and with the Gulf of Mexico closed by clockwise rotation of the Yucatan continental block (~42 degrees), the positions of North America and South America indicate that the Gulf of Mexico opened at least 20 My after the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean (ca. 180 Ma) and the earlier breakup of Pangea (ca. 200 Ma). The Gondwanan terranes of eastern Mexico, Yucatan, Florida, and the United States south of the Ouachita-Marathon Suture, remained attached to Laurasia after the breakup of the supercontinent. The Gulf of Mexico then formed in Late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous times (ca. 160 Ma to 140 Ma) by counterclockwise rotation of the Yucatan block. Two prominent basement structures, defined by seismic refraction and gravity data, are interpreted to be hotspot tracks created by a single mantle plume during this rotation. A third prominent basement structure is interpreted to be a marginal ridge that developed along the ocean-continental transform boundary between the Yucatan block and eastern Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico formed after initial rifting and extension of continental crust and widespread salt deposition (ca. 160 Ma to 150 Ma), followed by the mantle plume eruption and sea-floor spreading (ca. 150 Ma to 140 Ma).

  14. Biodiversity and biogeographic relationships of the polychaete fauna in French Atlantic and Mediterranean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Dauvin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the literature, including the recent systematic reviews, reveals that 934 polychaete species have been recorded in French Atlantic (including the English Channel and Mediterranean marine waters, including 818 species living on the continental shelf and 116 species that are strictly bathyal. These 934 species belong to 71 families, among which the Syllidae is the most diverse (97 species, followed by the Serpulidae (69 species, Spionidae and Phyllodocidae, each with more than 40 species. Forty-four families have fewer than 10 species recorded in each. The total number of species is spread over 11 continental shelf areas as well as the Atlantic and Mediterranean bathyal depths. In terms of species diversity, the richest areas are the Mediterranean coasts of Provence-Côte d’Azur (507 species and Languedoc-Roussillon (483 species, the western part of the English Channel (402 species, and the southern part of the Bay of Biscay (343 species. The lowest numbers of species were recorded in the eastern English Channel, due to an impoverishment of all the fauna in this part of the Channel. Other areas—for example, the Iroise Sea, the coast of Corsica and Mediterranean bathyal depths—also show low numbers, but this may only reflect the fact that insufficient information about these areas is available. A similarity analysis of 13 areas distinguishes four distinct faunal groups, each specific to one of four general locations: (1 the bathyal Atlantic and Mediterranean zones, including the coast of Corsica, (2 the two Mediterranean coastal areas (Provence-Côte d’Azur and Languedoc-Roussillon, (3 the four zones of the Atlantic continental shelf, and (4 the English Channel. The combined species can be separated into 17 different biogeographic groups.

  15. French Extended Continental Shelf Mapping: example of new continental margin understanding offshore French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roest, Walter; Loubrieu, Benoit; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Graindorge, David; Shipboard Party, Guyaplac

    2017-04-01

    Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Coastal States can extend sovereign rights over the natural resources of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (M) if they can demonstrate that their continental margin extends beyond this distance from the coast. Article 76 of the Convention defines the continental shelf and includes geomorphological and geological criteria to claim such a shelf beyond 200 M. Since 2006, France has filed 7 submissions for a total of 10 distinct geographic regions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf that was established by the Convention to examine those claims, and make recommendations with respect to the justification of the outer limits of the continental shelf. To support the French submissions, a significant effort was employed in acquiring new marine geophysical and geological data and compiling existing data along the deep water parts of the continental margins offshore all the French overseas territories. In this presentation, we will discuss the example of French Guiana, where the data collected for the purpose of fulfilling the obligation under the Convention to submit data and information to the Commission within a 10 year time frame have led to new understanding of the transform continental margin and the Demerara Plateau located to the north of French Guiana and Surinam. In addition, the data collected for this purpose have led to new scientific questions and have encouraged new and enhanced scientific collaboration between French government organizations and the academic community. Follow up research and scientific cruises that will be presented in separate communications have addressed sedimentary processes including contourites, giant comet tail like depressions probably associated with the strong bottom currents observed along the continental slope and potentially related to pockmarks, as well as giant submarine landslides. Most recently, multichannel reflection and wide angle

  16. Benthic fauna of southwest and southeast coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.; Sheba, P.; Balasubramanian, T.; Venugopal, P.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Benthos, sediments characteristics and organic matter content were studied along southwest and southeast coasts of India. Number of groups/species varied with the stations and also with the depths. Population density was very low in southeast coast...

  17. Geology and tectonic development of the continental margin north of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, A.; Eittreim, S.; Dinter, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The continental margin north of Alaska, as interpreted from seismic reflection profiles, is of the Atlantic type and consists of three sectors of contrasting structure and stratigraphy. The Chukchi sector, on the west, is characterized by the deep late Mesozoic and Tertiary North Chukchi basin and the Chukchi Continental Borderland. The Barrow sector of central northern Alaska is characterized by the Barrow arch and a moderately thick continental terrace build of Albian to Tertiary clastic sediment. The terrace sedimentary prism is underlain by lower Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The Barter Island sector of northeastern Alaska and Yukon Territory is inferred to contain a very thick prism of Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary marine and nonmarine clastic sediment. Its structure is dominated by a local deep Tertiary depocenter and two regional structural arches. We postulate that the distinguishing characteristics of the three sectors are inherited from the configuration of the rift that separated arctic Alaska from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago relative to old pre-rift highlands, which were clastic sediment sources. Where the rift lay relatively close to northern Alaska, in the Chukchi and Barter Island sectors, and locally separated Alaska from the old source terranes, thick late Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary prisms extend farther south beneath the continental shelf than in the intervening Barrow sector. The boundary between the Chukchi and Barrow sectors is relatively well defined by geophysical data, but the boundary between the Barrow and Barter Island sectors can only be inferred from the distribution and thickness of Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. These boundaries may be extensions of oceanic fracture zones related to the rifting that is postulated to have opened the Canada Basin, probably beginning during the Early Jurassic. ?? 1979.

  18. From the Icelandic continental shelf to the deep abyss; a tale of divergent plate boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskuldsson, Armann; Hey, Richard; Martinez, Fernando; Thordarson, Sigvaldi; Benediktsdottir, Asdis

    2017-04-01

    Iceland is a part of the north Atlantic igneous providence and as such forms a large island in the middle of the north Atlantic. With its continental shelf, Iceland covers about 780 kkm3. The mid Atlantic ridge plate boundary crosses through Iceland from south to north. In this presentation, we are presenting results from two missions that cover the southern and northern part of the ridge named Reykjanes ridge. We shall show how the Reykjanes ridge plunges into the abyss from Iceland and follow its extent some 900 km to the south, until it hits the Bight Transform fault. This part of the Mid Atlantic ridge system is slow spreading with an average separation of some 2 cm per year. Due to unprecedented detailed multibeam mapping in the area finest details in volcanic structures can be observed. However, the active plate boundary shows remarkable diversity in overall forms and individual landforms as we extend away from Iceland. Close to Iceland evidence of shallow magma storage in the crust are evident, with calderas and evolved magma composition. At the termination of the Reykjanes ridge single volcanic ridges are observed at regular interval. These ridges are formed in multiple eruptions and occupy the rift valley in the south. However, towards the north rift valleys are absent ore shallow. In between the rift valleys we observe monogenetic eruptive vents. Reorganization of the plate boundary is observed in magnetic fabric of the seafloor and numerous oceanic core complexes seem to be related to such reorganization. Off rift monogenetic eruptive vents are also more frequent as we go further away from Iceland.

  19. Correlated oceanic and continental records demonstrate past climate and hydrology of North Africa (0-140 ka)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezine, A.M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France)); Casanova, J. (Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-04-01

    Analysis of pollen and dinocysts in a core from the eastern Atlantic (core V22-196; lat 13{degree}50'N, long 18{degree}57'W) provides the first continuous record of paleoclimate and paleohydrology for the latest climatic cycle. During interglacial intervals, increases in pollen input from humid vegetation zones are correlative with high dinocyst productivity. This data shows a close coincidence of northward extensions of Sudanian and Guinean vegetation zones in North Africa and increases in fresh-water input into the Atlantic. Direct evidence indicates positive hydroclimatic phases at 135, 125, 103, 80, 47, and 12-10 ka, coincident with widespread continental records of high lake levels, that confirm the validity of the U/Th chronology.

  20. An Introduction to Human Rights in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnama, H.R.; Sharom, Azmi; Mullen, Matthew; Asuncion, Melizel; Hayes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    When the Southeast Asian Human Rights Studies Network (SEAHRN) was formed in 2009 one of its first activities was the development of a textbook for Southeast Asia students. This was in response to its objective of improving teaching on human rights in Southeast Asian universities. Given that

  1. Popular Music in Southeast Asia : Banal Beats, Muted Histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, Bart; Keppy, Peter; Schulte Nordholt, Henk

    2017-01-01

    'Popular Music in Southeast Asia: Banal Beats, Muted Histories' offers a cultural history of modern Southeast Asia from the original vantage point of popular music since the 1920s up to the present. By creatively connecting indigenous musical styles with foreign musical genres, Southeast Asians

  2. (AJST) PHYSICO-CHEMISTRY OF CONTINENTAL BENTONITES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT:- Growing demand for bentonite and kaolin applications in the ceramic industry motivated this study which aimed at physico-chemically characterizing some selected continental clayey materials from Botswana, Mozambique, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa and the United. States of America. The hydrogen ion ...

  3. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  4. Root zone of a continental rift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Moritz; Svenningsen, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Mafic magmatic rocks formed between ca. 615 and 560 Ma along the Neoproterozoic margins of Baltica and Laurentia are classically attributed to continental rifting heralding the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. We report new data for the Kebnekaise Intrusive Complex (KIC) exposed in the Seve Nappes i...

  5. Peridotites and mafic igneous rocks at the foot of the Galicia Margin: an oceanic or continental lithosphere? A discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korprobst, J.; Chazot, G.

    2016-10-01

    An ultramafic/mafic complex is exposed on the sea floor at the foot of the Galicia Margin (Spain and Portugal). It comprises various types of peridotites and pyroxenites, as well as amphibole-diorites, gabbros, dolerites and basalts. For chronological and structural reasons (gabbros were emplaced within peridotites before the continental break-up) this unit cannot be assigned to the Atlantic oceanic crust. The compilation of all available petrological and geochemical data suggests that peridotites are derived from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, deeply transformed during Cretaceous rifting. Thus, websterite dykes extracted from the depleted MORB mantle reservoir (DMM), were emplaced early within the lithospheric harzburgites; subsequent boudinage and tectonic dispersion of these dykes in the peridotites, during deformation stages at the beginning of rifting, resulted in the formation of fertile but isotopically depleted lherzolites. Sterile but isotopically enriched websterites, would represent melting residues in the peridotites, after significant partial melting and melt extraction related to the thermal erosion of the lithosphere. The latter melts are probably the source of brown amphibole metasomatic crystallization in some peridotites, as well as of the emplacement of amphibole-diorite dykes. Melts directly extracted from the asthenosphere were emplaced as gabbro within the sub-continental mantle. Mixing these DMM melts together with the enriched melts extracted from the lithosphere, provided the intermediate isotopic melt-compositions - in between the DMM and Oceanic Islands Basalts reservoir - observed for the dolerites and basalts, none of which are characterized by a genuine N-MORB signature. An enriched lithospheric mantle, present prior to rifting of the Galicia margin, is in good agreement with data from the Messejana dyke (Portugal) and more generally, with those of all continental tholeiites of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP

  6. Transforming poultry production in Southeast Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... Backyard poultry farming is thought to have played a key role in the rapid spread of bird flu among humans in the early 2000s. Since the widespread outbreaks of avian influenza in China and Southeast Asia in the early 2000s, government policies intended to reduce the risk of future outbreaks have led to ...

  7. Southeast Asian history and the Mediterranean analogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutherland, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Historians of Southeast Asia have been inspired by Fernand Braudel's classic The Mediterranean because of its focus on the sea and multidisciplinary approach, and because it seems to solve two recalcitrant historiographical problems: the definition of time and space, and the reconciliation of local

  8. Regionalising Higher Education for Repositioning Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Que Anh

    2017-01-01

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has led the way in constructing the East Asian region with China, Japan, and South Korea, and an inter-regional entity with the European Union (EU)--known as the Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM). The initial aims were security and trade. Recently, however, higher education has been brought into these…

  9. Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia. Philanthropy in Singapore has traditionally had a charitable and local orientation. However, given the country's growing wealth and strong ties (trade, investment, migration) with its less advantaged neighbours, it is expected that considerable philanthropic capital will ...

  10. Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia. Philanthropy in Singapore has traditionally had a charitable and local orientation. However, given the country's growing wealth and strong ties (trade, investment, migration) with its less advantaged neighbours, it is expected that considerable philanthropic capital will ...

  11. Supporting Biotechnology Regulatory Policy Processes in Southeast ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Supporting Biotechnology Regulatory Policy Processes in Southeast Asia. Biotechnology innovations or bio-innovations can provide solutions to problems associated with food security, poverty and environmental degradation. Innovations such as genetically engineered (GE) crops can increase food production and ...

  12. Globalization and its discontents in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klinken, G.; Owen, N.G.

    2013-01-01

    Something was missing from the Asian Studies conference I attended in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 2009: a panel on globalization. Instead, there was one on the impact of climate change in Southeast Asia, and one on the coming "East Asian community." For the rest, as they had done for years, nations in

  13. Supporting Biotechnology Regulatory Policy Processes in Southeast ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    But many Southeast Asian countries, such as Cambodia, Viet Nam and Lao PDR, have yet to develop the regulations, institutional mechanisms and organizational structures necessary for ... Les entreprises peuvent comprendre les tendances commerciales et les défis futurs dans la communauté économique de l'ASEAN.

  14. Institutions and regional development in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriesse, E.H.S.

    2008-01-01

    The study of relationships between regional performance and varieties of capitalism within developing countries is an interesting and challenging topic. Although it is evident that capitalist institutions have made further inroads in Southeast Asia, it is far from certain how particular

  15. SAMM: a prototype southeast Alaska multiresource model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; Lawrence D. Garrett; Dale L. Weyermann

    1990-01-01

    The adaptive environmental assessment method was used by an interdisciplinary team of forest specialists to gain an understanding of resource interactions and tradeoffs resulting from forest management activities in southeast Alaska. A forest multiresource projection model was developed in the process. The multiresource model, “SAMM,” is capable of characterizing and...

  16. Rock Magnetic Properties Across Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Sediments from the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, and Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, P. C.; Zachos, J.; Bohaty, S.; Quattlebaum, T.

    2004-12-01

    We present new rock magnetic data from Wilson Lake, NJ (N. Atlantic continental shelf), ODP Site 1262, (Walvis Ridge, S. Atlantic), and Lodo, CA (continental shelf, coastal California) in an effort to evaluate the comet-impact trigger hypothesis (Kent et al., 2003) for the carbon isotope excursion (CEI) associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The comet-impact trigger hypothesis is based primarily on anomalous magnetic properties in outer shelf Paleocene-Eocene boundary sediments from the New Jersey continental margin; proponents of this hypothesis suggest these magnetic properties indicate the presence of extraterrestrial nanoparticles of magnetite. Our results suggest that these nanoparticles of magnetite may be terrestrial, not cosmic, in origin. Changes in magnetic hysteresis properties (e.g., Mr/Ms and Hc/Hcr) across the Wilson Lake section are similar to those from other regional stratigraphic sections (re: Kent et al., 2003), but similar changes are not observed at S. Atlantic or coastal California sites; thus, there may be a regional rather than global source of magnetic material. Squareness plots (Tauxe et al., 2003) and Day plots (Day, 1977) of hysteresis data suggest that Wilson Lake magnetite is single domain (SD flower structure to SD cubic), but the grain size of magnetite from the other two sites is mixed, possibly with a significant component of pseudo-single domain grains. Weak-field high temperature susceptibility experiments suggest that the primary magnetic mineral in these sections is magnetite. Low-temperature zero- and strong-field saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) experiments indicate that the fine-grained magnetite is partially oxidized, probably to maghemite. More significant, however, the low-temperature experiments suggest that the fine-grained magnetite from the CIE portion of the Wilson Lake section may have a biogenic origin. Although it is clear that intact chains of magnetosomes are not

  17. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  18. Relation between the continental TCZ and the TCZ over Equatorial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    So the relationship between the continental and oceanic TCZ is complex. On the one hand, the oceanic TCZ maintains the continental TCZ by propagations, on the other it tries to suppress it by competition.

  19. 'Andesite Model' of Continental Crust Formation Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Fifty years ago, Ross Taylor observed that the chemical composition of average continental crust and orogenic andesites were similar for many major and trace elements. However, almost immediately it was recognized that this generalization does not apply to many oceanic island arcs because they are too mafic and too depleted in the most incompatible elements, including K, Th, and U. Although intra-crustal differentiation and delamination might produce sufficiently evolved middle and lower crust, it is an inefficient way to increase incompatible element concentrations in intermediate magma. There are alternative processes. First, because the vast majority of arc rocks are volcaniclastic sediments rather than igneous rocks, mechanical mixing is a dominant process during arc evolution. Although its effects are similar to those of magma mixing and assimilation, it has fewer physical constraints and is more likely. The finer-grained the sediment, the more mixing is likely. Drilling in the Izu arc shows that the majority of the sediment is andesitic mud even though the majority of lavas are basalt and rhyolite. Volcaniclastic sediments may be a better match to continental crust than the lavas that were the original basis of the andesite model. Second, some reararc lavas and sediments are more like continental crust than those from volcanic fronts, and reararc crust is at least as thick. Third, aeolian dust in arc muds may be a larger mass fraction of recycled continental crust in oceanic arcs than the subducted pelagic sediment component in arc magmas. The net effect of these features adds nuance to the andesite model but is not enough to overcome the deficit of incompatible elements in Cenozoic oceanic arcs. Accreting them still makes the continents less continental in composition.

  20. Trends and drivers of marine debris on the Atlantic coast of the United States 1997-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, C.A.; Sheavly, S.B.; Rugg, D.J.; Erdmann, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, we documented regional differences in amounts and long-term trends of marine debris along the US Atlantic coast. The Southeast Atlantic had low land-based and general-source debris loads as well as no increases despite a 19% increase in coastal population. The Northeast (8% population increase) also had low land-based and general-source debris loads and no increases. The Mid-Atlantic (10% population increase) fared the worst, with heavy land-based and general-source debris loads that increased over time. Ocean-based debris did not change in the Northeast where the fishery is relatively stable; it declined over the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast and was correlated with declining regional fisheries. Drivers, including human population, land use status, fishing activity, and oceanic current systems, had complex relationships with debris loads at local and regional scales. Management challenges remain undeniably large but solid information from long-term programs is one key to addressing this pressing pollution issue. ?? 2010.

  1. Seismic Structure of Southeast Asia from Full Waveform Seismic Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, P. R.; Saygin, E.; Fichtner, A.; Masturyono, M.

    2015-12-01

    We image the lower crust and upper-mantle structure of Southeast Asia with a 3D full waveform adjoint inversion scheme by directly inverting Green's functions retrieved from interstation seismic noise correlations. Synthetic Green's functions are computed at a period range between 10 and 40 s to simulate the wave propagation in the region. Misfits between observed and synthetic waveforms are reduced by iteratively updating model parameters using sensitivity kernels with a conjugate-gradient optimization method. The final model is verified via comparing the simulated waveforms with the recorded earthquakes in the region. The balanced coverage of rays in the region enabled us to image complex structure. The Australian plate is characterized with higher velocities for most of the crust, where most of Indonesia, and its surroundings show complex structure with low velocities. The transition from the oceanic part of the Australian Plate to the continental crust adjacent to the Banda Arc is clearly imaged.

  2. Investigating Miocene Mediterranean-Atlantic Gateway Exchange (IMMAGE) - an amphibious drilling proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecker, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    Today Mediterranean seawater flows out through the Gibraltar Straits, forming a saline plume at intermediate depths in the Atlantic. The plume's sedimentary record of distinctive, contouritic deposits has recently been recovered during IODP Leg 339 in the Gulf of Cadiz documenting a Mediterranean contribution to Atlantic thermohaline circulation since the Pliocene. However, before the Pliocene, the conduit for Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange is unclear. Gibraltar may have already been open, but two additional marine corridors also existed through northern Morocco and southern Spain. The restriction and closure of these Miocene connections resulted in extreme salinity fluctuations in the Mediterranean, leading to the precipitation of thick evaporites. This event is known as the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) and recovering a complete record of the MSC is the target of current IODP drilling proposals (e.g. DREAM). Understanding both the causes of high-amplitude salinity change in the Mediterranean and its global consequences for thermohaline circulation in the Atlantic is dependent on recovering a complete record of Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange before, during and after the MSC. This key objective of the IMMAGE drilling proposal requires core recovery on-shore at the mouths of the Betic and Rifian corridors which are now exposed on land, as well as offshore, in the Alborán Sea and on the Atlantic continental margin. Consequently to meet this objective, an amphibious drilling strategy is necessary, involving both IODP and ICDP targets. In addition to allowing us to reconstruct Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange during high amplitude salinity fluctuations and identify the conduit through which exchange occurred, the sediments recovered from IMMAGE drilling will also provide us with a unique and explicit test for ocean physics hypotheses describing the location, size and velocity of overflow plumes under conditions where the density contrast between the two water

  3. Outer Continental Shelf Submerged Lands Act Boundary - Atlantic Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary line (also known as State Seaward Boundary (SSB), or Fed State Boundary) in ESRI shapefile formats for...

  4. Spatial Variability of Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Particulate Material from Northwest Atlantic Continental Shelf Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human encroachment on the coastal zone has led to a rise in the delivery of nitrogen (N) to estuarine and near-shore waters. Potential routes of anthropogenic N inputs include export from estuaries, atmospheric deposition, and dissolved N inputs from groundwater outflow. Stable...

  5. The evolution of the atlantic mega-undation : Causing the American continental drift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemmelen, R.W. van

    Mega-undations are the largest class of deformations of the earth's surface, with diameters of many thousands of kilometers. They result from deepseated mass-circuits, probably in the inner mantle. Though their potential amplitude may be in the order of 100 km, their actual height is not more than

  6. Dynamics of Extreme Floods in Southeast and South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Lima, C. H.; Lall, U.

    2015-12-01

    Many extreme floods result from a causal chain, where exceptional rain and floods in water basins from different sizes are related to large scale, anomalous and persistent patterns in atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Organized moisture plumes from oceanic sources are often implicated. One could use an Eulerian-Lagrangian climate model to test a causal chain hypothesis, but the parameterization and testing of such a model covering convection and transport continues to be a challenge. Consequently, empirical data based studies can be useful to establish the need to formally model such events using this approach. Here we consider two flood-prone regions in Southeast and South Brazil as case studies. A hypothesis of the causal chain of extreme floods in these regions is investigated by means of observed streamflow and reanalysis data and some machine learning tools. The signatures of the organization of the large scale atmospheric circulation in the days prior to the flood events are evaluated based on the integrated moisture flux and its divergence field and storm track data, so that a better understanding of the relations between the flood magnitude and duration, strength of moisture convergence and role of regional moisture recycling or teleconnected moisture is established. Persistent patterns and anomalies in the sea surface temperature (SST) field in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans that may be associated with disturbances in the atmospheric circulation and with the flood dynamics are investigated through composite analysis. Finally, machine learning algorithms for nonlinear dimension reduction are employed to visualize and understand some of the spatio-temporal patterns of the dominated climate variables in a reduced dimensional space. Prospects for prediction are discussed.

  7. Magnetotelluric soundings across the Taubaté Basin, Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Antonio L.; Vitorello, Ícaro; Brito, Paula M. A.

    2002-05-01

    Thirteen magnetotelluric (MT) soundings were carried out in Neoproterozoic crystalline terrains and Tertiary sediments of the Taubaté basin, southeastern Brazil. The soundings were deployed in a cross-strike profile bisecting the basin along one of its thickest sub-basins and extending over mountain plateaus to the southeast and the northwest. Occurrences of numerous alkaline plugs and aligned tectonic grabens in the region are records of intense Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic activity. MT analysis techniques were used to evaluate data quality, infer strike direction, and correct for near-surface distortion. As the studied area is located only some tens of kilometers away from the Atlantic Ocean and in one of the most densely populated regions of the country, the data are severely distorted by industrial interference and the coast effect. Because of such effects, the data are modelled using a 2D inversion scheme within periods shorter than 0.1 s for the Taubaté Basin sites and shorter than 1-10 s for the off-basin sites, the latter depending on the distance of the site from the coast. The main result observed in the modelling is the identification of a conducting zone below 10 km depths beneath the region. There is poor resolution in the data of structures below this conductor, which is also not imaged beneath the basin. Studies carried out in different tectonic regions of the world have also reported conductive layers at about the same depth but in the studied area it is impossible to reach any conclusion about the total conductance of the layer with the available MT data.

  8. A current perspective on antimicrobial resistance in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, Raphaël M; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P J; Thwaites, Guy E; Baker, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Southeast Asia, a vibrant region that has recently undergone unprecedented economic development, is regarded as a global hotspot for the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Understanding AMR in Southeast Asia is crucial for assessing how to control AMR on an international scale. Here we (i) describe the current AMR situation in Southeast Asia, (ii) explore the mechanisms that make Southeast Asia a focal region for the emergence of AMR, and (iii) propose ways in which Southeast Asia could contribute to a global solution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  9. Insect Galls of the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia (Southeast Region, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Valéria C; Mascarenhas, Bernardo

    2017-05-01

    The Parque Nacional do Itatiaia (PNI) (Brazilian Southeast Region) was surveyed monthly for insect galls from February/2014 to December/ 2015. A total of 432 gall morphotypes were found. This number places the PNI as the richest Atlantic forest area in number of gall morphotypes. The galls were found on 47 plant families. Among them, Asteraceae were pointed out as the superhost. The gall richness in the lower part of the PNI is higher than that of the plateau. The insect galls were found in 154 native, 56 endemic and only one exotic plant species. Concerning the conservational status, the host plants include two vulnerable species with three morphotypes together. Several new botanical records were reported. Leaves were the most galled plant organ, followed by stems. Globoid, green, glabrous and one-chambered galls were the most frequent. Cecidomyiidae were the most common gallers. Parasitoids, successors and inquilines composed the associated fauna.

  10. Atlantic Flyway Breeding Waterfowl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Atlantic Flyway Technical Section initiated this breeding waterfowl survey in 11 northeast states ranging from New Hampshire to Virginia.

  11. Virginia Atlantic Coast Recreational Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    Virginia Department of Environmental Quality — As a member of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, through its Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program, collected information on how the...

  12. VA Atlantic Coast Recreational Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    Virginia Department of Environmental Quality — As a member of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO), Virginia, through its Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Program, collected information on how the...

  13. Atlantic Flyway Sea Duck Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Atlantic Flyway Sea Duck Survey, conducted from 1991 to 2002 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, was established to record sea duck numbers using near shore...

  14. The Cretaceous and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahirovic, S.; Seton, M.; Müller, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of Southeast Asia have given rise to numerous controversies that include the accretionary history of Sundaland and the enigmatic tectonic origin of the proto-South China Sea. We assimilate a diversity of geological and geophysical observations into a new regional plate model, coupled to a global model, to address these debates. Our approach takes into account terrane suturing and accretion histories, the location of subducted slabs imaged in mantle tomography in order to constrain the evolution of regional subduction zones, as well as plausible absolute and relative plate velocities and tectonic driving mechanisms. We propose a scenario of rifting from northern Gondwana in the latest Jurassic, driven by northward slab pull from north-dipping subduction of Tethyan crust beneath Eurasia, to detach East Java, Mangkalihat, southeast Borneo and West Sulawesi blocks that collided with a Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zone in the mid-Cretaceous and subsequently accreted to the Sunda margin (i.e., southwest Borneo core) in the Late Cretaceous. In accounting for the evolution of plate boundaries, we propose that the Philippine Sea plate originated on the periphery of Tethyan crust forming this northward conveyor. We implement a revised model for the Tethyan intra-oceanic subduction zones to reconcile convergence rates, changes in volcanism and the obduction of ophiolites. In our model the northward margin of Greater India collides with the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc at ∼53 Ma, followed by continent-continent collision closing the Shyok and Indus-Tsangpo suture zones between ∼42 and 34 Ma. We also account for the back-arc opening of the proto-South China Sea from ∼65 Ma, consistent with extension along east Asia and the formation of supra-subduction zone ophiolites presently found on the island of Mindoro. The related rifting likely detached the Semitau continental fragment from South China, which accreted to northern Borneo in the mid

  15. The copyright wars three centuries of trans-atlantic battle

    CERN Document Server

    Baldwin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Today’s copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright—and its violation—a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries—and their history is essential to understanding today’s battles. The Copyright Wars—the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today—tells this important story. Peter Baldwin explains why the copyright wars have always been driven by a fundamental tension. Should copyright assure authors and rights holders lasting claims, much like conventional property rights, as in Continental Europe? Or should copyright be primarily concerned with giving consumers cheap and easy ac...

  16. A land-cover map for South and Southeast Asia derived from SPOT-VEGETATION data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibig, H.-J.; Belward, A.S.; Roy, P.S.; Rosalina-Wasrin, U.; Agrawal, S.; Joshi, P.K.; ,; Beuchle, R.; Fritz, S.; Mubareka, S.; Giri, C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim  Our aim was to produce a uniform ‘regional’ land-cover map of South and Southeast Asia based on ‘sub-regional’ mapping results generated in the context of the Global Land Cover 2000 project.Location  The ‘region’ of tropical and sub-tropical South and Southeast Asia stretches from the Himalayas and the southern border of China in the north, to Sri Lanka and Indonesia in the south, and from Pakistan in the west to the islands of New Guinea in the far east.Methods  The regional land-cover map is based on sub-regional digital mapping results derived from SPOT-VEGETATION satellite data for the years 1998–2000. Image processing, digital classification and thematic mapping were performed separately for the three sub-regions of South Asia, continental Southeast Asia, and insular Southeast Asia. Landsat TM images, field data and existing national maps served as references. We used the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) for coding the sub-regional land-cover classes and for aggregating the latter to a uniform regional legend. A validation was performed based on a systematic grid of sample points, referring to visual interpretation from high-resolution Landsat imagery. Regional land-cover area estimates were obtained and compared with FAO statistics for the categories ‘forest’ and ‘cropland’.Results  The regional map displays 26 land-cover classes. The LCCS coding provided a standardized class description, independent from local class names; it also allowed us to maintain the link to the detailed sub-regional land-cover classes. The validation of the map displayed a mapping accuracy of 72% for the dominant classes of ‘forest’ and ‘cropland’; regional area estimates for these classes correspond reasonably well to existing regional statistics.Main conclusions  The land-cover map of South and Southeast Asia provides a synoptic view of the distribution of land cover of tropical and sub

  17. Bottom Pressure Tides Along a Line in the Southeast Atlantic Ocean and Comparisons with Satellite Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Byrne, Deidre A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor pressure records, collected at 11 stations aligned along a single ground track of the Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellites, are analyzed for their tidal content. With very low background noise levels and approximately 27 months of high-quality records, tidal constituents can be estimated with unusually high precision. This includes many high-frequency lines up through the seventh-diurnal band. The station deployment provides a unique opportunity to compare with tides estimated from satellite altimetry, point by point along the satellite track, in a region of moderately high mesoscale variability. That variability can significantly corrupt altimeter-based tide estimates, even with 17 years of data. A method to improve the along-track altimeter estimates by correcting the data for nontidal variability is found to yield much better agreement with the bottom-pressure data. The technique should prove useful in certain demanding applications, such as altimetric studies of internal tides.

  18. Extension of PIRATA in the tropical South-East Atlantic: an initial one ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mooring is fitted with a current meter/temperature sensor deployed 10–13 m deep, five temperature/conductivity sensors deployed at depths of 1, 10, 20, ... and two temperature/pressure sensors at 300 m and 500 m, as well as an anemometer, air temperature, humidity and short-wave solar radiation probes, and a rain ...

  19. 75 FR 57517 - Atlantic Southeast Airlines, a Subsidiary of Skywest, Inc., Airport Customer Service Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Customer Service Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Delta Global Services, Inc., Fort Smith, AR... Customer Service Division v. United States Secretary of Labor (Court No. 09- 00522). Background On... services to a foreign country during this period. A customer survey was not conducted because the subject...

  20. 76 FR 4733 - Atlantic Southeast Airlines, a Subsidiary of Skywest, Inc., Airport Customer Service Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... Customer Service Division, Fort Smith, AR; Notice of Negative Determination on Second Remand On November 4... Airlines, a Subsidiary of Skywest, Inc., Airport Customer Service Division v. United States Secretary of...) provided airline customer services. AR 4,8,14,37. The Department's Notice of determination was published in...

  1. Australia: US Redoubt in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-04-08

    aircraft) and a compliment of Gannet and Venom fighters are carried on H.M.A.S. MELBOURNE Official Handbook, op. cit., p. 324. 35 for anti-submarine...security pact were brought about by the signing of the North Atlantic Mohn B. Condliffe, The Development of Australia, p. 5. ^Gordon Greenwood, ed

  2. Geodynamic models of continental subduction and obduction of overriding plate forearc oceanic lithosphere on top of continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Sarah J.; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, Joao C.

    2015-01-01

    Continental subduction takes place in the final stage of subduction when all oceanic lithosphere is consumed and continental passive margin is pulled into the mantle. When the overriding plate is oceanic, dense forearc oceanic lithosphere might be obducted onto light continental crust forming an

  3. The Cumacea community of the southeastern Brazilian Continental Shelf: structure and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda L. Dos Santos

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific composition, abundance, diversity and dynamics of the Cumacea community from the southeastern Brazilian continental shelf were studied. The area is characterized by the intrusion of a cold and highly saline water mass in summer, the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW, from the slope towards the coast, changing the hydrographic structure of the shelf and the species distribution. During the other seasons the inner shelf, area shallower than 50 m, is filled with warm and low saline water, the Coastal Water (CW. The presence of the SACW seems to favor the abundance and diversity of Cumacea due to its higher primary production and stability. Three groups of species were related to the water masses. Depth and fine sand fraction were shown to be the main factors structuring the Cumacea community. The role of the SACW in maintaining the Cumacea populations in the area through the passive transport of pre-ovigerous and ovigerous females is discussed.

  4. Relating Ctenophore Population to Water Mass Indices in the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sparks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ctenophores exist throughout the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf Ecosystem, but the underlying mechanisms that control ctenophore populations at this scale are not clear. Ctenophore population data over the last 30 years coincides with changes in several water masses on the shelf, but discovering which water mass was most influential was problematic without mechanistic clarity. This paper strives to identify the relationship between oceanography and ctenophore populations over the last 30 years. Using a numerical modeling approach, we found a strong relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation index, percent Labrador Subarctic Slope Water, and ctenophore population. We suggest these results might inform future efforts to develop a predictive capability for major changes in ctenophore population.

  5. Impact of CO2 and continental configuration on Late Cretaceous ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puceat, Emmanuelle; Donnadieu, Yannick; Moiroud, Mathieu; Guillocheau, François; Deconinck, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    The Late Cretaceous period is characterized by a long-term climatic cooling (Huber et al., 1995; Pucéat et al., 2003; Friedrich et al., 2012) and by major changes in continental configuration with the widening of the Atlantic Ocean, the initiation of the Tethyan ocean closure, and the deepening of the Central Atlantic Gateway. The Late Cretaceous also marks the end of the occurrence of Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs), that are associated to enhanced organic carbon burial, to major crises of calcifying organisms, and to possible ocean acidification (Jenkyns, 2010). It has been suggested that the evolution in continental configuration and climate occurring during the Late Cretaceous could have induced a reorganization in the oceanic circulation, that may have impacted the oxygenation state of the oceanic basins and contributed to the disappearance of OAEs (Robinson et al., 2010; Robinson and Vance, 2012). Yet there is no consensus existing on the oceanic circulation modes and on their possible evolution during the Late Cretaceous, despite recent improvement of the spatial and temporal coverage of neodymium isotopic data (ɛNd), a proxy of oceanic circulation (MacLeod et al., 2008; Robinson et al., 2010; Murphy and Thomas, 2012; Robinson and Vance, 2012; Martin et al., 2012; Moiroud et al., 2012). Using the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Model FOAM, we explore in this work the impact on oceanic circulation of changes in continental configuration between the mid- and latest Cretaceous. Two paleogeography published by Sewall et al. (2007) were used, for the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary and for the Maastrichtian. For each paleogeography, 3 simulations have been realized, at 2x, 4x, and 8x the pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 level, in order to test the sensitivity of the modelled circulation to CO2. Our results show for both continental configurations a bipolar mode for the oceanic circulation displayed by FOAM. Using the Cenomanian/Turonian land-sea mask

  6. Anesthesia induces stress in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, Inger Hilde; Kiessling, Anders; Samuelsen, Ole Bent; Olsen, Rolf Erik

    2010-09-01

    Stress in response to anesthesia with benzocaine, MS-222, metomidate and isoeugenol was studied in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) with no concomitant stress from handling or confinement in association with anesthesia or sampling. All of the anesthetics tested induced a stress response in all species, displayed by a release of cortisol to the water. MS-222 anesthesia elicited the highest cortisol release rates, reaching maximum levels 0.5 h post-exposure and returning to basal levels after 3-4 h. Benzocaine anesthesia caused a bimodal response where the initial peak in cortisol release rate was followed by a second increase lasting towards the end of the trial (6 h). This bimodality was more profound in Atlantic salmon than in Atlantic halibut and Atlantic cod. Metomidate anesthesia induced the lowest release of cortisol of the agents tested in both Atlantic halibut and Atlantic cod, but resulted in a bimodal response in Atlantic salmon where the initial increase in cortisol release was followed by a larger increase peaking at 2-2.5 h post exposure before returning to basal levels after 5 h. The stress induced in Atlantic salmon by isoeugenol anesthesia resembled that of MS-222, but did not reach the same elevated level. Overall, the cortisol release was most profound in Atlantic salmon followed by Atlantic halibut and Atlantic cod.

  7. Boulder Deposits on the Southern Spanish Atlantic Coast: Possible Evidence for the 1755 AD Lisbon Tsunami?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Kelletat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Field evidence of visible tsunami impacts in Europe is scarce. This research focused on an analysis of large littoral debris and accompanying geomorphic features and their rela- tionship to a tsunami event at Cabo de Trafalgar, located on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast. Relative dating of weathering features as well as minor bioconstructive forms in the littoral zone suggest the Lisbon tsunami of 1755 AD as the event responsible for the large deposits described. This tsunami had run up heights of more than 19 m and was generated at the Gorringe Bank, located 500 km west off the Cape. Tsunami deposits at Cabo de Tra- falgar are the first boulder deposits identified on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast and are located approximately 250 km southeast of the Algarve coast (Portugal, where other geo- morphic evidence for the Lisbon tsunami has been reported.

  8. Landscape modelling at Regional to Continental scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    Most work on simulating landscape evolution has been focused at scales of about 1 Ha, there are still limitations, particularly in understanding the links between hillslope process rates and climate, soils and channel initiation. However, the need for integration with GCM outputs and with Continental Geosystems now imposes an urgent need for scaling up to Regional and Continental scales. This is reinforced by a need to incorporate estimates of soil erosion and desertification rates into national and supra-national policy. Relevant time-scales range from decadal to geological. Approaches at these regional to continental scales are critical to a fuller collaboration between geomorphologists and others interested in Continental Geosystems. Two approaches to the problem of scaling up are presented here for discussion. The first (MEDRUSH) is to embed representative hillslope flow strips into sub-catchments within a larger catchment of up to 5,000 km2. The second is to link one-dimensional models of SVAT type within DEMs at up to global scales (CSEP/SEDWEB). The MEDRUSH model is being developed as part of the EU Desertification Programme (MEDALUS project), primarily for semi-natural vegetation in southern Europe over time spans of up to 100 years. Catchments of up to 2500 km2 are divided into 50-200 sub-catchments on the basis of flow paths derived from DEMs with a horizontal resolution of 50 m or better. Within each sub-catchment a representative flow strip is selected and Hydrology, Sediment Transport and Vegetation change are simulated in detail for the flow strip, using a 1 hour time step. Changes within each flow strip are transferred back to the appropriate sub-catchment and flows of water and sediment are then routed through the channel network, generating changes in flood plain morphology.

  9. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  10. Tracing the phylogeographic history of Southeast Asian long-tailed macaques through mitogenomes of museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Hongjie; Martin, Robert D; Moreau, Corrie S; Malhi, Ripan S

    2017-11-01

    The biogeographical history of Southeast Asia is complicated due to the continuous emergences and disappearances of land bridges throughout the Pleistocene. Here, we use long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), which are widely distributed throughout the mainland and islands of Southeast Asia, asa model for better understanding the biogeographical patterns of diversification in this geographically complex region. A reliable intraspecific phylogeny including individuals from localities on oceanic islands, continental islands, and the mainland is needed to trace relatedness along with the pattern and timing of colonization in this region. We used high-throughput sequencing techniques to sequence mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from 95 Southeast Asian M. fascicularis specimens housed at natural history museums around the world. To achieve a comprehensive picture, we more than tripled the mitogenome sample size for M. fascicularis from previous studies, and for the first time included documented samples from the Philippines and several small Indonesian islands. Confirming the result from a previous, recent intraspecific phylogeny for M. fascicularis, the newly reconstructed phylogeny of 135 specimens divides the samples into two major clades: Clade A includes haplotypes from the mainland and some from northern Sumatra, while Clade B includes all insular haplotypes along with lineages from southern Sumatra. This study resolves a previous disparity by revealing a disjunction in the origin of Sumatran macaques, with separate lineages originating within the two major clades, suggesting that at least two major migrations to Sumatra occurred. However, our dated phylogeny reveals that the two major clades split ∼1.88Ma, which is earlier than in previously published phylogenies. Our new data reveal that most Philippine macaque lineages diverged from the Borneo stock within the last ∼0.06-0.43Ma. Finally, our study provides insight into successful sequencing of DNA

  11. The New Political Economy of Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    would be adopted widely for courses in Asian studies and political economy.’ – Hal Hill, The Australian National University ‘The different parts of the Southeast Asian puzzle fit better together as a consequence of reading this valuable book, which brings history back in to show how regions learn from...... each other and establish an identity.’ – Alice Amsden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US This well-researched book examines the dramatic transformation of Southeast Asian countries from agricultural and mining economies to industrial nations. In doing so, it explores the effects of development...... policy on a number of interdisciplinary issues, and the emergence of new social and political pressures created by industrialization. These include their heightened vulnerability to complex economic crises, their use of sophisticated instruments in the labour process and increased awareness...

  12. Pan-African Paleostresses and Reactivation of the Eburnean Basement Complex in Southeast Ghana (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahaman Sani Tairou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This faulting tectonics analysis concerns the southernmost segment of the Dahomeyide Orogen and the West-African craton eastern margin in southeast Ghana. The analysis of strike-slip faults in the frontal units of the Dahomeyide Belt indicates that four distinct compressive events (NE-SW, ENE-WSW to E-W, ESE-WNW to SE-NW and SE-NW to SSE-NNW originated the juxtaposition of the Pan-African Mobile Zone and the West-African craton. These paleostress systems define a clockwise rotation of the compressional axis during the structuring of the Dahomeyide Orogen (650–550 Ma. The SE-NW and SSE-NNW to N-S compressional axes in the cratonic domain and its cover (Volta Basin suggest that the reactivation of the eastern edge of the West African craton is coeval with the last stages of the Pan-African tectogenesis in southeast Ghana. An extensional episode expressed as late normal faulting is also recorded in this study. This E-W to SE-NW extension, which is particular to the southernmost part of the Dahomeyide Belt, appears to be post-Pan-African. This extension probably contributed to the formation of a major Jurassic rifting zone that originated the Central Atlantic and the Benue Trough.

  13. Erosional and depositional contourite features at the transition between the western Scotia Sea and southern South Atlantic Ocean: links with regional water-mass circulation since the Middle Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Esteban, Federico D.; Tassone, Alejandro; Piola, Alberto R.; Maldonado, Andrés; Preu, Benedict; Violante, Roberto A.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterise the morpho-sedimentary features and main stratigraphic stacking pattern off the Tierra del Fuego continental margin, the north-western sector of the Scotia Sea abyssal plain (Yaghan Basin) and the Malvinas/Falkland depression, based on single- and multi-channel seismic profiles. Distinct contourite features were identified within the sedimentary record from the Middle Miocene onwards. Each major drift developed in a water depth range coincident with a particular water mass, contourite terraces on top of some of these drifts being associated with interfaces between water masses. Two major palaeoceanographic changes were identified. One took place in the Middle Miocene with the onset of Antarctic Intermediate Water flow and the enhancement of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) flow, coevally with the onset of Weddell Sea Deep Water flow in the Scotia Sea. Another palaeoceanographic change occurred on the abyssal plain of the Yaghan Basin in the Late Miocene as a consequence of the onset of Southeast Pacific Deep Water flow and its complex interaction with the lower branch of the CDW. Interestingly, these two periods of change in bottom currents are coincident with regional tectonic episodes, as well as climate and Antarctic ice sheet oscillations. The results convincingly demonstrate that the identification of contourite features on the present-day seafloor and within the sedimentary record is the key for decoding the circulation of water masses in the past. Nevertheless, further detailed studies, especially the recovery of drill cores, are necessary to establish a more robust chronology of the evolutionary stages at the transition between the western Scotia Sea and the southern South Atlantic Ocean.

  14. Formation of continental crust by intrusive magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozel, A. B.; Golabek, G. J.; Jain, C.; Tackley, P. J.; Gerya, T.

    2017-09-01

    How were the continents formed in the Earth? No global numerical simulation of our planet ever managed to generate continental material self-consistently. In the present study, we show that the latest developments of the convection code StagYY enable to estimate how to produce the early continents, more than 3 billion years ago. In our models, melting of pyrolitic rocks generates a basaltic melt and leaves behind a depleted solid residue (a harzburgite). The melt generated in the mantle is transported to the surface. Only basaltic rocks melting again can generate continental crust. Should the basaltic melt always reach the open air and cool down? Should the melt be intruded warm in the pre-existing crust? The present study shows that both processes have to be considered to produce continents. Indeed, granitoids can only be created in a tight window of pressure-temperature. If all basalt is quickly cooled by surface volcanism, the lithosphere will be too cold. If all basalt is intruded warm below the crust then the lithosphere will be too warm. The key is to have both volcanism and plutonism (intrusive magmatism) to reach the optimal temperature and form massive volumes of continental material.

  15. Continental Deformation in Madagascar from GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, D. S.; Rajaonarison, T.; Rambolamanana, G.; Herimitsinjo, N.; Carrillo, R.; Jesmok, G.

    2015-12-01

    D.S. Stamps, T. Rajaonarison, G. Rambolamanana Madagascar is the easternmost continental segment of the East African Rift System (EARS). Plate reconstructions assume the continental island behaves as a rigid block, but studies of geologically recent kinematics suggest Madagascar undergoes extension related to the broader EARS. In this work we test for rigidity of Madagascar in two steps. First, we quantify surface motions using a novel dataset of episodic and continuous GNSS observations that span Madagascar from north to south. We established a countrywide network of precision benchmarks fixed in bedrock and with open skyview in 2010 that we measured for 48-72 hours with dual frequency receivers. The benchmarks were remeasured in 2012 and 2014. We processed the episodic GNSS data with ABPO, the only continuous GNSS station in Madagascar with >2.5 years of data, for millimeter precision positions and velocities at 7 locations using GAMIT-GLOBK. Our velocity field shows 2 mm/yr of differential motion between southern and northern Madagascar. Second, we test a suite of kinematic predictions from previous studies and find residual velocities are greater than 95% uncertainties. We also calculate angular velocity vectors assuming Madagascar moves with the Lwandle plate or the Somalian plate. Our new velocity field in Madagascar is inconsistent with all models that assume plate rigidity at the 95% uncertainty level; this result indicates the continental island undergoes statistically significant internal deformation.

  16. ASEAN and security in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Nugroho, M. Santoso E.

    1994-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited The Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) was established in Bangkok in 1967, by the five founding governments of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. Its sixth member, Brunei Darussalam, joined the Association in 1984, shortly after its independence. ASEAN stresses its objective in promoting economic growth through regional cooperation, but the facts speak for only modest achievements in this area. On t...

  17. Seafloor mapping of the southeast Iberian margin (from Cabo de Palos to Cabo de Gata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastras, Galderic; Leon, César; Elvira, Elena; Pascual, Laura; Muñoz, Araceli; de Cárdenas, Enrique; Acosta, Juan; Canals, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    We present the multibeam bathymetry and derived maps of the southeast Iberian margin from Cabo de Palos to Cabo de Gata, 37º35'N to 35º45'N and 2º10'W to 0º20'E, from the coastline down to the Algero-Balearic abyssal plain at depths exceeding 2600 m. The edition of of the maps is carried out within the Complementary Action VALORPLAT ("Scientific valorisation of multibeam bathymetry data from the Spanish continental shelf and slope"), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitivity. The multibeam bathymetry data of the slope and abyssal plain were obtained during different surveys in 2004, 2006 and 2007 on board R/V Vizconde de Eza with a Simrad EM300 multibeam echo-sounder as part of the CAPESME Project, a collaboration between the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) and General Secretariat of Fisheries (SGP), primarily aiming at creating maps of the fishing grounds of the Mediterranean continental margins of Spain. Multibeam bathymetry data from the continental shelf were obtained within the ESPACE project, also in a cooperative frame between IEO and SGP. The map series is constituted by a general map at 1:400,000 scale and 14 detailed maps at 1:75,000 scale, which include inset maps on slope gradients and seafloor nature (rock or sediment type), the later obtained with rock dredges and Shipeck sediment dredges. Both the detailed maps and the general map are available in paper print, and the whole collection is also distributed in an edited USB. The geological features displayed in the different maps include the continental shelf, with abundant geomorphic features indicative of past sea-level changes, the continental slope carved by the Palos, Tiñoso, Cartagena Este, Cartagena Oeste, Águilas, Almanzora, Alias, Garrucha and Gata submarine canyons, the Mazarrón, Palomares and Al-Mansour escarpments, the Abubácer, Maimonides and Yusuf ridges, the Águilas and Al-Mansour seamounts, and the Algero-Balearic abyssal plain where prominent

  18. Ultramafic geoecology of South and Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, M L; van der Ent, A; Iqbal, M C M; Rajakaruna, N

    2017-12-01

    Globally, ultramafic outcrops are renowned for hosting floras with high levels of endemism, including plants with specialised adaptations such as nickel or manganese hyperaccumulation. Soils derived from ultramafic regoliths are generally nutrient-deficient, have major cation imbalances, and have concomitant high concentrations of potentially phytotoxic trace elements, especially nickel. The South and Southeast Asian region has the largest surface occurrences of ultramafic regoliths in the world, but the geoecology of these outcrops is still poorly studied despite severe conservation threats. Due to the paucity of systematic plant collections in many areas and the lack of georeferenced herbarium records and databased information, it is not possible to determine the distribution of species, levels of endemism, and the species most threatened. However, site-specific studies provide insights to the ultramafic geoecology of several locations in South and Southeast Asia. The geoecology of tropical ultramafic regions differs substantially from those in temperate regions in that the vegetation at lower elevations is generally tall forest with relatively low levels of endemism. On ultramafic mountaintops, where the combined forces of edaphic and climatic factors intersect, obligate ultramafic species and hyperendemics often occur. Forest clearing, agricultural development, mining, and climate change-related stressors have contributed to rapid and unprecedented loss of ultramafic-associated habitats in the region. The geoecology of the large ultramafic outcrops of Indonesia's Sulawesi, Obi and Halmahera, and many other smaller outcrops in South and Southeast Asia, remains largely unexplored, and should be prioritised for study and conservation.

  19. Southeast Asian tropical medicine and parasitology network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, Jitra

    2006-01-01

    The SEAMEO TROPMED Network is a regional cooperative network established in 1967 for education, training and research in tropical medicine and public health under the Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organization. The Network operates through four Regional Centers with respective areas of specialization and host institutions: Community Nutrition/Tropmed Indonesia; Microbiology, Parasitology and Entomology/Tropmed Malaysia; Public Health/Tropmed Philippines; and Tropical Medicine/Tropmed Thailand. To train health workers, to support research on endemic and newly emerging diseases, and to advocate relevant health policies are the main functions of these centers. SEAMEO TROPMED Network in collaboration with the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University and other institutions has regularly organized the Seminar on Food-borne Parasitic Zoonoses every 3-5 years over the past 15 years. The Faculty of Tropical Medicine has organized the annual Joint International Tropical Medicine Meeting since 1996. Full papers of the presentations at these two meetings have been published as supplementary issues to the Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, an in-house journal of SEAMEO TROPMED Network. Recently, the Parasitology Association of ASEAN Countries has rotated the hosting of the ASEAN Congress of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine. These institutional and conference networks will enable closer links, to promote the health of people in the Southeast Asian region.

  20. The current status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus currently poses a global threat and is a major public health issue throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. However, Zika virus infections in humans have also been observed in other regions, including Southeast Asia, where arboviral diseases are very common. In this study, we summarize the current status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia. This review aims to provide an overview of the current situation and also to suggest ways of adequately managing the emergence of Zika virus in Southeast Asia. The literature searching for the reports on Zika virus in Southeast Asia was done using standard database PubMed and the re-analysis and summarization on the reports was done. A limited number of reports have addressed Zika virus disease in Southeast Asia, but it is has been confirmed that a problem already exists. Individual case reports and outbreaks of Zika virus have been confirmed in Southeast Asia. Several reports have also described patients becoming infected after visiting Southeast Asia. In addition, the concurrent circulation of Zika virus with other arboviruses has been confirmed. As a tropical region with a high prevalence of arboviral diseases, the emergence of Zika virus in Southeast Asia is a major concern. It is essential for local medical personnel to recognize this disease. Given the status of Southeast Asia as a globally important tourist destination, continuous updates on the status of Zika virus in Southeast Asia are required and should be incorporated into global health advisories regarding travel.

  1. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  2. Model Analysis of Tropospheric Aerosol Variability and Sources over the North Atlantic during NAAMES 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Moore, R.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Fairlie, T. D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Gantt, B.; Jaegle, L.

    2016-12-01

    The North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES) is a five-year Earth-Venture Suborbital-2 Mission to characterize the plankton ecosystems and their influences on remote marine aerosols, boundary layer clouds, and their implications for climate in the North Atlantic. While marine-sourced aerosols have been shown to make important contributions to surface aerosol loading, cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions, it is still a challenge to differentiate the marine biogenic aerosol signal from the strong influence of continental pollution outflow. We examine here the spatiotemporal variability and quantify the sources of tropospheric aerosols over the North Atlantic during the first two phases (November 2015 and May-June 2016) of NAAMES using a state-of-the-art chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The model is driven by the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) from the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It includes sulfate-nitrate-ammonium aerosol thermodynamics coupled to ozone-NOx-hydrocarbon-aerosol chemistry, mineral dust, sea salt, elemental and organic carbon aerosols, and especially a recently implemented parameterization for the marine primary organic aerosol emission. The simulated aerosols over the North Atlantic are evaluated with available satellite (e.g., MODIS) observations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), and aircraft and ship aerosol measurements. We diagnose transport pathways for continental pollution outflow over the North Atlantic using carbon monoxide, an excellent tracer for anthropogenic pollution transport. We also conduct model perturbation experiments to quantify the relative contributions of terrestrial and oceanic sources to the aerosol loading, AOD, and their variability over the North Atlantic.

  3. Marine magnetics data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in U.S. Atlantic Seaboard in 2014 (Geographic, WGS84, point shapefile 2014-011-FA_mag.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In summer 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 21-day geophysical program in deep water along the Atlantic continental margin by using R/V Marcus G. Langseth...

  4. Trackline navigation for multi-channel seismic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey on U.S. Atlantic Seaboard in 2014 (Geographic, WGS84, polyline shapefile 2014-011-FA_seistrk.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In summer 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 21-day geophysical program in deep water along the Atlantic continental margin by using R/V Marcus G. Langseth...

  5. 76 FR 72383 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Administration 50 CFR Part 635 RIN 0648-BA17 Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management...) and fishery management plan (FMP) amendment that would consider catch shares for the Atlantic shark... design elements for potential catch shares programs in the Atlantic shark fisheries. Additionally, NMFS...

  6. Paintings in Atlantic Megalithic Art: Barnenez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno Ramírez, Primitiva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of technique is usually considered in European megalithic art as an indicator of the level of culture sophistication attained by a particular community. Traditionally, it was considered that only the Iberian Peninsula is home to painted dolmens. The analysis of chamber H of the Barnenez tumulus together with some information scattered over the continent, prove that painting was part of the graphic programs in the most archetypal Atlantic sites, such as Brittany. A highly rewarding panorama appears for European megalithic art with potential new readings. The most suitable method of detecting paintings and interpreting them in funerary contexts must be reviewed.

    La técnica ha venido estableciéndose en el arte megalítico europeo como una categoría cultural. Solo la Península Ibérica disponía de dólmenes pintados. Pero algunos datos dispersos en el resto del continente, junto con los análisis que se aportan procedentes de la cámara H del túmulo de Barnenez, certifican que la pintura formó parte de los programas gráfi cos de los más clásicos conjuntos atlánticos, como es el bretón. Se abre un panorama muy enriquecedor de nuevas lecturas para un arte megalítico europeo en el que habrá de contemplarse la metodología pertinente para la detección de pinturas y su interpretación en los discursos funerarios.

  7. Atlantic menhaden processing plant test tagging data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic menhaden are a schooling forage fish species, which are subject to a large commercial purse seine fishery. Atlantic menhaden are harvested for reduction...

  8. Atlantic NAD 83 OCS Planning Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains BOEM Planning Area outlines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The old Atlantic Planning Area outlines were changed as of...

  9. A harbinger of plate tectonics: a commentary on Bullard, Everett and Smith (1965) 'The fit of the continents around the Atlantic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, John F

    2015-04-13

    In the 1960s, geology was transformed by the paradigm of plate tectonics. The 1965 paper of Bullard, Everett and Smith was a linking transition between the theories of continental drift and plate tectonics. They showed, conclusively, that the continents around the Atlantic were once contiguous and that the Atlantic Ocean had grown at rates of a few centimetres per year since the Early Jurassic, about 160 Ma. They achieved fits of the continental margins at the 500 fathom line (approx. 900 m), not the shorelines, by minimizing misfits between conjugate margins and finding axes, poles and angles of rotation, using Euler's theorem, that defined the unique single finite difference rotation that carried congruent continents from contiguity to their present positions, recognizing that the real motion may have been more complex around a number of finite motion poles. Critically, they were concerned only with kinematic reality and were not restricted by considerations of the mechanism by which continents split and oceans grow. Many of the defining features of plate tectonics were explicit or implicit in their reconstructions, such as the torsional rigidity of continents, Euler's theorem, closure of the Tethyan ocean(s), major continental margin shear zones, the rapid rotation of small continental blocks (Iberia) around nearby poles, the consequent opening of small wedge-shaped oceans (Bay of Biscay), and misfit overlaps (deltas and volcanic piles) and underlaps (stretched continental edges). This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  10. Mesoscale eddies over the Laptev Sea continental slope in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnyushkov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Nguyen, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are an important component in Arctic Ocean dynamics and can play a role in vertical redistribution of ocean heat from the intermediate layer of warm Atlantic Water (AW). We analyze mooring data collected along the continental slope of the Laptev Sea in 2007-11 to improve the characterization of Arctic mesoscale eddies in this region of the Eurasian Basin (EB).Wavelet analyses suggest that ~20% of the mooring record is occupied by mesoscale eddies, whose vertical scales can be large, often >600 m. Based on similarity between temperature/salinity profiles measured inside eddies and modern climatology for the 2000s, we found two distinct sources of eddy formation in the EB; one in the vicinity of Fram Strait and the other at the continental slope of the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago. Both sources of eddies are on the route of AW propagation along the EB margins, so that the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) can carry these eddies along the continental slope.The lateral advection of waters isolated inside the eddy cores by ACBC affect the heat and salt balance of the eastern EB. The average temperature anomaly inside Fram Strait eddies in the layer above the AW temperature core (i.e., above 350 m depth level) was ~0.1º C with the strongest temperature anomaly in this layer exceeding 0.5ºC. In contrast to Fram Strait eddies, Severnaya Zemlya eddies carry anomalously cold and fresh water, and likely contribute to ventilation of the AW core. In addition, we found increased vertical shears of the horizontal velocities inside eddies that result in enhanced mixing. Our estimates made using the Pacanowski and Philander (1981) relationship suggest that, on average, vertical diffusivity coefficients inside eddies are four times larger than those in the surrounding waters. We will use the high resolution ECCO model to investigate the relative contributions of along and across slope transports induced by eddies along the ACBC path.

  11. Trophic state of benthic deep-sea ecosystems from two different continental margins off Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dell'Anno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of organic matter in benthic deep-sea ecosystems, commonly used to define their trophic state, can greatly influence key ecological processes such as biomass production and nutrient cycling. Here, we assess the trophic state of deep-sea sediments from open slopes and canyons of the Catalan (NW Mediterranean and Portuguese (NE Atlantic continental margins, offshore east and west Iberia, respectively, by using a biomimetic approach based on enzymatic digestion of protein and carbohydrate pools. Patterns of sediment trophic state were analyzed in relation to increasing water depth, including repeated samplings over a 3 yr period in the Catalan margin. Two out of the three sampling periods occurred a few months after dense shelf water cascading events. The benthic deep-sea ecosystems investigated in this study were characterized by high amounts of bioavailable organic matter when compared to other deep-sea sediments. Bioavailable organic matter and its nutritional value were significantly higher in the Portuguese margin than in the Catalan margin, thus reflecting differences in primary productivity of surface waters reported for the two regions. Similarly, sediments of the Catalan margin were characterized by significantly higher food quantity and quality in spring, when the phytoplankton bloom occurs in surface waters, than in summer and autumn. Differences in the benthic trophic state of canyons against open slopes were more evident in the Portuguese than in the Catalan margin. In both continental margins, bioavailable organic C concentrations did not vary or increase with increasing water depth. Overall, our findings suggest that the intensity of primary production processes along with the lateral transfer of organic particles, even amplified by episodic events, can have a role in controlling the quantity and distribution of bioavailable organic detritus and its nutritional value along these continental margin ecosystems.

  12. Latest Quaternary palaeoceanographic change in the eastern North Atlantic based upon a dinoflagellate cyst event ecostratigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Harland

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The analyses of dinoflagellate cyst records, from the latest Quaternary sediments recovered from DSDP Core 610A taken on the Feni Ridge in the southern Rockall Trough, and part of core MD01-2461 on the continental margin of the Porcupine Seabight in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, has provided evidence for significant oceanographic change encompassing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM and part of the Holocene. This together with other published records has led to a regional evaluation of oceanographic change in the eastern North Atlantic over the past 68 ka, based upon a distinctive dinoflagellate event ecostratigraphy. These changes reflect changes in the surface waters of the North Atlantic Current (NAC, and perhaps the deeper thermohaline Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC, driving fundamental regime changes within the phytoplanktonic communities. Three distinctive dinoflagellate cyst associations based upon both factor and cluster analyses have been recognised. Associations characterised by Bitectatodinium tepikiense (between 61.1 ± 6.2 to 13.4 ± 1.1 ka BP, Nematosphaeropsis labyrinthus (between 10.5 ± 0.3 and 11.45 ± 0.8 ka. BP, and the cyst of Protoceratium reticulatum (between 8.5 ± 0.9 and 5.2 ± 1.3 ka. BP indicate major change within the eastern North Atlantic oceanography. The transitions between these changes occur over a relatively short time span (c.1.5 ka, given our sampling resolution, and have the potential to be incorporated into an event stratigraphy through the latest Quaternary as recommended by the INTIMATE (INTegrating Ice core, MArine and TErrestrial records group. The inclusion of a dinoflagellate cyst event stratigraphy would highlight changes within the phytoplankton of the North Atlantic Ocean as a fully glacial world changed to our present interglacial.

  13. Horizontal and vertical distribution of mesozooplankton species richness and composition down to 2,300 m in the southwest Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio L.C. Bonecker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the species richness, distribution and composition of mesozooplankton over the continental shelf and slope, and in the water masses in the Campos Basin, southwest Atlantic Ocean. We analyzed the mesozooplankton from two oceanographic cruises (rainy and dry seasons, 2009 with samples taken in five different water masses from the surface to 2,300 m depth. In the Subsurface Water (SS, in both sampling periods, more species were recorded over the slope (rainy: 100; dry: 128 than the continental shelf (rainy: 97; dry: 104. Over the slope, species richness decreased with increasing depth: the highest values were observed in the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW, and the lowest values in the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW, in both sampling periods. We recorded 262 species in 10 groups (Hydrozoa, Siphonophora, Ctenophora, Branchiopoda, Copepoda, Euphausiacea, Decapoda, Chaetognatha, Appendicularia e Thaliacea, with 13 new occurrences for the southwest Atlantic. Copepoda was the group with the highest species richness, containing 138 species. In both periods, the samples from SS, SACW and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW/Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW were clustered in different faunistic zones, based on species composition. This study confirmed that zooplankton richness in the southwest Atlantic Ocean is underestimated, and suggests that additional efforts must be directed toward a better understanding of this fairly unknown region.

  14. Atlantic Seaduck Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M.C.; Hanson, Alan; Kerekes, Joseph; Paquet, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Atlantic Seaduck Project is being conducted to learn more about the breeding and moulting areas of seaducks in northern Canada and more about their feeding ecology on wintering areas, especially Chesapeake Bay. Satellite telemetry is being used to track surf scoters wintering in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland and black scoters on migrational staging areas in New Brunswick, Canada to breeding and moulting areas in northern Canada. Various techniques used to capture the scoters included mist netting, night-lighting, and net capture guns. All captured ducks were transported to a veterinary hospital where surgery was conducted following general anaesthesia procedures. A PTT100 transmitter (39 g) manufactured by Microwave, Inc., Columbia, Maryland was implanted into the duck?s abdominal cavity with an external (percutaneous) antenna. Eight of the surf scoters from Chesapeake Bay successfully migrated to possible breeding areas in Canada and all 13 of the black scoters migrated to suspected breeding areas. Ten of the 11 black scoter males migrated to James Bay presumably for moulting. Updated information from the ARGOS Systems aboard the NOAA satellites on scoter movements was made accessible on the Patuxent Website. Habitat cover types of locations using GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and aerial photographs (in conjunction with remote sensing software) are currently being analyzed to build thematic maps with varying cosmetic layer applications. Many factors related to human population increases have been implicated in causing changes in the distribution and abundance of wintering seaducks. Analyses of the gullet (oesophagus and proventriculus) and the gizzard of seaducks are currently being conducted to determine if changes from historical data have occurred. Scoters in the Bay feed predominantly on the hooked mussel and several species of clams. The long-tailed duck appears to select the gem clam in greater amounts than other seaducks, but exhibits a diverse diet of

  15. Feeding ecology of Coryphaenoides rupestris from the mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Gjelsvik, Guro; Schander, Christoffer; Høines, Age S

    2010-05-03

    The Macrourid fish roundnose grenadier, Coryphaenoides rupestris, is one of the most common benthopelagic fishes on the northern mid-Atlantic Ridge. The ecology of the species is comparatively well studied in continental slope waters of the North Atlantic, but not on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, which is a central mid-ocean area of its distribution. In total, 166 specimens from the RV G.O. Sars cruise in July 2004 were examined. The diet mainly comprised cephalopods, pelagic shrimps and fish. Pelagic and benthopelagic copepods were the most numerous prey, but did not contribute much on a weight basis. Cephalopods were by far the most important prey of the small grenadiers, while shrimps and fish became increasingly significant with increasing size. Previous studies from other areas have also found pelagic prey to be important, but in contrast to this study, cephalopods were generally of less importance. The study was an element of more wide-ranging food-web studies of the mid-Atlantic Ridge macro- and megafauna communities within the international MAR-ECO project.

  16. Feeding ecology of Coryphaenoides rupestris from the mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd Aksel Bergstad

    Full Text Available The Macrourid fish roundnose grenadier, Coryphaenoides rupestris, is one of the most common benthopelagic fishes on the northern mid-Atlantic Ridge. The ecology of the species is comparatively well studied in continental slope waters of the North Atlantic, but not on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, which is a central mid-ocean area of its distribution. In total, 166 specimens from the RV G.O. Sars cruise in July 2004 were examined. The diet mainly comprised cephalopods, pelagic shrimps and fish. Pelagic and benthopelagic copepods were the most numerous prey, but did not contribute much on a weight basis. Cephalopods were by far the most important prey of the small grenadiers, while shrimps and fish became increasingly significant with increasing size. Previous studies from other areas have also found pelagic prey to be important, but in contrast to this study, cephalopods were generally of less importance. The study was an element of more wide-ranging food-web studies of the mid-Atlantic Ridge macro- and megafauna communities within the international MAR-ECO project.

  17. Atlantic CFC data in CARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steinfeldt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant parameters have been collected and merged into a new database called CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. In order to provide a consistent data set, all data have been examined for systematic biases and adjusted if necessary (secondary quality control (QC. The CARINA data set is divided into three regions: the Arctic/Nordic Seas, the Atlantic region and the Southern Ocean. Here we present the CFC data for the Atlantic region, including the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-113 as well as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. The methods applied for the secondary quality control, a crossover analyses, the investigation of CFC ratios in the ocean and the CFC surface saturation are presented. Based on the results, the CFC data of some cruises are adjusted by a certain factor or given a "poor'' quality flag.

  18. Topographic evolution of a continental indenter: The eastern Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Jörg; Heberer, Bianca; Prasicek, Günther; Neubauer, Franz; Hergarten, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The topographic evolution of the eastern Southern Alps (ESA) is controlled by the Late Oligocene - Early Miocene indentation of the Adriatic microplate into an overthickened orogenic wedge emplaced on top of the European plate. Rivers follow topographic gradients that evolve during continental collision and in turn incise into bedrock counteracting the formation of topography. In principle, erosional surface processes tend to establish a topographic steady state so that an interpretation of topographic metrics in terms of the latest tectonic history should be straightforward. However, a series of complications impede deciphering the topographic record of the ESA. The Pleistocene glaciations locally excavated alpine valleys and perturbed fluvial drainages. The Late Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean Sea and the uplift of the northern Molasse Basin led to significant base level changes in the far field of the ESA and the Eastern Alps (EA), respectively. Among this multitude of mechanisms, the processes that dominate the current topographic evolution of the ESA and the ESA-EA drainage divide have not been identified and a number of questions regarding the interaction of crustal deformation, erosion and climate in shaping the present-day topography remain. We demonstrate the expected topographic effects of each mechanism in a 1-dimensional model and compare them with observed channel metrics. Modern uplift rates are largely consistent with long-term exhumation in the ESA and with variations in the normalized steepness index (ksn) indicating a stable uplift and erosion pattern since Miocene times. We find that ksn increases with uplift rate and declines from the indenter tip in the northwest to the foreland basin in the southeast. The number and magnitude of knickpoints and the distortion in longitudinal channel profiles similarly decrease towards the east. Most knickpoints probably evolved during Pleistocene glaciation cycles, but may represent the incrementally

  19. Airborne measurements of organosulfates over the continental U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Froyd, Karl D; Murphy, Daniel M; Keutsch, Frank N; Yu, Ge; Wennberg, Paul O; St Clair, Jason M; Crounse, John D; Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Jimenez, Jose L; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A; Hu, Weiwei; Ryerson, Thomas B; Pollack, Ilana B; Peischl, Jeff; Anderson, Bruce E; Ziemba, Luke D; Blake, Donald R; Meinardi, Simone; Diskin, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfates are important secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components and good tracers for aerosol heterogeneous reactions. However, the knowledge of their spatial distribution, formation conditions, and environmental impact is limited. In this study, we report two organosulfates, an isoprene-derived isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) (2,3-epoxy-2-methyl-1,4-butanediol) sulfate and a glycolic acid (GA) sulfate, measured using the NOAA Particle Analysis Laser Mass Spectrometer (PALMS) on board the NASA DC8 aircraft over the continental U.S. during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). During these campaigns, IEPOX sulfate was estimated to account for 1.4% of submicron aerosol mass (or 2.2% of organic aerosol mass) on average near the ground in the southeast U.S., with lower concentrations in the western U.S. (0.2–0.4%) and at high altitudes (<0.2%). Compared to IEPOX sulfate, GA sulfate was more uniformly distributed, accounting for about 0.5% aerosol mass on average, and may be more abundant globally. A number of other organosulfates were detected; none were as abundant as these two. Ambient measurements confirmed that IEPOX sulfate is formed from isoprene oxidation and is a tracer for isoprene SOA formation. The organic precursors of GA sulfate may include glycolic acid and likely have both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. Higher aerosol acidity as measured by PALMS and relative humidity tend to promote IEPOX sulfate formation, and aerosol acidity largely drives in situ GA sulfate formation at high altitudes. This study suggests that the formation of aerosol organosulfates depends not only on the appropriate organic precursors but also on emissions of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide (SO2), which contributes to aerosol acidity. Key Points IEPOX sulfate is an isoprene SOA tracer at acidic and low NO conditions Glycolic acid sulfate

  20. Can we estimate molluscan abundance and biomass on the continental shelf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Eric N.; Mann, Roger; Ashton-Alcox, Kathryn A.; Kuykendall, Kelsey M.; Chase Long, M.

    2017-11-01

    Few empirical studies have focused on the effect of sample density on the estimate of abundance of the dominant carbonate-producing fauna of the continental shelf. Here, we present such a study and consider the implications of suboptimal sampling design on estimates of abundance and size-frequency distribution. We focus on a principal carbonate producer of the U.S. Atlantic continental shelf, the Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima. To evaluate the degree to which the results are typical, we analyze a dataset for the principal carbonate producer of Mid-Atlantic estuaries, the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, obtained from Delaware Bay. These two species occupy different habitats and display different lifestyles, yet demonstrate similar challenges to survey design and similar trends with sampling density. The median of a series of simulated survey mean abundances, the central tendency obtained over a large number of surveys of the same area, always underestimated true abundance at low sample densities. More dramatic were the trends in the probability of a biased outcome. As sample density declined, the probability of a survey availability event, defined as a survey yielding indices >125% or sample accessed about 0.001-0.004% of the domain, 8-15 random samples were required to reduce the probability of a survey availability event below 40%. The problem of differential bias, in which the probabilities of a biased-high and a biased-low survey index were distinctly unequal, was resolved with fewer samples than the problem of overall bias. These trends suggest that the influence of sampling density on survey design comes with a series of incremental challenges. At woefully inadequate sampling density, the probability of a biased-low survey index will substantially exceed the probability of a biased-high index. The survey time series on the average will return an estimate of the stock that underestimates true stock abundance. If sampling intensity is increased

  1. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Initiation of continental accretion: metamorphic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Conand; Frederic, Mouthereau; Gianreto, Manatschal; Adbeltif, Lahfid

    2017-04-01

    The physical processes involved at the beginning of the continental collision are largely unknown because they are transient and therefore hardly identifiable from the rock record. Despite the importance of key parameters for understanding mountain building processes, especially the formation of deep mountain roots and their impacts on earthquakes nucleation, rock/fluid transfers and oil/gas resources in the continental crust, observations from the earliest collision stages remain fragmentary. Here, we focus on the example of Taiwan, a young and active mountain belt where the transition from oceanic subduction, accretion of the first continental margin to mature collision can be followed in space and time. We present preliminary results and provide key questions regarding the reconstruction of time-pressure-temperature paths of rocks & fluids to allow discriminating between rift-related thermal/rheological inheritance and burial/heating phases during convergence. Previous studies have focused on peak temperatures analyzed by Raman Spectrometry of Carbonaceous Matter from the deeper structural layers exposed in the Central Range of Taiwan. In the pre-rift sediments, these studies reported a positive gradient from West to Est, and values from directly be interpreted in terms of syn-convergence nappe stacking only and must reflect a component of initial (pre-collisional) high-geothermal gradients (up to 60°C/km) known in the region, and higher temperature closer to the pre-rift units. Cross sections and maps with high resolution peak temperatures are in process as well as pressure estimations to determine how the sediments were metamorphosed. In addition to this work, we report a few inherited temperatures in the 390-570 °C range, indicating recycling of organic matter from metasediments that recorded HT events, likely originated from higher grade metamorphic units of mainland China, which have been eroded and deposited in the post-rift sediments.

  3. Crew coordination concepts: Continental Airlines CRM training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Darryl; Morgan, Alice

    1987-01-01

    The outline of the crew coordination concepts at Continental airlines is: (1) Present relevant theory: Contained in a pre-work package and in lecture/discussion form during the work course, (2) Discuss case examples: Contained in the pre-work for study and use during the course; and (3) Simulate practice problems: Introduced during the course as the beginning of an ongoing process. These concepts which are designed to address the problem pilots have in understanding the interaction between situations and their own theories of practice are briefly discussed.

  4. Impending conservation crisis for Southeast Asian amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jodi; Brown, Rafe; Bain, Raoul; Kusrini, Mirza; Inger, Robert; Stuart, Bryan; Wogan, Guin; Thy, Neang; Chan-ard, Tanya; Trung, Cao Tien; Diesmos, Arvin; Iskandar, Djoko T.; Lau, Michael; Ming, Leong Tzi; Makchai, Sunchai; Truong, Nguyen Quang; Phimmachak, Somphouthone

    2010-01-01

    With an understudied amphibian fauna, the highest deforestation rate on the planet and high harvesting pressures, Southeast Asian amphibians are facing a conservation crisis. Owing to the overriding threat of habitat loss, the most critical conservation action required is the identification and strict protection of habitat assessed as having high amphibian species diversity and/or representing distinctive regional amphibian faunas. Long-term population monitoring, enhanced survey efforts, collection of basic biological and ecological information, continued taxonomic research and evaluation of the impact of commercial trade for food, medicine and pets are also needed. Strong involvement of regional stakeholders, students and professionals is essential to accomplish these actions. PMID:20007165

  5. Impending conservation crisis for Southeast Asian amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jodi; Brown, Rafe; Bain, Raoul; Kusrini, Mirza; Inger, Robert; Stuart, Bryan; Wogan, Guin; Thy, Neang; Chan-Ard, Tanya; Trung, Cao Tien; Diesmos, Arvin; Iskandar, Djoko T; Lau, Michael; Ming, Leong Tzi; Makchai, Sunchai; Truong, Nguyen Quang; Phimmachak, Somphouthone

    2010-06-23

    With an understudied amphibian fauna, the highest deforestation rate on the planet and high harvesting pressures, Southeast Asian amphibians are facing a conservation crisis. Owing to the overriding threat of habitat loss, the most critical conservation action required is the identification and strict protection of habitat assessed as having high amphibian species diversity and/or representing distinctive regional amphibian faunas. Long-term population monitoring, enhanced survey efforts, collection of basic biological and ecological information, continued taxonomic research and evaluation of the impact of commercial trade for food, medicine and pets are also needed. Strong involvement of regional stakeholders, students and professionals is essential to accomplish these actions.

  6. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, P. A.; Marler, Clayton Fay

    2001-03-01

    Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.

  7. Continental cement trial burn strategy follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodford, J. [Gossman Consulting, Inc., Springboro, OH (United States); Winders, H. [Continental Cement Company, Hannibal, MO (United States); Constans, D.L. [Gossman Consulting, Inc., Peachtree City, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Continental Trial Burn strategy, presented at the 1995 BIF Conference, included the use of {open_quotes}data-in-lieu-of{close_quotes} from previous compliance testing conducted at the facility. Since the submission of the Trial Burn Plan and the 1995 presentation, Continental Cement has completed their two campaign trial burn. This paper will update the implementation of the Continental Trial Burn strategy. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. A vision for a continental energy strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R. [Borden Ladner Gervais LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada); Tobin, B. [Fraser Milner Casgrain LLP. Toronto, ON (Canada); Angevine, G. [Angevine Economic Consulting Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Fryer, K.; Martin, L.T. [Fraser Inst., Vancouver, BC (Canada)] (eds.)

    2008-02-15

    This paper presented a vision with respect to a continental energy strategy and the principles and goals that must underlie such a strategy. These principles include relying on signals emanating from energy markets to guide investment; limiting the role of government to that of ensuring that the policy and institutional framework is conducive to the development and operation of competitive and innovative energy markets; and ensuring free and open energy trade in energy commodities, both within the continent and with the rest of the world. The paper also identified a number of important factors that, would shape and condition continental energy development and trade. The paper provided an overview of the North American energy use and supply situation for the following resources: oil; natural gas; electricity; coal; nuclear power; hydroelectricity; geothermal energy; wind power; solar power; and ethanol. It also discussed the contribution of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) through increased natural gas exports. It was concluded that given the petroleum resources of the three countries and their increased value because of higher oil and gas prices, there was considerable incentive for Canada, the United States, and Mexico to streamline regulations in order to facilitate the efficient development, transportation, and use of the continent's energy resources in accordance with market conditions. 38 refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs.

  9. The Mediterranean Water content in the Northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Angela; Bashmachnikov, Igor; Neves, Filipe

    2014-05-01

    Distribution of the Mediterranean Water (MW) in the subtropical Northeast Atlantic [20-50o N, 5-40o W] was studied using Optimum Multiparameter analysis (OMP) applied to the World Ocean Atlas (http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/) and MEDTRANS climatologies (http://co.fc.ul.pt/en/). The areas of influence of water masses in the study region were obtained from literature and from analysis of individual TS-diagrams. The analysis permitted to divide the water column between 500 to 2000 m into 5 vertical layers. The boundaries of the layers separated different expected sets of the dominant water masses; their depth varied across the study region. For the OMP we used the following water masses: the central fraction of the North Atlantic Central Water (H), the lower fraction of the North Atlantic Central Water (NACWl), the Mediterranean Water (MW), the Sub-Artic Intermediate Water (SAIW), the modified Antarctic Intermediate Water (AA), the Labrador Sea Water (LSW) and the upper fraction of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADWu). The characteristics of the water masses were obtained from Perez et al. (2001), Alvarez et al. (2004) and Barbero et al. (2010), taken at the places where the water masses entered the study region. For each of the layers and each of the grid-points OMP was applied for estimation of the percentage of the each of the water masses in the observed mixture. The analysis of sensitivity of the results to the definition of water mass proprieties showed that their percentages were derived within the average error of 10%. The percentages of water masses obtained in this study compared well with the previous OMP results at some individual sections across our region (Hinrichsen and Tomczak, 1993; Alvarez et al., 2004 and Barbero et al., 2010). In this work we specifically focused on distribution of the MW. The results showed that the MW reached its maximum of 50% at 1200 m depth in the Gulf of Cadiz. The percentage decreased to about 40% along the Iberian continental

  10. A relatively reduced Hadean continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaozhi; Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    Among the physical and chemical parameters used to characterize the Earth, oxidation state, as reflected by its prevailing oxygen fugacity (fO2), is a particularly important one. It controls many physicochemical properties and geological processes of the Earth's different reservoirs, and affects the partitioning of elements between coexisting phases and the speciation of degassed volatiles in melts. In the past decades, numerous studies have been conducted to document the evolution of mantle and atmospheric oxidation state with time and in particular the possible transition from an early reduced state to the present oxidized conditions. So far, it has been established that the oxidation state of the uppermost mantle is within ±2 log units of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer, probably back to ~4.4 billion years ago (Ga) based on trace-elements studies of mantle-derived komatiites, kimberlites, basalts, volcanics and zircons, and that the O2 levels of atmosphere were initially low and rose markedly ~2.3 Ga known as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), progressively reaching its present oxidation state of ~10 log units above QFM. In contrast, the secular evolution of oxidation state of the continental crust, an important boundary separating the underlying upper mantle from the surrounding atmosphere and buffering the exchanges and interactions between the Earth's interior and exterior, has rarely been addressed, although the presence of evolved crustal materials on the Earth can be traced back to ~4.4 Ga, e.g. by detrital zircons. Zircon is a common accessory mineral in nature, occurring in a wide variety of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, and is almost ubiquitous in crustal rocks. The physical and chemical durability of zircons makes them widely used in geochemical studies in terms of trace-elements, isotopes, ages and melt/mineral inclusions; in particular, zircons are persistent under most crustal conditions and can survive many secondary

  11. Witches in the Atlantic World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslaw, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that focuses on witchcraft in the Atlantic world. Describes each of the four sections of the lesson that encompasses learning about terms and religious views on witchcraft to the history of witchcraft in New England, in the United States, and the Salem (Massachusetts) witchcraft trials. (CMK)

  12. The life cycle of continental rifts: Numerical models of plate tectonics and mantle convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon

    2017-04-01

    persist until break-up is achieved and often reduce several tens of millions of years after continental separation. By illustrating the geodynamic connection between subduction dynamics and rift evolution, our results allow new interpretations of plate tectonic reconstructions. Rift acceleration during the transition from phase 1 to phase 2 induces elevated convergence rates at the opposite side of the continents. This leads to enhanced subduction velocities, e.g. between North America and the Farallon plate 200 million years ago, or to the closure of potential back-arc basins such as in the proto-Andean ranges of South America. Post-rift deceleration occurs when the global plate system re-equilibrates after the phase of enhanced stress during continental rupture. This phenomenon of a plate slow-down after mechanical rupture occurred in the real-world aftermath of Australia-Antarctica separation, South Atlantic opening, and North Atlantic break-up.

  13. Demand management implementation in Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaboriboon, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The need to apply transportation system management, to developing countries is urgent. Attempts to alleviate severe traffic congestion in their metropolises have so far failed to provide adequate solutions. The countries are faced with many difficulties because of the lack of sufficient financial resources together with their complex internal administrative and political problems. They are incapable of providing sufficient road space to cope with the escalating demand in private automobiles. This has led to excessive delays in urban traveling, environmental pollution problems, decline of road-based public transit services and deterioration of the quality of life in these metropolises. Demand management, in use for decades in the Western world, has also been recognized in Singapore`s famous area licensing scheme (ALS) making other Southeast Asian Metropolises aware of its advantages as an alternative in solving their chaotic traffic problems. However, realization is far different from implementation and still many metropolises are not able to apply the technique. Singapore and Thailand, two leaders among many other Southeast Asian regions in economics, tourism, trade and industry handle their problems far differently, especially the traffic congestion problem. While a number of demand management schemes have been implemented successfully in Singapore since 1975, Bangkok is still struggling to implement such measures to alleviate severe traffic congestion problems. This article intends to high light the successful practices and unsuccessful attempts of demand management techniques applied in Singapore and Bangkok.

  14. Thermal history and evolution of the Rio de Janeiro - Barbacena section of the southeastern Brazilian continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri Gezatt, Julia; Stephenson, Randell; Macdonald, David

    2015-04-01

    formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The preliminary results add to the growing thermochronological data base for the southeastern Brazilian continental margin and to deciphering the complex evolution of the region, as well as to the knowledge about the development and evolution of divergent continental margins in general. In a regional setting, AFT ages from this study, though not broadly variant locally, are distinct from basement rock AFT ages for adjacent areas produced by other authors along the southeastern continental margin. Similar ages are found at the southern Bocaina Plateau, for example, where structural control of age distribution is evident. Such regional thermal age difference has been previously attributed to continental scale structural compartmentalization throughout the continental passive margin, related to Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic reactivation of the E-W fracture zones linked to rifting of the South Atlantic. The present AFT results are compatible with Late Cretaceous reactivation but show no relation with younger events.

  15. Generation of continental crust in intra-oceanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Kelemen, P. B.; Everson, E. D.; Holbrook, W. S.; Vance, E.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of continental crust is still an unsolved mystery in the evolution of our planet. Although the best candidates to produce juvenile continental crust are intra-oceanic arcs these systems are dominated by basaltic lavas, and when silicic magmas are produced, the incompatible-element compositions are generally too depleted to be a good match for continental crust estimates. Others, such as the W. Aleutians, are dominated by andesitic melts with trace element compositions similar to average continental crust. In order to evaluate which intra-oceanic arcs produced modern continental crust, we developed a geochemical continental index (CI) through a statistical analysis that compared all available data from modern intra-oceanic arcs with global estimates of continental crust. Our results suggest that magmas from Costa Rica (tracks. Iwo-Jima and Vanuatu are in a similar tectonic scenario with subducting intraplate seamounts. Melts from the subducting oceanic crust are thought to significantly control the geochemical signature in the W. Aleutians and Panama. In the L. Antilles and E. Aleutians the continental signature may reflect recycling of a component derived from subducting continental sediments. Most of Izu-Bonin, Marianas, S. Scotia and Tonga arcs with a CI >100 have the least continent-like geochemical signatures. In these arcs the subducting plate is old (>100 Ma), not overprinted by enriched intraplate volcanism and the geochemistry may be dominated by slab-derived, aqueous fluids. We also found a strong correlation between the CI and average crustal P-wave velocity, validating the geochemical index with the available seismic data for intra-oceanic arcs. In conclusion, the production of young continental crust with compositions similar to Archean continental crust is an unusual process, limited to locations where there are especially voluminous partial melts of oceanic crust.

  16. Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For Southeast Asian countries, this is a new framework for approaching governance and decision-making, and one that requires sustained support. Partnership for urban climate resilience. The objective of the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership is to enhance the ability of cities to adapt at the economic ...

  17. Supporting Healthier Food Policies in Southeast Asia | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nearly one-quarter of the world's non-communicable disease deaths take place in Southeast Asia. This project will seek to address the problem through research on how policies can shape healthy food environments. Death and disease in Southeast Asia The problem of non-communicable disease deaths in the region is ...

  18. Prevalence of HIV infection among premarital couples in southeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Catholic Church in Nigeria offers premarital HIV screening to couples, yet instances of voluntary screening are rare in southeast Nigeria. This study examines the contribution of such tests to HIV detection, and evaluates the prevalence of HIV infection in southeast Nigeria among couples who are planning to marry.

  19. 7 CFR 1007.2 - Southeast marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Southeast marketing area. 1007.2 Section 1007.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating...

  20. Southeast Asian Women of Chinese Ancestry: New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Fernie; Lundquist, Gerald W.

    1980-01-01

    Background and historical information regarding adaptation assimilation of Chinese women to living in Southeast Asia includes details of Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, socialization factors affecting identity and change, and language education. (Journal availability: National Dissemination and Assessment Center, California State…

  1. Corporate governance and corruption : A comparative study of Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijayati, Nureni; Hermes, Niels; Holzhacker, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The weak corporate governance framework in Indonesia, as in other countries in Southeast Asia, was deemed a crucial factor in deepening the financial and economic crisis in the late 1990s. Over a decade after the 1997 Asian financial crisis, Indonesia and other Southeast Asian countries have made

  2. Doctor-Patient Communication in Southeast Asia: A Different Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative…

  3. Synoptic controls on ozone over the northeastern U.S. and continental export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Jennifer D.

    This dissertation focused on the impact of circulation, a key climate variable, on air quality from regional to global scale. The relationships between circulation and tropospheric ozone (O3) levels were investigated for the surface over the northeastern U.S. as well as for the spring-, winter- and summertime North American export and trans-Atlantic Transport. The latter studies utilized the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) retrievals of O3 and carbon monoxide (CO) to explore the three-dimensional structure of continental outflow and to identify anthropogenic influence on the free troposphere over the remote oceanic region. The key findings are summarized as follows. First, the most common among the top five circulation patterns across the northeastern U.S. for summers 2000-2004, identified with a correlation-based synoptic categorization technique, was associated with stagnant warm conditions that were intimately associated with occurrence of high O3. O 3 varied on an interannual timescale from a mean daily maximum value of 64 ppbv in 2002 to 52 ppbv in 2004. The sea level pressure (SLP) system intensity and frequency of each map type accounted for 46% of the interannual variability. The remainder was possibly due to non-linear relationships between climate and biogenic emissions and decreasing power plant emissions over the analysis period. Second, during spring continental export was evident from enhanced O3 (>55 ppbv) and CO (>115 ppbv) at the 681 hPa retrieval level suggesting anthropogenic influence. The export was found to be facilitated by both the primary and secondary branches of the warm conveyor belt (WCB) of cyclones which lofted pollutants from the continental boundary layer to the free troposphere enabling fast long distance transport with subsequent global impact. Ample evidence suggested stratospheric intrusions associated with cyclonic circulations particularly to the north of 45°N. Third, during winter the O3 levels at 681 hPa were

  4. Estimation of continental 187Os/186Os values by using 187Os/186Os and 143Nd/144Nd ratios in marine manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turekian, Karl K.; Luck, Jean-Marc

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between 187Os/186Os and 143Nd/144Nd in different manganese nodule fields is used to determine the 187Os/186Os ratio of the continental terrains bounding the major ocean basins. The Atlantic Ocean drainages yield 187Os/186Os of about 11; the Pacific Ocean, between 25 and 36; and the western Indian Ocean, 20. By assuming a two-component continental crust composed of “ultramafic rocks” (high Os concentration, low 187Os/186Os) and “granite” with only radiogenic 187Os produced in accessory Re-bearing molybdenite, the ultramafic contribution to weathering is about 0.2%. Some or most of this may come from the alteration of oceanic ultramafics. PMID:16578780

  5. Estimation of continental Os/Os values by using Os/Os and Nd/Nd ratios in marine manganese nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turekian, K K; Luck, J M

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between (187)Os/(186)Os and (143)Nd/(144)Nd in different manganese nodule fields is used to determine the (187)Os/(186)Os ratio of the continental terrains bounding the major ocean basins. The Atlantic Ocean drainages yield (187)Os/(186)Os of about 11; the Pacific Ocean, between 25 and 36; and the western Indian Ocean, 20. By assuming a two-component continental crust composed of "ultramafic rocks" (high Os concentration, low (187)Os/(186)Os) and "granite" with only radiogenic (187)Os produced in accessory Re-bearing molybdenite, the ultramafic contribution to weathering is about 0.2%. Some or most of this may come from the alteration of oceanic ultramafics.

  6. Subduction of lower continental crust beneath the Pamir imaged by receiver functions from the seismological TIPAGE network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. M.; Yuan, X.; Schurr, B.; Mechie, J.; Sippl, C.; Kufner, S.; Haberland, C. A.; Minaev, V.; Oimahmadov, I.; Gadoev, M.; Abdybachaev, U.; Orunbaev, S.

    2013-12-01

    As the northwestern promontory of the Tibetan Plateau, the Pamir forms an outstanding part of the India-Asia convergence zone. The Pamir plateau has an average elevation of more than 4000 m surrounded by peaks exceeding 7000 m at its northern, eastern and southern borders. The Pamir is thought to consist of the same collage of continental terranes as Tibet. However, in this region the Indian-Asian continental collision presents an extreme situation since, compared to Tibet, in the Pamir a similar amount of north-south convergence has been accommodated within a much smaller distance. The Pamir hosts a zone of intermediate depth earthquakes being the seismic imprint of Earth's most spectacular active intra-continental subduction zone. We present receiver function (RF) images from the TIPAGE seismic profile giving evidence that the intermediate depth seismicity is situated within a subducted layer of lower continental crust: We observe a southerly dipping 10-15 km thick low-velocity zone (LVZ), that starts from the base of the crust and extends to a depth of more than 150 km enveloping the intermediate depth earthquakes that have been located with high precision from our local network records. In a second northwest to southeast cross section we observe that towards the western Pamir the dip direction of the LVZ bends to the southeast following the geometry of the intermediate depth seismic zone. Our observations imply that the complete arcuate intermediate depth seismic zone beneath the Pamir traces a slab of subducting Eurasian continental lower crust. These observations provide important implications for the geodynamics of continental collision: First, it shows that under extreme conditions lower crust can be brought to mantle depths despite its buoyancy, a fact that is also testified by the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Recent results from teleseismic tomography show a signal of Asian mantle lithosphere down to 600 km depth, implying a great

  7. Quantifying sedimentation in extensional basins and magmatism during continental collision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrić, N.

    2017-01-01

    Continental collision is one of the main tectonic processes responsible for the formation of mountain ranges and plays an important role in the overall crustal growth, i.e. in the creation of new crust. Understanding the processes operating during continental collision demands an integrated approach

  8. Crustal growth at active continental margins: Numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370618947; Gerya, Taras; Castro, Antonio

    The dynamics and melt sources for crustal growth at active continental margins are analyzed by using a 2D coupled petrological–thermomechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction zone. This model includes spontaneous slab retreat and bending, dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous

  9. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory of...

  10. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory of...

  11. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust territories...

  12. Temporal change in fragmentation of continental US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Wickham; Kurt H. Riitters; Timothy G. Wade; Collin Homer

    2008-01-01

    Changes in forest ecosystem function and condition arise from changes in forest fragmentation. Previous studies estimated forest fragmentation for the continental United States (US). In this study, new temporal land-cover data from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) were used to estimate changes in forest fragmentation at multiple scales for the continental US....

  13. Morphometric interpretation of the northwest and southeast slopes of Tenerife, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    occurs within the deposit. Although the avalanche and associated debris flow surfaces on the northwest slope appear pristine, being only partially covered by lava flow from a volcano in one of the channels, those on the southeast slope are partially buried by postfailure volcanics and detrital sediments. At the distal end of the slope failure masses, there are extensive fans. On the southeast slope these depocenters were reworked into a sediment drift field of northeast trending ridges by the southerly flowing North Atlantic Deep Water. On the surfaces of the fans off the northwest slope, there are exotic blocks transported downslope from their original positions either by riding on the surface of the highly dense debris avalanche or by being transported within the avalanche itself.

  14. Different modes of continental break-up triggered by a sole mantle plume: a 2D and 3D numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniest, Anouk; Koptev, Alexander; Leroy, Sylvie; Burov, Evgueni

    2017-04-01

    We used 2D and 3D numerical models to investigate the impact of a single mantle plume on continental rifting and breakup processes. We varied the thermo-rheological structure of the continental lithosphere, its geometry and the initial plume position. Based on the results of our 2D experiments, three continental break-up modes can be distinguished: A) 'central' continental break-up, the break-up center is located directly above the original mantle anomaly position, B) 'shifted' break-up, the break-up center is 50 to 200 km displaced from the initial plume location and C) 'distant' break-up, due to convection and/or slab-subduction/delamination, the break-up center is considerably shifted (300 to 800 km) from the primary plume position. Our 3D model, with a laterally homogeneous initial setup also results in continental break-up with the axis of continental break-up hundreds of kilometers shifted from the original plume location. The model results show that the classical, 'central' view of mantle plume induced continental break-up is not the only mode of break-up. When considering a diversity of break-up styles, it is possible to explain a variety of observed geophysical and geological features. For example, the mantle material glued to the base of the lithosphere at shallower depths corresponds geometrically and location-wise to high-velocity/high-density bodies observed on seismic data below the thinned continental lithosphere and the transition zone of the South Atlantic domain. During migration, products of partial melting of the mantle material can move vertically to (shallow) lower crustal levels. They might resemble high density bodies observed at lower crustal levels inside continental crust with similar geometries observed with gravity modelling. Also, topographic variation form in the very early stages of rifting on the first impingement of upwelled plume material. These variations remain visible, as the final position of the spreading center is shifted

  15. Continental Transform Boundaries: Tectonic Evolution and Geohazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Steckler

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Continental transform boundaries cross heavily populated regions, and they are associated with destructive earthquakes,for example, the North Anatolian Fault (NAFacross Turkey, the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault in Haiti,the San Andreas Fault in California, and the El Pilar fault in Venezuela. Transform basins are important because they are typically associated with 3-D fault geometries controlling segmentation—thus, the size and timing of damaging earthquakes—and because sediments record both deformation and earthquakes. Even though transform basins have been extensively studied, their evolution remains controversial because we don’t understand the specifics about coupling of vertical and horizontal motions and about the basins’long-term kinematics. Seismic and tsunami hazard assessments require knowing architecture and kinematics of faultsas well as how the faults are segmented.

  16. Effects of cumulus parameterization closures on simulations of summer precipitation over the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Fengxue; Liang, Xin-Zhong

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of five cumulus closure assumptions on simulations of summer precipitation in the continental U.S. by utilizing an ensemble cumulus parameterization (ECP) that incorporates multiple alternate closure schemes into a single cloud model formulation. Results demonstrate that closure algorithms significantly affect the summer mean, daily frequency and intensity, and diurnal variation of precipitation, with strong regional dependence. Overall, the vertical velocity (W) closure produces the smallest summer mean biases, while the moisture convergence (MC) closure most realistically reproduces daily variability. Both closures have advantages over others in simulating U.S. daily rainfall frequency distribution, though both slightly overestimate intense rain events. The MC closure is superior at capturing summer rainfall amount, daily variability, and heavy rainfall frequency over the Central U.S., but systematically produces wet biases over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region and Southeast U.S., which can be reduced by using the W closure. The instability tendency (TD) and the total instability adjustment (KF) closures are better at capturing observed diurnal signals over the Central U.S. and the NAM, respectively. The results reasonably explain the systematic behaviors of several major cumulus parameterizations. A preliminary experiment combining two optimal closures (averaged moisture convergence and vertical velocity) in the ECP scheme significantly reduced the wet (dry) biases over the Southeast U.S. in the summer of 1993 (2003), and greatly improved daily rainfall correlations over the NAM. Further improved model simulation skills may be achieved in the future if optimal closures and their appropriate weights can be derived at different time scales based on specific climate regimes.

  17. Crustal structure of the Agulhas Ridge (South Atlantic Ocean): Formation above a hotspot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Hagen, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    The southern South Atlantic Ocean contains several features believed to document the traces of hotspot volcanism during the early formation of the ocean basin, namely the Agulhas Ridge and the Cape Rise seamounts located in the southeast Atlantic between 36°S and 50°S. The Agulhas Ridge parallels the Agulhas-Falkland Fracture Zone, one of the major transform zones of the world. The morphology of the ridge changes dramatically from two parallel segments in the southwest, to the broad plateau-like Agulhas Ridge in the northeast. Because the crustal fabric of the ridge is unknown relating its evolution to hotspots in the southeast Atlantic is an open question. During the RV Polarstern cruise ANT-XXIII-5 seismic reflection and refraction data were collected along a 370 km long profile with 8 Ocean Bottom Stations to investigate its crustal fabric. The profile extends in NNE direction from the Agulhas Basin, 60 km south of the Agulhas Ridge, and continues into the Cape Basin crossing the southernmost of the Cape Rise seamounts. In the Cape Basin we found a crustal thickness of 5.5-7.5 km, and a velocity distribution typical for oceanic crust. The Cape Rise seamounts, however, show a higher velocity in comparison to the surrounding oceanic crust and the Agulhas Ridge. Underplated material is evident below the southernmost of the Cape Rise seamounts. It also has a 5-8% higher density compared to the Agulhas Plateau. The seismic velocities of the Agulhas Ridge are lower, the crustal thickness is approximately 14 km, and age dating of dredge samples from its top provides clear evidence of rejuvenated volcanism at around 26 Ma. Seismic data indicate that although the Cape Rise seamounts formed above a mantle thermal anomaly it had a limited areal extent, whereas the hotspot material that formed the Agulhas Ridge likely erupted along a fracture zone.

  18. Prolongation of SMAP to Spatiotemporally Seamless Coverage of Continental U.S. Using a Deep Learning Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kuai; Shen, Chaopeng; Kifer, Daniel; Yang, Xiao

    2017-11-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission has delivered valuable sensing of surface soil moisture since 2015. However, it has a short time span and irregular revisit schedules. Utilizing a state-of-the-art time series deep learning neural network, Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM), we created a system that predicts SMAP level-3 moisture product with atmospheric forcings, model-simulated moisture, and static physiographic attributes as inputs. The system removes most of the bias with model simulations and improves predicted moisture climatology, achieving small test root-mean-square errors (0.87 for over 75% of Continental United States, including the forested southeast. As the first application of LSTM in hydrology, we show the proposed network avoids overfitting and is robust for both temporal and spatial extrapolation tests. LSTM generalizes well across regions with distinct climates and environmental settings. With high fidelity to SMAP, LSTM shows great potential for hindcasting, data assimilation, and weather forecasting.

  19. Ethical Wills – a Continental Law Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Swennen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethical wills are testaments, or planning instruments mortis causa alike, that contain provisions regarding the deceased’s (non-economic values rather than his (economic valuables. The authors define and analyse the substance and form of ethical wills from a comparative Continental law perspective, drawing on Belgian, Dutch, French and German law. The focus primarily is on charges or conditions in restraint or constraint of (non- denominational or family choices by testamentary beneficiaries; and in this context it is contended that both the doctrine of public policy (“ordre public” and the horizontal application of the ECHR extensively restrict testamentary freedom. Nevertheless, the analogous application of estate planning techniques increasingly allows benevolent testators to plan their ethical legacy. Los testamentos éticos son testamentos, similares a instrumentos de planificación mortis causa, que contienen disposiciones relativas a los valores (no económicos del difunto, en lugar de sus objetos de valor (económico. Los autores definen y analizan el contenido y la forma de los testamentos éticos desde una perspectiva comparativa de derecho continental, basada en la legislación belga, holandesa, francesa y alemana. Se centra principalmente en los cargos o las condiciones de restricción o limitación de las opciones (aconfesionales o familiares de los herederos; y en este contexto se afirma que tanto la doctrina de política pública ("ordre public" como la aplicación horizontal del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, restringen ampliamente la libertad testamentaria. Sin embargo, la aplicación análoga de técnicas de planificación y gestión patrimonial y sucesoria, permite cada vez más a los testadores de últimas voluntades planificar su legado ético.

  20. Progress towards Continental River Dynamics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Wei; Zheng, Xing; Liu, Frank; Maidment, Daivd; Hodges, Ben

    2017-04-01

    The high-resolution National Water Model (NWM), launched by U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in August 2016, has shown it is possible to provide real-time flow prediction in rivers and streams across the entire continental United States. The next step for continental-scale modeling is moving from reduced physics (e.g. Muskingum-Cunge) to full dynamic modeling with the Saint-Venant equations. The Simulation Program for River Networks (SPRNT) provides a computational approach for the Saint-Venant equations, but obtaining sufficient channel bathymetric data and hydraulic roughness is seen as a critical challenge. However, recent work has shown the Height Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) method can be applied with the National Elevation Dataset (NED) to provide automated estimation of effective channel bathymetry suitable for large-scale hydraulic simulations. The present work examines the use of SPRNT with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and HAND-derived bathymetry for automated generation of rating curves that can be compared to existing data. The approach can, in theory, be applied to every stream reach in the NHD and thus provide flood guidance where none is available. To test this idea we generated 2000+ rating curves in two catchments in Texas and Alabama (USA). Field data from the USGS and flood records from an Austin, Texas flood in May 2015 were used as validation. Large-scale implementation of this idea requires addressing several critical difficulties associated with numerical instabilities, including ill-posed boundary conditions generated in automated model linkages and inconsistencies in the river geometry. A key to future progress is identifying efficient approaches to isolate numerical instability contributors in a large time-space varying solution. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant number CCF-1331610.

  1. Regional comparison of syn- and post-rift sequences in salt and salt-free basins offshore Brazil and Angola/Namibia, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozyk, Frank; Back, Stefan; Kukla, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The large South Atlantic basins offshore South America and Africa record a highly variable syn- to post-breakup tectono-stratigraphic development. The present-day diversity in the structural and sedimentary architecture of the conjugate margins offshore southern Brazil, Namibia and Angola reflects variations in the interplay of a number of controlling factors, of which the most important are i) the structural configuration of each margin segment at the time of break-up, ii) the post break-up geodynamic history including tectonics and magmatism, and iii) variations in the type, quantity and distribution of sediment input to the respective margin segment. Particularly the basins around the Rio Grande Rise - Walvis Ridge volcanic complex show a pronounced tectono-stratigraphic asymmetry both along the respective continental margin and across the Atlantic. Only a few attempts exist to establish a regional tectono-stratigraphic correlation framework across the South Atlantic Ocean, mainly because of the lack of data across entire margin segments and limited resolution of basin wide geophysics. Still unresolved issues particularly concern the explanation of the basin-specific geological evolution of respective margin segments along the same continental margin, as well as the correlation of conjugate basins and margin segments across the Atlantic Ocean. In our study we present interpretations and first-pass restorations of regional 2D seismic-reflectivity data from the large basins offshore Brazil (Pelotas Basin, Santos Basin, Campos Basin, Espirito Santo Basin), and offshore Namibia and Angola (Walvis Basin, Namibe Basin, Benguela Basin, Kwanza Basin), which represent four adjacent pairs of conjugate basins on both sides of the South Atlantic. Results are used to document and compare on a basin-scale the contrasting styles of rift and post-rift settings during and after the continental breakup.

  2. Enrichments of the mantle sources beneath the Southern Volcanic Zone (Andes) by fluids and melts derived from abraded upper continental crust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Paul Martin; Søager, Nina; Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup

    2014-01-01

    mantle by means of subduction erosion in response to the northward increasingly strong coupling of the converging plates. Both types of enrichment had the same Pb isotope composition in the TSVZ with no significant component derived from the subducting oceanic crust. Pb–Sr–Nd isotopes indicate a major......, was dominated by fluids which enriched a pre-metasomatic South Atlantic depleted MORB mantle type asthenosphere. The second enrichment was by melts having the characteristics of upper continental crust (UCC), distinctly different from Chile trench sediments. We suggest that granitic rocks entered the source...

  3. VARIABILITY OF THE THERMAL CONTINENTALITY INDEX IN CENTRAL EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIARANEK1 DOMINIKA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the spatial and temporal variability of thermal continentality in Central Europe. Gorczyński’s and Johansson-Ringleb’s formulae were used to derive the continentality index. The study also looked at the annual patterns of air temperature amplitude (A, a component of both of these formulae, and D; the difference between the average temperatures of autumn (Sep.-Nov. and spring (Mar.-May. Records of six weather stations representing the climate of Central Europe were included in the study covering the period 1775-2012 (Potsdam, Drezden, Prague, Vienna, Krakow, Debrecen. The highest continentality index was found in Debrecen and the lowest in Potsdam. The continentality index fluctuated with time with two pronounced dips at the turn of the 19th century and in the second half of the 20th century. The highest continentality index values were recorded during the 1930s and 1940s.

  4. The extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J.-M.; Collier, J. S.; Rümpker, G.

    2013-11-01

    The granitic islands of the Seychelles Plateau have long been recognised to overlie continental crust, isolated from Madagascar and India during the formation of the Indian Ocean. However, to date the extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles region remains unknown. This is particularly true beneath the Mascarene Basin between the Seychelles Plateau and Madagascar and beneath the Amirante Arc. Constraining the size and shape of the Seychelles continental fragment is needed for accurate plate reconstructions of the breakup of Gondwana and has implications for the processes of continental breakup in general. Here we present new estimates of crustal thickness and VP/VS from H-κ stacking of receiver functions from a year long deployment of seismic stations across the Seychelles covering the topographic plateau, the Amirante Ridge and the northern Mascarene Basin. These results, combined with gravity modelling of historical ship track data, confirm that continental crust is present beneath the Seychelles Plateau. This is ˜30-33 km thick, but with a relatively high velocity lower crustal layer. This layer thins southwards from ˜10 km to ˜1 km over a distance of ˜50 km, which is consistent with the Seychelles being at the edge of the Deccan plume prior to its separation from India. In contrast, the majority of the Seychelles Islands away from the topographic plateau show no direct evidence for continental crust. The exception to this is the island of Desroche on the northern Amirante Ridge, where thicker low density crust, consistent with a block of continental material is present. We suggest that the northern Amirantes are likely continental in nature and that small fragments of continental material are a common feature of plume affected continental breakup.

  5. Capitalist Development in Contemporary Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juego, Bonn

    2013-01-01

    The study attempts to contribute to an understanding of the political economy of contemporary Southeast Asia in analytical, conceptual, empirical, and theoretical terms. It offers a critical explanation of the historical specificities of capitalist development in the region through a comparative...... examination of the evolution of two diverse domestic socioeconomic formations of the Philippines and Malaysia against the background of neoliberal globalization. It argues that an understanding of the distinctiveness of capitalist development in the region demands an analysis of the structure-agency dynamics...... in global and local accumulation regimes which entails a comprehension of the dialectical relationships (i.e., the interrelations and contradictions) between processes, interests, and forms in/of capitalist accumulation. In particular, the study examines the dialectics between the prevailing process...

  6. The role of Atlantic overturning circulation in the recent decline of Atlantic major hurricane frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Rong; Knutson, Thomas R

    2017-11-22

    Observed Atlantic major hurricane frequency has exhibited pronounced multidecadal variability since the 1940s. However, the cause of this variability is debated. Using observations and a coupled earth system model (GFDL-ESM2G), here we show that the decline of the Atlantic major hurricane frequency during 2005-2015 is associated with a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) inferred from ocean observations. Directly observed North Atlantic sulfate aerosol optical depth has not increased (but shows a modest decline) over this period, suggesting the decline of the Atlantic major hurricane frequency during 2005-2015 is not likely due to recent changes in anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Instead, we find coherent multidecadal variations involving the inferred AMOC and Atlantic major hurricane frequency, along with indices of Atlantic Multidecadal Variability and inverted vertical wind shear. Our results provide evidence for an important role of the AMOC in the recent decline of Atlantic major hurricane frequency.

  7. Southeast regional experiment station. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-05

    This is the final report of the Southeast Regional Experiment Station project. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), a research institute of the University of Central Florida (UCF), has operated the Southeast Regional Experiment Station (SE RES) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since September 1982. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) provides technical program direction for both the SE RES and the Southwest Regional Experiment Station (SW RES) located at the Southwest Technology Development Institute at Las Cruces, New Mexico. This cooperative effort serves a critical role in the national photovoltaic program by conducting system evaluations, design assistance and technology transfer to enhance the cost-effective utilization and development of photovoltaic technology. Initially, the research focus of the SE RES program centered on utility-connected PV systems and associated issues. In 1987, the SE RES began evaluating amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film PV modules for application in utility-interactive systems. Stand-alone PV systems began receiving increased emphasis at the SE RES in 1986. Research projects were initiated that involved evaluation of vaccine refrigeration, water pumping and other stand-alone power systems. The results of this work have led to design optimization techniques and procedures for the sizing and modeling of PV water pumping systems. Later recent research at the SE RES included test and evaluation of batteries and charge controllers for stand-alone PV system applications. The SE RES project provided the foundation on which FSEC achieved national recognition for its expertise in PV systems research and related technology transfer programs. These synergistic products of the SE RES illustrate the high visibility and contributions the FSEC PV program offers to the DOE.

  8. The role of Atlantic overturning circulation in the recent decline of Atlantic major hurricane frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Rong; Knutson, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Observed Atlantic major hurricane frequency has exhibited pronounced multidecadal variability since the 1940s. However, the cause of this variability is debated. Using observations and a coupled earth system model (GFDL-ESM2G), here we show that the decline of the Atlantic major hurricane frequency during 2005–2015 is associated with a weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) inferred from ocean observations. Directly observed North Atlantic sulfate aerosol optical ...

  9. Region-wide synchrony and traveling waves of dengue across eight countries in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Panhuis, Willem G; Choisy, Marc; Xiong, Xin; Chok, Nian Shong; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Lam, Sai K; Chong, Chee K; Lam, Fook C; Phommasak, Bounlay; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Bouaphanh, Khamphaphongphane; Rekol, Huy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Thai, Pham Quang; Duong, Tran Nhu; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang; Liu, Yu-Lun; Ng, Lee-Ching; Shi, Yuan; Tayag, Enrique A; Roque, Vito G; Lee Suy, Lyndon L; Jarman, Richard G; Gibbons, Robert V; Velasco, John Mark S; Yoon, In-Kyu; Burke, Donald S; Cummings, Derek A T

    2015-10-20

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted virus infection that causes epidemics of febrile illness and hemorrhagic fever across the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Annual epidemics are commonly observed, but there is substantial spatiotemporal heterogeneity in intensity. A better understanding of this heterogeneity in dengue transmission could lead to improved epidemic prediction and disease control. Time series decomposition methods enable the isolation and study of temporal epidemic dynamics with a specific periodicity (e.g., annual cycles related to climatic drivers and multiannual cycles caused by dynamics in population immunity). We collected and analyzed up to 18 y of monthly dengue surveillance reports on a total of 3.5 million reported dengue cases from 273 provinces in eight countries in Southeast Asia, covering ∼ 10(7) km(2). We detected strong patterns of synchronous dengue transmission across the entire region, most markedly during a period of high incidence in 1997-1998, which was followed by a period of extremely low incidence in 2001-2002. This synchrony in dengue incidence coincided with elevated temperatures throughout the region in 1997-1998 and the strongest El Niño episode of the century. Multiannual dengue cycles (2-5 y) were highly coherent with the Oceanic Niño Index, and synchrony of these cycles increased with temperature. We also detected localized traveling waves of multiannual dengue epidemic cycles in Thailand, Laos, and the Philippines that were dependent on temperature. This study reveals forcing mechanisms that drive synchronization of dengue epidemics on a continental scale across Southeast Asia.

  10. Survival Of Magnetic Paleoclimatic Signals From Shallow To Deep Water Marine Redoxomorphic Sediments Across The Northwest Iberian Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic properties of marine sediments on the North Atlantic Iberian continental Margin are strongly dependent on the organic matter input to the sediments and the onset of reductive diagenesis. An onshore-offshore gradient in the intensity of early diagenesis was recently described for the Ría de Vigo, matched by similar patterns in the adjacent rias of Pontevedra and Muros. In the ria environments of NW Iberia, early diagenetic dissolution of magnetic minerals can lead to magnetite half-lives of a few decades, and virtually obliterates any paleoenvironmental signal carried by magnetic minerals, rendering magnetic properties especially useful for the study of early diagenesis dynamics. Early diagenesis has also been identified in sediments of the adjacent continental shelf and deeper environments of the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain. However, in these settings, slower dissolution of magnetic minerals allows the preservation of paleoclimatic signatures on different temporal scales. For instance, magnetic properties of continental shelf sediments reveal periods of enhanced rainfall and continental sediment input to the shelf, coincident with the Roman Warm Period and Medieval Climatic Optimum. On the contrary, cold periods are associated with less detrital input. Furthermore, levels of intensified diagenesis are also recorded during cold periods, which have been interpreted as periods of intensified coastal upwelling probably related to long-term North Atlantic Oscillation positive state. At the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain sediments early diagenesis is also pervasive, although a paleoceanographic record of changes in the concentration of magnetic minerals transported by water masses flowing from the Portuguese Margin can still be identified. In addition to the progressive dissolution of magnetic minerals with depth, bulk magnetic properties in these deep marine settings show strong dependence on the pelagic carbonate sedimentation and low

  11. 76 FR 45781 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Meeting of the Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA573 Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Meeting of the Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Advisory Panel AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... meeting. SUMMARY: NMFS will hold a 3-day Atlantic Highly Migratory Species (HMS) Advisory Panel (AP...

  12. 75 FR 44938 - Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Atlantic Coastal Shark Fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... 0648-XX28 Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act Provisions; Atlantic Coastal Shark... cancellation of the Federal moratorium on fishing for Atlantic coastal sharks in the State waters of New Jersey... Sharks (Coastal Shark Plan). DATES: Effective July 30, 2010. ADDRESSES: Emily Menashes, Acting Director...

  13. 76 FR 57709 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Species; Atlantic Shark Management Measures AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... Atlantic shark landings; request for comments. SUMMARY: This notice announces the National Marine Fisheries... Atlantic shark fisheries. NMFS published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on September 20...

  14. 76 FR 67121 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; 2012 Atlantic Shark Commercial Fishing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... Species; 2012 Atlantic Shark Commercial Fishing Season AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... season for the Atlantic commercial shark fisheries. Quotas would be adjusted based on any over- and/or underharvests experienced during the 2010 and 2011 Atlantic commercial shark fishing seasons. In addition, NMFS...

  15. 77 FR 61562 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; 2013 Atlantic Shark Commercial Fishing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Species; 2013 Atlantic Shark Commercial Fishing Season AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... season for the Atlantic commercial shark fisheries. Quotas would be adjusted as allowable based on any over- and/or underharvests experienced during the 2011 and 2012 Atlantic commercial shark fishing...

  16. Suggestions for Teaching the Principles of Continental Drift in the Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, William H.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of current geographic ideas regarding continental drift and plate tectonics and suggests techniques for illustrating continental motions to elementary school pupils. (Author/DB)

  17. Mass wasting on the Orange Cone of the Atlantic Margin, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielies, Anthony; Murphy, Alain; Johnson, Sean; Thovhogi, Tshifhiwa

    2017-04-01

    The South African Atlantic Margin represents the rift-drift passive volcanic margin sequence which records the break-up of Gondwana around 155 Ma and the subsequent opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. The Orange Cone - the morphological expression of the sediment buildout and modification of the continental margin along the southwest African continental margin - has undergone extensive mass failure and slope modification over a protracted period. This failure extends all the way to the present-day toe of the Orange Cone. This paper outlines the data and analysis by South Arica in support of its Submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. South Africa has, in its submission, identified and mapped a considerable number of gravity-driven failure features and deposits as evidence of the Orange Cone being classified as a slope in the sense of Article 76 of UNCLOS. Sediment mass failure, which includes slumping, sliding, mass transport deposits, etc., are known to be continental slope phenomena because they are gravity-driven and thus require a free slope upon which gravitational forces can cause kinetic action. Upper slope failure is ubiquitous on the Orange Cone and has been well documented. The most striking example of slope modification and downslope movement in the upper slope of the Orange Cone/Basin is the paired, gravity-driven deformation system, over 100 km across, with extension high on the submarine slope and contraction toward the toe of slope. The lower slope of the Orange Cone has experienced multiple episodes of failure in the form of glides, slides and debris flows. Failure on the lower slope is highly relevant for the purposes of delineating the foot of the continental slope as the deposition location represents the terminus of the slope processes. These gravity-driven failures are inherently linked to upper slope failure processes although their expression is markedly different. The change in gradients between the upper and

  18. UNIDADES GEOMORFOLÓGICAS DE PORTUGAL CONTINENTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantino Insua Pereira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available São representadas cartograficamente as unidades geomorfológicas identificadas para os 89015 km2 do território de Portugal Continental. A delimitação das unidades teve por base a análise dos padrões da textura fornecida por imagens SRTM, com revisão e adaptação posterior à altimetria e à geologia, para os quais foram usadas bases cartográficas digitais. Foram considerados três níveis taxionómicos que permitem descrever e caracterizar áreas homogéneas do ponto de vista geomorfológico. As três unidades de 1º nível baseiam-se nas unidades morfostruturais clássicas consideradas para a Península Ibérica. As dez unidades de 2º nível constituem, na sua maioria, divisões clássicas do relevo de Portugal Continental, agora agrupadas de acordo com a metodologia adoptada e designadas como unidades morfosculturais. As 56 unidades de 3º nível, ou subunidades morfosculturais, foram individualizadas com base nos padrões de relevo identificados nas imagens SRTM e na observação de campo e adquiriram uma designação baseada essencialmente nas geoformas que as individualizam e na toponímia local. As unidades geomorfológicas identificadas são descritas através de características do relevo, dissecação fluvial, estruturas, tipo de drenagem e base geológica, bem como de parâmetros numéricos gerados de forma automática, como classes de altitude e de declividade. Pretende-se que o mapa elaborado possa contribuir para a gestão territorial, em especial na tomada de decisões em conservação da natureza.

  19. Metamorphic zirconology of continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ren-Xu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Zircon is widely used to date geological events and trace geochemical sources in high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks of continental subduction zones. However, protolith zircons may be modified by three different types of metamorphic recrystallization via mechanisms of solid-state transformation, metasomatic alteration and dissolution reprecipitation; new zircon growth may be induced by dehydration reactions below the wet solidus of crustal rocks (metamorphic zircon) or peritectic reactions above the wet solidus (peritectic zircon). As a consequence, there are different origins of zircon domains in high-grade metamorphic rocks from collisional orogens. Thus, determining the nature of individual zircon domains is substantial to correct interpretation of their origin in studies of isotopic geochronology and geochemical tracing. We advocate an integrated study of zircon mineragraphy (internal structure and external morphology), U-Pb ages, mineral inclusions, trace elements, and Lu-Hf and O isotope compositions. Only in this way we are in a position to advance the simple zircon applications to metamorphic zirconology, enabling discrimination between the different origins of zircon and providing constraints on the property of fluid activity at subduction-zone conditions. The metamorphic recrystallization of protolith zircons and the new growth of metamorphic and peritectic zircons are prominent in HP to UHP metamorphic rocks of collisional orogens. These different types of recrystallized and grown zircons can be distinguished by their differences in element and isotope compositions. While the protolith nature of metamorphosed rocks dictates water availability, the P-T conditions of subduction zones dictate the property of subduction-zone fluids. The fluids of different properties may be produced at different positions of subducting and exhuming crustal slices, and they may physically and chemically mix with each other in continental

  20. Sub-continental transport mechanisms and pathways during two ozone episodes in northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoiti, G.; Albizuri, A.; Alonso, L.; Navazo, M.; Matabuena, M.; Valdenebro, V.; García, J. A.; Millán, M. M.

    2006-05-01

    Two ozone episodes (occurring in June 2001 and June 2003) in the air quality monitoring network of the Basque Country (BC) are analyzed. The population information threshold was exceeded in many stations (urban, urban-background and rural). During this type of episodes, forced by a blocking anticyclone over the British Isles, ozone background concentrations over the area increase after the import of pollution from both, the continental Europe and the western Mediterranean areas (Gangoiti et al., 2002). For the present analysis, emphasis is made in the search for transport mechanisms, pathways and area sources contributing to the build-up of the episodes. Contributions from a selection of 17 urban and industrial conglomerates in the western European Atlantic (WEA) and the western Mediterranean (WM) are shown after the results of a coupled RAMS-HYPACT modelling system. Meteorological simulations are tested against both the high-resolution wind data recorded at the BC coastal area by a boundary layer wind-profiler radar (Alonso et al., 1998) and the wind soundings reported by the National Centres of Meteorology at a selection of European and north-African sites. Results show that during the accumulation phase of the episodes, background ozone concentrations increase in the whole territory as a consequence of transport from the Atlantic coast of France and the British Channel. For the peak phase, intrusions from new sources, located at the Western Mediterranean, Southern France, Ebro Valley, and, occasionally, the area of Madrid are added, resulting in a further increase in the ozone concentrations. Direct day and night transport within the north-easterly winds over the sea from the WEA source region, and night-time transport within the residual layer over continental areas (southern France, the Ebro Valley, and central Iberia) modulate the import sequence of pollutants and the local increase of ozone concentrations. The alternative direct use of low resolution

  1. Sub-continental transport mechanisms and pathways during two ozone episodes in northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gangoiti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Two ozone episodes (occurring in June 2001 and June 2003 in the air quality monitoring network of the Basque Country (BC are analyzed. The population information threshold was exceeded in many stations (urban, urban-background and rural. During this type of episodes, forced by a blocking anticyclone over the British Isles, ozone background concentrations over the area increase after the import of pollution from both, the continental Europe and the western Mediterranean areas (Gangoiti et al., 2002. For the present analysis, emphasis is made in the search for transport mechanisms, pathways and area sources contributing to the build-up of the episodes. Contributions from a selection of 17 urban and industrial conglomerates in the western European Atlantic (WEA and the western Mediterranean (WM are shown after the results of a coupled RAMS-HYPACT modelling system. Meteorological simulations are tested against both the high-resolution wind data recorded at the BC coastal area by a boundary layer wind-profiler radar (Alonso et al., 1998 and the wind soundings reported by the National Centres of Meteorology at a selection of European and north-African sites. Results show that during the accumulation phase of the episodes, background ozone concentrations increase in the whole territory as a consequence of transport from the Atlantic coast of France and the British Channel. For the peak phase, intrusions from new sources, located at the Western Mediterranean, Southern France, Ebro Valley, and, occasionally, the area of Madrid are added, resulting in a further increase in the ozone concentrations. Direct day and night transport within the north-easterly winds over the sea from the WEA source region, and night-time transport within the residual layer over continental areas (southern France, the Ebro Valley, and central Iberia modulate the import sequence of pollutants and the local increase of ozone concentrations. The alternative direct use of low

  2. Quantifying the Relative Impact of Continental Shelf and Storm Characteristics on Nearshore Waves during Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, S.; Birchler, J. J.; Stockdon, H. F.; Thompson, D.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between storm characteristics (such as the size and velocity distribution of the wind field) and the waves they generate is well-understood, as is the dissipation and spectral transformation that occurs to swell and wind waves propagating over broad areas of the continental shelf. However, predicting differences in shallow water storm-wave climate between locations with varying shelf slope and width are more challenging. As a result, quantifying the spatial variability in coastal vulnerability to hurricanes, which along the US East Coast is done for Saffir-Simpson scale categories of hurricanes using the Stockdon run-up model and a simple method for modeling nearshore (20-m) wave height based on a uniform wind field, yields inaccurate results. Understanding differing storm-shelf interactions is also necessary to determine how vulnerability in different areas of the coast will be altered by potential climate-change impacts to storm frequency and intensity. In this study, simple, category-based wave model predictions were compared with deterministic SWAN model runs and observational data for Hurricane Earl (2010) offshore of Puerto Rico (PR) and Hurricane Bonnie (2010) offshore of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). Wave height overestimation by the simple model is exacerbated at PR, where the continental shelf is steep and narrow. Over the wider shelf in the SAB, unrealistically high energy, long period waves are filtered from the spectrum, and the simple model compares relatively well to observations. To examine this effect, wave transformation over different simple shelf configurations was modeled for a suite of idealized storms to develop relationships between nearshore wave parameters and storm and shelf characteristics. These results will be used to improve estimations of coastal vulnerability based on hurricane category, and to determine the spatial variability in nearshore wave response with potential changes in hurricane climatology.

  3. Railroads, roads and lateral disconnection in the river landscapes of the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Paul; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2009-11-01

    Railroads and roads are ubiquitous features in the river corridors of the United States. However, their impact on hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes in fluvial and riparian landscapes has not been systematically explored at regional or continental extents. This study documents the geographic distribution of roads and railroads in the alluvial floodplains of the continental United States and the regional variability of their potential impacts on lateral connectivity and resultant channel and floodplain structure and function. We use national scale data sets and GIS analysis to derive data on stream-transportation network interactions in two broad categories: (1) crossing impacts, such as bridges and culverts, and (2) impacts where transportation infrastructure acts as a longitudinal dam along the stream channel, causing lateral floodplain disconnection. Potential stream crossing impacts are greatest in regions with long histories of road and railroad development and relatively low relief, such as the Mid-Atlantic, New England, and the Lower Mississippi and Ohio Valleys. Potential lateral disconnections are more prevalent in rugged regions such as the Western U.S. and Appalachians where transportation routes follow river corridors along valley bottoms. Based on these results, we develop a conceptual model that suggests that the area of lateral disconnection due to transportation infrastructure should be most extensive in mid-sized alluvial valleys in relatively rugged settings. The result of this disconnection is the disruption of the long-term, cut-and-fill alluviation and of the shorter-term flood and flow pulse processes that create and maintain ecosystem function in river landscapes. The tremendous extent of transportation infrastructure in alluvial valleys documented in this study suggests a revision to H.B.N. Hynes' statement that the valley rules the stream. Instead, it appears that in modern landscapes of the U.S. the valley rules the

  4. A51F-0123: Model Analysis of Tropospheric Aerosol Variability and Sources over the North Atlantic During NAAMES 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Moore, Richard; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard Anthony; Fairlie, Thomas Duncan; Hu, Youngxiang; Chen, Gao; Hair, Johnathan W.; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    The North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES) is a five-year Earth-Venture Suborbital-2 Mission to characterize the plankton ecosystems and their influences on remote marine aerosols, boundary layer clouds, and their implications for climate in the North Atlantic. While marine-sourced aerosols have been shown to make important contributions to surface aerosol loading, cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions, it is still a challenge to differentiate the marine biogenic aerosol signal from the strong influence of continental pollution outflow. We examine here the spatiotemporal variability and quantify the sources of tropospheric aerosols over the North Atlantic during the first two phases (November 2015 and May-June 2016) of NAAMES using a state-of-the-art chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The model is driven by the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) from the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It includes sulfate-nitrate-ammonium aerosol thermodynamics coupled to ozone-NOx-hydrocarbon-aerosol chemistry, mineral dust, sea salt, elemental and organic carbon aerosols, and especially a recently implemented parameterization for the marine primary organic aerosol emission. The simulated aerosols over the North Atlantic are evaluated with available satellite (e.g., MODIS) observations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), and aircraft and ship aerosol measurements. We diagnose transport pathways for continental pollution outflow over the North Atlantic using carbon monoxide, an excellent tracer for anthropogenic pollution transport. We also conduct model perturbation experiments to quantify the relative contributions of terrestrial and oceanic sources to the aerosol loading, AOD, and their variability over the North Atlantic.

  5. Evolution of the continental margin of southern Spain and the Alboran Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, William P.; Robb, James M.; Greene, H. Gary; Lucena, Juan Carlos

    1980-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles and magnetic intensity measurements were collected across the southern continental margin of Spain and the Alboran basin between Spain and Africa. Correlation of the distinct seismic stratigraphy observed in the profiles to stratigraphic information obtained from cores at Deep Sea Drilling Project site 121 allows effective dating of tectonic events. The Alboran Sea basin occupies a zone of motion between the African and Iberian lithospheric plates that probably began to form by extension in late Miocene time (Tortonian). At the end of Miocene time (end of Messinian) profiles show that an angular unconformity was cut, and then the strata were block faulted before subsequent deposition. The erosion of the unconformity probably resulted from lowering of Mediterranean sea level by evaporation when the previous channel between the Mediterranean and Atlantic was closed. Continued extension probably caused the block faulting and, eventually the opening of the present channel to the Atlantic through the Strait of Gibraltar and the reflooding of the Mediterranean. Minor tectonic movements at the end of Calabrian time (early Pleistocene) apparently resulted in minor faulting, extensive transgression in southeastern Spain, and major changes in the sedimentary environment of the Alboran basin. Active faulting observed at five locations on seismic profiles seems to form a NNE zone of transcurrent movement across the Alboran Sea. This inferred fault trend is coincident with some bathymetric, magnetic and seismicity trends and colinear with active faults that have been mapped on-shore in Morocco and Spain. The faults were probably caused by stresses related to plate movements, and their direction was modified by inherited fractures in the lithosphere that floors the Alboran Sea.

  6. Fingerprinting North Atlantic water masses near Iceland using Nd-isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Norbert [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, INF229, Heidelberg (Germany); Waldner, Astrid [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Montagna, Paolo [CNR - ISMAR, Bologna (Italy); Colin, Christophe [IDES, Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Wu, Qiong [State Key Laboratory, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-01

    The radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio of seawater is a valuable tracer of north Atlantic circulation pathways, driven by continental runoff (freshwater and Aeolian dust), boundary exchange and advection and thus mixing patterns. A region of particular interest in the North Atlantic is the overflow across the Iceland-Scotland Ridge injecting water from the Arctic Ocean into the Iceland basin (Iceland Scotland Overflow Water). However, Iceland itself constitutes a local source for Nd due to possible leaching of young volcanic basalts adding radiogenic {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd to seawater. We have conducted an intense survey of physical properties and Nd-isotope composition between Iceland and the Azores that allows to fingerprint different water masses of the North Atlantic through the {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratio and that demonstrates the very local influence of volcanic material to the seawater Nd cycle. A first local transect is achieved from the open ocean to the outflow of the Vatnajoekull glacier. Runoff influences seawater Nd in close vicinity (< 40 km near the outflow). A along shelf transect provide a similar observation. From Iceland to the Azores, however, water masses of the sub-tropical and sub-polar gyre are clearly distinguishable.

  7. Unique common mid-point (cmp) navigation for multi-channel seismic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey on U.S. Atlantic Seaboard in 2014 (Geographic, WGS84, point shapefile 2014-011-FA_mcscmp.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In summer 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 21-day geophysical program in deep water along the Atlantic continental margin by using R/V Marcus G. Langseth...

  8. Breakup of Pangaea and plate kinematics of the central Atlantic and Atlas regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Antonio; Turco, Eugenio

    2009-08-01

    A new central Pangaea fit (type A) is proposed for the late Ladinian (230 Ma), together with a plate motions model for the subsequent phases of rifting, continental breakup and initial spreading in the central Atlantic. This model is based on: (1) a reinterpretation of the process of formation of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly along the eastern margin of North America and the corresponding magnetic anomalies at the conjugate margins of northwest Africa and the Moroccan Meseta; (2) an analysis of major rifting events in the central Atlantic, Atlas and central Mediterranean and (3) a crustal balancing of the stretched margins of North America, Moroccan Meseta and northwest Africa. The process of fragmentation of central Pangaea can be described by three major phases spanning the time interval from the late Ladinian (230 Ma) to the Tithonian (147.7 Ma). During the first phase, from the late Ladinian (230 Ma) to the latest Rhaetian (200 Ma), rifting proceeded along the eastern margin of North America, the northwest African margin and the High, Saharan and Tunisian Atlas, determining the formation of a separate Moroccan microplate at the interface between Gondwana and Laurasia. During the second phase, from the latest Rhaetian (200 Ma) to the late Pliensbachian (185 Ma), oceanic crust started forming between the East Coast and Blake Spur magnetic anomalies, whereas the Morrocan Meseta simply continued to rift away from North America. During this time interval, the Atlas rift reached its maximum extent. Finally, the third phase, encompassing the time interval from the late Pliensbachian (185 Ma) to chron M21 (147.7 Ma), was triggered by the northward jump of the main plate boundary connecting the central Atlantic with the Tethys area. Therefore, as soon as rifting in the Atlas zone ceased, plate motion started along complex fault systems between Morocco and Iberia, whereas a rift/drift transition occurred in the northern segment of the central Atlantic, between Morocco

  9. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  10. Effects of climate oscillations on wildland fire potential in the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Shelby A.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Hamlington, Benjamin D.; Matt Jolly, W.; Hoffman, Chad M.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of climate oscillations on spatial and temporal variations in wildland fire potential in the continental U.S. are examined from 1979 to 2015 using cyclostationary empirical orthogonal functions (CSEOFs). The CSEOF analysis isolates effects associated with the modulated annual cycle and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The results show that, in early summer, wildland fire potential is reduced in the southwest during El Niño but is increased in the northwest, with opposite trends for La Niña. In late summer, El Niño is associated with increased wildland fire potential in the southwest. Relative to the mean, the largest impacts of ENSO are observed in the northwest and southeast. Climate impacts on fire potential due to ENSO are found to be most closely associated with variations in relative humidity. The connections established here between fire potential and climate oscillations could result in improved wildland fire risk assessment and resource allocation.

  11. Stratigraphic landscape analysis, thermochronology and the episodic development of elevated, passive continental margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green, Paul F.

    2013-12-01

    that peneplains grade towards base level, and that in the absence of other options (e.g. widespread resistant lithologies, the most likely base level is sea level. This is particularly so at continental margins due to their proximity to the adjacent ocean. Studies in which EPCMs are interpreted as related to rifting or break-up commonly favour histories involving continuous denudation of margins following rifting, and interpretation of thermochronology data in terms of monotonic cooling histories. However, in several regions, including southern Africa, south-east Australia and eastern Brazil, geological constraints demonstrate that such scenarios are inappropriate, and an episodic development involving post-breakup subsidence and burial followed later by uplift and denudation is more realistic. Such development is also indicated by the presence in sedimentary basins adjacent to many EPCMs of major erosional unconformities within the post-breakup sedimentary section which correlate with onshore denudation episodes. The nature of the processes responsible is not yet understood, but it seems likely that plate-scale forces are required in order to explain the regional extent of the effects involved. New geodynamic models are required to explain the episodic development of EPCMs, accommodating post-breakup subsidence and burial as well as subsequent uplift and denudation, long after break-up which created the characteristic, modern-day EPCM landscapes.

  12. Thinking ethical and regulatory frameworks in medicine from the perspective of solidarity on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prainsack, Barbara; Buyx, Alena

    2016-12-01

    This article provides a concise overview of the history of scholarship on solidarity in Europe and North America. While recent decades have seen an increase in conceptual and scholarly interest in solidarity in North America and other parts of the Anglo-Saxon world, the concept is much more strongly anchored in Europe. Continental European politics in particular have given rise to two of the most influential traditions of solidarity, namely, socialism and Christian ethics. Solidarity has also guided important public instruments and institutions in Europe (e.g., welfare, healthcare, etc.). Despite the much stronger affinity of continental European societies to solidaristic thinking, we argue that solidarity has much to offer for addressing societal challenges on both sides of the Atlantic and beyond. After proposing a working definition of solidarity that highlights its utility for guiding policy and practice, we give an example of how a solidarity-based perspective can shape instruments for the governance of data use.

  13. Southeast Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Southeast...

  14. Geologic Provinces of Southeast Asia, 2000 (prv3bl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons and polygon labels that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined geologic provinces of Southeast Asia (Brunei, Indonesia,...

  15. AFSC/ABL: Southeast Coastal Monitoring Project - CTD database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Alaska Coastal Monitoring (SECM) project in Alaska was initiated in 1997 by the Auke Bay Laboratory, National Marine Fisheries Service, to study the...

  16. Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (PC1402, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fishery-Independent Survey (SEFIS) was created by the National Marine Fisheries Service in 2010 and operates out of the NOAA Beaufort Laboratory. The...

  17. The frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, Patrick L; Newhall, Christopher G; Bradley, Kyle E

    There are ~750 active and potentially active volcanoes in Southeast Asia. Ash from eruptions of volcanic explosivity index 3 (VEI 3) and smaller pose mostly local hazards while eruptions of VEI ≥ 4 could disrupt trade, travel, and daily life in large parts of the region. We classify Southeast Asian volcanoes into five groups, using their morphology and, where known, their eruptive history and degassing style. Because the eruptive histories of most volcanoes in Southeast Asia are poorly constrained, we assume that volcanoes with similar morphologies have had similar eruption histories. Eruption histories of well-studied examples of each morphologic class serve as proxy histories for understudied volcanoes in the class. From known and proxy eruptive histories, we estimate that decadal probabilities of VEI 4-8 eruptions in Southeast Asia are nearly 1.0, ~0.6, ~0.15, ~0.012, and ~0.001, respectively.

  18. DoD Workshop on Southeast Regional Planning and Sustainability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berke, Philip; Brown, Robert; Elliott, Michael; Friday, Paul; Holst, Robert; Weiss, Jonathan; Wilkens, R. N

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings encompass outcomes from the DoD Southeast Regional Planning and Sustainability Workshop, which took place in April 2007, and reflect the opinions and views of workshop participants...

  19. India China Rivalry and Competition in Southeast Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine the implications of these gradual and in some cases opposing shifts in foreign policy of China and India in Southeast Asia. Both countries are increasingly struggling for a hegemonic position in the developing countries and especially in Southeast Asia...... the interrelated variables, inconsistencies and disruptive effects of India's and China’s dramatic rise and insertion into the global political economy and more specifically how this relationship is playing out in Southeast Asia. The paper is divided into five sections. In the introduction the overall historical...... and strategic relationship between India and China has been briefly outlined. Second section recaps the theoretical considerations while part three focuses on China and India’s encroachment into Southeast Asia. Part four gives examples of competition and rivalry in energy and related resources between the two...

  20. South Carolina southeast high speed rail corridor improvement study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    The Southeast Rail Corridor was originally designated as a high-speed corridor in Section 1010 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) of 1991. More specifically, it involved the high-speed grade-crossing improvement program o...