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Sample records for southampton so17 1bj

  1. Temperatures kept cool in Southampton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katey

    2010-03-01

    According to Digitron, hospitals countrywide are seeing the benefits of DigiTrak, the company's automatic wireless temperature monitoring system. Katey McDonald, the company's marketing manager, outlines how the system replaces traditional methods of data collection by providing a single networked package, and describes its use at Southampton General Hospital for blood monitoring, with the help of advanced biomedical scientist and quality officer there Marie Cundall.

  2. Southampton uni's computer whizzes develop "mini" grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    "In a bid to help its students explore the potential of grid computing, the University of Southampton's Computer Science department has developed what it calls a "lightweight grid". The system has been designed to allow students to experiment with grid technology without the complexity of inherent security concerns of the real thing. (1 page)

  3. Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, AS, Taipei 10617, Taiwan. Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30244 Kraków, Poland. University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, UK. University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK. ARIES, Manora Peak, Nainital 263 ...

  4. The Southampton Cauchy-characteristic matching project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Inverno, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Southampton Numerical Relativity Group have set up a long term project concerned with investigating Cauchy-characteristic matching (CCM) codes in numerical relativity. The CCM approach has two distinct features. Firstly, it dispenses with an outer boundary condition and replaces this with matching conditions at an interface residing in the vacuum between the Cauchy and characteristic regions. A successful CCM code leads to a transparent interface and so avoids the spurious reflections which plague most codes employing outer boundary conditions. Secondly, by employing a compactified coordinate, it proves possible to generate global solutions. This means that gravitational waves can be identified unambiguously at future null infinity. To date, cylindrical codes have been developed which have been checked against the exact solutions of Weber-Wheeler, Safier-Stark-Piran and Xanthopoulos. In addition, a cylindrical code has been constructed for investigating dynamic cosmic strings. Recently a master vacuum axi-symmetric CCM code has been completed which consists of four independent modules comprising an interior Cauchy code, an exterior characteristic code together with injection and extraction codes. The main goal of this work is to construct a 3 dimensional code possessing the characteristic, injection and extraction modules which can be attached to an interior code based on a finite grid. Such a code should lead to the construction of more accurate templates which are needed in the search for gravitational waves. (author)

  5. The Evolution of Digital Chemistry at Southampton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Colin; Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we take a historical view of e-Science and e-Research developments within the Chemical Sciences at the University of Southampton, showing the development of several stages of the evolving data ecosystem as Chemistry moves into the digital age of the 21(st) Century. We cover our research on aspects of the representation of chemical information in the context of the world wide web (WWW) and its semantic enhancement (the Semantic Web) and illustrate this with the example of the representation of quantities and units within the Semantic Web. We explore the changing nature of laboratories as computing power becomes increasing powerful and pervasive and specifically look at the function and role of electronic or digital notebooks. Having focussed on the creation of chemical data and information in context, we finish the paper by following the use and reuse of this data as facilitated by the features provided by digital repositories and their importance in facilitating the exchange of chemical information touching on the issues of open and or intelligent access to the data. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  6. Alternative designs of a superconducting synchronous generator: the Southampton approach

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, K.F.; Lukasik, B.; Sykulski, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes various designs undertaken at the University of Southampton for building both cored and coreless superconducting synchronous generators using high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. An overview of electromagnetic and mechanical design issues is presented and scalability is considered. Results are included for the full (original) size machine and extended to a double size unit.

  7. Technology tug-of-war : Statoil v. University of Southampton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2006-12-15

    Statoil is in a legal dispute with the University of Southampton over ownership of a breakthrough technology expected to save the oil and gas industry millions of dollars. Called seabed logging, the technology uses a new electromagnetic imaging technique that allows explorers to confirm the existence of hydrocarbons in deep undersea reservoirs. Statoil has maintained that its staff members originated the technology at a research centre in Norway. Southampton has countered that the university's expertise advanced the technology and made it viable. The method uses electromagnetic signals rather than seismic sound waves to survey subsea sediments, which rapidly attenuate the signal, while hydrocarbon-filled reservoirs attenuate less due to their higher resistivity. Research into the method began in Norway in 1997. Southampton became involved with the research, supplying a deep-towed active source instrument, as well as the necessary receivers. Tests conducted by the university showed strong responses for inline configurations of source and receiver. The Patent Office concluded that all the elements of the concept were invented by Statoil researchers, despite the fact that Southampton applied for the patent before them. However, the Offshore Hydrocarbon Mapping (OHM) plc, a spinoff from the University of Southampton, continues to use the technology, which they claim has been modified in such a way that it no longer resembles the original patent. OHM has had consistent results with the technology, which is being used by oil and gas companies of all sizes. However, Statoil has now launched proceedings against OHM for infringement of one the patents related to seabed logging, claiming that OHM is using the technology in regions in which thy have confirmed patents. 1 fig.

  8. The T-cell receptor beta chain CDR3 region of BV8S1/BJ1S5 transcripts in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naserke, H E; Durinovic-Bellò, I; Seidel, D; Ziegler, A G

    1996-01-01

    We recently described the T-cell receptor (TCR) beta chain CDR3 motif S-SDRLG-NQPQH (BV8S1-BJ1S5) in an islet-specific T-cell clone (K2.12) from a type 1 diabetic patient (AS). A similar motif (RLGNQ) was also reported in a T-cell clone of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice by others. In order to determine the frequency of our motif in selected and unselected T-cell populations, we cloned and sequenced the CDR3 region of BV8S1-BJ1S5 transcripts. These transcripts were derived from unstimulated peripheral blood T lymphocytes from two type 1 diabetic patients (AS and FS) and their non-diabetic sibling (WS), as well as from an islet-specific T-cell line of one of the patients. In addition, we compared the structure and composition of the CDR3 region in BV8S1-BJ1S5 transcripts from peripheral blood T cells between the patients and their non-diabetic sibling (>50 sequences each). We found that 30% of the islet-specific T-cell line cDNA clones expressed the entire sequence-motif, whereas it was absent in the clones of unstimulated peripheral blood T cells from both patients and their non-diabetic sibling. The average length of the CDR3 region was shorter in the patients (mean AS 9.9, FS 9.9, versus WS 10.7, p = 0.0037) and the number of inserted nucleotides in N nucleotide addition at the DJ-junction lower (mean AS 3.5, FS 3. 2, versus WS 5.2, P = diabetic sibling. Moreover, the pattern of amino acid usage in the CDR3 region was dissimilar at positions 5 and 6, where polar amino acids predominated in both diabetic siblings. In contrast, basic amino acids are preferentially used at position 5 in the clones of the non-diabetic sibling. These data provide information on the general structure of the TCR(BV8S1-BJ1S5) CDR3 region in type 1 diabetes and may indicate differences in the amino and nucleic acid composition of the TCR beta chain CDR3 region between two type 1 diabetic patients and their non-diabetic sibling.

  9. The development of labour politics in Southampton 1890 - 1945

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The debate on the development of Labour politics has become more complex and it is accepted that local economic, social and political experiences are crucial to an understanding of the growth of Labour and the decline of the Liberals. The majority of regional and local studies have concentrated on the north or London. This study tries to redress the balance by looking at how and why Labour politics developed in Southampton. The economic background is considered including ...

  10. Exposure of Polish children to Southampton food colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda-Wyrębek, J; Kuźma, K; Świtka, A; Jarecka, J; Beresińska, M; Postupolski, J

    2017-01-01

    A study published in 2007 showed that the intake of six food colours (the so-called 'Southampton colours') may have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children. The present study set out to assess the exposure of Polish children (3 and 8-9 years old, n = 149) to six of the target colours. Two methods were used to evaluate colour consumption by children: scenario 1 using the maximum permitted levels (MPLs) and actual food consumption data; and scenario 2 using the actual levels in food and actual food consumption data. The data on the actual consumption of food containing the colours was collected using a 7-day questionnaire survey. The results of laboratory analysis of food consumed by children provided data on the actual levels of the colours in food. Consumption of the colours estimated by scenario 1 in any case did not exceed the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) of the colours in both age groups of children. For more refined colour intake (scenario 2), isolated cases exceeding the ADI were recorded for four colours, but assuming that manufacturers comply with the current legislation on MPL of colours in food, the intake of the colours assessed in scenario 2 should not be a reason for exceeding of ADIs for the target food colours.

  11. Southampton: A Case Study on Why Academies Are Not the Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The author recounts the arrival of two Oasis Community Learning Academies in Southampton through a process of failed political courage to continue supporting the Local Authority. He tells of the subsequent impact when children and parents react against the regime in one of the Academies. In conclusion he challenges the Labour Government over the…

  12. Population Ecology of Caribou Populations without Predators: Southampton and Coats Island Herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Quellet

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the ecology of two caribou populations inhabiting predator-free northern islands, Coats and Southampton Island. Findings are analyzed in light of the hypothesis that in absence of prédation or high human harvest, food competition results in delayed puberty, reduced calf production, increased winter starvation of caribou and regulates populations at high densities (>2 km-2. Caribou were hunted to extinction on Southampton Island (Northwest Territories, Canada by mid-century. In 1967, 48 caribou were captured on neighbouring Coats Island and released on Southampton Island. Southampton Island is characterized by a high per capita winter food availability in summer and in winter. The population on Southampton Island has been increasing at a rapid rate of growth since re-introduction (Lamba=1.27. Fast population growth was possible because females invested early in reproduction and over winter survival rate was high. The population on Coats Island is also characterized by high per capita food availability in summer but low food availability in winter. The population size has undergone some marked fluctuations, abrupt declines followed by relatively rapid recovery and, contrary to predictions, densities were always less than 1 km-2. Low population densities on Coats Island result primarily from low food availability. This review suggests that in the absence of prédation or high human harvest competition for food regulates caribou population abundance. However, caribou numbers can fluctuate markedly among years because inter-annual variation of weather conditions affects forage accessibility in winter. This review also emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between factors that determine absolute population density and variation in density among years (in our case probably plant production and winter weather conditions which influence forage accessibility from the regulatory factors, processes that stop population

  13. The wine trade, piracy and maritime contract law in late medieval Southampton

    OpenAIRE

    Pamuk, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of History, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2014. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2014. Includes bibliographical references leaves 102-105. In late medieval Southampton, wine was a commodity, which was extensively traded, and quite precious to the pirates of the English Channel because it was easy to sell and the vessels loaded with wine had less protection than the ships of precious metals. Therefore, increase of wine trade in the late m...

  14. Women and children first? The administration of Titanic relief in Southampton, 1912–59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    One of the principal narratives woven around the 1912 sinking of the Titanic is that the tragedy united people around the world in a shared sense of horror and grief. This study examines the administration of the relief fund collected for victims and questions the established image of social unity and collective suffering. The records of the Southampton Titanic Relief Fund reveal welfare processes imbued with class and gender prejudices that consigned many of the relatives of victims to poverty-stricken lives, despite the massive fund collected in their names.

  15. High angle of attack position sensing for the Southampton University magnetic suspension and balance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David H.

    1987-01-01

    An all digital five channel position detection system is to be installed in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (SUMSBS). The system is intended to monitor a much larger range of model pitch attitudes than has been possible hitherto, up to a maximum of a 90 degree angle of attack. It is based on the use of self-scanning photodiode arrays and illuminating laser light beams, together with purpose built processing electronics. The principles behind the design of the system are discussed, together with the results of testing one channel of the system which was used to control the axial position of a magnetically suspended model in SUMSBS. The removal of optically coupled heave position information from the axial position sensing channel is described.

  16. Occupational physical activities, working hours and outcome of pregnancy: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzini, M; Coggon, D; Godfrey, K; Inskip, H; Crozier, S; Palmer, K T

    2009-10-01

    To investigate risks of physical activity at work by pregnancy trimester, including the effects on head and abdominal circumference. At 34 weeks of gestation we interviewed 1327 mothers from the prospective Southampton Women's Survey (SWS); we asked about their activities (working hours, standing/walking, kneeling/squatting, trunk bending, lifting and night shifts) in jobs held at each of 11, 19 and 34 weeks of gestation, and subsequently ascertained four birth outcomes (preterm delivery, small for gestational age (SGA) and reduced head or abdominal circumference) blinded to employment history. Risk of preterm delivery was elevated nearly threefold in women whose work at 34 weeks entailed trunk bending for >1 h/day. Small head circumference was more common in babies born to women who worked for >40 h/week. However, no statistically significant associations were found with SGA or small abdominal circumference, and preterm delivery showed little association with long working hours, lifting, standing or shift work. There is a need for more research on trunk bending late in pregnancy, and on the relationship of work to reduced head circumference. Our findings on several other occupational exposures common among pregnant workers are reassuring.

  17. Counsellors in primary care in Southampton: a questionnaire survey of their qualifications, working arrangements, and casemix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A; Hook, J; Stein, K

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been an upsurge of interest in counselling in primary care over the past five years. This has been stimulated by a growing demand for non-drug treatment of emotional disorders and by the extension of reimbursement for the costs of counsellors. Continued calls for careful evaluation have been largely unheeded in the face of heady growth. AIM: To establish the prevalence of counselling services in the 67 general practices in the Southampton and South West Hampshire Health District, and to describe in detail their qualifications, working arrangements, and casemix. METHOD: A questionnaire enquiring about counselling services was sent to all the general practices in the district. A second questionnaire was then posted to all the counsellors identified as working in these practices. RESULTS: Twenty-six (39%) practices employed one or more counsellors. Fundholding practices were four times more likely than non-fundholders to employ a counsellor. Most of the counselling work was short term (4-20 sessions). The most common presenting complaints were relationship problems, depression, anxiety, and bereavement. CONCLUSION: This descriptive study highlights the wide variation in the qualifications and training of counsellors. Until the issue of effectiveness is resolved through further research, the best safeguard of quality is to ensure that counsellors meet the appropriate training standards laid down by the British Association of Counsellors. Monitoring standards is a legitimate task for those commissioning health care who are increasingly responsible for reimbursement of a counsellor's salary. Counsellors who meet appropriate training criteria should be encouraged to pursue accreditation with the British Association of Counsellors. Those who do not meet these criteria should be encouraged to undergo additional training. PMID:9474822

  18. CALL in a Climate of Change: Adapting to Turbulent Global Conditions. Short Papers from EUROCALL 2017 (25th, Southampton, United Kingdom, August 23-26, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Kate, Ed.; Bradley, Linda, Ed.; Thouësny, Sylvie, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    The 25th European Association of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (EUROCALL) conference was hosted by Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton, in the United Kingdom, from the 23rd to the 26th of August 2017. The theme of the conference was "CALL in a climate of change." The theme encompassed the notion of how…

  19. Environmental impact of early Sadlermiut settlements at Native Point (Southampton Island, Nunavut, Canada) before the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehberg, Finn; Pienitz, Reinhard; Plessen, Birgit; Muir, Derek; Wang, Xiaowa

    2017-04-01

    Several Thule forager groups settled successfully in the Hudson Bay region of the Canadian Arctic starting at ca. AD 1050. First evidence of settlements at Native Point on Southampton Island dates prior to AD 1400 by Sadlermiuts. The village consisted of numerous sod and winter houses which framed a small shallow freshwater body (ca. 20,000 m2). Numerous butchered carcasses of mainly walrus, seal, bowhead whales and caribou remained in the pond and further decayed in the water. Here, we present first results from three short sediment cores taken from the bottom of the settlement pond. Sedimentological, geochemical and micropaleontological analyses show an abrupt change at ca. AD 1500 from pristine aquatic environments to eutrophic conditions. Variation in d15N and d13C of the organic matter suggest that this shift is related to the first butchering activity of Sadlermiuts in the area.

  20. Reconstructing historical trends in metal input in heavily-disturbed, contaminated estuaries: studies from Bilbao, Southampton Water and Sicily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, A.B.; Croudace, I.W.; Cearreta, A.; Irabien, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Estuaries may be important reservoirs for contaminants as they tend to act as sinks for fine, contaminant-reactive sediments, and, historically, they have acted as centres for industrial and urban development. Analysis of dated sediment cores from these areas may allow historical trends in heavy metal input to be reconstructed, and recent and historical inputs of metal contaminants to be compared. Undisturbed saltmarsh settings have been used widely in the reconstruction of historical trends in metal input as saltmarshes provide a stable, vegetated substrate of dominantly fine sediments, and are less prone to erosion and reworking than adjacent mudflat areas. In comparison, much less research on historical pollution trends has been undertaken at estuarine sites which are prone to severe local disturbance, such as intertidal areas which are routinely dredged or where sedimentary processes have been modified by human activities such as shipping, salt working, port activities, land claim etc. This paper assesses the usefulness of 210 Pb and 137 Cs dating, combined with geochemical studies, in reconstructing historical trends in heavy metal input and sediment accretion in 3 heavily-modified, industrialised estuarine areas in Europe: the Bilbao estuary (Spain), Southampton Water (UK), and the Mulinello estuary (Sicily). Of these sites, only a salt marsh core from the Mulinello estuary provides a high-resolution record of recent heavy metal inputs. In Southampton Water only a partial record of changing metal inputs over time is retained due to land-claim and possible early-diagenetic remobilisation, while at Bilbao the vertical distribution of heavy metals in intertidal flats is mainly controlled by input on reworked sediment particles and variations in sediment composition. Where 137 Cs and 210 Pb distributions with depth allow a chronology of sediment deposition to be established, and early-diagenetic remobilisation has been minimal, mudflat and saltmarsh cores from

  1. Reducing hospital admissions and improving the diagnosis of COPD in Southampton City: methods and results of a 12-month service improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Tom; North, Mal; Bourne, Simon C

    2014-08-21

    The British Lung Foundation highlighted Southampton City as a hotspot for patients at future risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations due to severe deprivation levels and a high undiagnosed level of disease based on health economic modelling. We developed a strategy spanning primary and secondary care to reduce emergency admissions of patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and increase the diagnosed prevalence of COPD on general practitioner (GP) registers closer to that predicted from local modelling. A comprehensive 3-year audit of admissions was performed. Patients who had been admitted with an exacerbation to University Hospital Southampton three or more times in the previous 12 months were cohorted and cared for in a consultant-led, but community based, COPD service. Within primary care, a programme of education and case-based finding was delivered to most practices within the city. Thirty-four patients were found to be responsible for 176 admissions (22% of total COPD admissions) to the hospital. These 34 patients required 185 active interventions during the 12-month period but only 39 hospital admissions. The 30-day readmission rate dropped from 13.4 to 1.9% (Pmodel.

  2. Adaptação transcultural e análise da confiabilidade do Southampton Assessment of Mobility para avaliar a mobilidade de idosos brasileiros com demência Cross-cultural adaptation and reliability analyses of the Southampton Assessment of Mobility to assess mobility of Brazilian elderly with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leani Souza Máximo Pereira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi adaptar transculturalmente o instrumento Southampton Assessment of Mobility e testar sua confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores para idosos brasileiros da comunidade, com demência, classificados quanto à gravidade pelo Clinical Dementia Rating. O instrumento adaptado foi aplicado em uma amostra de 107 idosos (76,26 anos ± 7,59; 27,1% homens, 72,9% mulheres com diagnóstico clínico de demência dado pelo serviço de geriatria do Centro de Referência em Atenção ao Idoso Professor Caio Benjamin Dias, do Estado de Minas Gerais, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Dentre os avaliados, 39 (76,85 anos ± 7,75; 23,1% homens, 76,9% mulheres foram aleatorizados para avaliação da confiabilidade. A ferramenta estatística foi o teste kappa. Os resultados mostraram que a confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores foram, respectivamente: demência leve 0,89-0,86; moderada 0,79-0,85 e grave 0,53-0,49. O instrumento adaptado demonstrou ser aplicável à população alvo e demonstrou ter confiabilidade "quase perfeita" para demência leve e moderada. Para a demência grave os índices de confiabilidade foram "moderados".The objective was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Southampton Assessment of Mobility and test its intra- and inter-examiner reliability for Brazilian elderly living in the community and diagnosed with dementia, with severity classified according to the Clinical Dementia Rating. The instrument was applied to 107 elderly (76.26 years ± 7.59; 27.1% males, 72.9% females diagnosed with dementia by the geriatric clinic at the university hospital of the Federal University in Minas Gerais. From the initial group, a randomized sample of 39 elderly (76.85 years ± 7.75; 23.1% males, 76.9% females was selected for the reliability tests. The statistical tool was the kappa test. The respective reliability indices were: mild dementia ­ 0.89-0.86; moderate

  3. Teaching Databases at Southampton University

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Ken

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some of the issues faced when designing a database systems course that will be a compulsory component for second year undergraduates in computer science. The main goal is to give an overview of database systems starting from Codd’s classical paper through to practical implementation using a SQL server (MySQL) For conceptual modelling, we chose UML because of the prior knowledge of the target class. The logical model is derived from the conceptual model and we place ...

  4. Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiran, Clare; Rowen, David; Clarke, Ian Nicholas; Marsh, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in England. Our objective was to perform a detailed survey of the molecular epidemiology of C. trachomatis in the population of Southampton UK attending the genitourinary medicine clinic (GUM) to seek evidence of sexual network activity. Our hypothesis was that certain genotypes can be associated with specific demographic determinants. 380 positive samples were collected from 375 C. trachomatis positive GUM attendees out of the 3118 who consented to be part of the survey. 302 of the positive samples were fully genotyped. All six of the predominant genotypes possessed ompA locus type E. One ward of Southampton known to contain a large proportion of students had a different profile of genotypes compared to other areas of the city. Some genotypes appeared embedded in the city population whilst others appeared transient. Predominant circulating genotypes remain stable within a city population whereas others are sporadic. Sexual networks could be inferred but not conclusively identified using the data from this survey.

  5. Desafíos en la creación, desarrollo e implementación de los MOOC: El curso de Web Science en la Universidad de Southampton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Sánchez Vera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El carácter masivo es una de las peculiaridades de los MOOC, que lo diferencian de otro tipo de experiencias de aprendizaje en red. Este hecho configura una serie de posibilidades, pero también una serie de retos que hay que tener en cuenta a la hora de diseñar e implementar un curso masivo en red, en relación, por ejemplo, a los contenidos, el proceso de trabajo, las actividades, la evaluación y el feed-back. Este trabajo presenta un análisis de las ventajas y desventajas del carácter masivo de los MOOC y concretamente describe la experiencia de creación de un MOOC sobre Web Science desarrollada en la Universidad de Southampton (Reino Unido en la plataforma FutureLearn durante el otoño de 2013. Se analiza la importancia del estudio de la rama de Web Science y cómo se originó esta experiencia. También describen las decisiones y el proceso de trabajo desarrollado para la creación e implementación del MOOC en concreto. Se termina este trabajo analizando alguno de los datos que se han obtenido, como el índice de participación (ligeramente elevado respecto a la media de los MOOC, los comentarios de los participantes, la manera de gestionar la facilitación del curso y algunos de los retos que nos encontramos a la hora de gestionar un MOOC, que se relacionan con el diseño del curso, la plataforma que se utiliza y cómo se organiza la facilitación del curso.

  6. Migration in Vulnerable Deltas: A Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, C.; Nicholls, R. J.; Allan, A.

    2015-12-01

    C. Hutton1, & R. J. Nicholls1, , 1 University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO17 1BJ. cwh@geodata. soton.ac.ukAbstractGlobally, deltas contain 500 million people and with rising sea levels often linked to large number of forced migrants are expected in the coming century. However, migration is already a major process in deltas, such as the growth of major cities such as Dhaka and Kolkata. Climate and environmental change interacts with a range of catchment and delta level drivers, which encompass a nexus of sea-level rise, storms, freshwater and sediment supply from the catchment, land degradation, subsidence, agricultural loss and socio-economic stresses. DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation/CARRIA) is investigating migration in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM), Mahanadi and Volta Deltas, including the influence of climate change. The research will explore migration from a range of perspectives including governance and stakeholder analysis, demographic analysis, household surveys of sending and receiving areas, macro-economic analysis, and hazards and hotspot analysis both historically and into the future. Migration under climate change will depend on other adaptation in the deltas and this will be examined. Collectively, integrated analysis will be developed to examine migration, other adaptation and development pathways with a particular focus on the implications for the poorest. This will require the development of input scenarios, including expert-derived exogenous scenarios (e.g., climate change) and endogenous scenarios of the delta developed in a participatory manner. This applied research will facilitate decision support methods for the development of deltas under climate change, with a focus on migration and other adaptation strategies.

  7. 78 FR 58458 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Quogue Canal, Southampton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this rule, call or email Ms. Judy Leung-Yee, Project Officer, First Coast Guard District, telephone (212) 668-7165, email [email protected] . If you have...

  8. Implementing the undergraduate mini-CEX: a tailored approach at Southampton University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Faith; Kendall, Kathleen; Galbraith, Kevin; Crossley, Jim

    2009-04-01

    The mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is widely used in the UK to assess clinical competence, but there is little evidence regarding its implementation in the undergraduate setting. This study aimed to estimate the validity and reliability of the undergraduate mini-CEX and discuss the challenges involved in its implementation. A total of 3499 mini-CEX forms were completed. Validity was assessed by estimating associations between mini-CEX score and a number of external variables, examining the internal structure of the instrument, checking competency domain response rates and profiles against expectations, and by qualitative evaluation of stakeholder interviews. Reliability was evaluated by overall reliability coefficient (R), estimation of the standard error of measurement (SEM), and from stakeholders' perceptions. Variance component analysis examined the contribution of relevant factors to students' scores. Validity was threatened by various confounding variables, including: examiner status; case complexity; attachment specialty; patient gender, and case focus. Factor analysis suggested that competency domains reflect a single latent variable. Maximum reliability can be achieved by aggregating scores over 15 encounters (R = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] +/- 0.28 based on a 6-point assessment scale). Examiner stringency contributed 29% of score variation and student attachment aptitude 13%. Stakeholder interviews revealed staff development needs but the majority perceived the mini-CEX as more reliable and valid than the previous long case. The mini-CEX has good overall utility for assessing aspects of the clinical encounter in an undergraduate setting. Strengths include fidelity, wide sampling, perceived validity, and formative observation and feedback. Reliability is limited by variable examiner stringency, and validity by confounding variables, but these should be viewed within the context of overall assessment strategies.

  9. International Conference on Narrow Gap Semiconductors Held in Southampton, England on 19-23 July 1992. Abstracts Booklet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    University, Liniz. Narrow gap semiconductors offer the possibility to investigate in detail the role of conduction electrons in spin relaxation processes. In...crucial role on device performance. Hg1 ,-Zn.Te (N2T) is considered an alternative material to Hg1 -. Cd.Te (NCT) for infrared detectors. To the best of our... iaSb -AlSb-InAs-AlSh-GaSb), focusing on the effects of a magnetic fiheld parallel to the tunneling current, that is, perpendicular to the materials

  10. The Noisiness of Low-Frequency One-Third Octave Bands of Noise. M.S. Thesis - Southampton Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the relative noisiness of low frequency one-third octave bands of noise bounded by the bands centered at 25 Hz and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 db sound pressure level (SPL) to 95 db SPL. The thirty-two subjects used a method-of-adjustment technique, producing comparison-band intensities as noisy as standard bands centered at 100 Hz and 200 Hz with intensities of 60 db SPL and 72 db SPL. Four contours of equal noisiness were developed for one-third octave bands, extending down to 25 Hz and ranging in intensity from approximately 58 db SPL to 86 db SPL. These curves were compared with the contours of equal noisiness of Kryter and Pearsons. In the region of overlap (between 50 Hz and 200 Hz) the agreement was good.

  11. Learners' and Teachers' Perceptions of Learning Analytics (LA): A Case Study of Southampton Solent University (SSU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Osama

    2017-01-01

    This paper depicts a perceptual picture of learning analytics based on the understanding of learners and teachers at the SSU as a case study. The existing literature covers technical challenges of learning analytics (LA) and how it creates better social construct for enhanced learning support, however, there has not been adequate research on…

  12. Proceedings of the International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics (2nd) held at the University of Southampton (England) on 9-13 April 1984. Volume 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    the load is one of the main dynamic responses of the 148 crane structure. It effects the dynamic operational performanc, 0 and the strength of the...integrally. The present study is based upon this idea. 2. BOUNDARY PROBLEM OF THE DINAMICS OF A STRUCTURE Here we use the methods described in [5] and...waves of an explosion, and continuous atmospheric turbulence. For economic reasons, the use of the substantial res-rve in strength inherent in most

  13. Proceedings of the International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics (2nd) held at the University of Southampton (England) on 9-13 April 1984. Volume 2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    each FFT-step). For a frequency domain S/N of 60dB, 12 bits are suited up to 128 points, 16 bits up to 2048 points. Experimental results gave better...Schwingungen des unendlichen, federnd gebetteten Balkens unter der Wirkung eines unrunden Rades. 19. J. KORB 1980 VDI -Berichte Nr. 381, 99-104...to squealing noise. 7. REFERENCES 1. H. STAPPENBECK 1954 Zeitschrift VDI 96, 171-175. Das Kurvengerdusch der Strafenbahn - Mglichkeiten zu seiner

  14. Carbonate and carbon fluctuations in the Eastern Arabian Sea over 140 ka: Implications on productivity changes?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Haake, B.G.; Schiebel, R.

    , University of Hamburg, Grabenstr. 27, 20357 Hamburg, Germany c School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK Received25April2003;accepted21May2005 Abstract Biological...

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    effects for microcavity polaritons is presented by Ivanov and Littlewood, who also discuss possible applications of this effect for optical modulation and switching. Hopefully, as well as providing a new resource, this issue will stimulate imaginative exploitation of this emerging field. Guest Editors J J Baumberg Departments of Physics & Astronomy, Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK L Viña Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid, Spain

  16. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale Systems Integration Group, School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK The paper [2] describes a novel impedance spectroscopic measurement method for applications in the identification of biological cells. The frequency-dependent impedance is obtained in the frequency domain by applying a fast M-sequence transform (FMT), and a fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the time domain response. Using FMT, the evaluation takes place within a short timescale of the order of milliseconds. This technique is used in a microfluidic impedance cytometer, for the analysis of single biological cells in suspension. The theory of the technique is analysed in depth. It is then applied to an experimental system that characterizes the impedance spectrum of red blood cells within the microfluidic system. Measured spectra show good agreement with simulations. The paper has a short but excellent introduction, supported by a solid reference list of about 55 papers describing related work. Most of these papers are citations from 2000 onwards. This is followed by a detailed analysis of maximum length sequences and theory used for predictions of spectra. It then continues with a useful description of a cytometer that was used to confirm theoretical predictions of spectra. Results are at an early stage. The system is still under development, since there are issues arising from the fact that the particle flows during the acquisition of data, and is not static in the electric field as assumed by the model. Nevertheless, the paper possesses good clarity of the motivation behind the work, of the measurement techniques developed and of the potential relevance to applications in the life sciences. 2007 Award Winners—Precision Measurement Ultraprecision micro-CMM using a low force 3D touch probe A Küng, F Meli and R Thalmann Swiss Federal Office of Metrology (METAS), Lindenweg 50, CH-3003 Bern-Wabern, Switzerland The paper [3] describes a new three

  17. The power and statistical behaviour of allele-sharing statistics when ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    3Human Genetics Division, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Abstract ... that the statistic S-#alleles gives good performance for recessive ... (H50) of the families are linked to the single marker. The.

  18. Darkness in El Dorado: human genetics on trial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Human Genetics Research Division, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. A recent ..... advice' he acknowledges in his book (p. xviii), leading to revision .... Venezuelan government, held his team back from giving medical ...

  19. A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Palike, H.; Lyle, M.W.; Nishi, H.; Raffi, I.; Ridgwell, A.; Gamage, K.; Klaus, A.; Acton, G.; Anderson, L.; Backman, J.; Baldauf, J.; Beltran, C.; Bohaty, S.M.; Bown, P.; Busch, W.; Channell, J.E.T.; Chun, C.O.J.; Delaney, M.; Dewangan, P.; et al.

    A. Wilson 1, Yuhji Yamamoto 49, Shinya Yamamoto 50, Toshitsugu Yamazaki 51 & Richard E. Zeebe 52       1 Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton, SO... revision 7491). Scenarios were investigated as open system runs and with enabled climate feedback (temperature responsive to greenhouse gas forcing) until steady state conditions were achieved (~150 kyr). Ensembles were run on the Southampton high...

  20. Active faulting on the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relation to deformation of the Indo-Australian plate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sager, W.W.; Bull, J.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK , bull@noc.soton.ac.uk 4CSIR - National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India, krishna@nio.org Abstract The ~4500 km-long Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the northeastern...

  1. Improving the resilience of the healthcare workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-11-24

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses government strategies to ensure a future healthcare workforce that is sustainable and does not rely on overseas recruitment.

  2. Improving the resilience of the healthcare workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses government strategies to ensure a future healthcare workforce that is sustainable and does not rely on overseas recruitment

  3. ONRASIA Scientific Information Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    with volcanic eruptions. backbone hierarchical KREONET, that currently "* Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy independent research and educational...Zone, East Indonesia: Dpt., Southampton University, Southampton Adrian Richardson, Dpt. of Geology, Royal S09 5NH, U.K. ***Dpt. of Geological Sciences

  4. Improved network monitoring using UTC detector data 'RAID'

    OpenAIRE

    Cherrett, Tom; Waterson, Ben; McDonald, Mike; Clarke, Russell; Bangert, Alex; Morris, Ray

    2002-01-01

    As part of the 5th Framework PRIME project1 (Prediction Of Congestion And Incidents In Real Time, For Intelligent Incident Management And Emergency Traffic Management), a new incident detection algorithm has been developed using the 250-ms digital data produced by UTC detectors. The contributors to this part of the project were the University of Southampton, Southampton City Council and Siemens Traffic Controls.

  5. Tracing the strength of the southwest monsoon using boron isotopes in the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Foster, G.L.; Martínez-Boti, M.A.

    . Foster and Miguel A. Martínez-Botí Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, SO14 3ZH,UK Corresponding author: S. S. Naik, CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography, Goa 403004, India (sushant... of the foraminifers was determined at the University of Southampton on a Thermo Scientific Neptune MC-ICPMS [see Foster, 2008 and Henehan et al., 2013]. External reproducibility of the MC-ICPMS δ11B data is determined from a relationship between the reproducibility...

  6. AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks. In Proceedings of The PLE Conference 2011. July, 11-13, 2011, Southampton, UK.

  7. Promoting mental health first aid literacy in secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Glasper, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses a new initiative designed to help teachers in secondary schools better understand and identify mental health issues in children.

  8. A generalised solution for step-drawdown tests including flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2001-07-03

    Jul 3, 2001 ... interpreted as the theoretical solution of the groundwater flow equation for the .... and gravity force the water to flow from the rock matrix to the fracture. ..... Computational Mechanics Publications, Southampton. CLOOT AHJ ...

  9. Diverse methane concentrations in anoxic brines and underlying sediments, eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karisiddaiah, S.M.

    .S. Quednau, M. Maggiulli and Jens Hefter, who helped me in various ways during my stay at the Free University, Berlin. Jens Hefter assisted me during onboard sampling, gas extraction and methane analysis. I am indebted to Guy Rothwell (Southampton...

  10. Why is the Bay of Bengal less productive during summer monsoon compared to the Arabian Sea?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Prasad, T.G.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; DeSouza, S.N.; Sardessai, S.; Madhupratap, M.

    the European Center for Medium Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and surface fluxes from the Southampton Oceanography Climatology (SOC). The model vertical resolution is 1m with 200 levels. Model integration is started during April (using Levitus temperature...

  11. Foraminifera in surface sediments of Mandovi River Estuary: Indicators for mining pollution and high sea stand in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.; Banerjee, P.

    .W., and AUSTIN, R.L., 1991. Benthic foraminiferids as pollution indicators in Southampton Water, southern England, U.K. Journal of Micropalaeontology, 10, 109– 113. YANKO, V.; AHMAD, M., and KAMINISKI, M., 1998. Morphological deformities of benthic foraminiferal...

  12. Seasonal variability of upper-layer geostrophic transport in the tropical Indian Ocean during 1992-1996 along TOGA-I XBT tracklines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Lambata, B.P.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pednekar, S.M.; Rao, A.S.; Luis, A.J.; Kaka, A.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    (2000) 1569}1582 1581 Subrahmanyam, B., 1998. A study of the Indian Ocean Circulation using satellite observations and model simulations. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Southampton, Department of Oceanography, UK., p. 251, unpublished. Suryanarayana, A...

  13. Narcolepsy/Cataplexy and Occult Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; University Hospital Southampton, UK; and Kiev Paediatric Hospital, Ukraine, report three children with narcolepsy and cataplexy subsequently diagnosed with neuroblastoma.

  14. Exemplar PV system for test and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report describes the construction of Reference Photovoltaic System for Test and Development at University of Southampton between April 1995 and June 2000, which subsequently became known as the STaR Facility. (author)

  15. study and analysis of asa river hypothetical dam break using hec-ras

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    outcome of the analysis showed that in the event of such failure of Asa dam, some areas which include industrial and residential .... Road Bridge (Coca Cola Axis). (iv) Stretch ..... Solutions and Case Studies, WIT Press, Southampton,. Boston ...

  16. Logs, blogs and pods: smart electronic laboratory notebooks

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Jeremy G.

    2009-01-01

    The Southampton experiences in developing a semantic electronic laboratory notebook for synthetic organic chemistry and a web 2.0 style laboratory Blog Book are introduced and discussed in the context of the Smart Laboratory.

  17. Developing geometrical reasoning in the secondary school: outcomes of trialling teaching activities in classrooms, a report to the QCA

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Margaret; Jones, Keith; Taylor, Ron

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the findings of the Southampton/Hampshire Group of mathematicians and mathematics educators sponsored by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) to develop and trial some teaching/learning materials for use in schools that focus on the development of geometrical reasoning at the secondary school level. The project ran from October 2002 to November 2003. An interim report was presented to the QCA in March 2003. 1. The Southampton/Hampshire Group consisted of five...

  18. Sea level changes induced by local winds on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mehra, P.; Tsimplis, M.N.; Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.; Shaw, A.G.P.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Cipollini, P.

    1 National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India 2 National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK # [Corresponding author: pmehra@nio.org] Abstract The contribution of atmospheric pressure and wind to sea level variability at Goa (West...), Southampton under an Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning System (IOWTS) fellowship-2008-2009. We are all grateful to the International Oceanographic Commission for providing us with the opportunity of working together. 17 R: Correlation coefficient between sea...

  19. Seasonal variability of the mixed layer in the central Bay of Bengal and associated changes in nutrients and chlorophyll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons, Indian Journal of Marine Sciences 17, 258-264. Josey, S. A., Kent, E. C. and Taylor, P. K., 1998. The Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) Ocean - Atmosphere Heat, Momentum... and Freshwater Flux Atlas, Southampton Oceanography Centre Report No. 6, 30 pp. plus figs. Levitus, S., 1982. Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean, NOAA Professional paper 13, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Rockville Md, 173...

  20. Surface freshwater from Bay of Bengal runoff and Indonesian throughflow in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, D.; Raj, B.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    ]); monthly evaporation from the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) data (Josey et al. [1998]), and monthly 2openbulletby 2openbulletsurface currents in the tropical Indian Ocean, based on 1985-2002 trajecto- ries of drogued WOCE drifters (Shenoi et al..., Deep-Sea Re- search II, 50, 2111?2127, 2003. Josey, S. A., E. C. Kent, and P. K. Taylor, The Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) Ocean - Atmosphere Heat, Mo- mentum and Freshwater Flux Atlas, Tech. Rep. 6, Southamp- ton Oceanography Centre, 1998...

  1. 2016 Electrochemistry Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    Russell (University of Southampton, United Kingdom ) "New Adventures in Spectroscopic Studies of Electrode Surfaces" 9:15 pm - 9:30 pm Discussion Monday...Determination of Molecular Co-Catalysts for Energetically Efficient Electrochemical Processes" 12:10 pm - 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm - 4:00...discussion and mentoring. Organizers: Carol Korzeniewski (Texas Tech University, USA) and Andrea Russell (University of Southampton, United Kingdom

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11964-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .. 42 0.87 4 ( EK022497 ) 1092955341513 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1... 48 1.1 1 ( EL474594 ) CHUL2538.b1_C12.ab1 CHU(LMS) puz...zle sunflower Hel... 48 1.1 1 ( BJ370153 ) Dictyostelium

  3. Dicty_cDB: VHK296 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK296 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHK296P (Link to Original site) VHK2...96F 531 VHK296Z 314 VHK296P 825 - - Show VHK296 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK2... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK296Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHK2...96P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK296 (VHK296Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK2... 5' ... 993 0.0 1 ( BJ427875 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k24, 5' ... 993 0.0 1 ( BJ427874 ) D

  4. Habitat heterogeneity and its influence on benthic biodiversity in oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gooday, A.J.; Bett, B.J.; Escobar, E.; Ingole, B.S.; Levin, L.A.; Neira, C.; Raman, A.V.; Sellanes, J.

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2 Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-305 Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F., Mexico... is mirrored in the change in assemblage composition on the Pakistan Margin, as represented in plots of MDSx versus depth and oxygen (Fig. 7). In samples taken along the axis of the Gulf of California (Mexico), between 740 and 2250 m, the rate of polychaete...

  5. A comparison of Mg/Ca ratios in Globigerinoides ruber (white): sensu stricto versus a mixture of genotypes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.

    at the University of Southampton, UK, using G. ruber, sensu stricto only. Cleaned samples were dissolved in 100-300 µl 0.5M HNO3. Mg/Ca ratios were analysed on a Thermo Finnigan Element 2 ICP-MS. Long term precision for Mg/Ca is 3% (2σ) based on repeat.... Acknowledgements: I thank Jimin Yu of LDEO and Miguel Martinez-Boti of the University of Southampton for the analytical help. This work was funded by the INDOUSSTF fellowship and a DST Fast Track Project to SN. This is National Institute of Oceanography...

  6. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    < 2m and the zero-crossing period during the satellite overpass is small (< 6s, �O�O < 60m). We therefore utilized the visit of one of the authors (Sarma) to the Southampton Oceanographic Centre, U.K., to procure two ERS-1 digital image mode SAR...-dimensional FFT as well as a computer program for downloading SAR data from CCT. Finally we owe a debt of gratitude to J C da Silva, Southampton Oceanographic Centre, U K for sharing some of his SAR data with us. References Allan T. D. (Ed) (1983...

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U07450-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ration Library Syntrich... 208 3e-52 2 ( CN205665 ) Tor6072 Gametophyte rehydration... Library Syntrichi... 208 3e-52 2 ( CN202424 ) Tor2583 Gametophyte rehydration Li...brary Syntrichi... 208 3e-52 2 ( CN207120 ) Tor7541 Gametophyte rehydration Library Syntrichi... 208 3e-52 2...... 224 1e-54 1 ( BJ958614 ) Physcomitrella patens subsp. patens cDNA clone:pp... 216 3e-52 1 ( CN200625 ) Tor10291 Gametophyte rehyd

  8. Letters to the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents The imaginary Sun? Harold Aspden Energy Science Ltd, PO Box 35, Southampton SO16 7RB, UK Difficult physics? Tim Akrill Chief Examiner, A-level Physics, Edexcel Foundation Was it a dream? Bill Jarvis 6 Peggy's Mill Road, Edinburgh EH4 6JY

  9. A Collaborative Action Research Project towards Embedding ESD within the Higher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present a collaborative action research project conducted at the University of Southampton with the aim to promote curriculum and professional development in education for sustainable development (ESD) and learn from everyday practices of academics. Design/methodology/approach: An action research approach guided by…

  10. A Project-Based Biologically-Inspired Robotics Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, R. M.; Zauner, K.-P.

    2013-01-01

    The design of any robotic system requires input from engineers from a variety of technical fields. This paper describes a project-based module, "Biologically-Inspired Robotics," that is offered to Electronics and Computer Science students at the University of Southampton, U.K. The overall objective of the module is for student groups to…

  11. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 13, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    Efficiency Method J.R. Willis R.K. Jeyapalan and P.E. Doak School of Mathematics, Bath Univ., Claverton Down, Inst. Sound Vib. Res., Univ. of Southampton S09...Grossman, D.T ............ 947 Jepson, D ............... 873 Lew, H.S ............... 1158 Guex, L ................ 974 Jeyapalan , R.K.......... 1047 Lewis

  12. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    abhi@mri.ernet.in. Banerjee Sunanda, Fermilab, PO Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA banerjee@mail.cern.ch. Belyaev Alexander, University of Southampton, School of Physics and Astronomy,. Bld 46, Room 5053, Highfield Hampshire, UK a.belyaev@phys.soton.ac.uk. Berera Arjun, School of Physics, JCM Building, ...

  13. 26 CFR 49.4264(f)-1 - Transportation outside the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transportation from New York to Southampton, England. The vessel on which A sails makes an intermediate stop... outside the northern portion of the Western Hemisphere, by water on a vessel which makes one or more... Tokyo, Japan. The vessel on which B travels makes a stop at Honolulu, Hawaii, to discharge passengers...

  14. Interactive Radiological Anatomy eLearning Solution for First Year Medical Students: Development, Integration, and Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its…

  15. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  16. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Physics. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas Ph.D. (Southampton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 October 1940. Specialization: Lasers and laser Instrumentation Address: 26, Paramanu Nagar, Indore 452 013, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0731) 232 2707. Residence: (0731) 232 0031. Mobile: 93032 ...

  17. Contributions to the 12th. International Cryogenic Engineering Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The report consists of two papers read at the 12 th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference Held in Southampton from 12 to 15 July 1988. The first deals with the design of a conductor for NET machine; the second one gives the description of the liquid Nitrogen cooling system of the FTU tokamak

  18. Clinical applications of corneal confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tavakoli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitra Tavakoli1, Parwez Hossain2, Rayaz A Malik11Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK; 2University of Southampton, Southampton Eye Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: Corneal confocal microscopy is a novel clinical technique for the study of corneal cellular structure. It provides images which are comparable to in-vitro histochemical techniques delineating corneal epithelium, Bowman’s layer, stroma, Descemet’s membrane and the corneal endothelium. Because, corneal confocal microscopy is a non invasive technique for in vivo imaging of the living cornea it has huge clinical potential to investigate numerous corneal diseases. Thus far it has been used in the detection and management of pathologic and infectious conditions, corneal dystrophies and ecstasies, monitoring contact lens induced corneal changes and for pre and post surgical evaluation (PRK, LASIK and LASEK, flap evaluations and Radial Keratotomy, and penetrating keratoplasty. Most recently it has been used as a surrogate for peripheral nerve damage in a variety of peripheral neuropathies and may have potential in acting as a surrogate marker for endothelial abnormalities.Keywords: corneal confocal microscopy, cornea, infective keratitis, corneal dystrophy, neuropathy

  19. Language Learning within Academic Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, George M.

    This paper reports on a research project that examined nonnative Southampton University (England) students' attitudes to continued language learning and the importance of language learning and cultural adaptation. A survey was administered to pre-sessional and in-sessional students that included information on background, past and present language…

  20. Anything Can Happen out There: A Holistic Approach to Field Trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutino, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks back at an academic-led language field trip project, now in its third year, involving ab-initio students of Italian at the University of Southampton. It considers the role of academic-led field trips in Modern Languages (ML) and it explores the underlying pedagogical approaches that were adopted to enhance students' engagement,…

  1. 75 FR 59745 - In the Matter of: Certain Components for Installation of Marine Autopilots With GPS or IMU...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ..., Southampton Road. Portsmouth Hampshire, PO6 4QB, United Kingdom. Raymarine Inc., 21 Manchester Street... violations of section 337 based upon the importation into the United States, the sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain installation of marine autopilots with...

  2. Richard A. Werners forskning i pengeskabelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Hvilken rolle spiller penge i samfundsøkonomien og hvilken rolle burde penge spille i den økonomiske videnskab? Det forsker Richard Werner i. Han er professor i økonomi ved Southampton University i England, og her præsenteres fire dele af hans forskning i penge: (1) Hvad foregår der egentlig i en...

  3. Embedding Key Transferable Employability Skills for Lifelong Success through Blending an Innovative Portfolio to Complement Traditional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Joanne; Whistance, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Southampton Solent University has been running the unit ENG195 Applied and Academic English Advanced for international students since 2008 as part of the Institution-Wide Language Programme. Following the implementation of a new employability strategy in 2013, the unit was revalidated in July 2014, which led to a major redesign of the curriculum…

  4. Evaluation of a Short-term, Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Primary Age Children with Anger-Related Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Rachel L.; Treadwell, Susanne; Dosani, Sima; Frederickson, Norah

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the school-based short-term, cognitive-behavioral group anger management programme, "Learning How to Deal with our Angry Feelings" (Southampton Psychology Service, 2003). Thirteen groups of children aged 7- to 11-years-old were randomly allocated to two different cohorts: One cohort ("n"?=?35) first…

  5. High performance simulation of lattice physics using enhanced transputer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, A.J.G.; Jesshope, C.R.; Nicole, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe an architecture under construction at Southampton using arrays of communicating transputers with enhanced floating-point capabilities. Performance in the Gigaflop range is expected. Algorithms for taking explicit advantage of this MIMD architecture are discussed using the Occam programming paradigm. (Auth.)

  6. Ferromanganese nodules and their associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Rare earth element geochemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Migdisov, A.A.; Colley, S.; Higgs, N.C.; Demidenko, L.

    FerromanganeseNodulesandtheirAssociatedSedimentsfromtheCentralIndianOceanBasin:RareEarthElementGeochemistry J.N.PATTANCH.M.RAONationalInstituteofOceanography,DonaPaula Goa,IndiaA.A.MIGDISOV InstituteofGeochemistry,RussianAcademyofSciencesMoscow,Russia S.COLLEY,N.C.HIGGSSouthamptonOceanographyCentre,EmpressDockSouthampton...

  7. Aerospace Medicine and Biology: A Continuing Bibliography with Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    drug against motion sickness more closely than any other medication. Author A87-35422 THE USE OF EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY IN AVIATORS A87...diagnosis and treatment Denmark) Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine (ISSN Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has recently become 0095...and M. J. GRIFFIN ( Southampton , University, functional mechanisms are insufficient. Solutions are discussed England) Aviation, Space, and Environmental

  8. What drives the biological productivity of the northern Indian Ocean?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.; Nuncio, M.; Gauns, M.; Sardessai, S.

    Silva et al., 1994], while the net heat flux was taken from the National Oceanography Centre 1.1 (formerly Southampton Oceanog- raphy Centre) Air-Sea Flux Climatology (1980–1993) [Josey et al., 1998]. The spatial resolution of both freshwater flux...

  9. Potential diagenetic and detrital sources for calcareous sediments from the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Borole, D.V.; Shejwalkar, A.S.; Kalangutkar, N.G.; Fernandes, N.O.; Dias, C.C.

    ., Cruise report of RSS Charles Darwin (CD-149) (18 July–6 August 2003), Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK, p. 3. 11. Anon, Cruise report of ORV Sagar Kanya (SK-207) (13 July–19 August 2004), National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, p. 27...

  10. Effects of sudden stress due to heavy metal mercury on benthic foraminifer Rosalina leei: Laboratory culture experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Linshy, V.N.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Saraswat, R.

    and their use as environmental indicators. Rev. Español. Micropaleontol., 7, 453-487. Sharifi A.R., Croudace T.W., Austin R.L., 1991. Benthonic foraminiferids as pollution indicators in Southampton water, Southern England, UK. Journal of Micropalaeontol...

  11. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    currents of the Indian Ocean (T0 25S, 100E): Compiled from historical data archived by the Meteorological Office, Bracknell, U.K., IOS Rep. 187, 88 pp. and 36 charts, Inst. of Oceanogr. Sci., Southampton, U.K. Durand, F., S. R. Shetye, J. Vialard, D...

  12. Water-column geochemical anomalies associated with the remnants of a mega plume: A case study after CR-2003 hydrothermal event in Carlsberg Ridge, NW Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; Mirza, I.H.; Prakash, L.S.; Kaisary, S.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, B.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Drolia, R.K.; KameshRaju, K.A.

    . 1. Massoth, G. J. et al., Manganese and iron in hydrothermal plumes resulting from the 1996 Gorda Ridge Event. Deep Sea Res. II, 1998, 45, 2683–2712. 2. Anon., Cruise report of RSS Charles Darwin (CD-149) (18 July–6 August 2003), Southampton...

  13. Seasonal variability of the upper ocean driven by the atmospheric forcing and its regulation of nutrients and chlorophyll in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.

    of the incoming short wave radiation, wind speed, evaporation, precipitation and net heat flux on 1 o longitude by 1 o latitude grid obtained from National Oceanographic Centre (NOC), Southampton for the period 1980-1993. The remote sensing data used...

  14. Dynamics and thermodynamics of the Indian Ocean warm pool in a high-resolution global general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Ishida, A.; Yoneyama, K.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Kashino, Y.; Mitsudera, H.

    line) is completely out of phase with surface heat flux. Once again, surface heat flux and advection together (solid-thick line, Fig. 8c) almost entirely accounts for the local heat storage. A comparison with Southampton oceano- graphic Center (SOC...

  15. 40 CFR 81.347 - Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X Mathews County X... Intrastate AQCR: Isle of Wight County X James City County X Southampton County X York County X City of... County X King George County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X...

  16. The Who's who of Nobel Prize winners, 1901-2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherby, Louise S; Odelberg, Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    ... steamer from New York to Southampton, went by train to Harwich, from there to Esbjerg in Denmark, and so to Sweden. An English gentleman who boarded the boat at Harwich happened to be given a seat at the same dining table as Michelson. During the voyage a somewhat heated discussion ensued between the two of them. The English gentleman spoke dispar...

  17. Language Teachers' Target Language Project: Language for Specific Purposes of Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, Alexey; Westbrook, Carolyn; Merry, Yvonne; Ershova, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    The Language Teachers' Target Language project (LTTL) aims to describe language teachers' target language use domain (Bachman & Palmer 2010) and to develop a language test for future teachers of English. The team comprises four researchers from Moscow State University (MSU) and Southampton Solent University.

  18. Innovative Breakwaters Design for Wave Energy Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Stagonas, D.; Müller, G.

    2012-01-01

    the rubble mound breakwaters and seawalls related activity and the energy demand of small human communities. Wave loadings and overtopping on a seawall and rubble mound breakwater with front reservoir are discussed on the basis of physical 2-D model tests carried out at University of Southampton (UK...

  19. On-Chip Out-of-Plane High-Q Inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    and leaves the substrate available for circuits. Magnetic forces [2] and the surface tension of a molten dot of solder [3] or polymer [4] have been...and P. Renaud, "High aspect ratio planar coils embedded in SU8 photoepoxy for MEMS applications," Tech. Digest Eurosensors XII, Southampton, Sep. 13-16

  20. The I3E Model for Embedding Education for Sustainability within Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Gisela

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an evidence-based model (the I3E model) for embedding education for sustainability (EfS) within a higher education institution. This model emerged from a doctoral research that examined organisational learning and change processes at the University of Southampton to build EfS into the university curriculum. The researcher aimed…

  1. Social Media and Anatomy Education: Using Twitter to Enhance the Student Learning Experience in Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Catherine M.; Kirkpatrick, Emma; Smith, Claire F.; Border, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is a difficult subject in medical education, with students often feeling worried and anxious before they have even started, potentially decreasing their engagement with the subject. At the University of Southampton, we incorporated the use of Twitter as a way of supporting students' learning on a neuroanatomy module to evaluate how it…

  2. Inside the ETH spectrometer magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The ETH spectrometer magnet being prepared for experiment S134, which uses a frozen spin polarized target to study the associated production of a kaon and a lambda by negative pions interacting with protons (CERN-ETH, Zurich-Helsinki-Imperial College, London-Southampton Collaboration). (See Photo Archive 7406316)

  3. Optical observations at Svalbard during winter 1979-80 carried out by the multi-national auroral expedition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, K.

    A discription is given of the facilities available to a group from the Universities of Tromsoe, Oslo, Alaska, Southampton, London and Belfast for observations of the visible, near-ultraviolet and near-infrared radiation from aurorae at a site in Spitzbergen. A small selection of spectra is given in figures and further data is freely available for the cost of copying. (JIW)

  4. Reduction in camera-specific variability in [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT outcome measures by image reconstruction optimized for multisite settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchert, Ralph; Kluge, Andreas; Tossici-Bolt, Livia

    2016-01-01

    the Southampton method with binding in the whole brain, occipital cortex or cerebellum as the reference. The correlation between SBR and age was used as the primary quality measure. RESULTS: The fraction of SBR variability explained by age was highest (1) with QSPECT, independently of the reference region, and (2...... as the reference provides more stable quantitative estimates than occipital or cerebellar binding....

  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R.Narasimhan(krishtel emaging)1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    J M Bull, Southampton, UK. Chaofang Zhao, China. D Chandrasekharan, Mumbai, India. R Cullers, Kansas, USA. Danling Tang, Japan. A C Das, Ahmedabad, India. S K Dash, Delhi, India. Don Olson, USA, India. Dev Niyogi, Raleigh, NC, USA. Edward Monahan, USA. G Ekstrom, Cambridge, USA. Elgar Desa, Goa, India.

  6. 75 FR 18090 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ...] 0 2. The tables published under the authority of Sec. 65.4 are amended as follows: Date and name of... modification Community notice was published of community No. New York: Suffolk Town of Southampton March 4... Austin (09-06- March 10, 2010; The Honorable Lee July 15, 2010 480624 3398P). March 17, 2010; Leffingwell...

  7. Dicty_cDB: AFL826 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AF (Link to library) AFL826 (Link to dictyBase) - - - - AFL826P (Link to Original s...ite) AFL826F 588 AFL826Z 766 AFL826P 1334 - - Show AFL826 Library AF (Link to library) Clone ID AFL826 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig - Original site URL http://dictycdb.biol.t... Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N ( BJ346543 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cD...NA clone:dda24d08, 3' ... 1100 0.0 1 ( BJ341682 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA c

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11651-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 1 ( BJ435790 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv28j10, 3' ... 355 2e-93 1 ( EY481033 ) CBBP11161.rev CBBP Hirudo medicina...lis hermaphrodi... 36 1.6 2 ( EY486444 ) CBBP15196.rev CBBP Hirudo medicinalis hermaphr...odi... 36 1.6 2 ( EY503165 ) CBBP6773.rev CBBP Hirudo medicinalis hermaphrodit...... 36 1.6 2 ( EY494245 ) CBBP19905.rev CBBP Hirudo medicinalis hermaphrodi... 36 1.6 2 ( EY504499 ) CBBP7545.rev CBBP Hirudo medicina...lis hermaphrodit... 36 1.6 2 ( EY503685 ) CBBP7067.rev CBBP Hirudo medicinalis hermap

  9. Dicty_cDB: VHK273 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK273 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 - (Link to Original site) VHK2...73F 620 - - - - - - Show VHK273 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK273 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK273Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK273 (VHK273Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK273Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAA...27874 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k23, 5' ... 1170 0.0 1 ( BJ42787

  10. Dicty_cDB: VHK256 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK256 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 - (Link to Original site) VHK2...56F 620 - - - - - - Show VHK256 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK256 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-C/VHK256Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK256 (VHK256Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-C/VHK256Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAA...27874 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k23, 5' ... 1170 0.0 1 ( BJ42787

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15060-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 000227 |pid:none) Bacillus cereus Q1, complete ge... 114 3e-23 B83991( B83991 ) glycolate oxidase subunit BH2730 [imported...ana interm... 56 2e-15 5 ( AF211126 ) Carsonella ruddii natural-host Bactericera cocker....psnkfvpqrlfqq*fvf tiqrkln*vllgnqvkvl*vnsqvqwlksifitfvplisrmfvslslvskvqrrl*isie lqfsissprmlplv*vlllvklgpkkdmi... la... 1074 0.0 1 ( AB000109 ) Dictyostelium discoideum mitochondrial DNA, compl... 1074 0.0 1 ( BJ412759 ) Dictyosteli...7, 3' ... 731 0.0 1 ( DQ336395 ) Dictyostelium citrinum mitochondrion, complete ge... 456 0.0 3 ( BJ387435 ) Dictyosteli

  12. Law across nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of participants keen to work together to promote research and policy development in such a lively forum." - Professor Steve Saxby PhD, Cert Ed., MBCS Professor of IT Law and Public Policy, Solicitor, Deputy Head of School (Research), Faculty of Business and Law, University of Southampton, Editor...... not only the original themes of Legal, Security and Privacy Issues in IT Law and International Law and Trade but more recently two new conferences on International Public and Private Law. The papers in this volume then represent the contributions to all these fields and reflect the strong desire......-in-Chief, The Computer Law & Security Review - The International Journal of Technology Law and Practice (Elsevier), www.elsevier.com/locate/clsr, Editor, The Encyclopedia of Information Technology Law (Sweet & Maxwell), Director ILAWS - Institute for Law and the Web - School of Law, Southampton University, www...

  13. [(123)I]FP-CIT ENC-DAT normal database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Dickson, John C; Sera, Terez

    2017-01-01

    quantifications methods, BRASS and Southampton, and explores the performance of the striatal phantom calibration in their harmonisation. RESULTS: BRASS and Southampton databases comprising 123 ENC-DAT subjects, from gamma cameras with parallel collimators, were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP......) and iterative reconstruction OSEM without corrections (IRNC) and compared against the recommended OSEM with corrections for attenuation and scatter and septal penetration (ACSC), before and after applying phantom calibration. Differences between databases were quantified using the percentage difference......-camera variability (-0.2%, p = 0.44). CONCLUSIONS: The ENC-DAT reference values are significantly dependent on the reconstruction and quantification methods and phantom calibration, while reducing the major part of their differences, is unable to fully harmonize them. Clinical use of any normal database, therefore...

  14. [(123)I]FP-CIT ENC-DAT normal database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Dickson, John C; Sera, Terez

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: [(123)I]FP-CIT is a well-established radiotracer for the diagnosis of dopaminergic degenerative disorders. The European Normal Control Database of DaTSCAN (ENC-DAT) of healthy controls has provided age and gender-specific reference values for the [(123)I]FP-CIT specific binding ratio...... quantifications methods, BRASS and Southampton, and explores the performance of the striatal phantom calibration in their harmonisation. RESULTS: BRASS and Southampton databases comprising 123 ENC-DAT subjects, from gamma cameras with parallel collimators, were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP......) and iterative reconstruction OSEM without corrections (IRNC) and compared against the recommended OSEM with corrections for attenuation and scatter and septal penetration (ACSC), before and after applying phantom calibration. Differences between databases were quantified using the percentage difference...

  15. Integration of a Miniaturized Conductivity Sensor into an Animal-Borne Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    an Animal -Borne Instrument Lars Boehme Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute University of St Andrews St Andrews, KY16 8LB United... Kingdom phone: +44 1334-462677 fax: +44 1334-463443 email: lb284@st-andrews.ac.uk Robin Pascal Sensors Development Group National...Oceanography Centre Southampton, SO14 3ZY United Kingdom phone: +44 2380-596138 fax: +44 2380-593029 email: rwp@nerc.ac.uk Phil Lovell

  16. A knitting legacy: Linda Newington opens up the doors to the University of Southampton’s fascinating knitting collections

    OpenAIRE

    Newington, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Our fascination with the knitwear of the past seems to know no bounds - the classic, elegant knits of yesteryear continue to inspire and influence designers and knitters alike. Working to collect, preserve and share these patterns is the University of Southampton Library, whose Knitting Collections contain more than 12,000 patterns from the early 20th century to the present day.The Library holds the resources of three renowned figures from the world of knitting: Montse Stanley, Richard Ruttan...

  17. Inspiring the generations: the Knitting Reference Library

    OpenAIRE

    Newington, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The Knitting Reference Library (KRL) is part of the University of Southampton Library, and is located at Winchester School of Art, a campus of the University. The KRL was launched at the first In the loop conference in 2008 and is founded on the bibliographic collections of Richard Rutt, Montse Stanley and Jane Waller. Each collector possessed a serious passion for knitting, their individual approaches are illustrated through the resources they collected and established as an essential part o...

  18. The influence of a student's 'home' climate on room temperature and indoor environmental controls use in a modern halls of residence

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Rucha; Teli, Despoina; James, Patrick; Bourikas, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive comfort theory states that over time people adapt to their normal environment. Therefore, people from different climates are expected to have different thermal preferences and behaviours, which could lead to ‘performance gap’ in buildings with occupants of diverse climate backgrounds. This study investigates the influence of occupants’ thermal history on use of controls and indoor temperature preference in a newly built halls of residence building complex in Southampton, UK, which pr...

  19. The challenges of managing an international branch campus:An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a study of the challenges of managing an international branch campus(IBC) of a UK university. Branch or satellite campuses are not a new phenomenon.Within the UK, the Universities of Leicester, Nottingham and Southampton all began asuniversity colleges of the University of London, teaching a prescribed curriculum andacting as an examination centre for the University of London. Ironically perhaps, over acentury after London provided higher education to the provinces, at least 13...

  20. Norovirus Real Time RT-PCR Detection Technology Transition to the Joint Biological Identification and Diagnosis System (JBAIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    virus and Southampton virus, and II (GII), which includes Bristol virus, Lordsdale virus, Toronto virus, Mexico virus, Hawaii virus and Snow Mountain...Shigella flexneriATCC12022 1 Negative Shigella sonnei ATCC25931 1 Negative Vibrio cholera (NAG) (Culture) 2 Negative Vibrio cholera (Ogawa...Culture) 1 Negative Vibrio cholera (Inaga) (Culture) 1 Negative Sapovivus (Known specimen extract) 2 Negative Rotavirus (Known specimen extract) 2

  1. Food additives and children's behaviour: evidence based policy at the margins of certainty

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The possible effects of food additives (specifically artificial colours) have been debated for over 30 years. The evidence accumulated suggests that for some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) food colours exacerbate their condition. Two studies undertaken by a research group at the University of Southampton have extended these findings to the effects on hyperactivity in children from the general population who do not show ADHD. This article reviews the response ...

  2. Software pi/4 DQPSK Modem: A Student Project Using the TMS320-C6201 EVM Board

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, S; Braithwaite, SJ; Stewart, RD

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on a student project performed at the University of Southampton jointly by 4th year MEng students within the course "Advanced Radio Communications". The aim was to design a software modem capable of transmitting 16kb/s of data, whereby random number generation, advanced modulation, pulse shaping, synchronisation, and error counting techniques had to be applied. The ultimate aim was the implementation on a Texas Instruments TMS320-C6201 EVM board, which dictated some of the ...

  3. Sustainable procurement for greener logistics in the Higher Education sector

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, F.; Cherrett, T.; Bailey, G.; Allen, J.; Browne, M.; Leonardi, J.; Aditjandra, P.; Zunder, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Using the University of Southampton as a case study example, this paper reviews how procurement practices (i.e. purchasing of goods and services) of large organisations impact upon goods and service vehicle activity, with a view to investigating what approaches may be taken to reduce carbon footprint and improve environmental sustainability. The approaches considered included consolidation of suppliers, buyers (individuals and departments), orders and consignments. Research Approach:...

  4. Epidemiology of cancer in young persons in West Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snee, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    A brief report is given of a lecture by Professor Gardner of the MRC in which some of the epidemiological evidence of cancer in young persons in the vicinity of the Sellafield site was reviewed. The studies that the MRC Environmental Epidemiology Unit at Southampton were currently undertaking in relation to Recommendations 1,2 and 3 of the Black Committee 1984 Report were also outlined. Some of the questions put to Professor Gardner after his lecture are briefly discussed. (UK)

  5. Acoustic sensing of renal stone fragmentation in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy

    OpenAIRE

    Fedele, Fiammetta

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the research carried out by the author on the exploitation of acoustic emissions detected during extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (a non-invasive procedure for the treatment of urinary stones) to develop a new diagnostic system. The work formed part of a research project on lithotripsy undertaken by the University of Southampton in collaboration with Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (London) and a UK based company, Precision Acoustics Ltd (Dorche...

  6. Nonlinear Acoustics: Periodic Waveguide, Scattering of Sound by Sound, Three-Layer Fluid, Finite Amplitude Sound in a Medium Having a Distribution of Relaxation Processes, and Production of an Isolated Negative Pulse in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-03

    propagation and shape of the waveform," Conference on Lithotripsy (Extra-Corporeal Shock Wave Applications - Technical and Clinical Problems), Univer- sity of...Blackstock, "Physical aspects of lithotripsy ," Paper GG1, 115th Meeting, Acoustical Society of America, Seattle, 16-20 May 1988. ABSTRACT: J. Acoust...Am. 90, 2244(A) (1991). kAlso supported in part by Grant NAG-1-1204 and University of Southampton , Eng- land. 49 1992 ONR Contract Code 1109 JS 1. F

  7. A partnership approach to research data management

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Mark L.; White, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This outlines developments to support and enhance research data management policy and practice at the University of Southampton. It details a research-led approach to identify institutional challenges and priorities and use of this evidence-base to inform the creation of a 10 year roadmap and policy framework. The particular issues relating to workflow, storage, security and archiving are discussed and examples are given of both pilot and embedded services including data management planning s...

  8. Porous Electrodes I: Numerical Simulation Using Random Network and Single Pore Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-31

    characteristic of Zn and ZnO ) and scaling them down to the magnitude of a unit pore size- approximately 10i in diameter. We define a characteristic...supported by the Office of Naval Research under contract N00014-81-K-0339. 11 - 15 - REFERENCES 1. R. de Levis in Advances in Electrochemistry and...P. 3. Hendra Dr. C. E. Mueller Department of Chemistry The Electrochemistry Branch University of Southampton Naval Surface Weapons Center

  9. Alternative designs of high-temperature superconducting synchronous generators

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, K. F.; Lukasik, B.; Sykulski, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the different possible designs of both cored and coreless superconducting synchronous generators using high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, with particular reference to demonstrators built at the University of Southampton using BiSCCO conductors. An overview of the electromagnetic, thermal, and mechanical issues is provided, the advantages and drawbacks of particular designs are highlighted, the need for compromises is explained, and practical solutions are offer...

  10. Scientific publishing online,and the question of open access. Why such a long delay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kosmopoulos

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In October of 2003 in Berlin, twenty directors of European research institutes (the CNRS, INSERM, the Max Plank Institute, ratified a Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities, in which they committed themselves to supporting all initiatives based on the paradigm of free access on the Internet. In February 2005, the Berlin 3 Conference, held in Southampton, encouraged researchers to publish in journals offering free access. But while this model is being in...

  11. Autonomous Underwater Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,; Stephen,

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles are only now being marketed as robust commercial vehicles for many industries, and of these vehicles underwater gliders are becoming the new tool for oceanographers. Satellites have provided scientists and marine specialists with measurements of the sea surface such as temperature since the late 1970s, and data via subsurface oceanographic moorings since the 1950's. As stated by David Smeed of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, England, that "gliders...

  12. Coming up: energy from hot water wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.

    1982-06-17

    Britain's first commercial exploitation of geothermal energy, located at Southampton, is discused. The project will use a large aquifer with a temperature of 70/sup 0/C to heat a large shopping mall and office complex; the first heat should be produced in 1985. Also discussed is geothermal energy in the USA, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, El Salvadore, Iceland, France, Hungary, and the USSR. (MJF)

  13. The alternative library

    OpenAIRE

    Collinson, Timothy; Williams, A.

    2004-01-01

    Much time and effort has been devoted to designing and developing library Web sites that are easy to navigate by both new students and experienced researchers. In a review of the Southampton Institute Library it was decided that in addition to updating the existing homepage an alternative would be offered. Drawing on theory relating to user interface design, learning styles and creative thinking, an Alternative Library navigation system was added to the more traditional library homepage. The ...

  14. Theorising interprofessional pedagogic evaluation: framework for evaluating the impact of interprofessional CPD on practice change

    OpenAIRE

    Payler, Jane; Meyer, Edgar; Humphris, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This study outlines the development of a conceptual framework to guide the evaluation of the impact of the pedagogy employed in continuing professional development for professionals in education, health and social care. The work is developed as part of the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Interprofessional Learning across the Public Sector (CETL: IPPS) at the University of Southampton. The study briefly outlines the field for pedagogic research and comments on the underpinning ...

  15. Growth hormone doping: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erotokritou-Mulligan I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ioulietta Erotokritou-Mulligan, Richard IG Holt, Peter H SönksenDevelopmental Origins of Health and Disease Division, University of Southampton School of Medicine, The Institute of Developmental Science, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UKAbstract: The use of growth hormone (GH as a performance enhancing substance was first promoted in lay publications, long before scientists fully acknowledged its benefits. It is thought athletes currently use GH to enhance their athletic performance and to accelerate the healing of sporting injuries. Over recent years, a number of high profile athletes have admitted to using GH. To date, there is only limited and weak evidence for its beneficial effects on performance. Nevertheless the “hype” around its effectiveness and the lack of a foolproof detection methodology that will detect its abuse longer than 24 hours after the last injection has encouraged its widespread use. This article reviews the current evidence of the ergogenic effects of GH along with the risks associated with its use. The review also examines methodologies, both currently available and in development for detecting its abuse.Keywords: performance enhancing substance, GH, doping in sport, detection methods

  16. Design course in space astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, A J; Perez-Fournon, I

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this course is to provide direct experience of collaboration with other European astronomy/space science students and to gain an insight into the establishment of ESA space science programmes. The first half of the course takes place in Southampton. The Southampton students work as a team to track a past ESA space science mission from initial conception through to final realization and operations. This is achieved through the study of the high quality documentation available in the form of ESA reports. Each student has well defined responsibilities within the team. The second half of the course takes place in Tenerife, at the University of La Laguna. Again the students are expected to complete a team study of a space science mission. This time, however, there are important differences: the study teams are now international, approximately half Southampton and half University of La Laguna students; and this time they are expected to design a completely new space astronomy mission with clearly specified scientific objectives and operational constraints

  17. Erythropoietin and a nonerythropoietic peptide analog promote aortic endothelial cell repair under hypoxic conditions: role of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikal L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamia Heikal,1 Pietro Ghezzi,1 Manuela Mengozzi,1 Blanka Stelmaszczuk,2 Martin Feelisch,2 Gordon AA Ferns1 1Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, 2Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital and Institute for Life Sciences, Southampton, UK Abstract: The cytoprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO and an EPO-related nonerythropoietic analog, pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide (pHBSP, were investigated in an in vitro model of bovine aortic endothelial cell injury under normoxic (21% O2 and hypoxic (1% O2 conditions. The potential molecular mechanisms of these effects were also explored. Using a model of endothelial injury (the scratch assay, we found that, under hypoxic conditions, EPO and pHBSP enhanced scratch closure by promoting cell migration and proliferation, but did not show any effect under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, EPO protected bovine aortic endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis under hypoxic conditions. The priming effect of hypoxia was associated with stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, EPO receptor upregulation, and decreased Ser-1177 phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS; the effect of hypoxia on the latter was rescued by EPO. Hypoxia was associated with a reduction in nitric oxide (NO production as assessed by its oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate, consistent with the oxygen requirement for endogenous production of NO by endothelial NOS. However, while EPO did not affect NO formation in normoxia, it markedly increased NO production, in a manner sensitive to NOS inhibition, under hypoxic conditions. These data are consistent with the notion that the tissue-protective actions of EPO-related cytokines in pathophysiological settings associated with poor oxygenation are mediated by NO. These findings may be particularly relevant to atherogenesis and postangioplasty restenosis. Keywords

  18. Dicty_cDB: SLH243 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SL (Link to library) SLH243 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15469-1 SLH243P (Link to Original site) SLH2...43F 436 SLH243Z 369 SLH243P 805 - - Show SLH243 Library SL (Link to library) Clone ID SLH2... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH243Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID SLH2...43P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >SLH243 (SLH243Q) /CSM/SL/SLH2-B/SLH2...SA605. 785 0.0 1 ( AU062023 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SLH243. 785 0.0 1 ( BJ416791 ) Dicty

  19. Dicty_cDB: VHK202 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK202 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHK202P (Link to Original site) VHK2...02F 618 VHK202Z 741 VHK202P 1339 - - Show VHK202 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-A/VHK202Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHK2...02P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK202 (VHK202Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-A/VHK2...446805 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k21, 3' ... 1449 0.0 1 ( BJ446732 ) Dictyostelium discoide

  20. Dicty_cDB: VFK242 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VF (Link to library) VFK242 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VFK242P (Link to Original site) VFK2...42F 606 VFK242Z 292 VFK242P 878 - - Show VFK242 Library VF (Link to library) Clone ID VFK2... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VF/VFK2-B/VFK242Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VFK2...42P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VFK242 (VFK242Q) /CSM/VF/VFK2-B/VFK2...eum cDNA clone:ddv63n23, 5' ... 1142 0.0 1 ( BJ427875 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k24, 5' ...

  1. Dicty_cDB: VHK254 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK254 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 VHK254P (Link to Original site) VHK2...54F 616 VHK254Z 744 VHK254P 1340 - - Show VHK254 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK2...e URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-C/VHK254Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID VHK2...54P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK254 (VHK254Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-C/VHK2...BJ446805 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k21, 3' ... 1455 0.0 1 ( BJ446732 ) Dictyostelium discoi

  2. Dicty_cDB: VHK278 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHK278 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16260-1 - (Link to Original site) VHK2...78F 533 - - - - - - Show VHK278 Library VH (Link to library) Clone ID VHK278 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK278Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >VHK278 (VHK278Q) /CSM/VH/VHK2-D/VHK278Q.Seq.d/ AACTCTCGAGTGCAAAA...BJ427875 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k24, 5' ... 997 0.0 1 ( BJ427874 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddv63k2

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05633-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) PUHQF14TD ZM_0.6_1.0_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZM... 46 1.9 1 ( EC770709 ) EST 7205 Guarana fruits cDNA library Paullinia cu...o... 44 7.7 1 ( BM027318 ) GIT0000656 Root-induced cDNA library from Glomus ... 44 7.7 1 ( BJ427410 ) Dic...ble cien cDNA librar... 50 0.12 1 ( EW965375 ) BRHL_03_O01_T7 Headlice composite library... DN564657 ) 90838967 Sea Urchin primary mesenchyme cell cDNA ... 46 1.9 1 ( CN845958 ) PG07006A08 Ginseng cDNA library from MeJA tre... BF648097 ) NF044C02EC1F1017 Elicited cell culture Medicago t... 44 7.7 1 ( BF646377 ) NF071B12EC1F1096 Elicited cell culture Medic

  4. A Review of Multimode Interference in Tapered Optical Fibers and Related Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Xianfan; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, tapered optical fibers (TOFs) have attracted increasing interest and developed into a range of devices used in many practical applications ranging from optical communication, sensing to optical manipulation and high-Q resonators. Compared with conventional optical fibers, TOFs possess a range of unique features, such as large evanescent field, strong optical confinement, mechanical flexibility and compactness. In this review, we critically summarize the multimode interference in TOFs and some of its applications with a focus on our research project undertaken at the Optoelectronics Research Centre of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. PMID:29538333

  5. Multi-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation analysis using the modified finite element method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náprstek, Jiří; Král, Radomil

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 744, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 012177. ISSN 1742-6588. [International Conference on Motion and Vibration Control (MOVIC 2016) /13./ and International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics (RASD 2016) /12./. Southampton, 04.07.2016-06.07.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-34467P; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01035S Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : Fokker-Planck equation * finite element method * single degree of freedom systems (SDOF) Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/744/1/012177

  6. When science meets capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Greg

    2008-03-01

    When I joined the University of Southampton's microelectronics group in 1987 after spending 10 years in industry, I shared some of my commercial ideas for advancing the group into the 21st century with my academic colleagues. To say that my personal vision of paradise was close to their vision of hell is probably a pretty accurate observation. Two decades on, I now understand why they felt that way. Science for Sale contains a lot of information that explains this vast difference in perception, and the book also does a good job of highlighting how academia and industry differ on practical and ethical levels.

  7. CSIR ScienceScope: Space science & technology in CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available biology and carbon fluxes.” Bernard says his interest in water em- anates from all the time he spent in the water as a boy, growing up near Lake Malawi. He obtained his BSc in oceanography and physics at the University of Southampton in the United... not only re- lies on earth observation data, but em- braces chemistry, physics, biology and mathematics by transcending disciplinary boundaries to treat the earth as an inte- grated system. The observation and com- putationally intensive coupled...

  8. A Case Study for Business Integration as a Service

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Business Integration as a Service (BIaaS) to allow two services to work together in the Cloud to achieve a streamline process. We illustrate this integration using two services; Return on Investment (ROI) Measurement as a Service (RMaaS) and Risk Analysis as a Service (RAaaS) in the case study at the University of Southampton. The case study demonstrates the cost-savings and the risk analysis achieved, so two services can work as a single service. Advanced techniques are u...

  9. A Lab-On-Chip Phosphate Analyzer for Long-term In Situ Monitoring at Fixed Observatories: Optimization and Performance Evaluation in Estuarine and Oligotrophic Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime M. Grand

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of phosphate sensors suitable for long-term in situ deployments in natural waters, is essential to improve our understanding of the distribution, fluxes, and biogeochemical role of this key nutrient in a changing ocean. Here, we describe the optimization of the molybdenum blue method for in situ work using a lab-on-chip (LOC analyzer and evaluate its performance in the laboratory and at two contrasting field sites. The in situ performance of the LOC sensor is evaluated using hourly time-series data from a 56-day trial in Southampton Water (UK, as well as a month-long deployment in the subtropical oligotrophic waters of Kaneohe Bay (Hawaii, USA. In Kaneohe Bay, where phosphate concentrations were characteristic of the dry season (0.13 ± 0.03 μM, n = 704, the in situ sensor accuracy was 16 ± 12% and a potential diurnal cycle in phosphate concentrations was observed. In Southampton Water, the sensor data (1.02 ± 0.40 μM, n = 1,267 were accurate to ±0.10 μM relative to discrete reference samples. Hourly in situ monitoring revealed striking tidal and storm derived fluctuations in phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water that would not have been captured via discrete sampling. We show the impact of storms on phosphate concentrations in Southampton Water is modulated by the spring-neap tidal cycle and that the 10-fold decline in phosphate concentrations observed during the later stages of the deployment was consistent with the timing of a spring phytoplankton bloom in the English Channel. Under controlled laboratory conditions in a 250 L tank, the sensor demonstrated an accuracy and precision better than 10% irrespective of the salinity (0–30, turbidity (0–100 NTU, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM concentration (0–10 mg/L, and temperature (5–20°C of the water (0.3–13 μM phosphate being analyzed. This work demonstrates that the LOC technology is mature enough to quantify the influence of stochastic events on

  10. How likely are older people to take up different falls prevention activities?

    OpenAIRE

    Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav Ben; Gilbert, Rebecca; Whitehead, Sarah; Todd, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent to which older people are willing to engage in different falls preventionactivities, and how this may vary in different sectors of the older population.Methods: A survey sent to patients aged over 54 in ten general practices in the Southampton, Bristol andManchester areas of the UK in 2006 yielded 5,440 respondents. The survey assessed willingness to attendclasses of strength and balance training (SBT), carry out SBT at home, or accept support to reduce home...

  11. The empty carriage: lessons in leadership from Florence Nightingale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegge, Marge

    2011-01-01

    Florence Nightingale made a profound statement about leadership when she returned from the Crimean War without the fanfare offered to her. Promoters paraded her empty carriage around the city of Southampton England to applaud her accomplishments in the war. Her absence signaled a new leadership, one of quiet determination, humility, and political strategy to improve quality of life. The lessons to be learned for today's nurse leaders revolve around mindfulness, clarity of purpose, reverence for human life, collaborative partnerships, co-evolution, engagement, keeping up with a world in motion, and making meaning.

  12. Full Cryogenic Test of 600 A HTS Hybrid Current Leads for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Mosawi, MK; Beduz, C; Ballarino, A; Yang, Y

    2007-01-01

    For full cryogenic test of CERN 600 A High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads prior to integration into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a ded. facility has been designed, constructed and operated at the University of Southampton. The facility consists of purpose-built test cryostats, 20 K helium gas supply, helium gas flow and temperature control systems and quench protection system. Over 400 such leads have already been successfully tested and qualified for installation at CERN. This paper describes various design and operation aspects of the test facility and presents the detailed cryogenic test results of the CERN 600 A current leads, including steady state 20 K flow rates.

  13. EPRINT ARCHIVE USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    University of Southampton invites the CERN community to participate in a survey Professor Stevan Harnad is conducting on current users and non-users of Eprint Archives. http://www.eprints.org/survey/ The findings will be used to suggest potential enhancements of the services as well as to get a deeper understanding of the very rapid developments in the on-line dissemination and use of scientific and scholarly research. (The survey is anonymous. Revealing your identity is optional and it will be kept confidential.)

  14. Progress towards extreme attitude testing with Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Parker, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is reported in a research effort aimed towards demonstration of the feasibility of suspension and aerodynamic testing of models at high angles of attack in wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems. Extensive modifications, described in this paper, have been made to the Southampton University suspension system in order to facilitate this work. They include revision of electromagnet configuration, installation of all-new position sensors and expansion of control system programs. An angle of attack range of 0 to 90 deg is expected for axisymmetric models. To date, suspension up to 80 deg angle of attack has been achieved.

  15. A Review of Multimode Interference in Tapered Optical Fibers and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tapered optical fibers (TOFs have attracted increasing interest and developed into a range of devices used in many practical applications ranging from optical communication, sensing to optical manipulation and high-Q resonators. Compared with conventional optical fibers, TOFs possess a range of unique features, such as large evanescent field, strong optical confinement, mechanical flexibility and compactness. In this review, we critically summarize the multimode interference in TOFs and some of its applications with a focus on our research project undertaken at the Optoelectronics Research Centre of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom.

  16. A Review of Multimode Interference in Tapered Optical Fibers and Related Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Xianfan; Farrell, Gerald; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2018-03-14

    In recent years, tapered optical fibers (TOFs) have attracted increasing interest and developed into a range of devices used in many practical applications ranging from optical communication, sensing to optical manipulation and high-Q resonators. Compared with conventional optical fibers, TOFs possess a range of unique features, such as large evanescent field, strong optical confinement, mechanical flexibility and compactness. In this review, we critically summarize the multimode interference in TOFs and some of its applications with a focus on our research project undertaken at the Optoelectronics Research Centre of the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom.

  17. Nonlinear Acoustics: Periodic Waveguide, Finite-Amplitude Propagation in a Medium Having a Distribution of Relaxation Processes, and Production of an Isolated Negative Pulse in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-24

    T. Blackstock, "Shock wave propagation and shape of the waveform," Conference on Lithotripsy (Extra-Corporeal Shock Wave Applications - Technical and...83, S5 (1988). 0574 0 b4 . D. T. Blackstock, "Physical aspects of lithotripsy ," Paper GG1, 115th Meeting, Acoustical Society of America, Seattle, 16...1991). kAlso supported in part by Grant NAG-1-1204 and University of Southampton , Eng- land. 23 1992 ONR Contract Code 1109 0 𔃻. James A. Ten Cate

  18. Educational attainment, perceived control and the quality of women's diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Mary; Lawrence, Wendy; Crozier, Sarah; Robinson, Siân; Baird, Janis; Margetts, Barrie; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-06-01

    Data from the Southampton Women's Survey have established that women of lower educational attainment have poorer quality diets than those of higher educational attainment. This relationship is strong and graded such that for every increase in level of educational qualification, there is an increase in the likelihood that a woman will have a better quality diet. It is not wholly explained by socio-economic status. Qualitative research carried out in Southampton suggests that women of lower educational attainment may have a poorer diet because they feel they lack control over the food choices they make for themselves and their families. We set out to investigate the relationship between educational attainment, perceived control and quality of diet in a sample of women from Southampton. Cross-sectional study using structured interviews in which women's diet, educational attainment and perceived control were assessed. 19 Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. 372 women, median age 28 years. Quality of diet assessed by prudent diet score produced from principal components analysis of 20-item food frequency questionnaire, and perceived control assessed by a validated questionnaire. Women of lower educational attainment tended to have lower prudent diet scores and lower perceived control scores than women of higher educational attainment. Having a lower prudent diet score was associated with consuming fewer vegetables and vegetable dishes, less wholemeal bread and vegetarian food, and more chips and roast potatoes, meat pies, Yorkshire puddings and pancakes, crisps and snacks, white bread and added sugar. In a regression model both lower educational attainment and lower perceived control were associated with lower prudent diet scores, independent of the effects of confounding factors. However there was an interaction effect such that lower perceived control was only related to prudent diet score in the group of women of lower educational attainment. Women

  19. Perturbative and nonperturbative renormalization in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Horsley, R. [University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Perlt, H. [Leipzig Univ. (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2010-03-15

    We investigate the perturbative and nonperturbative renormalization of composite operators in lattice QCD restricting ourselves to operators that are bilinear in the quark fields (quark-antiquark operators). These include operators which are relevant to the calculation of moments of hadronic structure functions. The nonperturbative computations are based on Monte Carlo simulations with two flavors of clover fermions and utilize the Rome-Southampton method also known as the RI-MOM scheme. We compare the results of this approach with various estimates from lattice perturbation theory, in particular with recent two-loop calculations. (orig.)

  20. What the drivers do and do not tell you: using verbal protocol analysis to investigate driver behaviour in emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Victoria A; Stanton, Neville A; Harvey, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Although task analysis of pedestrian detection can provide us with useful insights into how a driver may behave in emergency situations, the cognitive elements of driver decision-making are less well understood. To assist in the design of future Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, such as Autonomous Emergency Brake systems, it is essential that the cognitive elements of the driving task are better understood. This paper uses verbal protocol analysis in an exploratory fashion to uncover the thought processes underlying behavioural outcomes represented by hard data collected using the Southampton University Driving Simulator.

  1. Manipulation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using Synthetic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Zachary; Gomit, Guillaume; Lavoie, Philippe; Ganapathisubramani, Bharath

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the application of active flow control, in the form of synthetic jet actuators, of turbulent boundary layers. An array of 2 synthetic jets are oriented in the spanwise direction and located approximately 2.7 meters downstream from the leading edge of a flat plate. Actuation is applied perpendicular to the surface of the flat plate with varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies (open-loop). Two-component large window particle image velocimetry (PIV) was performed at the University of Southampton, in the streamwise-wall-normal plane. Complementary stereo PIV measurements were performed at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), in the spanwise-wall-normal plane. The freestream Reynolds number is 3x104, based on the boundary layer thickness. The skin friction Reynolds number is 1,200 based on the skin friction velocity. The experiments at Southampton allow for the observation of the control effects as the flow propagates downstream. The experiments at UTIAS allow for the observation of the streamwise vorticity induced from the actuation. Overall the two experiments provide a 3D representation of the flow field with respect to actuation effects. The current work focuses on the comparison of the two experiments, as well as the effects of varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies on the turbulent boundary layer. Funded Supported by Airbus.

  2. Recovery from TBT pollution in English Channel environments: A problem solved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, W J; Pope, N D; Davey, M; Langston, K M; O' Hara, S C M; Gibbs, P E; Pascoe, P L

    2015-06-30

    Following recognition of effects in the 1980s, tributyltin (TBT) has been monitored at sites in the English Channel to evaluate the prognosis for biota - spanning the introduction of restrictions on TBT use on small boats and the recent phase-out on the global fleet. We describe how persistence and impact of TBT in clams Scrobicularia plana has changed during this period in Southampton Water and Poole Harbour. TBT contamination (and loss) in water, sediment and clams reflects the abundance and type of vessel activity: half-times in sediment (up to 8y in Poole, 33y in Southampton) are longest near commercial shipping. Recovery of clam populations - slowest in TBT-contaminated deposits - provides a useful biological measure of legislative efficacy in estuaries. On rocky shores, recovery from imposex in Nucella lapillus is evident at many sites but, near ports, is prolonged by shipping impacts, including sediment legacy, for example, in the Fal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Open Access UHPSFC/MS - an additional analytical resource for an academic mass spectrometry facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herniman, Julie M; Langley, G John

    2016-08-15

    Many compounds submitted for analysis in Chemistry at the University of Southampton do not retain, elute or ionize using open access reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC/MS) and require analysis via infusion. An ultra-high-performance supercritical fluid chromatography mass spectrometry approach was implemented to afford high-throughput analysis of these compounds with chromatographic separation. A UPC(2) -TQD MS system has been incorporated into the open access MS provision within Chemistry at the University of Southampton, using an ESCi source (electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization) and an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Access to instrumentation is enabled via a web-based interface (RemoteAnalyzer™). Compounds such as fluorosugars, fullerenes, phosphoramidites, porphyrins, and rotaxanes exhibiting properties incompatible with RP-UHPLC/MS have been analyzed using automated chromatography and mass spectrometry methods. The speedy return of data enables research in these areas to progress unhindered by sample type. The provision of an electronic web format enables easy incorporation of chromatograms and mass spectra into electronic files and reports. The implementation of UHPSFC/MS increases access to a wide range of chemistries incompatible with reversed-phase chromatography and polar solvents, enabling more than 90% of submitted samples to be analyzed using an open access approach. Further, chromatographic separation is provided where previously flow injection or infusion analyses were the only options. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Translating Developmental Origins: Improving the Health of Women and Their Children Using a Sustainable Approach to Behaviour Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Barker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Theories of the developmental origins of health and disease imply that optimising the growth and development of babies is an essential route to improving the health of populations. A key factor in the growth of babies is the nutritional status of their mothers. Since women from more disadvantaged backgrounds have poorer quality diets and the worst pregnancy outcomes, they need to be a particular focus. The behavioural sciences have made a substantial contribution to the development of interventions to support dietary changes in disadvantaged women. Translation of such interventions into routine practice is an ideal that is rarely achieved, however. This paper illustrates how re-orientating health and social care services towards an empowerment approach to behaviour change might underpin a new developmental focus to improving long-term health, using learning from a community-based intervention to improve the diets and lifestyles of disadvantaged women. The Southampton Initiative for Health aimed to improve the diets and lifestyles of women of child-bearing age through training health and social care practitioners in skills to support behaviour change. Analysis illustrates the necessary steps in mounting such an intervention: building trust; matching agendas and changing culture. The Southampton Initiative for Health demonstrates that developing sustainable; workable interventions and effective community partnerships; requires commitment beginning long before intervention delivery but is key to the translation of developmental origins research into improvements in human health.

  5. Relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes SJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarah J Holmes,1 Stephen C Allen,2,3 Helen C Roberts4,5 1Medicine and Elderly Care, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Winchester, 2Medicine and Geriatrics, The Royal Bournemouth Hospital and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, 3Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, Bournemouth University, Poole, 4Academic Geriatric Medicine, University of Southampton, 5University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Objective: Older people with reduced respiratory muscle strength may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients without known airways disease.Methods: Patients in acute medical wards were recruited who were aged ≥70 years; no history, symptoms, or signs of respiratory disease; Mini Mental State Examination ≥24; willing and able to consent to participate; and able to perform hand grip and forced spirometry. Data including lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate [PEFR], and slow vital capacity [SVC], grip strength, age, weight, and height were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression unadjusted and adjusted (for age, height, and weight.Results: A total of 50 patients (20 men were recruited. Stronger grip strength in men was significantly associated with greater FEV1, but this was attenuated by adjustment for age, height, and weight. Significant positive associations were found in women between grip strength and both PEFR and SVC, both of which remained robust to adjustment.Conclusion: The association between grip strength and PEFR and SVC may reflect stronger patients generating higher intrathoracic pressure at the start of spirometry and pushing harder against thoracic cage recoil at end-expiration. Conversely, patients with

  6.  Patient safety in orthopedic surgery: prioritizing key areas of iatrogenic harm through an analysis of 48,095 incidents reported to a national database of errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panesar SS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  Sukhmeet S Panesar,1 Andrew Carson-Stevens,2 Sarah A Salvilla,1 Bhavesh Patel,3 Saqeb B Mirza,4 Bhupinder Mann51Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 3National Patient Safety Agency, London, UK; 4Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, Hampshire, UK; 5Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UKBackground: With scientific and technological advances, the practice of orthopedic surgery has transformed the lives of millions worldwide. Such successes however have a downside; not only is the provision of comprehensive orthopedic care becoming a fiscal challenge to policy-makers and funders, concerns are also being raised about the extent of the associated iatrogenic harm. The National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS in England and Wales is an underused resource which collects intelligence from reports about health care error.Methods: Using methods akin to case-control methodology, we have identified a method of prioritizing the areas of a national database of errors that have the greatest propensity for harm. Our findings are presented using odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs.Results: The largest proportion of surgical patient safety incidents reported to the NRLS was from the trauma and orthopedics specialty, 48,095/163,595 (29.4%. Of those, 14,482/48,095 (30.1% resulted in iatrogenic harm to the patient and 71/48,095 (0.15% resulted in death. The leading types of errors associated with harm involved the implementation of care and on-going monitoring (OR 5.94, 95% CI 5.53, 6.38; self-harming behavior of patients in hospitals (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.45, 3.18; and infection control (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.69, 2.17. We analyze these data to quantify the extent and type of iatrogenic

  7. Design optimization of 600 A-13 kA current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, D M; Al-Mosawl, M K; Friend, C M; Thacker, P; Ballarino, A

    2001-01-01

    The requirements of the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads have been widely publicized. CERN require hybrid current leads of resistive and HTS materials with current ratings of 600 A, 6 kA and 13 kA. BICC General Superconductors, in collaboration with the University of Southampton, have developed and manufactured prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project. The resistive section consists of a phosphorus de-oxidized copper conductor and heat exchanger and the HTS section is constructed from BICC General's (Pb, Bi)2223 tapes with a reduced thermal conductivity Ag alloy sheath. We present the results of the materials optimization studies for the resistive and the HTS sections. Some results of the acceptance tests at CERN are discussed. (9 refs).

  8. Report on the Marine Imaging Workshop 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timm Schoening

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine optical imaging has become a major assessment tool in science, policy and public understanding of our seas and oceans. Methodology in this field is developing rapidly, including hardware, software and the ways of their application. The aim of the Marine Imaging Workshop (MIW is to bring together academics, research scientists and engineers, as well as industrial partners to discuss these developments, along with applications, challenges and future directions. The first MIW was held in Southampton, UK in April 2014. The second MIW, held in Kiel, Germany, in 2017 involved more than 100 attendees, who shared the latest developments in marine imaging through a combination of traditional oral and poster presentations, interactive sessions and focused discussion sessions. This article summarises the topics addressed during the workshop, particularly the outcomes of these discussion sessions for future reference and to make the workshop results available to the open public.

  9. 13th Forum for Specification and Design Languages (FDL) conference

    CERN Document Server

    Morawiec, Adam; System Specification and Design Languages : Selected Contributions from FDL 2010

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together a selection of the best papers from the thirteenth edition of the Forum on specification and Design Languages Conference (FDL), which was held in Southampton, UK in September 2010.  FDL is a well established international forum devoted to dissemination of research results, practical experiences and new ideas in the application of specification, design and verification languages to the design, modelling and verification of integrated circuits, complex hardware/software embedded systems, and mixed-technology systems. Covers design verification, automatic synthesis and mechanized debug aids; Includes language-based modeling and design techniques for embedded systems; Covers design, modeling and verification of mixed physical domain and mixed signal systems that include significant analog parts in electrical and non-electrical domains; Includes formal and semi-formal system level design methods for complex embedded systems based on the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and Model Driven E...

  10. Measurement and Numerical Evaluation of AC-Losses in a ReBCO Roebel Cable at 4.5 K

    CERN Document Server

    van Nugteren, J.; Gao, P.; Bottura, L,; Dhallé, M.; Goldacker, W.; Kario, A.; ten Kate, H.; Kirby, G.; Krooshoop, E.; de Rijk, G.; Rossi, L.; Senatore, C.; Wessel, S.; Yagotintsev, K.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    EUCARD2 aims to research ReBCO superconducting magnets for future accelerator applications. The properties of ReBCO conductors are very different from low temperature superconductors. To investigate dynamic field quality, stability and normal zone propagation an electrical network model for coated conductor cables was developed. To validate the model two identical samples were prepared at CERN after which measurements were taken at the University of Twente and Southampton University. The model predicts that for Roebel cable, in a changing magnetic field applied in the perpendicular direction, the hysteresis loss is much larger than the coupling loss. In the case of a changing magnetic field applied parallel to the cable coupling loss is dominant. In the first case the experiment is in good agreement with the model. In the second case the data can only be compared qualitatively because the calibration for the inductive measurement is not available.

  11. Mercury in a coastal marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, J D; Leatherland, T M

    1971-06-18

    The problem of mercury pollution was investigated in Southampton Water and the English Channel. Mercury was determined in five specimens of the mollusk, Mercenaria mercenaria. The concentrations in whole organisms, without shell, ranged from 0.18 to 0.57 p.p.m. The amounts of mercury in the river and estuarine waters were found to be low. Yet, samples from the surface of the bottom mud in different parts of the estuary had mercury contents ranging from 0.19 to 0.64 p.p.m. The role of sediments in the transport of mercury in food chains could be significant, particularly for bottom living, suspension feeding animals. 14 references, 1 table.

  12. Firefly: A HOT camera core for thermal imagers with enhanced functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillans, Luke; Harmer, Jack; Edwards, Tim

    2015-06-01

    Raising the operating temperature of mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors from 80K to above 160K creates new applications for high performance infrared imagers by vastly reducing the size, weight and power consumption of the integrated cryogenic cooler. Realizing the benefits of Higher Operating Temperature (HOT) requires a new kind of infrared camera core with the flexibility to address emerging applications in handheld, weapon mounted and UAV markets. This paper discusses the Firefly core developed to address these needs by Selex ES in Southampton UK. Firefly represents a fundamental redesign of the infrared signal chain reducing power consumption and providing compatibility with low cost, low power Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) computing technology. This paper describes key innovations in this signal chain: a ROIC purpose built to minimize power consumption in the proximity electronics, GPU based image processing of infrared video, and a software customisable infrared core which can communicate wirelessly with other Battlespace systems.

  13. Helminths Parasite Larvae collected from Arabian Gulf Fish. 4. Description of four Larvae including two Metacercarae, one Didymozoid and one Acanthocephalan from Emirati Coasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardousha, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Four helminth larvae from different fish hosts caught from Emirate coasts are described. Two are metacercariae related to genus Southampton's, type (I) and (II). Type (I) was found encysted in body cavities of the Indian halibut Psettodes erumei and the areolate grouper Epinephelus areolatusu and type (II) in the golden stripped goatfish Mulloides flavolineatus. The third larva is related to Acanthocephala and identified as Serrasentis sagittifer. It was collected from the body cavity of the spotted lizard fish Saurida undosquamius. The fourth larva belongs to the didymozoid trematodes, and was found infecting the kidneys of different hosts, such as Saurida undosquamis, the Jack pomfret Parastromateus niger and mackerel tuna Euthynnus affins. The larva related to Stephanostomum type (I) and type (II) and the dydimozoid type are described for the first time in the Arabian Gulf. (author)

  14. Landscape, Memory and Myth: An Interview with Native American Artist, Jeremy Dennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis, Jeremy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeremy Dennis is a photographer and visual artist living and working in Southampton, New York. He is a member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation; a federally recognised tribe of historically Algonquian-speaking Native Americans based at the eastern end of Long Island, New York. He received his MFA from Pennsylvania State University in 2016, and in the same year, was one of only two artists in the USA awarded the Harpo Native American Residency Fellowship. In his work, Jeremy channels his experiences as an indigenous artist to explore and expand upon issues relating to identity, assimilation and post-colonialism. Through a combination of digitally manipulated photography, site-specific installation, performance and documentation, Dennis attempts to create multi-dimensional conversations around local and broader contemporary Native American issues, whilst also referencing its rich and complex history. jeremynative.com

  15. Perturbatively improving RI-MOM renormalization constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinou, M.; Costa, M.; Panagopoulos, H. [Cyprus Univ. (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Schhierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The determination of renormalization factors is of crucial importance in lattice QCD. They relate the observables obtained on the lattice to their measured counterparts in the continuum in a suitable renormalization scheme. Therefore, they have to be computed as precisely as possible. A widely used approach is the nonperturbative Rome-Southampton method. It requires, however, a careful treatment of lattice artifacts. In this paper we investigate a method to suppress these artifacts by subtracting one-loop contributions to renormalization factors calculated in lattice perturbation theory. We compare results obtained from a complete one-loop subtraction with those calculated for a subtraction of contributions proportional to the square of the lattice spacing.

  16. The UK National Quantum Technologies Hub in sensors and metrology (Keynote Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongs, K.; Boyer, V.; Cruise, M. A.; Freise, A.; Holynski, M.; Hughes, J.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Petrov, P.; Plant, S.; Singh, Y.; Stabrawa, A.; Paul, D. J.; Sorel, M.; Cumming, D. R. S.; Marsh, J. H.; Bowtell, R. W.; Bason, M. G.; Beardsley, R. P.; Campion, R. P.; Brookes, M. J.; Fernholz, T.; Fromhold, T. M.; Hackermuller, L.; Krüger, P.; Li, X.; Maclean, J. O.; Mellor, C. J.; Novikov, S. V.; Orucevic, F.; Rushforth, A. W.; Welch, N.; Benson, T. M.; Wildman, R. D.; Freegarde, T.; Himsworth, M.; Ruostekoski, J.; Smith, P.; Tropper, A.; Griffin, P. F.; Arnold, A. S.; Riis, E.; Hastie, J. E.; Paboeuf, D.; Parrotta, D. C.; Garraway, B. M.; Pasquazi, A.; Peccianti, M.; Hensinger, W.; Potter, E.; Nizamani, A. H.; Bostock, H.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Sinuco-Leon, G.; Hill, I. R.; Williams, R. A.; Gill, P.; Hempler, N.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Cross, T.; Kock, B. O.; Maddox, S.; John, P.

    2016-04-01

    The UK National Quantum Technology Hub in Sensors and Metrology is one of four flagship initiatives in the UK National of Quantum Technology Program. As part of a 20-year vision it translates laboratory demonstrations to deployable practical devices, with game-changing miniaturized components and prototypes that transform the state-of-the-art for quantum sensors and metrology. It brings together experts from the Universities of Birmingham, Glasgow, Nottingham, Southampton, Strathclyde and Sussex, NPL and currently links to over 15 leading international academic institutions and over 70 companies to build the supply chains and routes to market needed to bring 10-1000x improvements in sensing applications. It seeks, and is open to, additional partners for new application development and creates a point of easy open access to the facilities and supply chains that it stimulates or nurtures.

  17. Rare models: Roger Casement, the Amazon, and the ethnographic picturesque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    In 1910 Roger Casement was sent by the British government to investigate the alleged humanitarian abuses of the Peruvian Amazon Company in the Putumayo, a disputed border zone in North West Amazonia. Casement brought more than verbal and written testimony back to London. On 26 June, some six months after he returned from the Amazon, Casement collected two Amerindian boys - Omarino and Ricudo - from Southampton docks. This paper will reconstruct the brief period that these young men spent in Britain in the summer of 1911 and assess, in particular, to what extent they were treated as 'exhibits' by Casement, who not only introduced them to leading members of the British establishment but also arranged for them to be painted and photographed following contemporary ethnographic conventions.

  18. Rehand: Realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Ryo; Higashihara, Takanori; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Myoelectric prosthetic hands provide an appearance with five fingers and a grasping function to forearm amputees. However, they have problems in weight, appearance, and cost. This paper reports on the Rehand, a realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer. It provides a realistic appearance that is same as the cosmetic prosthetic hand and a grasping function. A simple link mechanism with one linear actuator for grasping and 3D printed parts achieve low cost, light weight, and ease of maintenance. An operating system based on a distance sensor provides a natural operability equivalent to the myoelectric control system. A supporter socket allows them to wear the prosthetic hand easily. An evaluation using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) demonstrated that an amputee was able to operate various objects and do everyday activities with the Rehand.

  19. The impact of reconstruction and scanner characterisation on the diagnostic capability of a normal database for [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickson, John C; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Sera, Terez

    2017-01-01

    for scan normality using the ENC-DAT normal database obtained in well-documented healthy subjects. Patient and normal data were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction with correction for attenuation, scatter and septal penetration (ACSC), the same reconstruction without corrections (IRNC......), and filtered back-projection (FBP) with data quantified using small volume-of-interest (VOI) (BRASS) and large VOI (Southampton) analysis methods. Test performance was assessed with and without system characterisation, using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis for age-independent data and using......BACKGROUND: The use of a normal database for [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT imaging has been found to be helpful for cases which are difficult to interpret by visual assessment alone, and to improve reproducibility in scan interpretation. The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of different...

  20. Urban hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Third International Conference on Urban Storm Drainage will be held in Goteborg, Sweden, June 4-8, 1984. Contact A. Sjoborg, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden, for more information. The Fourth Conference will be in late August 1987 in Lausanne, Switzerland, and the Fifth Conference is planned for Tokyo in 1990. The proceedings of the First International Conference, held in Southampton, England, in April 1978, are available from Wiley-Interscience under the title “Urban Storm Drainage.”The proceedings of the Second International Conference, held in Urbana, Illinois, in June 1981, are available from Water Resources Publications, Littleton, Colo., under the title, “Urban Stormwater Hydraulics and Hydrology” and “Urban Stormwater Quality, Management, and Planning.”

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  2. Maternal serum retinol and β-carotene concentrations and neonatal bone mineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Händel, Mina N; Moon, Rebecca J.; Titcombe, Philip

    2016-01-01

    were assessed prepregnancy and at 11 and 34 wk of gestation. In late pregnancy, maternal serum retinol and β-carotene concentrations were measured. Offspring total body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone area (BA) were measured within 2 wk after birth. RESULTS: In total......BACKGROUND: Studies in older adults and animals have suggested contrasting relations between bone health and different vitamin A compounds. To our knowledge, the associations between maternal vitamin A status and offspring bone development have not previously been elucidated. OBJECTIVE: We examined...... the associations between maternal serum retinol and β-carotene concentrations during late pregnancy and offspring bone mineralization assessed at birth with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. DESIGN: In the Southampton Women's Survey mother-offspring birth cohort, maternal health, lifestyle, and diet...

  3. Progress of Space Charge Research on Oil-Paper Insulation Using Pulsed Electroacoustic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the space charge behavior in oil-paper insulation systems used in power transformers. It begins with the importance of understanding the space charge behavior in oil-paper insulation systems, followed by the introduction of the pulsed electrostatic technique (PEA. After that, the research progress on the space charge behavior of oil-paper insulation during the recent twenty years is critically reviewed. Some important aspects such as the environmental conditions and the acoustic wave recovery need to be addressed to acquire more accurate space charge measurement results. Some breakthroughs on the space charge behavior of oil-paper insulation materials by the research team at the University of Southampton are presented. Finally, future work on space charge measurement of oil-paper insulation materials is proposed.

  4. Abriendo la historia, abriendo la enseñanza. Una aproximación al proyecto OpenLIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Borthwick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The OpenLIVES project (Learning Insights from the Voices of Émigrés will digitise and publish materials documenting the experiences of Spanish migrants especially to France, Germany and the UK during the decade of 50s, 60s and 70s and returning migrants to Spain, repurposing this data as open educational resources. Such primary research data on migration has potential relevance to a wide range of academic disciplines including history, politics, economics, sociology, etc. and is of ongoing interest and debate in the wider world. The project will demonstrate that a set of research data collected using an ethnographic methodology for a specific purpose can be used in a range of ways within humanities and social science disciplines. The data and open education resources will be released, in the first instance using the community repository for the humanities, Humbox, developed with funding from JISC by the University of Southampton.

  5. Ship board testing of a deoxygenation ballast water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollin, Tracy; Quilez-Badia, Gemma; Josefsen, Kjell D; Gill, Margaret E; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Frid, Chris L J

    2007-08-01

    A ship board trial of a deoxygenation method for treating ballast water was carried out during a voyage from Southampton (United Kingdom) to Manzanillo (Panama). A nutrient solution added to two ballast tanks encouraged bacterial growth, resulting in a gradual change to an anoxic environment. Samples were taken from two treated tanks and two untreated tanks to assess changes in the abundance and viability of zooplankton, phytoplankton and bacteria. The work was carried out before the International Maritime Organization (IMO) standard was agreed so only a broad indication of whether the results achieved the standard was given. For the zooplankton, the standard would have been achieved within 5 or 7 days but the phytoplankton results were inconclusive. The biological efficacy was the result of the combination of several factors, including the treatment, pump damage and an increase in the water temperature during the voyage.

  6. The refrigeration of high temperature superconductors between 25K and 65K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, R.N.; Scurlock, R.G.; Tavner, A.C.R.

    1996-01-01

    The present state of the art indicates that acceptable j - H characteristics for power applications of the new high Tc superconductors will only be achieved using materials at temperatures below liquid nitrogen temperature. A boiling point of 27.1K and high specific cooling capacity make neon an eminently suitable choice of refrigerant at these temperatures. A cryostat has been constructed which employs a two stage Gifford-McMahon cooler to liquefy neon gas. The cryostat contains up to 5 litres of liquid neon which can be used for open-quote in-situ close-quote experiments or transfer to another cryostat. Another set of cryostats are being used with liquid nitrogen/oxygen mixtures at reduced pressure for temperatures down to 50K. All these cryostats provide a core facility for characterising and operating high T c superconductors at Southampton

  7. Geothermal resources of the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that geothermal energy applications and research are being actively pursued in the United Kingdom despite the relatively normal heat flow regime. The cumulative expenditure on geothermal activity from 1975 to 1989 has been approximately Brit-pounds 46 million of 32% of the Renewable Energy Research Budget to date. The first practical application is a 2 MWt scheme at Southampton as part of a district heating scheme. Commercial operation started in February 1988 and further expansion is planned. The UK's enthusiasm for Hot Dry Rock has dimmed slightly as the entire program is reappraised and the long heralded deep exploration hole has yet to materialize. Future activity looks likely to focus on geothermal opportunities that have multiple uses or applications for the fluids in small scale schemes and Hot Dry Rock research will probably be linked to a pan-European program based in France

  8. Robot hand tackles jobs in hazardous areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, Mark; Crowder, Richard.

    1989-01-01

    A robot hand and arm designed to mimic the operation of its human counterpart, developed at the University of Southampton for use in a standard industrial glovebox, is described. It was specifically designed for use in a radioactive environment moving high dosage components around. As dosage limits go down, there is a legal requirement to remove people from that environment. The nine-axis arm is for use in a glove designed for a human hand. Drive for the motors used to power the hand is from three-phase MOSFET inventor cards, the switching pattern controlled by the Hall effect communication sensors integral to each motor. The computer software for the arm allows the hand to be positioned using a joystick on a control box, with three levels of command for grip, pinch and touch. (author)

  9. Helping students with learning difficulties in medical and health-care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, C R

    1990-05-01

    In health profession education many more students than is currently acknowledged experience often extreme difficulties with their studying. This booklet is intended to help them. It outlines an approach being adopted in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton by which students are encouraged to reflect on and discuss their approaches to studying, identifying their perception of their task and where necessary changing this. It is shown that students need to elaborate their knowledge, that is to structure the factual information they are receiving and to relate it to their practical experiences. A number of suggestions are made to encourage this, and their theoretical underpinnings are discussed. It is concluded that while inappropriate curricula and teaching methods and not some weakness on the part of students are largely the cause of learning difficulties, it will take time to change these. Establishing a kind of 'clinic' for helping students cope can be of value immediately.

  10. 5th August 2008 - British Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills J. Denham MP with DIUS Director General Designate A. F.M. Smith and PA Catherine Perez meeting British scientists, engineers and technicians.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Present around the table: Jonathan Ellis\tCERN, Adviser to the Director-General Lyndon R. Evans\tCERN, LHC Project Leader ATLAS Collaboration Catrin Bernius, University College London Dave Charlton, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham CMS Collaboration Robert Bainbridge, Blackett Lab.High Energy Phys.Group, London Peter Sharp, Imperial College, LONDON LHCb Collaboration Themis Bowcock, Department of Physics, Liverpool Malcolm John, Department of Theoretical Physics, Oxford Information Technology James Casey, CERN, Computing engineer Sue Foffano, CERN, Senior Administrator Accelerators Paul Collier, CERN, Senior Physicist David Nisbet, CERN, Electronics Engineer Medical application Manjit Dosanjh, CERN, Senior Engineer Technical students Tom Lansdale, University of the West of England, Bristol Dan Dengate, University of the West of England, Bristol Doctoral student Stephen March, University of Southampton Summer student Hamish Gordon

  11. Special-purpose multifingered robotic end-effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowder, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    A number of advanced multifingered robotic end-effectors have been developed recently in which the finger joints are powered from external actuators. Although this gives dexterous performance, there are considerable problems with power transmission, due to the use of flexible tendons between the external actuators and the individual finger joints. If a multifingered robotic end-effector is to be operated in a confined space, local actuation of the fingers needs to be fully considered, even if there is a reduction in hand dexterity over that of an externally mounted actuator system. The University of Southampton has developed a number of end-effectors that incorporate integral finger actuators and mechanisms, two examples of which are discussed in this paper

  12. Constraints on food choices of women in the UK with lower educational attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, M.; Lawrence, W. T.; Skinner, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Women of lower educational attainment have less balanced and varied diets than women of higher educational attainment. The diets of women are vital to the long-term health of their offspring. The present study aimed to identify factors that influence the food choices of women with lower...... educational attainment and how women could be helped to improve those choices. Design: We conducted eight focus group discussions with women of lower educational attainment to identify these factors. We contrasted the results of these discussions with those from three focus group discussions with women...... of higher educational attainment. Setting: Southampton, UK. Subjects: Forty-two white Caucasian women of lower educational attainment and fourteen of higher educational attainment aged 18 to 44 years. Results: The dominant theme in discussions with women of lower educational attainment was their sense...

  13. Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Schlotz, Wolff; Crozier, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions......, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women...... of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control...

  14. Peptide-coated gold nanoparticles for modulation of angiogenesis in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roma-Rodrigues C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Catarina Roma-Rodrigues,1 Amelie Heuer-Jungemann,2 Alexandra R Fernandes,1 Antonios G Kanaras,2 Pedro V Baptista1 1UCIBIO, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal; 2Institute for Life Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Abstract: In this work, peptides designed to selectively interact with cellular receptors involved in the regulation of angiogenesis were anchored to oligo-ethylene glycol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and used to evaluate the modulation of vascular development using an ex ovo chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. These nanoparticles alter the balance between naturally secreted pro- and antiangiogenic factors, under various biological conditions, without causing toxicity. Exposure of chorioallantoic membranes to AuNP–peptide activators of angiogenesis accelerated the formation of new arterioles when compared to scrambled peptide-coated nanoparticles. On the other hand, antiangiogenic AuNP–peptide conjugates were able to selectively inhibit angiogenesis in vivo. We demonstrated that AuNP vectorization is crucial for enhancing the effect of active peptides. Our data showed for the first time the effective control of activation or inhibition of blood vessel formation in chick embryo via AuNP-based formulations suitable for the selective modulation of angiogenesis, which is of paramount importance in applications where promotion of vascular growth is desirable (eg, wound healing or ought to be contravened, as in cancer development. Keywords: angiogenesis activators, antiangiogenic, CAM assay, gold nanoparticles, peptide-coated gold nanoparticles, vascular development

  15. Cathedral outreach: student-led workshops for school curriculum enhancement in non-traditional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; Jantzen, Alexander; van Putten, Lieke D.; Ravagli, Andrea; Donko, Andrei L.; Soper, Nathan; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; John, Pearl V.

    2017-08-01

    Universities in the United Kingdom have been driven to work with a larger pool of potential students than just the more traditional student (middle-class white male), in order to tackle the widely-accepted skills-shortage in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), whilst honoring their commitment to fair access to higher education. Student-led outreach programs have contributed significantly to this drive. Two such programs run by postgraduate students at the University of Southampton are the Lightwave Roadshow and Southampton Accelerate!, which focus on photonics and particle physics, respectively. The program ambassadors have developed activities to enhance areas of the national curriculum through presenting fundamental physical sciences and their applications to optics and photonics research. The activities have benefitted significantly from investment from international organizations, such as SPIE, OSA and the IEEE Photonics Society, and UK research councils, in conjunction with university recruitment and outreach strategies. New partnerships have been formed to expand outreach programs to work in non-traditional environments to challenge stereotypes of scientists. This paper presents two case studies of collaboration with education learning centers at Salisbury Cathedral and Winchester Cathedral. The paper outlines workshops and shows developed for pupils aged 6-14 years (UK key stages 2-4) on the electromagnetic spectrum, particle physics, telecommunications and the human eye using a combination of readily obtainable items, hand-built kits and elements from the EYEST Photonics Explorer kit. The activities are interactive to stimulate learning through active participation, complement the UK national curriculum and link the themes of science with the non-traditional setting of a cathedral. We present methods to evaluate the impact of the activity and tools to obtain qualitative feedback for continual program improvement. We also

  16. The benefits of being a near-peer teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Samuel; Harrison, Charlotte H; Stephens, Jonny; Andrade, Matheus Gesteria; Seaby, Eleanor G; Parton, William; McElligott, Simon; Myers, Matthew A; Elmansouri, Ahmed; Ahn, Michael; Parrott, Rachel; Smith, Claire F; Border, Scott

    2018-03-23

    Near-peer teaching is used in anatomy education because of its benefits to the learner, teacher and faculty members. Despite the range of reports focusing on the learner, the advantages for the teacher, which are thought to include communication skills, subject knowledge and employability, are only beginning to be explored. A questionnaire was distributed to the teachers involved in anatomy near-peer teaching at the University of Southampton and Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). This questionnaire was designed using a rating scale of 0-10 to assess teacher perspectives on their level of knowledge, teaching skills and enjoyment of teaching. Free-text responses determined the teachers' motivation and perceived benefits from the teaching. Twenty-eight questionnaires were gathered (54.9% response rate), including 20 from Southampton and eight from BSMS. Long-term knowledge retention and better understanding of the material were rated 8.1 and 7.9 out of 10, respectively. Eight responses were from currently practising doctors, who rated how much they now use their teaching skills as doctors as 8.9 out of 10. Of the eight doctors, seven gained points for their foundation programme applications as a direct result of near-peer teaching. The most common motivator for engaging in teaching was to improve subject matter knowledge and the most common benefit was improved communication skills. There are numerous advantages to being a near-peer teacher in medical school DISCUSSION: There are numerous advantages to being a near-peer teacher in medical school, which include knowledge improvement, transferrable professional skills and employability. These initial results support the hypothesised benefits to the teachers and provide a foundation for further longitudinal studies. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  17. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  18. Assessing diets of 3-year-old children: evaluation of an FFQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Megan; Fisk, Catherine M; Ntani, Georgia; Crozier, Sarah R; Godfrey, Keith M; Inskip, Hazel M; Cooper, Cyrus; Robinson, Sian M

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the use of an administered eighty-item FFQ to assess nutrient intake and diet quality in 3-year-old children. Frequency of consumption and portion size of the foods listed on the FFQ during the 3 months preceding the interview were reported by the child's main caregiver; after the interview a 2 d prospective food diary (FD) was completed on behalf of the child. Nutrient intakes from the FFQ and FD were estimated using UK food composition data. Diet quality was assessed from the FFQ and FD according to the child's scores for a principal component analysis-defined dietary pattern ('prudent' pattern), characterised by high consumption of fruit, vegetables, water and wholemeal cereals. Southampton, UK. Children (n 892) aged 3 years in the Southampton Women's Survey. Intakes of all nutrients assessed by the FFQ were higher than FD estimates, but there was reasonable agreement in terms of ranking of children (range of Spearman rank correlations for energy-adjusted nutrient intakes, r s = 0·41 to 0·59). Prudent diet scores estimated from the FFQ and FD were highly correlated (r = 0·72). Some family and child characteristics appeared to influence the ability of the FFQ to rank children, most notably the number of child's meals eaten away from home. The FFQ provides useful information to allow ranking of children at this age with respect to nutrient intake and quality of diet, but may overestimate absolute intakes. Dietary studies of young children need to consider family and child characteristics that may impact on reporting error associated with an FFQ.

  19. Mithramycin encapsulated in polymeric micelles by microfluidic technology as novel therapeutic protocol for beta-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capretto L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Capretto1, Stefania Mazzitelli2, Eleonora Brognara2, Ilaria Lampronti2, Dario Carugo1, Martyn Hill1, Xunli Zhang1, Roberto Gambari2, Claudio Nastruzzi31Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, ItalyAbstract: This report shows that the DNA-binding drug, mithramycin, can be efficiently encapsulated in polymeric micelles (PM-MTH, based on Pluronic® block copolymers, by a new microfluidic approach. The effect of different production parameters has been investigated for their effect on PM-MTH characteristics. The compared analysis of PM-MTH produced by microfluidic and conventional bulk mixing procedures revealed that microfluidics provides a useful platform for the production of PM-MTH with improved controllability, reproducibility, smaller size, and polydispersity. Finally, an investigation of the effects of PM-MTH, produced by microfluidic and conventional bulk mixing procedures, on the erythroid differentiation of both human erythroleukemia and human erythroid precursor cells is reported. It is demonstrated that PM-MTH exhibited a slightly lower toxicity and more pronounced differentiative activity when compared to the free drug. In addition, PM-MTH were able to upregulate preferentially γ-globin messenger ribonucleic acid production and to increase fetal hemoglobin (HbF accumulation, the percentage of HbF-containing cells, and their HbF content without stimulating α-globin gene expression, which is responsible for the clinical symptoms of ß-thalassemia. These results represent an important first step toward a potential clinical application, since an increase in HbF could alleviate the symptoms underlying ß-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. In conclusion, this report suggests that PM-MTH produced by microfluidic approach warrants further evaluation as a potential therapeutic protocol

  20. Evaluation of a high resolution genotyping method for Chlamydia trachomatis using routine clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Genital chlamydia infection is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the UK. C. trachomatis genital infections are usually caused by strains which fall into two pathovars: lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV and the genitourinary genotypes D-K. Although these genotypes can be discriminated by outer membrane protein gene (ompA sequencing or multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, neither protocol affords the high-resolution genotyping required for local epidemiology and accurate contact-tracing.We evaluated variable number tandem repeat (VNTR and ompA sequencing (now called multi-locus VNTR analysis and ompA or "MLVA-ompA" to study local epidemiology in Southampton over a period of six months. One hundred and fifty seven endocervical swabs that tested positive for C. trachomatis from both the Southampton genitourinary medicine (GUM clinic and local GP surgeries were tested by COBAS Taqman 48 (Roche PCR for the presence of C. trachomatis. Samples tested as positive by the commercial NAATs test were genotyped, where possible, by a MLVA-ompA sequencing technique. Attempts were made to isolate C. trachomatis from all 157 samples in cell culture, and 68 (43% were successfully recovered by repeatable passage in culture. Of the 157 samples, 93 (i.e. 59% were fully genotyped by MLVA-ompA. Only one mixed infection (E & D in a single sample was confirmed. There were two distinct D genotypes for the ompA gene. Most frequent ompA genotypes were D, E and F, comprising 20%, 41% and 16% of the type-able samples respectively. Within all genotypes we detected numerous MLVA sub-types.Amongst the common genotypes, there are a significant number of defined MLVA sub-types, which may reflect particular background demographics including age group, geography, high-risk sexual behavior, and sexual networks.

  1. Strategies for improving early detection and diagnosis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane PA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pearse A Keane,1 Gabriella de Salvo,2 Dawn A Sim,1 Srini Goverdhan,2 Rupesh Agrawal,1 Adnan Tufail1 1NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: Treatment of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD has been revolutionized by the introduction of such agents as ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept. As a result, the incidence of legal blindness occurring secondary to AMD has fallen dramatically in recent years in many countries. While these agents have undoubtedly been successful in reducing visual impairment and blindness, patients with neovascular AMD typically lose some vision over time, and often lose the ability to read, drive, or perform other important activities of daily living. Efforts are therefore under way to develop strategies that allow for earlier detection and treatment of this disease. In this review, we begin by providing an overview of the rationale for, and the benefits of, early detection and treatment of neovascular AMD. To achieve this, we begin by providing an overview of the pathophysiology and natural history of choroidal neovascularization, before reviewing the evidence from both clinical trials and “real-world” outcome studies. We continue by highlighting an area that is often overlooked: the importance of patient education and awareness for early AMD detection. We conclude the review by reviewing an array of both established and emerging technologies for early detection of choroidal neovascularization, ranging from Amsler chart testing, to hyperacuity testing, to advanced imaging techniques, such as optical coherence tomography. Keywords: Amsler, detection, choroidal neovascularization, hyperacuity, optical coherence tomography

  2. Stemcell Information: SKIP000674 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rous hESC-like colonies in BJ cultures that were mechanically picked at day 18, 20, 21, and 25, respectively. BJ新生児線維芽細胞由来iPS細胞...。|低酸素下でKlf4, c-Myc, Oct4, Sox2とLIN28を3:1:1:1:1の割合でコードした合成RNAを、線維芽細胞株に20日間毎日添加し、遺伝子を細胞へ導入し... SKIP000674 ... foreskin foreskin Normal BJ-RiPS1.1 BJ-RiPS1.1 ... 0-9 Male ... -- No hiPS-cell...cy and directed differentiation of human cells with synthetic modified mRNA.--Som...atic coding mutations in human induced pluripotent stem cells. Warren L, Manos PD, Ahfeldt T, Loh YH, Li H,

  3. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  4. The 13th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitcheson, Paul; Beeby, Steve

    2013-12-01

    our conference. The social program is an important aspect of any conference and the PowerMEMS 2013 banquet will be held in the Science Museum. This provides a fantastic opportunity to network whilst viewing some of the fundamental engineering innovations that have ultimately bought us all here today. There is a long list of individuals we would like to thank for their support in organising PowerMEMS 2013. Once again the TPC, chaired by Eric Yeatman and Douglas Paul, have given us their valuable time and effort in reviewing abstracts. The PowerMEMS School chairs Einar Halvorsen and Shad Roundy and the expert speakers made the School possible. The local organising committee, led by Alwyn Elliott, have provided us with invaluable assistance in making PowerMEMS 2013 happen. The financial support from Imperial College London, the University of Southampton and conference sponsors has also been gratefully appreciated. Finally, we would like to thank you all for attending and helping in making PowerMEMS 2013 a success. We wish you a productive and enjoyable conference and a wonderful stay in London. Paul Mitcheson and Steve Beeby CONFERENCE OFFICIALS Conference Co-Chairs Stephen Beeby, University of Southampton, UK Paul Mitcheson, Imperial College London, UK Technical Program Committee Co-Chairs Douglas Paul, University of Glasgow, UK Eric Yeatman, Imperial College London, UK PowerMEMS School Co Chairs Einar Halvorsen, Vestfold University College, Norway Shad Roundy, University of Utah, USA Local Organising Committee Chair Alwyn Elliott, Imperial College London, UK International Steering Committee Mark Allen, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Steve Beeby, University of Southampton, UK Young-Ho Cho, KAIST, South Korea Alan Epstein, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA Masayoshi Esashi, Tohoku University, Japan Luc Fréchette, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada Reza Ghodssi, University of Maryland, USA Hiroki Kuwano, Tohoku University, Japan Jeff Lang, Massachusetts

  5. EDITORIAL: The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008) The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 08), which took place at the RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, from 28-30 September, 2008. The workshop is a well recognized and established European event in the field of micro system technology using thin-film technologies for creating micro components, micro sensors, micro actuators, and micro systems. The first MME Workshop was held 1989 in Enschede (The Netherlands) and continued 1990 in Berlin (Germany), 1992 in Leuven (Belgium), and then was held annually in Neuchâtel (Switzerland), Pisa (Italy), Copenhagen (Denmark), Barcelona (Spain), Southampton (UK), Ulvik in Hardanger (Norway), Gif-sur-Yvette (France), Uppsala (Sweden), Cork (Ireland), Sinaia (Romania), Delft (The Netherlands), Leuven (Belgium), Göteborg (Sweden), Southampton (UK), and in Guimarães (Portugal). The two day workshop was attended by 180 delegates from 26 countries all over Europe and from Armenia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cuba, Iran, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United States of America. A total of 97 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. I am proud to present 22 high-quality papers from MME 2008 selected for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing. I am eternally grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to the members of the Programme Committee of MME 2008, Dr Reinoud Wolffenbuttel, Professor José Higino Correia, and Dr Patrick Pons for pre-selection of the papers as well as to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers. My thanks also go to Dr Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process and to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I

  6. Building a measurement framework of burden of treatment in complex patients with chronic conditions: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eton DT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1 Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira,2,3 Jason S Egginton,1 Jennifer L Ridgeway,1 Laura Odell,4 Carl R May,5 Victor M Montori1,61Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2College of Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 3Medication Therapy Management Program, Fairview Pharmacy Services LLC, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 4Pharmacy Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 5Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 6Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: Burden of treatment refers to the workload of health care as well as its impact on patient functioning and well-being. We set out to build a conceptual framework of issues descriptive of burden of treatment from the perspective of the complex patient, as a first step in the development of a new patient-reported measure.Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with patients seeking medication therapy management services at a large, academic medical center. All patients had a complex regimen of self-care (including polypharmacy, and were coping with one or more chronic health conditions. We used framework analysis to identify and code themes and subthemes. A conceptual framework of burden of treatment was outlined from emergent themes and subthemes.Results: Thirty-two patients (20 female, 12 male, age 26–85 years were interviewed. Three broad themes of burden of treatment emerged including: the work patients must do to care for their health; problem-focused strategies and tools to facilitate the work of self-care; and factors that exacerbate the burden felt. The latter theme encompasses six subthemes including challenges with taking medication, emotional problems with others, role and activity limitations, financial challenges, confusion about medical information, and health care delivery obstacles

  7. European multicentre database of healthy controls for [123I]FP-CIT SPECT (ENC-DAT): age-related effects, gender differences and evaluation of different methods of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varrone, Andrea; Dickson, John C.; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Sera, Terez; Asenbaum, Susanne; Booij, Jan; Kapucu, Ozlem L.; Kluge, Andreas; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Koulibaly, Pierre Malick; Nobili, Flavio; Pagani, Marco; Sabri, Osama; Borght, Thierry vander; Laere, Koen van; Tatsch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [ 123 I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) is an established diagnostic tool in parkinsonism and dementia. Although qualitative assessment criteria are available, DAT quantification is important for research and for completion of a diagnostic evaluation. One critical aspect of quantification is the availability of normative data, considering possible age and gender effects on DAT availability. The aim of the European Normal Control Database of DaTSCAN (ENC-DAT) study was to generate a large database of [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls. SPECT data from 139 healthy controls (74 men, 65 women; age range 20 - 83 years, mean 53 years) acquired in 13 different centres were included. Images were reconstructed using the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm without correction (NOACSC), with attenuation correction (AC), and with both attenuation and scatter correction using the triple-energy window method (ACSC). Region-of-interest analysis was performed using the BRASS software (caudate and putamen), and the Southampton method (striatum). The outcome measure was the specific binding ratio (SBR). A significant effect of age on SBR was found for all data. Gender had a significant effect on SBR in the caudate and putamen for the NOACSC and AC data, and only in the left caudate for the ACSC data (BRASS method). Significant effects of age and gender on striatal SBR were observed for all data analysed with the Southampton method. Overall, there was a significant age-related decline in SBR of between 4 % and 6.7 % per decade. This study provides a large database of [ 123 I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls across a wide age range and with balanced gender representation. Higher DAT availability was found in women than in men. An average age-related decline in DAT availability of 5.5 % per decade was found for both genders, in agreement with previous reports. The data collected in this study may serve as a reference database for

  8. MAVIDOS Maternal Vitamin D Osteoporosis Study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. The MAVIDOS Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Nicholas C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MAVIDOS is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ISRCTN82927713, registered 2008 Apr 11, funded by Arthritis Research UK, MRC, Bupa Foundation and NIHR. Background Osteoporosis is a major public health problem as a result of associated fragility fractures. Skeletal strength increases from birth to a peak in early adulthood. This peak predicts osteoporosis risk in later life. Vitamin D insufficiency in pregnancy is common (31% in a recent Southampton cohort and predicts reduced bone mass in the offspring. In this study we aim to test whether offspring of mothers supplemented with vitamin D in pregnancy have higher bone mass at birth than those whose mothers were not supplemented. Methods/Design Women have their vitamin D status assessed after ultrasound scanning in the twelfth week of pregnancy at 3 trial centres (Southampton, Sheffield, Oxford. Women with circulating 25(OH-vitamin D levels 25-100 nmol/l are randomised in a double-blind design to either oral vitamin D supplement (1000 IU cholecalciferol/day, n = 477 or placebo at 14 weeks (n = 477. Questionnaire data include parity, sunlight exposure, dietary information, and cigarette and alcohol consumption. At 19 and 34 weeks maternal anthropometry is assessed and blood samples taken to measure 25(OH-vitamin D, PTH and biochemistry. At delivery venous umbilical cord blood is collected, together with umbilical cord and placental tissue. The babies undergo DXA assessment of bone mass within the first 14 days after birth, with the primary outcome being whole body bone mineral content adjusted for gestational age and age. Children are then followed up with yearly assessment of health, diet, physical activity and anthropometric measures, with repeat assessment of bone mass by DXA at age 4 years. Discussion As far as we are aware, this randomised trial is one of the first ever tests of the early life origins hypothesis in human participants and has the potential to inform

  9. Social support received by multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients and related factors: a cross-sectional study in Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bin Chen,1 Yin Peng,1 Lin Zhou,1 Chengliang Chai,1 Hui-Chi Yeh,2 Songhua Chen,1 Fei Wang,1 Mingwu Zhang,1 Tieniu He,1 Xiaomeng Wang1 1Department of Tuberculosis Control and Prevention, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Binjiang District, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Politics & International Relations, Social Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Objectives: The objective of this study is to assess the social support received by patients diagnosed with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China and the factors that may have influenced it. Methods: A total of 220 MDR-TB patients participated in the questionnaire-based survey, and the data from 212 valid questionnaires were analyzed. The respondents reported their sociodemographic status, disease features, and attitudes toward the disease. The social support rating scale was used to measure the patients’ social support scores. An Independent Samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and a multiple linear regression model were used to analyze the related factors for the social support scores. Result: The average social support score of each MDR-TB patient was 32.56±7.86. Participants who were single, widowed or divorced, retired, and had fewer family members and lower family income were found to have lower social support scores. Participants unwilling to disclose their disease tended to have less social support (31.59<34.23, P=0.010. Participants who perceived great help from health care workers reported higher social support rating scale scores than those who perceived no help (35.36>29.89, P=0.014. Conclusion: MDR-TB patients in Zhejiang Province were shown to have a low level of social support. Patients who were not married, had smaller families, and lower family income received less social support, suggesting that family harmony could be an important source of social support. Patients

  10. MAVIDOS Maternal Vitamin D Osteoporosis Study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. The MAVIDOS Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nicholas C; Javaid, Kassim; Bishop, Nicholas; Kennedy, Stephen; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Fraser, Robert; Gandhi, Saurabh V; Schoenmakers, Inez; Prentice, Ann; Cooper, Cyrus

    2012-02-07

    MAVIDOS is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ISRCTN82927713, registered 2008 Apr 11), funded by Arthritis Research UK, MRC, Bupa Foundation and NIHR. Osteoporosis is a major public health problem as a result of associated fragility fractures. Skeletal strength increases from birth to a peak in early adulthood. This peak predicts osteoporosis risk in later life. Vitamin D insufficiency in pregnancy is common (31% in a recent Southampton cohort) and predicts reduced bone mass in the offspring. In this study we aim to test whether offspring of mothers supplemented with vitamin D in pregnancy have higher bone mass at birth than those whose mothers were not supplemented. Women have their vitamin D status assessed after ultrasound scanning in the twelfth week of pregnancy at 3 trial centres (Southampton, Sheffield, Oxford). Women with circulating 25(OH)-vitamin D levels 25-100 nmol/l are randomised in a double-blind design to either oral vitamin D supplement (1000 IU cholecalciferol/day, n = 477) or placebo at 14 weeks (n = 477). Questionnaire data include parity, sunlight exposure, dietary information, and cigarette and alcohol consumption. At 19 and 34 weeks maternal anthropometry is assessed and blood samples taken to measure 25(OH)-vitamin D, PTH and biochemistry. At delivery venous umbilical cord blood is collected, together with umbilical cord and placental tissue. The babies undergo DXA assessment of bone mass within the first 14 days after birth, with the primary outcome being whole body bone mineral content adjusted for gestational age and age. Children are then followed up with yearly assessment of health, diet, physical activity and anthropometric measures, with repeat assessment of bone mass by DXA at age 4 years. As far as we are aware, this randomised trial is one of the first ever tests of the early life origins hypothesis in human participants and has the potential to inform public health policy regarding vitamin D supplementation in

  11. Giacomo Castelvetro’s political translations: narrative strategies and literary style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa De Rinaldis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - Translations of contemporary polemical and political tracts attributed to or associated with Giacomo Castelvetro (1546-1616 show a rejection of a servile adherence to the source text and the effort to produce an autonomous, readable text, one that in many cases is stylistically elevated and hence ‘literary’. Like most Renaissance translators, Castelvetro changes the form of expression of the texts and adopts narrative strategies in order to increase their communicative potential and reinforce the message they convey. An analysis of extracts from the translations of Discourse of the Maner of the Discovery of this late intended Treason (1605 and Elizabeth I’s proclamation By the Queen on the Seizure of the Earls of Essex, Rutland, Southampton (1600 will show how, through changes in emphasis and syntax, the translations give prominence to certain ‘characters’ in the narratives such as Guy Fawkes and the Earl of Essex. The stylistic elevation of the source text, moreover, shows how Castelvetro’s translations respond to a strong rhetorical tradition. Riassunto - Alcune traduzioni di testi contemporanei, di argomento politico e polemico, attribuite o associate a Giacomo Castelvetro (1546-1616 mostrano il rigetto di un’aderenza servile al testo d’origine e lo sforzo di produrre un testo autonomo, leggibile, che in molti casi è stilisticamente più elevato e quindi ‘letterario’. Come molti traduttori rinascimentali, Castelvetro cambia la forma espressiva dei testi e adotta strategie narrative per accrescere il potenziale comunicativo e rafforzare il messaggio. Un’analisi di estratti dalle traduzioni del Discourse of the Maner of the Discovery of this late intended Treason (1605 e del proclama di Elisabetta I  By the Queen on the Seizure of the Earls of Essex, Rutland, Southampton (1600 mostrerà come, attraverso cambiamenti di enfasi e di sintassi, le traduzioni diano risalto ad alcuni ‘personaggi’ della

  12. European multicentre database of healthy controls for [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT (ENC-DAT): age-related effects, gender differences and evaluation of different methods of analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varrone, Andrea [Karolinska University Hospital, R5:02, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Dickson, John C. [UCLH NHS Foundation Trust and University College, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Tossici-Bolt, Livia [University Hospitals Southampton NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics, Southampton (United Kingdom); Sera, Terez [University of Szeged, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Asenbaum, Susanne [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapucu, Ozlem L. [Gazi University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Kluge, Andreas [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Knudsen, Gitte M. [Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Koulibaly, Pierre Malick [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Department, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Borght, Thierry vander [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Nuclear Medicine Division, Mont-Godinne Medical Center, Yvoir (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Tatsch, Klaus [Municipal Hospital of Karlsruhe Inc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) is an established diagnostic tool in parkinsonism and dementia. Although qualitative assessment criteria are available, DAT quantification is important for research and for completion of a diagnostic evaluation. One critical aspect of quantification is the availability of normative data, considering possible age and gender effects on DAT availability. The aim of the European Normal Control Database of DaTSCAN (ENC-DAT) study was to generate a large database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls. SPECT data from 139 healthy controls (74 men, 65 women; age range 20 - 83 years, mean 53 years) acquired in 13 different centres were included. Images were reconstructed using the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm without correction (NOACSC), with attenuation correction (AC), and with both attenuation and scatter correction using the triple-energy window method (ACSC). Region-of-interest analysis was performed using the BRASS software (caudate and putamen), and the Southampton method (striatum). The outcome measure was the specific binding ratio (SBR). A significant effect of age on SBR was found for all data. Gender had a significant effect on SBR in the caudate and putamen for the NOACSC and AC data, and only in the left caudate for the ACSC data (BRASS method). Significant effects of age and gender on striatal SBR were observed for all data analysed with the Southampton method. Overall, there was a significant age-related decline in SBR of between 4 % and 6.7 % per decade. This study provides a large database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT scans in healthy controls across a wide age range and with balanced gender representation. Higher DAT availability was found in women than in men. An average age-related decline in DAT availability of 5.5 % per decade was found for both genders, in agreement with previous reports. The data collected in this study may serve as a reference

  13. A simplified approach to the pooled analysis of calibration of clinical prediction rules for systematic reviews of validation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov BD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Borislav D Dimitrov,1,2 Nicola Motterlini,2,† Tom Fahey2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; 2HRB Centre for Primary Care Research, Department of General Medicine, Division of Population Health Sciences, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland †Nicola Motterlini passed away on November 11, 2012 Objective: Estimating calibration performance of clinical prediction rules (CPRs in systematic reviews of validation studies is not possible when predicted values are neither published nor accessible or sufficient or no individual participant or patient data are available. Our aims were to describe a simplified approach for outcomes prediction and calibration assessment and evaluate its functionality and validity. Study design and methods: Methodological study of systematic reviews of validation studies of CPRs: a ABCD2 rule for prediction of 7 day stroke; and b CRB-65 rule for prediction of 30 day mortality. Predicted outcomes in a sample validation study were computed by CPR distribution patterns (“derivation model”. As confirmation, a logistic regression model (with derivation study coefficients was applied to CPR-based dummy variables in the validation study. Meta-analysis of validation studies provided pooled estimates of “predicted:observed” risk ratios (RRs, 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and indexes of heterogeneity (I2 on forest plots (fixed and random effects models, with and without adjustment of intercepts. The above approach was also applied to the CRB-65 rule. Results: Our simplified method, applied to ABCD2 rule in three risk strata (low, 0–3; intermediate, 4–5; high, 6–7 points, indicated that predictions are identical to those computed by univariate, CPR-based logistic regression model. Discrimination was good (c-statistics =0.61–0.82, however, calibration in some studies was low. In such cases with miscalibration, the under

  14. Risk of community-acquired pneumonia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease stratified by smoking status: a population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeken DCW

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dionne CW Braeken,1–3 Gernot GU Rohde,2 Frits ME Franssen,1,2 Johanna HM Driessen,3–5 Tjeerd P van Staa,3,6 Patrick C Souverein,3 Emiel FM Wouters,1,2 Frank de Vries3,4,7 1Department of Research and Education, CIRO, Horn, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+, Maastricht, 3Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+, Maastricht, 5Department of Epidemiology, Care and Public Health Research Institute (CAPHRI, Maastricht, the Netherlands; 6Department of Health eResearch, University of Manchester, Manchester, 7MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK Background: Smoking increases the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and is associated with the development of COPD. Until now, it is unclear whether CAP in COPD is due to smoking-related effects, or due to COPD pathophysiology itself. Objective: To evaluate the association between COPD and CAP by smoking status. Methods: In total, 62,621 COPD and 191,654 control subjects, matched by year of birth, gender and primary care practice, were extracted from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2005–2014. Incidence rates (IRs were estimated by dividing the total number of CAP cases by the cumulative person-time at risk. Time-varying Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs for CAP in COPD patients versus controls. HRs of CAP by smoking status were calculated by stratified analyses in COPD patients versus controls and within both subgroups with never smoking as reference. Results: IRs of CAP in COPD patients (32.00/1,000 person-years and controls (6.75/1,000 person-years increased with age and female gender. The risk of CAP in COPD patients was higher than in controls (HR 4.51, 95% CI: 4.27–4.77. Current smoking

  15. Experiences and attitudes about physical activity and exercise in patients with chronic pain: a qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson L

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Linn Karlsson,1 Björn Gerdle,1 Esa-Pekka Takala,2 Gerhard Andersson,3,4 Britt Larsson1 1Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Work-related Diseases, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; 3Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with chronic pain experience physical activity and exercise (PA&E.Method: This qualitative interview study included 16 women and two men suffering from chronic pain and referred to a multimodal pain rehabilitation program. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interviews.Results: One main theme emerged: “To overcome obstacles and to seize opportunities to be physically active despite chronic pain.” This main theme was abstracted from five themes: “Valuing a life with physical activity,” “Physical activity and exercise – before and after pain,” “A struggle – difficulties and challenges,” “The enabling of physical activity,” and “In need of continuous and active support.” Conclusion: Although these participants valued PA&E, they seldom achieved desirable levels, and performance of PA&E was undermined by difficulties and failure. The discrepancy between the intention to perform physical activity and the physical activity accomplished could be related to motivation, self-efficacy, and action control. The participants desired high-quality interaction with healthcare providers. The findings can be applied to chronic pain rehabilitation that uses PA&E as treatment. Keywords: chronic pain, experiences, physical activity, rehabilitation, qualitative content analysis

  16. Legal and Illegal Colours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian

    2008-01-01

    opinions on food additives, including colours, and on the bioavailability and safety of nutrient sources. The WG ADD consists of several members from the AFC Panel together with selected external experts. The draft opinions go forward to the AFC Panel for discussion and final adoption. The adopted opinions......://www.efsa.europa.eu/EFSA/efsa_locale-1178620753812_1178620761956.htm. Accessed 12.05.08.] this paper only deals with some of the major issues that the Panel has faced in relation to the use of food colours. The three topics to be dealt with are (1) evaluation of illegal colours in food in the EU (EFSA, 2005), (2) re-evaluation of the authorised...... food colours in the EU (ongoing, but one opinion on Red 2G has been published; EFSA, 2007), and (3) evaluation of 'the Southampton study' on hyperactivity in children after intake of food colours (and sodium benzoate) (ongoing at the time of this presentation, but an opinion has now been published...

  17. Waterborne gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp caused by two norovirus genogroups: GI and GII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Waarbeek, Henriëtte L G; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M; Vennema, Harry; Hoebe, Christian J P A

    2010-03-01

    A cross-border gastroenteritis outbreak at a scouting camp was associated with drinking water from a farmer's well. A retrospective cohort study was performed to identify size and source of the outbreak, as well as other characteristics. Epidemiological investigation included standardized questionnaires about sex, age, risk exposures, illness and family members. Stool and water (100mL) samples were analyzed for bacteria, viruses and parasites. Questionnaires were returned by 84 scouts (response rate 82%), mean age of 13 years. The primary attack rate was 85% (diarrhoea and/or vomiting). Drinking water was the strongest independent risk factor showing a dose-response effect with 50%, 75%, 75%, 93% and 96% case prevalence for 0, 1, 2-3, 4-5 and >5 glasses consumed, respectively. Norovirus (GI.2 Southampton and GII.7 Leeds) was detected in 51 stool specimens (75%) from ill scouts. Water analysis showed fecal contamination, but no norovirus. The secondary attack rate was 20%. This remarkable outbreak was caused by a point-source infection with two genogroups of noroviruses most likely transmitted by drinking water from a well. Finding a dose-response relationship was striking. Specific measures to reduce the risk of waterborne diseases, outbreak investigation and a good international public health network are important.

  18. Recent trends in the use of food additives in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Mike

    2015-03-15

    The E number system for food additives was introduced in the 1960s and the E was intended to reassure consumers that permitted additives were safe. In the 1980s full ingredient declarations had to be provided on food products for the first time and manufacturers were permitted to use either the name or the number of the additive on the ingredient list. This paper outlines some of the trends in the sourcing, use and labelling of additives since the introduction of full ingredient listing. Generally, sourcing has become more global with a large number of suppliers being based in China. From an initial use of E numbers in ingredient lists, manufacturers are increasingly using the names of additives. This trend is being extended to avoid the use of anything the consumer might consider an additive, particularly in connection with colours and preservatives. Specifically, the colours used in the Southampton study on the impact of food colours on hyperactivity in children have largely been replaced by colouring foodstuffs, and the preservative used in the study, sodium benzoate, has been replaced by potassium sorbate in the majority of soft drinks. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Experimental and modelling studies on a laboratory scale anaerobic bioreactor treating mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikanthan, P; Sughosh, P; White, James; Sivakumar Babu, G L

    2017-07-01

    The performance of an anaerobic bioreactor in treating mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste was investigated using experimental and modelling techniques. The key parameters measured during the experimental test period included the gas yield, leachate generation and settlement under applied load. Modelling of the anaerobic bioreactor was carried out using the University of Southampton landfill degradation and transport model. The model was used to simulate the actual gas production and settlement. A sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential model parameters are the monod growth rate and moisture. In this case, pH had no effect on the total gas production and waste settlement, and only a small variation in the gas production was observed when the heat transfer coefficient of waste was varied from 20 to 100 kJ/(m d K) -1 . The anaerobic bioreactor contained 1.9 kg (dry) of mechanically biologically treated waste producing 10 L of landfill gas over 125 days.

  20. Development of Vision Based Multiview Gait Recognition System with MMUGait Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the acquisition setup and development of a new gait database, MMUGait. This database consists of 82 subjects walking under normal condition and 19 subjects walking with 11 covariate factors, which were captured under two views. This paper also proposes a multiview model-based gait recognition system with joint detection approach that performs well under different walking trajectories and covariate factors, which include self-occluded or external occluded silhouettes. In the proposed system, the process begins by enhancing the human silhouette to remove the artifacts. Next, the width and height of the body are obtained. Subsequently, the joint angular trajectories are determined once the body joints are automatically detected. Lastly, crotch height and step-size of the walking subject are determined. The extracted features are smoothened by Gaussian filter to eliminate the effect of outliers. The extracted features are normalized with linear scaling, which is followed by feature selection prior to the classification process. The classification experiments carried out on MMUGait database were benchmarked against the SOTON Small DB from University of Southampton. Results showed correct classification rate above 90% for all the databases. The proposed approach is found to outperform other approaches on SOTON Small DB in most cases.

  1. Feasibility of detection and intervention for alcohol-related liver disease in the community: the Alcohol and Liver Disease Detection study (ALDDeS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheron, Nick; Moore, Michael; O'Brien, Wendy; Harris, Scott; Roderick, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In the past 15 years mortality rates from liver disease have doubled in the UK. Brief alcohol advice is cost effective, but clinically meaningful reductions in alcohol consumption only occur in around 1 in 10 individuals. To provide evidence that detecting early liver disease in the community is feasible, practical, and that feedback of liver risk can increase the proportion of subjects reducing alcohol consumption. A community feasibility study in nine general practice sites in Hampshire. Hazardous and harmful drinkers were identified by WHO AUDIT questionnaire and offered screening for liver fibrosis. In total, 4630 individuals responded, of whom 1128 (24%) hazardous or harmful drinkers were offered a liver fibrosis check using the Southampton Traffic Light (STL) test; 393 (38%) attended and test results were returned by post. The STL has a low threshold for liver fibrosis with 45 (11%) red, 157 (40%) amber, and 191 (49%) green results. Follow-up AUDIT data was obtained for 303/393 (77%) and 76/153 (50%) subjects with evidence of liver damage reduced drinking by at least one AUDIT category (harmful to hazardous, or hazardous to low risk) compared with 52/150 (35%, PAUDIT >15), 22/34 (65%) of STL positives, reduced drinking compared with 10/29 (35%, PDetection of liver disease in the community is feasible, and feedback of liver risk may reduce harmful drinking.

  2. DRD4 and DAT1 in ADHD: Functional neurobiology to pharmacogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Turic

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Darko Turic1, James Swanson2, Edmund Sonuga-Barke1,31Institute for Disorders of Impulse and Attention, School of Psychology, University of Southampton, UK; 2Child Development Center, University of California, Irvine, California, US; 3Department of Experimental, Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, BelgiumAbstract: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common and potentially very impairing neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood. Statistical genetic studies of twins have shown ADHD to be highly heritable, with the combination of genes and gene by environment interactions accounting for around 80% of phenotypic variance. The initial molecular genetic studies where candidates were selected because of the efficacy of dopaminergic compounds in the treatment of ADHD were remarkably successful and provided strong evidence for the role of DRD4 and DAT1 variants in the pathogenesis of ADHD. However, the recent application of noncandidate gene strategies (eg, genome-wide association scans has failed to identify additional genes with substantial genetic main effects, and the effects for DRD4 and DAT1 have not been replicated. This is the usual pattern observed for most other physical and mental disorders evaluated with current state-of-the-art methods. In this paper we discuss future strategies for genetic studies in ADHD, highlighting both the pitfalls and possible solutions relating to candidate gene studies, genome-wide studies, defining the phenotype, and statistical approaches.Keywords: dopamine, ADHD, pharmacogenetics, candidate gene

  3. Home is where the hearth is: grant recipients' views of England's home energy efficiency scheme (Warm Front).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Jan; Stevens, Maryjane; Stiell, Bernadette; Thorogood, Nicki

    2006-08-01

    This paper reports the results of research carried out as part of the national health impact evaluation of the Warm Front Scheme, a government initiative aimed at alleviating fuel poverty in England. Semi-structured interviews were carried out in a purposive sample of 49 households which received home energy improvements under the Scheme from five urban areas (Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Southampton). Each household had received installation, replacement or refurbishment of the heating system and, in some cases, also insulation of the cavity wall or loft or both, and draught-proofing measures. Most householders reported improved and more controllable warmth and hot water. Many also reported perceptions of improved physical health and comfort, especially of mental health and emotional well-being and, in several cases, the easing of symptoms of chronic illness. There were reports of improved family relations, an expansion of the domestic space used during cold months, greater use of kitchens and improved nutrition, increased privacy, improved social interaction, and an increase in comfort and atmosphere within the home. Greater warmth and comfort also enhanced emotional security, and recipients were more content and at ease in their homes. However there was little evidence of substantially lower heating bills. These results provide evidence that Warm Front home energy improvements are accompanied by appreciable benefits in terms of use of living space, comfort and quality of life, physical and mental well-being, although there is only limited evidence of change in health behaviour.

  4. Using cognitive behaviour therapy with South Asian Muslims: Findings from the culturally sensitive CBT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Phiri, Peter; Munshi, Tariq; Rathod, Shanaya; Ayub, Muhhhamad; Gobbi, Mary; Kingdon, David

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) needs adaptation for it to be effective for patients from collectivistic cultures, as currently CBT is underpinned by individualistic values. In prior studies we have demonstrated that CBT could be adapted for Pakistani patients in Southampton, UK, and for local populations in Pakistan. Findings from these studies suggest that CBT can be adapted for patients from collectivistic cultures using a series of steps. In this paper we focus on these steps, and the process of adapting CBT for specific groups. The adaptation process should focus on three major areas of therapy, rather than simple translation of therapy manuals. These include (1) awareness of relevant cultural issues and preparation for therapy, (2) assessment and engagement, and (3) adjustments in therapy. We also discuss the best practice guidelines that evolved from this work to help therapists working with this population. We reiterate that CBT can be adapted effectively for patients from traditional cultures. This is, however, an emerging area in psychotherapy, and further work is required to refine the methodology and to test adapted CBT.

  5. Port entry arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicken, J.C.; King, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to describe the safety scheme port authorities should establish to deal with any contingency that may result from the visit of a nuclear powered ship. The safety scheme should be devised to cover both normal operation and any accident conditions that could arise while the ship is in port. The paper is divided into three parts. The three parts being: background information, general instructions, and emergency procedures. The background information will describe the nature of the hazards a port authority has to be prepared to deal with, and the philosophical basis for a berthing policy. In the part dealing with general instructions the objective of the safety scheme will be described. Also this part will describe the composition of the Port Safety Panel, allocation of responsibilities, passage and berthing arrangements, general safety precautions, records required, and rescue arrangements. In the part dealing with emergency procedures the role of: the Ship's Master, Harbour Authorities, Local Police, and local Health Services are discussed. As an Appendix to the paper a copy of the safety scheme that has been devised for visits of nuclear merchant ships to Southampton is given

  6. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G; Korablev, A; Esau, I

    2010-01-01

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Phenotype/genotype correlation in a case series of Stargardt's patients identifies novel mutations in the ABCA4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2013-11-01

    To investigate phenotypic variability in terms of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in patients with Stargardt disease (STGD) and confirmed ABCA4 mutations. Entire coding region analysis of the ABCA4 gene by direct sequencing of seven patients with clinical findings of STGD seen in the Retina Clinics of Southampton Eye Unit between 2002 and 2011.Phenotypic variables recorded were BCVA, fluorescein angiographic appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. All patients had heterozygous amino acid-changing variants (missense mutations) in the ABCA4 gene. A splice sequence change was found in a 30-year-old patient with severly affected vision. Two novel sequence changes were identified: a missense mutation in a mildly affected 44-year-old patient and a frameshift mutation in a severly affected 34-year-old patient. The identified ABCA4 mutations were compatible with the resulting phenotypes in terms of BCVA. Higher BCVAs were recorded in patients with missense mutations. Sequence changes, predicted to have more deleterious effect on protein function, resulted in a more severe phenotype. This case series of STGD patients demonstrates novel genotype/phenotype correlations, which may be useful to counselling of patients. This information may prove useful in selection of candidates for clinical trials in ABCA4 disease.

  8. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Theories of Matter, Space and Time; Classical theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N.; King, S. F.

    2017-12-01

    This book and its sequel ('Theories of Matter Space and Time: Quantum Theories') are taken from third and fourth year undergraduate Physics courses at Southampton University, UK. The aim of both books is to move beyond the initial courses in classical mechanics, special relativity, electromagnetism, and quantum theory to more sophisticated views of these subjects and their interdependence. The goal is to guide undergraduates through some of the trickier areas of theoretical physics with concise analysis while revealing the key elegance of each subject. The first chapter introduces the key areas of the principle of least action, an alternative treatment of Newtownian dynamics, that provides new understanding of conservation laws. In particular, it shows how the formalism evolved from Fermat's principle of least time in optics. The second introduces special relativity leading quickly to the need and form of four-vectors. It develops four-vectors for all kinematic variables and generalize Newton's second law to the relativistic environment; then returns to the principle of least action for a free relativistic particle. The third chapter presents a review of the integral and differential forms of Maxwell's equations before massaging them to four-vector form so that the Lorentz boost properties of electric and magnetic fields are transparent. Again, it then returns to the action principle to formulate minimal substitution for an electrically charged particle.

  10. Patient-centred performance monitoring systems and multi-agency care provision: a case study using a stakeholder participative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, N A; Goddard, A R; Philp, I; Bray, J

    1998-05-01

    We describe the processes involved in the development of an information system which can assess how care given by a number of agencies could be monitored by those agencies. In particular, it addresses the problem of sharing information as the boundaries of each agency are crossed. It focuses on the care of one specific patient group--the rehabilitation of elderly patients in the community, which provided an ideal multi-agency setting. It also describes: how a stakeholder participative approach to information system development was undertaken, based in part on the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) approach (Checkland, 1981, 1990); some of the difficulties encountered in using such an approach; and the ways in which these were addressed. The paper goes on to describe an assessment tool called SCARS (the Southampton Community Ability Rating Scale). It concludes by reflecting on the management lessons arising from this project. It also observes, inter alia, how stakeholders have a strong preference for simpler, non-IT based systems, and comments on the difficulties encountered by stakeholders in attempting to reconcile their perceptions of the needs of their discipline or specialty with a more patient-centred approach of an integrated system.

  11. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  12. A regional study of the radiation environment of Greenham Common, Newbury District and surrounding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This study was commissioned by Newbury District Council and Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council in response to public concern following disclosures about events at Greenham Common in the 1950s, and the suspicion that there may have been an accident involving a nuclear weapon leading to off-site contamination at the airbase. The Greenham Common airbase is at an advanced stage of decommissioning with parts of the site already re-developed for industrial and leisure purposes and material being removed for use in construction of the Newbury by-pass. The success of such developments is critically dependent on public confidence in the quality of the environment, both near the site, and more generally throughout the area. For this reason the study was commissioned with the aims of: I. defining the radiation environment of the whole district and parts of its surrounding areas. II. examining whether there is any evidence of radioactive contamination in the vicinity of the Greenham Common airbase. III. assessing the evidence that there may have been a release of nuclear material from the site. The work involved a collaboration between scientists from the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, who conducted gamma ray surveys to define the general radiation environment of the area, and Scientists from the University of Southampton who collected an extensive range of samples for high sensitivity radiochemical analyses. This report presents their findings and main conclusions, together with a discussion of the background to the study and its implications. (Author)

  13. Research Data Management Education for Future Curators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Scott

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Science has progressed by “standing on the shoulders of giants” and for centuries research and knowledge have been shared through the publication and dissemination of books, papers and scholarly communications. Moving forward, much of our understanding builds on (large scale datasets, which have been collected or generated as part of the scientific process of discovery. How will this be made available for future generations? How will we ensure that, once collected or generated, others can stand on the shoulders of the data we produce?Educating students about the challenges and opportunities of data management is a key part of the solution and helps the researchers of the future to start to think about the problems early on in their careers. We have compiled a set of case studies to show the similarities and differences in data between disciplines, and produced a booklet for students containing the case studies and an introduction to the data lifecycle and other data management practices. This has already been used at the University of Southampton within the Faculty of Engineering and is now being adopted centrally for use in other faculties. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the case studies and the guide, and reflect on the reception the guide has had to date.

  14. Permitting issues in Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    As background, LG and E Development Corporation (formerly Hadson) has successfully put 16 Qualifying Facilities in the ground over the past 9 years in California, Maine, Virginia, and North Carolina. Each of these qualifying facilities has had some environmental innovative first, so there is no apology for the authors' environmental credentials. In Virginia, there are four identical 60 MW stoker coal cogeneration projects in Southampton County, Altavista, Hopewell, and -lastly-Buena Vista. The Buena Vista cogeneration project becomes the exception that proves the permitting rules. It has been in the permitting process for over 4 years; and despite being the cleanest coal project ever considered east of the Mississippi (design at 0.1 lbs/MMBtu for both So 2 and NO x ), it has suffered serous consequences from permitting delays and BACT ratcheting. As a simple comparison of importance, the Virginia Power Mt. Storm coal power facility emits approximately 150,000 tons of So 2 per year, while the Buena Vista project will actually emit approximately 150 tons of SO 2 per year (not including 1,500' tons of purchased SO 2 offsets). Both are similar distances from the Shenandoah National Park which has been the primary environmental point of concern in Virginia

  15. Influences on the diet quality of pre-school children: importance of maternal psychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Megan; Inskip, Hazel M; Ntani, Georgia; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Robinson, Sian M; Barker, Mary E

    2015-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that maternal psychological profiles relate to children's quality of diet. Cross-sectional study. Mothers provided information on their health-related psychological factors and aspects of their child's mealtime environment. Children's diet quality was assessed using an FFQ from which weekly intakes of foods and a diet Z-score were calculated. A high score described children with a better quality diet. Cluster analysis was performed to assess grouping of mothers based on psychological factors. Mealtime characteristics, describing how often children ate while sitting at a table or in front of the television, their frequency of takeaway food consumption, maternal covert control and food security, and children's quality of diet were examined, according to mothers' cluster membership. Mother-child pairs (n 324) in the Southampton Initiative for Health. Children were aged 2-5 years. Hampshire, UK. Two main clusters were identified. Mothers in cluster 1 had significantly higher scores for all psychological factors than mothers in cluster 2 (all P diets (β = -0.61, 95% CI -0.82, -0.40, P ≤ 0.001). This association was attenuated, but remained significant after controlling for confounding factors that included maternal education and home/mealtime characteristics (P = 0.006). The study suggests that mothers should be offered psychological support as part of interventions to improve children's quality of diet.

  16. Source splitting via the point source method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthast, Roland; Fazi, Filippo M; Nelson, Philip A

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for source identification and field splitting based on the point source method (Potthast 1998 A point-source method for inverse acoustic and electromagnetic obstacle scattering problems IMA J. Appl. Math. 61 119–40, Potthast R 1996 A fast new method to solve inverse scattering problems Inverse Problems 12 731–42). The task is to separate the sound fields u j , j = 1, ..., n of n element of N sound sources supported in different bounded domains G 1 , ..., G n in R 3 from measurements of the field on some microphone array—mathematically speaking from the knowledge of the sum of the fields u = u 1 + ... + u n on some open subset Λ of a plane. The main idea of the scheme is to calculate filter functions g 1 ,…, g n , n element of N, to construct u l for l = 1, ..., n from u| Λ in the form u l (x) = ∫ Λ g l,x (y)u(y)ds(y), l=1,... n. (1) We will provide the complete mathematical theory for the field splitting via the point source method. In particular, we describe uniqueness, solvability of the problem and convergence and stability of the algorithm. In the second part we describe the practical realization of the splitting for real data measurements carried out at the Institute for Sound and Vibration Research at Southampton, UK. A practical demonstration of the original recording and the splitting results for real data is available online

  17. International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, P; Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics

    1992-01-01

    This book Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics is the second volume of the two volume proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics, held in Southampton, U.K., in April 1992. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is now fully established as an ac­ curate and successful technique for solving engineering problems in a wide range of fields. The success of the method is due to its advantages in data reduction, as only the boundary of the region is modelled. Thus moving boundaries may be more easily handled, which is not the case if domain methods are used. In addition, the method is easily able to model regions to extending to infinity. Fluid mechanics is traditionally one of the most challenging areas of engi­ neering, the simulation of fluid motion, particularly in three dimensions, is always a serious test for any numerical method, and is an area in which BEM analysis may be used taking full advantage of its special character...

  18. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  19. Experimental investigation into the effect of substrate clamping on the piezoelectric behaviour of thick-film PZT elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torah, R N; Beeby, S P; White, N M [Department of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-07

    This paper details an experimental investigation of the clamping effect associated with thick-film piezoelectric elements printed on a substrate. The clamping effect reduces the measured piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 33}, of the film. This reduction is due to the influence of the d{sub 31} component in the film when a deformation of the structure occurs, by either the direct or indirect piezoelectric effect. Theoretical analysis shows a reduction in the measured d{sub 33} of 62%, i.e. a standard bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-5H sample with a manufacturer specified d{sub 33} of 593pC/N would fall to 227.8pC/N. To confirm this effect, the d{sub 33} coefficients of five thin bulk PZT-5H samples of 220 {mu}m thickness were measured before and after their attachment to a metallized 96% alumina substrate. The experimental results show a reduction in d{sub 33} of 74% from 529pC/N to 139pC/N. The theoretical analysis was then applied to existing University of Southampton thick-film devices. It is estimated that the measured d{sub 33} value of 131pC/N of the thick-film devices is the equivalent of an unconstrained d{sub 33} of 345pC/N.

  20. Comparative study of state-of-the-art myoelectric controllers for multigrasp prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segil, Jacob L; Controzzi, Marco; Weir, Richard F ff; Cipriani, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A myoelectric controller should provide an intuitive and effective human-machine interface that deciphers user intent in real-time and is robust enough to operate in daily life. Many myoelectric control architectures have been developed, including pattern recognition systems, finite state machines, and more recently, postural control schemes. Here, we present a comparative study of two types of finite state machines and a postural control scheme using both virtual and physical assessment procedures with seven nondisabled subjects. The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) was used in order to compare the effectiveness of the controllers during activities of daily living using a multigrasp artificial hand. Also, a virtual hand posture matching task was used to compare the controllers when reproducing six target postures. The performance when using the postural control scheme was significantly better (p state machines during the physical assessment when comparing within-subject averages using the SHAP percent difference metric. The virtual assessment results described significantly greater completion rates (97% and 99%) for the finite state machines, but the movement time tended to be faster (2.7 s) for the postural control scheme. Our results substantiate that postural control schemes rival other state-of-the-art myoelectric controllers.

  1. Dorset and Thule divergence from East Central Asian roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, E D; Jones, G

    1998-06-01

    The history of the immigration of East Asians to America during the last glacial period remains controversial. In an attempt to add critical data to this problem, a large sample of whole teeth derived from Southeast Asian, Mongolian, Thule, Western Inuit, and pre-Inca (Huari) people was quantified (N = 4,507 teeth from 495 individuals; approximately 30 variables per tooth). Multivariate analysis helped establish that all Native Americans were likely derived from one ancient, extinct population that resided in the region of Mongolia (east Central Asia), and that Mongolians and Southeast Asians are two independent groups. A controversial and enigmatic Central Canadian Arctic "Thule culture Inuit" group on Southampton Island that survived until 1902 was identified as a relic, mainly Paleoeskimo Dorset community. Surprisingly, there was little, or no, indication of Dorset-to-Thule gene flow. Cumulatively, the data suggest that a small population of Paleoindian founders remained resident in Beringia, may have blocked further immigration, and were the antecedents to the Thule/Inuit. With the confluence of the Arctic and Pacific oceans at the breakup of Beringia, the resulting increased availability of marine animal food sources allowed this population to increase in size and expand throughout the eastern Arctic.

  2. Nuclear weapons policy at the crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, D.; Ogilvie-White, T.; Simpson, J.; Taylor, E.

    2000-01-01

    This study on nuclear futures is a product of work undertaken by the Mountbatten Centre for International Studies (MCIS) of the University of Southampton. The study has pursued three goals: to attempt to understand the dynamics of the nuclear present; to elucidate a range of possible nuclear futures that may emerge; and to assess different strategies that could be pursued in response to these futures, including proposals for promoting nuclear disarmament. The aim was to draw on research, meetings and outreach to achieve these goals, and to use the knowledge gained to help inform the international policy-making community. The work underlying this study was divided into two stages. During the first stage, the apparent threat perceptions of the five acknowledged NWS (China, France, Russia, the UK and the United States) and the three de facto NWS (India, Israel and Pakistan) were explored . The purpose of this research was to identify the main factors (or shapers) that seem to have influenced nuclear weapons policy in all these states, and to assess their relative importance. The second stage of the work drew on the conclusions reached on the eight countries. The shapers were divided into categories on the basis of their apparent impact on nuclear weapons policy. This study summarizes the main conclusions reached in the course of this work

  3. An Environment IoT Sensor Network for Monitoring the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, K.; Hart, J. K.; Bragg, O.; Black, A.; Bader, S.; Basford, P. J.; Bragg, G. M.; Fabre, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Internet of Things is a term which has emerged to describe the increase of Internet connectivity of everyday objects. While wireless sensor networks have developed highly energy efficient designs they need a step-change in their interoperability and usability to become more commonly used in Earth Science. IoT techniques can bring many of these advances while reusing some of the technologies developed for low power sensing. Here we concentrate on developing effective use of internet protocols throughout a low power sensor network. This includes 6LowPAN to provide a mesh IPv6 network, 40mW 868 MHz CC1120 radio transceivers to save power but provide kilometre range, a CC2538 ARM® Cortex®-M3 as main processor and CoAP to provide a binary HTTP-like interface to the nodes. We discuss in detail a system we deployed to monitor periglacial, peat and fluvial processes in the Scottish Highlands. The system linked initial nodes 3km away further up the mountain 2km away and used a CoAP GET sequence from a base station in the valley to gather the data. The IPv6 addressing and tunnelling allowed direct connectivity to desktops in Southampton. This provides insights into how the combination of low power techniques and emerging internet standards will bring advantages in interoperability, heterogeneity, usability and maintainability.

  4. Can UK NHS research ethics committees effectively monitor publication and outcome reporting bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rasheda; Kolstoe, Simon

    2015-07-25

    Publication and outcome reporting bias is often caused by researchers selectively choosing which scientific results and outcomes to publish. This behaviour is ethically significant as it distorts the literature used for future scientific or clinical decision-making. This study investigates the practicalities of using ethics applications submitted to a UK National Health Service (NHS) research ethics committee to monitor both types of reporting bias. As part of an internal audit we accessed research ethics database records for studies submitting an end of study declaration to the Hampshire A research ethics committee (formerly Southampton A) between 1st January 2010 and 31st December 2011. A literature search was used to establish the publication status of studies. Primary and secondary outcomes stated in application forms were compared with outcomes reported in publications. Out of 116 studies the literature search identified 57 publications for 37 studies giving a publication rate of 32%. Original Research Ethics Committee (REC) applications could be obtained for 28 of the published studies. Outcome inconsistencies were found in 16 (57%) of the published studies. This study showed that the problem of publication and outcome reporting bias is still significant in the UK. The method described here demonstrates that UK NHS research ethics committees are in a good position to detect such bias due to their unique access to original research protocols. Data gathered in this way could be used by the Health Research Authority to encourage higher levels of transparency in UK research.

  5. From classroom tutor to hypertext adviser: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kemp

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a three-year experiment to investigate the possibility of making economies by replacing practical laboratory sessions with courseware while attempting to ensure that the quality of the student learning experience did not suffer. Pathology labs are a central component of the first-year medical undergraduate curriculum at Southampton. Activities in these labs had been carefully designed and they were supervised by lab demonstrators who were subject domain experts. The labs were successful in the eyes of both staff and students but were expensive to conduct, in terms of equipment and staffing. Year by year evaluation of the introduction of courseware revealed that there was no measurable difference in student performance as a result of introducing the courseware, but that students were unhappy about the loss of interaction with the demonstrators. The final outcome of this experiment was a courseware replacement for six labs which included a software online hypertext adviser. The contribution of this work is that it adds to the body of empirical evidence in support of the importance of maintaining dialogue with students when introducing courseware, and it presents an example of how this interaction might be achieved in software.

  6. Arachidonic acid and DHA status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6-7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Sarah R; Sibbons, Charlene M; Fisk, Helena L; Godfrey, Keith M; Calder, Philip C; Gale, Catharine R; Robinson, Sian M; Inskip, Hazel M; Baird, Janis; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus; Burdge, Graham C

    2018-06-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) and DHA, supplied primarily from the mother, are required for early development of the central nervous system. Thus, variations in maternal ARA or DHA status may modify neurocognitive development. We investigated the relationship between maternal ARA and DHA status in early (11·7 weeks) or late (34·5 weeks) pregnancy on neurocognitive function at the age of 4 years or 6-7 years in 724 mother-child pairs from the Southampton Women's Survey cohort. Plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition was measured in early and late pregnancy. ARA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 13 % of the variation in ARA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·36, PDHA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 21 % of the variation in DHA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·46, PDHA nor ARA concentrations in early or late pregnancy were associated significantly with neurocognitive function in children at the age of 4 years or the age of 6-7 years. These findings suggest that ARA and DHA status during pregnancy in the range found in this cohort are unlikely to have major influences on neurocognitive function in healthy children.

  7. Developmental origins, behaviour change and the new public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Mary

    2016-01-01

    A developmental approach to public health focuses attention on better nourishing girls and young women, especially those of low socio-economic status, to improve mothers’ nutrition and thereby the health of future generations. There have been significant advances in the behavioural sciences that may allow us to understand and support dietary change in young women and their children in ways that have not previously been possible. This paper describes some of these advances and aims to show how they inform this new approach to public health. The first of these has been to work out what is effective in supporting behaviour change which has been achieved by careful and detailed analysis of behaviour change techniques used by practitioners in intervention, and of the effectiveness of these in supporting change. There is also a new understanding of the role that social and physical environments play in shaping our behaviours, and that behaviour is influenced by automatic processes and ‘habits’ as much as by reflective processes and rational decisions. To be maximally effective, interventions therefore have to address both influences on behaviour. An approach developed in Southampton aims to motivate, support and empower young women to make better food choices, but also to change the culture in which those choices are being made. Empowerment is the basis of the new public health. An empowered public demand for better access to better food can go a long way towards improving maternal, infant and family nutrition, and therefore the health of generations to come. PMID:26152930

  8. Specific psychological variables predict quality of diet in women of lower, but not higher, educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Schlotz, Wolff; Crozier, Sarah; Skinner, Timothy C; Haslam, Cheryl; Robinson, Sian; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Barker, Mary

    2011-02-01

    Our previous work found that perceived control over life was a significant predictor of the quality of diet of women of lower educational attainment. In this paper, we explore the influence on quality of diet of a range of psychological and social factors identified during focus group discussions, and specify the way this differs in women of lower and higher educational attainment. We assessed educational attainment, quality of diet, and psycho-social factors in 378 women attending Sure Start Children's Centres and baby clinics in Southampton, UK. Multiple-group path analysis showed that in women of lower educational attainment, the effect of general self-efficacy on quality of diet was mediated through perceptions of control and through food involvement, but that there were also direct effects of social support for healthy eating and having positive outcome expectancies. There was no effect of self-efficacy, perceived control or outcome expectancies on the quality of diet of women of higher educational attainment, though having more social support and food involvement were associated with improved quality of diet in these women. Our analysis confirms our hypothesis that control-related factors are more important in determining dietary quality in women of lower educational attainment than in women of higher educational attainment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast: the need for psychosocial research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, C; Payne, S

    1999-01-01

    Since the introduction of the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP), the number of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases has increased considerably. Despite its increased incidence, some NHS leaflets and reports do not mention it, and the general public seems largely unaware of its existence. There are numerous biological studies dealing with this condition, but its psychosocial aspects seem to have been neglected. We have only been able to locate two British studies (Farmer, A. 1996. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Southampton; Webb, C. and Koch, T. 1997. J. Adv. Nurs., 25, 154-525) that address some of the psychosocial issues associated with DCIS. This paper starts by defining DCIS and explaining its usual presentation, natural history and epidemiology. The treatment options for DCIS are described, together with the great deal of confusion and lack of agreement that accompanies them. The psychological issues that women with screen-detected DCIS have to deal with are different from those affecting women diagnosed with symptomatic breast cancer, and a summary of these issues is given. Finally, some suggestions for future psychosocial research are provided. Because the UK as a whole was not covered by the NHSBSP until 1990 (Baum, M. 1995. Lancet, 346, 436; Gage and Fouquet, 1997), the main focus will be on papers published from that year onwards, although some key papers published before then will also be included. The papers reviewed here were found in MEDLINE, EMBASE and BIDS (ISI). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Theories of Matter, Space and Time, Volume 2; Quantum theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N.; King, S. F.

    2018-06-01

    This book and its prequel Theories of Matter Space and Time: Classical Theories grew out of courses that we have both taught as part of the undergraduate degree program in Physics at Southampton University, UK. Our goal was to guide the full MPhys undergraduate cohort through some of the trickier areas of theoretical physics that we expect our undergraduates to master. Here we teach the student to understand first quantized relativistic quantum theories. We first quickly review the basics of quantum mechanics which should be familiar to the reader from a prior course. Then we will link the Schrödinger equation to the principle of least action introducing Feynman's path integral methods. Next, we present the relativistic wave equations of Klein, Gordon and Dirac. Finally, we convert Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism to a wave equation for photons and make contact with quantum electrodynamics (QED) at a first quantized level. Between the two volumes we hope to move a student's understanding from their prior courses to a place where they are ready, beyond, to embark on graduate level courses on quantum field theory.

  11. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai (Ed.), G.A.

    2007-06-11

    The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

  12. Investigating the effect of distance between the teacher and learner on the student perception of a neuroanatomical near-peer teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jonny R; Hall, Samuel; Andrade, Matheus Gesteira; Border, Scott

    2016-12-01

    Near-peer teaching (NPT) is a highly valuable resource for the education of medical undergraduates with benefits to the students, teachers themselves, and the faculty. To maximise the effectiveness of such teaching programmes, the aim of this study was to determine how the student learning experience, and underpinning social and cognitive congruencies changes as the learner-teacher distance increases. Second-year medical students at the University of Southampton participated in a series of neuroanatomy, extra-curricular revision sessions taught by the third-, fourth-, and fifth-year medical students and junior doctors. The students completed a validated questionnaire after the session rating various aspects of the teaching. Although all teachers delivered sessions that we rated highly with a mean perceived gain in knowledge of 18 % amongst all students, it was found that the third- and fourth-year medical students delivered a session that was rated significantly better than the fifth-year students and junior doctors across all, but one areas of feedback. We believe that these findings may be explained by the diminishing social and cognitive congruencies shared between learner and teacher with increasing distance. From our results, we hypothesise that graduation is an important threshold, where there is a significant drop in congruencies between the learner and teacher, therefore, having a significant impact on the perception of the NPT session.

  13. Near-peer teaching in clinical neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Samuel; Lewis, Michael; Border, Scott; Powell, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    Near-peer teaching involves students being taught by more senior students and draws on their similar knowledge base and shared experiences. It has been used previously for teaching gross anatomy, but has not yet been reported specifically for neuroanatomy. At the University of Southampton there is no formal neuroanatomy teaching during the clinical years, and so a near-peer teaching programme was developed to support students, learning in between attending their clinical attachments. A series of seven sessions were organised and delivered by two medical students throughout the 2010/11 academic year, and each session was evaluated by using participant feedback forms. Sixty feedback forms were returned by the students, giving an average rating for the overall quality of the sessions of 4.3 out of 5.0. There was an 18 per cent increase in the student's perceived level of knowledge (p peer teaching sessions. The most common feedback received from our students related to the availability of handouts and expressions of gratitude. The results from this teaching development support the use of near-peer teaching in neuroanatomy. In this article we provide some evidence to suggest that students feel more confident with neuroanatomy after attending these sessions, and describe some unique advantages of this teaching programme over sessions led by faculty staff. The wider benefits to both faculty staff and student teachers are also considered. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Explaining the differences in household food waste collection and treatment provisions between local authorities in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bees, A D; Williams, I D

    2017-12-01

    Separate household food waste collection for anaerobic digestion is one method used in the sustainable management of biodegradable municipal solid waste (MSW). Recycling of food waste contributes to the UK's reuse, recycling and composting targets and can help local authorities boost plateauing rates whilst encouraging landfill diversion. This study explored the reasons for differences in the provision of food waste collections, using two comparable local authorities, one with a collection in Wales (Cardiff), and the other absent of such service in England (Southampton). A PESTLE analysis investigated the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental impacts of separate food waste collections. The greenhouse gas impacts of the collection and treatment systems of MSW in both cities were estimated for 2012/13. Results showed significant policy and legislative differences between devolved governments, that separate food waste collections can save local authorities significant sums of money and substantially reduce greenhouse gas impacts. A survey of one hundred respondents in each city aimed to understand attitudes and behaviours towards recycling, food waste segregation, cooking and purchasing habits. The number of frequent recyclers and levels of satisfaction were higher in the authority which provided a separate food waste collection. In the area which lacked a separate collection service, over three-quarters of respondents would participate in such a scheme if it were available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  16. Erica the Rhino: A Case Study in Using Raspberry Pi Single Board Computers for Interactive Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Basford

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Erica the Rhino is an interactive art exhibit created by the University of Southampton, UK. Erica was created as part of a city wide art trail in 2013 called “Go! Rhinos”, curated by Marwell Wildlife, to raise awareness of Rhino conservation. Erica arrived as a white fibreglass shell which was then painted and equipped with five Raspberry Pi Single Board Computers (SBC. These computers allowed the audience to interact with Erica through a range of sensors and actuators. In particular, the audience could feed and stroke her to prompt reactions, as well as send her Tweets to change her behaviour. Pi SBCs were chosen because of their ready availability and their educational pedigree. During the deployment, ‘coding clubs’ were run in the shopping centre where Erica was located, and these allowed children to experiment with and program the same components used in Erica. The experience gained through numerous deployments around the country has enabled Erica to be upgraded to increase reliability and ease of maintenance, whilst the release of the Pi 2 has allowed her responsiveness to be improved.

  17. Developmental origins, behaviour change and the new public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M

    2015-10-01

    A developmental approach to public health focuses attention on better nourishing girls and young women, especially those of low socio-economic status, to improve mothers' nutrition and thereby the health of future generations. There have been significant advances in the behavioural sciences that may allow us to understand and support dietary change in young women and their children in ways that have not previously been possible. This paper describes some of these advances and aims to show how they inform this new approach to public health. The first of these has been to work out what is effective in supporting behaviour change, which has been achieved by careful and detailed analysis of behaviour change techniques used by practitioners in intervention, and of the effectiveness of these in supporting change. There is also a new understanding of the role that social and physical environments play in shaping our behaviours, and that behaviour is influenced by automatic processes and 'habits' as much as by reflective processes and rational decisions. To be maximally effective, interventions therefore have to address both influences on behaviour. An approach developed in Southampton aims to motivate, support and empower young women to make better food choices, but also to change the culture in which those choices are being made. Empowerment is the basis of the new public health. An empowered public demand for better access to better food can go a long way towards improving maternal, infant and family nutrition, and therefore the health of generations to come.

  18. Changes needed to medicine in the UK before senior UK-trained doctors, working outside the UK, will return: questionnaire surveys undertaken between 2004 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2017-12-01

    To report the changes to UK medicine which doctors who have emigrated tell us would increase their likelihood of returning to a career in UK medicine. Questionnaire survey. UK-trained medical graduates. Questionnaires were sent 11 years after graduation to 7158 doctors who qualified in 1993 and 1996 in the UK: 4763 questionnaires were returned. Questionnaires were sent 17 and 19 years after graduation to the same cohorts: 4554 questionnaires were returned. Comments from doctors working abroad about changes needed to UK medicine before they would return. Eleven years after graduation, 290 (6%) of respondents were working in medicine abroad; 277 (6%) were doing so 17/19 years after graduation. Eleven years after graduation, 53% of doctors working abroad indicated that they did not intend to return, and 71% did so 17/19 years after graduation. These respondents reported a number of changes which would need to be made to UK medicine in order to increase the likelihood of them returning. The most frequently mentioned changes cited concerned 'politics/management/funding', 'pay/pension', 'posts/security/opportunities', 'working conditions/hours', and 'factors outside medicine'. Policy attention to factors including funding, pay, management and particularly the clinical-political interface, working hours, and work-life balance may pay dividends for all, both in terms of persuading some established doctors to return and, perhaps more importantly, encouraging other, younger doctors to believe that the UK and the National Health Service can offer them a satisfying and rewarding career.

  19. Carbon: Nitrogen Interaction Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in N-Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Goel

    Full Text Available In plants, several cellular and metabolic pathways interact with each other to regulate processes that are vital for their growth and development. Carbon (C and Nitrogen (N are two main nutrients for plants and coordination of C and N pathways is an important factor for maintaining plant growth and development. In the present work, influence of nitrogen and sucrose (C source on growth parameters and expression of genes involved in nitrogen transport and assimilatory pathways was studied in B. juncea seedlings. For this, B. juncea seedlings were treated with four combinations of C and N source viz., N source alone (-Suc+N, C source alone (+Suc-N, with N and C source (+Suc+N or without N and C source (-Suc-N. Cotyledon size and shoot length were found to be increased in seedlings, when nitrogen alone was present in the medium. Distinct expression pattern of genes in both, root and shoot tissues was observed in response to exogenously supplied N and C. The presence or depletion of nitrogen alone in the medium leads to severe up- or down-regulation of key genes involved in N-uptake and transport (BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.8 in root tissue and genes involved in nitrate reduction (BjNR1 and BjNR2 in shoot tissue. Moreover, expression of several genes, like BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2 and BjPK in root and two genes BjAMT2 and BjGS1.1 in shoot were found to be regulated only when C source was present in the medium. Majority of genes were found to respond in root and shoot tissues, when both C and N source were present in the medium, thus reflecting their importance as a signal in regulating expression of genes involved in N-uptake and assimilation. The present work provides insight into the regulation of genes of N-uptake and assimilatory pathway in B. juncea by interaction of both carbon and nitrogen.

  20. Written reflection in an eHealth intervention for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative study

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    Lie SS

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Silje S Lie,1 Bjørg Karlsen,1 Christopher P Niemiec,2 Marit Graue,3 Bjørg Oftedal1 1Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; 3Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway Background: Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are responsible for the daily decisions and actions necessary to manage their disease, which makes self-management the cornerstone of diabetes care. Many patients do not reach recommended treatment goals, and thus it is important to develop and evaluate innovative interventions that facilitate optimal motivation for adequate self-management of T2DM. Objective: The aim of the current study was to explore how adults with T2DM experience using reflection sheets to stimulate written reflection in the context of the Guided Self-Determination (GSD eHealth intervention and how written reflection might affect their motivation for self-management of T2DM. Methods: We used a qualitative design in which data were collected through individual interviews. The sample consisted of 10 patients who completed the GSD eHealth intervention, and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The qualitative content analysis yielded 2 main themes. We labeled the first theme as “Written reflection affects awareness and commitment in diabetes self-management”, which reflects 2 subthemes, namely, “Writing creates space and time for autonomous reflection” and “Writing influences individuals’ focus in diabetes self-management”. We labeled the second theme as “Written reflection is perceived as inapplicable in diabetes self-management”, which reflects 2 subthemes, namely, “Responding in writing is difficult” and “The timing of the writing is inappropriate”. Conclusion: Our findings

  1. Participation in physical and social activities among home-dwelling persons with dementia – experiences of next of kin

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    Söderhamn U

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulrika Söderhamn,1 Bjørg Landmark,2,3 Sissel Eriksen,2 Olle Söderhamn11Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, 2Institute of Research and Development for Nursing and Care Services, Municipality of Drammen, Drammen, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, NorwayIntroduction: To be next of kin to a home-dwelling person with dementia is known to be a heavy burden, especially early in the process. Studies have revealed a need for information and support during the disease process. Likewise, there is support for the positive impacts of physical and social activities for wellbeing in home-dwelling people with dementia. It is important to obtain experiences from next of kin whose spouses or parents participate in such physical and social activities.Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate the experiences of next of kin to home-dwelling persons in an early stage of dementia who had an opportunity to participate in organized physical and social activities.Method: The study has a qualitative design. Focus group interviews were conducted with ten next of kin to home-dwelling dementia sufferers, who participated in physical and social activities in an activity center. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Findings: In the analysis, two categories emerged: "a break in the everyday" and "being attended and cared about." Two sub-categories identified in each of the two main categories were: "need of relief" and "meaningful activities;" and "being confirmed" and "sharing experiences and getting advice and help," respectively. These categories were interpreted in an overall theme: "contentment with adapted activities and group meetings provided with a person-centered approach."Conclusion: Adapted physical and social activities led by highly qualified personnel can provide needed relief and support to the next of kin, and

  2. Carbon: Nitrogen Interaction Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in N-Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Parul; Bhuria, Monika; Kaushal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    In plants, several cellular and metabolic pathways interact with each other to regulate processes that are vital for their growth and development. Carbon (C) and Nitrogen (N) are two main nutrients for plants and coordination of C and N pathways is an important factor for maintaining plant growth and development. In the present work, influence of nitrogen and sucrose (C source) on growth parameters and expression of genes involved in nitrogen transport and assimilatory pathways was studied in B. juncea seedlings. For this, B. juncea seedlings were treated with four combinations of C and N source viz., N source alone (-Suc+N), C source alone (+Suc-N), with N and C source (+Suc+N) or without N and C source (-Suc-N). Cotyledon size and shoot length were found to be increased in seedlings, when nitrogen alone was present in the medium. Distinct expression pattern of genes in both, root and shoot tissues was observed in response to exogenously supplied N and C. The presence or depletion of nitrogen alone in the medium leads to severe up- or down-regulation of key genes involved in N-uptake and transport (BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.8) in root tissue and genes involved in nitrate reduction (BjNR1 and BjNR2) in shoot tissue. Moreover, expression of several genes, like BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2 and BjPK in root and two genes BjAMT2 and BjGS1.1 in shoot were found to be regulated only when C source was present in the medium. Majority of genes were found to respond in root and shoot tissues, when both C and N source were present in the medium, thus reflecting their importance as a signal in regulating expression of genes involved in N-uptake and assimilation. The present work provides insight into the regulation of genes of N-uptake and assimilatory pathway in B. juncea by interaction of both carbon and nitrogen. PMID:27637072

  3. Volunteering in dementia care – a Norwegian phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderhamn U

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrika Söderhamn1, Bjørg Landmark2,3, Live Aasgaard2, Hilde Eide3, Olle Söderhamn11Center for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway; 2Institute of Research and Development for Nursing and Care Services, Municipality of Drammen, Drammen, Norway; 3Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, NorwayIntroduction: The number of people suffering from dementia will increase dramatically in the future, and this will be a great challenge and concern for health care services. It is assumed that volunteers will strengthen community health care services more in the future than they do today.Aim: The aim of this study was to elucidate lived experiences of working as a volunteer in an activity center with adapted activities for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia.Methods: Qualitative interviews were implemented in a group of nine female volunteers from an activity center in southern Norway. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method. Results: Volunteering in an activity center for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia was reported to provide experiences of being useful and feeling satisfied with performing a good job. It was an advantage for the volunteers to have had experiences from life in general, but also as a health professional or as being the next of kin of a dementia sufferer. It was important for the volunteers to focus on the dementia sufferer and show caring behavior, and interaction with and the appreciation of the health care professionals were also important. The volunteers were motivated by being able to have influence and participate in the planning of the work, to be a part of the social setting, and to learn. However, for some volunteers it was difficult to adjust to an appropriate role.Conclusion: In order to promote volunteering in a caring context, mutual

  4. EFEITOS DA INOCULAÇÃO COM BACTÉRIAS DIAZOTRÓFICAS E DA ADUBAÇÃO NITROGENADA NO CRESCIMENTO E NA QUALIDADE DE MUDAS DE Inga laurina (SW. Willd. (Fabaceae1

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    Gabriel Salles Góes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inga laurina é uma espécie arbórea com ampla distribuição na América do Sul, útil para sistemas agroflorestais, restauração florestal e arborização urbana. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos da inoculação com bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio (N e da adubação nitrogenada no crescimento e qualidade de mudas de I. laurina. O experimento teve duração de 170 dias, e as mudas foram cultivadas em tubetes plásticos com 115 cm3 de capacidade, contendo uma mistura 9: 1 em volume de HS Florestal® e pó de fibra de coco como substrato. Foram analisados seis tratamentos, sendo quatro inoculações (Bradyrhizobium japonicum 1 - BJ1, Rhizobium miluonense - RM, Bradyrhizobium japonicum 2- BJ2 e Burkholderia cepacia - BC, o controle positivo - C+ (sem inoculação e com adubação nitrogenada semanal, 60 mg dm3 de N, na forma de ureia e o controle negativo - C- (sem inoculação e sem adubação nitrogenada. Os tratamentos com inoculação foram pouco efetivos em relação ao crescimento das mudas, visto que as médias das variáveis de crescimento, da massa foliar específica (MFE e do índice de qualidade de Dixon (IQD foram significativamente superiores no C+, em comparação com os demais tratamentos. No entanto, os isolados RM e BJ2 foram efetivos na produção de nódulos, pois apresentaram os maiores valores médios da massa de matéria seca de nódulos (MSN. Além disso, os valores médios do índice de clorofila Falker (ICF foram significativamente superiores nos tratamentos com inoculação em relação ao C-. Os melhores resultados entre os tratamentos com inoculação foram obtidos para RM, seguido de BJ2.

  5. Aflibercept treatment for neovascular AMD beyond the first year: consensus recommendations by a UK expert roundtable panel, 2017 update

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    Patel PJ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Praveen J Patel,1 Helen Devonport,2 Sobha Sivaprasad,1 Adam H Ross,3 Gavin Walters,4 Richard P Gale,5 Andrew J Lotery,6 Sajjad Mahmood,7 James S Talks,8 Jackie Napier9 1National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK; 2The Ophthalmology Department, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Bradford, UK; 3The Ophthalmology Department, Bristol Eye Hospital, Bristol, UK; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Harrogate District Hospital, Harrogate, UK; 5The Ophthalmology Department, The York Hospital and Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK; 6Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 7Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK; 8Newcastle Eye Centre, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK; 9Medical Affairs, Bayer plc, Reading, Berkshire, UK Abstract: National recommendations on continued administration of aflibercept solution for injection after the first year of treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD have been developed by an expert panel of UK retina specialists, based on clinician experience and treatment outcomes seen in year 2. The 2017 update reiterates that the treatment goal is to maintain or improve the macular structural and functional gains achieved in year 1 while attempting to reduce or minimize the treatment burden, recognizing the need for ongoing treatment. At the end of year 1 (ie, the decision visit at month 11, two treatment options should be considered: do not extend the treatment interval and maintain fixed 8-weekly dosing, or extend the treatment interval using a treat-and-extend regimen up to a maximum 12 weeks. Criteria for considering not extending the treatment interval are persistent macular fluid with stable

  6. Finalizing a measurement framework for the burden of treatment in complex patients with chronic conditions

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    Eton DT

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1,2 Jennifer L Ridgeway,1,2 Jason S Egginton,1,2 Kristina Tiedje,3 Mark Linzer,4,5 Deborah H Boehm,4 Sara Poplau,6 Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira,7 Laura Odell,8 Victor M Montori,1,9 Carl R May,10 Roger T Anderson11 1Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Robert D and Patricia E Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Lyon, France; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 5University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 6Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 7Department of Social Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; 8Pharmacy Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 9Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 10Faculty of Health Sciences and NIHR CLAHRC Wessex, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 11School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: The workload of health care and its impact on patient functioning and well-being is known as treatment burden. The purpose of this study was to finalize a conceptual framework of treatment burden that will be used to inform a new patient-reported measure of this construct. Patients and methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 chronically ill patients from a large academic medical center (n=32 and an urban safety-net hospital (n=18. We coded themes identifying treatment burden, with the themes harmonized through discussion between multiple coders. Four focus groups, each with five to eight participants with chronic illness, were subsequently held to confirm the thematic structure that emerged from the interviews. Results: Most interviewed patients (98

  7. O impacto do declínio cognitivo, da capacidade funcional e da mobilidade de idosos com doença de Alzheimer na sobrecarga dos cuidadores The impact of cognitive, functional, and mobility decline of elderly with Alzheimer disease on their caregivers' burden

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    Larissa de Lima Borges

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi avaliar capacidade funcional, mobilidade e função cognitiva de idosos com a doença de Alzheimer (DA, bem como o nível de sobrecarga de seus cuidadores, verificando possíveis associações entre essas variáveis. Foram selecionados 28 idosos (77,8±8,3 anos diagnosticados com DA por meio do manual diagnóstico e estatístico das doenças mentais e da Classificação Internacional de Doenças; e também os respectivos cuidadores (58,0±13,9 anos, todos participantes da Associação Brasileira de Alzheimer em Goiás. Foram avaliadas função cognitiva, mobilidade e capacidade funcional dos idosos, por meio do miniexame do estado mental, Southampton assessment of mobility e Disability assessment for dementia, respectivamente. O nível de sobrecarga dos cuidadores foi avaliado pela Zarit burden interview. As associações foram calculadas pelo teste de correlação de Spearman e o nível de significância fixado em 0,05. Obtiveram-se correlações fracas significativas entre o nível cognitivo e a escolaridade dos idosos (r=0,389; p=0,041, nível de funcionalidade dos idosos e nível de sobrecarga dos cuidadores (r=-0,398; p=0,036, e mobilidade e tempo de diagnóstico da DA (r=0,401; p=0,042. Os resultados sugerem que o deficit cognitivo não interferiu na capacidade funcional e a perda cognitiva foi proporcionalmente maior que a perda da mobilidade. Foi possível associar a sobrecarga dos cuidadores ao nível de funcionalidade dos idosos com doença de Alzheimer.The purpose here was to assess functional capacity, mobility, and cognitive function of elderly with Alzheimer disease (AD, as well as the level of burden of their respective caregivers, and to search for possible associations between both. Among members of the Brazilian Alzheimer Association in Goiás, 28 subjects (aged 77.8±8.3 years were selected, diagnosed following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Statistical

  8. Theorising and testing environmental pathways to behaviour change: natural experimental study of the perception and use of new infrastructure to promote walking and cycling in local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-09-03

    Some studies have assessed the effectiveness of environmental interventions to promote physical activity, but few have examined how such interventions work. We investigated the environmental mechanisms linking an infrastructural intervention with behaviour change. Natural experimental study. Three UK municipalities (Southampton, Cardiff and Kenilworth). Adults living within 5 km of new walking and cycling infrastructure. Construction or improvement of walking and cycling routes. Exposure to the intervention was defined in terms of residential proximity. Questionnaires at baseline and 2-year follow-up assessed perceptions of the supportiveness of the environment, use of the new infrastructure, and walking and cycling behaviours. Analysis proceeded via factor analysis of perceptions of the physical environment (step 1) and regression analysis to identify plausible pathways involving physical and social environmental mediators and refine the intervention theory (step 2) to a final path analysis to test the model (step 3). Participants who lived near and used the new routes reported improvements in their perceptions of provision and safety. However, path analysis (step 3, n=967) showed that the effects of the intervention on changes in time spent walking and cycling were largely (90%) explained by a simple causal pathway involving use of the new routes, and other pathways involving changes in environmental cognitions explained only a small proportion of the effect. Physical improvement of the environment itself was the key to the effectiveness of the intervention, and seeking to change people's perceptions may be of limited value. Studies of how interventions lead to population behaviour change should complement those concerned with estimating their effects in supporting valid causal inference. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Modern Practice in Stress and Vibration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    Southampton School of Engineering Sciences Conference Chairman The PDF contains lists of the organising committee, scientific committee, sponsors and co-sponsors.

  10. Saving lives with public access defibrillation: A deadly game of hide and seek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, David B; Potter, Ryan; Newitt, Laura K; Hodgetts, Gillian A; Deakin, Charles D

    2018-07-01

    Early defibrillation is a critical link in the chain of survival. Public access defibrillation (PAD) programmes utilising automated external defibrillators (AEDs) aim to decrease the time-to-first-shock, and improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Effective use of PADs requires rapid location of the device, facilitated by adequate signage. We aimed to therefore assess the quality of signage for PADs in the community. From April 2017 to January 2018 we surveyed community PADs available for public use on the 'Save a Life' AED locator mobile application in and around Southampton, UK. Location and signage characteristics were collected, and the distance from the furthest sign to the AED was measured. Researchers evaluated 201 separate PADs. All devices visited were included in the final analysis. No signage at all was present for 135 (67.2%) devices. Only 15/201 (7.5%) AEDs had signage at a distance from AED itself. In only 5 of these cases (2.5%) was signage mounted more than 5.0 m from the AED. When signage was present, 46 used 2008 ILCOR signage and 15 used 2006 Resuscitation Council (UK) signage. Signage visibility was partially or severely obstructed at 27/66 (40.9%) sites. None of the 45 GP surgeries surveyed used exterior signage or an exterior 24/7 access box. Current signage of PADs is poor and limits the device effectiveness by impeding public awareness and location of AEDs. Recommendations should promote visible signage within the operational radius of each AED. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mindfulness of voices, self-compassion, and secure attachment in relation to the experience of hearing voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, James; Eames, Catrin; Mulligan, John; Fisher, Naomi

    2018-03-01

    Developing compassion towards oneself has been linked to improvement in many areas of psychological well-being, including psychosis. Furthermore, developing a non-judgemental, accepting way of relating to voices is associated with lower levels of distress for people who hear voices. These factors have also been associated with secure attachment. This study explores associations between the constructs of mindfulness of voices, self-compassion, and distress from hearing voices and how secure attachment style related to each of these variables. Cross-sectional online. One hundred and twenty-eight people (73% female; M age  = 37.5; 87.5% Caucasian) who currently hear voices completed the Self-Compassion Scale, Southampton Mindfulness of Voices Questionnaire, Relationships Questionnaire, and Hamilton Programme for Schizophrenia Voices Questionnaire. Results showed that mindfulness of voices mediated the relationship between self-compassion and severity of voices, and self-compassion mediated the relationship between mindfulness of voices and severity of voices. Self-compassion and mindfulness of voices were significantly positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with distress and severity of voices. Mindful relation to voices and self-compassion are associated with reduced distress and severity of voices, which supports the proposed potential benefits of mindful relating to voices and self-compassion as therapeutic skills for people experiencing distress by voice hearing. Greater self-compassion and mindfulness of voices were significantly associated with less distress from voices. These findings support theory underlining compassionate mind training. Mindfulness of voices mediated the relationship between self-compassion and distress from voices, indicating a synergistic relationship between the constructs. Although the current findings do not give a direction of causation, consideration is given to the potential impact of mindful and

  12. Front gardens to car parks: changes in garden permeability and effects on flood regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warhurst, Jennifer R; Parks, Katherine E; McCulloch, Lindsay; Hudson, Malcolm D

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the consequences of widespread conversion of permeable front gardens to hard standing car parking surfaces, and the potential consequences in high-risk urban flooding hotspots, in the city of Southampton. The last two decades has seen a trend for domestic front gardens in urban areas to be converted for parking, driven by the lack of space and increased car ownership. Despite media and political attention, the effects of this change are unknown, but increased and more intense rainfall, potentially linked to climate change, could generate negative consequences as runoff from impermeable surfaces increases. Information is limited on garden permeability change, despite the consequences for ecosystem services, especially flood regulation. We focused on eight flooding hotspots identified by the local council as part of a wider urban flooding policy response. Aerial photographs from 1991, 2004 and 2011 were used to estimate changes in surface cover and to analyse permeability change within a digital surface model in a GIS environment. The 1, 30 and 100 year required attenuation storage volumes were estimated, which are the temporary storage required to reduce the peak flow rate given surface permeability. Within our study areas, impermeable cover in domestic front gardens increased by 22.47% over the 20-year study period (1991-2011) and required attenuation storage volumes increased by 26.23% on average. These increases suggest that a consequence of the conversion of gardens to parking areas will be a potential increase in flooding frequency and severity - a situation which is likely to occur in urban locations worldwide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional and Psychosocial Outcomes of Hand Transplantation Compared with Prosthetic Fitting in Below-Elbow Amputees: A Multicenter Cohort Study.

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    Stefan Salminger

    Full Text Available Hand-transplantation and improvements in the field of prostheses opened new frontiers in restoring hand function in below-elbow amputees. Both concepts aim at restoring reliable hand function, however, the indications, advantages and limitations for each treatment must be carefully considered depending on level and extent of amputation. Here we report our findings of a multi-center cohort study comparing hand function and quality-of-life of people with transplanted versus prosthetic hands.Hand function in amputees with either transplant or prostheses was tested with Action Research Arm Test (ARAT, Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand measure (DASH. Quality-of-life was compared with the Short-Form 36 (SF-36.Transplanted patients (n = 5 achieved a mean ARAT score of 40.86 ± 8.07 and an average SHAP score of 75.00 ± 11.06. Prosthetic patients (n = 7 achieved a mean ARAT score of 39.00 ± 3.61 and an average SHAP score of 75.43 ± 10.81. There was no significant difference between transplanted and prosthetic hands in ARAT, SHAP or DASH. While quality-of-life metrics were equivocal for four scales of the SF-36, transplanted patients reported significantly higher scores in "role-physical" (p = 0.006, "vitality" (p = 0.008, "role-emotional" (p = 0.035 and "mental-health" (p = 0.003.The indications for hand transplantation or prosthetic fitting in below-elbow amputees require careful consideration. As functional outcomes were not significantly different between groups, patient's best interests and the route of least harm should guide treatment. Due to the immunosuppressive side-effects, the indication for allotransplantation must still be restrictive, the best being bilateral amputees.

  14. First ground-based optical analysis of Hβ Doppler profiles close to local noon in the cusp

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    S. C. Robertson

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations of hydrogen emissions along the magnetic zenith at Longyearbyen (78.2 N, 15.8 E geographic are used to investigate the energy and source of protons precipitating into the high latitude region. During the hours around local solar noon (11:00 UT, measurements of the hydrogen Balmer β line are severely affected by sunlight, such that most data until now have been disregarded during these times. Here we use a simple technique to subtract sunlight contamination from such spectral data. An example is shown in which the removal of twilight contamination reveals a brightening of Hβ aurora over Svalbard on 27 November 2000 between 08:00 UT and 10:00 UT, which is centred on magnetic noon (08:48 UT. These data were measured by the High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES, one instrument on the Southampton-UCL Spectrographic Imaging Facility (SIF. Data from the IMAGE satellite confirms the location of a cusp "spot" over Svalbard at the time of the ground-based measurements, which moved in response to changes in the IMF conditions. A coincident pass of the DMSP F12 satellite provided input spectra for modelling studies of the Hβ profiles, which confirm that the method for removing the twilight contamination is robust. The results described here are the first ground-based optical measurements of Hβ Doppler profiles from the cusp region close to local solar noon, when scattered sunlight swamps the raw data.

  15. Evaluation of work-based screening for early signs of alcohol-related liver disease in hazardous and harmful drinkers: the PrevAIL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Penny A; Morleo, Michela; Billington, David; Sanderson-Shortt, Kevin; Jones, Colin; Gabbay, Mark; Sheron, Nick; Bellis, Mark A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Gilmore, Ian T

    2015-06-04

    The direct cost of excessive alcohol consumption to health services is substantial but dwarfed by the cost borne by the workplace as a result of lost productivity. The workplace is also a promising setting for health interventions. The Preventing Alcohol Harm in Liverpool and Knowsley (PrevAIL) project aimed to evaluate a mechanism for detecting the prevalence of alcohol related liver disease using fibrosis biomarkers. Secondary aims were to identify the additive effect of obesity as a risk factor for early liver disease; to assess other impacts of alcohol on work, using a cross-sectional survey. Participants (aged 36-55 y) from 13 workplaces participated (March 2011-April 2012). BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure and self-reported alcohol consumption in the previous week was recorded. Those consuming more than the accepted UK threshold (men: >21 units; female: >14 units alcohol) provided a 20 ml venous blood sample for a biomarker test (Southampton Traffic Light Test) and completed an alcohol questionnaire (incorporating the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire). The screening mechanism enrolled 363 individuals (52 % women), 39 % of whom drank above the threshold and participated in the liver screen (n = 141, complete data = 124 persons). Workplaces with successful participation were those where employers actively promoted, encouraged and facilitated attendance. Biomarkers detected that 30 % had liver disease (25 %, intermediate; 5 % probable). Liver disease was associated with the frequency of visits to the family physician (P = 0.036) and obesity (P = 0.052). The workplace is an important setting for addressing alcohol harm, but there are barriers to voluntary screening that need to be addressed. Early detection and support of cases in the community could avert deaths and save health and social costs. Alcohol and obesity should be addressed simultaneously, because of their known multiplicative effect on liver disease risk, and because employers

  16. EscapED: A Framework for Creating Educational Escape Rooms and Interactive Games to For Higher/Further Education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Clarke

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Game-based learning (GBL is often found to be technologically driven and more often than not, serious games for instance, are conceptualised and designed solely for digital platforms and state of the art technologies. To encourage a greater discussion on the potential benefits and challenges of a more holistic approach to developing GBL that promote human centered interactions and play for learning, the authors present the escapED programme. The escapED programme was conceived following the recent entertainment trend of escape rooms and is used for developing non-digital GBL approaches within education. escapED aids the design and creation of educational Escape Rooms and Interactive Gaming Experiences for staff and students in further/higher education settings. The paper first presents a pilot study that was used to assess the feasibility and acceptance of University teaching staff of embedding interactive GBL into a higher education environment. The authors then present the escapED theoretical framework that was used to create the prototype game for the pilot study as a tool to aid future design and development of on-site interactive experiences. The paper also presents an external developer report of using the escapED framework to develop a prototype game for teaching research methods to Southampton University students. Finally, the authors present a discussion on the use of the escapED framework so far and plans for future work and evaluation in order to provide engaging alternatives for learning and soft skills development amongst higher education staff andstudents.

  17. Mapping the structural organization of the brain in conduct disorder: replication of findings in two independent samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Graeme; Toschi, Nicola; Sully, Kate; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; Hagan, Cindy C; Diciotti, Stefano; Goodyer, Ian M; Calder, Andrew J; Passamonti, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Neuroimaging methods that allow researchers to investigate structural covariance between brain regions are increasingly being used to study psychiatric disorders. Structural covariance analyses are particularly well suited for studying disorders with putative neurodevelopmental origins as they appear sensitive to changes in the synchronized maturation of different brain regions. We assessed interregional correlations in cortical thickness as a measure of structural covariance, and applied this method to investigate the coordinated development of different brain regions in conduct disorder (CD). We also assessed whether structural covariance measures could differentiate between the childhood-onset (CO-CD) and adolescence-onset (AO-CD) subtypes of CD, which may differ in terms of etiology and adult outcomes. We examined interregional correlations in cortical thickness in male youths with CO-CD or AO-CD relative to healthy controls (HCs) in two independent datasets. The age range in the Cambridge sample was 16-21 years (mean: 18.0), whereas the age range of the Southampton sample was 13-18 years (mean: 16.7). We used FreeSurfer to perform segmentations and applied structural covariance methods to the resulting parcellations. In both samples, CO-CD participants displayed a strikingly higher number of significant cross-cortical correlations compared to HC or AO-CD participants, whereas AO-CD participants presented fewer significant correlations than HCs. Group differences in the strength of the interregional correlations were observed in both samples, and each set of results remained significant when controlling for IQ and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. This study provides new evidence for quantitative differences in structural brain organization between the CO-CD and AO-CD subtypes, and supports the hypothesis that both subtypes of CD have neurodevelopmental origins. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

  18. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  19. Comparison of efficacy of phenol and sodium hydroxide matricectomies for management of ingrown toenails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbar, A.; Majeed, S.; Arif, A.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of Phenol and Sodium Hydroxide Matricectomies in terms of frequency of pain and wound healing in the management of Ingrown Toenails. Study Design: Randomized Clinical Trial Place of Duration of Study: Out Patient Department of Surgery Combined Military Hospital Kharian from Aug 2010 to Feb 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 140 cases with Ingrown Toenails were selected and randomly divided into two groups of 70 each. Cases of Group A and B were subjected to Phenol Matricectomy (PMC) and Sodium Hydroxide Matricectomy (SHMC) respectively. Postoperative pain was comparatively and Southampton Wound Grade for wound healing were analyzed at 2nd and 10th postop day. Results: Mean age of Group A was 28.86 ± 6.423 whereas that of Group B was 28.80 ± 5.997. Group A had 58 (83%) males and 12 (17%) females. Group B had 48 (69%) males and 22 (31%) females. Postoperative pain was comparatively less in group A with statistical difference between two groups on 2nd day (p = 0.014), whereas it was less intense in group B with no statistical significant difference on 10th day (p=0.662). Wound healing was better in group B with statistical difference between two groups on 2nd (p = 0.022) and 10th day (p = 0.024). Group B (91.4%) had more statistically significant efficacy than Group A (71.4%) (p = 0.004). Conclusion: SHMC is superior to PMC in reducing pain and improving wound healing for managing Ingrown Toenails. (author)

  20. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  1. Reflecting photonics: reaching new audiences through new partnerships - IYL 2015 and the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; John, Pearl V.; Standen, Deanna; Wheeler, Natalie V.; van Putten, Lieke D.; Soper, Nathan; Parsonage, Tina L.; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    The `Reflecting Photonics' show garden was exhibited at the 2015 Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Flower Show in Tatton Park, UK, to celebrate the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. Elks-Smith Garden Design alongside landscapers `Turf N' Earth' collaborated with researchers, marketing and outreach professionals from the University of Southampton to design, construct and exhibit a photonics-themed garden. The garden and supporting exhibition united science and art to reach new audiences - particularly family groups alongside other key influencers to the young - and showcased the world-leading research in optical fibers at the university in an accessible manner. Researchers and a publicity professional, funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Photonics, developed an integrated approach to the event's public engagement and marketing. The overarching aim was to influence a positive change in the attitude of the garden visitors towards physics and photonics, with additional focus on promoting careers for women in STEM. The show garden won an RHS Gold Medal award and the coveted `People's Choice Award' for the best large garden. The project subsequently won the South East England Physics Network Public Engagement Innovation Project Award. Approximately 80,000 visitors saw the garden, with a further three million television viewers on a popular British gardening show. There were also over 75,400 Tweet impressions on social media. This paper discusses the project aims, explores the design of the garden and its relationship with the research, describes the work of the public engagement team, and outlines the impact of the event.

  2. Interactive radiological anatomy eLearning solution for first year medical students: Development, integration, and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its effectiveness was evaluated using a questionnaire, pre- and post-tests, focus groups, summative assessment, and tracking data. Since introduced in 2009, a total of 781 students have used RA eLearning, and among them 167 Year 1 students in 2011, of whom 116 participated in the evaluation study. Students enjoyed learning (77%) with RA eLearning, found it was easy to use (81%) and actively engaged them in their learning (75%), all of which were associated to the usability, learning design of the TELT solution and its integration in the curriculum; 80% of students reported RA eLearning helped their revision of anatomy and 69% stated that it facilitated their application of anatomy in a clinical context, both of which were associated with the benefits offered by the learning and activities design. At the end of course summative assessment, student knowledge of RA eLearning relevant topics (mean 80%; SD ±16) was significantly better as compared to topics not relevant to RA eLearning (mean 63%; SD ±15) (mean difference 18%; 95% CI 15% to 20%; P < 0.001). A well designed and integrated TELT solution can be an efficient method for facilitating the application, integration, and contextualization of anatomy and radiology to create a blended learning environment. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Quantitation of specific binding ratio in 123I-FP-CIT SPECT: accurate processing strategy for cerebral ventricular enlargement with use of 3D-striatal digital brain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Onishi, Hideo; Amijima, Hizuru

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of ventricular enlargement on the specific binding ratio (SBR) and to validate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-Mask algorithm for quantitative SBR assessment of 123 I-FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images with the use of a 3D-striatum digital brain (SDB) phantom. Ventricular enlargement was simulated by three-dimensional extensions in a 3D-SDB phantom comprising segments representing the striatum, ventricle, brain parenchyma, and skull bone. The Evans Index (EI) was measured in 3D-SDB phantom images of an enlarged ventricle. Projection data sets were generated from the 3D-SDB phantoms with blurring, scatter, and attenuation. Images were reconstructed using the ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm and corrected for attenuation, scatter, and resolution recovery. We bundled DaTView (Southampton method) with the CSF-Mask processing software for SBR. We assessed SBR with the use of various coefficients (f factor) of the CSF-Mask. Specific binding ratios of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 corresponded to SDB phantom simulations with true values. Measured SBRs > 50% that were underestimated with EI increased compared with the true SBR and this trend was outstanding at low SBR. The CSF-Mask improved 20% underestimates and brought the measured SBR closer to the true values at an f factor of 1.0 despite an increase in EI. We connected the linear regression function (y = - 3.53x + 1.95; r = 0.95) with the EI and f factor using root-mean-square error. Processing with CSF-Mask generates accurate quantitative SBR from dopamine transporter SPECT images of patients with ventricular enlargement.

  4. Social media and anatomy education: Using twitter to enhance the student learning experience in anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Catherine M; Kirkpatrick, Emma; Smith, Claire F; Border, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Neuroanatomy is a difficult subject in medical education, with students often feeling worried and anxious before they have even started, potentially decreasing their engagement with the subject. At the University of Southampton, we incorporated the use of Twitter as a way of supporting students' learning on a neuroanatomy module to evaluate how it impacted upon their engagement and learning experience. The #nlm2soton hashtag was created and displayed (via a widget) on the university's virtual learning environment (VLE) for a cohort of 197 Year 2 medical students studying neuroanatomy. Student usage was tracked to measure levels of engagement throughout the course and frequency of hashtag use was compared to examination results. Student opinions on the use of Twitter were obtained during a focus group with eleven students and from qualitative questionnaires. The hashtag was used by 91% of the student cohort and, within this, more students chose to simply view the hashtag rather than make contributions. The completed questionnaire responses (n = 150) as well as focus group outcomes revealed the value of using Twitter. A negligible correlation was found between student examination scores and their viewing frequency of the hashtag however, no correlation was found between examination scores and contribution frequency. Despite this, Twitter facilitated communication, relieved anxieties and raised morale, which was valued highly by students and aided engagement with neuroanatomy. Twitter was successful in creating and providing a support network for students during a difficult module. Anat Sci Educ 9: 505-515. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Eprints Institutional Repository Software: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike R. Beazley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting up an institutional repository (IR can be a daunting task. There are many software packages out there, some commercial, some open source, all of which offer different features and functionality. This article will provide some thoughts about one of these software packages: Eprints. Eprints was one of the first IR software packages to appear and has been available for 10 years. It is under continual development by its creators at the University of Southampton and the current version is v3.2.3. Eprints is open-source, meaning that anyone can download and make use of the software for free and the software can be modified however the user likes. This presents clear advantages for institutions will smaller budgets and also for institutions that have programmers on staff. Eprints requires some additional software to run: Linux, Apache, MySQL, and Perl. This software is all open-source and already present on the servers of many institutions. There is now a version of Eprints that will run on Windows servers as well, which will make the adoption of Eprints even easier for some. In brief, Eprints is an excellent choice for any institution looking to get an IR up and running quickly and easily. Installation is straightforward as is the initial configuration. Once the IR is up and running, users may upload documents and provide the necessary metadata for the records by filling out a simple web form. Embargoes on published documents are handled elegantly by the software, and the software links to the SHERPA/RoMEO database so authors can easily verify their rights regarding IR submissions. Eprints has some drawbacks, which will be discussed later in the review, but on the whole it is easy to recommend to anyone looking to start an IR. However, It is less clear that an institution with an existing IR based on another software package should migrate to Eprints.

  6. Taking local optics outreach abroad for IYL 2015: administrative and logistical challenges and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Posner, Matthew T.; Mittal, Vinita; Gray, David R.; John, Pearl V.

    2016-09-01

    The Lightwave Roadshow is an outreach program run by research students at the University of Southampton, UK, that seeks to educate and inspire young students with optics, through conducting workshops in local schools and exhibiting at local and regional educational fairs. Adopting a hands-on philosophy enabled by an extensive collection of experimental optical demonstrations, Lightwave aims to promote scientific interest and indirectly address the global STEM skills shortage. While Lightwave has become a well-established program in local schools since its inception in 1998, 2015 included an unprecedented number of overseas activities. Inspired by the In- ternational Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL 2015), Lightwave organized a school workshop in a foreign country (Singapore) as well as exhibited at major events, including the IYL 2015 opening ceremony in France, which marked the first time that the roadshow used UK school students to deliver outreach activities beyond the UK. These recent successful overseas projects have encouraged the outreach team to continue expand- ing the reach of the roadshow internationally. Of particular note is the involvement of Lightwave at academic conferences, where experiences and best practices can be shared among outreach ambassadors from different programs, student chapters, universities, and organizations. This paper provides a review of these activities, and identifies the administrative and practical challenges of bringing a local outreach program abroad and some strategies to overcome them. We also outline our travel suite of experimental demonstration kit, a portable selection from our main equipment inventory. This won the recent OSA `IYL-To-Go' student competition.

  7. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M; Tyler, Dustin J

    2016-02-01

    Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject's sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  8. Reduction in camera-specific variability in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT outcome measures by image reconstruction optimized for multisite settings: impact on age-dependence of the specific binding ratio in the ENC-DAT database of healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Ralph; Lange, Catharina [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kluge, Andreas; Bronzel, Marcus [ABX-CRO advanced pharmaceutical services Forschungsgesellschaft m.b.H., Dresden (Germany); Tossici-Bolt, Livia [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Physics, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dickson, John [University College London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Asenbaum, Susanne [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapucu, L. Oezlem Atay [Gazi University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Svarer, Claus [Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Koulibaly, Pierre-Malick [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Department, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Clinical Neurology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Pagani, Marco [CNR, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Sera, Terez [University of Szeged, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Tatsch, Klaus [Municipal Hospital of Karlsruhe Inc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); Borght, Thierry vander [CHU Namur, IREC, Nuclear Medicine Division, Universite catholique de Louvain, Yvoir (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Varrone, Andrea [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Iida, Hidehiro [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center - Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Quantitative estimates of dopamine transporter availability, determined with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT, depend on the SPECT equipment, including both hardware and (reconstruction) software, which limits their use in multicentre research and clinical routine. This study tested a dedicated reconstruction algorithm for its ability to reduce camera-specific intersubject variability in [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT. The secondary aim was to evaluate binding in whole brain (excluding striatum) as a reference for quantitative analysis. Of 73 healthy subjects from the European Normal Control Database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT recruited at six centres, 70 aged between 20 and 82 years were included. SPECT images were reconstructed using the QSPECT software package which provides fully automated detection of the outer contour of the head, camera-specific correction for scatter and septal penetration by transmission-dependent convolution subtraction, iterative OSEM reconstruction including attenuation correction, and camera-specific ''to kBq/ml'' calibration. LINK and HERMES reconstruction were used for head-to-head comparison. The specific striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding ratio (SBR) was computed using the Southampton method with binding in the whole brain, occipital cortex or cerebellum as the reference. The correlation between SBR and age was used as the primary quality measure. The fraction of SBR variability explained by age was highest (1) with QSPECT, independently of the reference region, and (2) with whole brain as the reference, independently of the reconstruction algorithm. QSPECT reconstruction appears to be useful for reduction of camera-specific intersubject variability of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT in multisite and single-site multicamera settings. Whole brain excluding striatal binding as the reference provides more stable quantitative estimates than occipital or cerebellar binding. (orig.)

  9. Using choice architecture to exploit a university Distinct Urban Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, Xavier; Williams, Ian D; Shaw, Peter J; Cleaver, Victoria

    2017-10-01

    There are widespread concerns regarding the potential future scarcity of ferrous and non-ferrous materials. However, there are already potentially rich reserves of secondary materials via high ownership of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) in economically-developed nations. Young people are particularly high consumers of EEE, thus university students and campuses may present an opportunity to harness this potential. University Distinct Urban Mines (DUM) may be used to exemplify how potential reserves of secondary metals may be exploited, and could contribute to the transition from a linear to a circular economy. This study aimed to evaluate small household appliances (SHA) DUM from a UK university, with the objectives to identify and quantify student households' SHA ownership, WEEE recycling, stockpiling and discarding habits amongst student households, assess and evaluate the monetary potential of SHA DUM at UK level, and propose methods to exploit DUM for universities in the UK. To this purpose, a quantitative survey was undertaken to measure students' ownership and discarding behaviour with respect to SHA. The amounts of ferrous and non-ferrous materials were then estimated and converted to monetary values from secondary materials market data to appraise the SHA DUM overall value. Thirty-five per cent of SHA are discarded in the general refuse. Broken personal care appliances (PCA) tend to be discarded due to hygiene and small size factors. When in working order, SHA tend to be equally reused, recycled or stockpiled. We conclude that a total of 189 tonnes of ferrous and non-ferrous materials were available via discarding or being stockpiled at the University of Southampton. Extrapolated to UK higher education level, discarded and stockpiled SHA represent a potential worth ∼USD 11 million. To initiate DUM exploitation within Higher Education campuses, we suggest improving users' choice architecture by providing collection methods specific to broken SHA

  10. Greening academia: Developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, N.; Williams, I.D.; Kemp, S.; Smith, N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England - the University of Southampton (UoS) - is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions - both nationally and internationally - can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around Pounds 125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken - recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach - provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

  11. Correlates of light and moderate-to-vigorous objectively measured physical activity in four-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sluijs, Esther M F; McMinn, Alison M; Inskip, Hazel M; Ekelund, Ulf; Godfrey, Keith M; Harvey, Nicholas C; Griffin, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Correlates of physical activity (PA) are hypothesized to be context and behaviour specific, but there is limited evidence of this in young children. The aim of the current study is to investigate associations between personal, social and environmental factors and objectively measured light and moderate-to-vigorous PA (LPA and MVPA, respectively) in four-year-old children. Cross-sectional data were used from the Southampton Women's Survey, a UK population-based longitudinal study. Four-year old children (n = 487, 47.0% male) had valid PA data assessed using accelerometry (Actiheart) and exposure data collected with a validated maternal questionnaire (including data on child personality, family demographics, maternal behaviour, rules and restrictions, and perceived local environment). Linear regression modelling was used to analyse associations with LPA and MVPA separately, interactions with sex were explored. LPA minutes were greater in children whose mothers reported more PA (vs. inactive: regression coefficient±standard error: 6.70±2.94 minutes), and without other children in the neighbourhood to play with (-6.33±2.44). MVPA minutes were greater in children with older siblings (vs. none: 5.81±2.80) and those whose mothers used active transport for short trips (vs. inactive: 6.24±2.95). Children accumulated more MVPA in spring (vs. winter: 9.50±4.03) and, in boys only, less MVPA with availability of other children in the neighbourhood (-3.98±1.70). Young children's LPA and MVPA have differing associations with a number of social and environmental variables. Interventions targeting PA promotion in young children outside of formal care settings should consider including intensity specific factors.

  12. Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huinink, Laura H B; Bouwsema, Hanneke; Plettenburg, Dick H; van der Sluis, Corry K; Bongers, Raoul M

    2016-10-07

    Little is known about action-perception learning processes underlying prosthetic skills in body-powered prosthesis users. Body-powered prostheses are controlled through a harness connected by a cable that might provide for limited proprioceptive feedback. This study aims to test transfer of training basic tasks to functional tasks and to describe the changes over time in kinematics of basic tasks of novice body-powered prosthesis users. Thirty able-bodied participants and 17 controls participated in the study, using a body-powered prosthetic simulator. Participants in the training group were divided over four groups and practiced during a 2-week-period either direct grasping, indirect grasping, fixation, or a combination of these tasks. Deformable objects with different compliances had to be manipulated while kinematic variables and grip force control were assessed. Functional performance was measured with the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) prior to and after the training sessions, and after 2 weeks and 3 months retention. The control group only performed the SHAP tests. All four training groups and the control group improved on the SHAP, also after a period of non-use. Type of training had a small but significant influence on the improvements of the SHAP score. On a kinematic level movement times decreased and hook closing velocities increased over time. The indirect grasping group showed significantly shorter plateau times than the other training groups. Grip force control only improved a little over training. Training action-perception couplings of body-powered prosthesis in basic tasks transferred to functional tasks and this lasted after a period of non-use. During training movement times decreased and the indirect grasping group showed advantages. It is advisable to start body-powered training with indirect grasping tasks but also to practice hook-object orientations.

  13. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  14. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  15. A survey exploring self-reported indoor and outdoor footwear habits, foot problems and fall status in people with stroke and Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Catherine; Ashburn, Ann; Cole, Mark; Donovan-Hall, Margaret; Burnett, Malcolm; Robison, Judy; Mamode, Louis; Pickering, Ruth; Bader, Dan; Kunkel, Dorit

    Ill-fitting shoes have been implicated as a risk factor for falls but research to date has focused on people with arthritis, diabetes and the general older population; little is known about people with neurological conditions. This survey for people with stroke and Parkinson's explored people's choice of indoor and outdoor footwear, foot problems and fall history. Following ethical approval, 1000 anonymous postal questionnaires were distributed to health professionals, leads of Parkinson's UK groups and stroke clubs in the wider Southampton area, UK. These collaborators handed out survey packs to people with a confirmed diagnosis of stroke or Parkinson's. Three hundred and sixty three completed surveys were returned (218 from people with Parkinson's and 145 from people with stroke). Most respondents wore slippers indoors and walking shoes outdoors and considered comfort and fit the most important factors when buying footwear. Foot problems were reported by 43 % (95 % confidence intervals 36 to 52 %; stroke) and 53 % (95 % confidence interval 46 to 59 %; Parkinson's) of respondents; over 50 % had never accessed foot care support. Fifty percent of all respondents reported falls. In comparison to non-fallers, a greater proportion of fallers reported foot problems (57 %), with greater proportions reporting problems impacting on balance and influencing choice of footwear ( p  footwear habits and choice of footwear; however many did not receive foot care support. These findings highlight that further exploration of footwear and foot problems in these populations is warranted to provide evidence based advice on safe and appropriate footwear to support rehabilitation and fall prevention.

  16. Radiation and stillbirths in Sellafield workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In The Lancet (23 October 1999), Dr Louise Parker and colleagues from the Departments of Child Health and Statistics, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, report the findings of a new study on stillbirths among offspring of male radiation workers at Sellafield. By linking the birth registration and stillbirth records in Cumbria from 1950 to 1989 to the database of workers at Sellafield, Dr Parker's team examined the stillbirth risk according to the father's exposure to radiation before conception of the child. From the birth documents of 248 097 livebirths and 3715 stillbirths, the team identified 130 stillbirths and 9078 livebirths to wives and partners of male radiation workers employed at Sellafield. Lifetime exposure, and that in the 90 days before conception, was derived from annual-exposure summaries for each worker. Exposures recorded on individual film badges for the fathers of each stillborn child and for four matched controls were also examined. The researchers found that although, as a group, babies of radiation workers were not more likely to be stillborn than babies of other Cumbrian fathers, there was an increased risk of stillbirth with increasing exposure of a father to external radiation. Although confounding factors also associated with stillbirth, such as whether the mother smoked, cannot be completely excluded, the researchers state that 'extensive checks confirmed that the statistical models were a good fit to the data and there was no statistical evidence of unmeasured factors'. However, the researchers are cautious in drawing any conclusions regarding causality. In the Commentary given in The Lancet, Hazel Inskip from the University of Southampton advises that the possible risk of stillbirth should be kept in perspective, and comments that 'there is no obvious mechanism for the association', but does concede that 'the greater increase in risk for stillbirths with neural-tube defects is at least focused on a more specific disorder

  17. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  18. A qualitative study of sleep quality in children and their resident parents when in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, Alice; Clayton, Esther; Sankey, Ruth; Hill, Catherine M

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs immune responses and pain tolerance, both key to recovery from acute illness. Hospitalised children and their co-sleeping parents also risk emotional lability and impaired coping skills when sleep-deprived. We aimed to study the experiences of children and parents during hospital admissions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents within a week of their child's discharge. Questions explored parent and child sleep quality, factors contributing to this, perceived impact on day-time functioning and suggested improvements to ward sleep environment. Southampton Children's Hospital, UK. 17 co-sleeping parents of 16 children aged 3-12 years completed interviews. Children admitted for surgical procedures and those with established sleep disorders or nocturnal seizures were excluded. Constant comparative methods identified themes within the data using a grounded theory approach. Parents reported that they, and to a lesser extent their children, experienced reduced sleep quality. Noise and light as well as ward schedules were identified as key factors disrupting sleep. Parents reported that lack of sleep caused difficulties with their own emotional regulation and that of their child, affecting daytime parent-child relationships. Furthermore, they reported a negative impact of sleep deprivation on decision-making about their child's medical care. Parents identified poor sleep in hospital as a significant additional burden to their child's hospital admission. Importantly, they identified potential improvements to the ward sleep environment. Intervention studies that target modifiable, child-centred alterations to night-time ward culture are recommended, focusing on measurable child and parental outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Correlates of light and moderate-to-vigorous objectively measured physical activity in four-year-old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M F van Sluijs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Correlates of physical activity (PA are hypothesized to be context and behaviour specific, but there is limited evidence of this in young children. The aim of the current study is to investigate associations between personal, social and environmental factors and objectively measured light and moderate-to-vigorous PA (LPA and MVPA, respectively in four-year-old children. METHODS: Cross-sectional data were used from the Southampton Women's Survey, a UK population-based longitudinal study. Four-year old children (n = 487, 47.0% male had valid PA data assessed using accelerometry (Actiheart and exposure data collected with a validated maternal questionnaire (including data on child personality, family demographics, maternal behaviour, rules and restrictions, and perceived local environment. Linear regression modelling was used to analyse associations with LPA and MVPA separately, interactions with sex were explored. RESULTS: LPA minutes were greater in children whose mothers reported more PA (vs. inactive: regression coefficient±standard error: 6.70±2.94 minutes, and without other children in the neighbourhood to play with (-6.33±2.44. MVPA minutes were greater in children with older siblings (vs. none: 5.81±2.80 and those whose mothers used active transport for short trips (vs. inactive: 6.24±2.95. Children accumulated more MVPA in spring (vs. winter: 9.50±4.03 and, in boys only, less MVPA with availability of other children in the neighbourhood (-3.98±1.70. DISCUSSION: Young children's LPA and MVPA have differing associations with a number of social and environmental variables. Interventions targeting PA promotion in young children outside of formal care settings should consider including intensity specific factors.

  20. Calibration of gamma camera systems for a multicentre European {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT normal database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossici-Bolt, Livia [Southampton Univ. Hospitals NHS Trust, Dept. of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dickson, John C. [UCLH NHS Foundation Trust and Univ. College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Sera, Terez [Univ. of Szeged, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Nijs, Robin de [Rigshospitalet and Univ. of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bagnara, Maria Claudia [Az. Ospedaliera Universitaria S. Martino, Medical Physics Unit, Genoa (Italy); Jonsson, Cathrine [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Scheepers, Egon [Univ. of Amsterdam, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zito, Felicia [Fondazione IRCCS Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Seese, Anita [Univ. of Leipzig, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Koulibaly, Pierre Malick [Univ. of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Dept., Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Kapucu, Ozlem L. [Gazi Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Koole, Michel [Univ. Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Raith, Maria [Medical Univ. of Vienna, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); George, Jean [Univ. Catholique Louvain, Nuclear Medicine Division, Mont-Godinne Medical Center, Mont-Godinne (Belgium); Lonsdale, Markus Nowak [Bispebjerg Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muenzing, Wolfgang [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Tatsch, Klaus [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Municipal Hospital of Karlsruhe Inc., Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); Varrone, Andrea [Center for Psychiatric Research, Karolinska Inst., Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    A joint initiative of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Neuroimaging Committee and EANM Research Ltd. aimed to generate a European database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans of healthy controls. This study describes the characterization and harmonization of the imaging equipment of the institutions involved. {sup 123}I SPECT images of a striatal phantom filled with striatal to background ratios between 10:1 and 1:1 were acquired on all the gamma cameras with absolute ratios measured from aliquots. The images were reconstructed by a core lab using ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) without corrections (NC), with attenuation correction only (AC) and additional scatter and septal penetration correction (ACSC) using the triple energy window method. A quantitative parameter, the simulated specific binding ratio (sSBR), was measured using the ''Southampton'' methodology that accounts for the partial volume effect and compared against the actual values obtained from the aliquots. Camera-specific recovery coefficients were derived from linear regression and the error of the measurements was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (COV). The relationship between measured and actual sSBRs was linear across all systems. Variability was observed between different manufacturers and, to a lesser extent, between cameras of the same type. The NC and AC measurements were found to underestimate systematically the actual sSBRs, while the ACSC measurements resulted in recovery coefficients close to 100% for all cameras (AC range 69-89%, ACSC range 87-116%). The COV improved from 46% (NC) to 32% (AC) and to 14% (ACSC) (p < 0.001). A satisfactory linear response was observed across all cameras. Quantitative measurements depend upon the characteristics of the SPECT systems and their calibration is a necessary prerequisite for data pooling. Together with accounting for partial volume, the

  1. Development of the clinic of pulmonology and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokic, D

    2013-01-01

    University Pulmology and Allergy Clinic was founded in 1975 when the Depertment of Internal Medicine, directed by Prof. Dr. Dimitar Arsov, later member of the Macedonian Academy of Sciencies and Arts, was divided into eight separate and independent clinics. The first head of the Pulmonology and Allergy Clinic was Prof. Dr. Ljubomir Kotevski. He had a very difficult goal: to establish and further develop the newly formed clinic. The Clinic flourished and became one of the leading Clinics in the Clinical Centre during the directorship of Prof. dr. Dejan Dokic.. He completely rebuilt and refurbished the Clinic, which became a modern Clinic providing excellent working conditions for the employees and, most importantly, provided a first class service to the patients. During his mandate he obtained a grant from the Japanese Government worth $1,000,000 which was used to obtain a new, modern and sophisticated medical equipment. Since the establishment of the clinic, many national and international scientific projects were carried out and many scientific papers were published as well as many monographs, and chapters in scientific books. As a result of continuous education, of the total number of 24 doctors there are 16 subspecialists in respiratory medicine and 4 specialists in internal medicine. There are 9 professors in internal medicine at the University of Pulmonology and Allergy Clinic lecturing at the Medical Faculty in Skopje. The University Pulmonology and Allergy Clinic has an international reputation due to many contacts with famous European Institutions. All these international interrelations have resulted in honouring 3 professors: Prof. Dr. Gert Kunkel from Berlin, Germany, Prof. Dr. Robert Loddenkemper from Berlin, Germany and Prof. Dr. Peter Howard from Southampton, UK.

  2. Verbal and non-verbal behaviour and patient perception of communication in primary care: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; White, Peter; Kelly, Joanne; Everitt, Hazel; Gashi, Shkelzen; Bikker, Annemieke; Mercer, Stewart

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have assessed the importance of a broad range of verbal and non-verbal consultation behaviours. To explore the relationship of observer ratings of behaviours of videotaped consultations with patients' perceptions. Observational study in general practices close to Southampton, Southern England. Verbal and non-verbal behaviour was rated by independent observers blind to outcome. Patients competed the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS; primary outcome) and questionnaires addressing other communication domains. In total, 275/360 consultations from 25 GPs had useable videotapes. Higher MISS scores were associated with slight forward lean (an 0.02 increase for each degree of lean, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.002 to 0.03), the number of gestures (0.08, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.15), 'back-channelling' (for example, saying 'mmm') (0.11, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.2), and social talk (0.29, 95% CI = 0.4 to 0.54). Starting the consultation with professional coolness ('aloof') was helpful and optimism unhelpful. Finishing with non-verbal 'cut-offs' (for example, looking away), being professionally cool ('aloof'), or patronising, ('infantilising') resulted in poorer ratings. Physical contact was also important, but not traditional verbal communication. These exploratory results require confirmation, but suggest that patients may be responding to several non-verbal behaviours and non-specific verbal behaviours, such as social talk and back-channelling, more than traditional verbal behaviours. A changing consultation dynamic may also help, from professional 'coolness' at the beginning of the consultation to becoming warmer and avoiding non-verbal cut-offs at the end. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of a brief intervention targeting predominantly non-verbal communication in general practice consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Paul; White, Peter; Kelly, Joanne; Everitt, Hazel; Mercer, Stewart

    2015-06-01

    The impact of changing non-verbal consultation behaviours is unknown. To assess brief physician training on improving predominantly non-verbal communication. Cluster randomised parallel group trial among adults aged ≥16 years attending general practices close to the study coordinating centres in Southampton. Sixteen GPs were randomised to no training, or training consisting of a brief presentation of behaviours identified from a prior study (acronym KEPe Warm: demonstrating Knowledge of the patient; Encouraging [back-channelling by saying 'hmm', for example]; Physically engaging [touch, gestures, slight lean]; Warm-up: cool/professional initially, warming up, avoiding distancing or non-verbal cut-offs at the end of the consultation); and encouragement to reflect on videos of their consultation. Outcomes were the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS) mean item score (1-7) and patients' perceptions of other domains of communication. Intervention participants scored higher MISS overall (0.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06 to 0.41), with the largest changes in the distress-relief and perceived relationship subscales. Significant improvement occurred in perceived communication/partnership (0.29, 95% CI = 0.09 to 0.49) and health promotion (0.26, 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.46). Non-significant improvements occurred in perceptions of a personal relationship, a positive approach, and understanding the effects of the illness on life. Brief training of GPs in predominantly non-verbal communication in the consultation and reflection on consultation videotapes improves patients' perceptions of satisfaction, distress, a partnership approach, and health promotion. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  4. Maternal stress and psychological distress preconception: association with offspring atopic eczema at age 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Heis, S; Crozier, S R; Healy, E; Robinson, S M; Harvey, N C; Cooper, C; Inskip, H M; Baird, J; Godfrey, K M

    2017-06-01

    Perinatal maternal stress and low mood have been linked to offspring atopic eczema. To examine the relation of maternal stress/mood with atopic eczema in the offspring, focusing particularly on stress/psychological distress preconception. At recruitment in the UK Southampton Women's Survey, preconception maternal reports of perceived stress in daily living and the effect of stress on health were recorded; in a subsample, psychological distress was assessed (12-item General Health Questionnaire). Infants were followed up at ages 6 (n = 2956) and 12 (n = 2872) months and atopic eczema ascertained (based on UK Working Party Criteria for the Definition of Atopic Dermatitis). At 6 months post-partum, mothers were asked if they had experienced symptoms of low mood since childbirth and completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Preconception perceived stress affecting health [OR 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.35), P = 0.001] and stress in daily living [OR 1.16 (1.03-1.30), P = 0.014] were associated with an increased risk of offspring atopic eczema at age 12 months but not at 6 months, robust to adjustment for potentially confounding variables. Findings were similar for maternal psychological distress preconception. Low maternal mood between delivery and 6 months post-partum was associated with an increased risk of infantile atopic eczema at age 12 months, but no significant association between post-natal mood and atopic eczema was seen after taking account of preconception stress. Our data provide novel evidence linking maternal stress at preconception to atopic eczema risk, supporting a developmental contribution to the aetiology of atopic eczema and pointing to potentially modifiable influences. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Creating context for the experiment record. User-defined metadata: investigations into metadata usage in the LabTrove ELN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Cerys; Bird, Colin L; Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G

    2014-12-22

    The drive toward more transparency in research, the growing willingness to make data openly available, and the reuse of data to maximize the return on research investment all increase the importance of being able to find information and make links to the underlying data. The use of metadata in Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) to curate experiment data is an essential ingredient for facilitating discovery. The University of Southampton has developed a Web browser-based ELN that enables users to add their own metadata to notebook entries. A survey of these notebooks was completed to assess user behavior and patterns of metadata usage within ELNs, while user perceptions and expectations were gathered through interviews and user-testing activities within the community. The findings indicate that while some groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users are making little attempts to use it, thereby endangering their ability to recover data in the future. A survey of patterns of metadata use in these notebooks, together with feedback from the user community, indicated that while a few groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users adopt a "minimum required" approach to metadata. To investigate whether the patterns of metadata use in LabTrove were unusual, a series of surveys were undertaken to investigate metadata usage in a variety of platforms supporting user-defined metadata. These surveys also provided the opportunity to investigate whether interface designs in these other environments might inform strategies for encouraging metadata creation and more effective use of metadata in LabTrove.

  6. Distribution of mast cell subtypes in interstitial cystitis: implications for novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shabana T; Birch, Brian R; Voegeli, David; Fader, Mandy; Foria, Vipul; Cooper, Alan J; Walls, Andrew F; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2018-05-15

    To identify the presence and geographical distribution of mast cell (MC) subtypes: MC T (tryptase positive-chymase negative) and MC TC (tryptase positive-chymase positive) in bladder tissue. Bladder tissue was obtained from patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (n=14) and normal histology from University Hospital Southampton tissue bank. Sequential tissue slices were immunohistochemically stained for MC subtypes using anti-MC tryptase (for MC T and MC TC ) and anti-MC chymase (for MC TC ). Stained sections were photographed, and positively stained MCs were quantified using ImageJ. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and individual paired t-tests. There was a significant difference in the density of MCs between each layer of the disease bladder, with the greatest accumulation within the detrusor (p<0.001). There was a significant increase in MC TC subtype in the lamina (p=0.009) in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Our results suggest that mastocytosis is present within all layers of disease bladder, especially the muscle layer. The varying increase in MC subtypes in the lamina and mucosa may explain the variability in painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis symptoms. A high influx of MC TC in the mucosa of individuals who also had ulceration noted within their diagnostic notes may be of the Hunner's ulcer subclassification. These findings suggest a relationship between the pathogenesis of MC subtypes and the clinical presentation of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. A cohort study would further elucidate the diagnostic and/or therapeutic potential of MCs in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Der grüne Weg zu Open Access: institutionelle und fachliche Repositorien / The Green Road to Open access: institutional and subject repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent issue 1/2009 of GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information has a focus on „The green road to open Access: institutional and subject repositories“. Self-archiving and storing scholarly publications on a print server were also central topics in many presentations at the 9th International Bielefeld Conference in February 2009. The authors in this issue are Birgit Schmidt and Karin Ilg-Hartecke (Open Access in Deutschland – erweiterte Perspektiven für die Wissenschaft, Christoph Bruch and Anja Lengenfelder (Unterstützung des Grünen Weges zu Open Access an der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Ulrich Herb and Matthias Müller (Nuancen in Grün: Betrieb eines institutionellen und disziplinären Repositoriums – Erfahrungen und Entwicklungen an der Saarländischen Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Timo Borst and Jan B. Weiland (EconStor: ein fachliches Repositorium für die Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Antonella de Robbio and Michael Katzmayr (The management of an international open access repository: the case of E-LIS and Christian Gumpenberger (The EPrints story: Southampton as the cradle of institutional self-archiving.Furthermore this focus issue features an interview of a representative of a research funding organisation (Repositorien: Der grüne Weg zu Open Access Publishing aus der Perspektive einer Forschungsförderungsorganisation. 10 Fragen von Bruno Bauer an Falk Reckling, Mitarbeiter des FWF Der Wissenschaftsfonds and an interview of a publisher (Repositorien: Der grüne Weg zu Open Access Publishing aus der Perspektive der International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (STM: 10 Fragen von Bruno Bauer an Barbara Kalumenos, Director of Public Affairs bei STM.

  8. Association between coffee or caffeine consumption and fecundity and fertility: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyngsø J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Julie Lyngsø,1 Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen,1 Bjørn Bay,2 Hans Jakob Ingerslev,3 Adam Hulman,1,4 Ulrik Schiøler Kesmodel5 1Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 2The Fertility Clinic, Regional Horsens Hospital, Horsens, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 4Danish Diabetes Academy, Odense, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev, Denmark Objective: The aim was to investigate whether coffee or caffeine consumption is associated with reproductive endpoints among women with natural fertility (ie, time to pregnancy [TTP] and spontaneous abortion [SAB] and among women in fertility treatment (ie, clinical pregnancy rate or live birth rate. Design: This study was a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis including data from case–control and cohort studies. Methods: An extensive literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and Embase, with no time and language restrictions. Also, reference lists were searched manually. Two independent reviewers assessed the manuscript quality using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS. A two-stage dose–response meta-analysis was applied to assess a potential association between coffee/caffeine consumption and the outcomes: TTP, SAB, clinical pregnancy, and live birth. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed using Cochrane Q-test and I2 statistics. Publication bias was assessed using Egger’s regression test. Results: The pooled results showed that coffee/caffeine consumption is associated with a significantly increased risk of SAB for 300 mg caffeine/day (relative risk [RR]: 1.37, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.19; 1.57 and for 600 mg caffeine/day (RR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.62; 3.31. No association was found between coffee/caffeine consumption and outcomes of fertility treatment (based on two studies. No clear association was found between exposure to coffee/caffeine and natural

  9. Indirect treatment comparison of bevacizumab + interferon-α-2a vs tyrosine kinase inhibitors in first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald HJ Mickisch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gerald HJ Mickisch1, Björn Schwander2, Bernard Escudier3, Joaquim Bellmunt4, José P Maroto5, Camillo Porta6, Stefan Walzer7, Uwe Siebert8,91Department of Urology, Center of Operative Urology Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 2Department of Outcomes Research, AiM GmbH Assessment-in-Medicine, Lörrach, Germany; 3Immunotherapy Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; 4Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital del Mar UPF, Barcelona, Spain; 5Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 6Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Matteo University Hospital Foundation, Pavia, Italy; 7Global Health Economics, F Hoffmann-La Roche Pharmaceuticals AG, Basel, Switzerland; 8Department of Public Health, Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment, UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall i.T., Austria; 9Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USABackground: The vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor bevacizumab (BEV given in combination with interferon-α-2a (IFN, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs sunitinib (SUN and pazopanib (PAZ, have all shown significant increase in progression-free survival (PFS in first-line metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC therapy. These targeted therapies are currently competing to be primary choice; hence, in the absence of direct head-to-head comparison, there is a need for valid indirect comparison assessment.Methods: Standard indirect comparison methods were applied to independent review PFS data of the pivotal Phase III trials, to determine indirect treatment comparison hazard-ratios (HR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. As BEV+IFN and SUN have been compared to IFN, indirect comparison was enabled by the common IFN comparator arms. As PAZ was compared to placebo (PLA, a connector trial (IFN vs PLA was required for the indirect comparison to BEV

  10. Earthquakes, fluid pressures and rapid subduction zone metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viete, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    pulses caused by localized, earthquake-related modifications to fluid pressures in the subducted slab. In other words, HP/LT metamorphism marks abrupt changes in stress state within the subducted slab, driven by earthquake rupture and fluid flow, and involving a rapid return toward lithostatic pressure from effective pressures well below lithostatic. References: 1. Bjørnerud, MG, Austrheim, H & Lund, MG, 2002. Processes leading to eclogitization (densification) of subducted and tectonically buried crust. Journal of Geophysical Research 107, 2252. 2. Camacho, A, Lee, JKW, Hensen, BJ & Braun, J, 2005. Short-lived orogenic cycles and the eclogitization of cold crust by spasmodic hot fluids. Nature 435, 1191-1196. 3. Green, HW & Houston, H, 1995. The mechanics of deep earthquakes. Annual Reviews of Earth and Planetary Sciences 23, 169-213. 4. Hacker, BR, Peacock, SM, Abers, GA & Holloway, SD, 2003. Subduction factory 2. Are intermediate-depth earthquakes in subducting slabs linked to metamorphic dehydration reactions?. Journal of Geophysical Research 108, 2030.

  11. Initial Clinical Evaluation of the Modular Prosthetic Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana N. Perry

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Modular Prosthetic Limb (MPL was examined for its feasibility and usability as an advanced, dexterous upper extremity prosthesis with surface electromyography (sEMG control in with two individuals with below-elbow amputations. Compared to currently marketed prostheses, the MPL has a greater number of sequential and simultaneous degrees of motion, as well as wrist modularity, haptic feedback, and individual digit control. The MPL was successfully fit to a 33-year-old with a trans-radial amputation (TR01 and a 30-year-old with a wrist disarticulation amputation (TR02. To preserve anatomical limb length, we adjusted the powered degrees of freedom of wrist motion between users. Motor training began with practicing sEMG and pattern recognition control within the virtual integration environment (VIE. Prosthetic training sessions then allowed participants to complete a variety of activities of daily living with the MPL. Training and Motion Control Accuracy scores quantified their ability to consistently train and execute unique muscle-to-motion contraction patterns. Each user also completed one prosthetic functional metric—the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP for TR01 and the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT for TR02. Haptic feedback capabilities were integrated for TR01. TR01 achieved 95% accuracy at 84% of his VIE sessions. He demonstrated improved scores over a year of prosthetic training sessions, ultimately achieving simultaneous control of 13 of the 17 (76% attempted motions. His performance on the SHAP improved from baseline to final assessment with an increase in number of tasks achieved. TR01 also used vibrotactile sensors to successfully discriminate between hard and soft objects being grasped by the MPL hand. TR02 demonstrated 95% accuracy at 79% of his VIE sessions. He demonstrated improved scores over months of prosthetic training sessions, however there was a significant drop in scores initially following a mid

  12. Comparative Clinical Study of the Wound Healing Effects of a Novel Micropore Particle Technology: Effects on Wounds, Venous Leg Ulcers, and Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyayeva, Olga O; Neshta, Viacheslav V; Golub, Alexander A; Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the wound healing effects of Acapsil, a white, odorless powder based on micropore particle technology (MPPT) (Willingsford Ltd, Southampton, UK) by comparing it to Gentaxane (Gentaksan, Borshchagovsky CCP, Kyiv, Ukraine) (polydimethylsiloxane powder with gentamicin antibiotic) and Ioddicerin (Farmak, Kyiv, Ukraine) (iodine with dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO]). The study included 266 patients with primarily trophic ulcers caused by pancreatic diabetes and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities, carbuncles, phlegmons, infected third- or fourth-degree heat burns, and infiltrations of postoperative wounds. The products were applied once daily to the wound until it was clean (ie, free from necrosis, pus, and fibrinogenous thickenings). The number of days (mean ± standard deviation) to a clean wound was 3.0 ± 0.9 for MPPT (n = 88) compared with 7.0 ± 1.2 and 8.0 ± 1.1 for Gentaxane (n = 90) and iodine/DMSO (n = 88), respectively. Thus, MPPT reduced the time to reach a clean wound by 57% and 62%, respectively. Products were used once daily until a clean wound was reached, which also reflects the number of applications. Days to onset of granulation for MPPT, Gentaxane, and iodine/DMSO were 4.5 ± 0.8, 9.2 ± 1.4, and 10.3 ± 1.5 days, respectively; and days to onset of epithelialization were 7.8 ± 1.1, 14.1 ± 1.9, and 16.4 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Subgroup analysis of patients with diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers found that each of these demonstrated the same pattern of healing as the overall study. The number of hospitalization days was 14.6 ± 5.6 for MPPT, 21.0 ± 10.7 for Gentaxane, and 24.0 ± 7.9 for iodine/DMSO. Compared with Gentaxane, patients receiving MPPT had a 31% reduction in hospitalization duration and a 39% reduction compared with iodine/DMSO. These findings demonstrate that MPPT represents a valuable new approach to wound care.

  13. CO2 geosequestration at the laboratory scale: Combined geophysical and hydromechanical assessment of weakly-cemented shallow Sleipner-like reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon-Suarez, I.; North, L. J.; Best, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    To date, the most promising mitigation strategy for reducing global carbon emissions is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). The storage technology (i.e., CO2 geosequestration, CGS) consists of injecting CO2 into deep geological formations, specifically selected for such massive-scale storage. To guarantee the mechanical stability of the reservoir during and after injection, it is crucial to improve existing monitoring techniques for controlling CGS activities. We developed a comprehensive experimental program to investigate the integrity of the Sleipner CO2 storage site in the North Sea - the first commercial CCS project in history where 1 Mtn/y of CO2 has been injected since 1996. We assessed hydro-mechanical effects and the related geophysical signatures of three synthetic sandstones and samples from the Utsira Sand formation (main reservoir at Sleipner), at realistic pressure-temperature (PT) conditions and fluid compositions. Our experimental approach consists of brine-CO2 flow-through tests simulating variable inflation/depletion scenarios, performed in the CGS-rig (Fig. 1; Falcon-Suarez et al., 2017) at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton. The rig is designed for simultaneous monitoring of ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities and attenuations, electrical resistivity, axial and radial strains, pore pressure and flow, during the co-injection of up to two fluids under controlled PT conditions. Our results show velocity-resistivity and seismic-geomechanical relations of practical importance for the distinction between pore pressure and pore fluid distribution during CGS activities. By combining geophysical and thermo-hydro-mechano-chemical coupled information, we can provide laboratory datasets that complement in situ seismic, geomechanical and electrical survey information, useful for the CO2 plume monitoring in Sleipner site and other shallow weakly-cemented sand CCS reservoirs. Falcon-Suarez, I., Marín-Moreno, H., Browning, F., Lichtschlag, A

  14. Semiconductor micro cavities: half light, half matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2003-01-01

    World, Jeremy J Baumberg of the University of Southampton, UK, explains how semiconductor micro cavities could one day even be used as a new type of ultra-efficient light emitter for optoelectronic interconnects or quantum processors. (U.K.)

  15. Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Dan; Muller, Alexandru

    2003-07-01

    in MEMS topics. This year special attention was devoted to the emerging RF MEMS technology. In addition, a presentation of `Microsystems in FP6' was held as a special invited talk at the end of the conference. The selection of papers for inclusion in this issue was difficult, due to the high quality of the papers of the workshop. The final content is a result of the collaboration of the programme committee and Institute of Physics Publishing staff. We wish to thank our colleagues from the MME'02 programme committee: A G R Evans (Southampton University), M Hill (Cork Institute of Technology) and R Wolffenbuttel (Delft University of Technology). We are grateful to all participants for making the workshop a very stimulating meeting place for the MEMS community in Europe.

  16. PREFACE: 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Dear Colleagues, 1st International School and Conference "Saint Petersburg OPEN 2014" on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on March 25 - 27, 2014 at St. Petersburg Academic University - Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim to introduce young scientists with actual problems and major advances in physics and technology. The keynote speakers were: Mikhail Glazov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Vladimir Dubrovskii (Saint Petersburg Academic University RAS, Russia) Alexey Kavokin (University of Southampton, United Kingdom and St. Petersburg State University, Russia) Vladimir Korenev (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia) Sergey Kukushkin (Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering RAS, Russia) Nikita Pikhtin (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, Russia and "Elfolum" Ltd., Russia) Dmitry Firsov (Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Russia) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. Sufficiently large number of participants with more than 160 student attendees from all over the world allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for the fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers basing on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year's School and Conference is supported by SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics), OSA (The Optical Society), St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University and by Skolkovo Foundation. It is a continuation of the annual schools and

  17. 3rd International School and Conference “Saint Petersburg OPEN 2016” on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, 3rd International School and Conference “Saint Petersburg OPEN 2016” on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures was held on March 28 - 30, 2016 at St. Petersburg Academic University of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The School and Conference included a series of invited talks given by leading professors with the aim of introducing young scientists to the actual problems and major advances in modern physics and technology. The keynote speakers were Mircea Guina (Tampere University of Technology, Finland) Evgeny I. Terukov (Ioffe Institute RAS, Russia) Victor M. Ustinov (Ioffe Institute RAS, Russia) Peter G. Kazansky (University of Southampton, UK) Alexander O. Golubok (ITMO University, Russia) Georgy E. Cirlin (St Petersburg Academic University RAS, Russia) Levon V. Asryan (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA) Andrey A. Lipovskii (Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Russia) During the poster session all undergraduate and graduate students attending the conference presented their works. A large number of participants with more than 280 student attendees from all over the world allowed the Conference to provide a fertile ground for the fruitful discussions between the young scientists as well as to become a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between student authors and highly experienced scientists. The best student papers, which were selected by the Program Committee and by the invited speakers based on the theses and their poster presentation, were awarded with diplomas of the conference - see the photos. This year “Saint Petersburg OPEN 2016” is organized by St. Petersburg Academic University in cooperation with Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The School and Conference is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project N 16-32-10060) , Russian Science Foundation, SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics) and OSA (The

  18. 13th International Conference on Motion and Vibration Control (MOVIC 2016) and the 12th International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics (RASD 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the Thirteenth International Conference on Motion and Vibration Control (MoViC), together with the Twelfth International Conference on Recent Advances in Structural Dynamics (RASD). MoViC is an event that started in Yokohama, Japan in 1992 and has been organised every two years alternating between Japan, USA and Europe. The eleven previous RASD conferences have been held every three years or so since 1980 primarily in Southampton, UK. The idea of joining the two conferences came quite naturally because of the common ground of the two conferences and the chances of cross-pollination between two otherwise separate research groups. This joint conference is devoted to theoretical, numerical and experimental developments in motion/vibration/structural dynamics, their control and application to all types of structures and dynamical systems. The conference reflects the state-of-the- art in these topics, and is an excellent opportunity to exchange scientific, technical and experimental ideas. The Conference Proceedings include over 250 papers by authors from over 20 countries, forty technical sessions and five plenary presentations. The five invited speakers are Professor Roger Goodall (Loughborough University, UK) presenting “Motion and vibration control for railway vehicles”, Professor Takeshi Mizuno (Saitama University, Japan) presenting “Recent advances in magnetic suspension technology”, Professor Kevin Murphy (University of Louisville, USA) presenting “Dynamics of Passive Balancing Rings for Rotating Systems”, Professor David Wagg (University of Sheffield, UK) presenting “Reducing vibrations in structures using structural control”, and Professor Kon-Well Wang (University of Michigan, USA) presenting “From Muscles to Plants - Nature-Inspired Adaptive Metastructures for Structural Dynamics Enhancement”. I would like to thank members of the Organising Committee for their help, over the last year or so, in

  19. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Pricilla E.; Ntani, Georgia; Crozier, Sarah R.; Mahon, Pam A.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Hanson, Mark A.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Cleal, Jane K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother’s capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content) on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth. Methods RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women’s Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01), y + LAT2 (p = 0.03), aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02) and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04) mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01), ASCT1 (p = 0.03), mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02) and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05) was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern) pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01) associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01). Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001). Conclusion A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of

  20. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricilla E Day

    Full Text Available Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother's capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth.RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women's Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR.Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01, y+LAT2 (p = 0.03, aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02 and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04 mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01, ASCT1 (p = 0.03, mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02 and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05 was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05 associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05 and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01 associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01. Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001.A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of transporter and metabolic genes and maternal smoking

  1. Did a whole-crustal hydrothermal system generate the Irish Zn-Pb orefield?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. Stephen; Badenszki, Eszter; Chew, David; Kronz, Andreas; O'Rourke, Helen; Whitehouse, Martin; Menuge, Julian; van den Berg, Riana

    2016-04-01

    Current models[1] for the genesis of the giant Irish Carboniferous-hosted Zn-Pb orefield propose shallow (700°C) metamorphism and melting during the Acadian orogeny at ~390Ma and during separate episodes of extension at ~ 381-373Ma and ~362Ma. Sm-Nd garnet dating shows that the lower crust remained hot or was re-heated to ~600°C at ~341Ma during Lower Carboniferous volcanism, also associated with extension and, in part, coincident with the mineralization[1]. Isotopic data from the xenoliths correspond closely to Sr and Nd isotopic analyses of gangue calcite[8] and galena Pb[9] isotopic data from the major ore deposits. While Zn contents of the xenoliths permit them to be metal sources, their mineralogy and texture provide an enriched template and a plausible extraction mechanism. In situ analyses of modally-abundant biotite and garnet show significant enrichment in Zn (and other relevant metals) as well as order of magnitude depletion of Zn during retrograde alteration, providing a metal-release mechanism and pointing to a hydrothermal fluid system operating at least to depths of ~ 25km. References [1] Wilkinson, J.J. & Hitzman, M.W. 2015. The Irish Pb-Zn orefield: The view from 2014. In: Archibald, S.M. and Piercey, S.J. (eds) Current Perspectives on Zinc deposits. Irish Association for Economic Geology, pp. 59-72.; [2] Davidheiser-Kroll, B., Stuart, F.M. & Boyce, A.J. 2014. Mineralium Deposita, 49, 547-553; [3] Elliott, H. 2015. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Southampton; [4] Hnatyshin, D., Creaser, R.A., Wilkinson, J.J. & Gleeson, S.A. 2015. Geology, 43, 143-146; [5] McCusker, J. & Reed, C. 2013. Mineralium Deposita, 48, 687-695; [6] Van den Berg, R., Daly, J.S. & Salisbury, M.H. 2005. Tectonophysics, 407(1-2), 81-99; [7] Hauser, F., O'Reilly, B.M., Readman, P.W., Daly, J. S. & Van den Berg, R. 2008. Geophysical Journal International 175, 1254-1272; [8] Walshaw, R.D., Menuge, J.F. & Tyrrell, S. 2006. Mineralium Deposita, 41, 803-819; [9] Everett, C

  2. Log In to Experiential Learning Theory: Supporting Web-Based Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, Sarah; Parry, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Background For an increasingly busy and geographically dispersed faculty, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, developed a range of Web-based faculty development modules, based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle, to complement the faculty’s face-to-face workshops. Objective The objective of this study was to assess users’ views and perceptions of the effectiveness of Web-based faculty development modules based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. We explored (1) users’ satisfaction with the modules, (2) whether Kolb’s design framework supported users’ learning, and (3) whether the design principle impacts their work as educators. Methods We gathered data from users over a 3-year period using evaluation surveys built into each of the seven modules. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and responses to open-ended questions were analyzed using content analysis. Results Out of the 409 module users, 283 completed the survey (69.1% response rate). Over 80% of the users reported being satisfied or very satisfied with seven individual aspects of the modules. The findings suggest a strong synergy between the design features that users rated most highly and the key stages of Kolb’s learning cycle. The use of simulations and videos to give the users an initial experience as well as the opportunity to “Have a go” and receive feedback in a safe environment were both considered particularly useful. In addition to providing an opportunity for reflection, many participants considered that the modules would enhance their roles as educators through: increasing their knowledge on various education topics and the required standards for medical training, and improving their skills in teaching and assessing students through practice and feedback and ultimately increasing their confidence. Conclusions Kolb’s theory-based design principle used for Web-based faculty development can support faculty to

  3. The Future with Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    The applications of cryogenic systems have expanded over the past 50 years into many areas of our lives. During this time, the impact of the common features of Cryogenic Fluid Dynamics, CryoFD, on the economic design of these cryogenic systems, has grown out of a long series of experimental studies carried out by teams of postgraduate students at Southampton University.These studies have sought to understand the heat transfer and convective behavior of cryogenic liquids and vapors, but they have only skimmed over the many findings made, on the strong convective motions of fluids at low temperatures. The convection takes place in temperature gradients up to 10,000 K per meter, and density gradients of 1000% per meter and more, with rapid temperature and spatially dependent changes in physical properties like viscosity and surface tension, making software development and empirical correlations almost impossible to achieve. These temperature and density gradients are far larger than those met in other convecting systems at ambient temperatures, and there is little similarity. The paper will discuss the likely impact of CryoFD on future cryogenic systems, and hopefully inspire further research to support and expand the use of existing findings, and to improve the economy of present-day systems even more effectively. Particular examples to be mentioned include the following. Doubling the cooling power of cryo-coolers by a simple use of CryoFD. Reducing the boil-off rate of liquid helium stored at the South Pole, such that liquid helium availability is now all-the-year-round. Helping to develop the 15 kA current leads for the LHC superconducting magnets at CERN, with much reduced refrigeration loads. Improving the heat transfer capability of boiling heat transfer surfaces by 10 to 100 fold. This paper is an edited text of an invited plenary presentation at ICEC25/ICMC2014 by Professor Scurlock on the occasion of his being presented with the ICEC Mendelssohn Award for his

  4. Evaluating the pitch bias of CryoSat exploiting stacks of single look ehoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliola, Michele; Tagliani, Nicolas; Fornari, Marco; Bouzinac, Catherine; Parrinello, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    CryoSat was launched on the 8th April 2010 and it is the first European ice mission dedicated to monitoring precise changes in the thickness of polar ice sheets and floating sea ice over a 3-year period. CryoSat carries an innovative radar altimeter called the Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Altimeter (SIRAL), that transmits pulses at a high pulse repetition frequency thus making the received echoes phase coherent and suitable for azimuth processing. The attitude information of the spacecraft is provided by star trackers, that have an internal accuracy of few arc-seconds. By analysis of the CryoSat products, two different studies [1, 2] verified the existence of a bias between the pitch reported by the star trackers and the actual pitch of CryoSat during its flight. However those studies, that use two different methods to evaluate the actual pitch, provided different values for the pitch bias. This poster is aimed at describing a further method to estimated the pitch with which the satellite is actually flying by analysis of the stacks of the single look echoes that are accumulated for a given location of sea surface during the Level1 processing. In fact, over ocean the power of the single look echoes for a given point is shaped by the along-track antenna pattern. As a consequence, estimating the angular direction of pointing of the antenna from the stack, an estimate of the pitch can be obtained. Finally, the bias evaluated starting from the pitch measured with the proposed method is compared with the pitch bias measured in [1, 2]. [1] Galin,N. and Wingham, D., Estimating Pitch Angle of CryoSat-2 using the Power Distribution of the Synthetic Aperture, presented at SAR Altimetry Expert Group Meeting, Southampton UK, June 25-27, 2013. [2] Smith, W.H.F. and Scharroo, R., Retracking range, SWH, sigma-naught, and attitude in CryoSat conventional ocean data. In proceedings of Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting. San Diego, October 19-21, 2011.

  5. PREFACE: Sensors and their Applications XIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, S. J.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.

    2007-09-01

    The fourteenth conference in the Sensors and their Applications series took place at the Liverpool John Moores University in Liverpool, UK from 11-13 September 2007. The event was organised by the Instrument Science and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics. Previous conferences in this series were held in Manchester (1983 and 1993), Southampton (1985 and 1998), Cambridge (1987), Canterbury (1989), Edinburgh (1991), Dublin (1995), Glasgow (1997), Cardiff (1999), London (2001), Limerick (2003) and Chatham (2005). The event provided a forum for academic researchers and industrial engineers working in all areas of sensors, instrumentation and measurement to update themselves on the latest technical developments and applications, share knowledge and stimulate new ideas. The third decade of this conference series continues to highlight new technologies and applications as the sensor market benefits from enhanced signal processing power and wireless networking. Through presentation of oral papers, discussions at exhibited posters and informal exchanges of ideas, the conference continues to provide excellent knowledge transfer and networking opportunities. The high quality programme, headlined by notable contributions from invited speakers, included microsensors, automotive sensors, gas sensing, non-destructive inspection, food and healthcare, sensor signal processing, wireless sensing, modelling and imaging techniques. As in previous years, this conference was particularly highlighted by a large number of sensor applications papers. We take this opportunity to thank all of those who have contributed to the event. Our thanks also go to our colleagues in the Instrument Science and Technology Group for their support and encouragement, particularly in the refereeing of papers, and to the Sensors and Instrumentation Knowledge Transfer Network. Special thanks go to Claire Garland from the Conferences Department of the Institute of Physics and the local team at Liverpool

  6. Multinational comparative cross-sectional survey of views of medical students about acceptable terminology and subgroups in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Shanaya; Irfan, Muhammad; Bhargava, Rachna; Pinninti, Narsimha; Scott, Joseph; Mohammad Algahtani, Haifa; Guo, Zhihua; Gupta, Rishab; Nadkarni, Pallavi; Naeem, Farooq; Howells, Fleur; Sorsdahi, Katherine; Thorne, Kerensa; Osman-Hicks, Victoria; Pallikadavath, Sasee; Phiri, Peter; Carr, Hannah; Graves, Lizi; Kingdon, David

    2018-06-07

    The aim of this study was to inform thinking around the terminology for 'schizophrenia' in different countries. The objective of this study was to investigate: (1) whether medical students view alternative terminology (psychosis subgroups), derived from vulnerability-stress models of schizophrenia, as acceptable and less stigmatising than the term schizophrenia; (2) if there are differences in attitudes to the different terminology across countries with different cultures and (3) whether clinical training has an impact in reducing stigma. This is a cross-sectional survey that examined the attitudes of medical students towards schizophrenia and the alternative subgroups. The study was conducted across eight sites: (1) University of Southampton, UK; (2) All India Institute of Medical Science, India; (3) Rowan University, USA; (4) Peshawar Medical College, Pakistan; (5) Capital Medical University, China; (6) College of Medicine and Medical sciences, Bahrain; (7) Queens University, Kingston, Canada and (8) University of Cape Town, South Africa. This study extended an initial pilot conducted by the Royal College of Psychiatrists on the term schizophrenia and psychosis subgroups to assess whether the subgroup terminology might have an effect on the attitudes of a convenience sample of medical students from eight different countries and potentially play a role in reducing stigmatisation. 1873 medical students completed a questionnaire recording their attitudes to schizophrenia and the psychosis subgroups. A reduction in negative perceptions were found for the psychosis subgroups, especially for the stress sensitivity psychosis and anxiety psychosis subgroups. Negative perceptions were found for drug-related psychosis. Participants who had undergone clinical training had overall positive attitudes. Differences across different countries were found. The attitudes towards psychosis subgroups used in this study have shown mixed results and variation across countries. Further

  7. Validation of a maternal questionnaire on correlates of physical activity in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inskip Hazel M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valid measures of physical activity correlates in preschool children are lacking. This study aimed to assess the validity, factor structure and internal consistency of a maternal questionnaire on potential correlates of four-year-old children's physical activity. Methods The questionnaire was designed to measure the following constructs: child personal factors; parental support and self-efficacy for providing support; parental rules and restrictions; maternal attitudes and perceptions; maternal behaviour; barriers to physical activity; and the home and local environments. Two separate studies were conducted. Study I included 24 mothers of four-year-old children who completed the questionnaire then participated in a telephone interview covering similar items to the questionnaire. To assess validity, the agreement between interview and questionnaire responses was assessed using Cohen's kappa and percentage agreement. Study II involved 398 mothers of four-year-old children participating in the Southampton Women's Survey. In this study, principal components analysis was used to explore the factor structure of the questionnaire to aid future analyses with these data. The internal consistency of the factors identified was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Results Kappa scores showed 30% of items to have moderate agreement or above, 23% to have fair agreement and 47% to have slight or poor agreement. However, 89% of items had fair agreement as assessed by percentage agreement (≥ 66%. Limited variation in responses to variables is likely to have contributed to some of the low kappa values. Six questions had a low kappa and low percentage agreement (defined as poor validity; these included questions from the child personal factors, maternal self-efficacy, rules and restrictions, and local environment domains. The principal components analysis identified eleven factors and found several variables to stand alone. Eight of the composite

  8. Disaster resilience assessment and the global agenda: A journey from India to South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchiotti, Margherita; Torres, Jair; Burton, Christopher; Makarigakis, Alexandros

    2016-04-01

    Governments and stakeholders worldwide are placing great emphasis on fostering the resilience of communities to natural hazards and disasters. This is partially because communities that can increase their resilience are in a better position to withstand the adverse effects of damaging hazard events when they occur. With disaster risk reduction having emerged as a global challenge, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 has recognised the need to invest in enhancing disaster resilience as a priority on the international agenda. In order to successfully build community resilience to natural hazards, it then becomes essential to first understand, identify and assess all sets of conditions that contribute to resilience. The ability to measure resilience is increasingly being identified as a key step towards disaster risk reduction as a result. Relatively few studies, however, have been conducted to develop guidelines for measuring the concept, and more research is needed to develop effective tools for assessment of resilience in developing countries. This is because various environmental, built-environment, and social factors will operate and interact differentially across disaster and development contexts. This paper presents preliminary findings from two large projects in which the authors have been involved, namely the 'Enhancing Natural HAzards resilience iN South America' (ENHANS) and 'Deltas, Vulnerability & Climate Change: Migration & Adaptation' (DECCMA) projects. In collaboration with the Global Earthquake Model (GEM), the Understanding and Managing Extremes (UME) School of the Institute for Advanced Study (IUSS) of Pavia and the University of Southampton, UNESCO is working on the development of methods for disaster resilience measurement in developing nations. The studies build on the available literature to provide an ad-hoc conceptual framework for the quantification of community resilience in each study site by means of a bottom

  9. Patients' experiences of breathing retraining for asthma: a qualitative process analysis of participants in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden-Close, Emily; Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Thomas, Mike; Bruton, Anne

    2017-10-05

    Poor symptom control and impaired quality of life are common in adults with asthma, and breathing retraining exercises may be an effective method of self-management. This study aimed to explore the experiences of participants in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial, which investigated the effectiveness of breathing retraining as a mode of asthma management. Sixteen people with asthma (11 women, 8 per group) who had taken part in the intervention arms of the BREATHE trial (breathing retraining delivered by digital versatile disc (DVD) or face-to-face sessions with a respiratory physiotherapist) took part in semi-structured telephone interviews about their experiences. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Breathing retraining was perceived positively as a method of asthma management. Motivations for taking part included being asked, to enhance progress in research, to feel better/reduce symptoms, and to reduce medication. Participants were positive about the physiotherapist, liked having the materials tailored, found meetings motivational, and liked the DVD and booklet. The impact of breathing retraining following regular practice included increased awareness of breathing and development of new habits. Benefits of breathing retraining included increased control over breathing, reduced need for medication, feeling more relaxed, and improved health and quality of life. Problems included finding time to practice the exercises, and difficulty mastering techniques. Breathing retraining was acceptable and valued by almost all participants, and many reported improved wellbeing. Face to face physiotherapy was well received. However, some participants in the DVD group mentioned being unable to master techniques. PATIENTS RECEPTIVE TO BREATHING RETRAINING: Patients with asthma taught how to change their unconscious breathing patterns generally like non-pharmacological interventions. Researchers in the UK, led by Mike Thomas from the University of Southampton

  10. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  11. Graduates of different UK medical schools show substantial differences in performance on MRCP(UK Part 1, Part 2 and PACES examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollon Jennifer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK General Medical Council has emphasized the lack of evidence on whether graduates from different UK medical schools perform differently in their clinical careers. Here we assess the performance of UK graduates who have taken MRCP(UK Part 1 and Part 2, which are multiple-choice assessments, and PACES, an assessment using real and simulated patients of clinical examination skills and communication skills, and we explore the reasons for the differences between medical schools. Method We perform a retrospective analysis of the performance of 5827 doctors graduating in UK medical schools taking the Part 1, Part 2 or PACES for the first time between 2003/2 and 2005/3, and 22453 candidates taking Part 1 from 1989/1 to 2005/3. Results Graduates of UK medical schools performed differently in the MRCP(UK examination between 2003/2 and 2005/3. Part 1 and 2 performance of Oxford, Cambridge and Newcastle-upon-Tyne graduates was significantly better than average, and the performance of Liverpool, Dundee, Belfast and Aberdeen graduates was significantly worse than average. In the PACES (clinical examination, Oxford graduates performed significantly above average, and Dundee, Liverpool and London graduates significantly below average. About 60% of medical school variance was explained by differences in pre-admission qualifications, although the remaining variance was still significant, with graduates from Leicester, Oxford, Birmingham, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and London overperforming at Part 1, and graduates from Southampton, Dundee, Aberdeen, Liverpool and Belfast underperforming relative to pre-admission qualifications. The ranking of schools at Part 1 in 2003/2 to 2005/3 correlated 0.723, 0.654, 0.618 and 0.493 with performance in 1999–2001, 1996–1998, 1993–1995 and 1989–1992, respectively. Conclusion Candidates from different UK medical schools perform differently in all three parts of the MRCP(UK examination, with the

  12. Quality assessment of observational studies in a drug-safety systematic review, comparison of two tools: the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale and the RTI item bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margulis AV

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrea V Margulis,1 Manel Pladevall,1 Nuria Riera-Guardia,1 Cristina Varas-Lorenzo,1 Lorna Hazell,2,3 Nancy D Berkman,4 Meera Viswanathan,4 Susana Perez-Gutthann,1 1RTI Health Solutions, Barcelona, Spain; 2Drug Safety Research Unit, Southampton, UK; 3Associate Department of the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK; 4RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The study objective was to compare the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS and the RTI item bank (RTI-IB and estimate interrater agreement using the RTI-IB within a systematic review on the cardiovascular safety of glucose-lowering drugs. Methods: We tailored both tools and added four questions to the RTI-IB. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the 44 included studies with both tools, (independently for the RTI-IB and agreed on which responses conveyed low, unclear, or high risk of bias. For each question in the RTI-IB (n=31, the observed interrater agreement was calculated as the percentage of studies given the same bias assessment by both reviewers; chance-adjusted interrater agreement was estimated with the first-order agreement coefficient (AC1 statistic. Results: The NOS required less tailoring and was easier to use than the RTI-IB, but the RTI-IB produced a more thorough assessment. The RTI-IB includes most of the domains measured in the NOS. Median observed interrater agreement for the RTI-IB was 75% (25th percentile [p25] =61%; p75 =89%; median AC1 statistic was 0.64 (p25 =0.51; p75 =0.86. Conclusion: The RTI-IB facilitates a more complete quality assessment than the NOS but is more burdensome. The observed agreement and AC1 statistic in this study were higher than those reported by the RTI-IB's developers. Keywords: systematic review, meta-analysis, quality assessment, AC1

  13. Major Change in the Predominant Type of “Norwalk-Like Viruses” in Outbreaks of Acute Nonbacterial Gastroenteritis in Osaka City, Japan, between April 1996 and March 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iritani, Nobuhiro; Seto, Yoshiyuki; Haruki, Kosuke; Kimura, Masatsugu; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2000-01-01

    In Osaka City, Japan, between April 1996 and March 1999, a total of 350 fecal specimens from 64 outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis were examined to investigate infection by “Norwalk-like viruses” (NLVs). By reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, 182 samples (52.0%) from 47 outbreaks (73.4%) were NLV positive. During those three years, the incidence of NLV-associated outbreaks showed seasonality, being higher during January to March (winter to early spring). The ingestion of contaminated oysters was the most common transmission mode (42.6%). The amplicons of the 47 outbreak strains that were NLV positive by RT-PCR were tested using Southern hybridization with four probe sets (Ando et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:64–71, 1995). Forty of the outbreak strains were classified as 4 probe 1-A (P1-A) strains, 6 P1-B strains, 10 P2-A strains, 17 P2-B strains, and 3 untypeable strains, and the other 7 outbreaks were determined to be mixed-probe-type strains. Probe typing and partial sequence analysis of the outbreak strains indicated that a predominant probe type of NLVs in Osaka City had drastically changed; P2-B strains (77.8%) with multiple genetic clusters were observed during the 1996–97 season, the P2-A common strain (81.3%) related to the Toronto virus cluster was observed during the 1997–98 season, and P1-B strains (75.0%) with a genetic similarity were observed during the 1998–99 season. For the three untypeable outbreak strains (96065, 97024, and 98026), the 98026 outbreak strain had Southampton virus (SOV)-like sequences, and each of the other outbreak strains had a unique 81-nucleotide sequence. Newly designed probes (SOV probe for the 98026 outbreak strain and the 96065 probe for the 96065 and 97024 outbreak strains) were hybridized with relative strains and without other probe type strains. The prevalent NLV probe types in Osaka City during those three years were classified in six phylogenetic groups: P1-A, P1-B, P2-A, P2-B, SOV, and 96065 probe

  14. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsø (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Zeeonderzoek (The Netherlands, ref. Tjeerd C.E. van Weering).

  15. Personalised long-term follow-up of cochlear implant patients using remote care, compared with those on the standard care pathway: study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullington, Helen; Kitterick, Padraig; DeBold, Lisa; Weal, Mark; Clarke, Nicholas; Newberry, Eva; Aubert, Lisa

    2016-05-13

    Many resources are required to provide postoperative care to patients who receive a cochlear implant. The implant service commits to lifetime follow-up. The patient commits to regular adjustment and rehabilitation appointments in the first year and annual follow-up appointments thereafter. Offering remote follow-up may result in more stable hearing, reduced patient travel expense, time and disruption, more empowered patients, greater equality in service delivery and more freedom to optimise the allocation of clinic resources. This will be a two-arm feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving 60 adults using cochlear implants with at least 6 months device experience in a 6-month clinical trial of remote care. This project will design, implement and evaluate a person-centred long-term follow-up pathway for people using cochlear implants offering a triple approach of remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of device and a personalised online support tool for home speech recognition testing, information, self-rehabilitation, advice, equipment training and troubleshooting. The main outcome measure is patient activation. Secondary outcomes are stability and quality of hearing, stability of quality of life, clinic resources, patient and clinician experience, and any adverse events associated with remote care. We will examine the acceptability of remote care to service users and clinicians, the willingness of participants to be randomised, and attrition rates. We will estimate numbers required to plan a fully powered RCT. Ethical approval was received from North West-Greater Manchester South Research Ethics Committee (15/NW/0860) and the University of Southampton Research Governance Office (ERGO 15329). Results will be disseminated in the clinical and scientific communities and also to the patient population via peer-reviewed research publications both online and in print, conference and meeting presentations, posters, newsletter articles, website reports

  16. Tracking of 25-hydroxyvitamin D status during pregnancy: the importance of vitamin D supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Rebecca J; Crozier, Sarah R; Dennison, Elaine M; Davies, Justin H; Robinson, Sian M; Inskip, Hazel M; Godfrey, Keith M; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2015-11-01

    The role of maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in fetal development is uncertain, and findings of observational studies have been inconsistent. Most studies have assessed 25(OH)D only one time during pregnancy, but to our knowledge, the tracking of an individual's 25(OH)D during pregnancy has not been assessed previously. We determined the tracking of serum 25(OH)D from early to late pregnancy and factors that influence this. The Southampton Women's Survey is a prospective mother-offspring birth-cohort study. Lifestyle, diet, and 25(OH)D status were assessed at 11 and 34 wk of gestation. A Fourier transformation was used to model the seasonal variation in 25(OH)D for early and late pregnancy separately, and the difference between the measured and seasonally modeled 25(OH)D was calculated to generate a season-corrected 25(OH)D. Tracking was assessed with the use of the Pearson correlation coefficient, and multivariate linear regression was used to determine factors associated with the change in season-corrected 25(OH)D. A total of 1753 women had 25(OH)D measured in both early and late pregnancy. There was a moderate correlation between season-corrected 25(OH)D measurements at 11 and 34 wk of gestation (r = 0.53, P Vitamin D supplementation was the strongest predictor of tracking; in comparison with women who never used supplements, the discontinuation of supplementation after 11 wk was associated with a reduction in season-corrected 25(OH)D (β = -7.3 nmol/L; P D. Higher pregnancy weight gain was associated with a reduction in season-corrected 25(OH)D (β = -0.4 nmol · L(-1) · kg(-1); P = 0.015), whereas greater physical activity (β = 0.4 nmol/L per h/wk; P = 0.011) was associated with increases. There is a moderate tracking of 25(OH)D status through pregnancy; factors such as vitamin D supplementation, weight gain, and physical activity are associated with changes in season-corrected 25(OH)D from early to late gestation. These findings have implications for

  17. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsø (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee (The Netherlands, ref. Jens Greinert).

  18. Collection, Curation, Citation at Source: Publication@Source 10 Years On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Southampton chemical information group had its genesis in 2001, when we began an e-Science pilot project to investigate structure-property mapping, combinatorial chemistry, and the Grid. CombeChem instigated a range of activities that have since been underway for more than ten years, in many ways matching the expansion of interest in using the Web as a vehicle for collection, curation, dissemination, reuse, and exploitation of scientific data and information. Chemistry has frequently provided the exemplar case studies, notably for the series of projects – funded by Jisc and EPSRC – that investigated the issues associated with the long-term preservation of data to support the scholarly knowledge cycle, such as the eBank UK project. Rapid developments in Internet access and mobile technology have significantly influenced the way researchers view connectivity, data standards, and the increasing importance and power of semantics and the Semantic Web. These technical advances interact strongly with the social dimension and have led to a reconsideration of the responsibilities of researchers for the quality of their research and for satisfying the requirements of modern stakeholders. Such obligations have given rise to discussions about Open Access and Open Data, creating a range of alternatives that are now technically feasible but need to be socially acceptable. Business plans are changing too, but in a strange contradiction, desire can run ahead of what is possible, sensible, and affordable, while lagging behind in imagination of what would be technically possible and potentially game-changing! Taking the chemical sciences as our example and focusing on the curation of research data, we explore from our perspective, ten years back and ten years forward, how far we have been able to re-imagine the data/information value pathway from bench to publication. We assess not only the major advances and changes that have been achieved, but also

  19. Log In to Experiential Learning Theory: Supporting Web-Based Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Selma; Choi, Sunhea; Brien, Sarah; Parry, Marcus

    2017-09-27

    For an increasingly busy and geographically dispersed faculty, the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, developed a range of Web-based faculty development modules, based on Kolb's experiential learning cycle, to complement the faculty's face-to-face workshops. The objective of this study was to assess users' views and perceptions of the effectiveness of Web-based faculty development modules based on Kolb's experiential learning cycle. We explored (1) users' satisfaction with the modules, (2) whether Kolb's design framework supported users' learning, and (3) whether the design principle impacts their work as educators. We gathered data from users over a 3-year period using evaluation surveys built into each of the seven modules. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and responses to open-ended questions were analyzed using content analysis. Out of the 409 module users, 283 completed the survey (69.1% response rate). Over 80% of the users reported being satisfied or very satisfied with seven individual aspects of the modules. The findings suggest a strong synergy between the design features that users rated most highly and the key stages of Kolb's learning cycle. The use of simulations and videos to give the users an initial experience as well as the opportunity to "Have a go" and receive feedback in a safe environment were both considered particularly useful. In addition to providing an opportunity for reflection, many participants considered that the modules would enhance their roles as educators through: increasing their knowledge on various education topics and the required standards for medical training, and improving their skills in teaching and assessing students through practice and feedback and ultimately increasing their confidence. Kolb's theory-based design principle used for Web-based faculty development can support faculty to improve their skills and has impact on their role as educators

  20. Can we improve the identification of cold homes for targeted home energy-efficiency improvements?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, Emma J.; Wilkinson, Paul; Hong, Sung H.; Oreszczyn, Tadj

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the extent to which homes with low indoor-temperatures can be identified from dwelling and household characteristics. Design: Analysis of data from a national survey of dwellings, occupied by low-income households, scheduled for home energy-efficiency improvements. Setting: Five urban areas of England: Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle and Southampton. Methods: Half-hourly living-room temperatures were recorded for two to four weeks in dwellings over the winter periods November to April 2001-2002 and 2002-2003. Regression of indoor on outdoor temperatures was used to identify cold-homes in which standardized daytime living-room and/or nighttime bedroom-temperatures were o C (when the outdoor temperature was 5 o C). Tabulation and logistic regression were used to examine the extent to which these cold-homes can be identified from dwelling and household characteristics. Results: Overall, 21.0% of dwellings had standardized daytime living-room temperatures o C, and 46.4% had standardized nighttime bedroom-temperatures below the same temperature. Standardized indoor-temperatures were influenced by a wide range of household and dwelling characteristics, but most strongly by the energy efficiency (SAP) rating and by standardized heating costs. However, even using these variables, along with other dwelling and household characteristics in a multi-variable prediction model, it would be necessary to target more than half of all dwellings in our sample to ensure at least 80% sensitivity for identifying dwellings with cold living-room temperatures. An even higher proportion would have to be targeted to ensure 80% sensitivity for identifying dwellings with cold-bedroom temperatures. Conclusion: Property and household characteristics provide only limited potential for identifying dwellings where winter indoor temperatures are likely to be low, presumably because of the multiple influences on home heating, including personal choice and

  1. Feasibility of personalised remote long-term follow-up of people with cochlear implants: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullington, Helen; Kitterick, Padraig; Weal, Mark; Margol-Gromada, Magdalena

    2018-04-20

    Substantial resources are required to provide lifelong postoperative care to people with cochlear implants. Most patients visit the clinic annually. We introduced a person-centred remote follow-up pathway, giving patients telemedicine tools to use at home so they would only visit the centre when intervention was required. To assess the feasibility of comparing a remote care pathway with the standard pathway in adults using cochlear implants. Two-arm randomised controlled trial. Randomisation used a minimisation approach, controlling for potential confounding factors. Participant blinding was not possible, but baseline measures occurred before allocation. University of Southampton Auditory Implant Service: provider of National Health Service care. 60 adults who had used cochlear implants for at least 6 months. Control group (n=30) followed usual care pathway.Remote care group (n=30) received care remotely for 6 months incorporating: home hearing in noise test, online support tool and self-adjustment of device (only 10 had compatible equipment). Primary: change in patient activation; measured using the Patient Activation Measure.Secondary: change in hearing and quality of life; qualitative feedback from patients and clinicians. One participant in the remote care group dropped out. The remote care group showed a greater increase in patient activation than the control group. Changes in hearing differed between the groups. The remote care group improved on the Triple Digit Test hearing test; the control group perceived their hearing was worse on the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale questionnaire. Quality of life remained unchanged in both groups. Patients and clinicians were generally positive about remote care tools and wanted to continue. Adults with cochlear implants were willing to be randomised and complied with the protocol. Personalised remote care for long-term follow-up is feasible and acceptable, leading to more empowered patients. ISRCTN14644286

  2. Effects of organism preparation in metallothionein and metal analysis in marine invertebrates for biomonitoring marine pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaten, J F P; Hudson, M D; Jensen, A C; Williams, I D

    2015-06-15

    Metallothionein (MT) is established as a potentially useful biomarker for monitoring aquatic pollution. This paper addresses widespread inconsistencies in storage conditions, tissue type selection and pre-treatment of samples before MT and metal analysis in biomarker studies. This variation hampers comparability and so the widespread implementation of this monitoring approach. Actively sampled Mytilus edulis in Southampton Water, UK were exposed to different storage temperatures, a variety of tissue types were analysed, and various pre-treatments of transportation on ice, transportation in seawater, depuration, and rapid dissection in the field were examined. Storage temperatures of -20 °C were found to be adequate for periods of at least ten weeks, as MT was not reduced by protein degradation compared with samples kept at -80 °C. Whole tissue and digestive gland concentrations of MT and metals were significantly positively correlated and directly relatable. MT in the digestive gland appeared to be more responsive to metals than in whole tissue, where it may be diluted, masking MT responses. However, longer study periods may suffer the effects of mass changes to the digestive gland, which alters MT concentration, and it may therefore be advisable to measure whole tissue. Depuration and transportation in seawater reduced both MT and metal concentrations in the digestive gland, and few correlations between MT and metals were identified for these treatments. It is therefore recommended that: i) samples are transported to the laboratory on ice and dissected as soon as possible thereafter, ii) depuration should not be used when examining MT response to metal exposure until further research clarifying its utility is reported, iii) either whole tissue or the digestive gland can be used to measure MT, though whole tissue may be preferable on long-term studies, and iv) organisms can be stored at -20 °C before analysis for up to ten weeks. These practices can be applied

  3. From the Mahanadi Delta to Sendai via South America: Building bridges between research, practice and international policy for disaster resilience assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchiotti, Margherita; Torres, Jair

    2017-04-01

    The concept of disaster resilience has gained momentum in recent decades and major international initiatives, such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 and the Paris Agreement, all recognise the importance of fostering community resilience to natural hazards to save lives and reduce losses. Despite significant advances in the policy settings for disaster resilience assessment, the interpretation of the concept itself and its implications for practice and policy remain clouded and more research is needed to gather evidence of what resilience means for governments and communities. This paper aims to bring together the research work the authors have conducted in the field of disaster resilience assessments at their respective institutions (University of Southampton, UK and the UME Graduate School at the Institute for Advanced Studies of Pavia, Italy) with the practical implementation projects and international policy consultations they have been involved in under UNESCO's umbrella. The main findings of a research study conducted as part of the 'Deltas, Vulnerability & Climate Change: Migration & Adaptation' (DECCMA) project to investigate the differential resilience of local communities in the Mahanadi Delta, India using a development approach will be presented. Statistical methods have been employed to identify development hotspots and have been combined with a qualitative analysis of community perceptions of development and the mutual implications of development for disaster resilience to build case studies of community resilience to inform theory, policy and practice. The authors will then discuss the practical implications of this research study for the implementation of UNESCO's 'Enhancing Natural HAzards resilience iN South America' (ENHANS) project, which seeks to train a critical mass of decision-makers, community leaders and experts on disaster risk and resilience assessments in four

  4. Different approaches to the tasks of educating and training information systems professionals, within the National Health Service (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, R M; Horkin, E J; Melhuish, P J; Norris, A C

    1998-06-01

    In 1994, La Sainte Union College of Higher Education (LSU) developed an MSc in Health Informatics course, in conjunction with Southampton University NHS Trust (SUHT). The original part-time, 1 day per week mode of delivery has since been broadened to include a distance leaning route and recently a block release mode, by which students combine usage of the distance learning materials with attendance in College for an intensive 2-day taught element. Because the course was designed in close co-operation with a major teaching hospital, it has always been 'market led' to meet the needs both of the individual students and of the organisations that they work for. At the same time, students acquire a quality-assured qualification from a premier UK university, a qualification that holds credence outside the National Health Service (NHS). At the same time as LSU and SUHT were developing the MSc in Health Informatics, the UK NHS Training Division (NHSTD) started to promote a professional qualification for health service professionals. the so-called 'Statement of Recognition' (SoR). In contrast to the academic format of an MSc, the SoR was not a formal course, but a combination of modules designed to help candidates demonstrate their competence and achievement at work by portfolio evidence. This approach has national standing throughout the UK in a set of qualifications known as NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications). The NHSTD, through its successor, the Institute of Health Care Development (IHCD), has further refined this competency based model, culminating in the launch in 1996 of the Diploma and Advanced Diploma in Information and Technology (Health). Professionals within the area of Information Management and Technology (IM&T) in the NHS now have the alternatives of an academic or a competency route to achieve their goals. This paper traces the development of and the relationship between, these two approaches to the educational and training of healthcare professionals

  5. Greater access to fast-food outlets is associated with poorer bone health in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, C; Parsons, C; Godfrey, K; Robinson, S; Harvey, N C; Inskip, H; Cooper, C; Baird, J

    2016-03-01

    A healthy diet positively influences childhood bone health, but how the food environment relates to bone development is unknown. Greater neighbourhood access to fast-food outlets was associated with lower bone mass among infants, while greater access to healthy speciality stores was associated with higher bone mass at 4 years. Identifying factors that contribute to optimal childhood bone development could help pinpoint strategies to improve long-term bone health. A healthy diet positively influences bone health from before birth and during childhood. This study addressed a gap in the literature by examining the relationship between residential neighbourhood food environment and bone mass in infants and children. One thousand one hundred and seven children participating in the Southampton Women's Survey, UK, underwent measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) at birth and 4 and/or 6 years by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Cross-sectional observational data describing food outlets within the boundary of each participant's neighbourhood were used to derive three measures of the food environment: the counts of fast-food outlets, healthy speciality stores and supermarkets. Neighbourhood exposure to fast-food outlets was associated with lower BMD in infancy (β = -0.23 (z-score): 95% CI -0.38, -0.08) and lower BMC after adjustment for bone area and confounding variables (β = -0.17 (z-score): 95% CI -0.32, -0.02). Increasing neighbourhood exposure to healthy speciality stores was associated with higher BMD at 4 and 6 years (β = 0.16(z-score): 95% CI 0.00, 0.32 and β = 0.13(z-score): 95% CI -0.01, 0.26 respectively). The relationship with BMC after adjustment for bone area and confounding variables was statistically significant at 4 years, but not at 6 years. The neighbourhood food environment that pregnant mothers and young children are exposed may affect bone development during early childhood. If confirmed in

  6. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 22nd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2011) Selected papers from the 22nd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlckers, Per

    2012-07-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is a selection of 13 of the best papers presented at the 22nd Micromechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop, which was arranged in Toensberg, Norway, 19-22 June, 2011. 110 participants attended the 3 day workshop that had 5 invited keynote speakers and 80 submitted poster presentations. The MME Workshop is organized every year to gather mostly European scientists and people from industry to discuss topics related to research in micromechanics and microsystems in an informal manner. A distinct feature of this specialized workshop is to be an excellent venue for young scientists in the field, such as PhD students, to present their latest work. This workshop series was inaugurated in Enschede, the Netherlands in 1989, followed by: Berlin, Germany (1990), Leuven, Belgium (1992), Neuchatel, Switzerland (1993), Pisa, Italy (1994), Copenhagen, Denmark (1995), Barcelona, Spain (1996) [1], Southampton, UK (1997) [2], Ulvik, Norway (1998) [3], Gif-sur-Yvette, France (1999) [4], Uppsala, Sweden (2000), Cork, Ireland (2001) [5], Sinaia, Romania (2002) [6], Delft, The Netherlands (2003) [7], Leuven, Belgium (2004) [8], Goteborg, Sweden (2005) [9], Southampton, UK (2006) [10], Guimaraes, Portugal (2007) [11], Aachen, Germany (2008) [12], Toulouse, France (2009) [13] and Enschede, the Netherlands (2010) [14]. The workshop series has remained remarkably true to its original concept such as still having micromechanics as a priority topic while, at the same time, adapting to recent research topics such as microsystems integration. It is nice to observe that an earlier fragmented and mostly academic research field now has matured into a very strong industrial field being one of the fastest growing industries in the world, with successful applications on all levels from high end to low end, from space to consumer applications, with the inclusion of microsystems in smartphones such as three-axis accelerometers and

  7. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Damage Assessment of Structures (DAMAS) 2015. DAMAS has a long history of almost 20 years. The first DAMAS conference took place in 1995 (Pescara, Italy), followed by a biannual meeting in 1997 (Sheffield, UK), 1999 (Dublin, Ireland), 2001 (Cardiff, UK), 2003 (Southampton, UK), 2005 (Gdansk, Poland), 2007 (Torino, Italy), 2009 (Beijing, China), 2011 (Oxford, UK) and 2013 (Dublin, Ireland). The eleventh edition of DAMAS conference series, DAMAS 2015, is hosted by Ghent University, Belgium, and is held at the congress center Het Pand in Ghent city. Ghent is the capital and the largest city of the East Flanders province of the Flemish region of Belgium. Het Pand is the culture and congress center of Ghent University and is a historical monument. The conference is established as a major international forum for research topics relevant to damage assessment of engineering structures and systems including numerical simulations, signal processing of sensor measurements and theoretical techniques as well as experimental case studies. The presentations of DAMAS 2015 are divided into 6 main sessions, namely 1) Structural Health and Condition Monitoring, 2) Damage in Civil Engineering, 3) Damage in Machineries, 4) Damage in Composite Materials, 5) Sensing and Sensors and 6) Signal Processing. The organising committee is grateful to keynote speakers; Professor Guido De Roeck, Head of Structural Mechanics Division, KULeuven, Belgium, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Structural Health Monitoring: highlights and challenges', Professor Weidong Zhu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, USA, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Vibration-based Structural Damage Detection: Theory and Applications' and Professor Wieslaw Ostachowicz, Head of the Laboratory of Active Materials and Smart Structures, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, for his keynote lecture entitled 'Damage Assessment and

  8. Metal availability in technosols prepared with composted sewage sludge and limestone outcrop affected by the presence of barley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Alejandro; Navarro-Pedreño, José; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Gómez, Ignacio; Jordán, Manuel M.; Bech, Jaume

    2017-04-01

    P, Morra L, Leone A, Pagano L, Alfani A (2009) Effect of organic and mineral fertilizers on soil respiration and enzyme activities of two Mediterranean horticultural soils. Biol Fert Soils doi:10.1007/s00374-009-0365-z Jordán MM, Pina S, García-Orenes F, Almendro-Candel MB, García-Sánchez E (2008) Environmental risk evaluation of the use of mine spoils and treated sewage sludge in the ecological restoration of limestone quarries. Environ Geol doi:10.1007/s00254-007-0991-4 Jordão CP, Nascentes CC, Cecon PR, Fontes RLF, Pereira JL (2006) Heavy metal availability in soil amended with composted urban solid wastes. Environ Monit Assess doi:10.1007/s10661-006-1072-y Karaca A (2004) Effect of organic wastes on the extractability of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc in soil. Geoderma doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2004.01.016 Navarro-Pedreño J, Almendro-Candel MB, Jordán-Vidal MM, Mataix-Solera J, García-Sánchez E (2004) Risk areas in the application of sewage sludge on degraded soils in Alicante province (Spain). In: Martin JF, Brebbia CA, Godfrey AE, Díaz de Terán JR (eds) Geo-Environment. WIT Press, Southampton, pp 293-302

  9. Heavy metal water pollution associated with the use of sewage sludge compost and limestone outcrop residue for soil restoration: effect of saline irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gimeno, Ana; Navarro-Pedreño, Jose; Gómez, Ignacio; Belén Almedro-Candel, María; Jordán, Manuel M.; Bech, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    Assess doi:10.1007/s10661-006-1072-y. Karaca A (2004) Effect of organic wastes on the extractability of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc in soil. Geoderma doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2004.01.016. Navarro-Pedreño J, Almendro-Candel MB, Jordán-Vidal MM, Mataix-Solera J, García-Sánchez E (2004) Risk areas in the application of sewage sludge on degraded soils in Alicante province (Spain). In: Martin JF, Brebbia CA, Godfrey AE, Díaz de Terán JR (eds) Geo-Environment. WIT Press, Southampton, pp 293-302.

  10. The Quaternary uplift history of central southern England: evidence from the terraces of the Solent River system and nearby raised beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, Rob; Bridgland, David; White, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Early Pleistocene and by ˜150 m since the Middle Pliocene, there being a high degree of consistency between uplift histories inferred for river terraces and marine terraces. Uplift rates increase gradually westward, such that along the River Frome at the western end of the Hampshire Basin ˜80 m of uplift since the late Early Pleistocene is indicated. This variation is interpreted as a consequence of a regional-scale variation in crustal properties. About 80 m of uplift is also indicated on this timescale by raised beaches in the Portsdown area and adjacent terraces of the River Test and Solent in the vicinity of the Portsdown anticline to the north of Southampton. We interpret this as a consequence of ˜10 m of vertical slip in the past million years on the blind reverse fault beneath this anticline. This dataset thus provides the first clear indication of measurable Quaternary structural development in crustal basement in the onshore UK. The Solent has formed more than a single terrace per 100 ka Milankovitch cycle, leading us to attribute terraces to isotopic substages, potentially improving upon the resolution available from sequences in which terraces formed once per cycle. Athough the first appearence of Levallois technique was initially considered to date from the MIS 9-8 transition, based on evidence from the Thames, we found that there was a better modelling fit if this was taken as having occurred slightly earlier, in MIS 9b, perhaps in association with the post-MIS 9e or 9c marine regression, which could have permitted immigration into a previously insular Britain of people versed in Levallois technology.

  11. Late Quaternary Megafaunal Extinctions in Northern Eurasia: Latest Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    archaeological records in collaboration with colleagues at Durham University, Royal Holloway, University of London and Southampton University. It is clear from the results that environmental change had a major impact, but the geographical and chronological patterns are complex and there is striking variation in extinction dynamics between species. For example cave bear and spotted hyaena show early extinction in Europe c.28 cal ka, whereas cave lion and woolly rhino disappeared in the Late Glacial c.14 cal ka, and mammoth and giant deer persisted in limited areas well into the Holocene. Our current NERC funded project (3 years from March 2009) extends the scope of our research to include several species that survive to the present day: e.g. musk ox, reindeer, horse, red deer, and moose, and is also extended geographically to Alaska, and the Yukon. Modelling of vegetational changes during the last 40,000 years (by our colleagues at Durham: Judy Allen, Yvonne Collingham, Brian Huntley, using LPJ-Guess data from Paul Valdes) is providing much better geographical coverage than the available pollen data, and also structure and productivity of the vegetation - both of considerable importance to the mammal fauna. Comparing the chronological and geographical dynamics of extant and extinct species promises to shed light on why some species were lost whereas others survived. Moreover, by using a niche-modelling approach we hope to show whether or not species became extinct due to habitat loss, or whether other factors such as human hunting might have been involved in their final disappearance.

  12. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, United Kingdom Summary The challenge of improving water quality (WQ) is a growing global concern [1]. Poor WQ is mainly attributed to poor water management and outdated agricultural activities. We propose that collaborative sensor networks spread across an entire catchment can allow cooperation among individual activities for integrated WQ monitoring and management. We show that sharing information on critical parameters among networks of water bodies and farms can enable identification and quantification of the contaminant sources, enabling better decision making for agricultural practices and thereby reducing contaminants fluxes. Motivation and results Nutrient losses from land to water have accelerated due to agricultural and urban pursuits [2]. In many cases, the application of fertiliser can be reduced by 30-50% without any loss of yield [3]. Thus information about nutrient levels and trends around the farm can improve agricultural practices and thereby reduce water contamination. The use of sensor networks for monitoring WQ in a catchment is in its infancy, but more applications are being tested [4]. However, these are focussed on local requirements and are mostly limited to water bodies. They have yet to explore the use of this technology for catchment-scale monitoring and management decisions, in an autonomous and dynamic manner. For effective and integrated WQ management, we propose a system that utilises local monitoring networks across a catchment, with provision for collaborative information sharing. This system of networks shares information about critical events, such as rain or flooding. Higher-level applications make use of this information to inform decisions about nutrient management, improving the quality of monitoring through the provision of richer datasets of catchment information to local networks. In the full paper, we present example scenarios and analyse how the benefits of

  13. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani

  14. 15th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The 15 th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held at Selsdon Park Hotel, near London, United Kingdom, on 13-15 January 2016. The venue was an excellent location to exchange ideas, regardless whether this took place in the conference room, over lunch, at the drinks reception, or in the bar after the conference dinner. A total of 65 papers were presented at the conference. There were over 80 delegates from institutions covering five countries. On the first day of AFPAC, the Institute of Physics joined forces with the National Physical Laboratory (UK) to host a special session on cavitation. The Cavitation User Forum, a bi-annual event specifically dedicated to applications of high power ultrasound, brought together experts from academia and from the cleaning, processing and medical industries. This session was kicked off with an invited talk by Dr David Fernandez Rivas (University of Twente, The Netherlands), on the reproducibility of sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The Cavitation User Forum was followed by a special session on biomedical ultrasound, co-sponsored by the Medical Physics Group of the Institute of Physics, which featured a keynote talk by Prof Robin Cleveland (University of Oxford) on ultrasonic surgery. The session included talks on acoustic microscopy of live cells, histotripsy, phase-insensitive ultrasound computed tomography for the diagnosis of breast cancer, high-intensity focused ultrasound and the biomedical applications of solitary wave impulses generated by granular chains The second day featured an invited presentation by Prof Tim Leighton (University of Southampton, UK) on the acoustic bubble, which discussed ocean, cetacean and extra-terrestrial acoustics, and cold water cleaning. Prof Christ Glorieux (KU Leuven, Belgium) discussed the applications of photothermal and photoacoustic methods using different spatiotemporal excitation patterns. A broad range of physical acoustics topics was reviewed that day. Work was

  15. Britain Approaches ESO about Installation of Major New Telescope at Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    interesting celestial objects which can then be studied in much more detail with the many specialised instruments at the powerful VLT Unit Telescopes." ESO, the European Southern Observatory, has eight member states, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland. The United Kingdom participated actively in the early discussions in the 1950's about the establishment of ESO, but later elected not to join, mainly because of its access to other southern astronomical facilities in Australia and South Africa. ESO already possesses a smaller survey instrument at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), with the optical Wide-Field Imager at the ESO/MPG 2.2-m telescope. In addition, the 2.6-m VLT Survey Telescope (VST) with the 16kx16k OmegaCam camera will be installed at Paranal in 2002. It will operate in the visual region of the spectrum and, together with VISTA's infrared capability, ensure unequalled sky- and wavelength coverage from one observing site. Notes [1] The announcement was made in a PPARC Press Release, available at http://www.pparc.ac.uk and at the AlphaGalileo site. [2] Universities in the VISTA Consortium are (in alphabetical order) Birmingham, Cambridge, Cardiff, Durham, Edinburgh, Hertfordshire, Keele, Central Lancashire, Leicester, Liverpool John Moores, Nottingham, Oxford, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Queen's University Belfast, St Andrews, Southampton, Sussex, University College London.

  16. CTX-M ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae: estimated prevalence in adults in England in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Lecky, Donna M; Xu-McCrae, Li; Nakiboneka-Ssenabulya, Deborah; Chung, Keun-Taik; Nichols, Tom; Thomas, Helen Lucy; Thomas, Mike; Alvarez-Buylla, Adela; Turner, Kim; Shabir, Sahida; Manzoor, Susan; Smith, Stephen; Crocker, Linda; Hawkey, Peter M

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBLPE) are increasing in prevalence worldwide and are more difficult to treat than non-ESBLPE. Their prevalence in the UK general population is unknown, as the only previous UK ESBLPE faecal colonization study involved patients with diarrhoea. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of CTX-M ESBLPE faecal colonization in the general adult population of England in 2014, and investigate risk factors. Methods A stratified random sample of 58 337 registered patients from 16 general practices within four areas of England were invited to participate by returning faeces specimens and self-completed questionnaires. Specimens were tested for ESBLPE and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Results 2430 individuals participated (4% of those invited). The estimated prevalence of colonization with CTX-M ESBLPE in England was 7.3% (95% CI 5.6%–9.4%) (Shropshire 774 participants, 4.9% colonization; Southampton City 740 participants, 9.2%; Newham 612 participants, 12.7%; Heart of Birmingham 234 individuals, 16.0%) and was particularly high in: those born in Afghanistan (10 participants, 60.0% colonization, 95% CI 29.7%–84.2%); those born on the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or Sri Lanka) (259 participants, 25.0% colonization, 95% CI 18.5%–32.9%); travellers to South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka or Nepal) in the last year (140 participants, 38.5% colonization, 95% CI 27.8%–50.5%); and healthcare domestics (8 participants, unweighted 37.5% colonization, 95% CI 8.5%–75.5%). Risk factors identified included: being born in the Indian subcontinent (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 3.0–9.7); travel to South Asia (aOR 2.9, 95% CI 1.8–4.8) or to Africa, China, South or Central America, South East or Pacific Asia or Afghanistan (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.7–4.1) in the last year; and working as a healthcare domestic (aOR 6.2, 95% CI 1.3–31). None of the 48 participants who took co-amoxiclav in

  17. Environmentally-safe pest control using novel bioelectrostatic techniques: Initial results and prospects for area-wide usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howse, P.E.; Underwood, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of our work is to provide an alternative to broad-scale pesticide spraying for crop protection. The need for such a development, in order to protect the environment, wildlife and human health, has never been more urgent. The project was conceived in 1992 deriving from concepts which are the subject of patent applications in 60 countries throughout the world. Since then, feasibility studies have been completed and links have been made with other organisations keen to evaluate and develop the technique. A parallel project, using similar electrostatic powder technology, was the development of an environmentally-friendly cockroach trap, which received a Prince of Wales Award for Innovation in 1997. In order to hasten the commercialisation of the technology, a new company, ExoSect Ltd, has been set up in association with the University of Southampton. The technique is based on the discovery that certain inert powders that can be electrostatically charged will adhere to the insect cuticle. The cuticle appears to be permanently electrically polarised (i.e., it functions as an electret). Powders of opposite polarity to the surface will therefore attach readily and it is extremely difficult for the insect to dislodge itself. In contrast, powders which do not charge easily or which rapidly lose their charge, quickly fall off, or can be groomed off by the insect. Male insects are lured to a source of charged powder by odour attractants (e.g., sexual pheromones). They then contaminate themselves with the powder. After leaving the trap, they pass on the powder to females in mating attempts. An insecticidal material formulated with the powder can thus be delivered to the females. The insecticide must be slow-acting in order for this transfer to take place. The components of the method are the following: Carrier Particles There are various inert or biodegradable materials with appropriate electrostatic characteristics which can be used as carriers for other biologically

  18. Identification of urban gas leaks and evaluation of methane emission inventories using mobile measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeri, Giulia; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Butler, Dominique; Lanoisellé, Mathias; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2017-04-01

    Leakages from the natural gas distribution network, power plants and refineries account for the 10% of national methane emissions in the UK (http://naei.defra.gov.uk/), and are identified as a major source of methane in big conurbations (e.g. Townsend-Small et al., 2012; Phillips et al., 2013). The National Atmospheric Emission Inventories (NAEI) website provides a list of gas installations, but emissions from gas leakage, which in the inventories are estimated on the basis of the population distribution, are difficult to predict, which makes their estimation highly uncertain. Surveys with a mobile measurement system (Zazzeri et al., 2015) were carried out in the London region for detection of fugitive natural gas and in other sites in the UK (i.e. Bacton, Southampton, North Yorkshire) to identify emissions from various gas installations. The methane isotopic analysis of air samples collected during the surveys, using the methodology in Zazzeri et al. (2015), allows the calculation of the δ13C signature characterising natural gas in the UK. The isotopic value of the natural gas supply to SE London has changed a little in recent years, being close to -34 ‰ over 1998-99 period (Lowry et al., 2001) and close to -36 ‰ since at least 2002. Emissions from gas installations, such as pumping stations in NE England (-41 ± 2 ‰ ) were detected, but some of them were not listed in the inventories. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the gas leaks identified during the surveys in the London region does not coincide with the distribution suggested by the inventories. By locating both small gas leaks and emissions from large gas installations, we can verify how these methane sources are targeted by national emission inventories. Lowry, D., Holmes, C.W., Rata, N.D., O'Brien, P., and Nisbet, E.G., 2001, London methane emissions: Use of diurnal changes in concentration and δ13C to identify urban sources and verify inventories: Journal of Geophysical Research

  19. Editorial Seminar.net Issue 3 Vol. 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2010-11-01

    , The Philippines, Canada, Indonesia and Germany. We believe this demonstrates the necessity of an international journal that raises issues with wide interest.In this issue, we present five articles. The first four has been presented at an annual conference for the Network University of Norway, and then gone through a proper peer-review for publication in this journal. The first article, “Promoting the Good e-Teacher: Didactical choices when developing e-pedagogical Competences”, by Grete Oline Hole, Anne Karin Larsen and Jon Hoem, from the Bergen University College, explains how a blended e-pedagogy course for teachers of Higher Education teachers has been developed. The course evolved from the experiences of teaching international online courses for European BA students. The students plan their own courses in accordance with the stages of becoming an e-learner. Evaluations by students have demonstrated that this hands-on training course can help students attain the necessary competences needed to be skilled e-teachers. This paper demonstrates a concern that many higher education institutions hold for developing teaching skills in on-line or e-learning. Private institutions develop internal training, such as the University of Phoenix, and some actors plan to produce courses for the commercial market[1].Bjørn Klefstad, Geir Maribu, Svend Andreas Horgen and Thorleif Hjeltnes, from the Sør-Trøndelag University College present an article called: “Learning outcomes and a taxonomy as a starting point for creating digital multiple-choice tests”. They make the case for the use of multiple-choice tests for both formative and summative purposes. They regard the making of valid and reliable tests to be challenging, but they find Bloom’s taxonomy being a useful framework for assessment in higher education and fruitful for developing “learning outcomes”. Based on an analysis of several digital tests they examine to what degree learning outcomes and levels are

  20. Ocular consequences of blunt trauma in two species of nocturnal raptors (Athene noctua and Otus scops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruca, Cristina; Molina-López, Rafael; Peña, Teresa; Leiva, Marta

    2012-07-01

      To determine the type, prevalence, and prognosis of ocular and periocular lesions in free-living little owls (LO) and scops owls (SO), injured by blunt trauma.   Medical records from LO and SO with ocular or periocular lesions secondary to blunt trauma were reviewed. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed in all birds. Short protocol electroretinography (ERG) and ocular ultrasound were performed as dictated by the case.   During the study period, a total of 158 LO and 99 SO with blunt trauma were admitted. Among these, 43 LO (27.8%) and 27 SO (27.3%) had ocular or periocular lesions. Bilateral injuries (72.1% LO and 81.5% SO) were more common than unilateral. Common findings in both species were: corneal erosions/superficial ulcers, anterior and posterior uveitis, cataracts, hyphema, posterior synechia, vitreal hemorrhage, and retinal detachment. Electroretinography was performed in 32 LO and eight SO, which had posterior segment lesions or opacity of the transparent media. Normal to nonrecordable b-wave amplitudes were observed. Follow-up was available in 13 LO and 11 SO. Among these, nine LO (14 eyes) and 10 SO (17 eyes) had resolution of the clinical signs following medical treatment.   Ocular lesions are common in LO and SO injured by blunt trauma. Electroretinography is a valuable diagnostic tool to assess the severity of retinal dysfunction secondary to blunt trauma and to determine the response to medical treatment. A complete ophthalmic examination is a determining factor in the early management of trauma in these species. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  1. 16th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Proceedings will be visible and accessible through IOP after conclusion of the Conference. For the first time this year we have plan a “Power MEMS in Action” special session that is specifically dedicated to table-top demonstrations of micro power sources and small scale energy harvesting systems. With the growing interest in wireless sensors for the Internet of Things and other distributed or portable devices, there is no better time to bring power MEMS out of the lab and into applications. The Power MEMS in Action session will provide this opportunity by allowing researchers to demonstrate their technologies at the conference. As every year, this meeting is made possible by many generous contributions of time, effort, and financial support. Many thanks are due to the Technical Program Committee led by Pr Einar Halvorsen for their intensive efforts in reviewing abstract submissions, and to the International Steering Committee for their advice and support. Thanks to The PowerMEMS School chair Mickaël Lallart and the expert speakers that made the School possible. The local organizing committee, led by Dimitri Galayko, has provided us with invaluable assistance in making PowerMEMS 2016 happen. We wish you a productive and enjoyable conference and a wonderful stay in Paris. Philippe Basset Skandar Basrour CONFERENCE OFFICIALS Conference Chairs Philippe Basset Université Paris-Est, FRANCE Skandar Basrour Grenoble Alpes Université, FRANCE Technical Program Chair Einar Halvorsen University College of Southeast Norway, NORWAY PowerMEMS School Chair Mickaël Lallart Université de Lyon, FRANCE PowerMEMS in Action Chair Luc Frechette University ofSherbrooke, CANADA International Steering Committee Mark G. Allen - University of Pennsylvania, USA Philippe Basset - Université Paris-Est, FRANCE Skandar Basrour - Grenoble Alpes Université, FRANCE Steve Beeby - University of Southampton, UK Luc Frechette - University of Sherbrooke, CANADA Takayuki Fujita - University of Hyogo

  2. Initial-value problem for the Gardner equation applied to nonlinear internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Kurkina, Oxana; Kurkin, Andrey; Talipova, Tatiana; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2017-04-01

    ., Talipova T. Internal solitary waves // Chapter 4 in the book ``Solitary Waves in Fluids''. WIT Press. Southampton, Boston. 2007. P. 85 - 110. Rouvinskaya E., Kurkina O., Kurkin A. Dynamics of nonlinear internal gravity waves in layered fluids // NNSTU n.a. R.E. Alekseev Press - Nizhny Novgorod, 2014 - 160 p. [In Russian] Trillo S., Klein M., Clauss G., Onorato M. Observation of dispersive shock waves developing from initial depressions in shallow water // Physica D, 2016. - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physd.2016.01.007.

  3. Evaluation of DGT techniques for measuring inorganic uranium species in natural waters: Interferences, deployment time and speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Geraldine S.C. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Mills, Graham A. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Teasdale, Peter R. [Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland 4222 (Australia); Burnett, Jonathan L.; Amos, Sean [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Fones, Gary R., E-mail: gary.fones@port.ac.uk [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 3QL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-20

    SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (0.02-200 mg L{sup -1}) having little affect on any of the three DGT binding layers. PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} additions (5 {mu}g L{sup -1}-5 mg L{sup -1}) interfered by forming anionic uranyl phosphate complexes that Chelex-100 was unable to accumulate, or by directly competing with the uranyl species for binding sites, as with MnO{sub 2} and the Metsorb. HCO{sub 3}{sup -} (0.1-500 mg L{sup -1}) additions formed anionic species which interfered with the performance of the Chelex-100 and the MnO{sub 2}, and the Ca{sup 2+} (0.1-500 mg L{sup -1}) had the affect of forming labile calcium uranyl species which aided uptake of U by all three resins. DGT field deployments in sea water (Southampton Water, UK) gave a linear mass uptake of U over time with Metsorb and MnO{sub 2} (4 days). Field deployments in fresh water (River Lambourn, UK) gave linear uptake for up to 7 and 4 days for Metsorb and MnO{sub 2} respectively. Field deployment of the Metsorb-DGT samplers with various diffusive layer thicknesses (0.015-0.175 cm) allowed accurate measurements of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) and allowed DBL corrected concentrations to be determined. This DBL-corrected U concentration was half that determined when the effect of the DBL was not considered. The ability of the DGT devices to measure U isotopic ratios with no isotopic fractionation was shown by all three resins, thereby proving the usefulness of the technique for environmental monitoring purposes.

  4. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    -WAVES Project.",p.1-20. SWAN Team.,(2015)," SWAN Scientific and Technical Documentation,SWAN Cycle III version 41.01AB", Delft University of Technology Timmermans, B.,(2015), "Uncertainty In Numerical Wind-Wave Models", Doctoral dissertation of University of Southampton

  5. Self-archiving to Institutional Repositories Is Improved by Assisted and Mandated Deposit; Disciplinary Culture is not a Factor. A Review of: Xia, Jingfeng. “Assessment of Self-Archiving in Institutional Repositories: Across Disciplines.” The Journal of Academic Librarianship 33.6 (Dec. 2007: 647-54.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Haddow

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To test the assumption that authors familiar with subject-based repositories are more likely to self-archive to institutional repositories. Design – Comparative content analysis. Setting – Institutional repositories (IRs from the following seven universities: Queensland University of Technology (QUT, University of Melbourne, University of Queensland, Lund University, University of Glasgow, University of Southampton, and University of Strathclyde. The IRs included in the study were selected on the basis of repository size and use of EPrints software. Faculty size data and IR deposit policies were drawn from universities’ Websites. Methods – Each IR was searched to determine the number of deposits in the disciplines of chemistry, physics, economics and sociology. Physics and economics were selected because these disciplines have established internationally renowned subject-based repositories, in contrast to chemistry and sociology, which have not. Deposits from the disciplines were identified from subject terms, keywords and departmental names in metadata records. A “deposit rate” for the four disciplines in each IR was calculated. The metadata records were examined for name of the depositor, date of deposit, full-text availability, item type, and format. Information in the field “Deposited By” was used to identify the extent of self-archiving (that is, deposited by the author. Faculty size for the four disciplines at the seven universities was established from departmental Web site information. For the purposes of making comparisons between the IRs, these data were converted into “rates of faculty” size by dividing the number of faculty in the department by the total number of faculty at the institution. A weighted rate of deposits by discipline was calculated by dividing the rate offaculty size by the deposit rates. To take into account disciplinary differences in publication productivity, these rates were

  6. NEWS: Paperclip Physics: anatomy of a competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    heats, regional finals and then a Grand Final in London. That year 132 teams were whittled down to nine teams who went to London for the grand final. The competition and the top prizes of Psion organizers were won by a team of girls from St~Anne's School, Southampton with an excellent demonstration of static electricity (see Physics World, June 1999, 12 (6) 54). In 2000 the pattern of heats and regional finals was repeated, this time with 160 teams in 11 branches. On this occasion the overall winners were Shrewsbury School, who explained why a cat, when dropped upside down, can turn itself the right way up before reaching the ground, and can do so without violating any laws of physics (see Physics World, May 2000, 13 (5) 52). Their demonstration did not, as they were at pains to point out, involve any live animals (only toy ones!) but did give a very clear explanation of what angular momentum is, and how it must be conserved by the falling cat. Figure 1 Figure 1. Kirby Kendal School show that the tablecloth trick has more to do with inertia than magic. Figure 2 Figure 2. Shrewsbury School, overall winners in 2000, demonstrate why angular momentum is important to falling cats. Figure 3 Figure 3. Pupils from Omagh Academy demonstrating electrostatics. So why do we bother and, perhaps more importantly, why should teachers bother to encourage their pupils to enter? First of all because it all adds to the message that physics can be fun. Judges, organizers, pupils and teachers would all endorse that. Many of the schools are coming back year after year with another group of sixth-formers. And we hear of this year's contestants who did not win their heat going back to the school to help next year's team. Secondly it develops, in a very enjoyable way, some of the skills that we all know are useful and which have recently been labelled as `key skills' in the new A-level syllabuses for the UK---communicating science, team-working, problem solving and personal organization. This

  7. Combined letrozole and clomiphene versus letrozole and clomiphene alone in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajishafiha M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Masomeh Hajishafiha,1 Meisam Dehghan,2 Nazila Kiarang,1 Nahideh Sadegh-Asadi,1 Seyed Navid Shayegh,3 Mohammad Ghasemi-Rad2 1Department of Gynecology, Reproductive Health Research Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 2Urmia University of Medical Sciences, 3Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab Emirates Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women of childbearing age (6.8%–18%, is among the most common causes of infertility due to ovulation factors, and accounts for 55%–70% of infertility cases caused by chronic anovulation. In this study, we used a combination of letrozole and clomiphene in patients resistant to both drugs individually, and studied the effects of this combination in ovulation and pregnancy in resistant PCOS patients. Methods: The study population included infertile couples diagnosed as PCOS in the wife. The women used clomiphene for at least six cycles in order to ovulate after failure to form the dominant follicle, and were then put on letrozole for four cycles. Patients who were unable to form the dominant follicle were enrolled on letrozole and clomiphene combination therapy. Results: One hundred enrolled patients underwent 257 cycles of a combination of letrozole and clomiphene, in which 213 were able to form the dominant follicle (82.9% and 44 were unable to do so (17.1%. The number of mature follicles was 2.3±1.1. The mean endometrial thickness in patients on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration was 8.17±1.3 mm. The pregnancy rate was 42%. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it can be proposed that in PCOS patients resistant to clomiphene and letrozole used as single agents, a combination of the two drugs can be administered before using more aggressive treatment that may have severe complications or surgery. This combination may also be used as a first-line therapy to induce ovulation in severe cases of PCOS in order to

  8. Efeito do extrato de alho na quebra de dormência de gemas de videiras e no controle in vitro do agente causal da antracnose (Elsinoe ampelina Shear Effect of garlic extract on bud break of grapevines and in vitro control of causal agent of antracnose (Elsinoe ampelina Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Vasconcelos Botelho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerando a redução ou eliminação do uso de substâncias sintéticas que preconizam os sistemas sustentáveis de produção de frutas, este trabalho teve como objetivo a busca de novas alternativas para a quebra de dormência e o controle de doenças em videiras. Estacas de videira contendo uma gema foram pulverizadas com os seguintes tratamentos: 1 testemunha; 2 OV (óleo vegetal 1%; 3 extrato de alho (EA 3%; 4 EA 3% + OV 1%. Posteriormente, as estacas foram mantidas em câmara de crescimento (25±2.5ºC por 56 dias. O único tratamento que estimulou a brotação das estacas de videira cv. Isabel Precoce foi o EA 3% + OV 1%, que atingiu 35% de brotação, diferindo estatisticamente dos tratamentos- testemunha (12,5%, OV 1% (17,5% e EA 3% (15,0%. Provavelmente, o estádio de endodormência profunda das gemas, após apenas 90 horas de frio ( Considering the reduction or elimination of synthetic compounds used in sustainable fruit production systems, this work aimed to search for new alternatives for bud break dormancy and diseases control in grapevines. Single-bud cuttings of grapevines were sprayed with the following treatments: 1 control, 2 1% SO (soybean oil, 3 3% GE (garlic extract, 4 3% GE + 1% SO. After that, the cuttings were kept in a growth chamber (25±2.5ºC for 56 days. The unique treatment that stimulated sprouting of grapevines cv. Isabel Precoce was 3% GE + 1% S, that reached 35% sprouting, differing statistically from the control (12.5%, 1% SO (17.5% and 3% GE (15.0%. Probably, the stage of deep endodormancy of buds, after only 90 chilling hours (< 7.0ºC, avoided better results of bud breaks treatments. Three experiments were carried out in vitro, with different garlic extract doses aiming to evaluate the control of the fungus Elsinoe ampelina. In all trials, there were quadratic effects on mycelial growth, without differences between garlic extract treatments, evidencing its fungicide effect, even for the lowest dose of 0

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    , Kyushu G. R. Stewart, Gainesville C. Di Castro, Rome R. Osborn, Chicago H. Takagi, Tokyo M. Eremets, Mainz S. Ovchnikov, Krasnoyarsk L. Taillefer, Sherbrooke M. Fiebig, Bonn C. Panagopoulos, Singapore & Heraklion J. D. Thompson, Los Alamos Z. FiskIrvine S. Paschen, Vienna Y. Tokura, Tokyo J. Flouquet, Grenoble C. Pfleiderer, Munich K. Ueda, Tokyo P. Fulde, Dresden P. Phillips, Urbana C. M. Varma, Riverside A. Geim, Manchester D. Pines, Davis T. Vojta, Rolla J.C. Gomez-Sal, Santander T. V. Ramakrishnan, Bangalore N.L. Wang, Beijing A. Kavokin, Southampton A.K. Raychaudhuri, Calcutta T. Xiang, Beijing J. Goodenough, Austin M. Reifers, Kosice L. Yu, Beijing H. Hosono, Tokyo P. Riseborough, Philadelphia F. C. Zhang, Hong Kong S. Julian, Toronto M. L Saboungi, Orleans G. Zwicknagl, Braunschweig Operational Team Anson Cheung (co-ordinator)Hyeong Jin KimPaul Nahai-Williamson Beng Tan (co-ordinator)Jack GillettPeter Logg Cheng Liu (co-ordinator)Jo WensleyPrajakti Kalra Swee K. Goh (co-ordinator)Jonathan SilverRichard Brierley Adam HalskiLara SibleyRobert Hay Edd CavannaLeona HopeSeb Haines Felix NissenLina KlintbergSitikantha Das Gareth ConduitMarianne BauerStephen Rowley Gerie LonzarichMatt BurgessSven Friedemann Greg LeverMuhammad Ahsan ZebYang Zou Hannah PriceNick BristoweYiqian Xu Haruka TaniguchiOleksandr PoplavskyyZhuo Feng

  10. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    west.Water levels in many of the wells in the network fluctuated in response to precipitation, upgradient groundwater flow, and tidal flux in Shinnecock Bay. Water level altitudes ranged from 6.66 to 0.47 feet (ft) above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 during the spring measurement period, and from 5.25 to -0.24 ft (NAVD 88) during fall 2014. Historically, annual and seasonal precipitation seem to indicate long-term water level trends in an index well located in the town of Southampton, correlates with changes in storage in the upper glacial aquifer, but does not necessarily indicate water level extremes in the shallow groundwater system. To place the study period in perspective, calendar year 2014 was the 32d wettest year on record, with precipitation for the year totaling 48.1 inches, a 2.6-percent increase from the annual average (46.9 inches per year), based on 81 years of complete record at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service cooperative meteorological station at Bridgehampton, New York. Estimated recharge to the water table beneath the tribal lands from precipitation for 2014 is 25.4 inches.Tidal flux caused water levels in wells to fluctuate from 0.30 to -0.24 ft during May 2014. Water levels in wells located north of Old Fort Pond and beneath the southernmost extent of the tribal lands were most influenced by tidal flux. During June 2014, hydrographs indicate that tidal flux influenced water levels by 0.48 ft in a well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands approximately 0.3 miles north of Shinnecock Bay, and was zero at a well located approximately 0.5 miles south of Montauk Highway, and 0.4 miles west of Heady Creek, near the geographic center of the tribal lands. Tidal-influence delay time (time interval between peak high-tide stage and corresponding peak high-water level) ranged from 1.75 hours at the well located near the southernmost extent of the tribal lands, to more than 4

  11. The 26th International Physics Olympiad: On top down under!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    As they opened the plane door on arrival at Canberra it was like stepping inside a freezer. I had escaped from the heatwave in Britain to experience winter in Australia. I have not found anyone who believes that there was really frost! The Australian welcome did its best to combat the cold, however, and Professor Rod Jury had soon introduced our guides and got us settled in on the campus of Canberra University. The British team of five students, selected through the British Physics Olympiad, were: Alan Bain of Birkenhead School, Chris Blake of King Edward VI School, Southampton, Richard Davies of Dulwich College, Tom Down of Embley Park School, Romsey and Chris Webb of Royal Grammar School, Worcester. The two Leaders of the party were Cyril Isenberg of the University of Kent and Guy Bagnall of Harrow School. Chris Robson of St Bee's School and myself from Stoke on Trent Sixth form College were interested Observers and Guy's wife, Jenny, completed the party. For the old hands there were many friendships stretching back years to renew, and with 51 countries this year many new ones to be made. Â Photo Figure 1. Photograph taken by C Robson of the British Physics Team immediately after the Awards Ceremony in Canberra in July 1995. From left to right: Chris Webb, Richard Davies, Tom Down, Alan Bain and Chris Blake. In addition to the confusion caused by the Sun being in the North and the Moon appearing to lie on its back, we had to get used to the flocks of chattering parrots browsing on the lawns and the kangaroos on campus! Everyone was presented with a boomerang and there were several sessions introducing the art of throwing them, even in the dark! The Opening Ceremony was colourful and a good mix of ceremony and fun with the Aboriginal entertainment and the Flame of Science to be lit. This was followed by my first examiners' meeting. Once the questions have been introduced no one is allowed to leave the group until ten hours later when the students are in bed! The