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Sample records for sources neutral beam

  1. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device

  2. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments

  3. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  4. Development of neutral beam source using electron beam excited plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Yasuhiro; Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya; Hara, Tamio

    2011-01-01

    A low-energy neutral beam (NB) source, which consists of an electron-beam-excited plasma (EBEP) source and two carbon electrodes, has been developed for damageless etching of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) devices. It has been confirmed that the Ar ion beam energy was controlled by the acceleration voltage and the beam profile had good uniformity over the diameter of 80 mm. Dry etching of a Si wafer at the floating potential has been carried out by Ar NB. Si sputtering yield by an Ar NB clearly depends on the acceleration voltage. This result shows that the NB has been generated through the charge exchange reaction from the ion beam in the process chamber. (author)

  5. Manufacturing of neutral beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, E.D.; Duffy, T.J.; Harter, G.A.; Holland, E.D.; Kloos, W.A.; Pastrone, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Over 50 neutral beam sources (NBS) of the joint Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL)/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) design have been manufactured, since 1973, in the LLL Neutral Beam Source Facility. These sources have been used to provide start-up and sustaining neutral beams for LLL mirror fusion experiments, including 2XIIB, TMX, and Beta II. Experimental prototype 20-kV and 80-kV NBS have also been designed, built, and tested for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

  6. Prototype ion source for JT-60 neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, M.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype ion source for JT-60 neutral beam injectors has been fabricated and tested. Here, we review the construction of the prototype ion source and report the experimental results about the source characteristics that has been obtained at this time. The prototype ion source is now installed at the prototype unit of JT-60 neutral beam injection units and the demonstration of the performances of the ion source and the prototype unit has just started

  7. Automation of neutral beam source conditioning with artificial intelligence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.R.; Canales, T.W.; Lager, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system that automates neutral beam source conditioning. The system achieves this with artificial intelligence techniques. The architecture of the system is presented followed by a description of its performance

  8. Automation of neutral beam source conditioning with artificial intelligence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.R.; Canales, T.; Lager, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a system that automates neutral beam source conditioning. The system achieves this with artificial intelligence techniques. The architecture of the system is presented followed by a description of its performance

  9. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  10. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems

  11. Development of the ion source for PDX neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Gardner, W.L.; Barber, G.C.; Haselton, H.H.; Ponte, N.S.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the development of the ion source for neutral beam injection heating of PDX plasma. After a brief description of the plasma generator, the performance characteristics of the source, with different types of grids, are described. Based on test stand results it is concluded that at least two different versions of the source should be able to meet and even exceed the neutral power and energy requirements expected out of PDX injectors

  12. Large area negative ion source for high voltage neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, P.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1979-11-01

    A source of negative deuterium ions in the multi-ampere range is described that is readily extrapolated to reactor size, 10 amp or more of neutral beam, that is of interest in future experiments and reactors. The negative ion source is based upon the double charge exchange process. A beam of positive ions is created and accelerated to an energy at which the attachment process D + M → D - + M + proceeds efficiently. The positive ions are atomically neutralized either in D 2 or in the charge exchange medium M. Atomic species make a second charge exchange collision in the charge target to form D - . For a sufficiently thick target, the beam reaches an equilibrium fraction of negative ions. For reasons of efficiency, the target is typically alkali metal vapor; this experiment uses sodium. The beam of negative ions can be accelerated to high (>200 keV) energy, the electrons stripped from the ions, and a high energy neutral beam formed

  13. RF plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon S.; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being used as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus the ion beam to a small spot size. A radio frequency (RF) plasma source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The goal is to operate the source at pressures ∼ 10 -5 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10 -4 -10 -1 Torr and electron densities in the range of 10 8 -10 11 cm -3 . Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10 -6 Torr range with densities of 10 11 cm -3 . Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with the NTX facility and experiments have begun

  14. RF Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2003-10-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1 - 100 times the ion beam density and at a length 0.1-0.5 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An ECR source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 0-10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures 10-5 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10-4 - 10-1 Torr. Electron densities in the range of 10^8 - 10^11 cm-3 have been achieved. Recently, pulsed operation of the source has enabled operation at pressures in the 10-6 Torr range with densities of 10^11 cm-3. Near 100% ionization has been achieved. The source has been integrated with NTX and is being used in the experiments. The plasma is approximately 10 cm in length in the direction of the beam propagation. Modifications to the source will be presented that increase its length in the direction of beam propagation.

  15. Ferroelectric plasma source for heavy ion beam space charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Grisham, Larry; Grant Logan, B.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon S.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size and compress their axial pulse length. The plasma source should be able to operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally applied electric or magnetic fields. To produce 1 m-long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients are being developed. The sources utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic material, and high voltage (∼7 kV) will be applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A prototype ferroelectric source, 20 cm in length, has produced plasma densities of 5x10 11 cm -3 . It was integrated into the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K + ion beam. A 1 m-long source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested. Simply connecting the five sources in parallel to a single pulse forming network power supply yielded non-uniform performance due to the time-dependent nature of the load that each of the five plasma sources experiences. Other circuit combinations have been considered, including powering each source by its own supply. The 1-m-long source has now been successfully characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma over the 1 m length of the source in the mid-10 10 cm -3 density range. This source will be integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments

  16. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar{sup +} beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ∼5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  17. Long plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Grant Logan, Larry B.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William

    2009-01-01

    Plasmas are a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing intense heavy ion beams to focus them to a small spot size and compress their axial length. The plasma source should operate at low neutral pressures and without strong externally applied fields. To produce long plasma columns, sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics with large dielectric coefficients have been developed. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) is covered with ceramic material. High voltage (∼8 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramics. A BaTiO 3 source comprised of five 20-cm-long sources has been tested and characterized, producing relatively uniform plasma in the 5x10 10 cm -3 density range. The source was integrated into the NDCX device for charge neutralization and beam compression experiments, and yielded current compression ratios ∼120. Present research is developing multi-meter-long and higher density sources to support beam compression experiments for high-energy-density physics applications.

  18. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam Charge Neutralization

    CERN Document Server

    Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Grisham, Larry; Logan, B G; Waldron, William; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Plasmas are employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ~ 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce 1 meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic. High voltage (~ 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long produced plasma densities ~ 5x1011 cm-3. The source was integrated into the experiment and successfully charge neutralized the K ion beam. Presently, the 1 meter source ...

  19. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik; Grisham, Larry; Kolchin, Pavel; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Logan, B. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond the space-charge limit. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1 100 times the ion beam density and at a length [similar]0.1 2 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to support a joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 1 10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures [similar]10[minus sign]6 Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10[minus sign]4 10[minus sign]1 Torr. Electron densities in the range of 108 to 1011 cm[minus sign]3 have been achieved. Low-pressure operation is important to reduce ion beam ionization. A cusp magnetic field has been installed to improve radial confinement and reduce the field strength on the beam axis. In addition, axial confinement is believed to be important to achieve lower-pressure operation. To further improve breakdown at low pressure, a weak electron source will be placed near the end of the ECR source. This article also describes the wave damping mechanisms. At moderate pressures (> 1 mTorr), the wave damping is collisional, and at low pressures (< 1 mTorr) there is a distinct electron cyclotron resonance.

  20. Negative hydrogen ion sources for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1977-01-01

    Negative ion sources offer an attractive alternative in the design of high energy neutral beam injectors. The requirements call for a single source unit capable of yielding H - or D - beam currents of up to 10 A, operating with pulses of 1 s duration or longer, with gas and power efficiencies comparable to or better than achievable with double electron capture systems. H - beam currents of up to 1 A have already been achieved in pulses of 10 ms; gas and power efficiencies were, however, lower than required. In order to increase the H - yield, extend the pulse length and improve gas and power efficiencies fundamental processes in the source plasma and on cesium covered electrode surfaces have to be analyzed; these processes will be briefly reviewed and scaling rules established. Based on these considerations as well as on results obtained with 1 A source models a larger model was designed and constructed, having a 7.5 cm long cathode with forced cooling. Results of initial tests will be presented and possible scaling up to 10 A units discussed

  1. Industrialization and production of neutral beam ion sources for MFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    The existing LLNL designs of the 20 and 80kV deuterium fueled Neutral Beam Ion Source Modules (NBSM) have been industrialized and are being produced successfully for the MFTF. Industrialization includes value engineering, production engineering, cost reduction, fixturing, facilitation and procurement of components. Production assembly, inspection and testing is being performed in a large electronics manufacturing plant. Decades of experience in high voltage, high vacuum power tubes is being applied to the procedures and processes. Independent quality and reliability assurance criteria are being utilized. Scheduling of the various engineering, procurement and manufacturing task is performed by the use of a Critical Path Method (CPM) computer code, Innovative, computerized grid alignment methods were also designed and installed specifically for this project. New jointing and cleaning techniques were devised for the NBSMs. Traceability and cost control are also utilized

  2. Beam optics study of a negative ion source for neutral beam injection application at ASIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jiang-Long; Liang, Li-Zhen [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Jiang, Cai-Chao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xie, Ya-Hong, E-mail: xieyh@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Chun-Dong; Li, Jun; Gu, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Qian [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Jing-Yong; Wu, Ming-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2017-04-15

    In order to study the generation and extraction of negative ions for neutral beam injection application, a negative ion source is being designed and constructed at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). Through a four electrode grids system inside the accelerator, a negative ion beam will be extracted and accelerated up to −60 kV on a reduced scale extraction area of 12 × 50 cm{sup 2} (the area of PG apertures is 185 cm{sup 2}). The beam optics is a key issue for the accelerator design, and greatly determine the source experimental performance in term of beam current, heat load on the grid, beam divergence, and so on. In this paper, the trajectories of electrons and negative ions were simulated in the electrode grids of the negative ion source. The filter capability of electron deflection magnet on the co-extracted electrons is evaluated and confirmed. The negative ion beam optics was designed according to the calculated results of beam divergence and beam radius along the beamlet in different acceleration voltages. The deflection effect of the electron deflection magnet on the negative ion beam was investigated in the single beamlet case and multi-beamlets case.

  3. Ion accumulation and space charge neutralization in intensive electron beams for ion sources and electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirkov, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS), Electron Beam Ion Traps (EBIT) and electron beams for electron cooling application have the beam parameters in the same ranges of magnitudes. EBIS and EBIT produce and accumulate ions in the beam due to electron impact ionization. The cooling electron beam accumulates positive ions from the residual gas in the accelerator chamber during the cooling cycle. The space charge neutralization of cooling beam is also used to reduce the electron energy spread and enhance the cooling ability. The advanced results of experimental investigations and theoretical models of the EBIS electron beams are applied to analyze the problem of beam neutralization in the electron cooling techniques. The report presents the analysis of the most important processes connected with ion production, accumulation and losses in the intensive electron beams of ion sources and electron cooling systems for proton and ion colliders. The inelastic and elastic collision processes of charged particles in the electron beams are considered. The inelastic processes such as ionization, charge exchange and recombination change the charge states of ions and neutral atoms in the beam. The elastic Coulomb collisions change the energy of particles and cause the energy redistribution among components in the electron-ion beams. The characteristic times and specific features of ionization, beam neutralization, ion heating and loss in the ion sources and electron cooling beams are determined. The dependence of negative potential in the beam cross section on neutralization factor is studied. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. High Power Modulator/regulators for neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.Q.; Deitz, A.

    1975-01-01

    PPPL has recently completed two new Modulator/Regulators for neutral injection sources used on the ATC machine and is constructing four new ones for use with sources on the PLT machine. The ATC modulator uses the well proven 4CX35,000C tetrode as the main switch tube, while the PLT modulators will be using the new but significantly higher powered X-2170 tetrodes. Some interesting circuit and manufacturing techniques are discussed

  5. Multisample matrix-assisted laser desorption source for molecular beams of neutral peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupulescu, C.; Abd El Rahim, M.; Antoine, R.; Barbaire, M.; Broyer, M.; Dagany, X.; Maurelli, J.; Rayane, D.; Dugourd, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    We developed and tested a multisample laser desorption source for producing stable molecular beams of neutral peptides. Our apparatus is based on matrix-assisted laser desorption technique. The source consists of 96 different targets which may be scanned by a software control procedure. Examples of molecular beams of neutral peptides are presented, as well as the influence of the different source parameters on the jet

  6. Conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO Neutral Beam Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Fantz, U.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Simonin, A.; Tran, M. Q.

    2016-12-01

    DEMO (DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant) is a proposed nuclear fusion power plant that is intended to follow the ITER experimental reactor. The main goal of DEMO will be to demonstrate the possibility to produce electric energy from the fusion reaction. The injection of high energy neutral beams is one of the main tools to heat the plasma up to fusion conditions. A conceptual design of the Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor, is currently being developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. High efficiency and low recirculating power, which are fundamental requirements for the success of DEMO, have been taken into special consideration for the DEMO NBI. Moreover, particular attention has been paid to the issues related to reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability. A conceptual design of the beam source for the DEMO NBI is here presented featuring 20 sub-sources (two adjacent columns of 10 sub-sources each), following a modular design concept, with each sub-source featuring its radio frequency driver, capable of increasing the reliability and availability of the DEMO NBI. Copper grids with increasing size of the apertures have been adopted in the accelerator, with three main layouts of the apertures (circular apertures, slotted apertures and frame-like apertures for each sub-source). This design, permitting to significantly decrease the stripping losses in the accelerator without spoiling the beam optics, has been investigated with a self-consistent model able to study at the same time the magnetic field, the electrostatic field and the trajectory of the negative ions. Moreover, the status on the R&D carried out in Europe on the ion sources is presented.

  7. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST

  8. RF ion source development for neutral beam application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Kippenhan, D.; Vella, M.C.

    1983-11-01

    At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a 24 x 24 cm 2 RF source has been tested with beam acceleration. Recently, we have been investigating the characteristics of plasmas generated with different kinds of antenna coatings. The antenna coil was installed inside a cylindrical multicusp source (20-cm diam by 24-cm long) and was driven by a 500 W amplifier. A tiny light bulb filament was used to start a background plasma. The RF was then switched on and a steady-state hydrogen plasma of moderate density (n approx. = 10 11 /cm 3 ) could be sustained even with the filament turned off

  9. Saturable reactor-controlled power supply system for TCT/TFTR neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.R.; Hopkins, D.B.; Dexter, W.L.; Kuenning, R.W.; Smith, B.J.

    1975-11-01

    Each neutral beam source requires one major power supply, the acceleration supply, and four auxiliary power supplies. The power supplies are designed to permit independent interruption of current to any source and crowbarring within 20 μsec, in the event of a source spark, while not disturbing the normal pulsing of all other adjacent sources. The sources are described

  10. High-resolution spectral analysis of light from neutral beams and ion source plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, D.H.; Kim, J.

    1980-05-01

    The spectral distributions of Balmer alpha emission from 7- and 22-cm-diam neutral hydrogen beams have been measured with a Fabry-Perot interferometer to obtain information on the beam energy, divergence, and species composition. Results of these measurements are compared with other data on the beam properties to evaluate high-resolution spectroscopy as a beam diagnostic technique. Measurements on ion source plasmas and on beam-produced background plasmas yield average neutral atom energies of approximately 0.3 and 2.5 eV, respectively

  11. Long pulse characteristics of 5 MW ion source for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M.R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)], E-mail: mukti@ipr.res.in; Mattoo, S.K.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Patel, G.B.; Jayakumar, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2008-10-15

    We present characteristics of a 5 MW ion source for SST-1 neutral beam injector. Before the source could be tested for its performance, it was conditioned by 480 arc discharges of 1 s and beam extraction of hydrogen species at various beam voltages ranging between 19 kV and 56 kV. Breakdown free beam extraction could be secured only after about 3000 beam second extraction. The ion source is capable of delivering 1.7 MW of neutral beam power at 55 kV with horizontal and vertical focal length of 5.4 m and 7 m respectively. Beam divergence is {approx}0.97 deg. Steady-state beam energy of 31 MJ at 41 kV was achieved during 14 s long beam extraction. We have not noticed any deterioration of beam parameters, including beam divergence during long pulse operation. These results indicate that 0.5 MW of neutral beam power at 30 kV required for heating of plasma in SST-1 can be delivered.

  12. Long pulse characteristics of 5 MW ion source for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Mattoo, S.K.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Baruah, U.K.; Patel, G.B.; Jayakumar, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    We present characteristics of a 5 MW ion source for SST-1 neutral beam injector. Before the source could be tested for its performance, it was conditioned by 480 arc discharges of 1 s and beam extraction of hydrogen species at various beam voltages ranging between 19 kV and 56 kV. Breakdown free beam extraction could be secured only after about 3000 beam second extraction. The ion source is capable of delivering 1.7 MW of neutral beam power at 55 kV with horizontal and vertical focal length of 5.4 m and 7 m respectively. Beam divergence is ∼0.97 deg. Steady-state beam energy of 31 MJ at 41 kV was achieved during 14 s long beam extraction. We have not noticed any deterioration of beam parameters, including beam divergence during long pulse operation. These results indicate that 0.5 MW of neutral beam power at 30 kV required for heating of plasma in SST-1 can be delivered.

  13. Novel neutralized-beam intense neutron source for fusion technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osher, J.E.; Perkins, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a neutralized-beam intense neutron source (NBINS) as a relevant application of fusion technology for the type of high-current ion sources and neutral beamlines now being developed for heating and fueling of magnetic-fusion-energy confinement systems. This near-term application would support parallel development of highly reliable steady-state higher-voltage neutral D 0 and T 0 beams and provide a relatively inexpensive source of fusion neutrons for materials testing at up to reactor-like wall conditions. Beam-target examples described incude a 50-A mixed D-T total (ions plus neutrals) space-charge-neutralized beam at 120 keV incident on a liquid Li drive-in target, or a 50-A T 0 + T + space-charge-neutralized beam incident on either a LiD or gas D 2 target with calculated 14-MeV neutron yields of 2 x 10 15 /s, 7 x 10 15 /s, or 1.6 x 10 16 /s, respectively. The severe local heat loading on the target surface is expected to limit the allowed beam focus and minimum target size to greater than or equal to 25 cm 2

  14. Performance of a modified DuoPIGatron ion source for PLT neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.

    1978-09-01

    The performance of a modified duoPIGatron ion source for PLT neutral beam injectors is described. The 22-cm source has been operated to deliver beams of 70 A, up to 45 keV, and 0.5 sec. Following a brief review of source operation, the dominant reactions leading to an enhanced atomic ion fraction in the source plasma are emphasized. In addition to the high atomic ion species yield (about 85%), other important characteristics of the source such as high arc efficiency (about 1.1 A ion beam current per kW of arc power), long filament lifetime, high reliability, and scalability are also described

  15. Operating characteristics of a new ion source for KSTAR neutral beam injection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Chang, Doo-Hee; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang-Ryul

    2014-02-01

    A new positive ion source for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research neutral beam injection (KSTAR NBI-1) system was designed, fabricated, and assembled in 2011. The characteristics of the arc discharge and beam extraction were investigated using hydrogen and helium gas to find the optimum operating parameters of the arc power, filament voltage, gas pressure, extracting voltage, accelerating voltage, and decelerating voltage at the neutral beam test stand at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2012. Based on the optimum operating condition, the new ion source was then conditioned, and performance tests were primarily finished. The accelerator system with enlarged apertures can extract a maximum 65 A ion beam with a beam energy of 100 keV. The arc efficiency and optimum beam perveance, at which the beam divergence is at a minimum, are estimated to be 1.0 A/kW and 2.5 uP, respectively. The beam extraction tests show that the design goal of delivering a 2 MW deuterium neutral beam into the KSTAR Tokamak plasma is achievable.

  16. Modified source of a fast neutral atom beam with a controlled energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gostev, V.A.; Elakhovskij, D.V.; Khakhaev, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    A source of a metastable helium atom beam with a controlled energy based on a phenomenon of resonant ion neutralization on the surface of a solid body is described. The neutral particle energy control is carried out by changing ion velocities before their transformation into metastable atoms. The results of experiments with a modified construction of atomic beam source are stated. These experiments were conducted to find the possibilities to control velocities of atoms in a flow as well as to elucidate the peculiarities of operation of a collimator-converter of this construction. Dependences of a halfwidth of the ion velocity distribution function on the ion source parameters have been investigated. The possibility for particle energy control in a collimated flow of fast neutral. atoms has been experimentally shown, it is also shown that a mean value of atom energy in a beam coincides with a value of mean energy of ions from which atoms are produced by the resonant neutralization method; the construction of the source provides the possibility to realize the method of ''overtaking beams'' for neutral atoms and as a result of this to give a possibility for studying atom-atom collisions in a wide energy range at relatively high densities of flows

  17. Microwave plasma source for neutral-beam injection systems. Quarterly technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The overall program is described and the technical and programmatic reasons for the decision to pursue both the RFI and ECH sources into the current hydrogen test stage is discussed. We consider the general characteristics of plasma sources in the parameter regime of interest for neutral beam applications. The operatonal characteristics, advantages and potential problems of RFI and ECH sources are discussed. In these latter two sections we rely heavily on experience derived from developing RFI and ECH ion engine sources for NASA

  18. Development of ion source with a washer gun for pulsed neutral beam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kajiya, H; Takahashi, T; Imanaka, H; Takase, Y; Ono, Y; Sato, K N

    2008-06-01

    A new type of economical neutral beam source has been developed by using a single washer gun, pulsed operation, and a simple electrode system. We replaced the conventional hot filaments for arc-discharge-type plasma formation with a single stainless-steel washer gun, eliminating the entire dc power supply for the filaments and the cooling system for the electrodes. Our initial experiments revealed successful beam extraction up to 10 kV and 8.6 A, based on spatial profile measurements of density and temperature in the plasma source. The system also shows the potential to control the beam profile by controlling the plasma parameters in the ion accumulation chamber.

  19. Power supply for the LBL 40 keV neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.R.; Fitzgerald, M.L.; Honey, V.J.

    1975-11-01

    A 20 keV, 50 Amp, 10 millisec pulse D 0 Neutral Beam Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory that serves as the prototype for 12 similar sources now in operation on the 2XIIB Mirror Machine at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has been recently upgraded to operate at 40 keV. The system of electronically regulated and controlled power supplies that drive the Source is described

  20. All solid state high voltage power supply for neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    The conceptual design of a high frequency solid state, high power, high voltage, power system that reacts fast enough to be compatible with the requirements of a neutral beam source is presented. The system offers the potential of significant advantages over conventional power line frequency systems; such as high reliability, long life, relatively little maintenance requirements, compact size and modular design

  1. The diagnostic neutral beam injector with arc-discharge plasma source on the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpushov, Alexander N. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: alexander.karpushov@epfl.ch; Andrebe, Yanis; Duval, Basil P.; Bortolon, Alessandro [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-06-15

    The diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNBI) together with a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system has been used on the TCV Tokamak as a diagnostic tool for local measurements of plasma ion temperature, velocity and carbon impurity density based on analysis of the beam induced impurity radiation emission since 2000. To improve the performance of the CXRS diagnostic, several upgrades of both the optical system and the neutral beam were performed. An increase of the plasma source size together with beam optimization in 2003 resulted in a twofold increase the beam current. The RF plasma generator was replaced by an arc-discharge plasma source together with a new ion optical system (IOS) in 2006 and subsequent beam optimization is presented herein. This was designed to increase the line brightness of the beam in the CXRS observation region without increasing of the injected power (to avoid plasma perturbation by the beam). The beam characteristics are measured by a multi-chord scanning of Doppler-shifted H{sub {alpha}} emission, thermal measurements on a movable calorimeter and visible optical measurements inside the Tokamak vessel.

  2. Development of a 1-m plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Grant Logan, B.

    2005-05-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ˜0.1-1 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. A radio frequency (RF) source was constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization. Pulsing the source enabled operation at pressures ˜10 -6 Torr with plasma densities of 10 11 cm -3. Near 100% ionization was achieved. The plasma was 10 cm in length, but future experiments require a source 1 m long. The RF source does not easily scale to the length. Consequently, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. A 1 m long section of the drift tube inner surface of NTX will be covered with ceramic. A high voltage (˜1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. Plasma densities of 10 12 cm -3 and neutral pressures ˜10 -6 Torr are expected. A test stand to produce 20 cm long plasma is being constructed and will be tested before a 1 m long source is developed.

  3. Development of a 1-m plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Grant Logan, B.

    2005-01-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length ∼0.1-1 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. A radio frequency (RF) source was constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization. Pulsing the source enabled operation at pressures ∼10 -6 Torr with plasma densities of 10 11 cm -3 . Near 100% ionization was achieved. The plasma was 10 cm in length, but future experiments require a source 1 m long. The RF source does not easily scale to the length. Consequently, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO 3 to form metal plasma. A 1 m long section of the drift tube inner surface of NTX will be covered with ceramic. A high voltage (∼1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. Plasma densities of 10 12 cm -3 and neutral pressures ∼10 -6 Torr are expected. A test stand to produce 20 cm long plasma is being constructed and will be tested before a 1 m long source is developed

  4. Engineering issues of a 1000 S neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, P.K.; Jana, M.R.; Bisai, N.; Bajpai, M.; Singh, N.P.; Baruah, U.K.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakrapani, C.; Patel, D.; Patel, G.B.; Patel, P.J.; Prahlad, V.; Rao, N.V.M.; Rotti, C.; Sreedhar, V.; Mattoo, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the engineering features incorporated in the mechanical and the electrical design of the ion source for 1000 S pulse length operation. The design has made extensive use of the finite element analysis code ANSYS, for simulating the thermal and electrical features. In this paper, erosion of the grids is discussed in Section II, the new engineering features of the back panel in Section III, the electric design of the stress shields in Section IV and a summary recommendation for the operational parameters in Section V. (author)

  5. Protection and fault detection for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, D.B.; Baker, W.R.; Berkner, K.H.; Ehlers, K.W.; Honey, V.J.; Lietzke, A.F.; Milnes, K.A.; Owren, H.M.

    1979-11-01

    Testing of TFTR neutral beam (NB) sources has begun at the LBL Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). Operation at 120 kV, 65 A, 0.5 sec should be achieved soon. Because NB sources spark down frequently during conditioning, the main accelerating (accel) power supply must be interrupted within a few microseconds to avoid degrading the voltage holding capability, or even the damaging, of the NB source. A variety of improper magnitudes and/or ratios of voltages, currents, and times can occur and must be recognized as fault conditions in order to initiate a prompt interruption of the accel power supply. This paper discusses in detail the key signals which must be monitored and the manner in which they are processed in fault detector circuitry for safe operation of LBL NB sources. The paper also reviews the more standard interlocks and protective features recommended for these sources

  6. DISSOLVED OXYGEN REDUCTION IN THE DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM ION SOURCE COOLING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YIP, H.; BUSATH, J.; HARRISON, S.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Neutral beam ion sources (NBIS) are critical components for the neutral beam injection system supporting the DIII-D tokamak. The NBIS must be cooled with 3028 (ell)/m (800 gpm) of de-ionized and de-oxygenated water to protect the sources from overheating and failure. These ions sources are currently irreplaceable. Since the water cooled molybdenum components will oxidize in water almost instantaneously in the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO), de-oxygenation is extremely important in the NBIS water system. Under normal beam operation the DO level is kept below 5 ppb. However, during weeknights and weekends when neutral beam is not in operation, the average DO level is maintained below 10 ppb by periodic circulation with a 74.6 kW (100 hp) pump, which consumes significant power. Experimental data indicated evidence of continuous oxygen diffusion through non-metallic hoses in the proximity of the NBIS. Because of the intermittent flow of the cooling water, the DO concentration at the ion source(s) could be even higher than measured downstream, and hence the concern of significant localized oxidation/corrosion. A new 3.73 kW (5 hp) auxiliary system, installed in the summer of 2003, is designed to significantly reduce the peak and the time-average DO levels in the water system and to consume only a fraction of the power

  7. Detailed design of the RF source for the 1 MV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcuzzi, D.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pavei, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the EU activities for the development of the Neutral Beam Injector for ITER, the detailed design of the Radio Frequency (RF) driven negative ion source to be installed in the 1 MV ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) has been carried out. Results coming from ongoing R and D on IPP test beds [A. Staebler et al., Development of a RF-Driven Ion Source for the ITER NBI System, this conference] and the design of the new ELISE facility [B. Heinemann et al., Design of the Half-Size ITER Neutral Beam Source Test Facility ELISE, this conference] brought several modifications to the solution based on the previous design. An assessment was carried out regarding the Back-Streaming positive Ions (BSI+) that impinge on the back plates of the ion source and cause high and localized heat loads. This led to the redesign of most heated components to increase cooling, and to different choices for the plasma facing materials to reduce the effects of sputtering. The design of the electric circuit, gas supply and the other auxiliary systems has been optimized. Integration with other components of the beam source has been revised, with regards to the interfaces with the supporting structure, the plasma grid and the flexible connections. In the paper the design will be presented in detail, as well as the results of the analyses performed for the thermo-mechanical verification of the components.

  8. Applying neural networks to control the TFTR neutral beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagin, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of neural networks to the control of the neutral beam long-pulse positive ion source accelerators on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton University. Neural networks were used to learn how the operators adjust the control setpoints when running these sources. The data sets used to train these networks were derived from a large database containing actual setpoints and power supply waveform calculations for the 1990 run period. The networks learned what the optimum control setpoints should initially be set based uon desired accel voltage and perveance levels. Neural networks were also used to predict the divergence of the ion beam

  9. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in, E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  10. Design and fabrication of a large rectangular magnetic cusp plasma source for high intensity neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi, L.A.; Berkner, K.H.; Ehlers, K.W.; Paterson, J.A.; Porter, J.R.

    1979-11-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for a large, rectangular magnetic bucket plasma source are described. This source is compatible with the accelerator structures for the TFTR and DIII neutral-beam systems

  11. Beam divergence scaling in neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    One of the main considerations in the design of neutral beam injectors is to monimize the divergence of the primary ion beam and hence maximize the beam transport and minimize the input of thermal gas. Experimental measurements of the divergence of a cylindrical ion beam are presented and these measurements are used to analyze the major components of ion beam divergence, namely: space charge expansion, gas-ion scattering, emittance and optical aberrations. The implication of these divergence components in the design of a neutral beam injector system is discussed and a method of maximizing the beam current is described for a given area of source plasma

  12. Ion trajectories of the MFTF unshielded 80-keV neutral-beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, R.C.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cutler, T.A.; Foote, J.H.; Horvath, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The trajectories of ions from the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) 80-keV neutral-beam sources are calculated to obtain a preliminary understanding of the ion-beam paths and the magnitude of the power densities. This information will be needed for locating and designing thermal (kinetic-energy) absorbers for the ions. The calculations are made by employing a number of previously written computer codes. The TIBRO code is used to calculate the trajectories of the ions in the fringe magnetic field of the MFTF machine, which can operate with a center-field intensity of up to 2 T. The SAMPP code gives three-dimensional views of the ion beams for better visualization of the ion-beam paths. Also used are the codes MIG, XPICK, and MERGE, which were all previously written for manipulating data

  13. Mechanical properties considerations for use of epoxy insulators and bonded joints in neutral beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Trester, P.W.; Staley, H.G.

    1981-10-01

    In the Doublet III (D-III) neutral beam injectors, cast, rigid-epoxy insulators are joined to the AISI 304 stainless steel corona rings with semi-rigid epoxy adhesive. Selected mechanical properties of these materials were measured between 11 0 C and 65 0 C, well below the material temperature limits, to identify the trends and to confirm adequate mechanical strength for the insulators. Significant creep deformation was measured at 22 0 C. Empirical relationships were developed to predict long term strain over a range of stress and temperature of design interest. Delayed failure was observed in bonded specimens at stress levels well below the ultimate strength. In order to protect the D-III neutral beam ion source epoxy from elevated temperature effects, a chill was installed in the cooling water circuit. Outgassing measurements of the insulator epoxy were made and found to be low and primarily H 2 O

  14. Neutral beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A neutral beam generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange partially neutralizes the high energy beam, is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are identified. (U.K.)

  15. Numerical simulation for the accelerator of the KSTAR neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Seung Ho; In, Sang Ryul

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments with a prototype long-pulse, high-current ion source being developed for the neutral beam injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research have shown that the accelerator grid assembly needs a further upgrade to achieve the final goal of 120keV/65A for the deuterium ion beam. The accelerator upgrade concept was determined theoretically by simulations using the IGUN code. The simulation study was focused on finding parameter sets that raise the optimum perveance as large as possible and reduce the beam divergence as low as possible. From the simulation results, it was concluded that it is possible to achieve this goal by sliming the plasma grid (G1), shortening the second gap (G2-G3), and adjusting the G2 voltage ratio.

  16. The development of the radio frequency driven negative ion source for neutral beam injectors (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2012-01-01

    Large and powerful negative hydrogen ion sources are required for the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems of future fusion devices. Simplicity and maintenance-free operation favors RF sources, which are developed intensively at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP) since many years. The negative hydrogen ions are generated by caesium-enhanced surface conversion of atoms and positive ions on the plasma grid surface. With a small scale prototype the required high ion current density and the low fraction of co-extracted electrons at low pressure as well as stable pulses up to 1 h could be demonstrated. The modular design allows extension to large source dimensions. This has led to the decision to choose RF sources for the NBI of the international fusion reactor, ITER. As an intermediate step towards the full size ITER source at IPP, the development will be continued with a half-size source on the new ELISE testbed. This will enable to gain experience for the first time with negative hydrogen ion beams from RF sources of these dimensions.

  17. Study on the cathode of ion source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigeru

    1983-08-01

    Durability of the cathode is an important problem in developing a high power long pulse ion source for neutral beam injector. The Purpose of this study is to develope a long life cathode and investigate the applicability of it to the source. Directly heated filaments which are commonly used as the cathode of injector source do not live very long in general. In the present work, an indirectly heated hollow cathode made of impregnated porous tungsten tube is proposed as the alternative of the directly heated cathode. At first, we fabricated a small hollow cathode to study the discharge characteristcs in a bell-jar configuration and to apply it to a duoPIGatron hydrogen ion source. The experiment showed that the gas flow rate for sustaining the stable arc discharge in the discharge chamber becomes higher than that when the filament cathode is used. To solve this problem, an experiment for gas reduction was made using a newly fabricated larger hollow cathode and a magnetic multi-pole ion source. The influence of the orifice diameter, the effect of a button and of magnetic field on the gas flow rate were experimentally studied and a method for gas reduction was found. In addition, effect of the magnetic field on the characteristics of the hollow cathode ion source was examined in detail and an optimum field configuration around the cathode was found. Finally, beam extraction from an intensively cooled hollow cathode ion source for up to 10 sec was successfully carried out. (author)

  18. Development of the High Current Ion Source for Neutral Beam Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hun Ju; Kim, S. H.; Jang, D. H. [Jae Ju University, Jaeju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    The scope of the 1st year research is to design an 140keV deuterium ion source which has a beam current of 30-40A. According to the collected data, the model of an ion source for NBI of KSTAR was established. The negative ion source, which has good neutralization effecting in high energy, was selected. To generate a plasma, the thoriated tungsten filament was adopted. To increase the efficiency of plasma, the multi cusp type magnetic field was attached. The magnetic field was calculated by POISSON code. The extraction structure was designed with EGUN code, to extract the high quality ion beam. The design of a high current ion source for NBI was carried out. To develop the high current ion source with the high operational stability and the long lifetime, the parameters including an arc current, gas pressure and extraction voltage should be optimized. If designed ion source would be fabricated, its parameters could be optimized experimentally. Through the optimization of the ion source parameter, the core technology for NBI is established and the experiment of current drive in the fusion device can be performed. This technology also can be applied to the synthesis of new material and semiconductor industry. 18 refs., 11 tabs., 19 figs. (author)

  19. ORNL positive ion neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Haselton, H.H.; Barber, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G. G. Kelley and O. B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this Laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design

  20. Design of the 'half-size' ITER neutral beam source for the test facility ELISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, B.; Falter, H.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Gutser, R.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D.; Agostinetti, P.; Jiang, T.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the radio frequency driven negative hydrogen ion source developed at IPP in Garching was chosen by the ITER board as the new reference source for the ITER neutral beam system. In order to support the design and the commissioning and operating phases of the ITER test facilities ISTF and NBTF in Padua, IPP is presently constructing a new test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment). ELISE will be operated with the so-called 'half-size ITER source' which is an intermediate step between the present small IPP RF sources (1/8 ITER size) and the full size ITER source. The source will have approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular concept with 4 drivers will allow an easy extrapolation to the full ITER size with 8 drivers. Pulsed beam extraction and acceleration up to 60 kV (corresponding to pre-acceleration voltage of SINGAP) is foreseen. The aim of the design of the ELISE source and extraction system was to be as close as possible to the ITER design; it has however some modifications allowing a better diagnostic access as well as more flexibility for exploring open questions. Therefore one major difference compared to the source of ITER, NBTF or ISTF is the possible operation in air. Specific requirements for RF sources as found on IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU are implemented [A. Staebler, et al., Development of a RF-driven ion source for the ITER NBI system, SOFT Conference 2008, Fusion Engineering and Design, 84 (2009) 265-268].

  1. Commercialization of a high energy neutral beam ion source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This final report summarizes the effort and presents the results of a Phase II fabrication effort to build an industrial prototype of the LBL developed high energy neutral beam source. The effort was primarily concentrated on incorporating hard vacuum dielectric seals and a ceramic high voltage accelerator insulator. Several other design changes were incorporated for cost, reliability or life improvements to include: (1) accelerator grid locating dowel pins to aid final alignment, (2) plasma source to accelerator captive fasteners to aid filament replacement during source maintenance, (3) molybdenum cooling tubes on all accelerator grids, (4) additional fasteners in the plasma generator to facilitate hard seals, (5) modified suppressor grid rails and holders to simplify final grid alignment, (6) adjusting screws on exit grid rail holders to simplify final grid alignment, (7) addition of adjusting screws to the grid end pieces to simplify alignment, and (8) addition of accelerator hat shims to allow two different grid positioning locations

  2. Commercialization of a high energy neutral beam ion source. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-21

    This final report summarizes the effort and presents the results of a Phase II fabrication effort to build an industrial prototype of the LBL developed high energy neutral beam source. The effort was primarily concentrated on incorporating hard vacuum dielectric seals and a ceramic high voltage accelerator insulator. Several other design changes were incorporated for cost, reliability or life improvements to include: (1) accelerator grid locating dowel pins to aid final alignment, (2) plasma source to accelerator captive fasteners to aid filament replacement during source maintenance, (3) molybdenum cooling tubes on all accelerator grids, (4) additional fasteners in the plasma generator to facilitate hard seals, (5) modified suppressor grid rails and holders to simplify final grid alignment, (6) adjusting screws on exit grid rail holders to simplify final grid alignment, (7) addition of adjusting screws to the grid end pieces to simplify alignment, and (8) addition of accelerator hat shims to allow two different grid positioning locations.

  3. Ionization, charge exchange, and secondary electron emission in the extractor of an LBL/LLL neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.; McDowell, C.E.

    1975-01-01

    Using a computer code, bombardment of the electrodes resulting from ionization, charge-exchange, and back-ion emission from the neutralizer cell is studied in the positive-ion extractor region of a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL/LLL) neutral beam source. Ion and electron trajectories are presented, grid dissipations estimated, and proposals made for future designs

  4. Manufacturing of the full size prototype of the ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector – The SPIDER beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavei, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.pavei@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Boilson, Deirdre [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bonicelli, Tullio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Boury, Jacques [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Bush, Michael [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Ceracchi, Andrea; Faso, Diego [CECOM S.r.l., Via Tiburtina – Guidonia Montecelio, Roma (Italy); Graceffa, Joseph [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Heinemann, Bernd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Hemsworth, Ronald [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lievin, Christophe [Thales Electron Devices, Velizy Villacoublay (France); Marcuzzi, Diego [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Masiello, Antonio [Fusion for Energy, C/Joseph Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Sczepaniak, Bernd [Galvano-T GmbH, T, Raiffeisenstraße 8, 51570 Windeck (Germany); Singh, Mahendrajit [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Toigo, Vanni; Zaccaria, Pierluigi [Consorzio RFX, C.so Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Negative ion sources are key components of neutral beam injectors for nuclear fusion. • The SPIDER experiment aims to optimize the negative ion source of MITICA and HNB. • The SPIDER Beam Source manufacturing is currently on-going. • Manufacturing and assembling technological issues encountered are presented. - Abstract: In ITER, each heating neutral beam injector (HNB) will deliver about 16.5 MW heating power by accelerating a 40 A deuterium negative ion beam up to the energy of 1 MeV. The ions are generated inside a caesiated negative ion source, where the injected H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} is ionized by a radio frequency electromagnetic field. The SPIDER test bed, currently being manufactured, is going to be the ion source test facility for the full size ion source of the HNBs and of the diagnostic neutral beam injector of ITER. The SPIDER beam source comprises an ion source with 8 radio-frequency drivers and a three-grid system, providing an overall acceleration up to energies of about 100 keV [1]. SPIDER represents a substantial step forward between the half ITER size ion source, which is currently being tested at the ELISE test bed in IPP-Garching, and the negative ion sources to be used on ITER, in terms of layout, dimensions and operating parameters. The SPIDER beam source will be housed inside a vacuum vessel which will be equipped with a beam dump and a graphite diagnostic calorimeter. The manufacturing design of the main parts of the SPIDER beam source has been completed and many of the tests on the prototypes have been successfully passed. The most complex parts, from the manufacturing point of view, of the ion source and the accelerator, developed by galvanic deposition of copper are being manufactured. The manufacturing phase will be completed within 2015, when the assembly of the device will start at the PRIMA site, in Padova (I). The paper describes the status of the procurement, the adaptations operated on the design of the beam

  5. Neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the beam injection program for the Doublet-3 device is discussed. The design considerations for the beam line and design parameters for the Doublet-3 ion souce are given. Major components of the neutral beam injector system are discussed in detail. These include the neutralizer, magnetic shielding, reflecting magnets, vacuum system, calorimeter and beam dumps, and drift duct. The planned location of the two-injector system for Doublet-3 is illustrated and site preparation is considered. The status of beamline units 1 and 2 and the future program schedule are discussed

  6. Bunched beam neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammel, G.M.; Maschke, A.W.; Mobley, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    One of the steps involved in producing an intense ion beam from conventional accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) is beam bunching. To maintain space charge neutralized transport, neutralization must occur more quickly as the beam bunches. It has been demonstrated at BNL that a 60 mA proton beam from a 750 kV Cockcroft--Walton can be neutralized within a microsecond. The special problem in HIF is that the neutralization must occur in a time scale of nanoseconds. To study neutralization on a faster time scale, a 40 mA, 450 kV proton beam was bunched at 16 MHz. A biased Faraday cup sampled the bunched beam at the position where maximum bunching was nominally expected, about 2.5 meters from the buncher. Part of the drift region, about 1.8 meters, was occupied by a series of Gabor lenses. In addition to enhancing beam transport by transverse focussing, the background cloud of electrons in the lenses provided an extra degree of neutralization. With no lens, the best bunch factor was at least 20. Bunch factor is defined here as the ratio of the distance between bunches to the FWHM bunch length. With the lens, it was hoped that the increased plasma frequency would decrease the neutralization time and cause an increase in the bunch factor. In fact, with the lens, the instantaneous current increased about three times, but the bunch factor dropped to about 10. Even with the lens, the FWHM of the bunches at the position of maximum bunching was still comparable to or less than the oscillation period of the surrounding electron plasma. Thus, the electron density in the lens must increase before neutralization could be effective in this case, or bunching should be done at a lower frequency

  7. Long-pulse neutral beam power supply system for LBL 20 kV, 10 A sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honey, V.J.; Baker, W.R.; Fitzgerald, M.L.

    1976-05-01

    A description is given of the power supplies and control system for the LBL 20 kV, 10 A, 10 sec long-pulse neutral beam source test facility, now in operation. Such sources are used in a number of existing and planned fusion power experiments

  8. Report on the engineering test of the LBL 30 second neutral beam source for the MFTF-B project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, M.C.; Pincosy, P.A.; Hauck, C.A.; Pyle, R.V.

    1984-08-01

    Positive ion based neutral beam development in the US has centered on the long pulse, Advanced Positive Ion Source (APIS). APIS eventually focused on development of 30 second sources for MFTF-B. The Engineering Test was part of competitive testing of the LBL and ORNL long pulse sources carried out for the MFTF-B Project. The test consisted of 500 beam shots with 80 kV, 30 second deuterium, and was carried out on the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF). This report summarizes the results of LBL testing, in which the LBL APIS demonstrated that it would meet the requirements for MFTF-B 30 second sources. In part as a result of this test, the LBL design was found to be suitable as the baseline for a Common Long Pulse Source design for MFTF-B, TFTR, and Doublet Upgrade

  9. ITER Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato

    1991-03-01

    A Japanese design proposal of the ITER Neutral Beam Injection System (NBS) which is consistent with the ITER common design requirements is described. The injection system is required to deliver a neutral deuterium beam of 75MW at 1.3MeV to the reactor plasma and utilized not only for plasma heating but also for current drive and current profile control. The injection system is composed of 9 modules, each of which is designed so as to inject a 1.3MeV, 10MW neutral beam. The most important point in the design is that the injection system is based on the utilization of a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source which can produce an intense negative ion beam with high current density at a low source operating pressure. The design value of the source is based on the experimental values achieved at JAERI. The utilization of the cesium-seeded volume source is essential to the design of an efficient and compact neutral beam injection system which satisfies the ITER common design requirements. The critical components to realize this design are the 1.3MeV, 17A electrostatic accelerator and the high voltage DC acceleration power supply, whose performances must be demonstrated prior to the construction of ITER NBI system. (author)

  10. Neutral beam development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staten, H.S.

    1980-08-01

    The national plan is presented for developing advanced injection systems for use on upgrades of existing experiments, and use on future facilities such as ETF, to be built in the late 1980's or early 90's where power production from magnetic fusion will move closer to a reality. Not only must higher power and longer pulse length systems be developed , but they must operate reliably; they must be a tool for the experimenter, not the experiment itself. Neutral beam systems handle large amounts of energy and as such, they often are as complicated as the plasma physics experiment itself. This presents a significant challenge to the neutral beam developer

  11. Development of a high-current ion source with slit beam extraction for neutral beam injector of VEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Bong-ki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr; An, Young-Hwa; Park, Jong-Yoon; Hwang, Y.S.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A high-current ion source is developed for NBI system of VEST. • A cold-cathode electron gun is employed to produce primary electrons. • A hemi-cylindrical discharge chamber with cusp magnetic field is used. • Plasma density is measured to be 2 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} near the extraction aperture. • NBI power of 90 kW with beam energy of 20 keV is expected to be achieved. - Abstract: A high-current pulsed ion source has been developed for the neutral beam injector of the VEST (Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus) to accommodate high-beta fusion plasma experiments. The ion source consists of two parts: an electron gun for supplying sufficient primary electrons by cold-cathode arc discharge and a hemi-cylindrical discharge chamber where uniform, high-density plasma generated by the primary electrons is confined by multi-cusp magnetic field. A pulse forming network is also developed to drive high current of ∼1 kA to sustain the cold-cathode discharge in the electron gun up to 10 ms. Diagnostics with a triple probe in the discharge chamber shows that a hydrogen plasma whose density is as high as 1 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} can be obtained near extraction slits at the gas pressure lower than 0.5 Pa. This value is estimated to be sufficient to deposit a heating power of 90 kW to the VEST plasma when the appropriate extraction through slits with 20 cm{sup 2} in area and acceleration of ion beams up to 20 kV are fulfilled.

  12. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Akerman, M.A.; Becraft, W.R.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to prouce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applicatiosn in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions effeciently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summariezed. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Design considerations for a negative ion source for dc operation of high-power, multi-megaelectron-volt neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Akerman, M.A.; Becraft, W.R.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A dc negative hydrogen and/or deuterium ion source is needed to produce high-power, high-energy neutral beams for alpha diagnostics and current drive applications in fusion devices. The favorable beam particle energy for such applications extends to 1.5 MeV/amu. Continuous-wave (cw) radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators have been proposed to accelerate negative ions efficiently to this energy range. In this paper, the desired beam properties for ion beams injected into cw RFQ accelerators are summarized. A number of candidate ion sources being developed at Culham, JAERI, LBL, and ORNL may prove useful for these applications. The properties of the Volume Ionization with Transverse Extraction (VITEX) ion sources being developed at ORNL are presented. Scaling such a dc ion source to produce ampere beams is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Neutral beams for mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An important demonstration of negative ion technology is proposed for FY92 in the MFTF-α+T, an upgrade of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This facility calls for 200-keV negative ions to form neutral beams that generate sloshing ions in the reactor end plugs. Three different beam lines are considered for this application. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  15. Overcurrent protection for the TFTR neutral beam sources during spark down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    The accelerating grid of a neutral beam source (NBS) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) operates at 120 kV and 65 A. The capacitance to ground between the switch tube (ST) and the NBS is C 1 approx. 5 nF (approx. 36 J). The arc and filament power supplies for the NBS float at 120 kV and have a capacitance to ground of C 2 approx. 2 nF (approx. 14 J). When the NBS sparks to ground, C 2 begins to discharge immediately. The ST impedance limits the fault current from the high voltage (HV) power supply to approx. 100 A until it disconnects the power source 1 begins to discharge. During spark down, fault currents are limited with a saturated time-delay transformer (STDT) connected between the ST and the NBS and with a snubber, which is in the arc and filament power leads, in connection with a spark gap. Alternatively, STDT's can be used for the HV and for the arc and filament power leads. This paper presents design details and experimental results of the overcurrent protection circuits

  16. Characteristics of a long-pulse (30-s), high-power (4-MW) ion source for neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state ion source has been developed for neutral beam injection applications. It is of the duoPIGatron type designed for delivering 50 A of hydrogen ions at 80 keV for 30-s-long pulses. Ion beams of 40 A at 75 keV were extracted for pulse lengths up to 30 s, maintaining excellent optical quality in the beam for the entire pulse duration. The design features and operational characteristics of the ion source are elaborated

  17. ITER neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, P.L.; Di Pietro, E.; Bayetti, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Neutral Beam (NB) system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has reached a high degree of integration with the tokamak and with the rest of the plant. Operational requirements and maintainability have been considered in the design. The paper considers the integration with the tokamak, discusses design improvements which appear necessary and finally notes R and D progress in key areas. (author)

  18. PLT neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) neutral beam injection system is given and its performance characteristics are outlined. A detailed operational procedure is included, as are some tips on troubleshooting. Proper operation of the source is shown to be a crucial factor in system performance

  19. Control system for 5 MW neutral beam ion source for SST1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, G. B.; Onali, Raja; Sharma, Vivek; Suresh, S.; Tripathi, V.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Singh, N. P.; Thakkar, Dipal; Gupta, L. N.; Singh, M. J.; Patel, P. J.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Baruah, U. K.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the control system for a 5MW ion source of the NBI (neutral beam injector) for steady-state superconducting tokamak-1 (SST-1). The system uses both hardware and software solutions. It comprises a DAS (data acquisition system) and a control system. The DAS is used to read the voltage and current signals from eight filament heater power supplies and 24 discharge power supplies. The control system is used to adjust the filament heater current in order to achieve an effective control on the discharge current in the plasma box. The system consists of a VME (Verse Module Eurocard) system and C application program running on a VxWorks™ real-time operating system. A PID (proportional, integral, and differential) algorithm is used to control the filament heater current. Experiments using this system have shown that the discharge current can be controlled within 1% accuracy for a PID loop time of 20ms. Response of the control system to the pressure variation of the gas in the chamber has also been studied and compared with the results obtained from those of an uncontrolled system. The present approach increases the flexibility of the control system. It not only eases the control of the plasma but also allows an easy changeover to various operation scenarios.

  20. ORNL neutral-beam program in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.

    1982-12-01

    This report was presented at the ion source workshop held at Culham Laboratory, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, in 1978. Because the proceedings of that conference are unavailable, and because the material in this report is still not to be found elsewhere, it is issued as a laboratory report. The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G.G. Kelley and O.B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design

  1. Plasma neutralizers for H- or D- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.; Pyle, R.V.; Savas, S.E.; Stalder, K.R.

    1980-10-01

    Plasma neutralizers can produce higher conversion efficiencies than are obtainable with gas neutralizers for the production of high-energy neutral beams from negative hydrogen ions. Little attention has been paid to experimental neutralizer studies because of the more critical problems connected with the development of negative-ion sources. With the prospect of accelerating ampere dc beams from extrapolatable ion sources some time next year, we are re-examining plasma neutralizers. Some basic considerations, two introductory experiments, and a next-step experiment are described

  2. Development of an ion source for long-pulse (30-s) neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a long-pulse positive ion source that has been designed to provide high brightness deuterium beams (divergence approx. = 0.25 0 rms, current density approx. = 0.15 A cm -2 ) of 40 to 45 A, at a beam energy of 80 keV, for pulse lengths up to 30 s. The design and construction of the ion source components are described with particular emphasis placed on the long-pulse cathode assembly and ion accelerator

  3. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described

  4. Plasma neutralizer for H- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    Neutralization of H - beams by a hydrogen plasma is discussed. Optimum target thickness and maximum neutralization efficiency as a function of the fraction of the hydrogen target gas ionized is calculated for different H - beam energies. Also, the variation of neutralization efficiency with respect to target thickness for different H - beam energies is computed. The dispersion of the neutralized beam by a magnetic field for different energies and different values of B . z is found. Finally, a type of plasma jet is proposed, which may be suitable for a compact H - neutralizer

  5. Neutral helium beam probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  6. Advanced design of positive-ion sources for neutral-beam applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguerat, E.F.; Haselton, H.H.; Menon, M.M.; Schechter, D.E.; Stirling, W.L.; Tsai, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The APIS ion source is being developed to meet a goal of producing ion beams of less than or equal to 200 keV, 100 A, with 10-30-s pulse lengths. In a continuing effort to advance the state of the art and to produce long pulse ion beams, APIS ion sources with grid dimensions of 10 x 25 cm, 13 x 43 cm, and 16 x 48 cm are being developed. In the past year, the 10- x 25-cm ion source has been operated to produce ion beams in excess of 100 keV for many seconds pulse length. An advanced design concept is being pursued with the primary objectives to improve radiation protection, reduce fabrication costs, and simplify maintenance. The source magnetic sheild will be designed as a vacuum enclosure to house all source components. The electrical insulation requirements of energy recovery are also considered. Because of the frequent maintenance requirements, the electron emitter assembly will be designed with a remote handling capability. A new accelerator design which incorporates the necessary neutron shielding and associated steering gimbal system is also described

  7. Neutral beam in ALVAND IIC tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghrannevisse, M.; Moradshahi, M.; Avakian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Neutral beams have a wide application in tokamak experiments. It used to heat; fuel; adjust electric potentials in plasmas and diagnose particles densities and momentum distributions. It may be used to sustain currents in tokamaks to extend the pulse length. A 5 KV; 500 mA ion source has been constructed by plasma physics group, AEOI and it used to produce plasma and study the plasma parameters. Recently this ion source has been neutralized and it adapted to a neutral beam source; and it used to heat a cylindrical DC plasma and the plasma of ALVAND IIC Tokamak which is a small research tokamak with a minor radius of 12.6 cm, and a major radius of 45.5 cm. In this paper we report the neutralization of the ion beam and the results obtained by injection of this neutral beam into plasmas. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs

  8. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S., E-mail: sargis@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M. [Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Prasad, R. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany); Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7-1NN (United Kingdom); Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, CEA, CNRS, University of Bordeaux, 33405 Talence (France)

    2016-02-15

    The scenario of “electron-capture and -loss” was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities.

  9. New source of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    The scenario of “electron-capture and -loss” was recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with MeV kinetic energies. However, it does not explain why the formation of negative ions in a liquid spray is much more efficient than with an isolated atom. The role of atomic excited states in the charge-exchange processes is considered, and it is shown that it cannot account for the observed phenomena. The processes are more complex than the single electron-capture and -loss approach. It is suggested that the shell effects in the electronic structure of the projectile ion and/or target atoms may influence the capture/loss probabilities

  10. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  11. Soviet exoatmospheric neutral particle beam research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiss, J.E.; Abrams, R.H.; Ehlers, K.W.; Farrell, J.A.; Gillespie, G.H.; Jameson, R.A.; Keefe, D.; Parker, R.K.

    1988-02-01

    This technical assessment was performed by a panel of eight U.S. scientists and engineers who are familiar with Soviet research through their own research experience, their knowledge of the published scientific literature and conference proceedings, and personal contacts with Soviet scientists and other foreign colleagues. Most of the technical components of a neutral particle beam generating system including the ion source, the accelerator, the accelerator radio frequency power supply, the beam conditioning and aiming system, and the beam neutralizer system are addressed. It does not address a number of other areas important to an exoatmospheric neutral beam system

  12. Neutral particle beam alternative concept for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.; Brook, J.; Luzzi, T.; Deutsch, L.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of an ITER neutral particle beam system is presented. The analysis covers the neutralizer, ion dumps, pumping, and geometric aspects. The US beam concept for ITER consists of three or four clusters of beamlines delivering approximately 80 MW total of 1.6-MeV deuterium to three or four reactor ports. Each cluster has three self-contained beamlines featuring plasma neutralizers and electrostatic ion dumps. In this study, each of the beamlines has two source assemblies with separate gas neutralizers and magnetic ion dumps. Deuterium is injected into the gas neutralizers by a separate system. Saddle-shaped copper coils augment the tokamak poloidal field to turn the charged particles into the ion dumps. The gas flow from the source, neutralizer, and ion dump is pumped by regenerable cryopanels. The effect of the port between the TF coils and the beam injection angle on the plasma footprint was studied

  13. TFTR neutral beam power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, A.; Murray, H.; Winje, R.

    1977-01-01

    The TFTR NB System will be composed of four beam lines, each containing three ion sources presently being developed for TFTR by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) will provide the necessary power required to operate these Ion Sources in both an experimental or operational mode as well as test mode. This paper describes the technical as well as the administrative/management aspects involved in the development and building of this system. The NBPS will combine the aspects of HV pulse (120 kV) and long pulse width (0.5 sec) together to produce a high power system that is unique in the Electrical Engineering field

  14. Neutral Beam Source and Target Plasma for Development of a Local Electric Field Fluctuation Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Rhodes, A. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A new diagnostic measuring local E-> (r , t) fluctuations is being developed for plasma turbulence studies in tokamaks. This is accomplished by measuring fluctuations in the separation of the π components in the Hα motional Stark spectrum. Fluctuations in this separation are expected to be Ẽ / ẼEMSE 10-3EMSE 10-3 . In addition to a high throughput, high speed spectrometer, the project requires a low divergence (Ω 0 .5°) , 80 keV, 2.5 A H0 beam and a target plasma test stand. The beam employs a washer-stack arc ion source to achieve a high species fraction at full energy. Laboratory tests of the ion source demonstrate repeatable plasmas with Te 10 eV and ne 1.6 ×1017 m-3, sufficient for the beam ion optics requirements. Te and ne scalings of the ion source plasma are presented with respect to operational parameters. A novel three-phase resonant converter power supply will provide 6 mA/cm2 of 80 keV H0 at the focal plane for pulse lengths up to 15 ms, with low ripple δV / 80 keV 0.05 % at 280 kHz. Diagnostic development and validation tests will be performed on a magnetized plasma test stand with 0.5 T field. The test chamber will utilize a washer-stack arc source to produce a target plasma comparable to edge tokamak plasmas. A bias-plate with programmable power supply will be used to impose Ẽ within the target plasma. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  15. Design of power supply system for the prototype RF-driven negative ion source for neutral beam injection application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Caichao; Hu, Chundong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Graduate school, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wei, Jianglong, E-mail: jlwei@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xie, Yahong; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Chen, Shiyong; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Yuanlai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A supporting power supply system was designed in details for a RF-driven prototype negative ion source at ASIPP. • The RF power supply for plasma generation adopts an all-solid-state power supply structure. • The extraction grid power supply adopts the pulse step modulator (PSM) technology. - Abstract: In order to study the generation and extraction of negative ions for neutral beam injection application, a prototype RF-driven negative ion source and the corresponding test bed are under construction at Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The target of the negative ion source is extracting a negation ion beam of 350 A/m{sup 2} for 3600 s plasma duration and 100 s beam duration. According to the required parameters of test bed, the design of power supply system is put forward for earlier study. In this paper, the performance requirements and design schemes of RF power supply for plasma generation, impedance matching network, bias voltage power supply, and extraction voltage power supply for negative beam extraction are introduced in details. The schemes provide a reference for the construction of power supply system and lay a foundation for the next phase of experimental operation.

  16. European contributions to the beam source design and R and D of the ITER neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massmann, P.; Bayetti, P.; Bucalossi, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reports on the progress made by the European Home Team in strong interaction with the ITER JCT and JAERI regarding several key aspects of the beam source for the ITER injectors: integration of the SINGAP accelerator into the ITER injector design. This is a substantially simpler concept than the MAMuG accelerator of the ITER NBI 'reference design', which has potential for significant cost savings, and which avoids some of the weaknesses of the reference design such as the need for intermediate high voltage potentials from the HV power supply and pressurised gas insulation; high energy negative ion acceleration using a SINGAP accelerator; long pulse (i.e. >1000 s) negative ion source operation in deuterium; RF source development, which could reduce the scheduled maintenance of the ITER injectors (as it uses no filaments), and simplify the transmission line and the auxiliary power supplies for the ion source. (author)

  17. European contributions to the beam source design and R and D of the ITER neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massmann, P.; Bayetti, P.; Bucalossi, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reports on the progress made by the European Home Team in strong interaction with the ITER JCT and JAERI regarding several key aspects of the beam source for the ITER injectors: integration of the SINGAP accelerator into the ITER injector design. This is a substantially simpler concept than the MAMuG accelerator of the ITER NBI 'reference design', which has potential for significant cost savings, and which avoids some of the weaknesses of the reference design such as the need for intermediate high voltage potentials from the HV power supply and pressurised gas insulation; high energy negative ion acceleration using a SINGAP accelerator; long pulse (i.e. >1000 s) negative ion source operation in deuterium; RF source development, which could reduce the scheduled maintenance of the ITER injectors (as it uses no filaments), and simplify the transmission line and the auxiliary power supplies for the ion source. (author)

  18. Control and data acquisition of the ITER full-scale ion source for the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, Adriano; Manduchi, Gabriele; Taliercio, Cesare; Paolucci, Francesco; Sartori, Filippo; Svensson, Lennart; Labate, Carmelo Vincenzo; Breda, Mauro; Capobianco, Roberto; Molon, Federico; Moressa, Modesto; Simionato, Paola; Zampiva, Enrico; Barbato, Paolo; Polato, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper describes the requirements and architecture of the control and data acquisition system of the ITER full-ion source experiment in the neutral beam test facility. • The system architecture integrates various popular software frameworks. • Slow control is based on the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) framework. • Fast control is based on the MARTe (Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor) framework. • Data acquisition is based on the MDSplus framework. - Abstract: The neutral beam test facility, which is under construction in Padova, Italy, is developing the ITER full-scale ion source for the ITER heating neutral beam injectors, referred to as the SPIDER experiment, and the full-size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The SPIDER control and data acquisition system (CODAS) has been developed and its construction will start in 2014. Slow control and data acquisition will be based on the ITER CODAC core system software suite that has been designed to facilitate the integration of ITER plant systems with CODAC. Fast control and data acquisition will use solutions specific to the test facility, as the corresponding concepts are not ready-to-use in the ITER design. The ITER hardware catalog for fast control has been taken into consideration. The software development will be based on the integration of MDSplus and MARTe, two framework software packages that are well known in the fusion community, targeting data organization and fast real-time control, respectively. The paper revises the system requirements and the system design and shows the results already achieved in terms of system integration. In addition, the paper will report the experience in the usage of different cooperating software frameworks and in the integration of industrial procured plant systems.

  19. Control and data acquisition of the ITER full-scale ion source for the neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, Adriano, E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Manduchi, Gabriele; Taliercio, Cesare [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy); Paolucci, Francesco; Sartori, Filippo [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Svensson, Lennart [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Labate, Carmelo Vincenzo [Association ENEA-CREATE, Department of Engineering, University of Naples “Parthenope” (Italy); Breda, Mauro; Capobianco, Roberto; Molon, Federico; Moressa, Modesto; Simionato, Paola; Zampiva, Enrico; Barbato, Paolo; Polato, Sandro [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Padova (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • This paper describes the requirements and architecture of the control and data acquisition system of the ITER full-ion source experiment in the neutral beam test facility. • The system architecture integrates various popular software frameworks. • Slow control is based on the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) framework. • Fast control is based on the MARTe (Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor) framework. • Data acquisition is based on the MDSplus framework. - Abstract: The neutral beam test facility, which is under construction in Padova, Italy, is developing the ITER full-scale ion source for the ITER heating neutral beam injectors, referred to as the SPIDER experiment, and the full-size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The SPIDER control and data acquisition system (CODAS) has been developed and its construction will start in 2014. Slow control and data acquisition will be based on the ITER CODAC core system software suite that has been designed to facilitate the integration of ITER plant systems with CODAC. Fast control and data acquisition will use solutions specific to the test facility, as the corresponding concepts are not ready-to-use in the ITER design. The ITER hardware catalog for fast control has been taken into consideration. The software development will be based on the integration of MDSplus and MARTe, two framework software packages that are well known in the fusion community, targeting data organization and fast real-time control, respectively. The paper revises the system requirements and the system design and shows the results already achieved in terms of system integration. In addition, the paper will report the experience in the usage of different cooperating software frameworks and in the integration of industrial procured plant systems.

  20. Possible neutral beam requirements for TFTR upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, B.A. Jr.; Little, R.; Post, D.E.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A discussion is provided of possible neutral beam requirements and constraints for a TFTR upgrade. The time scale is the early 80s and beams of 250 keV D 0 , probably using 65 ampere negative ion sources, existing power supplies and vacuum enclosures would be required

  1. Neutralization of an ion beam from the end-Hall ion source by a plasma electron source based on a discharge in crossed E × H fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostanko, A. P.; Golosov, D. A.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of using a plasma electron source (PES) with a discharge in crossed E × H field for compensating the ion beam from an end-Hall ion source (EHIS) is analyzed. The PES used as a neutralizer is mounted in the immediate vicinity of the EHIS ion generation and acceleration region at 90° to the source axis. The behavior of the discharge and emission parameters of the EHIS is determined for operation with a filament neutralizer and a plasma electron source. It is found that the maximal discharge current from the ion source attains a value of 3.8 A for operation with a PES and 4 A for operation with a filament compensator. It is established that the maximal discharge current for the ion source strongly depends on the working gas flow rate for low flow rates (up to 10 ml/min) in the EHIS; for higher flow rates, the maximum discharge current in the EHIS depends only on the emissivity of the PES. Analysis of the emission parameters of EHISs with filament and plasma neutralizers shows that the ion beam current and the ion current density distribution profile are independent of the type of the electron source and the ion current density can be as high as 0.2 mA/cm2 at a distance of 25 cm from the EHIS anode. The balance of currents in the ion source-electron source system is considered on the basis of analysis of operation of EHISs with various sources of electrons. It is concluded that the neutralization current required for operation of an ion source in the discharge compensation mode must be equal to or larger than the discharge current of the ion source. The use of PES for compensating the ion beam from an end-Hall ion source proved to be effective in processes of ion-assisted deposition of thin films using reactive gases like O2 or N2. The application of the PES technique makes it possible to increase the lifetime of the ion-assisted deposition system by an order of magnitude (the lifetime with a Ti cathode is at least 60 h and is limited by the

  2. Ion beam neutralization with ferroelectrically generated electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herleb, U; Riege, H [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). LHC Division

    1997-12-31

    A technique for ion beam space-charge neutralization with pulsed electron beams is described. The intensity of multiply-charged ions produced with a laser ion source can be enhanced or decreased separately with electron beam trains of MHz repetition rate. These are generated with ferroelectric cathodes, which are pulsed in synchronization with the laser ion source. The pulsed electron beams guide the ion beam in a similar way to the alternating gradient focusing of charged particle beams in circular accelerators such as synchrotrons. This new neutralization technology overcomes the Langmuir-Child space-charge limit and may in future allow ion beam currents to be transported with intensities by orders of magnitude higher than those which can be accelerated today in a single vacuum tube. (author). 6 figs., 10 refs.

  3. Modeling of the negative ions extraction from a hydrogen plasma source. Application to ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochalskyy, S.

    2011-12-01

    The development of a high performance negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of a Neutral Beam Injector of the future fusion reactor ITER. NI source should deliver 40 A of H - or of D - . To address this problem in a realistic way, a 3D particles-in-cell electrostatic collisional code was developed. Binary collisions between the particles are introduced using Monte-Carlo collision scheme. This code called ONIX was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of the charged particles close to a typical extraction aperture. Results obtained from this code are presented in this thesis. They include negative ions and electrons 3D trajectories. The ion and electron current density profiles are shown for different local magnetic field configurations. Results of production, destruction, and transport of H - in the extraction region are also presented. The production of H - is investigated via 3 atomic processes: 1) electron dissociative attachment to the vibrationally excited molecules H 2 (v) in the volume, 2) interaction of the positive ions H + and H 2 + with the aperture wall and 3) collisions of the neutral gas H, H 2 with aperture wall. The influence of each process on the total extracted NI current is discussed. The extraction efficiency of H - from the volume is compared to the one of H - coming from the wall. Moreover, a parametric study of the H - surface production is presented. Results show the role of sheath behavior in the vicinity of the aperture developing a double layer structure responsible of the NI extraction limitations. The 2 following issues are also analysed. First the influence of the external extracted potential value on the formation of negative sheath and secondly the strength of the magnetic filter on the total extracted NI and co-extracted electron current. The suppression of the electron beam by the negative ion produced at the plasma grid wall is also discussed. Results are in good agreement

  4. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A conceptual design of a neutral beam line based on the neutralization of negative deuterium ions is presented. This work is a detailed design of a complete neutral beam line based on using negative ions from a direct extraction source. Anticipating major technological advancements, beam line components have been scaled including the negative ion sources and components for the direct energy recovery of charged beams and high speed cryogenic pumping. With application to the next step in experimental fusion reactors (TNS), the neutral beam injector system that has been designed provides 10 MW of 200 keV neutral deuterium atoms. Several arms are required for plasma ignition

  5. Neutral-beam development plan, FY 1982-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) status of BNL negative ion source development, (2) source development program plan, (3) status of beam transport and acceleration, (4) accelerator development program plan, (5) neutralizer concepts, (6) neutralization program plan, (7) neutral beam systems, (8) test facilities, (9) program milestones and time schedules, (10) organization and Grumman participation, and (11) funding tables

  6. Merged neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwalder, Andreas [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute for Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    A detailed description of a merged beam apparatus for the study of low energy molecular scattering is given. This review is intended to guide any scientist who plans to construct a similar experiment, and to provide some inspiration in describing the approach we chose to our goal. In our experiment a supersonic expansion of paramagnetic particles is merged with one of polar molecules. A magnetic and an electric multipole guide are used to bend the two beams onto the same axis. We here describe in detail how the apparatus is designed, characterised, and operated. (orig.)

  7. Research on the character and development of the neutral beam injector RF negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Liang

    2011-01-01

    The RF source is now an interesting alternative to the reference design with filamented sources due to its maintenance-free operation. Extensive R and D work on RF-driven negative hydrogen ion sources carried out at IPP Garching led to the decision of ITER to select this type of source as the new reference source for the ITER NBI system.The work is progressing with three test beds: BATMAN, MANITU and RADI, which are being used to carry out different investigations in parallel. The experimental results show that the RF source equals or surpasses the ITER requirements. (authors)

  8. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  9. INTOR neutral beam injector concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, D.H.; Stewart, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The US INTOR phase 1 effort in the plasma heating area is described. Positive ion based sources extrapolated from present day technology are proposed. These sources operate at 175 keV beam energy for 6 s. Five injectors - plus one spare - inject 75 MW. Beam energy, source size, interface, radiation hardening, and many other studies are summarized

  10. Development of bucket ion source for JFT-2M neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takatoshi; Kazawa, Minoru; Yokoyama, Kenji; Shibuya, Toshihiro; Honda, Atsushi; Shiina, Tomio

    1987-02-01

    Detailed description is given of a new Bucket Ion Source for NBI heating experiments on JFT-2M. The source is designed to achieve the high proton ratio (∼ 80 %) as well as high power. Results of the performance test is also given. (author)

  11. ICAN: High power neutral beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustaizis, S.D.; Lalousis, P.; Perrakis, K.; Auvray, P.; Larour, J.; Ducret, J.E.; Balcou, P.

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years there is an increasing interest on the development of alternative high power new negative ion source for Tokamak applications. The proposed new neutral beam device presents a number of advantages with respect to: the density current, the acceleration voltage, the relative compact dimension of the negative ion source, and the coupling of a high power laser beam for photo-neutralization of the negative ion beam. Here we numerically investigate, using a multi- fluid 1-D code, the acceleration and the extraction of high power ion beam from a Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID). The diode configuration will be coupled to a high power device capable of extracting a current up to a few kA with an accelerating voltage up to MeV. An efficiency of up to 92% of the coupling of the laser beam, is required in order to obtain a high power, up to GW, neutral beam. The new high energy, high average power, high efficiency (up to 30%) ICAN fiber laser is proposed for both the plasma generation and the photo-neutralizer configuration. (authors)

  12. Neutralization principles for the Extraction and Transport of Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Riege, H

    2000-01-01

    The strict application of conventional extraction techniques of ion beams from a plasma source is characterized by a natural intensity limit determined by space charge.The extracted current may be enhanced far beyond this limit by neutralizing the space charge of the extracted ions in the first extraction gap of the source with electrons injected from the opposite side. The transverse and longitudinal emittances of a neutralized ion beam, hence its brightness, are preserved. Results of beam compensation experiments, which have been carried out with a laser ion source, are resumed for proposing a general scheme of neutralizing ion sources and their adjacent low-energy beam transport channels with electron beams. Many technical applications of high-mass ion beam neutralization technology may be identified: the enhancement of ion source output for injection into high-intensity, low-and high-energy accelerators, or ion thrusters in space technology, for the neutral beams needed for plasma heating of magnetic conf...

  13. Summary of fueling by neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    Injected neutral beams supply energy, particles, and momentum to a plasma, while the thermalizing fast ions also increase the fusion reactivity by beam-target or hot-ion reactions. Magnetic mirror machines take advantage of all of these features, with the exception of the momentum input. Neutral-beam injection into toroidal plasmas has been proposed and has so far been utilized mainly as a source of heat, and secondarily as a source of increased neutron production. Nevertheless, fueling by injected beams can also play an important role in toroidal plasmas, especially in the start-up phase of ignited plasmas, or for the quasi-steady maintenance of low-Q plasmas where the average ion energy may exceed the electron energy by a large factor

  14. SCR series switch and impulse crowbar at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for CTR neutral beam source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franck, J.V.; Arthur, A.A.; Brusse, L.A.; Low, W.

    1977-10-01

    The series switch is designed to operate at 120kV and pass 65A for 0.5 sec every 30 sec on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CTR Neutral Beam Source Test Stand IIIB. The series switch consists of 400 individual SCR circuits connected in series and is turned on by a simple system of cascaded pulse transformers with multiple single turn secondaries each driving the individual SCR gates. It is turned off by an SCR impulse crowbar that momentarily shorts the power supply allowing the series switch to recover. The SCR switch has been tested in the impulse crowbar configuration and will reliably commutate up to 90A at 120kV. The series switch and impulse crowbar are now in service in Test Stand IIIB. A series switch and impulse crowbar similar in concept is routinely powering a 10 x 10 cm source at 150kV, 20A, 0.5 sec with a 1% duty cycle on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CTR NSB Test Stand IIIA

  15. Multimegawatt neutral beams for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1979-03-01

    Most of the large magnetic confinement experiments today and in the near future use high-power neutral-beam injectors to heat the plasma. This review briefly describes this remarkable technique and summarizes recent results as well as near term expectations. Progress has been so encouraging that it seems probable that tokamaks will achieve scientific breakeven before 1990

  16. Design of the ITER Neutral Beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemsworth, R.S.; Feist, J.; Hanada, M.; Heinemann, B.; Inoue, T.; Kuessel, E.; Kulygin, V.; Krylov, A.; Lotte, P.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Murdoch, D.; Nagase, A.; Ohara, Y.; Okumura, Y.; Pamela, J.; Panasenkov, A.; Shibata, K.; Tanii, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed in Europe, Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D 0 to the ITER plasma for pulse length of ≥1000 s. The injectors each use a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D - . This will be neutralized in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H 0 and 2 MW D 0 neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed

  18. Reduction of gas flow into a hollow cathode ion source for a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, S.; Akiba, M.; Arakawa, Y.; Horiike, H.; Sakuraba, J.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the reduction of the gas flow rate into ion sources which utilize a hollow cathode. The electron emitter of the hollow cathode was a barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten tube. The hollow cathode was mounted to a circular or a rectangular bucket source and the following results were obtained. There was a tendency for the minimum gas flow rate for the stable source operation to decrease with increasing orifice diameter of the hollow cathode up to 10 mm. A molybdenum button with an appropriate diameter set in front of the orifice reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without button. An external magnetic field applied antiparallel to the field generated by the heater current stabilized the discharges and reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without field. Combination of the button and the antiparallel field reduced the minimum gas flow rate from the initial value (9.5 Torr 1/s) to 2.4 Torr 1/s. The reason for these effects was discussed on the basis of the theory for arc starvation

  19. Electrostatic probe diagnostics on the LBL 10 ampere neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1978-08-01

    The experimental results of electrostatic probe measurements on the LBL 10 ampere ion source are presented. Data is obtained via a pulsed acquisition system which digitally records a probe characteristic and its first and second derivatives. The latter are shown to be proportional to the projected electron energy distribution function, and the isotropic electron energy distribution function, respectively. System performance for distribution function measurement is compared to the established technique of harmonic analysis. A complete analysis of the data acquisition system and its experimental accuracy is presented

  20. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochalskyy, S; Wünderlich, D; Ruf, B; Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Minea, T

    2014-01-01

    The development of a large area (A source,ITER  = 0.9 × 2 m 2 ) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (A source,BATMAN  ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m 2 ) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child–Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion–ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated

  1. Development of KSTAR Neutral Beam Heating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B. H.; Song, W. S.; Yoon, B. J. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    The prototype components of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system have been developed for the KSTAR, and a capability of the manufactured components has been tested. High power ion source, acceleration power supply, other ion source power supplies, neutralizer, bending magnet for ion beam separation, calorimeter, and cryo-sorption pump have been developed by using the domestic technologies and tested for a neutral beam injection of 8 MW per beamline with a pulse duration of 300 seconds. The developed components have been continuously upgraded to achieve the design requirements. The development technology of high power and long pulse neutral beam injection system has been proved with the achievement of 5.2 MW output for a short pulse length and 1.6 MW output for a pulse length of 300 seconds. Using these development technologies, the domestic NB technology has been stabilized under the development of high power ion source, NB beamline components, high voltage and current power supplies, NB diagnostics, NB system operation and control.

  2. Neutral beams for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances in forming energetic beams of neutral hydrogen and deuterium atoms have led to a breakthrough in magnetic fusion: neutral beams are now heating plasmas to thermonuclear temperatures, here at LLL and at other laboratories. For example, in our 2XIIB experiment we have injected a 500-A-equivalent current of neutral deuterium atoms at an average energy of 18 keV, producing a dense plasma (10 14 particles/cm 3 ) at thermonuclear energy (14 keV or 160 million kelvins). Currently, LLL and LBL are developing beam energies in the 80- to 120-keV range for our upcoming MFTF experiment, for the TFTR tokamak experiment at Princeton, and for the Doublet III tokamak experiment at General Atomic. These results increase our long-range prospects of producing high-intensity beams of energies in the hundreds or even thousands of kilo-electron-volts, providing us with optimistic extrapolations for realizing power-producing fusion reactors

  3. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  4. Mechanical design criteria for continuously operating neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosen, S.R.; Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Lee, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    A schematic of a neutral beam injector is shown. Neutral gas is injected into the ion source, where a discharge ionizes the gas. The ions are drawn from the source by an extractor grid and then accelerated to full energy by the accel grids. After acceleration the ions pass through the neutralizer cell. Once through the neutralizer cell, the beam consists of neutrals and ions. The ions traveling with the beam are space charge neutralized by background electrons. The grid which precedes the direct converter is negatively charged and acts to separate the electrons from the rest of the beam. As a result of the beam's uncompensated space charge the remaining ions spread out from the beam to be collected at the direct converter. This paper presents a generalized analysis which will be useful in determining effects of energy and particle fluxes on the long-term performance of the grids

  5. Steady state neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattoo, S.K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Baruah, U.K.; Bisai, N.; Chakbraborty, A.K.; Chakrapani, Ch.; Jana, M.R.; Bajpai, M.; Jaykumar, P.K.; Patel, D.; Patel, G.; Patel, P.J.; Prahlad, V.; Rao, N.V.M.; Rotti, C.; Singh, N.P.; Sridhar, B.

    2000-01-01

    Learning from operational reliability of neutral beam injectors in particular and various heating schemes including RF in general on TFTR, JET, JT-60, it has become clear that neutral beam injectors may find a greater role assigned to them for maintaining the plasma in steady state devices under construction. Many technological solutions, integrated in the present day generation of injectors have given rise to capability of producing multimegawatt power at many tens of kV. They have already operated for integrated time >10 5 S without deterioration in the performance. However, a new generation of injectors for steady state devices have to address to some basic issues. They stem from material erosion under particle bombardment, heat transfer > 10 MW/m 2 , frequent regeneration of cryopanels, inertial power supplies, data acquisition and control of large volume of data. Some of these engineering issues have been addressed to in the proposed neutral beam injector for SST-1 at our institute; the remaining shall have to wait for the inputs of the database generated from the actual experience with steady state injectors. (author)

  6. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a large area (Asource,ITER = 0.9 × 2 m2) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (Asource,BATMAN ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m2) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child-Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion-ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated extracted currents, both ions

  7. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Asai, Tomohiko; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 × 10(17) m(-3), i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  8. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-01

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented

  9. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  10. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, T.; McCormack, B.; Loesser, G.D.; Kalish, M.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grisham, L.; Edwards, J.; Cropper, M.; Rossi, G.; Halle, A. von; Williams, M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current

  11. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D - source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus

  12. Design and development of neutral beam module components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, P.M.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dilgard, L.W.; Horvath, J.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Porter, G.D.; Shearer, J.W.; Slack, D.S.; Colonias, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) injection system consists of twenty 20 keV start-up, and twenty-four 80 keV sustaining neutral beam source modules. The neutral beam modules are mounted in four clusters equally spaced around the waist of the vacuum vessel which contains the superconducting magnets. A module is defined here as an assembly consisting of a beam source and the interfacing components between that beam source and the vacuum chamber. Six major interfacing components are the subject of this paper. They are the magnetic shield, the neutralizer duct, the isolation valve, mounting gimbals, aiming bellows and actuators

  13. High power neutral beam injection in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Nagaoka, K.

    2005-01-01

    The results of high power injection with a neutral beam injection (NBI) system for the large helical device (LHD) are reported. The system consists of three beam-lines, and two hydrogen negative ion (H - ion) sources are installed in each beam-line. In order to improve the injection power, the new beam accelerator with multi-slot grounded grid (MSGG) has been developed and applied to one of the beam-lines. Using the accelerator, the maximum powers of 5.7 MW were achieved in 2003 and 2004, and the energy of 189 keV reached at maximum. The power and energy exceeded the design values of the individual beam-line for LHD. The other beam-lines also increased their injection power up to about 4 MW, and the total injection power of 13.1 MW was achieved with three beam-lines in 2003. Although the accelerator had an advantage in high power beam injection, it involved a demerit in the beam focal condition. The disadvantage was resolved by modifying the aperture shapes of the steering grid. (author)

  14. Doppler-shifted neutral beam line shape and beam transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kokatnur, N.; Lagin, L.J.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.

    1994-04-01

    Analysis of Doppler-shifted Balmer-α line emission from the TFTR neutral beam injection systems has revealed that the line shape is well approximated by the sum of two Gaussians, or, alternatively, by a Lorentzian. For the sum of two Gaussians, the broad portion of the distribution contains 40% of the beam power and has a divergence five times that of the narrow part. Assuming a narrow 1/e- divergence of 1.3 degrees (based on fits to the beam shape on the calorimeter), the broad part has a divergence of 6.9 degrees. The entire line shape is also well approximated by a Lorentzian with a half-maximum divergence of 0.9 degrees. Up to now, fusion neutral beam modelers have assumed a single Gaussian velocity distribution, at the extraction plane, in each direction perpendicular to beam propagation. This predicts a beam transmission efficiency from the ion source to the calorimeter of 97%. Waterflow calorimetry data, however, yield a transmission efficiency of ∼75%, a value in rough agreement with predictions of the Gaussian or Lorentzian models presented here. The broad wing of the two Gaussian distribution also accurately predicts the loss in the neutralizer. An average angle of incidence for beam loss at the exit of the neutralizer is 2.2 degrees, rather than the 4.95 degrees subtended by the center of the ion source. This average angle of incidence, which is used in computing power densities on collimators, is shown to be a function of beam divergence

  15. Multi-megawatt neutral beams for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Multi-megawatt neutral-beam sources have successfully made the transition from prototype to commercial production, with some operational improvements due to the commercialization. Long pulse source operation results will be available soon

  16. Ballistic-neutralized chamber transport of intense heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Oliver, B.V.; Clark, R.E.; Sharp, W.M.; Friedman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor chamber are presented. The ballistic-neutralized transport scheme studied uses 4 GeV Pb +1 ion beams injected into a low-density, gas-filled reactor chamber and the beam is ballistically focused onto an ICF target before entering the chamber. Charge and current neutralization of the beam is provided by the low-density background gas. The ballistic-neutralized simulations include stripping of the beam ions as the beam traverses the chamber as well as ionization of the background plasma. In addition, a series of simulations are presented that explore the charge and current neutralization of the ion beam in an evacuated chamber. For this vacuum transport mode, neutralizing electrons are only drawn from sources near the chamber entrance

  17. Targets for high power neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs

  18. Preliminary experiments on energy recovery on a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.

    1977-06-01

    Energy recovery tests performed on an injector of energetic neutral atoms in which the ion source is operated at the ground potential and the neutralizer is biased at the high energy potential corresponding to the desired neutral beam energy, are presented. The operation of the suppressor grid is studied in two different experiments. These tests underline the problems to be solved for an efficient recovery of the energy of the unneutralized beam fraction

  19. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device

  20. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500-700 keV are needed for this device

  1. Neutral-beam systems for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Neutral beams for magnetic fusion reactors are at an early stage of development, and require considerable effort to make them into the large, reliable, and efficient systems needed for future power plants. To optimize their performance to establish specific goals for component development, systematic analysis of the beamlines is essential. Three ion source characteristics are discussed: arc-cathode life, gas efficiency, and beam divergence, and their significance in a high-energy neutral-beam system is evaluated

  2. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su; Shikhovtsev, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5–1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  3. Recent DIII-D neutral beam calibration results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, J.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.

    1991-10-01

    Injected DIII-D neutral beam power is estimated based on three principle quantities: the fraction of ion beam that is neutralized in the neutralizer gas cell, the beamline transmission efficiency, and the fraction of beam reionized in the drift duct. System changes in the past few years have included a new gradient grid voltage operating point, ion source arc regulation, routine deuterium operations and new neutralizer gas flow controllers. Additionally, beam diagnostics have been improved and better calibrated. To properly characterize the beams the principle quantities have been re-measured. Two diagnostics are primarily used to measure the quantities. The beamline waterflow calorimetry system measures the neutralization efficiency and the beamline transmission efficiency, and the target tile thermocouples measure the reionization loss. An additional diagnostic, the target tile pyrometer, confirmed the reionization loss measurement. Descriptions and results of these measurements will be presented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Hydrogen ion species analysis and related neutral beam injection power assessment in the Heliotron E neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Fumimichi; Obiki, Tokuhiro; Sasaki, Akihiko; Iiyoshi, Atsuo; Uo, Koji

    1982-01-01

    The hydrogen ion species in a Heliotron E neutral beam injection system of maximum electric power 6.3 MW were analyzed in order to assess the neutral beam power injected into the torus. The masimum p roton ratio of the cylindrical bucket type ion source used was observed to be more than 90 percent assuming that the angular divergences for the respective species in the beam are the same. The experimental data are compared with calculations using a particle balance model. The analysis indicates that the net injection power reaches nearly 2.7 MW at the optimal conditions of the system considering the geometrical limitation of the neutral beam path. (author)

  5. TFTR neutral-beam power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winje, R.A.

    1982-10-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) consists of the accelerator grid power supply and the auxiliary power supplies required to operate the TFTR 120-keV ion sources. The current configuration of the NBPS including the 11-MVA accelerator grid power supply and the Arc and Filament power supplies isolated for operation at accelerator grid voltages up to 120 kV, is described. The prototype NBPS has been assembled at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and has been operated. The results of the initial operation and the description and resolution of some of the technical problems encountered during the commissioning tests are presented

  6. Development of high performance negative ion sources and accelerators for MeV class neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, M.; Hanada, M.; Iga, T.

    2003-01-01

    Operation of accelerator at low pressure is an essential requirement to reduce stripping loss of the negative ions, which in turn results in high efficiency of the NB systems. For this purpose, a vacuum insulated beam source (VIBS) has been developed at JAERI, which reduces the gas pressure in the accelerator by enhanced gas conductance through the accelerator. The VIBS achieves the high voltage insulation of 1 MV by immersing the whole structure of accelerator in vacuum with long (∼ 1.8 m) insulation distance. Results of the voltage holding test using a long vacuum gap of 1.8 m indicate that a transition from vacuum discharge to gas discharge occurs at around 0.2 Pa m in the long vacuum gap. So far, the VIBS succeeded in acceleration of 20 mA (H - ) beam up to 970 keV for 1 s. The high voltage holding capability of the VIBS was drastically improved by installing a new large stress ring, which reduces electric field concentration at the triple junction of the accelerator column. At present the VIBS sustains 1 MV stably for more than 1200 s. Acceleration of ampere class H- beams at high current density is to be started soon to demonstrate ITER relevant beam optics. Operation of negative ion source at low pressure is also essential to reduce the stripping loss. However, it was not so easy to attain high current density H - ions at low pressure, since destruction cross section of the negative ions becomes large if the electron temperature is > 1 eV, in low pressure discharge. Using strong magnetic filter to lower the electron temperature, and putting higher arc discharge power to compensate reduction of plasma density through the filter, an H - ion beam of 310 A/m 2 was extracted at very low pressure of 0.1Pa. This satisfies the ITER requirement of current density at 1/3 of the ITER design pressure (0.3 Pa). (author)

  7. Neutral Beam Power System for TPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Bowen, O.N.; O'Conner, T.; Edwards, J.; Fromm, N.; Hatcher, R.; Newman, R.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; von Halle, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements

  8. Development of the TFTR neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, B.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Lines are designed to inject 20 MW of 120 keV neutral deuterium atoms into the plasma. This is accomplished using 12 sources, 65 amperes each, mounted in 4 beam lines. The 120 kV sources are being developed by LBL and a prototype beam line which will be tested at Berkeley is being developed as a cooperative effort by LLL and LBL. The implementation of these beam lines has required the development of several associated pieces of hardware. The control and monitoring of the 12 sources will be done via the TFTR computer control system (CICADA) as will other parts of the machine, and software is being developed to condition and operate the sources automatically. The prototype beam line is scheduled to begin operation in the fall of 1978 and all four production beam lines on TFTR in 1982

  9. TFTR neutral-beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turitzin, N.M.; Newman, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    TFTR Neutral Beam System will have thirteen discharge ion sources, each with its own power supply. Twelve of these will be utilized for supplemental heating of the TFTR tokamak plasma, while the thirteenth will be dedicated to an off-machine test chamber for source development and/or conditioning. A test installation for one source was set up using prototype equipment to discover and correct possible deficiencies, and to properly coordinate the equipment. This test facility represents the first opportunity for assembling an integrated system of hardware supplied by diverse vendors, each of whom designed and built his equipment to performance specifications. For the installation and coordination of the different portions of the total system, particular attention was given to personnel safety and safe equipment operation. This paper discusses various system components, their characteristics, interconnection and control. Results of the recently initiated test phase will be reported at a later date

  10. Optimal neutral beam heating scenario for FED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Optimal neutral beam heating scenarios are determined for FED based on a 1/one-half/-D transport analysis. Tradeoffs are examined between neutral beam energy, power, and species mix for positive ion systems. A ramped density startup is found to provide the most economical heating. The resulting plasma power requirements are reduced by 10-30% from a constant density startup. For beam energies between 100 and 200 keV, the power needed to heat the plasma does not decrease significantly as beam energy is increased. This is due to reduced ion heating, more power in the fractional energy components, and rising power supply requirements as beam energy increases

  11. Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic Field Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton, Fred

    2007-01-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) a diagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters, flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. High proton fraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic neutral beams. In our design, a neutral hydrogen beam with an 8 cm x 11 cm (or smaller) elliptical beam spot at 2.5 m from the end of the extraction column is produced. The beam will deliver up to 5 A of hydrogen beam to the target with a pulse width of ∼1 s, once every 1-2 min. The H1+ ion species of the hydrogen beam will be over 90 percent. For this application, we have compared two types of RF driven multicusp ion sources operating at 13.56MHz. The first one is an ion source with an external spiral antenna behind a dielectric RF-window. The second one uses an internal antenna in similar ion source geometry. The source needs to generate uniform plasma over a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. We expect that the ion source with internal antenna will be more efficient at producing the desired plasma density but might have the issue of limited antenna lifetime, depending on the duty factor. For both approaches there is a need for extra shielding to protect the dielectric materials from the backstreaming electrons. The source walls will be made of insulator material such as quartz that has been observed to generate plasma with higher atomic fraction than sources with metal walls. The ion beam will be extracted and accelerated by a set of grids with slits, thus forming an array of 6 sheet-shaped beamlets. The multiple grid extraction will be optimized using computer simulation programs. Neutralization of the beam will be done in neutralization chamber, which has over 70 percent neutralization efficiency

  12. Computer code determination of tolerable accel current and voltage limits during startup of an 80 kV MFTF sustaining neutral beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhall, D.J.; Eckard, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    We have used a Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) version of the WOLF ion source extractor design computer code to determine tolerable accel current and voltage limits during startup of a prototype 80 kV Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) sustaining neutral beam source. Arc current limits are also estimated. The source extractor has gaps of 0.236, 0.721, and 0.155 cm. The effective ion mass is 2.77 AMU. The measured optimum accel current density is 0.266 A/cm 2 . The gradient grid electrode runs at 5/6 V/sub a/ (accel voltage). The suppressor electrode voltage is zero for V/sub a/ < 3 kV and -3 kV for V/sub a/ greater than or equal to 3 kV. The accel current density for optimum beam divergence is obtained for 1 less than or equal to V/sub a/ less than or equal to 80 kV, as are the beam divergence and emittance

  13. The ion source development for neutral injection heating at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, H.; Itoh, T.; Kondoh, U.; Matsuda, S.; Ohara, Y.; Ohga, T.; Shibata, T.; Sugawara, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1976-01-01

    The neutral beam research and development effort at JAERI has been mainly concentrated on design, construction and testing of ion sources needed for present and planned heating experiments. Fundamental characteristics of the ion sources developed are described

  14. Evidence for neutral beam injected oxygen impurities in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.; Moos, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    A series of experiments indicates that the principal source of impurities in the 2XIIB mirror confinement plasma experiment at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is oxygen in the neutral beams. The dependence of 0 II 539 A emissions on neutral beam current, spatial scans of oxygen emissions, impurity injection experiments, spectral scans of the 0 VI 1032 A line, and other experiments all support this conclusion

  15. Preliminary experiments on energy recovery on a neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumelli, M.

    1977-06-01

    Experimental tests of energy recovery are made on an injector of energetic neutral atoms in which the ion source (the circular periplasmatron) is operated at the ground potential and the neutralizer is biased at the high negative potential corresponding to the desired neutral beam energy. To prevent the acceleration of the neutralizer plasma electrons toward the collector of the decelerated ions (the recovery electrode), a potential barrier is created by means of a negatively biased long cylindrical grid (called the suppressor grid) surrounding the beam. For a given negative potential (relative to the neutralizer) applied to this grid a plasma sheath develops at the periphery of the beam. At the entry of the grid the width of this sheath is generally much smaller than the beam radius. However, the ions are deflected by the electric field of the sheath outward through the grid. The ion density in the sheath is thus decreasing as the beam propagates and the result is a sheath-widening process which in turn causes more ions to be deflected. If the suppressor grid is sufficiently long the sheath will eventually fill the whole section of the beam, the potential on the axis will fall below the neutralizer potential and stop the electrons. Concurrently, most of the ions are deflected out of the suppressor. These ions can be decelerated and collected outside the region where the neutral beam propagates. A drawing of such a system is shown

  16. Manufacturing, assembly and tests of SPIDER Vacuum Vessel to develop and test a prototype of ITER neutral beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.zaccaria@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete S.p.A.), Padova (Italy); Valente, Matteo; Rigato, Wladi; Dal Bello, Samuele; Marcuzzi, Diego; Agostini, Fabio Degli; Rossetto, Federico; Tollin, Marco [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete S.p.A.), Padova (Italy); Masiello, Antonio [Fusion for Energy F4E, Barcelona (Spain); Corniani, Giorgio; Badalocchi, Matteo; Bettero, Riccardo; Rizzetto, Dario [Ettore Zanon S.p.A., Schio (VI) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The SPIDER experiment aims to qualify and optimize the ion source for ITER injectors. • The large SPIDER Vacuum Vessel was built and it is under testing at the supplier. • The main working and assembly steps for production are presented in the paper. - Abstract: The SPIDER experiment (Source for the Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an RF plasma) aims to qualify and optimize the full size prototype of the negative ion source foreseen for MITICA (full size ITER injector prototype) and the ITER Heating and Current Drive Injectors. Both SPIDER and MITICA experiments are presently under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova (I), with the financial support from IO (ITER Organization), Fusion for Energy, Italian research institutions and contributions from Japan and India Domestic Agencies. The vacuum vessel hosting the SPIDER in-vessel components (Beam Source and calorimeters) has been manufactured, assembled and tested during the last two years 2013–2014. The cylindrical vessel, about 6 m long and 4 m in diameter, is composed of two cylindrical modules and two torispherical lids at the ends. All the parts are made by AISI 304 L stainless steel. The possibility of opening/closing the vessel for monitoring, maintenance or modifications of internal components is guaranteed by bolted junctions and suitable movable support structures running on rails fixed to the building floor. A large number of ports, about one hundred, are present on the vessel walls for diagnostic and service purposes. The main working steps for construction and specific technological issues encountered and solved for production are presented in the paper. Assembly sequences and tests on site are furthermore described in detail, highlighting all the criteria and requirements for correct positioning and testing of performances.

  17. Manufacturing, assembly and tests of SPIDER Vacuum Vessel to develop and test a prototype of ITER neutral beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccaria, Pierluigi; Valente, Matteo; Rigato, Wladi; Dal Bello, Samuele; Marcuzzi, Diego; Agostini, Fabio Degli; Rossetto, Federico; Tollin, Marco; Masiello, Antonio; Corniani, Giorgio; Badalocchi, Matteo; Bettero, Riccardo; Rizzetto, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The SPIDER experiment aims to qualify and optimize the ion source for ITER injectors. • The large SPIDER Vacuum Vessel was built and it is under testing at the supplier. • The main working and assembly steps for production are presented in the paper. - Abstract: The SPIDER experiment (Source for the Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from an RF plasma) aims to qualify and optimize the full size prototype of the negative ion source foreseen for MITICA (full size ITER injector prototype) and the ITER Heating and Current Drive Injectors. Both SPIDER and MITICA experiments are presently under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova (I), with the financial support from IO (ITER Organization), Fusion for Energy, Italian research institutions and contributions from Japan and India Domestic Agencies. The vacuum vessel hosting the SPIDER in-vessel components (Beam Source and calorimeters) has been manufactured, assembled and tested during the last two years 2013–2014. The cylindrical vessel, about 6 m long and 4 m in diameter, is composed of two cylindrical modules and two torispherical lids at the ends. All the parts are made by AISI 304 L stainless steel. The possibility of opening/closing the vessel for monitoring, maintenance or modifications of internal components is guaranteed by bolted junctions and suitable movable support structures running on rails fixed to the building floor. A large number of ports, about one hundred, are present on the vessel walls for diagnostic and service purposes. The main working steps for construction and specific technological issues encountered and solved for production are presented in the paper. Assembly sequences and tests on site are furthermore described in detail, highlighting all the criteria and requirements for correct positioning and testing of performances.

  18. Data acquisition system for medium power neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R. Jr.; Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.; Dagenhart, W.K.

    1978-06-01

    The Medium Power Neutral Beam Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed in order to develop, test, and condition powerful neutral beam lines for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors source performance, beam characteristics, and power deposition profiles to determine if the beam line is operating up to its design specifications. The speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. Analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  19. Data acquisition system for PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.E. Jr.; Hammons, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The PLT Neutral Beam Test Stand at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was constructed to test and condition powerful neutral beam sources for the Princeton Large Torus experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The data acquisition system for the test stand monitors the beam characteristics and power output to determine if the beam is operating at its design specifications. The high speed of the computer system is utilized to provide near-real-time analysis of experimental data. The analysis of the data is presented as numerical tabulation and graphic display

  20. Fault detection and protection system for neutral beam generators on the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deVries, G.J.; Chesley, K.L.; Owren, H.M.

    1983-12-01

    Neutral beam sources, their power supplies and instrumentation can be damaged from high voltage sparkdown or from overheating due to excessive currents. The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) in Berkeley has protective electronic hardware that senses a condition outside a safe operating range and generates a response to terminate such a fault condition. A description of this system is presented in this paper. 8 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  1. Neutral-beam-heating applications and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of heating the plasma in magnetically confined fusion devices by the injection of intense beams of neutral atoms is described. The basic principles governing the physics of neutral beam heating and considerations involved in determining the injection energy, power, and pulse length required for a fusion reactor are discussed. The pertinent experimental results from various fusion devices are surveyed to illustrate the efficacy of this technique. The second part of the paper is devoted to the technology of producing the neutral beams. A state-of-the-art account o the development of neutral injectors is presented, and the prospects for utilizing neutral injection to heat the plasma in a fusion reactor are examined

  2. Charge neutralization of small ion beam clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, D R [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Olson, C L; Hanson, D L [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The mega-ampere currents associated with light ion fusion (LIF) require excellent charge neutralization to prevent divergence growth. As the size and space-charge potential of a beam clump or `beamlet` become small (submillimeter size and kilovolt potentials), the neutralization becomes increasingly difficult. Linear theory predicts that plasma electrons cannot neutralize potentials < {phi}{sub crit} = (1/2)m{sub e}v{sub i}{sup 2}/e, where m{sub e} is the electron mass and v{sub i} is the ion beam velocity. A non-uniform beam would, therefore, have regions with potentials sufficient to add divergence to beam clumps. The neutralization of small beamlets produced on the SABLE accelerator and in numerical simulation has supported the theory, showing a plateau in divergence growths as the potential in the beamlet exceeds {phi}{sub crit}. (author). 1 tab., 2 figs., 4 refs.

  3. Neutral-particle-beam production and injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.; Pyle, R.

    1982-07-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first is a discussion of the interactions of neutral beams with confined plasmas, the second is concerned with the production and diagnosis of the neutral beams. In general we are dealing with atoms, molecules, and ions of the isotopes of hydrogen, but some heavier elements (for example, oxygen) will be mentioned. The emphasis will be on single-particle collisions; selected atomic processes on surfaces will be included

  4. TFTR neutral beam injection system conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Three subsystems are described in the following chapters: (1) Neutral Beam Injection Line; (2) Power Supplies; and (3) Controls. Each chapter contains two sections: (1) Functions and Design Requirements; this is a brief listing of the requirements of components of the subsystem. (2) Design Description; this section describes the design and cost estimates. The overall performance requirements of the neutral beam injection system are summarized. (MOW)

  5. Applications of neutral beam and rf technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselton, H.H.

    1987-04-01

    This presentation provides an update on the applications of neutral beams and radiofrequency (rf) power in the fusion program; highlights of the ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments now in progress, as well as the neutral beam experiments; and heating requirements of future devices and some of the available options. Some remarks on current drive are presented because this area of technology is one that is being considered for future devices

  6. Consistency checks in beam emission modeling for neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punyapu, Bharathi; Vattipalle, Prahlad; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Baruah, Ujjwal Kumar; Crowley, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    In positive neutral beam systems, the beam parameters such as ion species fractions, power fractions and beam divergence are routinely measured using Doppler shifted beam emission spectrum. The accuracy with which these parameters are estimated depend on the accuracy of the atomic modeling involved in these estimations. In this work, an effective procedure to check the consistency of the beam emission modeling in neutral beam injectors is proposed. As a first consistency check, at a constant beam voltage and current, the intensity of the beam emission spectrum is measured by varying the pressure in the neutralizer. Then, the scaling of measured intensity of un-shifted (target) and Doppler shifted intensities (projectile) of the beam emission spectrum at these pressure values are studied. If the un-shifted component scales with pressure, then the intensity of this component will be used as a second consistency check on the beam emission modeling. As a further check, the modeled beam fractions and emission cross sections of projectile and target are used to predict the intensity of the un-shifted component and then compared with the value of measured target intensity. An agreement between the predicted and measured target intensities provide the degree of discrepancy in the beam emission modeling. In order to test this methodology, a systematic analysis of Doppler shift spectroscopy data obtained on the JET neutral beam test stand data was carried out

  7. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E parallel B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Development of the TFTR neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, B.A. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Lines are designed to inject 20 MW of 120 keV neutral deuterium atoms into the plasma. This is accomplished using 12 sources, 65 amperes each, mounted in 4 beam lines. The 120 kV sources and a prototype beam line are being developed. The implementation of these beam lines has required the development of several associated pieces of hardware. 200 kV switch tubes for the power supplies are being developed for modulation and regulation of the accelerating supplies. A 90 cm metallic seal gate valve capable of sealing against atmosphere in either direction is being developed for separating the torus and beam line vacuum systems. A 70 x 80 cm fast shutter valve is also being developed to limit tritium migration from the torus into the beam line. Internal to the beam line a calorimeter, ion dump and deflection magnet have been designed to handle three beams, and optical diagnostics utilizing the doppler broadening and doppler shift of light emitted from the accelerated beam are being developed. The control and monitoring of the 12 sources will be done via the TFTR computer control system (CICADA) as will other parts of the machine, and software is being developed to condition and operate the sources automatically. The prototype beam line is scheduled to begin operation in the fall of 1978 and all four production beam lines on TFTR in 1982

  9. Neutralization of positive particle beams by electron trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobley, R.M.; Irani, A.A.; LeMaire, J.L.; Maschke, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    Initial results are presented of a planned series of experimental tests of positive ion beam neutralization, involving transverse space charge studies of a 720 keV 60mA H + beam in a drift region of 4.6 meters. Two conclusions drawn from the data are: (1) the change in transmission observed is consistent with complete neutralization in the drift pipe for grounded or negative electrodes, and with complete de-neutralization in the case of greater than +240 V electrodes; and (2) background gas ionization cannot be the main source of electrons

  10. Neutral beam data systems at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    A control system for neutral injection beam lines has been designed, implemented, and used with much success. Despite the problems with very high power levels this system is very successful in relieving the operators burdens of slow conditioning, data recording, and mode switching. The use of computer control with multiple beam lines now appears very promising

  11. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-01-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET

  12. The control of powerful neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1986-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in the development of neutral beams for the heating and sustaining of plasmas in large fusion experiments, the control of such devices has largely been a matter of hardware interlocks and operator experience. The need for computer-assisted control becomes more evident, however, with the initiation of multi-beamline experiments. This paper describes a software system that incorporates simple mathematical models coupled to Kalman filters for control of the high power (6 to 8 MW) beams currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility. Among the principal features of the system are: reduction of a large number of operator variables to just a few (usually one or two); the ability to describe most of the major neutral beams in use and under development; a foundation resting on statistical data analysis and control system principles rather than rules-of-thumb

  13. Current neutralization of converging ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.

    1978-01-01

    It is desired to consider the problem of current neutralization of heavy ion beams traversing gas backgrounds in which the conductivity changes due to beam heating and beam convergence. The procedure is to determine Green's-function solutions to the magnetic-diffusion equation derived from Maxwell's equations and an assumed scaler-plasma conductivity sigma for the background-electron current density j/sub e/. The present calculation is more general than some previously carried out in that arbitrary time variations for the beam current j/sub b/ and conductivity are allowed and the calculation is valid for both weak and strong neutralization. Results presented here must be combined with an appropriate energy-balance equation for the heated background in order to obtain the neutralization self-consistently

  14. Very-high-level neutral-beam control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elischer, V.; Jacobson, V.; Theil, E.

    1981-10-01

    As increasing numbers of neutral beams are added to fusion machines, their operation can consume a significant fraction of a facility's total resources. LBL has developed a very high level control system that allows a neutral beam injector to be treated as a black box with just 2 controls: one to set the beam power and one to set the pulse duration. This 2 knob view allows simple operation and provides a natural base for implementing even higher level controls such as automatic source conditioning

  15. Performance of the DIII-D neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Callis, R.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; Cummings, J.; Glad, A.S.; Gootgeld, A.M.; Haskovec, J.S.; Hong, R.; Kellman, D.H.; Langhorn, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    During the upgrade of the Doublet III tokamak, the neutral beam injection system as also modified to accommodate long pulse sources and to utilize the larger entrance apertures to the torus vessel. All four beamlines on DIII-D are now in operation with a total of eight common long pulse sources. These have exhibited easier conditioning and good reproducibility. Performance results of the beamlines and supporting systems are presented, and the observed beam properties are discussed

  16. Computerized operation of the DIII-D neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, A.S.; Tooker, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Operation of the DIII-D neutral beams utilizes computerized control to provide routine tokamak beam heating shots and an effective method for automatic ion source operation. Computerized control reduces operational complexity, thus providing consistent reliability and availability of beams and a significant reduction in the the costs of routine operation. The objectives in implementing computerized control for operation were: (1) to improve operator efficiency for controlling multiple beam lines and increasing beam availability through standard procedures, (2) to provide a simplified scheme that operators and coordinators can construct and maintain, and (3) to provide a single integrated mechanism for both tokamak operation and automatic source conditioning. The years of experience in operating neutral beams at Doublet III provided the data necessary to meet the objectives. The method for computerized control consisted of three integrated functions: (1) a structured command language was implemented to provide the mechanism for automatically sequencing beams, (2) a historical file was constructed from the operational parameters to characterize the ion source, and consists of data from approximately 100,000 beam shots, and (3) procedures were developed integrating the language to the historical file for normal operation and source conditioning. This paper describes the method for sequencing beams automatically, the structure of the historical data file, and the procedures which integrate the historical data with tokamak operation and automatic source conditioning

  17. Beam profile effects on NPB [neutral particle beam] performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClaire, R.J. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    A comparison of neutral particle beam brightness for various neutral beam profiles indicates that the widely used assumption of a Gaussian profile may be misleading for collisional neutralizers. An analysis of available experimental evidence shows that lower peaks and higher tails, compared to a Gaussian beam profile, are observed out of collisional neutralizers, which implies that peak brightness is over estimated, and for a given NPB platform-to-target range, the beam current (power), dwell time or some combination of such engagement parameters would have to be altered to maintain a fixed dose on target. Based on the present analysis, this factor is nominally about 2.4 but may actually be as low as 1.8 or as high as 8. This is an important consideration in estimating NPB constellation performance in SDI engagement contexts. 2 refs., 6 figs

  18. Negative ion based neutral beams for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral beam systems based on negative ions have been considered because of a high expected power efficiency. Methods for the production, acceleration and neutralization of negative ions will be reviewed and possibilities for an application in neutral beam lines explored

  19. ALCBEAM - Neutral beam formation and propagation code for beam-based plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Rowan, W. L.; Liao, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    the ion source by high voltage applied to the extraction and accelerating grids. The current distribution of a single beamlet emitted from a single pore of IOS depends on the shape of the plasma boundary in the emission region. Total beam extracted by IOS is calculated at every point of 3D mesh as sum of all contributions from each grid pore. The code effectively unifies the ion beam formation, extraction and neutralization processes with neutral beam attenuation and excitation in plasma and neutral gas and beam stopping by the beam apertures. Running time: 10 min for a standard run.

  20. Beam-induced pressure variations in a TFTR neutral-beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, J.E.; Berkner, K.H.

    1981-10-01

    In neutral-beam injection systems either all or part of the gas flow into the neutralizer comes from the plasma source. When the beam is switched on, ions from the plasma source, which used to contribute to the gas flow, are converted to an energetic beam and are pumped away: hence reducing the gas input to the neutralizer. The large volume of the neutralizer and its high conductance damp out rapid changes; for example, when the gas to the source is first turned on, there is a 230 msec exponential rise time associated with pressure in the neutralizer. The neutralizer in turn acts as a source of gas to the first chamber and the first chamber to the second and so on. Beam dumps become additional sources of gas in the second chamber and target tank as gas molecules are collisionally desorbed from the surface of the dump. A simple analytical model (the equivalent of an electrical RC circuit) of the volumes and conductances of the system has been used to describe the pressure variations. The use of time dependent sources terms in the model gives an estimate of the desorption rate from the dumps and its time variation during a beam pulse

  1. Doublet III neutral beam multi-stream command language system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Garcia, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A multi-stream command language system was developed to provide control of the dual source neutral beam injectors on the Doublet III experiment at GA Technologies Inc. The Neutral Beam command language system consists of three parts: compiler, sequencer, and interactive task. The command language, which was derived from the Doublet III tokamak command language, POPS, is compiled, using a recursive descent compiler, into reverse polish notation instructions which then can be executed by the sequencer task. The interactive task accepts operator commands via a keyboard. The interactive task directs the operation of three input streams, creating commands which are then executed by the sequencer. The streams correspond to the two sources within a Doublet III neutral beam, plus an interactive stream. The sequencer multiplexes the execution of instructions from these three streams. The instructions include reads and writes to an operator terminal, arithmetic computations, intrinsic functions such as CAMAC input and output, and logical instructions. The neutral beam command language system was implemented using Modular Computer Systems (ModComp) Pascal and consists of two tasks running on a ModComp Classic IV computer. The two tasks, the interactive and the sequencer, run independently and communicate using shared memory regions. The compiler runs as an overlay to the interactive task when so directed by operator commands. The system is succesfully being used to operate the three neutral beams on Doublet III

  2. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-μs accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance

  3. Design of a negative ion neutral beam system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easoz, J.R.; Sink, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    A design is presented that suggests that a negative ion neutral beam based on direct extraction is applicable to TNS, assuming technological advancements in several areas. Improvements in negative ion sources, direct energy conversion of charged beams, and high speed cryogenic pumping are needed. The increase in efficiency over a positive ion system and the encouraging results of the first attempt at a total design justify increased effort in the development of the above mentioned areas

  4. Engineering problems of future neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.

    1977-01-01

    Because there is no limit to the energy or power that can be delivered by a neutral-beam injector, its use will be restricted by either its cost, size, or reliability. Studies show that these factors can be improved by the injector design, and several examples, taken from mirror reactor studies, are given

  5. JET neutral beam duct Optical Interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, A.D.; Jones, T.T.C.; Surrey, E.; Ćirić, D.; Hall, S.I.; Young, D.; Afzal, M.; Hackett, L.; Day, I.E.; King, R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Optical Interlocks were installed on the JET NBI system as part of the EP2 upgrade. • The system protects the JET tokamak and NBI systems from thermal load damage. • Balmer-α beam emission is used to monitor the neutral beam-line pressure. • We demonstrate an improved trip delay of 2 ms compared to 50 ms before EP2. - Abstract: The JET Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system is the most powerful neutral beam plasma heating system currently operating. Optical Interlocks were installed on the beam lines in 2011 for the JET Enhancement Project 2 (EP2), when the heating power was increased from 23 MW to 34 MW. JET NBI has two beam lines. Each has eight positive ion injectors operating in deuterium at 80 kV–125 kV (accelerator voltage) and up to 65 A (beam current). Heating power is delivered through two ducts where the central power density can be more than 100 MW/m{sup 2}. In order to deliver this safely, the beam line pressure should be below 2 × 10{sup −5} mbar otherwise the power load on the duct from the re-ionised fraction of the beam is excessive. The new Optical Interlock monitors the duct pressure by measuring the Balmer-α beam emission (656 nm). This is proportional to the instantaneous beam flux and the duct pressure. Light is collected from a diagnostic window and focused into 1-mm diameter fibres. The Doppler shifted signal is selected using an angle-tuned interference filter. The light is measured by a photo-multiplier module with a logarithmic amplifier. The interlock activation time of 2 ms is sufficient to protect the system from a fully re-ionised beam—a significant improvement on the previous interlock. The dynamic range is sufficient to see bremsstrahlung emission from JET plasma and not saturate during plasma disruptions. For high neutron flux operations the optical fibres within the biological shield can be annealed to 350 °C. A self-test is possible by illuminating the diagnostic window with a test lamp and measuring

  6. Experimental approach to high power long duration neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiike, Hiroshi

    1981-12-01

    Experimental studies of ion sources and beam dumps for the development of a high power long duration neutral beam injector for JT-60 are presented. Long pulse operation of high power beams requires a high degree of reliability. To develop a reliable ion source with large extraction area, a new duoPIGatron ion source with a coaxially shaped intermediate electrode is proposed and tested. Magnetic configuration is examined numerically to obtain high current arc discharge and source plasma with small density variation. Experimental results show that primary electrons were fed widely from the cathode plasma region to the source plasma region and that dense uniform source plasma could be obtained easily. Source plasma characteristics are studied and comparison of these with other sources are also described. To develop extraction electrode of high power ion source, experimental studies were made on the cooling of the electrode. Long Pulse beams were extracted safely under the condition of high heat loading on the electrode. Finally, burnout study for the development of high power beam dumps is presented. Burnout data were obtained from subcooled forced-convective boiling of water in a copper finned tube irradiated by high power ion beams. The results yield simple burnout correlations which can be used for the prediction of burnout heat flux of the beam dump. (author)

  7. Neutral beam injection system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, B.H.; Lee, K.W.; Chung, K.S.; Oh, B.H.; Cho, Y.S.; Bae, Y.D.; Han, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    The NBI system for KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been designed based on conventional positive ion beam technology. One beam line consists of three ion sources, three neutralizers, one bending magnet, and one drift tube. This system will deliver 8 MW deuterium beam to KSTAR plasma in normal operation to support the advanced experiments on heating, current drive and profile control. The key technical issues in this design were high power ion source(120 kV, 65 A), long pulse operation (300 seconds; world record is 30 sec), and beam rotation from vertical to horizontal direction. The suggested important R and D points on ion source and beam line components are also included. (author). 7 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Instrumentation system for long-pulse MFTF neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risch, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The instrumentation system for long pulse neutral beams for MFTFS consists of monitoring and protective circuitry. Global synchronization of high speed monitoring data across twenty-four neutral beams is achieved via an experiment wide fiber optic timing system. Fiber optics are also used as a means of isolating signals at elevated voltages. An excess current monitor, interrupt monitor, sparkdown detector, spot detector and gradient grid ratio detector form the primary protection for the neutral beam source. A unique hierarchical interlocking scheme allows other protective devices to be factored into the shutdown circuitry of the power supply so that the initiating cause of a shutdown can be isolated and even allows some non-critical devices to be safely ignored for a period of time

  9. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O'Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12 degrees). Beamline calorimeters, of a ''V''-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the ''V'', complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected

  10. Spectrometric determination of the species distribution of hydrogen and deuterium in the multi-megawatt ion sources (PINI) of the neutral beam injectors NI-1 and NI-2 of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, H.; Uhlemann, R.

    1990-11-01

    The ion species fractions of hydrogen H + , H 2 + , H 3 + and deuterium D + , D 2 + , D 3 + in the extracted beam of the multi-megawatt ion sources (PINI) of the neutral beam injectors of TEXTOR are determined. The measurements are obtained from two grating spectrometers of 0.5 m focal length with a light guiding system of 50 mm aperture using the Doppler shifted H α /D α -light of the accelerated beam particles. The spectral resolution obtained is 0.76 A with a 50 μm entrance slit. The ion source is a bucket source (modified JET PINI) with a multipole magnetic field in checkerboard arrangement. The species fraction measurements are performed as function of beam current, ion source pressure and beam pulse length. The results for hydrogen and deuterium at particle energies of 20-55 keV and beam currents of 13-87 A show no significant difference between neutral injector I and II. For 55 keV and a beam current of 87 A in hydrogen and 63 A in deuterium a species mix of 67.2:24.5:8.4% (H + :H 2 + :H 3 + ) and of 69.1:23.8:7.1% (D + :D 2 + :D 3 + ) is obtained. (orig.) [de

  11. Design and testing of low capacitance, 80-kV source cables for MFTF sustaining neutral beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhall, D.J.; Shimer, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper we summarize characteristics of several cable configurations and consider one design in detail, which consists of twelve, 250 MCM arc cables, ten 4/0 filament cables, and accel, gradient grid, control, and instrumentation cables within a circular split Al pipe. The pipe is air insulated from an outer 24-in. x 24-in. steel duct by utility pin insulators. Varying run lengths require adjustment of the arc inductance by variation of cross sectional cable position. Equilibrium heat transfer analysis indicates the pulse-off time for source conditioning must be somewhat greater than 60 s to keep conductor temperatures below 90 0 C. The results of a high voltage test of a model cable are presented

  12. Modeling of the lithium based neutralizer for ITER neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, F., E-mail: franck.dure@u-psud.fr [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lifschitz, A.; Bretagne, J.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Simonin, A. [IRFM, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnetique, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Minea, T. [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France)

    2012-04-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare different lithium based neutraliser configurations to the deuterium one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study characteristics of the secondary plasma and the propagation of the 1 MeV beam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using lithium increases the neutralisation effiency keeping correct beam focusing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using lithium also reduces the backstreaming effect in direction of the ion source. - Abstract: To achieve thermonuclear temperatures necessary to produce fusion reactions in the ITER Tokamak, additional heating systems are required. One of the main method to heat the plasma ions in ITER will be the injection of energetic neutrals (NBI). In the neutral beam injector, negative ions (D{sup -}) are electrostatically accelerated to 1 MeV, and then stripped of their extra electron via collisions with a target gas, in a structure known as neutralizer. In the current ITER specification, the target gas is deuterium. It has been recently proposed to use lithium vapor instead of deuterium as target gas in the neutralizer. This would allow to reduce the gas load in the NBI vessel and to improve the neutralization efficiency. A Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo code has been developed to study the transport of the beams and the plasma formation in the neutralizer. A comparison between Li and D{sub 2} based neutralizers made with this code is presented here, as well as a parametric study on the geometry of the Li based neutralizer. Results demonstrate the feasibility of a Li based neutralizer, and its advantages with respect to the deuterium based one.

  13. BNL neutral-beam development group. Progress report FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.; Sluyters, T.

    1983-01-01

    Efforts were concentrated on the development of H - /D - sources capable of delivering about 1A of beam current, operating steady state at an energy of several tens of keV and having properties that would allow a scaling up to 10A and their use in a high energy neutral beam line. In the seventies we have developed negative ion sources of the plasms surface type with extracted current densities of several hundred mA/cm 2 . Particularly successful was the development of the magnetron source, from which pulsed beam currents in excess of one ampere have been obtained and accelerated up to 120 kV. These magnetrons have become standard sources in high energy accelerator laboratories around the world and they are candidates for application in polarized H - ion sources as well. Work on hollow cathode deuterium sources and neutraizers is reported

  14. BNL neutral beam development group. Progress report FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.; Sluyters, T.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of the BNL Neutral Beam Program is to develop a 250 keV neutral beam system suitable for heating and other experiments in toroidal or mirror plasma devices. The system is based on acceleration and neutralization of negative hydrogen ions produced in and directly extracted from a source. The objective of source studies is to develop a module delivering 10 A of negative ion currents, with pulse lengths ranging from several seconds duration up to a steady-state operation. The extracted current density should be several hundred mA/cm 2 , and the source should operate with power and gas efficiencies acceptable from the beam line point of view. The objective of beam extraction and transport studies is to design a system matching the 10 A source module to the acceleration stage. The 250 keV acceleration studies cover several options, including a d.c. close-coupled system, a large aperture d.c. system matched to the source by a bending magnet, a multiaperture d.c. system following a multiaperture strong focusing transport line, and a MEQALAC structure

  15. Molecular-beam sampling of a hollow-cathode discharge in argon as a plasma diagnostic and a source for fast neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theuws, P.G.A.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Schram, D.C.; Verster, N.F.

    1977-01-01

    Velocity analysis of the molecular beam is done with a time-of-flight method. The measured velocity distribution of the fast neutral atoms is described by the sum of two Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with temperatures on the order of 0.25 and 1 eV, respectively. This bimodal distribution is attributed to an overpopulation of the high-energy tail of the ion velocity distribution. The measured intensities of the fast neutrals vary between 5 x 10 14 and 7 x 10 15

  16. Neutral beam injection in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbs, S.M.

    1975-01-01

    Integrated into the operation of the 2XIIB controlled fusion experiment is a 600-A, 20-keV neutral injection system: the highest neutral-beam current capacity of any existing fusion machine. This paper outlines the requirements of the injection system and the design features to which they led. Both mechanical and electrical aspects are discussed. Also included is a brief description of some operational aspects of the system and some of the things we have learned along the way, as well as a short history of the most significant developments

  17. Neutral beam system for an ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasolo, J.; Fuja, R.; Jung, J.; Moenich, J.; Norem, J.; Praeg, W.; Stevens, H.

    1978-01-01

    We have attempted to make detailed designs of several neutral beam systems which would be applicable to a large machine, e.g. an ITR (Ignition Test Reactor), EPR (Experimental Power Reactor), or reactor. Detailed studies of beam transport to the reactor and neutron transport from the reactor have been made. We have also considered constraints imposed by the neutron radiation environment in the injectors, and the resulting shielding, radiation-damage, and maintenance problems. The effects of neutron heat loads on cryopanels and ZrAl getter panels have been considered. Design studies of power supplies, vacuum systems, bending magnets, and injector layouts are in progress and will be discussed

  18. Doublet III neutral beam multi-stream command language system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.; Garcia, J.R.

    1983-12-01

    A multi-stream command language system was developed to provide control of the dual source neutral beam injectors on the Doublet III experiment at GA Technologies Inc. The Neutral Beam command language system consists of three parts: compiler, sequencer, and interactive task. The command language, which was derived from the Doublet III tokamak command language, POPS, is compiled, using a recursive descent compiler, into reverse polish notation instructions which then can be executed by the sequencer task. The interactive task accepts operator commands via a keyboard. The interactive task directs the operation of three input streams, creating commands which are then executed by the sequencer. The streams correspond to the two sources within a Doublet III neutral beam, plus an interactive stream. The sequencer multiplexes the execution of instructions from these three streams. The instructions include reads and writes to an operator terminal, arithmetic computations, intrinsic functions such as CAMAC input and output, and logical instructions. The neutral beam command language system was implemented using Modular Computer Systems (ModComp) Pascal and consists of two tasks running on a ModComp Classic IV computer

  19. The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility towards SPIDER operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Dal Bello, S.; Gaio, E.; Luchetta, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Zaccaria, P.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Boldrin, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Gambetta, G.; Grando, L.; Jain, P.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pimazzoni, A.; Piovan, R.; Recchia, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Sartori, E.; Siragusa, M.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.; Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Svensson, L.; Schunke, B.; Decamps, H.; Urbani, M.; Kushwah, M.; Chareyre, J.; Singh, M.; Bonicelli, T.; Agarici, G.; Garbuglia, A.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Simon, M.; Bailly-Maitre, L.; Bragulat, E.; Gomez, G.; Gutierrez, D.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J.-F.; Pilard, V.; Chakraborty, A.; Baruah, U.; Rotti, C.; Patel, H.; Nagaraju, M. V.; Singh, N. P.; Patel, A.; Dhola, H.; Raval, B.; Fantz, U.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.; Cavenago, M.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Muraro, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Hemsworth, R.

    2017-08-01

    SPIDER is one of two projects of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility under construction in Padova, Italy, at the Consorzio RFX premises. It will have a 100 keV beam source with a full-size prototype of the radiofrequency ion source for the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) and also, similar to the ITER diagnostic neutral beam, it is designed to operate with a pulse length of up to 3600 s, featuring an ITER-like magnetic filter field configuration (for high extraction of negative ions) and caesium oven (for high production of negative ions) layout as well as a wide set of diagnostics. These features will allow a reproduction of the ion source operation in ITER, which cannot be done in any other existing test facility. SPIDER realization is well advanced and the first operation is expected at the beginning of 2018, with the mission of achieving the ITER heating and diagnostic NBI ion source requirements and of improving its performance in terms of reliability and availability. This paper mainly focuses on the preparation of the first SPIDER operations—integration and testing of SPIDER components, completion and implementation of diagnostics and control and formulation of operation and research plan, based on a staged strategy.

  20. Neutral particle beam distributed data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, R.T.; Kraimer, M.R.; Novick, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    A distributed data acquisition system has been designed to support experiments at the Argonne Neutral Particle Beam Accelerator. The system uses a host VAXstation II/GPX computer acting as an experimenter's station linked via Ethernet with multiple MicroVAX IIs and rtVAXs dedicated to acquiring data and controlling hardware at remote sites. This paper describes the hardware design of the system, the applications support software on the host and target computers, and the real-time performance

  1. Neutral beam current drive with balanced injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhartt, D.

    1990-01-01

    Current drive with fast ions has proved its capability to sustain a tokamak plasma free of externally induced electric fields in a stationary state. The suprathermal ion population within the toroidal plasma was created by quasi-tangential and uni-directional injection of high-energy neutral atoms, their ionisation and subsequent deceleration by collisions with the background plasma particles. In future large tokamaks of the NET/INTER-type, with reactor-relevant values of plasma density and temperature, this current drive scheme is expected to maintain the toroidal current at the plasma centre, as current drive by lower hybrid waves will be restricted to the outer plasma regions owing to strong wave damping. Adequate penetration of the neutral atoms through the dense plasma requires particle energies of several hundred kilovolts per nucleon since beam absorption scales roughly with the ratio beam energy over density. The realisation of such high-energy high-power neutral beams, based on negative ion technology, is now under study. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  2. Automated Calculation of DIII-D Neutral Beam Availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.; Hong, R.M.; Scoville, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    The neutral beam systems for the DIII-D tokamak are an extremely reliable source of auxiliary plasma heating, capable of supplying up to 20 MW of injected power, from eight separate beam sources into each tokamak discharge. The high availability of these systems for tokamak operations is sustained by careful monitoring of performance and following up on failures. One of the metrics for this performance is the requested injected power profile as compared to the power profile delivered for a particular pulse. Calculating this was a relatively straightforward task, however innovations such as the ability to modulate the beams and more recently the ability to substitute an idle beam for one which has failed during a plasma discharge, have made the task very complex. For example, with this latest advance it is possible for one or more beams to have failed, yet the delivered power profile may appear perfect. Availability used to be manually calculated. This paper presents the methods and algorithms used to produce a system which performs the calculations based on information concerning the neutral beam and plasma current waveforms, along with post-discharge information from the Plasma Control System, which has the ability to issue commands for beams in real time. Plots representing both the requested and actual power profiles, along with statistics, are automatically displayed and updated each shot, on a web-based interface viewable both at DIII-D and by our remote collaborators using no-cost software

  3. Negative-ion-based neutral beams for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Anderson, O.A.; Chan, C.F.

    1987-10-01

    To maximize the usefulness of an engineering test reactor (e.g., ITER, TIBER), it is highly desirable that it operate under steady-state conditions. The most attractive option for maintaining the circulating current needed in the center of the plasma is the injection of powerful beams of neutral deuterium atoms. The beam simultaneously heats the plasma. At the energies required, in excess of 500 keV, such beams can be made by accelerating D - ions and then removing the electron. Sources are being developed that generate the D - ions in the volume of a specially constructed plasma discharge, without the addition of cesium. These sources must operate with minimum gas flow, to avoid stripping the D - beam, and with minimum electron output. We are designing at LBL highly efficient electrostatic accelerators that combine electric strong-focusing with dc acceleration and offer the possibility of varying the beam energy at constant current while minimizing breakdown. Some form of rf acceleration may also be required. To minimize irradiation of the ion sources and accelerators, the D - beam can be transported through a maze in the neutron shielding. The D - ions can be converted to neutrals in a gas or plasma target, but advances in laser and mirror technology may make possible very efficient photodetachment systems by the time an ETR becomes operational. 9 refs., 4 figs

  4. 8MVA modulator/regulator for neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsen, D.B. Jr.; Overett, T.H.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes very generally the modulator/regulator (Mod/Reg) being built for Transrex by Systems, Science and Software for use on the neutral beam power supplies that Transrex is building for General Atomic Company to power the neutral beam heating systems that will be used on the Doublet III fusion device. The Mod/Reg is required to provide an 80 kV, 100 A pulse for a second every 90 sec. The voltage is to be regulated to 3%, and in case of fault the pulse must be interrupted within 10 μsec. An additional requirement was that the total system have very low capacity such that the total energy stored would be less than 15 joules. This is a restriction imposed by the source designer to prevent destroying the source in case of an arc within the source

  5. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  6. Large area ion and plasma beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldorf, J. [IPT Ionen- und Plasmatech. GmbH, Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    In the past a number of ion beam sources utilizing different methods for plasma excitation have been developed. Nevertheless, a widespread use in industrial applications has not happened, since the sources were often not able to fulfill specific demands like: broad homogeneous ion beams, compatibility with reactive gases, low ion energies at high ion current densities or electrical neutrality of the beam. Our contribution wants to demonstrate technical capabilities of rf ion and plasma beam sources, which can overcome the above mentioned disadvantages. The physical principles and features of respective sources are presented. We report on effective low pressure plasma excitation by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) for the generation of dense homogeneous plasmas and the rf plasma beam extraction method for the generation of broad low energy plasma beams. Some applications like direct plasma beam deposition of a-C:H and ion beam assisted deposition of Al and Cu with tailored thin film properties are discussed. (orig.).

  7. Large area ion and plasma beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldorf, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the past a number of ion beam sources utilizing different methods for plasma excitation have been developed. Nevertheless, a widespread use in industrial applications has not happened, since the sources were often not able to fulfill specific demands like: broad homogeneous ion beams, compatibility with reactive gases, low ion energies at high ion current densities or electrical neutrality of the beam. Our contribution wants to demonstrate technical capabilities of rf ion and plasma beam sources, which can overcome the above mentioned disadvantages. The physical principles and features of respective sources are presented. We report on effective low pressure plasma excitation by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) for the generation of dense homogeneous plasmas and the rf plasma beam extraction method for the generation of broad low energy plasma beams. Some applications like direct plasma beam deposition of a-C:H and ion beam assisted deposition of Al and Cu with tailored thin film properties are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Particle beam source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Electron beam research directed toward providing improved in-diode pinched beam sources and establishing the efficiency and feasibility for superposition of many beams progressed in three major areas. Focusing stability has been improved from large effective aspect ratio (radius/gap of emitting surface) diodes. Substantial progress toward establishing the feasibility of combining beams guided along ionized current-carrying channels has been made. Two beams have been transported and overlayed on a target. Theoretical and experimental measurements on channel formation have resulted in specifications for the capacitor bank channel initiation system for a 12-beam combination experiment on Proto II. An additional area of beam research has been the development of a small pulsed X-ray source to yield high quality flash X-radiography of pellets. A source yielding approximately 100-μm resolution of objects has been demonstrated and work continues to improve the convenience and reliability of this source. The effort to extend the capability of higher power conventional pulse power generators to accelerate ions (rather than electrons), and assess the feasibility of this technology variation for target experiments and reactors has progressed. Progress toward development of a multistage accelerator for ions with pulse power technology centered on development of a new laboratory facility and design and procurement of hardware for a five-stage test apparatus for the Pulslac concept

  9. Transmission of the Neutral Beam Heating Beams at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Lopez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Neutral beam injection heating has been development for the TJ-II stellarator. The beam has a port-through power between 700-1500 kW and injection energy 40 keV. The sensibility of the injection system to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Beam transmission is limited by losses processes since beam is born into the ions source until is coming into the fusion machine. For the beam transmission optimization several beam diagnostics have been developed. A carbon fiber composite (CFC) target calorimeter has been installed at TJ-II to study in situ the power density distribution of the neutral beams. The thermographic print of the beam can be recorded and analysed in a reliable way due to the highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of the target material. With the combined thermographic and calorimetric measurements it has been possible to determine the power density distribution of the beam. It has been found that a large beam halo is present, which can be explained by the extreme misalignment of the grids. This kind of halo has a deleterious effect on beam transport and must be minimized in order to improve the plasma heating capability of the beams. (Author) 155 refs

  10. Initial operation and performance of the PDX neutral-beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Rossmassler, J.E.; Schilling, G.; van Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the joint ORNL/PPPL PDX neutral beam heating project succeeded in reliably injecting 7.2 MW of D 0 into the PDX plasma, at nearly perpendicular angles, and achieved ion temperatures up to 6.5 keV. The expeditious achievement of this result was due to the thorough conditioning and qualification of the PDX neutral beam ion sources at ORNL prior to delivery coupled with several field design changes and improvements in the injection system made at PPPL as a result of neutral beam operating experience with the PLT tokamak. It has been found that the operation of high power neutral beam injection systems in a tokamak-neutral beam environment requires procedures and performance different from those required for development operation on test stands. In this paper, we review the installatin of the PDX neutral beam injection system, and its operation and performance during the initial high power plasma heating experiments with the PDX tokamak

  11. Overview of the JET Neutral Beam Enhancement Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, D.

    2006-01-01

    Three objectives of the JET Neutral Beam Enhancement (NBE) are a) to increase the NB power delivered to JET from 25 MW to >34 MW; b) to extend the beam pulse duration from 10 to 20 seconds and c) to improve availability and reliability of the JET NB system. The project is based on the upgrade of the two existing JET neutral injectors, each equipped with eight positive ion neutral injectors (PINIs). The main increase of the NB power will come from the rearrangement of the ion source permanent magnets from the present supercusp to pure chequerboard configuration, thus eliminating the magnetic filter used to limit primary electrons reaching the extraction region. This modification considerably increases the fraction of molecular ions, which leads to higher neutralisation efficiency. Further increase in the injected neutral beam power will result from higher beam transmission, the consequence of high uniformity and superior properties of the beams extracted from chequerboard ion sources. Finally, the maximum extracted deuterium ion current will be increased from the present ∼ 55 A to ∼ 65 A. This will be accomplished by the minor modification of the extraction aperture diameter and the accelerator gap. All PINIs will be operated at the same acceleration voltage (125 kV). The increase of the beam pulse length from 10 to 20 seconds requires modification or replacement of inter-pulse water cooled beamline components. The most challenging among these tasks is the replacement the duct liner, which protects the vessel from re-ionised beam power at the beam entry into the torus. It will be replaced with an actively cooled liner based on proven hypervapotron technology. To improve the overall reliability of the JET neutral beam system and to allow extraction of 65 A of deuterium ion current, eight existing 80 kV/60 A high voltage power supplies (HVPS) will be replaced with four new 130 kV/130 A units. This means that, after the completion of the NBE project, 75% of the JET

  12. Neutral beam control systems for the Tandem Mirror Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, R.I.

    1979-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is presently developing the technology and approaches which will be used in larger fusion systems. This paper describes some of the designs which were used in creating the control system for the TMX neutral beams. To create a system of controls that would work near these large, rapid switching current sources required a mixture of different technologies: fiberoptic data transmission, printed circuit and wirewrap techniques, etc

  13. Neutral beam injection on the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, G.; Ashcroft, D.L.; Eubank, H.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Knauer, R.C.; Stewart, L.D.; Stooksberry, R.W.; Ulrickson, M.; Williams, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the operation of the neutral beam injection system on the PLT tokamak. Improvements, retrofits, and conditioning have changed the injection system from an experiment in itself to a fairly reliable and useful plasma heating tool. We will present a brief overview of our physics achievements and then describe the system as it exists now. This will include injector performance, conditioning needs, maintenance needs, reliability, and daily operating sequences. We will also include hardware modifications and additions, electrical and mechanical, and point out remaining problem areas

  14. Supervisory control software for MFTF neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    We describe the software structures that control the operation of MFTF Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supplies (SNBPS). These components of the Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) comprise ten distinct tasks that exist in the SCDS system environment. The codes total about 16,000 lines of commented Pascal code and occupy 240 kbytes of memory. The controls have been running since March 1981, and at this writing are being integrated to the Local Control System and to the power supply Pulse Power Module Controller

  15. Mixed deuterium-tritium neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, L.; Lewis, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    An alternative mixed beam neutral beam injector (MNBI) for fusion reactors is proposed that eliminates the conventional isotope separation system (ISS) in the fuel cycle. The principal advantage of the alternative system is a capital and operating cost savings in the fuel cycle, as the ISS employs cryogenic distillation at liquid-hydrogen temperatures to effect a separation of hydrogen isotopes and to eliminate a buildup of normal hydrogen in the recycled fuel. Possible additional advantages of the alternative method involve an improvement in overall safety and a reduction of the amount of tritium in the fuel cycle. The alternative heating system uses an electromagnetic separation in the MNBI to limit the buildup of normal hydrogen. Calculations indicate that an MNBI can be reasonably optimized in the case of an upgraded injection system for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  16. Performance test results of ion beam transport for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428, Gujarat (India); Uhlemann, R, E-mail: mukti@ipr.res.i [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute fur Energieforschung IEF-4, Plasmaphysik D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    A neutral beam injector is built at IPR to heat the plasma of SST-1 and its upgrade. It delivers a maximum beam power of 1.7 MW for 55 kV Hydrogen beam or 80 kV Deuterium beam. At lower beam voltage, the delivered power falls to 500 kW at 30 kV Hydrogen beam which is adequate to heat SST-1 plasma ions to {approx} 1 keV. Process of acceleration of ions to the required beam voltage, conversion of ions to neutrals and removal of un-neutralized ions and the beam diagnostic systems occupy a large space. The consequence is that linear extent of the neutral beam injector is at least a few meters. Also, port access provides a very narrow duct. Even a very good injector design and fabrication practices keep beam divergence at a very low but finite value. The result is beam transport becomes an important issue. Since a wide area beam is constructed by hundreds of beam lets, it becomes essential they be focused in such a way that beam transport loss is minimized. Horizontal and vertical focal lengths are two parameters, in addition to beam divergence, which give a description of the beam transport. We have obtained these two parameters for our injector by using beam transport code; making several hundred simulation runs by varying optical parameters of the beam. The selected parameters set has been translated into the engineering features of the extractor grid set of the ion source. Aperture displacement technique is used to secure the horizontal beam focusing at 5.4 m. Combination of both aperture displacement and inclining of two grid halves to {approx} 17 mrad are secured for vertical beam focusing at 7 m from earth grid of the ion source. The gaps between the design, engineered and performance tested values usually arise due to lack of exercising control over fabrication processes or due to inaccuracies in the assumption made in the model calculations of beam optics and beam transport. This has been the case with several injectors, notably with JET injector. To overcome

  17. Comparison of beam deposition for three neutral beam injection codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, R.M.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.

    1979-03-01

    The three neutral beam injection codes BEAM (Houlberg, ORNL), HOFR (Howe, ORNL), and FREYA (Post, PPPL) are compared with respect to the calculation of the fast ion deposition profile H(r). Only plasmas of circular cross section are considered, with injection confined to the mid-plane of the torus. The approximations inherent in each code are pointed out, and a series of comparisons varying several parameters (beam energy and radius, machine size, and injection angle) shows excellent agreement among all the codes. A cost comparison (execution time and memory requirements) is made which points out the relative merits of each code within the context of incorporation into a plasma transport simulation code

  18. EPICS - MDSplus integration in the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, Adriano; Manduchi, Gabriele; Barbalace, Antonio; Soppelsa, Anton; Taliercio, Cesare

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER, the ITER-size ion-source test bed in the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, is a fusion device requiring a complex central system to provide control and data acquisition, referred to as CODAS. The CODAS software architecture will rely on EPICS and MDSplus, two open-source, collaborative software frameworks, targeted at control and data acquisition, respectively. EPICS has been selected as ITER CODAC middleware and, as the final deliverable of the Neutral Beam Test Facility is the procurement of the ITER Heating Neutral Beam Injector, we decided to adopt this ITER technology. MDSplus is a software package for data management, supporting advanced concepts, such as platform and underlying hardware independence, self description data, and data driven model. The combined use of EPICS and MDSplus is not new in fusion, but their level of integration will be new in SPIDER, achieved by a more refined data access layer. The paper presents the integration software to use effectively EPICS and MDSplus, including the definition of appropriate EPICS records to interact with MDSplus. The MDSplus and EPICS archive concepts are also compared on the basis of performance tests and data streaming is investigated by ad-hoc measurements.

  19. Lawrence Berkeley laboratory neutral-beam engineering test facility power-supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, I.C.; Arthur, C.A.; deVries, G.J.; Owren, H.M.

    1981-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is upgrading the neutral beam source test facility (NBSTF) into a neutral beam engineering test facility (NBETF) with increased capabilities for the development of neutral beam systems. The NBETF will have an accel power supply capable of 170 kV, 70 A, 30 sec pulse length, 10% duty cycle; and the auxiliary power supplies required for the sources. This paper describes the major components, their ratings and capabilities, and the flexibility designed to accomodate the needs of source development

  20. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) neutral beam design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, T.J.; Brook, J.W.; Spampinato, P.T.; Mueller, J.P.; Luzzi, T.E.; Sedgley, D.W.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ITER neutral beam design: ion dump; neutralizer and module gas flow analysis; vacuum system; cryogenic system; maintainability; power distribution; and system cost

  1. Apparatus and method for neutralizing the beam in an ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    An ion implanter apparatus is described with provision for neutralizing the space charge potential of the ionic beam with a closed loop feedback system responding to the electrical charges that tend to accumulate on a target specimen. Neutralization is provided by a controllable electron source surrounding the beam. Flow of electrons to a plate radially outward of the electron source is used to derive a signal proportional to the beam ion current when the space charge potential of the beam is neutralized. The beam current signal can be used (1) to provide a read-out display for the operator; (2) to control the magnitude of the ion beam; (3) to be integrated to determine the total positive charge that enters the faraday cage of the implanter for use to control the ion beam shutter; or (4) to effect relative movement of the specimen and the beam

  2. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; In, S R; Lee, K W; Jin, J T; Chang, D S; Oh, B H; Bae, Y S; Kim, J S; Park, H T; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Kashiwagi, M; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Hanada, M

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1∕3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D(+):D(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm(2). The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A∕kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the T(i) and T(e) profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  3. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamaka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; In, S. R.; Lee, K. W.; Jin, J. T.; Chang, D. S.; Oh, B. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, J. S.; Park, H. T.; Watanabe, K.; Inoue, T.; Kashiwagi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Hanada, M.

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1/3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D+:D2+:D3+ = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm2. The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A/kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the Ti and Te profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  4. The Doublet III neutral beam injector cryosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhorn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes neutral beam injection into the Doublet III tokamak for plasma heating experiments. Cryopanels employed in the beamline vacuum pumping system are force flow cooled to 3.8 K by a closed loop refrigeration system. Topics considered include beamline description, cryosystem description, system characteristics, and operational history. Evaluation of the first beamline was carried out using a 25 L/h liquefier and a unique reliquefaction heat exchanger to permit subatmospheric operation and panel flow rates of 140 L/h. The system was upgraded for three beamline operation by substitution of a 100 L/h liquefier and more cryogen storage capacity. It is concluded that the cryosystem gives stable operation of three beamline cryopanel arrays with little operator intervention

  5. Modeling and experimental studies of the DIII-D neutral beam system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, B., E-mail: crowleyb@fusion.gat.com; Rauch, J.; Scoville, J.T.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The issues surrounding proposals to increase neutral beam power are evaluated. • A tetrode version of the DIII-D ion source is modeled. • A neutralization efficiency of the DIII-D neutral beam is measured. • A power loading model of the neutral beam line is presented. - Abstract: In this paper, we present the results of beam physics experimental and modeling efforts aimed at learning from and building on the experience of the DIII-D off-axis neutral beam upgrade and other neutral beam system upgrades such as those at JET. The modeling effort includes electrostatic accelerator modeling (using a Poisson solver), gas dynamics modeling for the neutralizer and beam transport models for the beamline. Experimentally, spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques are used to evaluate the system performance. We seek to understand and ameliorate problems such as anomalous power deposition, originating from misdirected or excessively divergent beam particles, on a number of beamline components. We qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate possible project risks such as neutralization efficiency deficit and high voltage hold off associated with increasing the beam energy up to 105 keV.

  6. Beam-plasma instability in ion beam systems used in neutral beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.

    1977-02-01

    The beam-plasma instability is analyzed for the ion beams used for neutral beam generation. Both positive and negative ion beams are considered. Stability is predicted when the beam velocity is less than the electron thermal velocity; the only exception occurs when the electron density accompanying a negative ion beam is less than the ion density by nearly the ratio of electron to ion masses. For cases in which the beam velocity is greater than the electron thermal velocity, instability is predicted near the electron plasma frequency

  7. ORNL 150 keV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Kim, J.; Menon, M.M.; Schilling, G.

    1977-01-01

    The 150 keV neutral beam test facility provides for the testing and development of neutral beam injectors and beam systems of the class that will be needed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and The Next Step (TNS). The test facility can simulate a complete beam line injection system and can provide a wide range of experimental operating conditions. Herein is offered a general description of the facility's capabilities and a discussion of present system performance

  8. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    A fixed-price procurement contract for $24.9 million was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, CA, for the design, manufacture, installation, and acceptance testing of the sustaining neutral beam power supply system (SNBPSS). This system is scheduled for completion in early 1981 and will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each of the 24 power supply sets will provide the accel potential of 80 kV at 88 A, the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module

  9. Γ-source Neutral Point Clamped Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wei; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    Transformer based Z-source inverters are recently proposed to achieve promising buck-boost capability. They have improved higher buck-boost capability, smaller size and less components count over Z-source inverters. On the other hand, neutral point clamped inverters have less switching stress...... and better output performance comparing with traditional two-level inverters. Integrating these two types of configurations can help neutral point inverters achieve enhanced votlage buck-boost capability....

  10. Assembly process of the ITER neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graceffa, J., E-mail: joseph.graceffa@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Petrov, V.; Schunke, B.; Urbani, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Pilard, V. [Fusion for Energy, C/ Josep Pla, n°2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    The ITER neutral beam (NB) injectors are used for heating and diagnostics operations. There are 4 injectors in total, 3 heating neutral beam injectors (HNBs) and one diagnostic neutral beam injector (DNB). Two HNBs and the DNB will start injection into ITER during the hydrogen/helium phase of ITER operations. A third HNB is considered as an upgrade to the ITER heating systems, and the impact of the later installation and use of that injector have to be taken into account when considering the installation and assembly of the whole NB system. It is assumed that if a third HNB is to be installed, it will be installed before the nuclear phase of the ITER project. The total weight of one injector is around 1200 t and it is composed of 18 main components and 36 sets of shielding plates. The overall dimensions are length 20 m, height 10 m and width 5 m. Assembly of the first two HNBs and the DNB will start before the first plasma is produced in ITER, but as the time required to assemble one injector is estimated at around 1.5 year, the assembly will be divided into 2 steps, one prior to first plasma, and the second during the machine second assembly phase. To comply with this challenging schedule the assembly sequence has been defined to allow assembly of three first injectors in parallel. Due to the similar design between the DNB and HNBs it has been decided to use the same tools, which will be designed to accommodate the differences between the two sets of components. This reduces the global cost of the assembly and the overall assembly time for the injector system. The alignment and positioning of the injectors is a major consideration for the injector assembly as the alignment of the beamline components and the beam source are critical if good injector performance is to be achieved. The theoretical axes of the beams are defined relative to the duct liners which are installed in the NB ports. The concept adopted to achieve the required alignment accuracy is to use the

  11. Real time neutral beam power control on MAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homfray, David A., E-mail: david.homfray@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Benn, A.; Ciric, D.; Day, I.; Dunkley, V.; Keeling, D.; Khilar, S.; King, D.; King, R. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Kurutz, U. [Department of Experimental Plasma Physics, University of Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Payne, D.; Simmonds, M.; Stevenson, P.; Tame, C. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Real time power control of neutral beam provides an excellent tool for many different plasma physics studies. Power control at a better resolution than the level of a single injector is usually achieved by modulating individual power supplies. However, the short beam slowing down time on MAST is such that the plasma would be sensitive to modulating the neutral beam using this 100% on-off pulse-width modulation method. A novel alternative method of power control has been demonstrated, where the arc current, and hence beam current, has been controlled in real time allowing variations in neutral beam power. This has been demonstrated in a MAST plasma with almost no loss of transmission as a consequence of the optical properties of the high perveance MAST neutral beam system. This paper will detail the methodology, experiment and results and discuss the full implementation of this method that will allow MAST to control the beam power in real time.

  12. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdanier, William [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Roy, Prabir K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kaganovich, Igor [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  13. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  14. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D 0 formed from D - . The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV

  15. Active ion temperature measurement with heating neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yukitoshi; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shin

    1987-03-01

    When the heating neutral-beam (hydrogen beam) is injected into a deuterium plasma, the density of neutral particles is increased locally. By using this increased neutral particles, the local ion temperature is measured by the active charge-exchange method. The analyzer is the E//B type mass-separated neutral particle energy analyzer and the measured position is about one third outside of the plasma radius. The deuterium energy spectrum is Maxwellian, and the temperature is increased from 350 eV to 900 eV during heating. Since the local hydrogen to deuterium density concentration and the density of the heating neutral-beam as well as the ion temperature can be obtained good S/N ratio, the usefulness of this method during neutral-beam heating is confirmed by this experiment. (author)

  16. Experimental study of the stability of a neutralized electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudelainen, V.I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported from measurements of the spectral properties of a long neutralized electron beam in the NAP-M proton storage ring. It is shown that when the number of secondary electrons is small, both the longitudinal and the transverse oscillations are strongly damped, so that beam instability is suppressed. The current density of the neutralized electron beam produced in the experiments was approx.10 2 times greater than the theoretical value determined from the instability threshold for nonaxisymmetric oscillations

  17. CH2 molecular beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.A.R.; Grosser, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular beam source of CH 2 is described. Coaxial beams of methylene halide and alkali metal react and the mixture is formed into a molecular beam. Passage through a mechanical velocity selector rotating at a suitably high speed purifies the beam, separating light, fast CH 2 from heavier, slower contaminating species

  18. Neutral-beam performance analysis using a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed an optical diagnostic system suitable for characterizing the performance of energetic neutral beams. An absolutely calibrated CCD video camera is used to view the neutral beam as it passes through a relatively high pressure (10 -5 Torr) region outside the neutralizer: collisional excitation of the fast deuterium atoms produces H/sub proportional to/ emission (lambda = 6561A) that is proportional to the local atomic current density, independent of the species mix of accelerated ions over the energy range 5 to 20 keV. Digital processing of the video signal provides profile and aiming information for beam optimization. 6 refs., 3 figs

  19. Neutral beam systems for the magnetic fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beal, J.W.; Staten, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    The attainment of economic, safe fusion power has been described as the most sophisticated scientific problem ever attacked by mankind. The presently established goal of the magnetic fusion program is to develop and demonstrate pure fusion central electric power stations for commercial applications. Neutral beam heating systems are a basic component of the tokamak and mirror experimental fusion plasma confinement devices. The requirements placed upon neutral beam heating systems are reviewed. The neutral beam systems in use or being developed are presented. Finally, the needs of the future are discussed

  20. Doppler-shift spectra of Hα lines from negative-ion-based neutral beams for large helical device neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Asano, E.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Grisham, L.; Umeda, N.; Honda, A.; Ikeda, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    2006-01-01

    The velocity spectra of the negative-ion-(H - ) based neutral beams are studied in high-performance large-area ion sources during injection into large helical device fusion plasmas. We are conducting systematic observations in standard neutral beam injection to correlate beam spectra with source operating conditions. Almost all of the transmitted beam power was at full acceleration energy (∼170 keV). The small stripping beam component which was produced in the extraction gap was evaluated to be about 9%-22% by amplitude of the measured spectra for the sources in beam lines 1 and 2. H - production uniformity from the spectrum profile was 86%-90% for three sources. For the longest pulse injection during 74 and 128 s, a full energy component tended to decrease with time, while the accelerator gap stripping tail tended to increase slightly with time, which is attributed to beam-induced outgassing in the accelerator. A higher conductance multislot ground grid accelerator appeared to show little growth in the accelerator gap beam stripping during long pulses compared to the conventional multiaperture ground grid. The beam uniformity appeared to vary in part with the Cs uniformity on the plasma grid

  1. Protection of neutral-beam accelerator electrodes from spark discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-voltage (HV) electrodes of neutral beam sources (NBS's) must be protected from occasional sparks to ground. Spark currents can be limited with special transformers and reactors which introduce time delays that are long enough to quench the spark or to disconnect the energy source. A saturated time delay transformer (STDT) connected in series with the HV power supply detects spark faults and limits the current supplied by the power supply and its capacitance to ground; it also initiates spark quenching. Nonsaturated, longitudinal reactors limit the discharge current supplied by the energy stored in the circuit capacitance of the NBS filament and arc power supplies long enough to discharge this capacitance into a resistor. The design principles of these protective circuits are presented

  2. Protection of neutral-beam-accelerator electrodes from spark discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-voltage (HV) electrodes of neutral beam sources (NBS's) must be protected from occasional sparks to ground. Spark currents can be limited with special transformers and reactors which introduce time delays that are long enough to quench the spark or to disconnect the energy source. A saturated time delay transformer (STDT) connected in series with the HV power supply detects spark faults and limits the current supplied by the power supply and its capacitance to ground; it also initiates spark quenching. Nonsaturated, longitudinal reactors limit the discharge current supplied by the energy stored in the circuit capacitance of the NBS filament and arc power supplies long enough to discharge this capacitance into a resistor. The design principles of these protective circuits are presented in this paper

  3. Protection of neutral-beam-accelerator electrodes from spark discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    The high-voltage (HV) electrodes of neutral beam sources (NBS's) must be protected from occasional sparks to ground. Spark currents can be limited with special transformers and reactors which introduce time delays that are long enough to quench the spark or to disconnect the energy source. A saturated time delay transformer (STDT) connected in series with the HV power supply detects spark faults and limits the current supplied by the power supply and its capacitance to ground; it also initiates spark quenching. Nonsaturated, longitudinal reactors limit the discharge current supplied by the energy stored in the circuit capacitance of the NBS filament and arc power supplies long enough to discharge this capacitance into a resistor. The design principles of these protective circuits are presented in this paper

  4. Analysis of particle species evolution in neutral beam injection lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Haselton, H.H.

    1978-07-01

    Analytic solutions to the rate equations describing the species evolution of a multispecies positive ion beam of hydrogen due to charge exchange and molecular dissociation are derived as a function of the background gas (H 2 ) line density in the neutralizing gas cell and in the drift tube. Using the solutions, calculations are presented for the relative abundance of each species as a function of the gas cell thickness, the reionization loss rates in the drift tube, and the neutral beam power as a function of the beam energy and the species composition of the original ion beam

  5. Calculation of neutral beam deposition accounting for excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianakon, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Large-scale neutral-beam auxillary heating of plasmas has led to new plasma operational regimes which are often dominated by fast ions injected via the absorption of an energetic beam of hydrogen neutrals. An accurate simulation of the slowing down and transport of these fast ions requires an intimate knowledge of the hydrogenic neutral deposition on each flux surface of the plasma. As a refinement to the present generation of transport codes, which base their beam deposition on ground-state reaction rates, a new set of routines, based on the excited states of hydrogen, is presented as mechanism for computing the attenuation and deposition of a beam of energetic neutrals. Additionally, the numerical formulations for the underlying atomic physics for hydrogen impacting on the constiuent plasma species is developed and compiled as a numerical database. Sample results based on this excited state model are compared with the ground-state model for simple plasma configurations

  6. Design of cryo-vacuum system for MW neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chundong; Xie Yuanlai

    2010-01-01

    Neutral beam injector is an equipment that is used to produce and then to neutralize high energetic particle beam. A neutral beam injector (EAST-NBI) with MW magnitude neutral beam power is considered to be developed to support the EAST physical research. The requirements for vacuum system were analyzed after introducing the principle of EAST-NBI. A differential vacuum system structure was chosen after analyzing the performance of different vacuum pumping system structure. The gas sources and their characteristics were analyzed, and two inserted type cryocondensation pumps were chosen as main vacuum pump. The schematic structure of the two cryocondensation pump with pumping area 8 m 2 and 6 m 2 were given and their cooling method and temperature control mode were determined. (authors)

  7. The latest development of EAST neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chundong; Xu Yongjian

    2014-01-01

    As the first full superconducting non-circular cross section Tokomak in the world, EAST is used to explore the forefront physics and engineering issues on the construction of Tokomak fusion reactor. Neutral beam injection has been recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, a set of neutral beam injector (4∼8 MW, 10∼100 s)will be built and operational in 2014. The paper presents the latest development of EAST neutral beam injector and the latest experiment results of long pulse beam extraction and high power beam extraction are reported, those results show that all targets reach or almost reach the design targets. All these will lay a solid foundation for the achievement of plasma heating and current drive for EAST in 2014. (authors)

  8. Current neutralization of nanosecond risetime, high-current electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidestri, J.P.; Spence, P.W.; Bailey, V.L.; Putnam, S.D.; Fockler, J.; Eichenberger, C.; Champney, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the authors have recently investigated methods to achieve current neutralization in fast risetime (<3 ns) electron beams propagating in low-pressure gas. For this investigation, they injected a 3-MV, 30-kA intense beam into a drift cell containing gas pressures from 0.10 to 20 torr. By using a fast net current monitor (100-ps risetime), it was possible to observe beam front gas breakdown phenomena and to optimize the drift cell gas pressure to achieve maximum current neutralization. Experimental observations have shown that by increasing the drift gas pressure (P ∼ 12.5 torr) to decrease the mean time between secondary electron/gas collisions, the beam can propagate with 90% current neutralization for the full beam pulsewidth (16 ns)

  9. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qianhong; Gong Xueyu; Yang Lei; Li Xinxia; Lu Xingqiang; Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by the neutral beam injection is investigated in a large aspect ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are figured out. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current considered, the net current density obviously decreases due to electron return current, at the same time the peak of current moves towards the centre plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the neutral beam injection but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of net current is small for the neutral beam parallel injection but increases multipliedly for perpendicular injection, and increases with beam energy increasing. (authors)

  10. Neutral beam injection and plasma convection in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.; Hiroe, S.

    1988-06-01

    Injection of a neutral beam into a plasma in a magnetic field has been studied by means of numerical plasma simulations. It is found that, in the absence of a rotational transform, the convection electric field arising from the polarization charges at the edges of the beam is dissipated by turbulent plasma convection, leading to anomalous plasma diffusion across the magnetic field. The convection electric field increases with the beam density and beam energy. In the presence of a rotational transform, polarization charges can be neutralized by the electron motion along the magnetic field. Even in the presence of a rotational transform, a steady-state convection electric field and, hence, anomalous plasma diffusion can develop when a neutral beam is constantly injected into a plasma. Theoretical investigations on the convection electric field are described for a plasma in the presence of rotational transform. 11 refs., 19 figs

  11. Extending DIII-D Neutral Beam Modulated Operations with a Camac Based Total on Time Interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggest, D.S.; Broesch, J.D.; Phillips, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    A new total-on-time interlock has increased the operational time limits of the Neutral Beam systems at DIII-D. The interlock, called the Neutral Beam On-Time-Limiter (NBOTL), is a custom built CAMAC module utilizing a Xilinx 9572 Complex Programmable Logic Device (CPLD) as its primary circuit. The Neutral Beam Injection Systems are the primary source of auxiliary heating for DIII-D plasma discharges and contain eight sources capable of delivering 20MW of power. The delivered power is typically limited to 3.5 s per source to protect beam-line components, while a DIII-D plasma discharge usually exceeds 5 s. Implemented as a hardware interlock within the neutral beam power supplies, the NBOTL limits the beam injection time. With a continuing emphasis on modulated beam injections, the NBOTL guards against command faults and allows the beam injection to be safely spread over a longer plasma discharge time. The NBOTL design is an example of incorporating modern circuit design techniques (CPLD) within an established format (CAMAC). The CPLD is the heart of the NBOTL and contains 90% of the circuitry, including a loadable, 1 MHz, 28 bit, BCD count down timer, buffers, and CAMAC communication circuitry. This paper discusses the circuit design and implementation. Of particular interest is the melding of flexible modern programmable logic devices with the CAMAC format

  12. Gas utilization in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T 2 allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H 2 to D 2 could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Evaluation of beam-line components for use in a large neutral-beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual model of a neutral-beam injector was used to examine the effect of beam-line components on reactor performance. Criteria were established to optimize a reactor's reliability and minimize its cost

  14. Sparking protection for MFTF-B Neutral Beam Power Supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the upgrade of MFTF-B Neutral Beam Power Supplies for sparking protection. High performance ion sources spark repeatedly so ion source power supplies must be insensitive to sparking. The hot deck houses the series tetrode, arc and filament supplies, and controls. Hot deck shielding has been upgraded and a continuous shield around the arc, filament, gradient grid, and control cables now extends from the hot deck, through the core snubber, to the source. The shield carries accelerating current and connects only to the source. Shielded source cables go through an outer duct which now connects to a ground plane under the hot deck. This hybrid transmission line is a low inductance path for sparks discharging the stray capacitance of the hot deck and isolation transformers, reducing coupling to building steel. Parallel DC current return cables inside the duct lower inductance to reduce inductive turn-off transients. MOVs to ground further limit surges in the remote power supply return. Single point grounding is at the source. No control or rectifier components have been damaged nor are there any known malfunctions due to sparking up to 80 kV output

  15. Sparking protection for MFTF-B neutral beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the upgrade of MFTF-B Neutral Beam Power Supplies for sparking protection. High performance ion sources spark repeatedly so ion source power supplies must be insensitive to sparking. The hot deck houses the series tetrode, arc and filament supplies, and controls. Hot deck shielding has been upgraded and a continuous shield around the arc, filament, gradient grid, and control cables now extends from the hot deck, through the core snubber, to the source. The shield carries accelerating current and connects only to the source. Shielded source cables go through an outer duct which now connects to a ground plane under the hot deck. This hybrid transmission line is a low inductance path for sparks discharging the stray capacitance of the hot deck and isolation transformers, reducing coupling to building steel. Parallel dc current return cables inside the duct lower inductance to reduce inductive turn-off transients. MOVs to ground further limit surges in the remote power supply return. Single point grounding is at the source. No control or rectifier components have been damaged nor are there any known malfunctions due to sparking up to 80 kV output

  16. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  17. Efficient, radiation-hardened, 400- and 800-keV neutral-beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Cooper, W.S.; Fink, J.A.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ruby, L.; Soroka, L.; Tanabe, J.

    1983-04-01

    We present designs for two negative-ion based neutral beam lines with reactor-level power output. Both beam lines make use of such technologically advanced features as high-current-density surface-conversion ion sources, transverse-field-focussing (TFF) acceleration and transport, and laser photodetachment. For the second of these designs, we also presented detailed beam and vacuum calculations, as well as a brief description of a proof-of-principle test system currently under development

  18. Sawtooth stability in neutral beam heated plasmas in TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, I.T.; Pinches, S. D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; De Bock, M.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental sawtooth behaviour in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas in TEXTOR is described. It is found that the sawtooth period is minimized with a low NBI power oriented in the same direction as the plasma current. As the beam power is increased in the opposite direction to the

  19. Mechanical engineering problems in the TFTR neutral beam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, D.D.; Bryant, E.H.; Johnson, R.L.; Kim, J.; Queen, C.C.; Schilling, G.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design of a prototype beam line for the TFTR Neutral Beam System has been developed. The basic components have been defined, cost estimates prepared, and the necessary development programs identified. Four major mechanical engineering problems, potential solutions and the required development programs are discussed

  20. Energy composition of high-energy neutral beams on the COMPASS tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitosinkova Klara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS tokamak is equipped with two identical neutral beam injectors (NBI for additional plasma heating. They provide a beam of deuterium atoms with a power of up to ~(2 × 300 kW. We show that the neutral beam is not monoenergetic but contains several energy components. An accurate knowledge of the neutral beam power in each individual energy component is essential for a detailed description of the beam- -plasma interaction and better understanding of the NBI heating processes in the COMPASS tokamak. This paper describes the determination of individual energy components in the neutral beam from intensities of the Doppler-shifted Dα lines, which are measured by a high-resolution spectrometer viewing the neutral beam-line at the exit of NBI. Furthermore, the divergence of beamlets escaping single aperture of the last accelerating grid is deduced from the width of the Doppler-shifted lines. Recently, one of the NBI systems was modified by the removal of the Faraday copper shield from the ion source. The comparison of the beam composition and the beamlet divergence before and after this modification is also presented.

  1. Cornell electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Beebe, E.N.; Janson, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam ion source (EBIS) for the production of low energy, multiply charged ion beams to be used in atomic physics experiments has been designed and constructed. An external high perveance electron gun is used to launch the electron beam into a conventional solenoid. Novel features of the design include a distributed sputter ion pump to create the ultrahigh vacuum environment in the ionization region of the source and microprocessor control of the axial trap voltage supplies

  2. Shielding considerations for neutral-beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Seynes, X.

    1983-03-01

    Results of a study on the geometry of an FED-A Neutral Beam Injector beamline duct shield are presented. Also included is a calculation of dose rates, as a function of time, from an activated NBI. The shielding investigations consisted of varying the parameters of the geometry and transporting particles through it using the MCNP Monte-Carlo code. The dose rates were calculated by the ACDOS3 code using realistic MCNP results. A final-to-incident flux ratio of 6.5 x 10 -7 can be achieved through the use of a 65.5 cm reentry duct. This is for a realistic source and pure water shielding material. The activated NBI produced a dose rate of 15.9 mrem/hr two and a half days after shutdown of the reactor

  3. Component design description of the neutral beam injectors for PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Baer, M.B.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Mann, T.L.; Queen, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Whitfield, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma heating by injection of high energy neutrals is one of the experiments to be carried out on Princeton Large Torus (PLT). A four unit neutral beam injection system has been designed, built and tested which should inject a total of 3 MW of neutrals into PLT with a 200 millisecond pulse length. A typical system unit is described where the major components are identified. The following discussion describes each of these items along with some details of the design and fabrication problems encountered. Some early design considerations addressed the problems of separation and dumping of residual ions from the neutral beam, calorimetry of the neutrals with incident fuxes of 25 KW/cm 2 , and pumping speeds of several hundred thousand liters per second for hydrogen gas. Solutions were found for these problems while also resolving the complex dilemma of interfacing four large systems to a tokamak

  4. Calculation of beam neutralization in the IPNS-Upgrade RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Yong-Chul.

    1995-01-01

    The author calculated the neutralization of circulating beam in this report. In the calculation it is assumed that all electrons liberated from the background molecules due to the collisional processes are trapped in the potential well of the proton beam. Including the dependence of ionization cross sections on the kinetic energy of the incident particle, the author derived the empirical formula for beam neutralization as a function of time and baseline vacuum pressure, which is applicable to the one acceleration cycle of the IPNS-Upgrade RCS

  5. Progress report on the neutral beam radiation hardening study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Condit, R.H.; Hoenig, C.L.; Wilcox, T.P.; Erickson, J.

    1978-01-01

    A neutral beam injector as presently conceived directly views the plasma it is sustaining. In turn the injector is exposed to the primary fusion neutrons plus secondary neutrons and gammas streaming back up the neutral beam duct. The intent of this work is to examine representative beam lines to see how performance and lifetimes could be affected by this radiation environment and to determine how unacceptable effects could be alleviated. Potential radiation induced problems addressed in this report have been limited to: (1) overheating of cryopanels and insulators, (2) gamma flux induced electrical conductivity increase of insulators, and (3) neutron and gamma fluence induced damage to insulator materials

  6. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  7. Method for producing uranium atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM/sub x/ heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared with that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe 2 . An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced

  8. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1 μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100 nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up – a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture – in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam. - Highlights: • The presented results are essential for optimal operation conditions of a neutral atom microscope set-up. • The key parameters for the experimental arrangement of a neutral microscopy set-up are identified and their interplay is quantified. • Insights in the multidimensional problem provide deep and crucial understanding for pushing beyond the apparent focus limitations. • This work points out the trade-offs for high intensity and high spatial resolution indicating several use cases.

  9. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1 μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100 nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up – a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture – in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam. - Highlights: • The presented results are essential for optimal operation conditions of a neutral atom microscope set-up. • The key parameters for the experimental arrangement of a neutral microscopy set-up are identified and their interplay is quantified. • Insights in the multidimensional problem provide deep and crucial understanding for pushing beyond the apparent focus limitations. • This work points out the trade-offs for high intensity and high spatial resolution indicating several use cases.

  10. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O. [Graduate school of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shinto, K. [IFMIF R and D Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Wada, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  11. Compact 80-keV neutral-beam module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Baird, E.D.; Berkner, K.H.; Cooper, W.S.; Duffy, T.J.; Ehlers, K.W.; Fink, J.; Garner, D.; Wilder, C.

    1977-01-01

    A compact and maintainable source of 80-keV neutral beams that focus to a high power density is required for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). In the new source being designed and built to meet these requirements, the cross-sectional area is reduced in two ways: by immersing the source in a vacuum where high voltage can be held over smaller distances and by redesigning grid supporting structures. Reliability is increased by reducing the electric fields everywhere else below those present between grids and by design innovations. The latter include techniques to reduce stray magnetic field and disperse gas uniformly, all metal-ceramic construction, and a 60-kV shield enclosing all 80-kV electrodes. Wherever possible, we have attempted to simplify the construction. We expect to solve problems that arise during testing either with add-on fixes or with the techniques already tested successfully on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) 120-keV source. Easy maintenance is obtained by a compact isolation valve and by modular construction. Curving both the grid wires and their holders provides focusing in two planes

  12. TFTR neutral beam control and monitoring for DT operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Chu, J.

    1995-01-01

    Record fusion power output has recently been obtained in TFTR with the injection of deuterium and tritium neutral beams. This significant achievement was due in part to the controls, software, and data processing capabilities added to the neutral beam system for DT operations. Chief among these improvements was the addition of SUN workstations and large dynamic data storage to the existing Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) system. Essentially instantaneous look back over the recent shot history has been provided for most beam waveforms and analysis results. Gas regulation controls allowing remote switchover between deuterium and tritium were also added. With these tools, comparison of the waveforms and data of deuterium and tritium for four test conditioning pulses quickly produced reliable tritium setpoints. Thereafter, all beam conditioning was performed with deuterium, thus saving the tritium supply for the important DT injection shots. The lookback capability also led to modifications of the gas system to improve reliability and to control ceramic valve leakage by backbiasing. Other features added to improve the reliability and availability of DT neutral beam operations included master beamline controls and displays, a beamline thermocouple interlock system, a peak thermocouple display, automatic gas inventory and cryo panel gas loading monitoring, beam notching controls, a display of beam/plasma interlocks, and a feedback system to control beam power based on plasma conditions

  13. Development of a negative ion-based neutral beam injector in Novosibirsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A A; Abdrashitov, G F; Anashin, V V; Belchenko, Yu I; Burdakov, A V; Davydenko, V I; Deichuli, P P; Dimov, G I; Dranichnikov, A N; Kapitonov, V A; Kolmogorov, V V; Kondakov, A A; Sanin, A L; Shikhovtsev, I V; Stupishin, N V; Sorokin, A V; Popov, S S; Tiunov, M A; Belov, V P; Gorbovsky, A I; Kobets, V V; Binderbauer, M; Putvinski, S; Smirnov, A; Sevier, L

    2014-02-01

    A 1000 keV, 5 MW, 1000 s neutral beam injector based on negative ions is being developed in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk in collaboration with Tri Alpha Energy, Inc. The innovative design of the injector features the spatially separated ion source and an electrostatic accelerator. Plasma or photon neutralizer and energy recuperation of the remaining ion species is employed in the injector to provide an overall energy efficiency of the system as high as 80%. A test stand for the beam acceleration is now under construction. A prototype of the negative ion beam source has been fabricated and installed at the test stand. The prototype ion source is designed to produce 120 keV, 1.5 A beam.

  14. Noninterferometric phase imaging of a neutral atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, P.J.; Mackin, T.R.; Turner, L.D.; Colton, I.; Nugent, K.A.; Scholten, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of a neutral atomic beam by using a noninterferometric technique. A collimated thermal atomic beam is phase shifted by an off-resonant traveling laser beam with both a Gaussian and a TEM 01 profile and with both red and blue detuning of as much as 50 GHz. Phase variations of more than 1000 rad were recovered from velocity-selective measurements of the propagation of the atomic beam and were found to be in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on independently measured phase object intensity profiles and detunings

  15. Neutral beam injection optimization at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Wolfers, G.; Alonso, J.; Marcon, G.; Carrasco, R.; Guasp, J.; Acedo, M.; Sanchez, E.; Medrano, M.; Garcia, A.; Doncel, J.; Alejaldre, C.; Tsai, C.C.; Barber, G.; Sparks, D.

    2005-01-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) heating has been used on the TJ-II stellarator for the first time. The beam has a port-through power between 200 and 400 kW and injection energy 28 kV. Beam transmission is limited by beam interception at the injection port and the first toroidal field coil, therefore, beam steering optimization is of critical importance. The beam interaction areas inside TJ-II vacuum chamber are surveyed by infrared thermography. Beam reionization can be a problem due to the presence of residual gas in the duct region. Halpha emission is used to monitor the reionization at the duct. A careful optimization of the injected gas has been carried out

  16. Performance of the PDX neutral beam wall armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Williams, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    The PDX wall armor was designed to function as an inner wall thermal armor, a neutral beam diagnostic, and a large area inner toroidal plasma limiter. In this paper we discuss its thermal performance as wall armor during two years of PDX neutral beam heating experiments. During this period it provided sufficient inner wall protection to permit perpendicular heating injections into normal and disruptive plasmas as well as injections in the absence of plasma involving special experiments, calibrations, and tests important for the optimization and development of the PDX neutral beam injection system. Many of the design constraints and performance issues encountered in this work are relevant to the design of larger fusion devices

  17. Status of the realization of the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toigo, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are required to deliver 16.5 MW of additional heating power to the plasma, accelerating negative ions up to -1 MV with a beam current of 40A lasting up to 1 hour. Since these outstanding requirements were never achieved all together so far, the realization of a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), called PRIMA, currently under construction in Padova, was launched with the aim to test the operation of the NB injector and to study the relevant physical and technological issues, in advance to the implementation in ITER. Two projects are under development: MITICA and SPIDER. MITICA is a full scale prototype of the ITER NB injector; the design is based on a similar scheme and layout, with the same power supply system and also the control and protection systems are being designed according to the ITER rules and constraints. The HV components are procured by JADA; the low voltage ones and the injector are procured by F4E. SPIDER project is an ion source with the same characteristics of the ITER one, specifically addressed to study the issues related to the RF operation; for this reason, the beam energy is limited to 100keV. It can generate both Hydrogen and Deuterium Ions; the design includes provisions to filter electrons and also to allow the use of cesium to attain the high values of current density required. SPIDER is procured by F4E and INDA. The construction of PRIMA buildings and auxiliaries, started in autumn 2008, was completed in summer 2015. SPIDER plant systems procurement is well advanced and some systems are under installation or site acceptance tests. In 2016 integrated commissioning and power supply integrated tests will be performed followed by the beginning of the first experimental phase. MITICA design was completed; many procurement contracts have been signed or will be launched in the next months. Installation activity will start in December 2015 with the installation of the first HV power supply components provided

  18. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  19. Design and Control of Small Neutral Beam Arc Chamber for Investigations of DIII-D Neutral Beam Failure During Helium Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremlin, Carl; Beckers, Jasper; Crowley, Brendan; Rauch, Joseph; Scoville, Jim

    2017-10-01

    The Neutral Beam system on the DIII-D tokamak consists of eight ion sources using the Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS) design. During helium operation, desired for research regarding the ITER pre-nuclear phase, it has been observed that the ion source arc chamber performance steadily deteriorates, eventually failing due to electrical breakdown of the insulation. A significant investment of manpower and time is required for repairs. To study the cause of failure a small analogue of the DIII-D neutral beam arc chamber has been constructed. This poster presents the design and analysis of the arc chamber including the PLC based operational control system for the experiment, analysis of the magnetic confinement and details of the diagnostic suite. Work supported in part by US DoE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program and under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  20. Gas utilization in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Jones, T.T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of gas utilization were performed using hydrogen and deuterium beams in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam test beamline to study the feasibility of operating tritium beams with existing ion sources under conditions of minimal tritium consumption. (i) It was found that the fraction of gas molecules introduced into the TFTR long-pulse ion sources that are converted to extracted ions (i.e., the ion source gas efficiency) was higher than with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range 33%--55%, and its effect on neutralization of the extracted ions was studied. At the high end of the gas efficiency range, the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted from room-temperature molecular gas flow (similar to observations at the Joint European Torus). (ii) Beam isotope change studies were performed. No extracted hydrogen ions were observed in the first deuterium beam following a working gas change from H 2 to D 2 . There was no arc conditioning or gas injection preceding the first beam extraction attempt. (iii) Experiments were also performed to determine the reliability of ion source operation during the long waiting periods between pulses that are anticipated during tritium operation. It was found that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV could produce a clean beam pulse after a waiting period of 14 h by preceding the beam extraction with several acceleration voltage/filament warm-up pulses. It can be concluded that the operation of up to six ion sources on tritium gas should be compatible with on-site inventory restrictions established for D--T, Q = 1 experiments on TFTR

  1. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, 610041 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  2. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, G Q; Lei, G J; Cao, J Y; Duan, X R

    2012-07-01

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage (∼100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  3. PC application in DIII-D neutral beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladd, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    An IBM PC/AT has been implemented to improve operation of the DIII-D neutral beams. The PC system provides centralization of all beam data with reasonable access for online shot-to-shot control and analysis. The PC hardware was configured to interface all four neutral beam host mini-computers, support multi-tasking, and provide storage for approximately one month's accumulation of beam data. The PC software is composed of commercial packages used for performance and statistical analysis (i.e. LOTUS 123, PC PLOT, etc.) host communications software (i.e. PCLINK, KERMIT, etc.) and applications developed software utilizing FORTRAN and BASIC. The objectives of this paper are to describe the implementation of the PC system, the methods of integrating the various software packages, and the scenario for online control and analysis

  4. Personal computer applications in DIII-D neutral beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    An IBM PC AT has been implemented to improve operation of the DIII-D neutral beams. The PC system provides centralization of all beam data with reasonable access for on-line shot-to-shot control and analysis. The PC hardware was configured to interface all four neutral beam host minicomputers, support multitasking, and provide storage for approximately one month's accumulation of beam data. The PC software is composed of commercial packages used for performance and statistical analysis (i.e., LOTUS 123, PC PLOT, etc.), host communications software (i.e., PCLink, KERMIT, etc.), and applications developed software utilizing fortran and basIc. The objectives of this paper are to describe the implementation of the PC system, the methods of integrating the various software packages, and the scenario for on-line control and analysis

  5. Bootstrap current of fast ions in neutral beam injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qianhong; Gong Xueyu; Li Xinxia; Yu Jun

    2012-01-01

    The bootstrap current of fast ions produced by neutral beam injection (NBI) is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak with circular cross-section under specific parameters. The bootstrap current density distribution and the total bootstrap current are reported. In addition, the beam bootstrap current always accompanies the electron return current due to the parallel momentum transfer from fast ions. With the electron return current taken into consideration, the net current density obviously decreases; at the same time, the peak of the current moves towards the central plasma. Numerical results show that the value of the net current depends sensitively not only on the angle of the NBI but also on the ratio of the velocity of fast ions to the critical velocity: the value of the net current is small for neutral beam parallel injection, but increases severalfold for perpendicular injection, and increases with increasing beam energy. (paper)

  6. Spectroscopic determination of species and divergence of hydrogen beams in the W7AS neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.; Penningsfeld, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Light-collecting systems are installed at the neutralizers of the W7AS neutral beam lines. They receive light emitted at an angle of 120 to the beam axes. Hydrogen beams are analyzed at around the wavelength of H α (6562.8 A), helium beams at around 5875.6 A. The hydrogen spectra show the well-known shifted and unshifted lines emitted by the different beam species and the background gas. The line widths are mainly determined by the beam focussing, the beamlet divergence and the apparatus profile. Knowing the focussing properties of the ion source and the instrument function of the spectrometer, one can determine the beamlet divergence. The spectrum is approximated by a series of Gaussians using least-squares fitting methods and evaluated with respect to beam species and divergence. Evaluation of the spectra proved difficult because they show a structured background, which is observed in the whole range of the Doppler shift. It is shown with helium beams that the background is caused by wall reflection of light emitted by the beam in the whole angular range between 0 and 180 . The knowledge of the background structure gained with He beams allows interpretation of the more complicated hydrogen spectra. (orig.)

  7. Neutral beam heating in stellarators: a numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.A.; Rome, J.A.; Hender, T.C.; Fowler, R.H.

    1983-03-01

    Calculation of neutral beam deposition and heating in stellarators is complicated by the twisty stellarator geometry and by the usual beam focusing, divergence, and cross-sectional shape considerations. A new deposition code has been written that takes all of this geometry into account. A unique feature of this code is that it gives particle deposition in field-line coordinates, enabling the thermalization problem to be solved more efficiently

  8. Fast ion profiles during neutral beam and lower hybrid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, R.E.; Cavallo, A.; Motley, R.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    Profiles of the d(d,p)t fusion reaction are measured in the PLT tokamak using an array of collimated 3 MeV proton detectors. During deuterium neutral beam injection, the emission profile indicates that the beam deposition is at least as narrow as predicted by a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck code. The fast ion tail formed by lower hybrid waves (at densities above the critical density for current drive) also peaks strongly near the magnetic axis

  9. Fusion Energy Division automation of the ISX-B neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Hanna, P.C.

    1982-06-01

    Operation of the two neutral beams on the ISX-B tokamak has been fully automated for an injected power up to 2 MW. A PDP 11/34 FORTRAN program conditions and injects the beams using commercial CAMAC hardware and ad hoc modifications of the beam controls. The fundamental beam conditioning algorithm is based on the breakdown history of the source. Difficulties encountered were noise entering the CAMAC system through control and data lines and the lack of well-defined operating heuristics detailed problem diagnostic techniques. A brief description is given of the hardware and software systems, operating techniques, and items of special concern

  10. Progress in the design of the ITER Neutral Beam cell Remote Handling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuff, R., E-mail: robin.shuff@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Van Uffelen, M.; Damiani, C. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Tesini, A.; Choi, C.-H. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Meek, R. [Oxford Technologies Limited, 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon OX14 1RL (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    The ITER Neutral Beam cell will include a suite of Remote Handling equipment for maintenance tasks. This paper summarises the current status and recent developments in the design of the ITER Neutral Beam Remote Handling System. Its concept design was successfully completed in July 2012 by CCFE in the frame of a grant agreement with F4E, in collaboration with the ITER Organisation, including major systems like monorail crane, Beam Line Transporter, beam source equipment, upper port and neutron shield equipment and associated tooling. Research and development activities are now underway on the monorail crane radiation hardened on-board control system and first of a kind remote pipe and lip seal maintenance tooling for the beam line vessel, reported in this paper.

  11. Progress in the design of the ITER Neutral Beam cell Remote Handling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuff, R.; Van Uffelen, M.; Damiani, C.; Tesini, A.; Choi, C.-H.; Meek, R.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam cell will include a suite of Remote Handling equipment for maintenance tasks. This paper summarises the current status and recent developments in the design of the ITER Neutral Beam Remote Handling System. Its concept design was successfully completed in July 2012 by CCFE in the frame of a grant agreement with F4E, in collaboration with the ITER Organisation, including major systems like monorail crane, Beam Line Transporter, beam source equipment, upper port and neutron shield equipment and associated tooling. Research and development activities are now underway on the monorail crane radiation hardened on-board control system and first of a kind remote pipe and lip seal maintenance tooling for the beam line vessel, reported in this paper

  12. Efficient, radiation-hardened, 800-keV neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.A.; Cooper, W.S.; Goldberg, D.A.; Ruby, L.; Soroka, L.; Fink, J.H.

    1982-10-01

    Recent advances and new concepts in negative ion generation, transport, acceleration, and neutrailzation make it appear likely that an efficient, radiation-hardened neutral beam injection system could be developed in time for the proposed FED-A tokamak. These new developments include the operation of steady-state H - ion sources at over 5 A per meter of source length, the concept of using strong-focussing electrostatic structures for low-gradient dc acceleration of high-current sheet beams of negative ions and the transport of these beams around corners, and the development of powerful oxygen-iodine chemical lasers which will make possible the efficient conversion of the negative ions to neutrals using a photodetachment scheme in which the ion beam passes through the laser cavity

  13. Measurement of neutral beam power and beam profile distribution on DNB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhimin; Liu Sheng; Song Shihua; Han Xiaopu; Li Jun; Hu Chundong; Hu Liqun; Xie Jun

    2005-01-01

    The injection power of a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) can be obtained with the thermocouple probe measurement system on the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). With the 49 kv, 6 A, 100 ms pulse charge of an acceleration electrode, a thermocouple probe measurement system with 13 thermocouples crossly distributed on a coppery heat target was used to measure the temperature rise of the target, and the maximum measured temperature rise was 14 degree C. And the neutral beam power of 160 kW and beam profile distribution was obtained by calculation. The total neutral beam power of 130 kW was also obtained by integral calculation with the temperature rise on the heat section board. The difference between the two means was analyzed. The experiment results shows that the method of heat section board with thermocouple probe is one of the effective ways to measure the beam power and beam profile distribution. (authors)

  14. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  15. National negative-ion-based neutral-beam development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Pyle, R.V.

    1983-08-01

    The plan covers facilities required, program milestones, and decision points. It includes identification of applications, experiments, theoretical research areas, development of specific technologies and reactor development and demonstration facilities required to bring about the successful application of negative-ion-based neutral beams. Particular emphasis is placed on those activities leading to use on existing plasma confinement experiments or their upgrades

  16. Neutral-beam aiming and calorimetry for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, A.I.; Margolies, D.

    1981-01-01

    The vessel for the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will have up to eleven 0.5-s-duration neutral-beam injectors for the initial heating of the MFTF-B plasma. Knowing the exact alignment of the beams and their total power is critical to the performance of the experiment. Using prototype aiming and calorimetry systems on the High Voltage Test Stand (HVTS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we hope to prove our ability to obtain an aiming accuracy of +-1 cm at the plasma and a calorimetric accuracy of +-5% of the actual total beam energy

  17. Modeling of neutral beam ion loss from CHS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Sasao, Mamiko; Kondo, T.

    2000-01-01

    Beam ion loss measurements from Compact Helical System (CHS) plasmas under a variety of conditions show a strong loss of ions in the range of pitch angles corresponding to transition orbits at the probe location. A numerical model has been developed which includes the beam ion orbits, and details of the detector, plasma, vessel, and neutral beam geometry. From this, the expected classical (i.e. collisionless single particle orbit) signal at the detector can be computed. Preliminary comparisons between the experimental data and model predictions indicate that the classical behavior of the orbits and the machine geometry are insufficient to explain the observations. (author)

  18. Measurement of extent of intense ion beam charge neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelko, V [Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). INR

    1997-12-31

    Various diagnostic tools were employed to study and optimize the extent of space charge neutralization in the pulsed intense proton beam facility PROFA, comprising Langmuir probes, capacitive probes, and a novel type of the three electrode collector. The latter does not only allow us to measure ion and electron beam current densities in a high magnetic field environment, but also to deduce the density spectrum of the beam electrons. Appropriate operating conditions were identified to attain a complete space charge neutralisation. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source

  20. Current neutralization in ballistic transport of light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, R.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Ottinger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Intense light ion beams are being considered as drivers to ignite fusion targets in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Ballistic transport of these beams from the diode to the target is possible only if the beam current is almost completely neutralized by plasma currents. This paper summarizes related work on relativistic electron beam and heavy ion beam propagation and describes a simple simulation model (DYNAPROP) which has been modified to treat light ion beam propagation. DYNAPROP uses an envelope equation to treat beam dynamics and uses rate equations to describe plasma and conductivity generation. The model has been applied both to the high current, 30 MeV Li +3 beams for LMF as well as low current, 1.2 MeV proton beams which are currently being studied on GAMBLE B at the Naval Research Laboratory. The predicted ratio of net currents to beam current is ∼0.1--0.2 for the GAMBLE experiment and ∼0.01 for LMF. The implications of these results for LMF and the GAMBLE experiments art discussed in some detail. The simple resistive model in DYNAPROP has well-known limitations in the 1 torr regime which arise primarily from the neglect of plasma electron transport. Alternative methods for treating the plasma response are discussed

  1. Neutral beam injector for 475 keV MARS sloshing ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, D.M.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    A neutral beam injector system which produces 5 MW of 475 keV D 0 neutrals continuously on target has been designed. The beamline is intended to produce the sloshing ion distribution required in the end plug region of the conceptual MARS tandem mirror commercial reactor. The injector design utilizes the LBL self-extraction negative ion source and Transverse Field Focusing (TFF) accelerator to generate a long, ribbon ion beam. A laser photodetachment neutralizer strips over 90% of the negative ions. Magnetic and neutron shield designs are included to exclude the fringe fields of the end plug and provide low activation by the neutron flux from the target plasma. The use of a TFF accelerator and photodetachment neutralizer produces a total system electrical efficiency of about 63% for this design

  2. Improved numerical calculation of the generation of a neutral beam by charge transfer between chlorine ions/neutrals and a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Samukawa, Seiji; Watanabe, Naoki; Ohtsuka, Shingo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ono, Kohei; Iriye, Yasuroh

    2014-01-01

    The charge transfer process between chlorine particles (ions or neutrals) and a graphite surface on collision was investigated by using a highly stable numerical simulator based on time-dependent density functional theory to understand the generation mechanism of a high-efficiency neutral beam developed by Samukawa et al (2001 Japan. J. Appl. Phys. 40 L779). A straightforward calculation was achieved by adopting a large enough unit cell. The dependence of the neutralization efficiency on the incident energy of the particle was investigated, and the trend of the experimental result was reproduced. It was also found that doping the electrons and holes into graphite could change the charge transfer process and neutralization probability. This result suggests that it is possible to develop a neutral beam source that has high neutralization efficiency for both positive and negative ions. (paper)

  3. A Neutral Beam for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment Upgrade (LTX-U)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Enrique; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Thomas; Boyle, Dennis; Schmitt, John; Smirnov, Artem

    2015-11-01

    Neutral beam injection into tokamaks is a proven method of plasma heating and fueling. In LTX, high confinement discharges have been achieved with low-recycling lithium walls. To further improve plasma performance, a neutral beam (NB) will be installed as part of an upgrade to LTX (LTX-U). The NB will provide core plasma fueling with up to 700 kW of injected power. Requirements for accommodating the NB include the addition of injection and beam-dump ports onto the vessel and enhancement of the vacuum vessel pumping capability. Because the NB can also serve as a source of neutrals for charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, ``active'' spectroscopic diagnostics will also be developed. An overview of these plans and other improvements for upgrading LTX to LTX-U will be presented. Supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Optimization of a constrained linear monochromator design for neutral atom beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbacher, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A focused ground state, neutral atom beam, exploiting its de Broglie wavelength by means of atom optics, is used for neutral atom microscopy imaging. Employing Fresnel zone plates as a lens for these beams is a well established microscopy technique. To date, even for favorable beam source conditions a minimal focus spot size of slightly below 1μm was reached. This limitation is essentially given by the intrinsic spectral purity of the beam in combination with the chromatic aberration of the diffraction based zone plate. Therefore, it is important to enhance the monochromaticity of the beam, enabling a higher spatial resolution, preferably below 100nm. We propose to increase the monochromaticity of a neutral atom beam by means of a so-called linear monochromator set-up - a Fresnel zone plate in combination with a pinhole aperture - in order to gain more than one order of magnitude in spatial resolution. This configuration is known in X-ray microscopy and has proven to be useful, but has not been applied to neutral atom beams. The main result of this work is optimal design parameters based on models for this linear monochromator set-up followed by a second zone plate for focusing. The optimization was performed for minimizing the focal spot size and maximizing the centre line intensity at the detector position for an atom beam simultaneously. The results presented in this work are for, but not limited to, a neutral helium atom beam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane

  6. Neutral beam deployment on DEMO and its influence on design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrey, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.surrey@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); King, Damian; Lister, Jonathan; Porton, Michael; Timmis, William; Ward, David [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The demands on the neutral beam heating and current drive system of a DEMO device exceed those of existing fusion experiments by several orders of magnitude. By predicting possible power waveforms it is possible to analyse the technological advances necessary to achieve a system relevant to deployment on a power plant. Achieving the necessary efficiency will require simultaneous improvements in beam current density, neutralization efficiency and beam transmission. Considering the deployment on the tokamak vessel shows no major disruption to the tritium breeder blanket and no requirement to reach a high packing density of injectors. The thermal management of components subjected to low heat flux for many hours is considered and it is shown that radiation cooling can be exploited to control the temperature of such items.

  7. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-04-01

    A high current low emittance high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver HIF (heavy ion fusion) driver accelerator scale beam. Using high-charge-state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system which consists of the gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 2D beam envelope simulations and experimental feasibility studies' results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector

  8. Magnetic analysis of the magnetic field reduction system of the ITER neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Germán, E-mail: german.barrera@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ahedo, Begoña; Alonso, Javier; Ríos, Luis [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Chareyre, Julien; El-Ouazzani, Anass [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    The neutral beam system for ITER consists of two heating and current drive neutral beam injectors (HNB) and a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) injector. The proposed physical plant layout allows a possible third HNB injector to be installed later. For the correct operation of the beam, the ion source and the ion path until it is neutralized must operate under a very low magnetic field environment. To prevent the stray ITER field from penetrating inside those mentioned critical areas, a magnetic field reduction system (MFRS) will envelop the beam vessels and the high voltage transmission lines to ion source. This system comprises the passive magnetic shield (PMS), a box like assembly of thick low carbon steel plates, and the Active Correction and Compensation Coils (ACCC), a set of coils carrying a current which depends on the tokamak stray field. This paper describes the magnetic model and analysis results presented at the PMS and ACCC preliminary design review held in ITER organization in April 2013. The paper focuses on the magnetic model description and on the description of the analysis results. The iterative process for obtaining optimized currents in the coils is presented. The set of coils currents chosen among the many possible solutions, the magnetic field results in the interest regions and the fulfillment of the magnetic field requirements are described.

  9. Guidelines for Remote Handling Maintenance of ITER Neutral Beam Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, J.-J.; Hemsworth, R.; Bayetti, P.

    2006-01-01

    Remote handling maintenance of ITER components is one of the main challenges of the ITER project. This type of maintenance shall be operational for the nuclear phase of exploitation of ITER, and be considered at a very early stage since it significantly impacts on the components design, interfaces management and integration business. A large part of the R/H equipment will be procured by the EU partner, in particular the whole Neutral Beam Remote Handling (RH) equipment package. A great deal of work has already been done in this field during the EDA phase of ITER project, but improvements and alternative option that are now proposed by ITER lead to added RH and maintenance engineering studies. The Neutral Beam Heating -and- Current Drive system 1 is being revisited by the ITER project. The vertical maintenance scheme that is presently considered by ITER, may significantly impact on the reference design of the Neutral Beam (NB) system and associated components and lead to new design of the NB box itself. In addition, revision of both NB cell radiation level zoning and remote handling classification of the beam line injector will also significantly impact on components design and maintenance. Based on the experience gained on the vertical maintenance scheme, developed in detail for the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility 2 to be built in Europe in a near future, guidelines for the revision of the design and preliminary feasibility study of the remote handling vertical maintenance scheme of beam line components are described in the paper. A maintenance option for the SINGAP3 accelerator is also presented. (author)

  10. Design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Fong, M.; Koehler, G.W.; Low, W.; Purgalis, P.; Wells, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline is also equpped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities

  11. Progress of neutral beam R and D for plasma heating and current drive at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Recent progress and future plans regarding development of a high power negative ion source at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) are described. The neutral beam injection system, which is expected to play an important role not only in plasma heating but also in the plasma current drive in the fusion reactor, requires a high power negative ion source which can produce negative deuterium ion beams with current of order 20A at energy above 1MeV. In order to realize such a high power negative ion beam, intensive research and development has been carried out at JAERI since 1984. The negative hydrogen ion beam current of 10A achieved in recent years almost equals the value required for the fusion reactor. With regard to the negative ion acceleration, a high current negative ion beam of 0.2A has been accelerated up to 350keV electrostatically. On the basis of this recent progress, two development plans have been initiated as an intermediate step towards the fusion reactor. One is to develop a 500keV, 10MW negative ion based neutral beam injection system for JT-60U to demonstrate the neutral beam current drive in a high density plasma. The other is to develop a 1MeV, 1A ion source to demonstrate high current negative ion acceleration up to 1MeV. On the basis of this research and development, an efficient and reactor relevant neutral beam injection system will be developed for an experimental fusion reactor such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. ((orig.))

  12. Study of the synthesized plasma resulting from forced neutralization of a mercury ions beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiess, G.

    1969-01-01

    When an ionic beam is used (space simulation etc...) it needs a forced space charge neutralization by means of electrons injection when the perturbations resulting from the ionic space charge are not already eliminated by the well known self neutralization of the beam on the back ground gas of the tank. We have shown that it is possible to obtain the forced neutralization of a low energy (a few KeV) Hg + ion beam, 10 cm in diameter, with a neutraliser made of a hot emissive filament located inside the beam close to the ion source. The computed solution of the plane waves dispersion equation has shown that the synthesized plasma, resulting from the neutralised beam, is damping fluctuations with any wave length when the average ions velocity is less than the neutralizing electrons thermal velocity. This last conclusion assumes that no external electromagnetic field is applied. When a longitudinal electric field is applied, by means of a polarized grid into the beam, the plasma stability range is changed. (author) [fr

  13. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D's efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument's 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments' LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator's logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system's function and capabilities

  14. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D`s efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument`s 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments` LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator`s logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system`s function and capabilities.

  15. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project presented in this document is part of an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadian de Fusion Magnetique. The overall objective of the effort is to apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was started in December, 1990 to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present, satisfactory progress has been achieved. The ion gun is fully operational with the neutralizer in the final assembly stage in preparation for testing. The beam diagnostics have been completed and mounted in the computer automated test stand. The analyzer design and detailed trajectory calculations are nearing completion to allow for the vacuum interface construction. The CAMAC based data acquisition system hardware was integrated into the test stand. Part of this hardware is a component of the Tokamak de Varennes' contribution to the collaboration. Next steps on the critical path include the beginning of the neutralization tests and the start of the analyzer construction. Anticipated installation of the diagnostic on the tokamak is Spring 1992

  16. Performance of Doublet III neutral beam injector cryopumping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhorn, A.R.; Kim, J.; Tupper, M.L.; Williams, J.P.; Fasolo, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Doublet III neutral beam injector system is based on three beamlines; each beamline employs two 80 kV/80 A hydrogen ion sources. Two liquid helium (LHe) cooled cryopanel arrays were designed as an integral part of the beamline in order to provide high differential pumping of hydrogen gas along the beamline. The cryopanel arrays consist of a front (nearer to the torus) disk panel (3 m 2 each side) with liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) cooled chevrons and a rear cylindrical panel of modified Santeler panels (8 m 2 ) which also employs LN 2 cooled surfaces shielding LHe cooled surfaces. These cryopanels are piped in series. The LHe delivery is based on a closed-loop, forced-flow scheme intended for variable panel temperatures (3.7 to 4.3 K). It uses small tubes for mechanical flexibility and thermal resiliency providing ease of economic defrosting. The cryogenic system consists of a liquefier (100 l/h), a large Dewar, a heat exchanger, and a liquid ring pump. Three beamlines are serviced simultaneously by the system. Pumping speeds measured locally at ionization gauges, were well in excess of the 1.4 x 10 6 l/s design goal

  17. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm 2 anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies

  18. PLT and Doublet III neutral beam injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselton, H.H.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Schechter, D.E.; Stewart, L.D.; Stirling, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    The design program is being supported by experimental work with all beam line components: gas cells, bending magnets, beam stops, magnetic shielding, and high speed-high throughput cryopumping systems. Stray toroidal fields and fields produced by external transmission or mirror magnets are under study to determine the optimum means of removing the unneutralized component from the beam. Concepts utilizing materials with high permeability are adequate to provide the source with the necessary magnetic shielding. Beam stops capable of dissipating a power density of 10 to 40 kW/cm 2 are required for ion dumps, diagnostics, and on line ion source conditioning

  19. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  20. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  1. Computational study of the first stage of hypersonic ion beam neutralization: The cross neutralization stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomot, C.; Dolique, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A study is made of the first stage of evolution of a hypersonic ion beam in which thermoelectrons are emitted by a heated grid, known as the neutralizer. Downstream from the neutralizer there appears successively as a sheath a range of periodic and quasi-stationary electric field and a front where the electric field oscillates with the plasma frequency. The sheath is self-regulated. Some electrons are trapped in the periodic and stationary electric field. The characteristics of the periodic, quasi-stationary range correspond to those of both an experimental study and one-dimensional time-independent macroscopic theory. This quasi-stationary regime builds up in a time smaller than ω/subp/e -1 and is studied for a few periods ω/subP//sube/ -1 . The subsequent evolution of this state of nonequilibrium is not investigated. The experimental study has shown that, as for the neutralization of a subsonic ion beam, it leads to a field-free, homogeneous medium: a ''synthesized plasma.'' The importance of the first stage described herein, which may be called the gross neutralization stage, is due to the properties of mean neutrality in the current and in the charge insured by the regulating sheath, properties which will be preseved downstream

  2. The design, fabrication and operation of the mechanical systems for the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.A.; Fong, M.; Koehler, G.W.; Low, W.; Purgalis, P.; Wells, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a National Test Facility used to develop long pulse Neutral Beam Sources. The Facility will test sources up to 120 keV, 50 A, with 30 s beam-on times with a 10% duty factor. For this application, an actively cooled beam dump is required and one has been constructed capable of dissipating a wide range of power density profiles. The flexibility of the design is achieved by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure comprised of eight separately controllable manipulator assemblies. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permits the dissipation of 2 kW/cm 2 anywhere on the panel surface. The cooling water requirements of the actively cooled dump system are provided by the closed loop Primary High Pressure Cooling Water System. To minimize the operating costs of continuously running this high power system, a variable speed hydraulic drive is used for the main pump. During beam pulses, the pump rotates at high speed, then cycles to low speed upon completion of the beam shot. A unique neutralizer design has been installed into the NBETF beamline. This is a gun-drilled moveable brazed assembly which provides continuous armoring of the beamline near the source. The unit penetrates the source mounting valve during operation and retracts to permit the valve to close as needed. The beamline also has an inertially cooled duct calorimeter assembly. This assembly is a moveable hinged matrix of copper plates that can be used as a beam stop up to pulse lengths of 50 ms. The beamline is also equipped with many beam scraper plates of differing detail design and dissipation capabilities

  3. Experiments on ion space-charge neutralization with pulsed electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herleb, U; Riege, H [CERN LHC-Division, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The method of space-charge neutralization of heavy ion beams with electron beam pulses generated with electron guns incorporating ferroelectric cathodes was investigated experimentally. Several experiments are described, the results of which prove that the intensity of selected ion beam parts with defined charge states generated in a laser ion source can be increased by an order of magnitude. For elevated charge states the intensity amplification is more significant and may reach a factor of 4 for highly charged ions from an Al target. (author). 7 figs., 3 -refs.

  4. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  5. 3D-Printed Beam Splitter for Polar Neutral Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sean D. S.; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We describe a macroscopic beam splitter for polar neutral molecules. A complex electrode structure is required for the beam splitter which would be very difficult to produce with traditional manufacturing methods. Instead, we make use of a nascent manufacturing technique: 3D printing of a plastic piece, followed by electroplating. This fabrication method opens a plethora of avenues for research, since 3D printing imposes practically no limitations on possible shapes, and the plating produces chemically robust, conductive construction elements with an almost free choice of surface material. It has the added advantage of dramatically reduced production cost and time. Our beam splitter is an electrostatic hexapole guide that smoothly transforms into two bent quadrupoles. We demonstrate the correct functioning of this device by separating a supersonic molecular beam of ND3 into two correlated fractions. It is shown that this device can be used to implement experiments with differential detection wherein one of the fractions serves as a probe and the other as a reference. Reverse operation would allow the merging of two beams of polar neutral molecules.

  6. Period doubling on a non-neutral magnetized electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Low frequency oscillations on a non-neutral magnetized electron beam of very low density are investigated. A perturbation analysis of the slow mode of the rigid rotator equilibrium is developed to illustrate the nature of large amplitude fundamental mode oscillations. The results of this theoretical analysis show two important characteristics: firstly, as the perturbation amplitude is increasedthe waveform ceases to be purely sinusoidal and shows period doubling. Secondly, above a certain threshold, all harmonics of the wave grow and the wave breaks. The results of the former are compared with a simple electron beam experiment and are found to be in good qualitative agreement

  7. Development of vacuum components for neutral beam injection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.

    1977-01-01

    Neutral beam injectors and divertors for fusion devices require very high-speed pumping capabilities to remove cold gas and impurities from the beam and plasma drift regions. Cryopumping is one of the most favorable methods due to its freedom from contamination and relatively low capital cost. The theory of cryosorption pumping is summarized and contrasted with the process of cryocondensation. A variable-temperature cryostat for basic studies on small test cryosorption panels is described. Using results of these studies, a large sorption panel with an inlet area of 2 m 2 is being designed and fabricated. The design characteristics of this pump are discussed

  8. Superconducting magnetic shields for neutral beam injectors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    Large high energy deuterium neutral beams which must be made from negative ions require extensive magnetic shielding against the intense fringe fields surrounding a magnetic fusion power plant. The feasibility of shielding by multilayer sheets of copper-superconducting laminated material was investigated. It was found that, if necessary fabrication techniques are developed, intrinsically stable type II superconductors will be able to shield against the magnetic fields of the fusion reactors. Among the immediate benefits of this research is better magnetic shields for neutral beam injectors in support of DOE's fusion program. Another application may be in the space vehicles, where difficulties in transporting heavy μ-metal sections may make a comparatively light superconducting shield attractive. Also, as high-field superconducting magnets find widespread applications, the need for high-intensity magnetic shielding will increase. As a result, the commercial market for the magnetic shields should expand along with the market for superconducting magnets

  9. Tokamak heating by neutral beams and adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1973-08-01

    ''Realistic'' models of tokamak energy confinement strongly favor reactor operation at the maximum MHD-stable β-value, in order to maximize plasma density. Ohmic heating is unsuitable for this purpose. Neutral-beam heating plus compression is well suited; however, very large requirements on device size and injection power seem likely for a DT ignition experiment using a Maxwellian plasma. Results of the ATC experiment are reviewed, including Ohmic heating, neutral-beam heating, and production of two-energy-component plasmas (energetic deuteron population in deuterium ''target plasma''). A modest extrapolation of present ATC parameters could give zero-power conditions in a DT experiment of the two-energy-component type. (U.S.)

  10. Shielding calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.

    1979-07-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed: one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and walls of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m are sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/DT pulse

  11. Overcurrent protection device for neutral beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Electrical loads connected to capacitance elements in high voltage direct current systems are protected from damage caused by capacitance discharge overcurrents by connecting a longitudinal inductor between the capacitance element and the load. The inductor comprises a bifilar winding wound about a magnetic core, which forms an incomplete magnetic circuit. A diode is connected across a portion of the bifilar winding. Most of the energy discharged from the capacitance element is stored in the inductor and then dissipated, away from the load, in an L-R circuit comprising the diode and the coil winding. Multiple high voltage circuits having capacitance elements may be connected to loads through bifilar windings all wound about the aforementioned magnetic core

  12. Design of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) neutral beam system beamline, United States concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purgalis, P.; Anderson, O.A.; Cooper, W.S.; DeVries, G.E.; Lietzke, A.F.; Kunkel, W.B.; Kwan, J.W.; Matuk, C.A.; Nakai, T.; Stearns, J.W.; Soroka, L.; Wells, R.P.; Lindquist, W.B.; Neef, W.S.; Reginato, L.L.; Sedgley, D.W.; Brook, J.W.; Luzzi, T.E.; Myers, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Design of a neutral beamline for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is described. The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D - source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to watercooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules that can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of D degree into three ports with a total of nine modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port. To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW at 1.3 MeV; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is removed from service. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 35 m from the port into the torus. Neutron shielding in the drift duct provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus. Alternative component choices are also discussed for the evolving design. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs

  14. Diagnostics Neutral Beam Injector at the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynar, J.; Shukaev, A.N.; Bosshard, P.; Duval, B.P.; Ivanov, A.A.; Kollegov, M.; Kolmogorov, V.V.; Llobet, X.; Pitts, R.A.; Weisen, H.

    2001-10-01

    Within this report we summarize the technical and experimental effort made on diagnostics neutral beam injector (DNBI) which was installed at tokamak TCV last year. Basic components of DNBI are reviewed, its remote control is presented in more detail. Profile and attenuation studies are referred to. First experimental results obtained with DNBI, which led to a decision to upgrade the machine, are discussed in the last section. (author)

  15. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies

  16. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  17. Design and test of-80 kV snubber core assemblies for MFTF sustaining-neutral-beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, S.R.; Mayhall, D.J.; Wilson, J.H.; De Vore, K.R.; Ross, R.I.; Sears, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Core snubbers, located near the neutral beam source ends of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS) source cables, protect the neutral beam source extractor grid wires from overheating and sputtering during internal sparkdowns. The snubbers work by producing an induced counter-emf which limits the fault current and by absorbing the capacitive energy stored on the 80 kV source cables and power supplies. A computer program STACAL was used in snubber magnetic design to choose appropriate tape wound cores to provide 400 Ω resistance and 25 J energy absorption. The cores are mounted horizontally in a dielectric structure. The central source cable bundle passes through the snubber and terminates on three copper buses. Multilam receptacles on the buses connect to the source module jumper cables. Corona rings and shields limit electric field stresses to allow close clearances between snubbers

  18. Power supply system for KSTAR neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, W., E-mail: franciscocho@nfri.re.kr; Bae, Y.S.; Han, W.S.; Jeong, J.H.; Kim, J.S.; Park, H.T.; Yang, H.L.; Oh, Y.K.; Kwak, J.G.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The power supply system in KSTAR NBI consists of DC power supplies for ion source. • For operation NBI, DC High Voltage based on the low voltage transformer with chopper. • The surge absorber near the ion source limit the energy deposited to accelerator grid. - Abstract: The power supply system in KSTAR neutral beam injector consists of low voltage and high current DC power supplies for plasma generator of ion source and high voltage and high current DC power supply for accelerator grid system. The arc discharge is initiated by an arc power supply supplying the arc voltage between the chamber wall and 12 filaments which are heated by individual filament power supply. The negative output of arc power supply is common to each positive output of 12 filament power supplies. To interrupt the arc discharging for the fault condition of the arc current unbalance, DCCT current monitor is placed at the positive output cable of the filament power supply. The plasma grid (G1) power supply has the maximum capability of 120 kV/70 A which consists of low voltage regulator with IGBT-switched chopper array system for the voltage control in unit of 600 V and the high voltage rectified transformers to supply DC voltage of 20 kV, 30 kV, and 50 kV. The output voltage of the G1 power supply is also connected to the input of the voltage divider system which supplies the gradient voltage to the gradient grid (G2) in the range of 80–90% of G1 voltage by changing tap of winding resistors in unit of 1%. The charged G1 voltage is turned on and off by the high voltage switch (HVS) system consisting of MOSFET fast semiconductor switches which can immediately be opened less than 1 μs when the ion source grid breakdown occurs. The decelerating grid (G3) power supply is inverter system using capacitor-charge power supply to supply maximum −5 kV/5 A. The important component in power supply system is the surge absorber near the ion source to limit the arc energy deposited to

  19. Power supply system for KSTAR neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, W.; Bae, Y.S.; Han, W.S.; Jeong, J.H.; Kim, J.S.; Park, H.T.; Yang, H.L.; Oh, Y.K.; Kwak, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The power supply system in KSTAR NBI consists of DC power supplies for ion source. • For operation NBI, DC High Voltage based on the low voltage transformer with chopper. • The surge absorber near the ion source limit the energy deposited to accelerator grid. - Abstract: The power supply system in KSTAR neutral beam injector consists of low voltage and high current DC power supplies for plasma generator of ion source and high voltage and high current DC power supply for accelerator grid system. The arc discharge is initiated by an arc power supply supplying the arc voltage between the chamber wall and 12 filaments which are heated by individual filament power supply. The negative output of arc power supply is common to each positive output of 12 filament power supplies. To interrupt the arc discharging for the fault condition of the arc current unbalance, DCCT current monitor is placed at the positive output cable of the filament power supply. The plasma grid (G1) power supply has the maximum capability of 120 kV/70 A which consists of low voltage regulator with IGBT-switched chopper array system for the voltage control in unit of 600 V and the high voltage rectified transformers to supply DC voltage of 20 kV, 30 kV, and 50 kV. The output voltage of the G1 power supply is also connected to the input of the voltage divider system which supplies the gradient voltage to the gradient grid (G2) in the range of 80–90% of G1 voltage by changing tap of winding resistors in unit of 1%. The charged G1 voltage is turned on and off by the high voltage switch (HVS) system consisting of MOSFET fast semiconductor switches which can immediately be opened less than 1 μs when the ion source grid breakdown occurs. The decelerating grid (G3) power supply is inverter system using capacitor-charge power supply to supply maximum −5 kV/5 A. The important component in power supply system is the surge absorber near the ion source to limit the arc energy deposited to

  20. Optimizing beam transport in rapidly compressing beams on the neutralized drift compression experiment – II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton D. Stepanov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II is an induction linac that generates intense pulses of 1.2 MeV helium ions for heating matter to extreme conditions. Here, we present recent results on optimizing beam transport. The NDCX-II beamline includes a 1-m-long drift section downstream of the last transport solenoid, which is filled with charge-neutralizing plasma that enables rapid longitudinal compression of an intense ion beam against space-charge forces. The transport section on NDCX-II consists of 28 solenoids. Finding optimal field settings for a group of solenoids requires knowledge of the envelope parameters of the beam. Imaging the beam on the scintillator gives the radius of the beam, but the envelope angle is not measured directly. We demonstrate how the parameters of the beam envelope (radius, envelop angle, and emittance can be reconstructed from a series of images taken by varying the B-field strengths of a solenoid upstream of the scintillator. We use this technique to evaluate emittance at several points in the NDCX-II beamline and for optimizing the trajectory of the beam at the entry of the plasma-filled drift section. Keywords: Charged-particle beams, Induction accelerators, Beam dynamics, Beam emittance, Ion beam diagnostics, PACS Codes: 41.75.-i, 41.85.Ja, 52.59.Sa, 52.59.Wd, 29.27.Eg

  1. Power supply for plasma generator of HL-1M neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Detai; Qian Jiamei; Lei Guangjiu; Shun Mengda; Jiang Shaofeng; Wang Enyao; Lu Xuejun; Yang Tiehai; Wang Xuehua; Zhao Zhimin; Hao Ming; Huang Jianrong; Yu Yanqiu; Cheng Baoqiang; Wu Zhige; Sheng Ning; Hu Qingtao

    1999-01-01

    The diagram of the HL-1M Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) and the power supply (PS) system is shown. The NBI consists of ion source, beam line and power supply system etc. The ion source includes plasma generator and three-electrode extraction system. The power supply for plasma generator consists of a filament PS, an arc PS and gas valve PS. Testing has shown that the PS for plasma generator of the HL-1M NBI has excellent stability and obtain good plasma heating effect

  2. The text neutral lithium beam edge density diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howald, A.M.; McChesney, J.M.; West, W.P.

    1994-07-01

    A fast neutral lithium beam has been installed on the TEXT tokamak for Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) studies of the edge plasma electron density profile. The diagnostic was recently upgraded from ten to twenty spatial channels, each of which has two detectors, one to measure lithium beam signal and one to monitor plasma background light. The spatial resolution is 6 mm, and the temporal resolution is designed to be as high as 10 ms for studies of transient events including plasma density fluctuations. Initial results are presented from the ten-channel system: Edge electron densities unfolded from the LiI(2 s 2 S - 2 p 2 P) 670.8 nm emission profile have the same general time dependence as the line-averaged density measured by microwave interferometry

  3. Neutral-beam-injected tokamak fusion reactors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1976-08-01

    The theories of energetic-ion velocity distributions, stability, injection, and orbits were summarized. The many-faceted role of the energetic ions in plasma heating, fueling, and current maintenance, as well as in the direct enhancement of fusion power multiplication and power density, is discussed in detail for three reactor types. The relevant implications of recent experimental results on several beam-injected tokamaks are examined. The behavior of energetic ions is found to be in accordance with classical theory, large total ion energy densities are readily achieved, and plasma equilibrium and stability are maintained. The status of neutral-beam injectors and of conceptual design studies of beam-driven reactors are briefly reviewed. The principal plasma-engineering problems are those associated directly with achieving quasi-stationary operation

  4. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagwell, T.; Holmes, S.; McCarthy, J.; Webber, R.

    1984-05-01

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x10 9 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x10 7 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  5. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  6. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  7. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B.; Lee, E.P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  8. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.D.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (εβ/sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 10 19 m/sup /minus/3/ 19 m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Divergence in intense ion beams caused by incomplete charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Space charge neutralization for light ion fusion (LIF) ion beam transport is usually assumed to be perfect in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region of the diode and in the gas transport cell. However, small charge clumps in the beam will not be totally charge-neutralized, and the residual net space charge may contribute to the beam microdivergence θ μ . If the net potential of the clump is limited only by electron trapping, the minimum potential will be eφ ∼ 1/2 m e v i 2 where m e is the electron mass and v i is the ion velocity. For proton beams this leads to θ μ ∼ (m e /M p ) 1/2 ∼ 23 mrad, where M p is the proton rest mass. For non-protonic beams, different results occur. The mechanism predicts (1) no dependence of θ μ on diode voltage, (2) non-protonic θ μ greater than proton θ μ for proton-contaminated beams, and (3) axial energy spread Δε parallel /ε parallel ∼ ±2 θ μ , which are all consistent with present data. Results of analytic studies and computer simulations of this mechanism are presented. Plasma shielding reduces the effects of this mechanism but collisions and magnetic fields reduce the plasma shielding effects. 2-D PIC MAGIC simulations show that this mechanism contributes to θ μ both in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region and in the gas transport region. It is concluded that this mechanism is especially important in the open-quotes charge-neutralclose quotes region

  10. Dynamic neutral beam current and voltage control to improve beam efficacy in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, D. C.; Austin, M. E.; Bardoczi, L.; Collins, C. S.; Crowley, B.; Davis, E.; Du, X.; Ferron, J.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G. R.; Pawley, C.; Petty, C. C.; Podestà, M.; Rauch, J.; Scoville, J. T.; Spong, D. A.; Thome, K. E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Varela, J.; Victor, B.

    2018-05-01

    An engineering upgrade to the neutral beam system at the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables time-dependent programming of the beam voltage and current. Initial application of this capability involves pre-programmed beam voltage and current injected into plasmas that are known to be susceptible to instabilities that are driven by energetic ( E ≥ 40 keV) beam ions. These instabilities, here all Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), increase the transport of the beam ions beyond a classical expectation based on particle drifts and collisions. Injecting neutral beam power, P beam ≥ 2 MW, at reduced voltage with increased current reduces the drive for Alfvénic instabilities and results in improved ion confinement. In lower-confinement plasmas, this technique is applied to eliminate the presence of AEs across the mid-radius of the plasmas. Simulations of those plasmas indicate that the mode drive is decreased and the radial extent of the remaining modes is reduced compared to a higher beam voltage case. In higher-confinement plasmas, this technique reduces AE activity in the far edge and results in an interesting scenario of beam current drive improving as the beam voltage reduces from 80 kV to 65 kV.

  11. Neoclassical current effects in neutral-beam-heated tokamak discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    There is a long-standing prediction from neoclassical theory that strong contributions to the toroidal current should be driven by friction between trapped and passing particles when βsub(pol) exceeds root (R/a) in a tokamak. A number of neutral-beam heating experiments can now produce such parameters, and it is of interest to calculate the behaviour which should occur in this regime to determine the feasibility of using such a 'bootstrap' current as a steady-state tokamak current source. It is found that the neoclassical current should be large enough to reverse the external loop voltage for typical experimental parameters (ISX-B, in particular) in cases where the total current is fixed and to produce a detectable excess of total current above the pre-programmed (demand) value in cases where the loop voltage is regulated. Other manifestations of such a current should be either: a sharp rise in the central q-value (producing a cessation of internal m=1 and m=2 MHD activity), with an enhancement by two orders of magnitude of ion thermal conductivity (due to the formation of a hollow current density profile and a consequent drop in local values of the poloidal magnetic field in the central plasma region), or an enhanced tendency for disruption (arising from magnetic reconnection in hollow-profile equilibria). Since these gross manifestations are absent in a wide range of experiments on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B), as reported earlier, the conclusion is that the neoclassical current, if present, can have a value no larger than 25% of its theoretically calculated value. Since the neoclassical particle (Ware) pinch is strongly related to the neoclassical current in the theory (Onsager reciprocity), the existence of the particle pinch is thus called into question. (author)

  12. Magnetic Field Considerations for the Design and Location of a Diagnostic Neutral Beam Injector for the TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Lopez Fraguas, A.; Balbin, R.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic neutral beam injection system is being developed for the TJ-II stellarator. The principal goal is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to provide spatial resolution along the plasma minor radius in Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy and Neutral Particle Analysis diagnostics, while also opening up new opportunities for physics studies. After summarizing the compact diagnostic neutral beam injector system selected as well as the TJ-II vacuum vessel and coil geometry, we address the sensitivity of TJ-II magnetic configurations to the ferromagnetic materials that shield the ion source and neutralizer tubing of the neutral beam injection system using a popular approach in which the field is approximated via magnetic dipole moments, finally, the scientific and design trade-offs made to minimize the impact are discussed. (Author) 24 refs

  13. Heavy-atom neutral beams for tandem-mirror end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Santarius, J.F.; Emmert, G.A.

    1981-05-01

    The advantages of neutral beams with Z greater than or equal to 3 formed from negative ions, accelerated to 0.5 to 1.0 MeV/amu, and neutralized with high efficiency, are investigated for use in tandem mirror reactor end plugs. These beams can produce Q's of 20 to 30, and thus can replace the currently proposed 200 to 500 keV neutral proton beams presently planned for tandem mirror reactors. Thus, these Z greater than or equal to 3 neutral beams increase the potential attractiveness of tandem mirror reactors by offering a substitute for difficult high energy neutral hydrogen end plug beams

  14. Design study of a neutral beam injection system for the JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Design study has been made of a 200 kV, 45 MW D 0 neutral beam injection system for the JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) covering the following: determination of the ion source specifications, design of components such as ion source with extraction electrodes, energy converter, cryopump and cooling system, and estimations of the energy conversion efficiency, overall power efficiency and total power required for operation of the NBI system, and also a hydrogen isotope separation method using cryo-sorption pumps. Optimizations and parameter studies of the neutralizing cell length, gas flow rate, operating pressure of ion sources, total pumping speed and pressure of energy converters are made in the design study based on reactor plasma requirements. Hollow cathode ion sources are proposed because of the extended operation time at low gas pressure (about 4.5 x 10 -3 Torr) and the high gas efficiency (40%). Life of the extraction electrodes is determined by blistering due to deuterium ions. Fast neutron radiation damage is relatively small. In-line direct converters with grounded recovery electrodes and neutralizing cells floated at negative potential -190 kV are used to recover residual deuterium ion energy without interrupting the neutral beam trajectories. Energy conversion efficiency of 80% and overall power efficiency of about 40% are obtained. (auth.)

  15. Development of neutral beams for fusion plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselton, H.H.; Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A state-of-the-art account of neutral beam technology at the LBL/LLNL and ORNL facilities is given with emphasis on positive-ion-based systems. The advances made in the last few years are elaborated and problem areas are identified. The ORNL program has successfully completed the neutral injection systems for PLT, ISX-B, and most recently, PDX and the ISX-B upgrade. All of these are high current (60 to 100 A), medium energy (40 to 50 keV) systems. This program is also engaged in the development of a reactor-grade advanced positive ion system (150 to 200 kV/100 A/5 to 10 s) and a multimegawatt, long pulse (30 s) heating system for ISX-C. In a joint program, LBL and LLNL are developing and testing neutral beam injection systems based on the acceleration of positive ions for application in the 80- to 160-keV range on MFTF-B, D-III, TFTR/TFM, ETF, MNS, etc. A conceptual design of a 160-keV injection system for the German ZEPHYR project is in progress at LBL/LLNL and independently at ORNL. The laboratories are also engaged in the development of negative-ion-based systems for future applications at higher energies

  16. Fast ion behavior during neutral beam injection in ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; Rome, J.A.; England, A.C.; Fowler, R.H.; Aceto, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    In stellarators, single-particle confinement properties can be more complex than in their tokamak counterparts. Fast-ion behavior in tokamaks has been well characterized through an abundance of measurements on various devices and in general has been shown to be consistent with classical slowing-down theory, although anomalous ion behavior has been observed during intense beam injection in ISX-B, during fishbone instabilities in PDX, and in experiments on TFR. In contrast, fast ion behavior in stellarators is not as wel established experimentally with the primary experiments to date focusing o near-perpendicular or perpendicular neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Wendelstein 7-A stellarator (91 and Heliotron-E. This paper addresses fast-ion confinement properties in a large-aspect-ratio, moderate-shear stellarator, the Advanced Toroidal Facility, during tangential NBI. The primary data used in this study are the experimentally measured energy spectra of charge-exchange neutrals escaping from the plasma, using a two-dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer. This diagnostic method is well established, having been used on several devices since the early 1970's. Various aspects of fast-ion behavior are investigated by comparing these data with computed theoretical spectra based on energeticion distributions derived from the fastion Fokker-Planck equation. Ion orbits are studied by computer orbit following, by the computation of J* surfaces, and by Monte Carlo calculations

  17. Development of neutral beams for fusion plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselton, H.H.; Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    A state-of-the-art account of neutral beam technology at the LBL/LLNL and ORNL facilities is given with emphasis on positive-ion-based systems. The advances made in the last few years are elaborated and problem areas are identified. The ORNL program has successfully completed the neutral injection systems for PLT, ISX-B, and most recently, PDX and the ISX-B upgrade. All of these are high current (60 to 100 A), medium energy (40 to 50 keV) systems. This program is also engaged in the development of a reactor-grade advanced positive ion system (150 to 200 kV/100 A/5 to 10 s) and a multimegawatt, long pulse (30 s) heating system for ISX-C. In a joint program, LBL and LLNL are developing and testing neutral beam injection systems based on the acceleration of positive ions for application in the 80- to 160-keV range on MFTF-B, D-III, TFTR/TFM, ETF, MNS, etc. A conceptual design of a 160-keV injection system for the German ZEPHYR project is in progress at LBL/LLNL and independently at ORNL. The laboratories are also engaged in the development of negative-ion-based systems for future applications at higher energies.

  18. The influence of grid positioning on the beam optics in the neutral beam injectors for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, Pierluigi, E-mail: pierluigi.veltri@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova (Italy); INFN—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Agostinetti, Piero; Marcuzzi, Diego; Sartori, Emanuele; Serianni, Gianluigi [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Neutral beam injectors are routinely used to increase the ion temperature in magnetically confined plasmas. Typically, the beam is produced by neutralizing a bundle of hundreds of ion beamlets, energized in a multi-grid multi-stage accelerator. Precise aiming of each beamlet is required in order to focus the full beam to the plasma, avoiding any interception with beamline surfaces and with the beam duct. This paper describes the effects of grid in-plane and out-of-plane displacements (mispositioning, thermal expansion, grid tilting, etc…) in the case of the MITICA electrostatic accelerator, which is the full scale prototype of the ITER heating neutral beam injector. Various simulations have been carried out with the OPERA 3D code, by self-consistently simulating the beam charged particles travelling in an externally applied electric and magnetic field. The accelerator grids act like a series of electrostatic lenses, and produce a net deflection of the particles when one or more grids are offset. The numerical simulations were used to evaluate the “steering constant” of each grid and also showed that the linear superposition of effects was applicable, multiple causes of mispositioning are combined and used to quantify the overall effect in terms of beam misalignment.

  19. The influence of grid positioning on the beam optics in the neutral beam injectors for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltri, Pierluigi; Agostinetti, Piero; Marcuzzi, Diego; Sartori, Emanuele; Serianni, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Neutral beam injectors are routinely used to increase the ion temperature in magnetically confined plasmas. Typically, the beam is produced by neutralizing a bundle of hundreds of ion beamlets, energized in a multi-grid multi-stage accelerator. Precise aiming of each beamlet is required in order to focus the full beam to the plasma, avoiding any interception with beamline surfaces and with the beam duct. This paper describes the effects of grid in-plane and out-of-plane displacements (mispositioning, thermal expansion, grid tilting, etc…) in the case of the MITICA electrostatic accelerator, which is the full scale prototype of the ITER heating neutral beam injector. Various simulations have been carried out with the OPERA 3D code, by self-consistently simulating the beam charged particles travelling in an externally applied electric and magnetic field. The accelerator grids act like a series of electrostatic lenses, and produce a net deflection of the particles when one or more grids are offset. The numerical simulations were used to evaluate the “steering constant” of each grid and also showed that the linear superposition of effects was applicable, multiple causes of mispositioning are combined and used to quantify the overall effect in terms of beam misalignment

  20. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  1. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castracane, J.; Saravia, E.; Beckstead, J.; Aceto, S.

    1993-01-01

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year

  2. Predictive Simulations of ITER Including Neutral Beam Driven Toroidal Rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, Federico D.; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, G.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Budny, Robert V.; McCune, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Predictive simulations of ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 2002] discharges are carried out for the 15 MA high confinement mode (H-mode) scenario using PTRANSP, the predictive version of the TRANSP code. The thermal and toroidal momentum transport equations are evolved using turbulent and neoclassical transport models. A predictive model is used to compute the temperature and width of the H-mode pedestal. The ITER simulations are carried out for neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas, for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas, and for plasmas heated with a mix of NBI and ICRF. It is shown that neutral beam injection drives toroidal rotation that improves the confinement and fusion power production in ITER. The scaling of fusion power with respect to the input power and to the pedestal temperature is studied. It is observed that, in simulations carried out using the momentum transport diffusivity computed using the GLF23 model [R.Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)], the fusion power increases with increasing injected beam power and central rotation frequency. It is found that the ITER target fusion power of 500 MW is produced with 20 MW of NBI power when the pedesta temperature is 3.5 keV. 2008 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.2931037

  3. Fast magnetic field penetration into an intense neutralized ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armale, R.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments involving propagation of neutralized ion beams across a magnetic field indicate a magnetic field penetration time determined by the Hall resistivity rather than the Spitzer or Pedersen resistivity. In magnetohydrodynamics the Hall current is negligible because electrons and ions drift together in response to an electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. For a propagating neutralized ion beam, the ion orbits are completely different from the electron orbits and the Hall current must be considered. There would be no effect unless there is a component of magnetic field normal to the surface which would usually be absent for a good conductor. It is necessary to consider electron inertia and the consequent penetration of the normal component to a depth c/ω p . In addition it is essential to consider a component of magnetic field parallel to the velocity of the beam which may be initially absent, but is generated by the Hall effect. The penetration time is determined by whistler waves rather than diffusion

  4. A global fitting code for multichordal neutral beam spectroscopic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seraydarian, R.P.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    Knowledge of the heat deposition profile is crucial to all transport analysis of beam heated discharges. The heat deposition profile can be inferred from the fast ion birth profile which, in turn, is directly related to the loss of neutral atoms from the beam. This loss can be measured spectroscopically be the decrease in amplitude of spectral emissions from the beam as it penetrates the plasma. The spectra are complicated by the motional Stark effect which produces a manifold of nine bright peaks for each of the three beam energy components. A code has been written to analyze this kind of data. In the first phase of this work, spectra from tokamak shots are fit with a Stark splitting and Doppler shift model that ties together the geometry of several spatial positions when they are fit simultaneously. In the second phase, a relative position-to-position intensity calibration will be applied to these results to obtain the spectral amplitudes from which beam atom loss can be estimated. This paper reports on the computer code for the first phase. Sample fits to real tokamak spectral data are shown

  5. Positive ion portion of the LBL/LLL Neutral Beam Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyle, R.V.; Baker, W.R.; Anderson, O.A.

    1978-06-01

    The positive ion portion of the Neutral Beam Development Program at the Lawrence Berkeley (LBL) and Livermore (LLL) Laboratories has two purposes: (a) to carry out general research and development in a timely way to assure that users' needs can be met in principle, and (b) to carry out specific development for users. To meet the first requirement, we have programs to develop sources capable of producing beams with high (85%) atomic fractions, long pulse lengths (10 sec to DC), and at beam energies up to 150 keV. We are also pursuing the development of on-line computer diagnostics and controls, the sophisticated high-power electronics required by neutral beam systems, and energy recovery. To meet the second requirement, we are developing prototype source modules to meet the requirements of the TMX and MFTF experiments at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the TFTR experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the Doublet III experiment at General Atomic Co. The Lawrence Laboratories are also constructing and will demonstrate at LBL a complete prototype neutral injection system for TFTR, and are designing a similar system for Doublet III

  6. Long pulse neutral beam system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Bowen, O.N.; Dahlgren, F.; Edwards, J.W.; Kamperschroer, J.; Newman, R.; O'Connor, T.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; Halle, A. von; Wright, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is planned as a long-pulse or steady-state machine to serve as a successor to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The neutral beam component of the heating and current drive systems will be provided by a TFTR beamline modified to allow operation for pulse lengths of 1000s. This paper presents a brief overview of the conceptual design which has been carried out to determine the changes to the beamline and power supply components that will be required to extend the pulse length from its present limitation of 1s at full power. The modified system, like the present one, will be capable of injecting about 8MW of power as neutral deuterium. The initial operation will be with a single beamline oriented co-directional to the plasma current, but the TPX system design is capable of accommodating an additional co-directional beamline and a counter-directional beamline. ((orig.))

  7. Plasma heating by injection of neutral beams into TFR 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results from quasi-perpendicular high power (up to 1.2 MW) neutral beam injection in the TFR 600 tokamak are reported. The trapped fast ions show all the characteristics of a classical feature. This allows us to study the behaviour of a dense plasma (n approximately equal to 10 14 cm -3 ) whose electron and ion temperatures are significantly changed by fast neutrals injection (ΔTsub(e,i)>300 eV). No increase of the global energy confinement time has been observed, but at low q value a large increase of internal disruptions appears. This fact permits to partly enlighten the internal disruptions mechanism and to emphasize their importance. 1-D simulation calculations are also reported; changes in the electron and ion heat conduction, necessary to explain most of the experimental results observed during the internal disruptions will be discussed

  8. Overview of the JET neutral beam enhancement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, D.; Brown, D.P.D.; Challis, C.D.; Chuilon, B.; Cox, S.J.; Crowley, B.; Day, I.E.; Edwards, D.C.; Evison, G.; Hackett, L.J.; Hotchin, S.; Hudson, Z.; Jenkins, I.; Jones, T.T.C.; King, R.; Kovari, M.; Martin, D.; Milnes, J.; Parkin, A.; Puma, A. Li

    2007-01-01

    The JET neutral beam (NB) heating system is being upgraded as a part of the ongoing JET Enhancement Programme. This is one of the largest upgrades of the JET machine carried out within the EFDA-JET framework. The main goals of the project are to increase the NB power delivered to JET plasma, to increase the beam pulse duration and to improve the availability and reliability of the JET NB system. The upgrade of the system is being carried out through the modification of the two existing neutral injector boxes (NIBs), each equipped with up to eight positive ion neutral injectors (PINIs). Significant changes of the JET NB system will be carried out within the next few years and will include modification of all PINIs, modification or replacement of various beamline components and corresponding instrumentation, procurement and installation of new high voltage power supply (HVPS) units and corresponding control systems and refurbishment of the 36 kV power distribution. Various physics, engineering and planning issues related to this project, as well as the current status of the project are discussed in detail. Particular attention is given to the results of a PINI prototype test, which are of crucial importance for the successful completion of the entire enhancement programme. Upon the completion of the project in 2009/2010, JET NB system should be capable of delivering more than 34 MW of deuterium beam power into the JET plasma for a duration of up to 20 s with improved reliability. This will significantly enhance overall capabilities of the JET machine in support of ITER development

  9. Status of the Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A.

    2009-03-01

    The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB's) systems based on negative ion technology, each accelerating to 1 MeV 40 A of D- and capable of delivering 16.5 MW of D0 to the ITER plasma, with a 3rd HNB injector foreseen as an upgrade option [1]. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) accelerating 60 A of H- to 100 keV will inject ≈15 A equivalent of H0 for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and other diagnostics. Recently the RF driven negative ion source developed by IPP Garching has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference ITER design. The RF source developed at IPP, which is approximately a quarter scale of the source needed for ITER, is expected to have reduced caesium consumption compared to the filamented arc driven ion source. The RF driven source has demonstrated adequate accelerated D- and H- current densities as well as long-pulse operation [2, 3]. It is foreseen that the HNB's and the DNB will use the same negative ion source. Experiments with a half ITER-size ion source are on-going at IPP and the operation of a full-scale ion source will be demonstrated, at full power and pulse length, in the dedicated Ion Source Test Bed (ISTF), which will be part of the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), in Padua, Italy. This facility will carry out the necessary R&D for the HNB's for ITER and demonstrate operation of the full-scale HNB beamline. An overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration will be given and the ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant will be highlighted. It will be demonstrated how installation and maintenance logistics have influenced the design, notably the top access scheme facilitating access for maintenance and installation. The impact of the ITER Design Review and recent design change requests (DCRs) will be briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning issues. The low current hydrogen phase now envisaged for start

  10. Status of the Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A.

    2009-01-01

    The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB's) systems based on negative ion technology, each accelerating to 1 MeV 40 A of D - and capable of delivering 16.5 MW of D 0 to the ITER plasma, with a 3rd HNB injector foreseen as an upgrade option. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) accelerating 60 A of H - to 100 keV will inject ≅15 A equivalent of H 0 for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and other diagnostics. Recently the RF driven negative ion source developed by IPP Garching has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference ITER design. The RF source developed at IPP, which is approximately a quarter scale of the source needed for ITER, is expected to have reduced caesium consumption compared to the filamented arc driven ion source. The RF driven source has demonstrated adequate accelerated D - and H - current densities as well as long-pulse operation. It is foreseen that the HNB's and the DNB will use the same negative ion source. Experiments with a half ITER-size ion source are on-going at IPP and the operation of a full-scale ion source will be demonstrated, at full power and pulse length, in the dedicated Ion Source Test Bed (ISTF), which will be part of the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), in Padua, Italy. This facility will carry out the necessary R and D for the HNB's for ITER and demonstrate operation of the full-scale HNB beamline. An overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration will be given and the ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant will be highlighted. It will be demonstrated how installation and maintenance logistics have influenced the design, notably the top access scheme facilitating access for maintenance and installation. The impact of the ITER Design Review and recent design change requests (DCRs) will be briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning issues. The low current hydrogen phase now envisaged for start

  11. Si etching with reactive neutral beams of very low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuhiro [Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-chou, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hamagaki, Manabu; Mise, Takaya [RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Iwata, Naotaka; Hara, Tamio [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tenpaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2014-12-14

    A Si etching process has been investigated with reactive neutral beams (NBs) extracted using a low acceleration voltage of less than 100 V from CF{sub 4} and Ar mixed plasmas. The etched Si profile shows that the etching process is predominantly anisotropic. The reactive NB has a constant Si etching rate in the acceleration voltage range from 20 V to 80 V. It is considered that low-energy NBs can trigger Si etching because F radicals adsorb onto the Si surface and weaken Si–Si bonds. The etching rate per unit beam flux is 33 times higher than that with Ar NB. These results show that the low-energy reactive NB is useful for damage-free high speed Si etching.

  12. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants

  13. The measurement of neutral beam thermal profiles on 'V'-shaped calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Lagin, L.J.; Silber, K.

    1995-01-01

    It is customary in high power neutral beam systems to use a V-shaped calorimeter to stop and measure the beam. With proper instrumentation, it is possible to determine both the neutral beam power and divergence. By utilizing a near-grazing angle of incidence, the area over which the beam is in contact with the surface is increased, thereby decreasing the power density over the case of normal incidence. Thermocouples on the back of the calorimeter, in conjunction with real time fitting algorithms, are used to deduce the divergence from the thermal profile. This measurement implicitly assumes that the measured profile corresponds to that of the incident beam. It is shown that such is not the case. Energetic particle reflection at near-grazing angle causes the thermal profile on the calorimeter to be more peaked than the incident distribution. The implications of this on the non-linear multiple regression technique of determining the divergence are discussed. With the aid of a reflection model, developed and applied to the beam from a typical TFTR ion source, it is shown that a peaked power density can be modelled. Neural networks are being studied as a means of supplanting the older regression technique of measuring divergence. Y-direction divergences have been successfully derived using a one-dimensional neural network

  14. Energy Sources | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sources Energy Sources Many opportunities exist to improve the efficiency of energy supply systems at the central plant and then evaluate potential renewable energy sources and systems. Central Plant Begin by evaluating energy efficiency at the central plant through: Fuel Sources Heat Pumps and Combined

  15. Neutral beam power measurements inside the ASDEX torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zengliang, Y.; Staebler, A.; Vollmer, O.

    1982-11-01

    Neutral beam power measurements inside the ASDEX torus are done with a retractable calorimeter which is only radiation cooled. The calorimeter plate made from Molybdenum is subdivided into nine segments whose increase in energy content due to a shot yields the absorbed beam power. Different models for the backward extrapolation of the measured temperature curves are examined for a series of low energy shots with the result that pure radiation cooling is a valid assumption. Furthermore, a temperature correction to the measured power is derived from these experiments. The evaluation of the shots onto this calorimeter is done by a computer program. The application of this program to a few full power shots shows that a neutral power up to 3.2 MW has been injected into the ASDEX vessel by the two injectors with an overall efficiency of up to 40%. Reionization losses due to the ASDEX stray field are less than 10%; they do not show any dependence upon the pulse length for shots up to 200 ms. (orig.)

  16. Calculations of Neutral Beam Ion Confinement for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Darrow, D.S.; Egedal, J.; Kaye, S.M.; White, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    The spherical torus (ST) concept underlies several contemporary plasma physics experiments, in which relatively low magnetic fields, high plasma edge q, and low aspect ratio combine for potentially compact, high beta and high performance fusion reactors. An important issue for the ST is the calculation of energetic ion confinement, as large Larmor radius makes conventional guiding center codes of limited usefulness and efficient plasma heating by RF and neutral beam ion technology requires minimal fast ion losses. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a medium-sized, low aspect ratio ST, with R=0.85 m, a=0.67 m, R/a=1.26, Ip*1.4 MA, Bt*0.6 T, 5 MW of neutral beam heating and 6 MW of RF heating. 80 keV neutral beam ions at tangency radii of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7 m are routinely used to achieve plasma betas above 30%. Transport analyses for experiments on NSTX often exhibit a puzzling ion power balance. It will be necessary to have reliable beam ion calculations to distinguish among the source and loss channels, and to explore the possibilities for new physics phenomena, such as the recently proposed compressional Alfven eigenmode ion heating

  17. Multiple track Doppler-shift spectroscopy system for TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Reale, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    A Doppler-shift spectroscopy system has been installed on the TFTR neutral beam injection system to measure species composition during both conditioning and injection pulses. Two intensified vidicon detectors and two spectrometers are utilized in a system capable of resolving data from up to twelve ion sources simultaneously. By imaging the light from six ion sources onto one detector, a cost-effective system has been achieved. Fiber optics are used to locate the diagnostic in an area remote from the hazards of the tokamak test cell allowing continuous access, and eliminating the need for radiation shielding of electronic components. Automatic hardware arming and interactive data analysis allow beam composition to be computed between tokamak shots for use in analyzing plasma heating experiments. Measurements have been made using lines of sight into both the neutralizer and the drift duct. Analysis of the data from the drift duct is both simpler and more accurate since only neutral particles are present in the beam at this location. Comparison of the data taken at these two locations reveals the presence of partially accelerated particles possessing an estimated 1/e half-angle divergence of 15 0 and accounting for up to 30% of the extracted power

  18. Instrumentation and control of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, J.C.; Moore, C.D.; Drobnis, D.D.; Elischer, V.P.; Kilgore, R.; Uber, D.

    1980-03-01

    The hardware and software required for the operation of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System (NBIS) are described. Development and implementation of this Instrumentation and Control System was divided between the major participants - General Atomic Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The subdivision of responsibilities and the coordination of the participants' activities are described with reference to hardware and software requirements in support of the entire system. Included are a description of the operators' consoles, the interlock system and the CAMAC system. One feature of the control software is source modeling. This feature includes feedback on a shot to shot basis and adaptive control. Adaptive control permits the computer system to automatically adjust parameters after a shot, and to control the system to automatically compensate for time varying NBIS components. The Neutral Beam Power Supply features power supply modeling, fiber optic transmission of analog signals and digital control of power supply power-up/interlocks.

  19. A rule-based computer control system for PBX-M neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, K.T.; Kozub, T.A.; Kugel, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) neutral beams have been routinely operated under automatic computer control. A major upgrade of the computer configuration was undertaken to coincide with the PBX machine modification. The primary tasks included in the computer control system are data acquisition, waveform reduction, automatic control and data storage. The portion of the system which will remain intact is the rule-based approach to automatic control. Increased computational and storage capability will allow the expansion of the knowledge base previously used. The hardware configuration supported by the PBX Neutral Beam (XNB) software includes a dedicated Microvax with five CAMAC crates and four process controllers. The control algorithms are rule-based and goal-driven. The automatic control system raises ion source electrical parameters to selected energy goals and maintains these levels until new goals are requested or faults are detected

  20. Conceptual design of the DEMO neutral beam injectors: main developments and R&D achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonato, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Cismondi, F.; Fantz, U.; Fassina, A.; Franke, T.; Furno, I.; Hopf, C.; Jenkins, I.; Sartori, E.; Tran, M. Q.; Varje, J.; Vincenzi, P.; Zanotto, L.

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of the nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, to be built after the ITER experimental reactor, are usually understood to lie somewhere between those of ITER and a ‘first of a kind’ commercial plant. Hence, in DEMO the issues related to efficiency and RAMI (reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability) are among the most important drivers for the design, as the cost of the electricity produced by this power plant will strongly depend on these aspects. In the framework of the EUROfusion Work Package Heating and Current Drive within the Power Plant Physics and Development activities, a conceptual design of the neutral beam injector (NBI) for the DEMO fusion reactor has been developed by Consorzio RFX in collaboration with other European research institutes. In order to improve efficiency and RAMI aspects, several innovative solutions have been introduced in comparison to the ITER NBI, mainly regarding the beam source, neutralizer and vacuum pumping systems.

  1. Instrumentation and control of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohli, J.C.; Moore, C.D.; Drobnis, D.D.; Elischer, V.P.; Kilgore, R.; Uber, D.

    1980-03-01

    The hardware and software required for the operation of the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System (NBIS) are described. Development and implementation of this Instrumentation and Control System was divided between the major participants - General Atomic Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The subdivision of responsibilities and the coordination of the participants' activities are described with reference to hardware and software requirements in support of the entire system. Included are a description of the operators' consoles, the interlock system and the CAMAC system. One feature of the control software is source modeling. This feature includes feedback on a shot to shot basis and adaptive control. Adaptive control permits the computer system to automatically adjust parameters after a shot, and to control the system to automatically compensate for time varying NBIS components. The Neutral Beam Power Supply features power supply modeling, fiber optic transmission of analog signals and digital control of power supply power-up/interlocks

  2. Performance of the KTeV high-energy neutral kaon beam at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocean, V.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of the primary and secondary beams for the KTeV experiments E832 and E799-II is reviewed. The beam was commissioned in the summer of 1996 and initially operated for approximately one year. The report includes results on the primary beam, target station including primary beam dump and muon sweeping system, neutral beam collimation system, and alignment

  3. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V.; Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Jones, T.; Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D - ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  4. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  5. Electron temperature effects for an ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uramoto, Joshin.

    1979-05-01

    A hydrogen high temperature plasma up to 200 eV is produced by acceleration of electrons in a hot hollow cathode discharge and is used as an ion beam source. Then, two characteristics are observed: A rate of the atomic ion (H + ) number increases above 70%. A perveance of the ion beam increases above 30 times compared with that of a cold plasma, while a floating potential of an ion acceleration electrode approaches an ion acceleration potential (- 500 V) according as an increment of the electron temperature. Moreover, a neutralized ion beam can be produced by only the negative floating electrode without an external power supply. (author)

  6. Criticality in the fabrication of ion extraction system for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, M.R.; Mattoo, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    For the heating of plasma in steady-state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) (Y.C. Saxena, SST-1 Team, Present status of the SST-1 project, Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 1069-1082; D. Bora, SST-1 Team, Test results on systems developed for the SST-1 tokamak, Nucl. Fusion 43 (2003) 1748-1758), a neutral beam injector is provided to raise the ion temperature to ∼1 keV. This injector has a capability of injecting hydrogen beam with the power of 0.5 MW at 30 keV. For the upgrade of SST-1, power of 1.7 MW at 55 KeV is required. Further, beam power is to be provided for a pulse length of 1000S. We have designed a neutral beam injector (S.K. Mattoo, A.K. Chakraborty, U.K. Baruah, P.K. Jayakumar, M. Bandyopadhyay, N. Bisai, Ch. Chakrapani, M.R. Jana, R. Onali, V. Prahlad, P.J. Patel, G.B. Patel, B. Prajapati, N.V.M. Rao, S. Rambabu, C. Rotti, S.K. Sharma, S. Shah, V. Sharma, M.J. Singh, Engineering design of the steady-state neutral beam injector for SST-1, Fusion Eng. Des. 56 (2001) 685-691; A.K. Chakraborty, N. Bisai, M.R. Jana, P.K. Jayakumar, U.K. Baruah, P.J. Patel, K. Rajasekar, S.K. Mattoo, Neutral beam injector for steady-state superconducting tokamak, Fusion Technol. (1996) 657-660; P.K. Jayakumar, M.R. Jana, N. Bisai, M. Bajpai, N.P. Singh, U.K. Baruah, A.K. Chakraborty, M. Bandyopadhyay, C. Chrakrapani, D. Patel, G.B. Patel, P. Patel, V. Prahlad, N.V.M. Rao, C. Rotti, V. Sreedhar, S.K. Mattoo, Engineering issues of a 1000S neutral beam ion source, Fusion Technol. 1 (1998) 419-422) satisfying the requirements for both SST-1 and its upgrade. Since intense power is to be transported to SST-1 situated at a distance of several meters from the ion source, the optical quality of the beam becomes a primary concern. This in turn, is determined by the uniformity of the ion source plasma and the extractor geometry. To obtain the desired optical quality of the beam, stringent tolerances are to be met during the fabrication of ion extractor system. SST-1 neutral beam injector is

  7. Electron beam dynamics in Pasotron microwave sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmel, Y.; Shkvarunets, A.; Nusinovich, G.S.; Rodgers, J.; Bliokh, Yu.P.; Goebel, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Pasotron is a high efficiency (∼50%), plasma-assisted microwave generator in which the beam electrons exhibit two-dimensional motion in the slow wave structure. The electron beam propagates in the ion-focusing regime (Bennett pinch regime) because there is no applied magnetic field. Since initially only the neutral gas is present in the vacuum system and the ions in the neutralizing plasma channel are produced only due to the beam impact ionization, the beam dynamics in Pasotrons is inherently a nonstationary process, and important for efficient operation. The present paper contains results of experimental studies of stationary and nonstationary effects in the beam dynamics in Pasotrons and their theoretical interpretation

  8. Final design of the neutral beam lines for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.; Valby, L.E.; Stone, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Denhoy, B.; Yoard, R.

    1979-01-01

    Final design of the neutral beam lines for TFTR has been completed. A prototype has been assembled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and is undergoing testing as part of the Neutral Beam System Test Facility (NBSTF). The final neutral beam line (NBL) configuration differs in several details from that previously reported upon; certain components have been added; and testing of the cryopump system has led to some design simplification. It is these developments which are reported herein

  9. Outgassing measurements and results used in designing the Doublet III Neutral Beam Injector System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.M.; Harvey, J.

    1979-11-01

    Material vacuum properties played an important part in designing the Neutral Beam Injector System for General Atomic's Doublet III Tokamak. Low operating vacuum tank pressures were desired to keep re-ionization of the Neutral Beam to a minimum. Plasma contamination was also a major concern, hence stringent material impurity constraints were imposed. Outgassing Rate Measurement and Residual Gas Analyses were performed on different types of materials to determine if their vacuum properties were compatible with the Neutral Beam Injector System requirements

  10. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R S [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  11. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He + multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams

  12. Transmission of the Neutral Beam Heating Beams at TJ-II; Transmision del Haz de Neutros de Calentamiento en TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes Lopez, C

    2007-09-27

    Neutral beam injection heating has been development for the TJ-II stellarator. The beam has a port-through power between 700-1500 kW and injection energy 40 keV. The sensibility of the injection system to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Beam transmission is limited by losses processes since beam is born into the ions source until is coming into the fusion machine. For the beam transmission optimization several beam diagnostics have been developed. A carbon fiber composite (CFC) target calorimeter has been installed at TJ-II to study in situ the power density distribution of the neutral beams. The thermographic print of the beam can be recorded and analysed in a reliable way due to the highly anisotropic thermal conductivity of the target material. With the combined thermographic and calorimetric measurements it has been possible to determine the power density distribution of the beam. It has been found that a large beam halo is present, which can be explained by the extreme misalignment of the grids. This kind of halo has a deleterious effect on beam transport and must be minimized in order to improve the plasma heating capability of the beams. (Author) 155 refs.

  13. Confinement studies during neutral beam injection in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.; Davis, S.; Eubank, H.

    1980-12-01

    Neutral beam injection experiments on PLT have provided definitive information on ion energy confinement in highly collisionless plasmas. We find that ion thermal conduction is consistent, within a factor of approx. 3, with neoclassical theory, and that anomalous thermal convection of ion energy is a factor of 2-3 less than would be calculated from the INTOR D/sub e/ with a convection loss term of the form 5/2nkTv/sub r/. From our experiments with a shunted TF coil we have found that a single shallow ripple well of 2.5% has a neglible effect on ion energy confinement, even at the lowest collisionality obtainable on PLT. Scrutiny of the analytic theories of ripple induced transport motivated by these experiments, suggests that more theoretical (and perhaps numerical) work is needed in this area

  14. Expansion of the TFTR neutral beam computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnerney, J.; Chu, J.; Davis, S.; Fitzwater, J.; Fleming, G.; Funk, P.; Hirsch, J.; Lagin, L.; Locasak, V.; Randerson, L.; Schechtman, N.; Silber, K.; Skelly, G.; Stark, W.

    1992-01-01

    Previous TFTR Neutral Beam computing support was based primarily on an Encore Concept 32/8750 computer within the TFTR Central Instrumentation, Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA). The resources of this machine were 90% utilized during a 2.5 minute duty cycle. Both interactive and automatic processes were supported, with interactive response suffering at lower priority. Further, there were additional computing requirements and no cost effective path for expansion within the Encore framework. Two elements provided a solution to these problems: improved price performance for computing and a high speed bus link to the SELBUS. The purchase of a Sun SPARCstation and a VME/SELBUS bus link, allowed offloading the automatic processing to the workstation. This paper describes the details of the system including the performance of the bus link and Sun SPARCstation, raw data acquisition and data server functions, application software conversion issues, and experiences with the UNIX operating system in the mixed platform environment

  15. Regulated 15-V, 7500-A, neutral-beam filament supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.

    1977-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) designed a cost-effective, regulated 15-V, 7500-A filament supply for use with the High-Voltage Test Stand , a major ERDA developmental neutral-beam test facility. The filament supply can float to 200 kV and can provide pulse widths up to 30 s. Powered by a 24-V, 0.5-TJ battery bank, it avoids the use of expensive isolation transformers and induction voltage regulators (IVR's). Battery output is regulated by a water-cooled resistor-contactor combination in which contactors are closed in sequential format to create a staircase current waveform. A fine-tuning network tunes in-between the ''steps'' for regulation to less than 0.5 percent. The regulator is digitally controlled except for the sense amplifiers, which are optically coupled to the digital controller. All ground telemetry uses optical links to minimize effects of rfi and emi noise in the data channels

  16. Design of neutral beam injection power supplies for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Ono, Youichi; Tanaka, Masanobu

    2000-03-01

    Design study on a power supply system for the ITER neutral beam injector(NBI) has been performed. Circuits of converter/inverter system and other components of the acceleration power supply whose capacity is 1 MV, 45 A have been designed in detail. Performance of the negative ion production power supplies such as an arc and an extraction power supplies was investigated using the EMTDC code. It was confirmed that ripples of 0.34%p-p for the extraction power supply and 1.7%p-p for the arc power supply are small enough. It was also confirmed that an energy input to a negative ion generator from the arc power supply at an arcing can be suppressed smaller than 8 J. The extraction power supply was designed to suppress the energy input lower than 13 J at the breakdown in the extractor. These performances satisfy the required specification of the power supply system. (author)

  17. Power and particle balance during neutral beam injection in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Budny, R.V.; Hill, K.W.; Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Ramsey, A.T.

    1991-05-01

    Detailed boundary plasma measurements on TFTR have been made during a NBI power scan in the range P tot = 1MW--20MW in the L-mode regime. The behavior of the plasma density left-angle n e right-angle, radiated power P rad , carbon and deuterium fluxes Γ C , Γ D , and Ζ eff can be summarized as, left-angle n e right-angle ∝ P tot 1/2 , P rad , Γ C , Γ D ∝ P tot , and Ζ eff ∼ constant. It is shown that central fuelling by the neutral beams plays a minor role in the particle balance of the discharge. More important is the NBI role in the power balance. The TFTR data during NBI originate primarily at the graphite limiter

  18. Development of a high current 60 keV neutral lithium beam injector for beam emission spectroscopy measurements on fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, G.; Dunai, D.; Lampert, M.; Krizsanóczi, T.; Németh, J.; Bató, S.; Nam, Y. U.; Hu, G. H.; Zoletnik, S.

    2018-01-01

    A 60 keV neutral lithium beam system was designed and built up for beam emission spectroscopy measurement of edge plasma on the KSTAR and EAST tokamaks. The electron density profile and its fluctuation can be measured using the accelerated lithium beam-based emission spectroscopy system. A thermionic ion source was developed with a SiC heater to emit around 4-5 mA ion current from a 14 mm diameter surface. The ion optic is following the 2 step design used on other devices with small modifications to reach about 2-3 cm beam diameter in the plasma at about 4 m from the ion source. A newly developed recirculating sodium vapour neutralizer neutralizes the accelerated ion beam at around 260-280 °C even during long (manipulation techniques are applied to allow optimization, aiming, cleaning, and beam modulation. The maximum 60 keV beam energy with 4 mA ion current was successfully reached at KSTAR and at EAST. Combined with an efficient observation system, the Li-beam diagnostic enables the measurement of the density profile and fluctuations on the plasma turbulence time scale.

  19. Confinement studies of neutral beam heated discharges in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Stauffer, F.; Bell, M.G.; Bitte, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Britz, N.

    1985-11-01

    The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2T). Recently, the D/sup 0/ neutral beam heating power has been increased to 6.3 MW. By operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ approx. = 0.8 MA) and low density anti n/sub e/ approx. = 1 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/), high ion temperatures (9 +- keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 10/sup 5/ m/s) have been achieved during injection. At the opposite extreme, pellet injection into high current plasmas has been used to increase the line-average density to 8 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/ and the central density to 1.6 x 10/sup 20/m/sup -3// This wide range of operating conditions has enabled us to conduct scaling studies of the global energy confinement time in both ohmically and beam heated discharges as well as more detailed transport studies of the profile dependence. In ohmic discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to scale linearly with density only up to anti n/sub e/ approx. 4.5 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/ and then to increase more gradually, achieving a maximum value of approx. 0.45 s. In beam heated discharges, the energy confinement time is observed to decrease with beam power and to increase with plasma current. With P/sub b/ = 5.6 MW, anti n/sub e/ = 4.7 x 10/sup 19/m/sup -3/, I/sub p/ = 2.2 MA and B/sub T = 4.7T, the gross energy confinement time is 0.22 s and T/sub i/(0) = 4.8 keV. Despite shallow penetration of D/sup 0/ beams (at the beam energy less than or equal to 80 keV with low species yield), tau/sub E/(a) values are as large as those for H/sup 0/ injection, but central confinement times are substantially greater. This is a consequence of the insensitivity of the temperature and safety factor profile shapes to the heating profile. The radial variation of tau/sub E/ is even more pronounced with D/sup 0/ injection into high density pellet-injected plasmas. 25 refs.

  20. Molecules in the cold environment of a supersonic free-jet beam: from spectroscopy of neutral-neutral interactions to a test of Bell's inequality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperski, J; Fry, E S

    2006-01-01

    The supersonic free-jet expansion technique has been used in different fields of research in physics, physical chemistry and chemistry to study vibrational and rotational molecular structures in ground and excited electronic energy states as well as in cold chemistry to study chemical reactions in a unique environment. The supersonic beam technique, as a widely used method in laser spectroscopy of molecules, exploits a source of monokinetic, rotationally and vibrationally cold molecules, that are very weakly bound in their ground electronic states (van der Waals molecules). In experiments at Jagiellonian University the supersonic free-jet beam serves as a source of ground-state van der Waals objects in studies of neutral-neutral interactions between group 12 metal (M = Zn, Cd, Hg) and noble gas (NG) atoms. Recently, the method has been applied as a source of entangled 199 Hg atom pairs in order to test Bell's inequality in an experiment at Texas A and M University

  1. The PRIMA Test Facility: SPIDER and MITICA test-beds for ITER neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Piovan, R.; Dal Bello, S.; Gaio, E.; Luchetta, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Zaccaria, P.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Antoni, V.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Boldrin, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Delogu, R.; De Muri, M.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Gambetta, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Grando, L.; Jain, P.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Moresco, M.; Ocello, E.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pimazzoni, A.; Recchia, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Rostagni, G.; Sartori, E.; Siragusa, M.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spada, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.; Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Svensson, L.; Schunke, B.; Decamps, H.; Urbani, M.; Kushwah, M.; Chareyre, J.; Singh, M.; Bonicelli, T.; Agarici, G.; Garbuglia, A.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Simon, M.; Bailly-Maitre, L.; Bragulat, E.; Gomez, G.; Gutierrez, D.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J.-F.; Pilard, V.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hanada, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Maejima, T.; Kojima, A.; Umeda, N.; Yamanaka, H.; Chakraborty, A.; Baruah, U.; Rotti, C.; Patel, H.; Nagaraju, M. V.; Singh, N. P.; Patel, A.; Dhola, H.; Raval, B.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Hanke, S.; Hauer, V.; Ochoa, S.; Blatchford, P.; Chuilon, B.; Xue, Y.; De Esch, H. P. L.; Hemsworth, R.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Muraro, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Cavenago, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Sandri, S.; Tonti, A.

    2017-08-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), called PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), is hosted in Padova, Italy and includes two experiments: MITICA, the full-scale prototype of the ITER heating neutral beam injector, and SPIDER, the full-size radio frequency negative-ions source. The NBTF realization and the exploitation of SPIDER and MITICA have been recognized as necessary to make the future operation of the ITER heating neutral beam injectors efficient and reliable, fundamental to the achievement of thermonuclear-relevant plasma parameters in ITER. This paper reports on design and R&D carried out to construct PRIMA, SPIDER and MITICA, and highlights the huge progress made in just a few years, from the signature of the agreement for the NBTF realization in 2011, up to now—when the buildings and relevant infrastructures have been completed, SPIDER is entering the integrated commissioning phase and the procurements of several MITICA components are at a well advanced stage.

  2. Sensibility Studies for the Neutral Beam Injection System in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.

    1999-01-01

    The sensibility of the Neutral Beam Injection system of TJ-II to the changes of several parameters is analysed. Transmission, absorption and power loads at the intercepting structures are evaluated. The adopted values for the ion source distance, focal length and divergence are confirmed as optimal, showing a small sensitivity to changes, except for the divergence. The operational margins for beam misalignments has been found to be small but feasible, confirming also the reference directions as optimal. Finally four possible alternatives, intended to reduce the power loads at the beam entering structures, are analysed. All of them have been discarded since lead to the appearance of new risk zones, with unacceptable load levels, and reduce the transmitted power. (Author) 13 refs

  3. DIII-D Neutral Beam control system operator interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.J.; Campbell, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A centralized graphical user interface has been added to the DIII-D Neutral Beam (NB) control systems for status monitoring and remote control applications. This user interface provides for automatic data acquisition, alarm detection and supervisory control of the four NB programmable logic controllers (PLC) as well as the Mode Control PLC. These PLCs are used for interlocking, control and status of the NB vacuum pumping, gas delivery, and water cooling systems as well as beam mode status and control. The system allows for both a friendly user interface as well as a safe and convenient method of communicating with remote hardware that formerly required interns to access. In the future, to enable high level of control of PLC subsystems, complete procedures is written and executed at the touch of a screen control panel button. The system consists of an IBM compatible 486 computer running the FIX DMACS trademark for Windows trademark data acquisition and control interface software, a Texas Instruments/Siemens communication card and Phoenix Digital optical communications modules. Communication is achieved via the TIWAY (Texas Instruments protocol link utilizing both fiber optic communications and a copper local area network (LAN). Hardware and software capabilities will be reviewed. Data and alarm reporting, extended monitoring and control capabilities will also be discussed

  4. Heat-exchanger concepts for neutral-beam calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.C.; Polk, D.H.; McFarlin, D.J.; Stone, R.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced cooling concepts that permit the design of water cooled heat exchangers for use as calorimeters and beam dumps for advanced neutral beam injection systems were evaluated. Water cooling techniques ranging from pool boiling to high pressure, high velocity swirl flow were considered. Preliminary performance tests were carried out with copper, inconel and molybdenum tubes ranging in size from 0.19 to 0.50 in. diameter. Coolant flow configurations included (1) smooth tube/straight flow, (2) smooth tube with swirl flow created by tangential injection of the coolant, and (3) axial flow in internally finned tubes. Additionally, the effect of tube L/D was evaluated. A CO 2 laser was employed to irradiate a sector of the tube exterior wall; the laser power was incrementally increased until burnout (as evidenced by a coolant leak) occurred. Absorbed heat fluxes were calculated by dividing the measured coolant heat load by the area of the burn spot on the tube surface. Two six element thermopiles were used to accurately determine the coolant temperature rise. A maximum burnout heat flux near 14 kW/cm 2 was obtained for the molybdenum tube swirl flow configuration

  5. Doublet III neutral beam injector test tank cryopanel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Kamperschroer, J.H.; Arend, P.V.

    1980-03-01

    A simple condensing cryopanel has been designed for the Doublet III neutral beam test tank with a 320,000 liters per second pumping capacity for hydrogen. This maintains a vacuum in the test tank which simulates the Doublet III vessel, 1.3 x 10 -3 Pa (approx.10 -5 torr). The hydrogen gas load comes from the beam striking the test tank calorimeter and amounts to about 7.2 torr liters per second. The cryopanel is cylindrical shaped with a liquid helium (LHe) surface that pumps through liquid nitrogen (LN) cooled aluminum chevrons located in squirrel-cage fashion around the inside surface of the cylinder. The LHe cooled surface is a smooth cylinder 2.09m in diameter by .69m long with LHe flowing in a approx. 1mm annular space between concentric cylinders. The chevrons which are not blackened are cooled from each end with LN flowing in ring manifolds that serve as the primary cryopanel structure. The LHe is force fed at 55.2 kPa remaining in the liquid phase through the panel. External heat exchanger capability permits use of helium at 3.8 to 4.2 0 K. Normal operating flow rate is 1.4 g/sec for a heat load expected to be 12.2 W total

  6. Gas injection in EBT-S for assessment of particle loading effects of neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.H.; Glowienka, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have begun to examine the physics of neutral beam injection on EBT-S. Preliminary experiments have been limited to a calibrated gas puffing experiment which simulates the effects of a pulsed beam with zero energy. These experiments begin to address some of the compatibility problems that exist for future beam heating experiments on EBT devices. In particular, neutral beams are to be a significant part of the planned EBT-II experiment which is designed to demonstrate steady-state, reactor-like conditions with both electron cyclotron heating and neutral beam heating

  7. Efficiency calculations for the direct energy conversion system of the Cadarache neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype energy conversion system is presently in operation at Cadarache, France. Such a device is planned for installation on each six neutral beam injectors for use in the Tore Supra experiment in 1989. We present calculations of beam performance that may influence design considerations. The calculations are performed with the DART charged particle beam code. We investigate the effects of cold plasma, direct energy conversion and neutral beam production. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Thermal analysis of EAST neutral beam injectors for long-pulse beam operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundong, HU; Yongjian, XU; Yuanlai, XIE; Yahong, XIE; Lizhen, LIANG; Caichao, JIANG; Sheng, LIU; Jianglong, WEI; Peng, SHENG; Zhimin, LIU; Ling, TAO; the NBI Team

    2018-04-01

    Two sets of neutral beam injectors (NBI-1 and NBI-2) have been mounted on the EAST tokamak since 2014. NBI-1 and NBI-2 are co-direction and counter-direction, respectively. As with in-depth physics and engineering study of EAST, the ability of long pulse beam injection should be required in the NBI system. For NBIs, the most important and difficult thing that should be overcome is heat removal capacity of heat loaded components for long-pulse beam extraction. In this article, the thermal state of the components of EAST NBI is investigated using water flow calorimetry and thermocouple temperatures. Results show that (1) operation parameters have an obvious influence on the heat deposited on the inner components of the beamline, (2) a suitable operation parameter can decrease the heat loading effectively and obtain longer beam pulse length, and (3) under the cooling water pressure of 0.25 MPa, the predicted maximum beam pulse length will be up to 260 s with 50 keV beam energy by a duty factor of 0.5. The results present that, in this regard, the EAST NBI-1 system has the ability of long-pulse beam injection.

  9. Detail design of the beam source for the SPIDER experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcuzzi, D.; Agostinetti, P.; Dalla Palma, M.; Degli Agostini, F.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; Trevisan, L.

    2010-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (PRIMA-Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated) is planned to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova, Italy). PRIMA includes two experimental devices: a full size plasma source with low voltage extraction called SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) and a full size neutral beam injector at full beam power called MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement). SPIDER is the first experimental device to be built and operated, aiming at testing the extraction of a negative ion beam (made of H - and in a later stage D - ions) from an ITER size ion source. The main requirements of this experiment are a H - /D - current of approximately 70 A/50 A and an energy of 100 keV. This paper presents an overview of the SPIDER beam source design, with a particular focus on the main design choices, aiming at reaching the best compromise between physics, optics, thermo-mechanical, cooling, assembly and electrical requirements.

  10. Observation of Beam Driven Modes during Neutral Beam Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelenkov, E.D.; Cheng, C.Z.; Bell, R.; Darrow, D.; Johnson, D.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.; Menard, J.; Kubota, S.; Peebles, W.

    2001-01-01

    With the first injection of neutral beams on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a broad and complicated spectrum of coherent modes was seen between approximately 0.4 MHz and 2.5 MHz [where f(subscript ''ci'')] for deuterium is approximately 2.2 MHz. The modes have been observed with high bandwidth magnetic pick-up coils and with a reflectometer. The parametric scaling of the mode frequency with density and magnetic field is consistent with Alfvenic modes (linear in B, inversely with the square root of density). These modes have been identified as magnetosonic waves or compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) excited by a cyclotron resonance with the neutral-beam ions. Modes have also been observed in the frequency range 50-150 kHz with toroidal mode numbers n = 1-5. These lower frequency modes are thought to be related to the TAE [Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode] seen commonly in tokamaks and driven by energetic fast ion populations resulting from ICRF [ion cyclotron range of frequency] and NBI [neutral-beam injection] heating. There is no clear indication of enhanced fast ion losses associated with the modes

  11. Design development of bellows for the DNB beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Venkata Nagaraju, M.; Joshi, Jaydeep; Patel, Hitesh; Yadav, Ashish; Pillai, Suraj; Singh, Mahendrajit; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, A.K.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2017-01-01

    Establishing a procedure and mechanism for alignment of Ion beams in Neutral Beam (NB) sources for ITER like systems are complex due to large traversal distances (∼21 m) and restricted use of flexible elements into the system. For the beam source of DNB, movement requirements for beam alignment are the combination of tilting (±9mrad), rotation (±9mrad) and translation (±25mm). The present work describes the design development of a system composed of three single ply ‘Gimbal’ type bellow system, placed in series, in L-shaped hydraulic lines (size DN50, DN20 and DN15). The paper shall detail out the generation of initial requirements, transformation of movements at bellow locations, selection of bellows/combination of bellows, minimizing the induced movements by optimization of bellows location, estimation of movements through CEASAR II and the design compliance with respect to EJMA code

  12. Beam focusing by aperture displacement in multiampere ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, L.D.; Kim, J.; Matsuda, S.

    1975-05-01

    Results are given of an experimental study of beam focusing by aperture displacement (Δx) in duoPIGatron ion sources. Measurements with a single aperture, accel-decel electrode geometry show that the beam deflection angle is linear with Δx/z for the round aperture and with Δx/z* 2 for the slit aperture where z and z* are respectively the extraction gap distance and the effective gap distance. Applying the result of the single aperture study to the multiaperture, duoPIGatron sources, it was possible to increase the neutral beam injection power to the ORMAK plasma by approximately 40 percent. Also presented are discussion and comparison of other work on the effect of aperture displacement on beam deflection. (U.S.)

  13. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuzzi, D., E-mail: diego.marcuzzi@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Muri, M.; Chitarin, G.; Gambetta, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Trevisan, L.; Visentin, M.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaupa, M. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Hemsworth, R. S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2016-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  14. Operation of a TFTR ion source with a ground potential gas feed into the neutralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Wright, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    TFTR long pulse ion sources have been operated with gas fed only into the neutralizer. Gas for the plasma generator entered through the accelerator rather than directly into the arc chamber. This modification has been proposed for tritium beam operation to locate control electronics at ground potential and to simplify tritium plumbing. Source operation with this configuration and with the nominal gas system that feeds gas into both the ion source and the center of the neutralizer are compared. Comparison is based upon accelerator grid currents, beam composition, and neutral power delivered to the calorimeter. Charge exchange in the accelerator can be a significant loss mechanism in both systems at high throughput. A suitable operating point with the proposed system was found that requires 30% less gas than used presently. The extracted D + , D + 2 , and D + 3 fractions of the beam were found to be a function of the gas throughput; at similar throughputs, the two gas feed systems produced similar extracted ion fractions. Operation at the proposed gas efficient point results in a small reduction (relative to the old high throughput mode) in the extracted D + fraction of the beam from 77% to 71%, with concomitant changes in the D + 2 fraction from 18% to 26%, and 6% to 3% for D + 3 . The injected power is unchanged, ∼2.2 MW at 95 kV

  15. Impurity radiation from a beam-plasma neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    Impurity radiation, in a worst case evaluation for a beam-plasma neutron source (BPNS), does not limit performance. Impurities originate from four sources: (a) sputtering from walls by charge exchange or alpha particle bombardment, (b) sputtering from limiters, (c) plasma desorption of gas from walls and (d) injection with neutral beams. Sources (c) and (d) are negligible; adsorbed gas on the walls of the confinement chamber and the neutral beam sources is removed by the steady state discharge. Source (b) is negligible for impinging ion energies below the sputtering threshold (T i ≤ 0.025 keV on tungsten) and for power densities to the limiter within the capabilities of water cooling (30-40 MW/m 2 ); both conditions can be satisfied in the BPNS. Source (a) radiates 0.025 MW/m 2 to the neutron irradiation samples, compared with 5 to 10 MW/m 2 of neutrons; and radiates a total of 0.08 MW from the plasma column, compared with 60 MW of injected power. The particle bombardment that yields source (a) deposits an average of 2.7 MW/m 2 on the samples, within the capabilities of helium gas cooling (10 MW/m 2 ). An additional worst case for source (d) is evaluated for present day 2 to 5 s pulsed neutral beams with 0.1% impurity density and is benchmarked against 2XIIB. The total radiation would increase a factor of 1.5 to ≤ 0.12 MW, supporting the conclusion that impurities will not have a significant impact on a BPN. (author). 61 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Design of the calorimeter and beam dump for the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.R.; Haughian, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    A calorimeter has been designed for use with the TFTR prototype neutral beam injection system. It consists of three vees each having two 18.8-mm-thick (0.75 in.) copper plates at a 6-deg angle, relative to the beam centerline. The maximum power density on a plate with this arrangement will be 2.0 kW/cm 2 , resulting in a front surface temperature rise of about 420 0 C. A support and retraction system moves the calorimeter in and out of the beam centerline. Various factors used in the selection of the absorber plate material will be discussed and also some experimental test results will be presented

  17. A directly heated electron beam line source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Masood, K.; Rafiq, M.; Chaudhry, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    A 140-mm cathode length, Electron Beam Line Source with a high degree of focusing of the beam is constructed. The design principles and basic characteristic considerations for electron beam line source consists of parallel plate electrode geometric array as well as a beam power of 35kW are worked out. The dimensions of the beam at the work site are 1.25xl00mm. The gun is designed basically for the study of evaporation and deposition characteristic of refractory metals for laboratory use. However, it may be equally used for melting and casting of these metals. (author)

  18. Considerations involved in the design of negative-ion-based neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.

    1983-11-01

    We consider the requirements and constraints for negative-ion-based neutral beam injection systems, and show how these are reflected in design considerations. We will attempt to develop a set of guidelines for users and developers to use to see how well (in a qualitative sense, at least) a particular neutral beam system fits a particular proposed need

  19. Five second helium neutral beam injection using argon-frost cryopumping techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.; Kellman, D.H.; Hong, R.; Kim, J.; Laughon, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    High power helium neutral beams for the heating of tokamak discharges can now be provided for 5 s by using argon cryopumping (of the helium gas) in the beamlines. The DIII-D neutral beam system has routinely provided up to 20 MW of deuterium neutral beam heating in support of experiments on the DIII-D tokamak. Operation of neutral beams with helium has historically presented a problem in that pulse lengths have been limited to 500 ms due to reliance solely on volume pumping of the helium gas. Helium is not condensed on the cryopanels. A system has now been installed to deposit a layer of argon frost on the DIII-D neutral beam cryopanels, between tokamak injection pulses. The layer serves to trap helium on the cryopanels providing sufficient pumping speed for 5 s helium beam extraction. The argon frosting hardware is now present on two of four DIII-D neutral beamlines, allowing injection of up to 6 MW of helium neutral beams per discharge, with pulse lengths of up to 5 s. The argon frosting system is described, along with experimental results demonstrating its effectiveness as a method of economically extending the capabilities of cryogenic pumping panels to allow multi-second helium neutral beam injection

  20. Heat transfer study of water-cooled swirl tubes for neutral beam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Davis, R.C.; Gambill, W.R.; Haselton, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    Heat transfer considerations of water-cooled swirl-tubes including heat transfer correlations, burnout data, and 2-D considerations are presented in connection with high power neutral beam target applications. We also discuss performance results of several swirl tube targets in use at neutral beam development facilities

  1. A suite of diagnostics to validate and optimize the prototype ITER neutral beam injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Agostini, M.; Barbisan, M.; Brombin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R. S.; De Muri, M.; Muraro, A.; Peruzzo, S.; Pimazzoni, A.; Pomaro, N.; Rebai, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Zaniol, B.; Zaupa, M.

    2017-10-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating provided by two neutral beam injectors using 40 A negative deuterium ions accelerated at 1 MV. As the beam requirements have never been experimentally met, a test facility is under construction at Consorzio RFX, which hosts two experiments: SPIDER, full-size 100 kV ion source prototype, and MITICA, 1 MeV full-size ITER injector prototype. Since diagnostics in ITER injectors will be mainly limited to thermocouples, due to neutron and gamma radiation and to limited access, it is crucial to thoroughly investigate and characterize in more accessible experiments the key parameters of source plasma and beam, using several complementary diagnostics assisted by modelling. In SPIDER and MITICA the ion source parameters will be measured by optical emission spectroscopy, electrostatic probes, cavity ring down spectroscopy for H^- density and laser absorption spectroscopy for cesium density. Measurements over multiple lines-of-sight will provide the spatial distribution of the parameters over the source extension. The beam profile uniformity and its divergence are studied with beam emission spectroscopy, complemented by visible tomography and neutron imaging, which are novel techniques, while an instrumented calorimeter based on custom unidirectional carbon fiber composite tiles observed by infrared cameras will measure the beam footprint on short pulses with the highest spatial resolution. All heated components will be monitored with thermocouples: as these will likely be the only measurements available in ITER injectors, their capabilities will be investigated by comparison with other techniques. SPIDER and MITICA diagnostics are described in the present paper with a focus on their rationale, key solutions and most original and effective implementations.

  2. Operation of TFTR neutral beams with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Stevenson, T.N.; Wright, K.E.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Oldaker, M.E.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1991-07-01

    High Z neutral atoms have been injected into TFTR plasmas in an attempt to enhance plasma confinement through modification of the edge electric field. TFTR ion sources have extracted 9 A of 62 keV Ne + for up to 0.2 s during injection into deuterium plasmas, and for 0.5 s during conditioning pulses. Approximately 400 kW of Ne 0 have been injected from each of two ion sources. Operation was at full bending magnet current, with the Ne + barely contained on the ion dump. Beamline design modifications to permit operation up to 120 keV with krypton or xenon are described. Such ions are too massive to be deflected up to the ion dump. The plan, therefore, is to armor those components receiving these ions. Even with this armor, modest increases in the bending magnet current capability are necessary to safely reach 120 kV with Kr or Xe. Information relevant to heavy ion operation was also acquired when several ion sources were inadvertently operated with water contamination. Spectroscopic analysis of certain pathological pulses indicate that up to 6% of the extracted ions were water. After dissociation in the neutralizer, water yields oxygen ions which, as with Ne, Kr, and Xe, are under-deflected by the magnet. Damage to a calorimeter scraper, due to the focal properties of the magnet, has resulted. A magnified power density of 6 KW/cm 2 for 2 s, from ∼ 90 kW of O + , is the suspected cause. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. Beam monitoring system for intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tron, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring system realizing novel principle of operation and allowing to register a two-dimensional beam current distribution within entire aperture (100...200 mm) of ion pipe for a time in nanosecond range has been designed and accomplished for beam control of the INR intense neutron source, for preventing thermo-mechanical damage of its first wall. Key unit of the system is monitor of two-dimensional beam current distribution, elements of which are high resistant to heating by the beam and to radiation off the source. The description of the system and monitor are presented. Implementation of the system for the future sources with more high intensities are discussed. (author)

  4. Nucleonic analysis of a preliminary design for the ETF neutral-beam-injector duct shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, W.T.; Seed, T.J.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nucleonic analysis of the Engineering Test Facility Neutral-Beam-Injector duct shielding has been made using a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates method. This method used Monte Carlo to determine internal and external boundary surface sources for a subsequent discrete-ordinates calculation of the neutron and gamma-ray transport through the shield. The analysis also included determination of the energy and angular distribution of neutrons and gamma rays entering the duct from the torus plasma chamber. Confidence in the hybrid method and the results obtained were provided through a comparison with three-dimensional Monte Carlo results

  5. Five second helium neutral beam injection using argon-frost cryopumping techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.; Kellman, D.H.; Hong, R.; Kim, J.; Laughon, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    High power helium neutral beams for the heating of tokamak discharges can now be provided for 5 s by using argon cryopumping (of the helium gas) in the beamlines. A system has now been installed to deposit a layer of argon frost on the DIII-D neutral beam cryopanels, between tokamak injection pulses. The layer serves to trap helium on the cryopanels providing sufficient pumping speed for 5 s helium beam extraction. The argon frosting hardware is now present on two of four DIII-D neutral beamlines, allowing injection of up to 6 MW of helium neutral beams per discharge, with pulse lengths of up to 5 s. The argon frosting system is described, along with experimental results demonstrating its effectiveness as a method of economically extending the capabilities of cryogenic pumping panels to allow multi-second helium neutral beam injection

  6. Modeling and simulation of a proton beam space-charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand and to model the build-up of a plasma in the low-energy beam transport line of a proton accelerator. This plasma is generated by the beam, which ionizes the residual gas remaining in this low-energy section. By neutralizing the space-charge of the beam, the plasma modifies its transport, thus, to control the beam, it is necessary to study this phenomenon. In this work, we consider a continuous beam and we take interest in the stationary states of the plasma. We first restrict the description of the plasma to a plane perpendicular to the beam, by assuming that the beam and the plasma are longitudinally invariant. The build-up of the plasma is first described with a kinetic model where binary collisions are neglected, based on the Vlasov-Poisson system with source terms which take into account ionization. We prove mathematically that this system has no stationary solution, by using appropriate subsets of the phase-space that we call trapping-sets. Yet, measurements show that the plasma evolves towards a steady state. To account for this evolution, we modify the source terms of the model. The resulting model is solved by a particle-in-cell method, and the results are compared to the measurements. Then, we show that binary collisions between plasma electrons and beam ions or gas molecules help to maintain the equilibrium of the plasma. In the last part of the thesis, we use hydrodynamic models to investigate more easily the coupling between transversal and longitudinal effects. The preliminary study of a one-dimensional model enables to find the behaviour of the transverse potential of the plasma. Finally, a two-dimensional model of the transport of the beam when it is neutralized by the plasma is solved numerically, which shows that the longitudinal electric field should play an important role in the set-up of the equilibrium of the plasma. (author) [fr

  7. Maximum entropy algorithm and its implementation for the neutral beam profile measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A tomography algorithm to maximize the entropy of image using Lagrangian multiplier technique and conjugate gradient method has been designed for the measurement of 2D spatial distribution of intense neutral beams of KSTAR NBI (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research Neutral Beam Injector), which is now being designed. A possible detection system was assumed and a numerical simulation has been implemented to test the reconstruction quality of given beam profiles. This algorithm has the good applicability for sparse projection data and thus, can be used for the neutral beam tomography. 8 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  8. Maximum entropy algorithm and its implementation for the neutral beam profile measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A tomography algorithm to maximize the entropy of image using Lagrangian multiplier technique and conjugate gradient method has been designed for the measurement of 2D spatial distribution of intense neutral beams of KSTAR NBI (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research Neutral Beam Injector), which is now being designed. A possible detection system was assumed and a numerical simulation has been implemented to test the reconstruction quality of given beam profiles. This algorithm has the good applicability for sparse projection data and thus, can be used for the neutral beam tomography. 8 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  9. Cryogenic supplies for the TFTR neutral beam line cryopanels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, G.

    1977-01-01

    Cryocondensing panels will be used for the Neutral Beam Lines of the TFTR to satisfy a pumping speed requirement of 2.5 x 10 6 l/s. The cryocondensing panels are fed by liquid helium (LHe), boiling at selectable temperatures of 4.5 0 K or 3.8 0 K. Liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) panels and chevrons thermally shield the LHe panel. The closed-loop LHe supply system and the open loop LN 2 system are discussed. The helium refrigerator of minimum 1070-W capacity, together with its distribution system, and the nitrogen distribution system in the ton/hour LN 2 range is presented. Problems and their solutions in connection with the LHe system, including the distribution over a distance of 500 feet of large quantities of liquid/gas mixtures with load variations over the range of about 3 : 1, and the economies of various types of distribution lines (passive, pumped, shielded, combined), are described. The system design passed the preliminary phase. Design features and auxiliary equipment to assure dispersion of large quantities of nitrogen into the atmosphere and to permit operation under degraded cryogenic helium refrigerator performance are also discussed in Design Considerations

  10. Conceptual design of a neutral-beam injection system for the TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlers, K.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Cooper, W.S.; Hooper, E.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Stearns, J.W.

    1975-11-01

    The neutral-beam injection requirements for heating and fueling the next generation of fusion reactor experiments far exceed those of present devices; the neutral-beam systems needed to meet these requirements will be large and complex. A conceptual design of a TFTR tokamak injection system to produce 120 keV deuterium-ion beams with a total power of about 80 MW is given

  11. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  12. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma

  13. Increased power delivery from the DIII-D neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colleraine, A.P.; Callis, R.W.; Hong, R.M.; Kellman, D.H.; Kim, J.; Langhorn, A.R.; Lee, R.; Phillips, J.C.; Wight, J.J.

    1989-12-01

    The neutral beam system installed on the DIII-D tokamak employs eight 80 kV Long Pulse Sources (LPS) mounted on four beamlines and was originally designed to deliver a nominal 12 MW of H degree power to a plasma for pulses of up to 5 sec duration. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory designed the LPS for the US Fusion Program to fill the requirements of both the DIII-D and the TFTR machines. Essentially all source components are of a common design; the DIII-D version is therefore conservative in its rated parameters. Recently a neutron shield has been constructed around the torus hall allowing D degree injection to become routine. Because deuterium beams have a better neutralization efficiency, the nominal power delivery per source has been measured to be approximately 2 MW (for a total of 16 MW) without any modifications. However, by reoptimizing the voltage gradients in the source, the perveance can be increased without degrading the optics. A change of gradient grid voltage from 0.83 V accel to 0.79 V accel raises the perveance from 2.5 to 3.0 μPerv with a corresponding gain in beam power of about 20%. The arc power required also must be increased to the range of 100 to 120 kW but this is well within the design limits of the LPS. Further studies of our systems are now underway to assess the possibilities of raising V accel above 80 kV. An additional gain in power is possible by this technique. 6 refs., 6 figs

  14. Overview of the LBL/LLNL negative-ion-based neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyle, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    The LBL/LLNL negative-ion-based neutral beam development program and status are described. The emphasis has shifted in some details since the first symposium in 1977, but our overall objectives remain the same, namely, the development of megawatt d.c. injection systems. Previous emphasis was on a system in which the negative ions were produced by double charge exchange in sodium vapor. At present, the emphasis is on a self-extraction source in which the negative ions are produced on a biased surface imbedded in a plasma. A one-ampere beam will be accelerated to at least 40 keV next year. Studies of negative-ion formation and interactions help provide a data base for the technology program

  15. Application of the OPTIMUS Code to the Neutral Beam Injection System of TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.

    1998-01-01

    The different losses processes affecting a neutral beam since is born into the ions source until is coming into the fusion machine, are dependent of the residual gas pressure distribution inside injector. The OPTIMUS code analyzes that losses and calculates the pressure distribution inside one injector with specific geometry. The adaptation of injector to TJ-II has not required important design changes, only the operating range of the gas flow and the pumping speed have modified. The calculations show that the required gas flows for the optimal operation of the system ned an independent pumping system for the calorimeter box with a pumping speed of 1200001/s. The system efficiency is not affected by an hypothetical beaming effect and it is found also that with a proper conditioning of the injector walls, so that the absorption coefficients do not surpass excessively the unity value, the injector operation remains optimal. (Author) 8 refs

  16. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Molecular beam (1-50eV) production by duoplasmatron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, M.; Gautherin, G.; Lejeune, C.

    1974-01-01

    The duoplasmatron discharge is commonly used to produce intense ion beams. A theoretical model of this discharge has been previously developed. The analysis of charge exchange processes between ions and neutral within the discharge shows that the source is able to deliver intense neutral beams (10 16 part s -1 ), the energy being in the range 1-50 eV. The intensity and energy distribution may be controlled from the discharge parameter variations. An experimental device has been realized in order to separate the neutral beam and the flux of charged particles; these latter are injected axially in a toroidal magnetic field configuration [fr

  18. Multicharged and intense heavy ion beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutner, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron plasma-are source (PIG), duoplasmatron (DP), laser source (LS), electron beam ion source (EBIS) and electron cyclotron resonance source (ECRS) from the viewpoint of generating intense and high charge state beams are considered. It is pointed out that for the last years three types of multicharged ion sources-EBIS, ECR and LS have been essentially developed. In the EBIS source the Xe 48+ ions are produced. The present day level of the development of the electron-beam ionization technique shows that by means of this technique intensive uranium nuclei beams production becomes a reality. On the ECR source Xe 26+ approximately 4x10 10 h/s, Asub(r)sup(12+) approximately 10 12 h/s intensive ion beams are produced. In the laser source a full number of C 6+ ions during one laser pulse constitutes not less than 10 10 from the 5x10mm 2 emission slit. At the present time important results are obtained pointing to the possibility to separate the ion component of laser plasma in the cyclotron central region. On the PIG source the Xe 15+ ion current up to 10μA per pulse is produced. In the duoplasmatron the 11-charge state of xenon ion beams is reached [ru

  19. High-power neutral-beam heating in the adiabatic toroidal compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A.; Eubank, H.P.; Goldston, R.; Smith, R.R.; Nagashima, T.

    1976-05-01

    Neutral-beam injection experiments on ATC have resulted in net power deposited in the plasma of up to 230 kW. The power deposited in the plasma ions is large compared to that from ohmic heating. For a variety of beam and plasma ion species, the increase in ion temperature is proportional to beam power

  20. Neutralized drift compression experiments with a high-intensity ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Waldron, W.L.; Anders, A.; Baca, D.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Eylon, S.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.G.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.; Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    To create high-energy density matter and fusion conditions, high-power drivers, such as lasers, ion beams, and X-ray drivers, may be employed to heat targets with short pulses compared to hydro-motion. Both high-energy density physics and ion-driven inertial fusion require the simultaneous transverse and longitudinal compression of an ion beam to achieve high intensities. We have previously studied the effects of plasma neutralization for transverse beam compression. The scaled experiment, the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), demonstrated that an initially un-neutralized beam can be compressed transversely to ∼1 mm radius when charge neutralization by background plasma electrons is provided. Here, we report longitudinal compression of a velocity-tailored, intense, neutralized 25 mA K + beam at 300 keV. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhances the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and produces a pulse duration of about 3 ns. The physics of longitudinal compression, experimental procedure, and the results of the compression experiments are presented

  1. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D.C.; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  2. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, D.C., E-mail: pacedc@fusion.gat.com; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  3. An Absolute Valve for the ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Ch.; Chuilon, B.; Michael, W.

    2006-01-01

    In the ITER reference design a fast shutter was included to limit tritium migration into the beamline vacuum enclosures. The need was recently identified to extend the functionality of the fast shutter to that of an absolute valve in order to facilitate injector maintenance procedures and to satisfy safety requirements in case of an in-vessel loss of coolant event. Three concepts have been examined satisfying the ITER requirements for speed of actuation, sealing performance over the required lifetime, and pressure differential in fault scenarios, namely: a rectangular closure section; a circular cross section; and a rotary JET-type valve. The rectangular section represents the most efficient usage of the available space envelope and leads to a minimum-mass system, although it requires greater total force for a given load per unit length of seal. However, a metallic seal of the '' hard/hard '' type, where the seal relies on the elastic properties of the material and does not utilise any type of spring device, can provide the required seal performance with typical loading of 200 kg/cm. The conceptual design of the proposed absolute valve will be presented. The aperture dimensions are 1.45 m high by 0.6 m wide, with minimum achievable leak rate of 1 · 10 -9 mbarl/s and maximum pressure differential of 3 bar across the valve. Sealing force is provided using two seal plates, linked by a 3 mm thick ' omega ' diaphragm, by pressurisation of the interspace to 8 bar; this allows for a relative movement of the plates of 2 mm. Movement of the device perpendicular to the beam direction is carried out using a novel magnetic drive in order to transmit the motive force across the vacuum boundary, similar to that demonstrated on a test-rig in an earlier study. The conceptual design includes provision of all the services such as pneumatics and water cooling to cope with the heat loads from neutral beams in quasi steady-state operation and from the ITER plasma. A future programme

  4. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  5. Resonant Effects in Neutral beam Moderation at TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.; Fuentes, C.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of fast ion losses in neutral beam moderation at TJ-II is analysed theoretically, in particular the influence of resonant effects and the radial electric field dependence. The direct losses show strong resonant effects when the ratio of the poloidal and toroidal rotation velocities pass near the values -4/3, -2 or 0. These effects are visible as strong maxima on the loss fractions and also as characteristic trajectory behaviours. The delayed losses present resonant effects also, generally at intermediate energies (5 to 20 KeV for 40 keV injection). Near the resonances the population of passing particles in these losses is very high and the loss fraction can equal or even surpass the direct losses. In these delayed losses the particles concentrate along vertical strips on the loss cone diagrams of roughly constant parallel velocity. This parallel velocity increases with the electric field, the loss maxima are reached usually when the pitch and energy of these strips are near the initial injection values. The trapped particle population in these delayed losses is maximal at null electric and decreases with the field intensity for both potential signs. The corresponding final energies are usually low (1 to 5 keV). Except at extreme potentials, where the -4 resonance can appear, no resonant effects are observed for this population. The resonance ordering is similar for all configurations and follows reasonably the predictions of a simple model. The extreme configurations are dominated by the effects of the 0 and -2 resonances, giving very high loss fractions even for null electric field. In contrast the intermediate configurations, near the Reference one, do not present resonant effects and the losses are moderate at low potentials. Only above 2000 v the resonant effects start to appear. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.K.; Greenway, W.; Kwan, J.W.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-01-01

    To heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter with intense ion beams, low mass ions, such as lithium, have an energy loss peak (dE/dx) at a suitable kinetic energy. The Heavy Ion Fusion Sciences (HIFS) program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will carry out warm dense matter experiments using Li + ion beam with energy 1.2-4 MeV in order to achieve uniform heating up to 0.1-1 eV. The accelerator physics design of Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) has a pulse length at the ion source of about 0.5 (micro)s. Thus for producing 50 nC of beam charge, the required beam current is about 100 mA. Focusability requires a normalized (edge) emittance ∼2 π-mm-mrad. Here, lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, of β-eucryptite, are being studied within the scope of NDCX-II construction. Several small (0.64 cm diameter) lithium aluminosilicate ion sources, on 70%-80% porous tungsten substrate, were operated in a pulsed mode. The distance between the source surface and the mid-plane of the extraction electrode (1 cm diameter aperture) was 1.48 cm. The source surface temperature was at 1220 C to 1300 C. A 5-6 (micro)s long beam pulsed was recorded by a Faraday cup (+300 V on the collector plate and -300 V on the suppressor ring). Figure 1 shows measured beam current density (J) vs. V 3/2 . A space-charge limited beam density of ∼1 mA/cm 2 was measured at 1275 C temperature, after allowing a conditioning time of about ∼ 12 hours. Maximum emission limited beam current density of (ge) 1.8mA/cm 2 was recorded at 1300 C with 10-kV extractions. Figure 2 shows the lifetime of two typical sources with space-charge limited beam current emission at a lower extraction voltage (1.75 kV) and at temperature of 1265 ± 7 C. These data demonstrate a constant, space-charge limited beam current for 20-50 hours. The lifetime of a source is determined by the loss of lithium from the alumino-silicate material either as ions or as neutral

  7. Integrating supervision, control and data acquisition—The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, A., E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.; Breda, M.; Capobianco, R.; Molon, F.; Moressa, M.; Simionato, P.; Zampiva, E.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper describes the experience gained in the integration of different systems for the control and data acquisition system of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility. • It describes the way the different frameworks have been integrated. • It reports some lessons learnt during system integration. • It reports some authors’ considerations about the development the ITER CODAC. - Abstract: The ITER Neutral Beam (NBI) Test Facility, under construction in Padova, Italy consists in the ITER full scale ion source for the heating neutral beam injector, referred to as SPIDER, and the full size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The Control and Data Acquisition System (CODAS) for SPIDER has been developed and is going to be in operation in 2016. The system is composed of four main components: Supervision, Slow Control, Fast Control and Data Acquisition. These components interact with each other to carry out the system operation and, since they represent a common pattern in fusion experiments, software frameworks have been used for each (set of) component. In order to reuse as far as possible the architecture developed for SPIDER, it is important to clearly define the boundaries and the interfaces among the system components so that the implementation of any component can be replaced without affecting the overall architecture. This work reports the experience gained in the development of SPIDER components, highlighting the importance in the definition of generic interfaces among component, showing how the specific solutions have been adapted to such interfaces and suggesting possible approaches for the development of other ITER subsystems.

  8. Integrating supervision, control and data acquisition—The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.; Breda, M.; Capobianco, R.; Molon, F.; Moressa, M.; Simionato, P.; Zampiva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper describes the experience gained in the integration of different systems for the control and data acquisition system of the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility. • It describes the way the different frameworks have been integrated. • It reports some lessons learnt during system integration. • It reports some authors’ considerations about the development the ITER CODAC. - Abstract: The ITER Neutral Beam (NBI) Test Facility, under construction in Padova, Italy consists in the ITER full scale ion source for the heating neutral beam injector, referred to as SPIDER, and the full size prototype injector, referred to as MITICA. The Control and Data Acquisition System (CODAS) for SPIDER has been developed and is going to be in operation in 2016. The system is composed of four main components: Supervision, Slow Control, Fast Control and Data Acquisition. These components interact with each other to carry out the system operation and, since they represent a common pattern in fusion experiments, software frameworks have been used for each (set of) component. In order to reuse as far as possible the architecture developed for SPIDER, it is important to clearly define the boundaries and the interfaces among the system components so that the implementation of any component can be replaced without affecting the overall architecture. This work reports the experience gained in the development of SPIDER components, highlighting the importance in the definition of generic interfaces among component, showing how the specific solutions have been adapted to such interfaces and suggesting possible approaches for the development of other ITER subsystems.

  9. Trans-Z-source Neutral Point Clamped inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, W.; Loh, P. C.; Li, D.

    2012-01-01

    Transformer based Z-source (trans-Z-source) inverters are recently proposed by extending the traditional Z-source inverter with higher buck-boost capability as well as reducing the passive components at the same time. Multi-Level Z-source inverters are single-stage topological solutions used...... for buck-boost energy conversion with all the favourable advantages of multi-level switching retained. This paper presents three-level trans-Z-source Neutral Point Clamped (NPC) inverter topology, which achieves both the advantages of trans-Z-source and three-level NPC inverter configuration. With proper...... modulation scheme, the three-level trans-Z-source inverter can function with minimum of six device commutations per half carrier cycle (same as the traditional buck NPC inverter), while maintaining to produce the designed volt-sec average and inductive voltage boosting at ac output terminals. The designed...

  10. Measurement of the force on microparticles in a beam of energetic ions and neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trottenberg, Thomas; Schneider, Viktor; Kersten, Holger

    2010-01-01

    The force on microparticles in an energetic ion beam is investigated experimentally. Hollow glass microspheres are injected into the vertically upward directed beam and their trajectories are recorded with a charge-coupled device camera. The net force on the particles is determined by means of the measured vertical acceleration. The resulting beam pressures are compared with Faraday cup measurements of the ion current density and calorimetric measurements of the beam power density. Due to the neutral gas background, the beam consists, besides the ions, of energetic neutral atoms produced by charge-exchange collisions. It is found that the measured composition of the drag force by an ion and a neutral atom component agrees with a beam model that takes charge-exchange collisions into account. Special attention is paid to the momentum contribution from sputtered atoms, which is shown to be negligible in this experiment, but should become measurable in case of materials with high sputtering yields.

  11. Performance of the first ASDEX Upgrade neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Vollmer, O.; Feist, J.H.; Speth, E.; Heinemann, B.; Melkus, W.; Obermayer, S.; Riedl, R.; Schaerich, W.; Wittenbecher, K.

    1995-01-01

    Plasmas of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak have been heated with H 0 beams of up to 7 MW and D 0 beams of up to 10 MW. Beam modulation allows to inject at any power level between zero and full power. Measurements characterizing the NBI system performance, the power accountability, and the operational experience obtained so far are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Fast control and data acquisition in the neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper describes the fast control and data acquisition in the ITER neutral beam test facility. • The usage of real time control in ion beam generation and extraction is proposed. • Real time management of breakdowns is described. • The implementation of event-driven data acquisition is reported. - Abstract: Fast control and data acquisition are required in the ion source test bed of the ITER neutral beam test facility, referred to as SPIDER. Fast control will drive the operation of the power supply systems with particular reference to special asynchronous events, such as the breakdowns. These are short-circuits among grids or between grids and vessel that can occur repeatedly during beam operation. They are normal events and, as such, they will be managed by the fast control system. Cycle time associated to such fast control is down to hundreds of microseconds. Fast data acquisition is required when breakdowns occur. Event-driven data acquisition is triggered in real time by fast control at the occurrence of each breakdown. Pre- and post-event samples are acquired, allowing capturing information on transient phenomena in a whole time-window centered on the event. Sampling rate of event-driven data acquisition is up to 5 MS/s. Fast data acquisition may also be independent of breakdowns as in the case of the cavity ring-down spectroscopy where data chunks are acquired at 100 MS/s in bursts of 1.5 ms every 100 ms and are processed in real time to produce derived measurements. The paper after the description of the SPIDER fast control and data acquisition application will report the system design based on commercially available hardware and the MARTe and MDSplus software frameworks. The results obtained by running a full prototype of the fast control and data acquisition system are also reported and discussed. They demonstrate that all SPIDER fast control and data acquisition requirements can be met in the prototype solution

  13. Fast control and data acquisition in the neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, A., E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it; Manduchi, G.; Taliercio, C.

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • The paper describes the fast control and data acquisition in the ITER neutral beam test facility. • The usage of real time control in ion beam generation and extraction is proposed. • Real time management of breakdowns is described. • The implementation of event-driven data acquisition is reported. - Abstract: Fast control and data acquisition are required in the ion source test bed of the ITER neutral beam test facility, referred to as SPIDER. Fast control will drive the operation of the power supply systems with particular reference to special asynchronous events, such as the breakdowns. These are short-circuits among grids or between grids and vessel that can occur repeatedly during beam operation. They are normal events and, as such, they will be managed by the fast control system. Cycle time associated to such fast control is down to hundreds of microseconds. Fast data acquisition is required when breakdowns occur. Event-driven data acquisition is triggered in real time by fast control at the occurrence of each breakdown. Pre- and post-event samples are acquired, allowing capturing information on transient phenomena in a whole time-window centered on the event. Sampling rate of event-driven data acquisition is up to 5 MS/s. Fast data acquisition may also be independent of breakdowns as in the case of the cavity ring-down spectroscopy where data chunks are acquired at 100 MS/s in bursts of 1.5 ms every 100 ms and are processed in real time to produce derived measurements. The paper after the description of the SPIDER fast control and data acquisition application will report the system design based on commercially available hardware and the MARTe and MDSplus software frameworks. The results obtained by running a full prototype of the fast control and data acquisition system are also reported and discussed. They demonstrate that all SPIDER fast control and data acquisition requirements can be met in the prototype solution.

  14. Solenoidal magnetic field influences the beam neutralization by a background plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration is much longer than the electron plasma period. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. Figure 1 shows the influence of a solenoidal magnetic field on charge and current neutralization. Analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field begins to influence the radial electron motion when ω ce > βω pe . Here, ω ce is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β = V b /c is the ion beam velocity. If a solenoidal magnetic field is not applied, plasma waves do not propagate. In contrast, in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field, whistler waves propagate ahead of the beam and can perturb the plasma ahead of the beam pulse. In the limit ω ce >> βω pe , the electron current completely neutralizes the ion beam current and the beam self magnetic field greatly diminishes. Application of an external solenoidal magnetic field clearly makes the collective processes of ion beam-plasma interactions rich in physics content. Many results of the PIC simulations remain to be explained by analytical theory. Four new papers have been published or submitted describing plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse

  15. Colliding-beams polarized ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainor, T.A.; Douglas, J.G.; Badt, D.; Christiensen, C.; Herron, A.; Leach, D.; Olsen, J.; Osborne, J.L.; Zeps, V.

    1985-01-01

    This ion source was to be purchased from ANAC, Inc., a New Zealand-based supplier of beam optics hardware and atomic beam polarized ion sources in December 1982. Shortly before scheduled delivery ANAC went into receivership. During 1983 little work was done on the project as various steps were taken by us, first to get the ion source completed at ANAC, and then, failing that, to obtain the existing parts. In early 1984 we began work to finish the ion source in Seattle. The project is nearly complete, and this article presents progress to date. 2 refs

  16. Advanced Light Source beam diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, has been recently commissioned. Beam diagnostics were very important to the success of the operation. Each diagnostic system is described in this paper along with detailed discussion of its performance. Some of the systems have been in operation for two years. Others, in the storage ring, have not yet been fully commissioned. These systems were, however, working well enough to provide the essential information needed to store beam. The devices described in this paper include wall current monitors, a beam charge monitor, a 50 ohm Faraday cup, DC current transformers, broad-hand striplines, fluorescence screens, beam collimators and scrapers, and beam position monitors. Also, the means by which waveforms are digitized and displayed in the control room is discussed

  17. Advanced Light Source beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation facility nearing completion at LBL. As a third-generation machine, the ALS is designed to produce intense light from bend magnets, wigglers, and undulators (insertion devices). The facility will include a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron, beam transport lines, a 1--2 GeV storage ring, insertion devices, and photon beam lines. Currently, the beam injection systems are being commissioned, and the storage ring is being installed. Electron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics. The design of the BPM instruments is complete, and 50 units have been constructed for use in the injector systems. We are currently fabricating 100 additional instruments for the storage ring. In this paper I discuss engineering fabrication, testing and performance of the beam pickup electrodes and the BPM electronics

  18. Analysis of activation and shutdown contact dose rate for EAST neutral beam port

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Ji; Zhong, Guoqiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinfang; Xie, Yahong; Wu, Bin; Hu, Chundong

    2017-12-01

    For the safe operation and maintenance of neutral beam injector (NBI), specific activity and shutdown contact dose rate of the sample material SS316 are estimated around the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) neutral beam port. Firstly, the neutron emission intensity is calculated by TRANSP code while the neutral beam is co-injected to EAST. Secondly, the neutron activation and shutdown contact dose rates for the neutral beam sample materials SS316 are derived by the Monte Carlo code MCNP and the inventory code FISPACT-2007. The simulations indicate that the primary radioactive nuclides of SS316 are 58Co and 54Mn. The peak contact dose rate is 8.52 × 10-6 Sv/h after EAST shutdown one second. That is under the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design values 1 × 10-5 Sv/h.

  19. The ITER neutral beam test facility: Designs of the general infrastructure, cryosystem and cooling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R.; Chantant, M.; Gravil, B.; Henry, D.; Sabathier, F.; Doceul, L.; Thomas, E.; Houtte, D. van; Zaccaria, P.; Antoni, V.; Bello, S. Dal; Marcuzzi, D.; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mondino, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    The CEA Association is involved, in close collaboration with ENEA, FZK, IPP and UKAEA European Associations, in the first ITER neutral beam (NB) injector and the ITER neutral beam test facility design (EFDA task ref. TW3-THHN-IITF1). A total power of about 50 MW will have to be removed in steady state on the neutral beam test facility (NBTF). The main purpose of this task is to make progress with the detailed design of the first ITER NB injector and to start the conceptual design of the ITER NBTF. The general infrastructure layout of a generic site for the NBTF includes the test facility itself equipped with a dedicated beamline vessel [P.L. Zaccaria, et al., Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility, this conference] and integration studies of associated auxiliaries such as cooling plant, cryoplant and forepumping system

  20. The Beam and detector for the NA48 neutral kaon CP violation experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fanti, V; Marras, D; Musa, L; Nappi, A; Batley, J Richard; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Galik, R; Gershon, T; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Katvars, S; Lazzeroni, C; Moore, R; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; Patel, M; Slater, M; Takach, S; White, T O; Wotton; Bal, F; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Bremer, J; Brodier-Yourstone, P; Buchholz, P; Burns, M; Ceccucci, A; Clément, M; Cuhadar-Donzelsmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels; Falaleev, V; Formenti, F; Funk, W; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Grafström, P; Hallgren, B; Kapusta, P; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Iwanski, W; Lacourt, A; Laverriere, G; Linser, G; Ljuslin, C; Marchioro, A; Mast, M; Matheys, J P; Morel, M; Norton, A; Orlic, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Schinzel, D; Seidl, W; Taureg, H; Tarlé, J C; Velasco, M; Vossnack, O; Wahl, H; Wertelaers, P; Weterings, J; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kalinin, A; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhevnikov, Yu; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tkatchev, A; Zinchenko, A I; Boyle, O; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Peach, K J; Sacco, R; Veitch, E; Walker, A; Carassiti, V; Contalbrigo, M; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Duclos, J; Ferretti, P; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Porcu, M; Rossi, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Simani, C; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Michetti, A; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Behler, M; Blümer, H; Coward, D; Ebersberger, C; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Geib, K H; Hirstius, A; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Luitz, S; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Melzer-Pellmann, I; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Peters, A; Renk, B; Scheidt, J; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Staeck, J; Wanke, R; Wilhelm, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Zeitnitz, O; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; de La Taille, C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Martin-Chassard, G; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Bordacchini, F; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lariccia, P; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Papi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Punturo, M; Talamonti, C; Tondini, F; Bertanza, L; Calafiura, P; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fidecaro, Francesco; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Gorini, B; Laico, F; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Marzulli, V; Passuello, D; Pierazzini, G M; Raffaelli, F; Sozzi, M; Tripiccione, R; Anvar, S; Bédérède, D; Bugeon, F; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Durand, D; Edard, S; Fallou, J L; Formica, A; Gosset, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Heitzmann, J; Le Provost, H; Louis, F; Mandzhavidze, I; Mazzucato, E; Migliori, A; Mur, M; Peyaud, B; Schanne, S; Steinkamp, O; Tarte, Gérard; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Maier, A; Schwarz, I; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Barberis, P L; Benotto, F; Bertolino, F; Biino, C; Brunasso, O; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Dattola, D; Goy-Lopez, S; Govi, G; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Palestini, S; Pastrone, N; Chlopik, A; Guzik, Z; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, E; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    The beam and detector, used for the NA48 experiment, devoted to the measurement of $\\Re(\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon)$, and for the NA48/1 experiment on rare $K_{S}$ and neutral hyperon decays, are described.

  1. Edge plasma diagnostics in the compact helical system (CHS) device using fast neutral lithium beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Mario

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports the research activities of the author on using fast neutral lithium beam edge plasma diagnostic, at the Japanese National Institute for Fusion Science compact helical system (CHS). (author). 20 figs.

  2. Proposed neutral-beam diagnostics for fast confined alpha particles in a burning plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Cooper, W.S.

    1986-10-01

    Diagnostic methods for fast confined alpha particles are essential for a burning plasma experiment. Several methods which use energetic neutral beams have been proposed. We review these methods and discuss system considerations for their implementation

  3. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Himanshu; Soni, Jignesh; Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli; Gahlaut, Agrajit; Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak; Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  4. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  5. Design and implementation of a user-friendly interface for DIII-D neutral beam automated operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.; Colleraine, A.P.; Hong, R.; Kim, J.; Lee, R.L.; Wight, J.J.

    1989-12-01

    The operational interface to the DIII-D neutral beam system, in use for the past 10 years, consisted of several interactive devices that the operator used to sequence neutral beam conditioning and plasma heating shots. Each of four independent MODCOMP Classic control computers (for four DIII-D beamlines) included a touch screen, rotary knobs, an interactive dual port terminal, and a keyboard to selectively address each of five display screens. Most of the hardware had become obsolete and repair was becoming increasingly expensive. It was clear that the hardware could be replaced with current equipment, while improving the ergonomics of control. Combined with an ongoing effort to increase the degree of automated operation and its reliability, a single microcomputer-based interface for each of the four neutral beam MODCOMP Classic control computers was developed, effectively replacing some twenty pieces of hardware. Macintosh II microcomputers were selected, with 1 megabyte of RAM and ''off-the-shelf'' input/output (I/O) consisting of a mouse, serial ports, and two monochrome high-resolution video monitors. The software is written in PASCAL and adopts standard Macintosh ''window'' techniques. From the Macintosh interface to the MODCOMP Classic, the operator can control the power supply setpoints, adjust ion source timing and synchronization, call up waveform displays on the Grinnell color display system, view the sequencing of procedures to ready a neutral beam shot, and add operator comments to an automated shot logging system. 3 refs., 2 figs

  6. Nuclear fusion ion beam source composed of optimum channel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukaw, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Numerical and experimental researches of the hall-type beam accelerator was conducted by highlighting both neutral species and material of acceleration channel wall. The hall-type beam accelerator is expected as ion beam source for nuclear fusion since it could product ion beam density over 10 3 times as high as that of electrostatic accelerator, which is used regularly as beam heating device, because it is proven that the beam heating method could accelerate ion to high energy beam by electric field and heat plasma to ultra high temperature of 100 million degrees or more. At high-voltage mode of DC regime that is normal operational condition, however, the various plasma MHD (magneto-hydrodynamic) instabilities are generated. In particular, the large-amplitude and low-frequency plasma MHD instability in the tens of kHz among them has been a serious problem that should be solved to improve the operational stability and the system durability. So, we propose a hall-type beam accelerator with new design concepts; both acquisition of simultaneous solution for reducing the plasma MHD instability and the accelerator core overheating and optimum combination of the acceleration channel wall material. The technologies for this concept are as follows: 1) To increase neutral species velocity-inlet in acceleration channel by preheating propellant through circularly propellant conduit line inside accelerator system could bring about the lower amplitude of the instability. 2) Through this method, the accelerator system is cooled, and the higher thrust and specific-impulse is produced with hardly changing thrust efficiency at the same time. 3) To select BN (Boron- Nitride) and Al 2 O 3 as wall material of ionization- and acceleration-zone in acceleration channel respectively having different secondary-electron emission-coefficient could achieve the higher-efficiency and -durability. The hall-type beam accelerator designed using these technologies

  7. Applications of high energy neutralized ion beams to a compact torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, N.; Katzenstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    Pulsed ion beams can be produced with ion diodes and Marx generators. The technology exists to produce high energy beams efficiently. A neutralized ion beam has an equal number of co-moving electrons. The resultant beam is electrically neutral, has no net current and can be transported across a magnetic field if the current density is sufficiently large. Preliminary experimental results have been obtained on injecting a neutralized proton beam into a small tokamak. To illuminate the physical processes involved in injection and trapping an experiment has been designed for TEXT. Possible applications to a compact torus include plasma heating, current maintenance and non-equilibrium reactors that do not require ignition. Each application is discussed and comparisons are made with other methods. (author)

  8. Consideration of beam plasma ion-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Fumimichi; Kusano, Norimasa; Ishida, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental analyses and their comparison were made on the plasma generation and on the beam extraction for the beam plasma ion-source. The operational principle and the structure of the ion-source are explained in the first part. Considerations are given on the electron beam-plasma interaction and the resulting generation of high frequency or microwaves which in turn increases the plasma density. The flow of energy in this system is also explained in the second part. The relation between plasma density and the imaginary part of frequency is given by taking the magnetic flux density, the electron beam energy, and the electron beam current as parameters. The relations between the potential difference between collector and drift tube and the plasma density or the ion-current are also given. Considerations are also given to the change of the plasma density due to the change of the magnetic flux density at drift tube, the change of the electron beam energy, and the change of the electron beam current. The third part deals with the extraction characteristics of the ion beam. The structure of the multiple-aperture electrode and the relation between plasma density and the extracted ion current are explained. (Aoki, K.)

  9. The TFTR 40 MW neutral beam injection system and DT operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, T.; O'Connor, T.; Garzotto, V.

    1995-01-01

    Since December 1993, TFTR has performed DT experiments using tritium fuel provided mainly by neutral beam injection. Significant alpha particle populations and reactor-like conditions have been achieved at the plasma core, and fusion output power has risen to a record 10.7 MW using a record 40 MW NB heating. Tritium neutral beams have injected into over 480 DT plasmas and greater than 500 kCi have been processed through the neutral beam gas, cryo, and vacuum systems. Beam tritium injections, as well as tritium feedstock delivery and disposal, have now become part of routine operations. Shot reliability with tritium is about 90% and is comparable to deuterium shot reliability. This paper describes the neutral beam DT experience including the preparations, modifications, and operating techniques that led to this high level of success, as well as the critical differences in beam operations encountered during DT operations. Also, the neutral beam maintenance and repair history during DT operations, the corrective actions taken, and procedures developed for handling tritium contaminated components are discussed in the context of supporting a continuous DT program

  10. Progress in control and data acquisition for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchetta, Adriano, E-mail: adriano.luchetta@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); Manduchi, Gabriele; Taliercio, Cesare; Soppelsa, Anton [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy); Paolucci, Francesco; Sartori, Filippo [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain); Barbato, Paolo; Capobianco, Roberto; Breda, Mauro; Molon, Federico; Moressa, Modesto; Polato, Sandro; Simionato, Paola; Zampiva, Enrico [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► An ion source experiment, referred to as SPIDER, is under construction in the ITER neutral beam test facility. ► The progress in designing and testing the SPIDER control and data acquisition system is reported. ► An original approach is proposed in using ITER CODAC and non-ITER CODAC technology. -- Abstract: SPIDER, the ion source test bed in the ITER neutral beam test facility, is under construction and its operation is expected to start in 2014. Control and data acquisition for SPIDER are undergoing final design. SPIDER CODAS, as the control and data acquisition system is referred to, is requested to manage 25 plant units, to acquire 1000 analogue signals with sampling rates ranging from a few S/s to 10 MS/s, to acquire images with up to 100 frames per second, to operate with long pulses lasting up to 1 h, and to sustain 200 MB/s data throughput into the data archive with an annual data storage amount of up to 50 TB. SPIDER CODAS software architecture integrates three open-source software frameworks each addressing specific system requirements. Slow control exploits the synergy among EPICS and Siemens S7 programmable controllers. Data handling is by MDSplus a data-centric framework that is geared towards the collection and organization of scientific data. Diagnostics based on imaging drive the design of data throughput and archive size. Fast control is implemented by using MARTe, a data-driven, object-oriented, real-time environment. The paper will describe in detail the progress of the system hardware and software architecture and will show how the software frameworks interact to provide the functions requested by SPIDER CODAS. The paper will focus on how the performance requirements can be met with the described SPIDER CODAS architecture, describing the progress achieved by carrying out prototyping activities.

  11. Progress in control and data acquisition for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchetta, Adriano; Manduchi, Gabriele; Taliercio, Cesare; Soppelsa, Anton; Paolucci, Francesco; Sartori, Filippo; Barbato, Paolo; Capobianco, Roberto; Breda, Mauro; Molon, Federico; Moressa, Modesto; Polato, Sandro; Simionato, Paola; Zampiva, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► An ion source experiment, referred to as SPIDER, is under construction in the ITER neutral beam test facility. ► The progress in designing and testing the SPIDER control and data acquisition system is reported. ► An original approach is proposed in using ITER CODAC and non-ITER CODAC technology. -- Abstract: SPIDER, the ion source test bed in the ITER neutral beam test facility, is under construction and its operation is expected to start in 2014. Control and data acquisition for SPIDER are undergoing final design. SPIDER CODAS, as the control and data acquisition system is referred to, is requested to manage 25 plant units, to acquire 1000 analogue signals with sampling rates ranging from a few S/s to 10 MS/s, to acquire images with up to 100 frames per second, to operate with long pulses lasting up to 1 h, and to sustain 200 MB/s data throughput into the data archive with an annual data storage amount of up to 50 TB. SPIDER CODAS software architecture integrates three open-source software frameworks each addressing specific system requirements. Slow control exploits the synergy among EPICS and Siemens S7 programmable controllers. Data handling is by MDSplus a data-centric framework that is geared towards the collection and organization of scientific data. Diagnostics based on imaging drive the design of data throughput and archive size. Fast control is implemented by using MARTe, a data-driven, object-oriented, real-time environment. The paper will describe in detail the progress of the system hardware and software architecture and will show how the software frameworks interact to provide the functions requested by SPIDER CODAS. The paper will focus on how the performance requirements can be met with the described SPIDER CODAS architecture, describing the progress achieved by carrying out prototyping activities

  12. Selected topics on surface effects in fusion devices: neutral-beam injectors and beam-direct converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral-beam injectors are being used for the heating and fueling of plasmas in existing devices such as PLT (Princeton), ISX (Oak Ridge) and 2XIIB (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory) and will be used in devices such as TFTR (Princeton), MX (Livermore) and Doublet III (Gulf Atomic). For example, TFTR has been designed to receive a total of 20 MW of 120-keV deuterium atoms in pulses of 0.5-sec duration from 12 neutral beam injectors; for the MX experiment it is planned to inject a total of 750A (equivalent) of deuterium atoms with a mean energy of 56 keV in 0.5-sec pulses. The interaction of energetic deuterium atoms with exposed surfaces of device components such as beam dumps, beam-direct-convertors collectors, beam calorimeters, and armor plates, cause a variety of surface effects which affect deleteriously the operation of such devices. Some of the major effects will be discussed

  13. A high charge state heavy ion beam source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.

    1996-01-01

    A high current, low emittance, high charge state heavy ion beam source is being developed. This is designed to deliver a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver accelerator scale beam. Using a high charge state beam in a driver accelerator for HIF may increase the acceleration efficiency, leading to a reduction in the driver accelerator size and cost. The proposed source system, which consists of a gas beam electron stripper followed by a high charge state beam separator, can be added to existing single charge state, low emittance, high brightness ion sources and injectors. We shall report on the source physics design using 3D beam simulations and experimental feasibility study results using a neutral gas stripper and a beam separator at the exit of the LBL 2 MV injector. (orig.)

  14. Computer system for the beam line data processing at JT-60 prototype neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiike, Hiroshi; Kawai, Mikito; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1987-08-01

    The present report describes the hard and soft wares of the data acquisition computer system for the prototype neutral injector unit for JT-60. In order to operate the unit, more than hundreds of signals of the beam line components have to be measured. These are mainly differential thermometers for the coolant waters and thermocouples for the beam dump components but not include those for the cryo system. Since the unit operates in a series of pulses, the measurement should be conducted very quickly in order to ensure the simultaneity of large number of the measured data. The present system actualize fast data acquisition using a small computer of 128 kB and measuring instruments connected through the bus. The system is connected to the JAERI computer center since the data capacity is fairly large to completely process them by the small computer. Therefore the measured data can be transferred to the computer center to calculate there, and the results can be received. After the system was completed the computer quickly print out the power flow data, which needed much work to calculate with hands. This system was very useful. It enhanced the experiments at the unit and reduced the labor. It enables us to early demonstrate the rated operation of the unit and to accurately estimate such operation data of the JT-60 NBI as the injection power. (author)

  15. Nonlinear Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Pre-formed Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Shvets, Gennady; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion beam in a cold pre-formed plasma is investigated. The outcome of the calculation is the quantitative prediction of the degree of charge and current neutralization of the ion beam pulse by the background plasma. The electric magnetic fields generated by the ion beam are studied analytically for the nonlinear case where the plasma density is comparable in size with the beam density. Particle-in-cell simulations and fluid calculations of current and charge neutralization have been performed for parameters relevant to heavy ion fusion assuming long, dense beams with el >> V(subscript b)/omega(subscript b), where V(subscript b) is the beam velocity and omega subscript b is the electron plasma frequency evaluated with the ion beam density. An important conclusion is that for long, nonrelativistic ion beams, charge neutralization is, for all practical purposes, complete even for very tenuous background plasmas. As a result, the self-magnetic force dominates the electric force and the beam ions are always pinched during beam propagation in a background plasma

  16. Electron behavior in ion beam neutralization in electric propulsion: full particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Hideyuki; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Miyake, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    By performing full Particle-In-Cell simulations, we examined the transient response of electrons released for the charge neutralization of a local ion beam emitted from an ion engine which is one of the electric propulsion systems. In the vicinity of the engine, the mixing process of electrons in the ion beam region is not so obvious because of large difference of dynamics between electrons and ions. A heavy ion beam emitted from a spacecraft propagates away from the engine and forms a positive potential region with respect to the background. Meanwhile electrons emitted for a neutralizer located near the ion engine are electrically attracted or accelerated to the core of the ion beam. Some electrons with the energy lower than the ion beam potential are trapped in the beam region and move along with the ion beam propagation with a multi-streaming structure in the beam potential region. Since the locations of the neutralizer and the ion beam exit are different, the above-mentioned bouncing motion of electrons is also observed in the direction of the beam diameter

  17. Nonlinear Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Pre-formed Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Gennady Shvets; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2001-01-30

    The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion beam in a cold pre-formed plasma is investigated. The outcome of the calculation is the quantitative prediction of the degree of charge and current neutralization of the ion beam pulse by the background plasma. The electric magnetic fields generated by the ion beam are studied analytically for the nonlinear case where the plasma density is comparable in size with the beam density. Particle-in-cell simulations and fluid calculations of current and charge neutralization have been performed for parameters relevant to heavy ion fusion assuming long, dense beams with el >> V(subscript b)/omega(subscript b), where V(subscript b) is the beam velocity and omega subscript b is the electron plasma frequency evaluated with the ion beam density. An important conclusion is that for long, nonrelativistic ion beams, charge neutralization is, for all practical purposes, complete even for very tenuous background plasmas. As a result, the self-magnetic force dominates the electric force and the beam ions are always pinched during beam propagation in a background plasma.

  18. The ASDEX 100 keV neutral lithium beam diagnostic gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, K.; Kick, M.

    1983-04-01

    The neutral lithium beam gun intended for measurement of the poloidal magnetic field and of the density gradient in the scrape-off layer of ASDEX is described, and test results over a beam energy range of 27-100 keV are presented. In the gun, lithium ions are extracted from a solid emitter (#betta#-Eurcryptite) in a Pierce-type configuration, accelerated and focused in a two-tube immersion lens, and neutralized in a charge-exchange cell using sodium. The beam can be pulsed from less than one to several seconds, depending on experimental needs. At a distance of 165 cm from the gun the neutral beam equivalent current is typically greater than 1 mA (0.16 mA) for a beam energy of 100 keV (27 keV), the beam FWHM being about 8-9 mm. It is found that to produce a particular beam with a certain ratio must be maintained between the extraction and total beam voltages, this relationship depending in turn on the emitter-extractor separation. The principal features which distinguish the ASDEX gun from that employed on W7a are the greater compactness - all the active elements, i.e. emitter, extractor, lens, deflection plates and neutralizer, are contained with 57 cm - and the vacuum vessel, which simultaneously serves as the magnetic shielding. (orig.)

  19. Numerical Study of Instabilities Driven by Energetic Neutral Beam Ions in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental observations from NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] suggest that many modes in a subcyclotron frequency range are excited during neutral-beam injection (NBI). These modes have been identified as Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAEs) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAEs), which are driven unstable through the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. The injection velocities of the NBI ions in NSTX are large compared to Alfven velocity, V(sub)0 > 3V(sub)A, and a strong anisotropy in the fast-ion pitch-angle distribution provides the energy source for the instabilities. Recent interest in the excitation of Alfven Eigenmodes in the frequency range omega less than or approximately equal to omega(sub)ci, where omega(sub)ci is the ion cyclotron frequency, is related to the possibility that these modes can provide a mechanism for direct energy transfer from super-Alfvenic beam ions to thermal ions. Numerical simulations are required in order to find a self-consistent mode structure, and to include the effects of finite-Larmor radius (FLR), the nonlinear effects, and the thermal plasma kinetic effects

  20. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle α to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin α (for the present design, α =13 0 and 21 0 ). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm 2 normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm 2 maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm 2 normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm 2 maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics

  1. Empirical Scaling Laws of Neutral Beam Injection Power in HL-2A Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jian-Yong; Wei Hui-Ling; Liu He; Yang Xian-Fu; Zou Gui-Qing; Yu Li-Ming; Li Qing; Luo Cui-Wen; Pan Yu-Dong; Jiang Shao-Feng; Lei Guang-Jiu; Li Bo; Rao Jun; Duan Xu-Ru

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain neutral beam injection (NBI) power scaling laws with operating parameters of the NBI system on HL-2A, including the beam divergence angle, the beam power transmission efficiency, the neutralization efficiency and so on. With the empirical scaling laws, the estimating power can be obtained in every shot of experiment on time, therefore the important parameters such as the energy confinement time can be obtained precisely. The simulation results by the tokamak simulation code (TSC) show that the evolution of the plasma parameters is in good agreement with the experimental results by using the NBI power from the empirical scaling law. (paper)

  2. Fast-ion transport and neutral beam current drive in ASDEX upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, B.; Weiland, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2015-01-01

    The neutral beam current drive efficiency has been investigated in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by replacing on-axis neutral beams with tangential off-axis beams. A clear modification of the radial fast-ion profiles is observed with a fast-ion D-alpha diagnostic that measures centrally peaked profiles...... during on-axis injection and outwards shifted profiles during off-axis injection. Due to this change of the fast-ion population, a clear modification of the plasma current profile is predicted but not observed by a motional Stark effect diagnostic. The fast-ion transport caused by MHD activity has been...

  3. Crosstalk measurement on the D-III neutral beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerm, A.; Bowles, E.; Callis, R.W.; Colleraine, A.; Cowels, G.; Finizio, R.; Moore, D.; Tooker, J.F.; Varga, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Doublet III neutral beam plasma heating system comprises three beamlines with a total of six ion sources. Each of these ion sources is energized from a Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) which is capable of delivering pulses at 80 kV and 100 A with pulse lengths up to 1 second in duration. A 138 kV San Diego Gas and Electric Company line is used as the prime power source for the NBPS. The 138 kV line is stepped down through an 84 MVA (pulse rating) 138 kV-12.47 kV transformer and an 8 MVA (pulse rating) 138 kV--480 V transformer. The 12.47 kV transformer feeds six NBPS high voltage circuits. The 480 V transformer supplies power to the filament, arc, and auxiliary power systems and control consoles in each NBPS. Each of the NBPS may block (controlled interruption of NBPS to protect the ion source) several times during a shot. Voltage variations due to such blocking by one or more systems have been measured on the 12.47 kV distribution bus as part of an effort to reduce system interaction. Interaction due to blocking during shots was found to be caused by noise picked up in low level circuits during ion source faults. High voltage DC fluctuations due to blocking do not cause interaction unless the voltage sags below the minimum required anode voltage for the pulse tetrodes in the Modular/Regulator, but interaction due to crowbar of the high voltage DC supply by a NBPS may result in a domino effect unless the remaining online systems are caused to block until the crowbarred system is cleared from the line (This feature is not presently implemented.). Voltage sag on the 480 V bus results from simultaneous operation of the ion sources. This sag, when it occurs, may lower the arc power input to the ion sources and cause reduced output power

  4. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  5. Pulsewidth-modulated 2-source neutral-point-clamped inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Loh, Poh Chang; Gao, Feng

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the careful integration of a newly proposed Z-source topological concept to the basic neutral-point-clamped (NPC) inverter topology for designing a three-level inverter with both voltage-buck and voltage-boost capabilities. The designed Z-source NPC inverter uses two unique X......-shaped inductance-capacitance (LC) impedance networks that are connected between two isolated dc input power sources and its inverter circuitry for boosting its AC output voltage. Through the design of an appropriate pulsewidth-modulation (PWM) algorithm, the two impedance networks can be short......-circuited sequentially (without shooting through the inverter full DC link) for implementing the ldquonearest-three-vectorrdquo modulation principle with minimized harmonic distortion and device commutations per half carrier cycle while performing voltage boosting. With only a slight modification to the inverter PWM...

  6. Assessment of the plasma start-up in Wendelstein 7-X with neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradic, D.; Dinklage, A.; Brakel, R.; McNeely, P.; Rust, N.; Wolf, R.; Osakabe, M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma start-up by neutral beam injection was investigated for stellarators. A zero-dimensional collisional model was extended to evaluate the temporal evolution of the plasma start-up in a confining toroidal magnetic field. Inclusion of different beam energy components indicated a substantial effect due to the energy dependence of beam–gas collisions. Additional collision processes and particle equations were considered to simulate the plasma start-up in helium–hydrogen mixtures. The isotope effect between operation with hydrogen and deuterium beams was also investigated. As a major objective the conditions necessary for a plasma start-up with neutral beams in W7-X have been examined. The assessed beam configuration in W7-X was found not to allow plasma start-up by neutral beam injection alone. The model has been validated for experimental data from W7-AS and Large Helical Device. Quantitative predictions of this study show that the ratio of the beam–plasma interaction length and the plasma volume is an essential quantity for the successful plasma start-up with neutral beams. (paper)

  7. Powerloads on the front end components and the duct of the heating and diagnostic neutral beam lines at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M. J.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Geli, F.; Graceffa, J.; Urbani, M.; Schunke, B.; Chareyre, J. [ITER Organisation, 13607 St. Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Dlougach, E.; Krylov, A. [RRC Kurchatov institute, 1, Kurchatov Sq, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-08

    The heating and current drive beam lines (HNB) at ITER are expected to deliver ∼16.7 MW power per beam line for H beams at 870 keV and D beams at 1 MeV during the H-He and the DD/DT phases of ITER operation respectively. On the other hand the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) line shall deliver ∼2 MW power for H beams at 100 keV during both the phases. The path lengths over which the beams from the HNB and DNB beam lines need to be transported are 25.6 m and 20.7 m respectively. The transport of the beams over these path lengths results in beam losses, mainly by the direct interception of the beam with the beam line components and reionisation. The lost power is deposited on the surfaces of the various components of the beam line. In order to ensure the survival of these components over the operational life time of ITER, it is important to determine to the best possible extent the operational power loads and power densities on the various surfaces which are impacted by the beam in one way or the other during its transport. The main factors contributing to these are the divergence of the beamlets and the halo fraction in the beam, the beam aiming, the horizontal and vertical misalignment of the beam, and the gas profile along the beam path, which determines the re-ionisation loss, and the re-ionisation cross sections. The estimations have been made using a combination of the modified version of the Monte Carlo Gas Flow code (MCGF) and the BTR code. The MCGF is used to determine the gas profile in the beam line and takes into account the active gas feed into the ion source and neutraliser, the HNB-DNB cross over, the gas entering the beamline from the ITER machine, the additional gas atoms generated in the beam line due to impacting ions and the pumping speed of the cryopumps. The BTR code has been used to obtain the power loads and the power densities on the various surfaces of the front end components and the duct modules for different scenarios of ITER

  8. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  9. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-01-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warm-dense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ∼1275 C, a space-charge-limited Li + beam current density of J ∼1 mA/cm 2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ∼50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 (micro) s.

  10. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, L., E-mail: neri@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund (Sweden); Galatà, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Patti, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Gozzo, A.; Lega, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Università degli Studi di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  11. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, Igor B.; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface

  12. Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Igor B; Ryabchikov, Alexander I; Sivin, Denis O; Verigin, Dan A

    2014-02-01

    The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

  13. PC-Link historical data base system MODCOMP/IBM at link for neutral particle beam operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurgood, P.

    1989-01-01

    PC-Link is a combination of hardware and software that connects an IBM PC/AT to a MODCOMP minicomputer. It is designed as an aid to the Neutral Beam operations coordinator during injection into the DIII-D tokamak project. An IBM PC/AT is linked to 4 MODCOMP realtime acquisition systems, each of which controls 2 neutral particle beam sources. At various points in the shot sequence, data is sent to the IBM PC/AT. This data can then be integrated with the data from the other sources into tables or graphics displays for use by the Beam Coordinator. In this way, the coordinator gets realtime feedback on the relative settings and performance of the sources and can observe trends within a particular source at one location. The PC-Link is used for observing relative timing information and for post shot historical archiving. The concept of the PC-Link was originally proposed several years ago. In April 1988, in-house implementation of the link software was begun. The PC-Link receives approximately 2 Kbytes of data per source per shot. This data is converted from MODCOMP format to IBM PC format and archived to disk. The last 280 shots per source are stored to disk to observe trends. The data can be displayed in a number of formats depending upon the situation. For example, prior to a shot, the beam MODCOMPs are sent timing information from the DIII-D tokamak control system. This data is echoed on the PC in a graphical representation displaying all 8 sources. At the end of the shot, the actual running times are displayed along with the requested settings. Any subset of the Historical data may be displayed either graphically or in tables for realtime comparisons between sources. 4 figs

  14. Injection of a relativistic electron beam into neutral hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Haan, P.H.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.; Hopman, H.J.; Granneman, E.H.A.

    1982-01-01

    The injection of a relativistic electron beam (0.8 MeV, 6 kA, 150 nsec) into hydrogen gas of 190 Pa pressure results in a plasma with density n/sub e/approx. =10 20 m -3 and temperature kT/sub e/< or approx. =kT/sub i/approx. =3.5 eV. The results of the measurements show good agreement with computations based on a model combining gas ionization and turbulent plasma heating. It is found that a quasistationary state exists in which the energy lost by the beam (about 6% of the total kinetic energy of the beam) is partly used to further ionize and dissociate the gas and for the other part is lost as line radiation

  15. Characterization of a 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Linton, R. C.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Whitaker, A. F.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental effort to characterize an existing 5-eV neutral atomic oxygen beam facility being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is described. This characterization effort includes atomic oxygen flux and flux distribution measurements using a catalytic probe, energy determination using a commercially designed quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and the exposure of oxygen-sensitive materials in this beam facility. Also, comparisons were drawn between the reaction efficiencies of materials exposed in plasma ashers, and the reaction efficiencies previously estimated from space flight experiments. The results of this study show that the beam facility is capable of producing a directional beam of neutral atomic oxygen atoms with the needed flux and energy to simulate low Earth orbit (LEO) conditions for real time accelerated testing. The flux distribution in this facility is uniform to +/- 6 percent of the peak flux over a beam diameter of 6 cm.

  16. Properties of H- and D- beams from magnetron and Penning sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluyters, T.; Kovarik, V.

    1979-01-01

    The quality of negative hydrogen isotope beams are evaluated after extraction from magnetron and Penning sources. The general conclusions of these measurements are that: (a) the beam quality from these plasma sources are adequate for the transport of high current negative ion beams in bending magnets; (b) there is evidence of practically complete space charge neutralization in the drift space beyond the extractor; (c) the beam performance from the Penning source appears to be better compared with the magnetron source; and (d) it is likely that the high electric field gradient and a concave ion emission boundary are responsible for a beam cross-over near the anode aperture, which causes beam divergence practically independent of the extraction geometry

  17. Generation of intense polarized beams by selective neutralization of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershcovitch, A.I.; Hinds, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    A novel scheme is proposed. This method is based on selective neutralization by laser negative hydrogen ions in a magnetic field. This selectivity is based on the fact that the final state of the neutralized atom depends on nuclear polarization in the magnetic field. A two-scenario approach is to be followed: one in which the resulting neutral atom is in the ground state, and in the other the neutral atom is in the n = 2 level. Limiting factors are discussed. The main advantages of this scheme are the availability of multi-ampere negative ion sources and the possibility to neutralize negative ions with very high efficiency. 15 references, 2 figures

  18. Targets for neutron beam spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    The meeting on Targets for Neutron Beam Spallation Sources held at the Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung at KFA Juelich on June 11 and 12, 1979 was planned as an informal get-together for scientists involved in the planning, design and future use of spallation neutron sources in Europe. These proceedings contain the papers contributed to this meeting. For further information see hints under relevant topics. (orig./FKS)

  19. Ion beam source construction and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torab, S.I.R.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to improve the performance of a new shape cold cathode Penning ion source to be suitable for some applications. In this work, many trials have been made to reach the optimum dimensions of the new shape of cold Molybdenum cathode Penning ion source with radial extraction. The high output ion beam can be extracted in a direction transverse to the discharge region. The new shape cold cathode Penning ion source consists of Copper cylindrical hollow anode of 40 mm length, 12 mm diameter and has two similar cone ends of 15 mm length, 22 mm upper cone diameter and 12 mm bottom cone diameter. The two movable Molybdenum cathodes are fixed in Perspex insulator and placed symmetrically at two ends of the anode. The Copper emission disc of 2 mm thickness and has central aperture of different diameters is placed at the middle of the anode for ion beam exit. The inner surface of the emission disc is isolated from the anode by Perspex insulator except an area of diameter 5 mm to confine the electrical discharge in this area. A movable Faraday cup is placed at different distances from the emission electrode aperture and used to collect the output ion beam from the ion source. The working gases are admitted to the ion source through a hole in the anode via a needle valve which placed between the gas cylinder and the ion source. The optimum anode- cathode distance, the uncovered area diameter of the emission disc, the central aperture diameter of the emission electrode, the distance between emission electrode and Faraday cup have been determined using Argon gas. The optimum distances of the ion source were found to be equal to 6 mm, 5 mm, 2.5 mm, and 3 cm respectively where stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current at low discharge current can be obtained. The discharge characteristics, ion beam characteristics, and the efficiency of the ion source have been measured at different operating conditions and different gas pressures using

  20. Feasibility of a fast optical pressure interlock for the ITER neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, Andrew; Surrey, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of using Balmer-α emission for a high-speed pressure diagnostic and beam interlock for the ITER neutral beam heating system is investigated. An interlock is needed to prevent excessive re-ionisation of the neutral beam when rapid excursions of pressure occur in either the electrostatic residual ion dump (ERID), or the neutral beam duct (NBD). The re-ionised fraction of the beam, will be deflected by stray tokamak fields, potentially causing excessive thermal loads on beam line components. Experience from JET indicates that a response time of order 100 μs is required in order to prevent fast pressure excursions. Fast penning gauges have a time response of around 30-50 ms, however, a faster response (around 1 μs) is possible by monitoring the H α (656.3 nm)/D α (656.1 nm) emission from collisional excitation of the background gas and neutral beam. Published total cross-sections are used to calculate a signal of 3.5x10 13 -3.0x10 17 photons s -1 m -2 sr -1 for normal conditions. This signal must be distinguished from the background light of the tokamak plasma (line emission and bremsstrahlung). The beam emission is Doppler shifted by up to 21 nm (D operation) and up to 27 nm (H operation) depending on angle of observation and this can be used to help distinguish against background line emission. The distribution of background light along the beam line is calculated with a two-dimensional radiosity code, solving the equilibrium energy balance within the beam line enclosure. The Balmer-α signal and background signal due to bremsstrahlung are compared for a 500-MW reference plasma.