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Sample records for sources emitting toxic

  1. Calorimetric measurement of strong γ emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brangier, B.; Herczeg, C.; Henry, R.

    1968-01-01

    This publication gives the principle and a description of an adiabatic calorimeter for measuring the real activity of strong gamma-emitting sources by absorbing the emitted energy in a mass of copper. Because of the difficulty of evaluating the amount self- absorption, we have built a calorimeter for measuring the self- absorption, and a description of it is given.The results of these three measurements are fairly satisfactory. The calibration and the actual measurements obtained are given with a few corrections made necessary by the design of the apparatus. The correlation of the various results is discussed. (author) [fr

  2. Aero particles characterization emitted by mobile sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas V, A.; Romero G, E. T.; Lopez G, H.

    2009-01-01

    In our country, the mobile sources that conform most of the emissions at the atmosphere, are concentrated on the urban areas. For the present work, samples coming from the escapes of terrestrial transport were obtained, such as: passenger buses, load transport and particular vehicles of the Metropolitan area of the Toluca valley. The material was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy of low vacuum and X-ray diffraction. The objective was to characterize the emitted particles by mobile sources, morphological and chemically to know the structure, size and elements that compose them. (Author)

  3. Toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides - Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Guilmette, R.A.; Gillett, N.A.; Diel, J.H.; Lundgren, D.L.; Hahn, F.F.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides is being investigated in a series of interrelated dose-response studies. Dogs, rodents, and nonhuman primates have been exposed to monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols of the oxides of 239 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, or 244 Cm to measure the relative importance of average organ dose, local dose around particles, specific activity, chemical form, particle size, and number of particles inhaled to the development of biological effects. The influence of animal species, age at exposure, and pre-existing lung disease, as well as the effects of repeated exposure, are also being studied, because they may influence the toxicity of these radionuclides. (author)

  4. Toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides - Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggenburg, B A; Mewhinney, J A; Guilmette, R A; Gillett, N A; Diel, J H; Lundgren, D L; Hahn, F F; Boecker, B B; McClellan, R O

    1988-12-01

    The toxicity of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides is being investigated in a series of interrelated dose-response studies. Dogs, rodents, and nonhuman primates have been exposed to monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols of the oxides of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 244}Cm to measure the relative importance of average organ dose, local dose around particles, specific activity, chemical form, particle size, and number of particles inhaled to the development of biological effects. The influence of animal species, age at exposure, and pre-existing lung disease, as well as the effects of repeated exposure, are also being studied, because they may influence the toxicity of these radionuclides. (author)

  5. Toxic pollutants emitted from thermal decomposition of phthalimide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Kai; Mackie, John C.; Wojtalewicz, Dominika; Kennedy, Eric M. [Process Safety and Environmental Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z., E-mail: Bogdan.Dlugogorski@newcastle.edu.au [Process Safety and Environmental Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-03-15

    Phthalimide (PI) and tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) are two structurally similar compounds extensively used as intermediates for the synthesis of variety of industrial chemicals. This paper investigates the thermal decomposition of PI and THPI under oxygen rich to oxygen lean conditions, quantifying the production of toxicants and explaining their formation pathways. The experiments involved a plug flow reactor followed by silica cartridges, activated charcoal trap and a condenser, with the decomposition products identified and quantified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and micro gas chromatography ({mu}GC). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations served to obtain dissociation energies and reaction pathways, to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The oxidation of PI and THPI produced several toxic nitrogen-containing gases and volatile organic compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, nitrogen oxides, benzonitrile, maleimide and tentatively identified benzenemethanimine. The detection of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF) suggests potential formation of the toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in fires involving PI and THPI, in presence of a chlorine source. The oxidation of THPI produced 2-cyclohexen-1-one, a toxic unsaturated ketone. The results of the present study provide the data for quantitative risk assessments of emissions of toxicants in combustion processes involving PI and THPI.

  6. Toxic pollutants emitted from thermal decomposition of phthalimide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kai; Mackie, John C.; Wojtalewicz, Dominika; Kennedy, Eric M.; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Phthalimide (PI) and tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) are two structurally similar compounds extensively used as intermediates for the synthesis of variety of industrial chemicals. This paper investigates the thermal decomposition of PI and THPI under oxygen rich to oxygen lean conditions, quantifying the production of toxicants and explaining their formation pathways. The experiments involved a plug flow reactor followed by silica cartridges, activated charcoal trap and a condenser, with the decomposition products identified and quantified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and micro gas chromatography (μGC). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations served to obtain dissociation energies and reaction pathways, to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The oxidation of PI and THPI produced several toxic nitrogen-containing gases and volatile organic compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, nitrogen oxides, benzonitrile, maleimide and tentatively identified benzenemethanimine. The detection of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF) suggests potential formation of the toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in fires involving PI and THPI, in presence of a chlorine source. The oxidation of THPI produced 2-cyclohexen-1-one, a toxic unsaturated ketone. The results of the present study provide the data for quantitative risk assessments of emissions of toxicants in combustion processes involving PI and THPI.

  7. Toxicity studies of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides - Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F F; Boeker, B B; Gillett, N A; Griffith, W C; Lundgren, D L; McClellan, R O; Muggenburg, B A; Snipes, M B

    1988-12-01

    The effects of beta-emitting radionuclides inhaled in either a relatively soluble form ({sup 90}SrCl{sub 2}, {sup 144}CeCl{sub 3}, {sup 91}yl{sub 3}, or {sup 137}CsCl) or in a relatively insoluble form ({sup 90}Y, {sup 91}Y, {sup 144}Ce or {sup 90}Sr in fused aluminosilicate particles [FAP]) have been studied in laboratory animals. The results showed that the total beta dose and the dose-rate pattern can modify both the neoplastic and non-neoplastic effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. In addition, the solubility and chemical characteristics of the radionuclides influence which organs are affected. Effects are seen primarily in organs where the radionuclide is ultimately accumulated, e.g., lung, bone, liver, or tracheobronchial lymph nodes. In addition, effects may be seen in organs where there is little accumulation, but where the radiation dose may still be high, e.g., nasal epithelium and heart. Studies of inhaled {sup 144}Ce-FAP in four different species showed that, compared to mice and dogs, lung tumor risk factors are very low for Syrian hamsters and high for rats. Studies of mice, Syrian hamsters, rats, and dogs repeatedly exposed to aerosols of {sup 144}Ce-FAP showed that lung tumor incidence correlates better with cumulative dose to the lung than with dose rate. Most of the studies in this program are nearing completion and full analyses are in progress. (author)

  8. Mobile source air toxics mitigation measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    In accordance with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Interim Guidance Update on Mobile Source Air Toxic Analysis in NEPA Documents (September 30, 2009), transportation projects subject to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) mus...

  9. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aue, W. P.; Guidetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  10. Determination of illuminants representing typical white light emitting diodes sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jost, S.; Ngo, M.; Ferrero, A.

    2017-01-01

    is to develop LED-based illuminants that describe typical white LED products based on their Spectral Power Distributions (SPDs). Some of these new illuminants will be recommended in the update of the CIE publication 15 on colorimetry with the other typical illuminants, and among them, some could be used......Solid-state lighting (SSL) products are already in use by consumers and are rapidly gaining the lighting market. Especially, white Light Emitting Diode (LED) sources are replacing banned incandescent lamps and other lighting technologies in most general lighting applications. The aim of this work...... to complement the CIE standard illuminant A for calibration use in photometry....

  11. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suresh C [Setauket, NY; Gonzales, Gilbert R [New York, NY; Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Meinken, George E [Middle Island, NY

    2012-02-14

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  12. The sources and fate of radionuclides emitted to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, J.

    2001-01-01

    The thesis represents an account of the sources and fate of radionuclides entering the atmosphere, and indicates where the candidate, through his own work, has contributed to the overall picture. The sources of the natural and man-made radionuclides found in the atmosphere are identified. New data on emissions from UK coal-fired power stations and UK steel works are reported. Radionuclides produced in nuclear fission and released to the atmosphere in the detonation of nuclear weapons, in nuclear accidents, and through routine discharges from nuclear sites have added to the atmospheric burden of radioactive materials; both acute and chronic low-level emissions are discussed. The various natural processes which remove radionuclides from the atmosphere are described. Soon after release, many radioactive materials become attached to the atmospheric aerosol, but others undergo gas-phase reactions. Some gases are sufficiently long-lived in the troposphere as to find their way into the stratosphere where their fate may be determined by the short-wave radiation from the sun. The nature of the particles of fuel emitted to the atmosphere in the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 are discussed, together with the associated environmental problems. The ground is the major sink for radionuclides leaving the atmosphere, and the behaviour of the more radiologically important radionuclides following deposition is described with special reference to: (i) fallout in both the urban and living environments; (ii) the pathways which may lead to contamination of the food chain; (iii) how the fuel particle fallout from Chernobyl was unique in nuclear accidents; (iv) soil-to-plant transfer of radioelements and (v) how radiation exposure of man can be mitigated in both the contaminated urban and rural environments. (author)

  13. Light emitting diodes as a plant lighting source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bula, R.J.; Tennessen, D.J.; Morrow, R.C. [Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, Madison, WI (United States); Tibbitts, T.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Electroluminescence in solid materials is defined as the generation of light by the passage of an electric current through a body of solid material under an applied electric field. A specific type of electroluminescence, first noted by Lossew in 1923, involves the generation of photons when electrons are passed through a p-n junction of certain solid materials (junction of a n-type semiconductor, an electron donor, and a p-type semiconductor, an electron acceptor). Development efforts to translate these observations into visible light emitting devices, however, was not undertaken until the 1950s. The term, light emitting diode (LEDs), was first used in a report by Wolfe, et al., in 1955. The development of this light emitting semiconductor technology dates back less than 30 years. During this period of time, the LED has evolved from a rare and expensive light generating device to one of the most widely used electronic components. The most popular applications of the LED are as indicators or as optoelectronic switches. However, several recent advances in LED technology have made possible the utilization of LEDs for applications that require a high photon flux, such as for plant lighting in controlled environments. The new generation of LEDs based on a gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAS) semiconductor material fabricated as a double heterostructure on a transparent substrate has opened up many new applications for these LEDs.

  14. Irradiation Pattern Analysis for Designing Light Sources-Based on Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, E.; Stolik, S.; La Rosa, J. de; Valor, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays it is possible to design light sources with a specific irradiation pattern for many applications. Light Emitting Diodes present features like high luminous efficiency, durability, reliability, flexibility, among others as the result of its rapid development. In this paper the analysis of the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes is presented. The approximation of these irradiation patterns to both, a Lambertian, as well as a Gaussian functions for the design of light sources is proposed. Finally, the obtained results and the functionality of bringing the irradiation pattern of the light emitting diodes to these functions are discussed. (Author)

  15. Development of QCD jets emitted by color-singlet sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.K.; Gunion, J.F.; Kalinowski, J.; Webber, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    We compare the angular-ordering approximation to QCD jet development with full calculations to order αsub(s) in the following cases: emission of quark jets by a color-singlet vector source (as in e + e - annihilation) and emission of gluon jets by a color-singlet scalar (Fsup(a)sub(μν)Fsup(aμν)) source. In contrast to the case of a color-octet (gluon) source, we find that the approximation is good in those regions of phase space where the next-to-leading corrections to the amplitude are large. (orig.)

  16. [Source identification of toxic wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Yu, Yin; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Chen, Xue-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Miao

    2014-12-01

    Petrochemical wastewaters have toxic impacts on the microorganisms in biotreatment processes, which are prone to cause deterioration of effluent quality of the wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the inhibition effects of activated sludge's oxygen consumption were tested to evaluate the toxicity of production wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park. The evaluation covered the wastewaters from not only different production units in the park, but also different production nodes in each unit. No direct correlation was observed between the toxicity effects and the organic contents, suggesting that the toxic properties of the effluents could not be predicted by the organic contents. In view of the variation of activated sludge sensitivity among different tests, the toxicity data were standardized according to the concentration-effect relationships of the standard toxic substance 3, 5-dichlorophenol on each day, in order to improve the comparability among the toxicity data. Furthermore, the Quality Emission Load (QEL) of corresponding standard toxic substance was calculated by multiplying the corresponding 3, 5-dichlorophenol concentration and the wastewater flow quantity, to indicate the toxicity emission contribution of each wastewater to the wastewater treatment plant. According to the rank list of the toxicity contribution of wastewater from different units and nodes, the sources of toxic wastewater in the petrochemical industrial park were clearly identified. This study provides effective guidance for source control of wastewater toxicity in the large industrial park.

  17. Elaboration of supports for beta emitting sources (with vyns)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes P, A.; Torre O, J. De la; Tejera R, A.; Becerril V, A.; Bribiesca S, L.

    1990-04-01

    The Laboratory of Radioactive patterns account with a 4 πβ-γ coincidence system of recent acquisition with which absolute measures of radioactive activity with uncertainties of the order of 0.1% can be made. Since the coincidence method for the activity measure consists on detecting to the particle and the photon corresponding to oneself nuclear disintegration, it is necessary to elaborate special radioactive sources on thin supports, in order to allowing the maximum possible fluence of β particles (∼ 100%). This work a technique for the elaboration of these sources and for the measure of the thickness of the walls of the support is presented. (Author)

  18. UV radiation emitted by selected sources at work stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, C.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of UV effective irradiance measurements at work stands for sources such as: welding arcs, gas blowpipes, exposure processes, printing machines and insecticide lamps. The irradiance measurements were performed using broad-band instruments with detector heads corrected to the Polish action spectra (erythematous and conjunctivitis). The obtained values of effective irradiance for above sources ranged from 0.2 to 8000 mW/m2. Safe exposure time corresponding to irradiance was calculated for the Polish threshold limit values. For welding processes the spectra of selected welding arcs are presented additionally. These spectra were measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer. (author)

  19. Potential environmental impacts of light-emitting diodes (LEDs): metallic resources, toxicity, and hazardous waste classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2011-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are advertised as environmentally friendly because they are energy efficient and mercury-free. This study aimed to determine if LEDs engender other forms of environmental and human health impacts, and to characterize variation across different LEDs based on color and intensity. The objectives are as follows: (i) to use standardized leachability tests to examine whether LEDs are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing United States federal and California state regulations; and (ii) to use material life cycle impact and hazard assessment methods to evaluate resource depletion and toxicity potentials of LEDs based on their metallic constituents. According to federal standards, LEDs are not hazardous except for low-intensity red LEDs, which leached Pb at levels exceeding regulatory limits (186 mg/L; regulatory limit: 5). However, according to California regulations, excessive levels of copper (up to 3892 mg/kg; limit: 2500), Pb (up to 8103 mg/kg; limit: 1000), nickel (up to 4797 mg/kg; limit: 2000), or silver (up to 721 mg/kg; limit: 500) render all except low-intensity yellow LEDs hazardous. The environmental burden associated with resource depletion potentials derives primarily from gold and silver, whereas the burden from toxicity potentials is associated primarily with arsenic, copper, nickel, lead, iron, and silver. Establishing benchmark levels of these substances can help manufacturers implement design for environment through informed materials substitution, can motivate recyclers and waste management teams to recognize resource value and occupational hazards, and can inform policymakers who establish waste management policies for LEDs.

  20. Sound power emitted by a pure-tone source in a reverberation room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez

    2009-01-01

    Energy considerations are of enormous practical importance in acoustics. In "energy acoustics," sources of noise are described in terms of the sound power they emit, the underlying assumption being that this property is independent of the particular environment where the sources are placed. Howev...

  1. Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, P.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2006-01-01

    Forest ecosystems may provide strong sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is important for atmospheric chemical and radiative properties. Nonetheless, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient to narrow current flux estimates, which still are associated with great...... uncertainties. In this study, we have investigated the quantitative and qualitative relationships between N-cycling and N2O production in European forests in order to evaluate the importance of nitrification and denitrification for N2O production. Soil samples were collected in 11 different sites characterized...... by variable climatic regimes and forest types. Soil N-cycling and associated production of N2O was assessed following application of 15N-labeled nitrogen. The N2O emission varied significantly among the different forest soils, and was inversely correlated to the soil C: N ratio. The N2O emissions were...

  2. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  3. Sources of nitrous oxide emitted from European forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ambus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest ecosystems may provide strong sources of nitrous oxide (N2O, which is important for atmospheric chemical and radiative properties. Nonetheless, our understanding of controls on forest N2O emissions is insufficient to narrow current flux estimates, which still are associated with great uncertainties. In this study, we have investigated the quantitative and qualitative relationships between N-cycling and N2O production in European forests in order to evaluate the importance of nitrification and denitrification for N2O production. Soil samples were collected in 11 different sites characterized by variable climatic regimes and forest types. Soil N-cycling and associated production of N2O was assessed following application of 15N-labeled nitrogen. The N2O emission varied significantly among the different forest soils, and was inversely correlated to the soil C:N ratio. The N2O emissions were significantly higher from the deciduous soils (13 ng N2O-N cm-3 d-1 than from the coniferous soils (4 ng N2O-N cm-3 d-1. Nitrate (NO3- was the dominant substrate for N2O with an average contribution of 62% and exceeding 50% at least once for all sites. The average contribution of ammonium (NH4+ to N2O averaged 34%. The N2O emissions were correlated with gross nitrification activities, and as for N2O, gross nitrification was also higher in deciduous soils (3.4 µg N cm-3 d-1 than in coniferous soils (1.1 µg N cm-3 d-1. The ratio between N2O production and gross nitrification averaged 0.67% (deciduous and 0.44% (coniferous. Our study suggests that changes in forest composition in response to land use activities and global change may have implications for regional budgets of greenhouse gases. From the study it also became clear that N2O emissions were driven by the nitrification activity, although the N2O was produced per se mainly from denitrification. Increased nitrification in response to accelerated N inputs predicted for forest ecosystems in Europe may

  4. Composition and comparative toxicity of particulate matter emitted from a diesel and biodiesel fuelled CRDI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Jitendra N.; Gupta, Tarun; Agarwal, Avinash K.

    2012-01-01

    There is a global concern about adverse health effects of particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel engine exhaust. In the current study, parametric investigations were carried out using a CRDI (Common Rail Direct Injection) diesel engine operated at different loads at two different engine speeds (1800 and 2400 rpm), employing diesel and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) produced from Karanja oil. A partial flow dilution tunnel was employed to collect and measure the mass of the primary particulates from diesel and biodiesel blend collected on a 47 mm quartz substrate. The collected PM (particulate matter) was subjected to chemical analyses in order to assess the amount of Benzene Soluble Organic Fraction (BSOF) and trace metals using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES). For both diesel and biodiesel, BSOF results showed decreasing levels with increasing engine load. B20 showed higher BSOF as compared to those measured with diesel. The concentration of different trace metals analyzed also showed decreasing trends with increasing engine loads. In addition, real-time measurements for Organic Carbon (OC), Elemental Carbon (EC) and total particle-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out on the primary engine exhaust coming out of the partial flow dilution tunnel. Analysis of OC/EC data suggested that the ratio of OC to EC decreases with corresponding increase in engine load for both fuels. A peak in PAH concentration was observed at 60% engine load at 1800 rpm and 20% engine load at 2400 rpm engine speeds almost identical for both kinds of fuels. Comparison of chemical components of PM emitted from this CRDI engine provides new insight in terms of PM toxicity for B20 vis-a-vis diesel.

  5. Volatile organic compounds emitted by filamentous fungi isolated from flooded homes after Hurricane Sandy show toxicity in a Drosophila bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Yin, G; Inamdar, A A; Luo, J; Zhang, N; Yang, I; Buckley, B; Bennett, J W

    2017-05-01

    Superstorm Sandy provided an opportunity to study filamentous fungi (molds) associated with winter storm damage. We collected 36 morphologically distinct fungal isolates from flooded buildings. By combining traditional morphological and cultural characters with an analysis of ITS sequences (the fungal DNA barcode), we identified 24 fungal species that belong to eight genera: Penicillium (11 species), Fusarium (four species), Aspergillus (three species), Trichoderma (two species), and one species each of Metarhizium, Mucor, Pestalotiopsis, and Umbelopsis. Then, we used a Drosophila larval assay to assess possible toxicity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by these molds. When cultured in a shared atmosphere with growing cultures of molds isolated after Hurricane Sandy, larval toxicity ranged from 15 to 80%. VOCs from Aspergillus niger 129B were the most toxic yielding 80% mortality to Drosophila after 12 days. The VOCs from Trichoderma longibrachiatum 117, Mucor racemosus 138a, and Metarhizium anisopliae 124 were relatively non-toxigenic. A preliminary analysis of VOCs was conducted using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry from two of the most toxic, two of the least toxic, and two species of intermediate toxicity. The more toxic molds produced higher concentrations of 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 2-octen-1-ol, and 2-nonanone; while the less toxic molds produced more 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol, or an overall lower amount of volatiles. Our data support the hypothesis that at certain concentrations, some VOCs emitted by indoor molds are toxigenic. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Low geometry counter for the absolute measurement of the activity of alpha-emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Torano, E.; Acena, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A low-geometry counter is described which allows the absolute determination of the activity for alpha-emitting sources. A Si implanted detector is used to obtain the spectrum of the sample. Two samples are measured with this counter and a 2 π gridded ion chamber. The results an their uncertainties for both instruments are discussed. (Author)

  7. Tetrodotoxin: Chemistry, Toxicity, Source, Distribution and Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Bane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a naturally occurring toxin that has been responsible for human intoxications and fatalities. Its usual route of toxicity is via the ingestion of contaminated puffer fish which are a culinary delicacy, especially in Japan. TTX was believed to be confined to regions of South East Asia, but recent studies have demonstrated that the toxin has spread to regions in the Pacific and the Mediterranean. There is no known antidote to TTX which is a powerful sodium channel inhibitor. This review aims to collect pertinent information available to date on TTX and its analogues with a special emphasis on the structure, aetiology, distribution, effects and the analytical methods employed for its detection.

  8. Procedure for the elaboration of extended sources beta and/or gamma emitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejera R, A.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.

    1991-12-01

    In the laboratory of radioactive standards they have been come manufacturing punctual sources gauged gamma emitting during several years. Before the demand of extended radioactive homogeneous sources of beta particles emitting, in particular with nuclides that are simultaneously gamma and beta emitting, it was designed a procedure for it elaboration based on the one that we use at the moment for the elaboration of the punctual gamma sources. This procedure consists on the integration of a compact group of this type of sources on a single extended support, sealed one of its faces with a film of transparent material in satisfactory grade to the beta particles. In this work this procedure is described and it is applied in the elaboration of two sources that its were requested by the Laguna Verde Central (CFE), one with area of 20 cm 2 and the other one of 100 cm 2 . The homogeneity, measure as the dispersion of the activities of the aliquot ones distributed in the active surfaces was inside 2%. The percentage of attenuation of the beta particles was also measured by the film (window) with the one that the sources were sealed. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides (60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source beta-, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the 192Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for 60Co, 137CS, 192Ir, and 169Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for 60Co and 192Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., > 0.5%) within 3.3 mm of 60Co and 1.7 mm of 192Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for 137Cs and 169Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  10. Analysis of the image of pion-emitting sources in the source center-of-mass frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yanyu; Feng, Qichun; Huo, Lei; Zhang, Jingbo; Liu, Jianli; Tang, Guixin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Zhang, Weining [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China); Dalian University of Technology, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, we try a method to extract the image of pion-emitting source function in the center-of-mass frame of the source (CMFS). We choose identical pion pairs according to the difference of their energy and use these pion pairs to build the correlation function. The purpose is to reduce the effect of ΔEΔt, thus the corresponding imaging result can tend to the real source function. We examine the effect of this method by comparing its results with real source functions extracted from models directly. (orig.)

  11. Absolute measurement of LDR brachytherapy source emitted power: Instrument design and initial measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Martha J; Palmer, Benjamin R; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-02-01

    Energy-based source strength metrics may find use with model-based dose calculation algorithms, but no instruments exist that can measure the energy emitted from low-dose rate (LDR) sources. This work developed a calorimetric technique for measuring the power emitted from encapsulated low-dose rate, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. This quantity is called emitted power (EP). The measurement methodology, instrument design and performance, and EP measurements made with the calorimeter are presented in this work. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was developed to measure EP from LDR brachytherapy sources. The calorimeter employed an electrical substitution technique to determine the power emitted from the source. The calorimeter's performance and thermal system were characterized. EP measurements were made using four (125)I sources with air-kerma strengths ranging from 2.3 to 5.6 U and corresponding EPs of 0.39-0.79 μW, respectively. Three Best Medical 2301 sources and one Oncura 6711 source were measured. EP was also computed by converting measured air-kerma strengths to EPs through Monte Carlo-derived conversion factors. The measured EP and derived EPs were compared to determine the accuracy of the calorimeter measurement technique. The calorimeter had a noise floor of 1-3 nW and a repeatability of 30-60 nW. The calorimeter was stable to within 5 nW over a 12 h measurement window. All measured values agreed with derived EPs to within 10%, with three of the four sources agreeing to within 4%. Calorimeter measurements had uncertainties ranging from 2.6% to 4.5% at the k = 1 level. The values of the derived EPs had uncertainties ranging from 2.9% to 3.6% at the k = 1 level. A calorimeter capable of measuring the EP from LDR sources has been developed and validated for (125)I sources with EPs between 0.43 and 0.79 μW.

  12. Development of the Dutch primary standard for beta-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marel, J. an der; Dijk, E. van

    2002-01-01

    The application of β-radiation emitting radioactive sources in medicine is rapidly expanding. An important new application is the use of β-radiation emitting radioactive sources in endovascular brachytherapy to avoid restenosis. Another well-known application is the use of the ophthalmic applicator (flat or concave surface source) for the treatment of tumors in the eye. Dose and dose distributions are very important characteristics of brachytherapy sources. The absorbed dose in the treated tissue should be known accurately to assure a good quality of the treatment and to develop new treatment methods and source configurations. At the Nederland s Meetinstituut (NMi) a project is going on for the development of a primary standard for betadosimetry. With this standard, dose and dose distributions of β-sources as used in brachytherapy can be measured in terms of absorbed dose to water. The primary standard is based on an extrapolation chamber. The extrapolation chamber will become part of a quality assurance system in Dutch hospitals for endovascular brachytherapy sources. The quality assurance system will further consist of transfer standards like well-type ionisation chambers, plastic scintillator systems and radiochromic film dosimetry. Apart from the endovascular sources the extrapolation chamber will be used to characterize ophthalmic applicators

  13. Grandfather regulations, new source bias, and state air toxics regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, Arik

    1999-01-01

    This paper uses plant-level data from the Census of Manufactures and the variation in toxic air pollution regulations across states to measure the effects of laws that are more stringent for new sources of pollution than for existing sources (so-called 'grandfather' regulations). Of particular interest is the resulting 'new source bias' and its effects on capital vintage and investment. Two industries are examined: commercial printing, which has a local product market; and paint manufacturing, which has a more national market. In general, there seem to be no statistically significant differences in capital vintage or investment between plants in states that grandfather new sources of pollution, plants in states that have no air toxics regulations, and plants in states that regulate both new and existing sources

  14. Does the source energy change when gravitaion waves are emitted in the einstein's gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Folomeshkin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that in the Einstein's gravitation theory the total ''energy'' of a plane gravitational wave calculated with any pseudotensor is equal to zero. The known Einstein's result, according to which the energy of a sourceis decreased when plane weak gravitational waves are emitted, have no place in the Einstein's gravitational theory. The examples are given of exact wave solutions for which the pseudotensor is strictly equal to zero. The energy-momentum of any weak gravitational waves is always equal to zero in the Einstein's gravitation theory. When such waves are emitted the energy of the source cannot change, although these waves are real curvature waves. By the means in the Einstein's gravitation theory the energy, e, is in essenc generated from nothing

  15. Monte Carlo dosimetry of a tandem positioned beta-emitting intravascular brachytherapy source train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Steven A.; Schumer, Wendy; Horrigan, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Prevention of restenosis following interventional coronary procedures with catheter based beta-emitting sources is currently under clinical trial investigations. Systems utilizing fixed length source trains limit the clinician's ability to increase the radiation source length as required. A technique known as 'pull back' is used when the segment of artery requiring radiation is longer than the available fixed length source train. In this instance, tandem positioning of the fixed length source is used to treat the longer length of artery. The aim of this study was to examine the dosimetry of the junction region associated with pull back treatments using a commercially available 90 Sr/Y catheter based intravascular brachytherapy source train. Dose profiles were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B, at radial distances of 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm for pull back techniques using 2.5 mm overlapping, abutting, and 2.5 mm spaced source trains. Results at the protocol prescription radius of 2 mm showed a junction dose elevated 61% above prescription for 2.5 mm overlapping source trains. For 2.5 mm spaced trains, this figure falls to 64% below prescription dose. In contrast, abutted source trains exhibited only a 1% depression below prescription dose in the junction region. The reference point dose rate per unit activity of this source was found to be consistent with previous studies

  16. Development and evaluation of a light-emitting diode endoscopic light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Li, Rui; Rogers, Kevin; Driscoll, Paul; Excel, Peter; Yandle, Ron; Hanna, George; Copner, Nigel; Elson, Daniel S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) based endoscopic illumination devices have been shown to have several benefits over arclamp systems. LEDs are energy-efficient, small, durable, and inexpensive, however their use in endoscopy has been limited by the difficulty in efficiently coupling enough light into the endoscopic light cable. We have demonstrated a highly homogenised lightpipe LED light source that combines the light from four Luminus LEDs emitting in the red, green, blue and violet using innovative dichroics that maximise light throughput. The light source spectrally combines light from highly divergent incoherent sources that have a Lambertian intensity profile to provide illumination matched to the acceptance numerical aperture of a liquid light guide or fibre bundle. The LED light source was coupled to a standard laparoscope and performance parameters (power, luminance, colour temperature) compared to a xenon lamp. Although the total illuminance from the endoscope was lower, adjustment of the LEDs' relative intensities enabled contrast enhancement in biological tissue imaging. The LED light engine was also evaluated in a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) box trainer and in vivo during a porcine MIS procedure where it was used to generate 'narrowband' images. Future work using the violet LED could enable photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  17. Measurement of Neutron Energy Spectrum Emitted by Cf-252 Source Using Time-of-Flight Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The techniques proposed to detect the neutrons usually require the detection of a secondary recoiling nucleus in a scintillator (or other type of detector) to indicate the rare collision of a neutron with a nucleus. This is the same basic technique, in this case detection of a recoil proton that was used by Chadwick in the 1930 s to discover and identify the neutron and determine its mass. It is primary technique still used today for detection of fast neutron, which typically involves the use of a hydrogen based organic plastic or liquid scintillator coupled to a photo-multiplier tube. The light output from such scintillators is a function of the cross section and nuclear kinematics of the n + nucleus collision. With the exception of deuterated scintillators, the scintillator signal does not necessarily produce a distinct peak in the scintillator spectrum directly related to the incident neutron energy. Instead neutron time-of-flight (TOF) often must be utilized to determine the neutron energy, which requires generation of a prompt start signal from the nuclear source emitting the neutrons. This method takes advantage of the high number of prompt gamma rays. The Time-of-Flight method was used to measure neutron energy spectrum emitted by the Cf-252 neutron source. Plastic scintillator that has a superior discrimination ability of neutron and gamma-ray was used as a stop signal detector and liquid scintillator was used as a stat signal detector. In experiment, neutron and gamma-ray spectrum was firstly measured and discriminated using the TOF method. Secondly, neutron energy spectrum was obtained through spectrum analysis. Equation of neutron energy spectrum that was emitted by Cf-252 source using the Gaussian fitting was obtained.

  18. Preliminary Results of Nuclear Fluorescence Imaging of Alpha and Beta Emitting Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feener, Jessica S.; Charlton, William S.

    2013-06-01

    The preliminary results from a series of nuclear fluorescence imaging experiments using a variety of radioactive sources and shielding are given. These experiments were done as part of a proof of concept to determine if nuclear fluorescence imaging could be used as a safeguards measurements tool or for nuclear warhead verification for nuclear arms control treaties such as the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty. An off-the-shelf Princeton Instruments charged coupled device camera system was used to image the emission of fluorescence photons from the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules in air that have been excited by ionizing radiation. The fluorescence emissions are primarily in the near ultraviolet range; between the wavelengths of 300 and 400 nm. Fluorescent imaging techniques are currently being investigated in a number of applications. A French research team has successfully demonstrated this concept for remote imaging of alpha contamination. It has also been shown that the phenomenon can be seen through translucent materials and that alpha radiation can be seen in the presence of large gamma backgrounds. Additionally, fluorescence telescopes and satellites utilize the de-excitation of nitrogen molecules to observe cosmic ray showers in the atmosphere. In cosmic ray shower detection, electrons are the main contributor to the excitation of the of nitrogen molecules in air. The experiments presented in this paper were designed to determine if the imaging system could observe beta emitting sources, differentiate between beta emitters and alpha emitting materials such as uranium oxide and uranium metal, and to further investigate the phenomenon through translucent and non-translucent materials. The initial results show that differentiation can be made between beta and alpha emitting sources and that the device can observe the phenomenon through very thin non-transparent material. Additionally, information is given on the

  19. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Unspecified Toxic Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intro to the unspecified toxic chemicals module, when to list toxic chemicals as a candidate cause, ways to measure toxic chemicals, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for toxic chemicals, toxic chemicals module references and literature reviews.

  20. A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model for pollutants emitted by complex source areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, Sergio; Costanzini, Sofia; Ghermandi, Grazia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Vinceti, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Gaussian dispersion models are widely used to simulate the concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants emitted by source areas. Very often, the calculation time limits the number of sources and receptors and the geometry of the sources must be simple and without holes. This paper presents CAREA, a new GIS-based Gaussian model for complex source areas. CAREA was coded in the Python language, and is largely based on a simplified formulation of the very popular and recognized AERMOD model. The model allows users to define in a GIS environment thousands of gridded or scattered receptors and thousands of complex sources with hundreds of vertices and holes. CAREA computes ground level, or near ground level, concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of pollutants. The input/output and the runs of the model can be completely managed in GIS environment (e.g. inside a GIS project). The paper presents the CAREA formulation and its applications to very complex test cases. The tests shows that the processing time are satisfactory and that the definition of sources and receptors and the output retrieval are quite easy in a GIS environment. CAREA and AERMOD are compared using simple and reproducible test cases. The comparison shows that CAREA satisfactorily reproduces AERMOD simulations and is considerably faster than AERMOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Collimating lens for light-emitting-diode light source based on non-imaging optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangzhen; Wang, Lili; Li, Fuli; Zhang, Gongjian

    2012-04-10

    A collimating lens for a light-emitting-diode (LED) light source is an essential device widely used in lighting engineering. Lens surfaces are calculated by geometrical optics and nonimaging optics. This design progress does not rely on any software optimization and any complex iterative process. This method can be used for any type of light source not only Lambertian. The theoretical model is based on point source. But the practical LED source has a certain size. So in the simulation, an LED chip whose size is 1 mm*1 mm is used to verify the feasibility of the model. The mean results show that the lenses have a very compact structure and good collimating performance. Efficiency is defined as the ratio of the flux in the illuminated plane to the flux from LED source without considering the lens material transmission. Just investigating the loss in the designed lens surfaces, the two types of lenses have high efficiencies of more than 90% and 99%, respectively. Most lighting area (possessing 80% flux) radii are no more than 5 m when the illuminated plane is 200 m away from the light source.

  2. Spectral matching research for light-emitting diode-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ruting; Guo, Zhenning; Lin, Jieben

    2015-09-01

    To decrease the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy and minimize the need for exchange transfusions, we report a novel design for light source of light-emitting diode (LED)-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device (NJTD). The bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target. Based on spectral constructing theory, we used commercially available LEDs with different peak wavelengths and full width at half maximum as matching light sources. Simple genetic algorithm was first proposed as the spectral matching method. The required LEDs number at each peak wavelength was calculated, and then, the commercial light source sample model of the device was fabricated to confirm the spectral matching technology. In addition, the corresponding spectrum was measured and the effect was analyzed finally. The results showed that fitted spectrum was very similar to the target spectrum with 98.86 % matching degree, and the actual device model has a spectrum close to the target with 96.02 % matching degree. With higher fitting degree and efficiency, this matching algorithm is very suitable for light source matching technology of LED-based spectral distribution, and bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo will be auspicious candidate for the target spectrum of new LED-based NJTD light source.

  3. The Use of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as Green and Red/Far-Red Light Sources in Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The use of green, red, and far-red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for plant physiological studies is outlined and evaluated. Indicates that LED lamps have the advantage over conventional light sources in that they are lightweight, low-cost, portable, easily constructed, and do not require color filters. (Author/DH)

  4. Automatic device for measuring β-emitting sources: P.A.P.A. β-meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomer, J.; Valentin, M.

    1969-01-01

    The apparatus described is designed for measuring β-emitting elements by the absorption method; it is suitable for carrying out a large number of routine analyses. A mechanical device pushes an aluminium absorption set automatically between the source and the detector; the movement is programmed for cutting on and off by a transistorized electronic unit, with printing out and punching of the results on tape; then this can be mathematically processed by a computer (tracing of absorption spectra, extrapolation and calculation of the activity). The detector is either a β-probe or a proportional counter with a specially designed loop. For routine measurements, the accuracy obtained, with all corrections made, is from 5 to 8 per cent; the reproducibility is about 2 per cent. (authors) [fr

  5. Scattering and absorption of particles emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljequist, D.

    2012-01-01

    A theory for the scattering and absorption of particles isotropically emitted by a point source in a cluster of point scatterers is described and related to the theory for the scattering of an incident particle beam. The quantum mechanical probability of escape from the cluster in different directions is calculated, as well as the spatial distribution of absorption events within the cluster. A source strength renormalization procedure is required. The average quantum scattering in clusters with randomly shifting scatterer positions is compared to trajectory simulation with the aim of studying the validity of the trajectory method. Differences between the results of the quantum and trajectory methods are found primarily for wavelengths larger than the average distance between nearest neighbour scatterers. The average quantum results include, for example, a local minimum in the number of absorption events at the location of the point source and interference patterns in the angle-dependent escape probability as well as in the distribution of absorption events. The relative error of the trajectory method is in general, though not generally, of similar magnitude as that obtained for beam scattering.

  6. Late changes in pig skin after irradiation from beta-emitting sources of different energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Heryet, J.C.; Hopewell, J.W.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin fields were irradiated on 3-month-old pigs with Sr 90 , Tm 170 and Pm 147 sources, ranging in size from 1mm to 22.5 mm in diameter. The severity of late skin atrophy was assessed 2 years after irradiation by a comparison of the thickness of the dermis in exposed skin with that of an adjacent area of unirradiated skin. Quantitative measurements were made from histological sections. The maximum dermal thinning after Sr 90 β-irradiation was approx. 55%. Irradiation with Tm 170 produced a maximal thinning of approximately 35%. Irradiation with Pm 147 produced no observable atrophy in pig skin. These differences reflect the different depth-dose characteristics of the three β-emitting sources. Significant late dermal atrophy was seen after doses which only produced a minimal erythema in the acute phase of the reaction. There was also a lack of a field-size effect for late atrophy with all but the two smallest Sr 90 sources. This is the converse of the marked field-size effects reported for the acute skin reactions. (author)

  7. Source apportionment of toxic chemical pollutants at Trombay region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.

    2007-05-01

    Anthropogenic activities like industrial production and transportation, a wide range of chemical pollutants such as trace and toxic metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons etc. eventually find their way into various environmental compartments. One of the main issues of environmental pollution is the chemical composition of aerosols and their sources. In spite of all the efforts a considerable part of the atmospheric aerosol mass is still not accounted for. This report describes some of the activities of Environmental Assessment Division which are having direct relevance to the public health and regulatory bodies. Extensive studies were carried out in our laboratories for the Trombay site, over the years; on the organic as well as inorganic pollution in the environment to understand inter compartmental behaviour of these chemical pollutants. In this report an attempt has been made to collect different size fractionated ambient aerosols and to quantify the percentage contribution of each size fraction to the total aerosol mass. Subsequently, an effort has been made for chemical characterization (inorganic, organic and carbon content) of these particulate matter using different analytical techniques. The comprehensive data set on chemical characterization of particulate matter thus generated is being used with receptor modeling techniques to identify the possible sources contributing to the observed concentrations of the measured pollutants. The use of this comprehensive data set in receptor modeling has been helpful in distinguishing the source types in a better way. Receptor modeling techniques are powerful tools that can be used to locate sources of pollutants to the atmosphere. The major advantage of the receptor models is that actual ambient data are used to apportion source contributions, negating the need for dispersion calculations. Pollution sources affecting the sampling site were statistically identified using varimax rotated factor analysis of

  8. The sensitivity of various thermoluminescent, photoluminescent and photographic detectors to neutrons emitted by a Pu-Be source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Frantisek; Marsault, Roger; Medioni, Roger; Portal, Guy.

    1975-07-01

    A series of experiments were conducted in order to determine the sensitivity of radiothermoluminescent detectors to fast neutrons. Experiments bearing on the determination of the sensitivity to neutrons emitted by a Pu-Be source are related here. The characteristics of the radiation field emitted by the source and especially of the γ-field are analysed as it is essential for the interpretation of results to know the latter, which appears to have been but partly studied so far. The measuring procedures are then described and a study is made of the best experimental procedures liable to eliminate or decrease the effect of external factors. The results are finally analysed [fr

  9. An optically stabilized fast-switching light emitting diode as a light source for functional neuroimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Wagenaar

    Full Text Available Neuroscience research increasingly relies on optical methods for evoking neuronal activity as well as for measuring it, making bright and stable light sources critical building blocks of modern experimental setups. This paper presents a method to control the brightness of a high-power light emitting diode (LED light source to an unprecedented level of stability. By continuously monitoring the actual light output of the LED with a photodiode and feeding the result back to the LED's driver by way of a proportional-integral controller, drift was reduced to as little as 0.007% per hour over a 12-h period, and short-term fluctuations to 0.005% root-mean-square over 10 seconds. The LED can be switched on and off completely within 100 μs, a feature that is crucial when visual stimuli and light for optical recording need to be interleaved to obtain artifact-free recordings. The utility of the system is demonstrated by recording visual responses in the central nervous system of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana using voltage-sensitive dyes.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly luminescent blue-emitting ZnSe(S) quantum dots exhibiting low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirnajafizadeh, Fatemeh; Ramsey, Deborah; McAlpine, Shelli [School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Wang, Fan; Reece, Peter [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Stride, John Arron, E-mail: j.stride@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2016-07-01

    Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) that emit in the visible spectrum are of interest to a number of imaging technologies, not least that of biological samples. One issue that hinders the application of luminescent markers in biology is the potential toxicity of the fluorophore. Here we show that hydrothermally synthesized ZnSe(S) QDs have low cytotoxicity to both human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT-116) and human skin fibroblast cells (WS1). The QDs exhibited a high degree of crystallinity, with a strong blue photoluminescence at up to 29% quantum yield relative to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without post-synthetic UV-irradiation. Confocal microscopy images obtained of HCT-116 cells after incubation with the QDs highlighted the stability of the particles in cell media. Cytotoxicity studies showed that both HCT-116 and WS1 cells retain 100% viability after treatment with the QDs at concentrations up to 0.5 g/L, which makes them of potential use in biological imaging applications. - Highlights: • Highly luminescent ZnSe(S) QDs were synthesized using a simple, one-step hydrothermal method. • The as-synthesized QDs were found to be nontoxic in the presence of biological cells. • The QDs were stable in biological media with identical emission profile to that in water.

  11. Recycled Thermal Energy from High Power Light Emitting Diode Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jae-Hoon; Jo, GaeHun; Ha, Jae-Geun; Koo, Sang-Mo; Kamiko, Masao; Hong, JunHee; Koh, Jung-Hyuk

    2018-09-01

    In this research, the recycled electrical energy from wasted thermal energy in high power Light Emitting Diode (LED) system will be investigated. The luminous efficiency of lights has been improved in recent years by employing the high power LED system, therefore energy efficiency was improved compared with that of typical lighting sources. To increase energy efficiency of high power LED system further, wasted thermal energy should be re-considered. Therefore, wasted thermal energy was collected and re-used them as electrical energy. The increased electrical efficiency of high power LED devices was accomplished by considering the recycled heat energy, which is wasted thermal energy from the LED. In this work, increased electrical efficiency will be considered and investigated by employing the high power LED system, which has high thermal loss during the operating time. For this research, well designed thermoelement with heat radiation system was employed to enhance the collecting thermal energy from the LED system, and then convert it as recycled electrical energy.

  12. Microcystis aeruginosa : source of toxic microcystins in drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , which is the most common toxic cyanobacterium in eutrophic freshwater. The association of environmental parameters with cyanobacterial blooms and the toxicity of microcystin are discussed. Also, the synthesis of the microcystins, as well as ...

  13. Energy–angle correlation of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an HEU source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloshevsky, G., E-mail: gennady@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A.

    2014-06-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) yield very unique fission signatures, namely correlated neutrons and gamma-rays. A major challenge is not only to detect, but also to rapidly identify and recognize SNM with certainty. Accounting for particle multiplicity and correlations is one of standard ways to detect SNM. However, many parameter data such as joint distributions of energy, angle, lifetime, and multiplicity of neutrons and gamma-rays can lead to better recognition of SNM signatures in the background radiation noise. These joint distributions are not well understood. The Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of neutrons and gamma-rays produced from spontaneous and interrogation-induced fission of SNM are carried out using the developed MONSOL computer code. The energy spectra of neutrons and gamma-rays from a bare Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) source are investigated. The energy spectrum of gamma-rays shows spectral lines by which HEU isotopes can be identified, while those of neutrons do not show any characteristic lines. The joint probability density function (JPDF) of the energy–angle association of neutrons and gamma-rays is constructed. Marginal probability density functions (MPDFs) of energy and angle are derived from JPDF. A probabilistic model is developed for the analysis of JPDF and MPDFs. This probabilistic model is used to evaluate mean values, standard deviations, covariance and correlation between the energy and angle of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the HEU source. For both neutrons and gamma-rays, it is found that the energy–angle variables are only weakly correlated.

  14. On the Measurement of the Velocity of Light Emitted by an Ultrarelativistic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupryaev, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    By analytical calculations it has been shown that in papers on the measurement of the velocity of light published in 2011 in the journals Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk [Physics-Uspekhi] and Pis'ma v ZhETF [JRTP Letters], in actual fact the velocity of a light pulse from a relativistic clot of electrons was not measured. All that was done was to compare the velocity of light emitted by an ultrarelativistic source with the velocity of light from a fixed source, i.e., both in the first and second variants (one independent quantity was compared with another), in essence, it was simply postulated. In the first variant a glass plate was used as the fixed light source, and in the second variants, a synchrotron pulse was used as the reference signal. The velocity of light was calculated using a calculated time based on the postulate of the special theory of relativity (STR) on the invariance of the velocity of light. This, of course, contradicts the Newton-Ritz hypothesis on ballistic addition of velocities, but at the present time this idea is not taken seriously. Practically none of the serious contemporary critics of STR, apart, of course, from amateurs, holds this point of view. The result cannot be considered as a direct experimental confirmation of the second postulate of Einstein's special theory of relativity, i.e., its main part, which speaks of the constancy of the velocity of light in all inertial reference frames, but only of that part which speaks of the independence of the velocity of light on motion of the source. Moreover, this same result stands as equal proof of the so-called theory of the luminiferous ether, which held sway up to the creation of the special theory of relativity and which has now been revived, i.e., it does not distinguish between these two theories. It is fundamentally impossible in principle to measure the velocity of light by the proposed method, it is only possible to postulate it.

  15. Photocatalytic performance of cylindrical reactor inserted with UV light-emitting-diodes for purification of low-level toxic volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Wan K.; Kang, Hyun J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Photocatalyst baked at 350 °C exhibited the highest BTEX degradation efficiency. ► Conventional lamp evidenced a higher degradation efficiency compared to LEDs. ► LEDs was more energy-efficient than conventional lamp for BTEX degradation. ► As the residence time increased, the average degradation efficiency increased. - Abstract: The present study investigated the photocatalytic performance of a cylindrical reactor inserted with UV light-emitting-diodes for the decomposition of low-level (0.1 ppm) gas-phase organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX)). The morphological and optical properties of photocatalysts (Degussa P-25 TiO 2 ) baked at different temperatures were determined using a range of spectral instruments. The photocatalyst baked at 350 °C exhibited the highest conversion efficiencies for both benzene and toluene (81 and ∼100%, respectively). The conventional lamp showed a higher conversion efficiency for benzene compared to the 380-nm UV-LED and a higher conversion efficiency for benzene and toluene than the 365-nm UV-LED. However, the ratios of conversion efficiency to electric power consumption were 2.5–3.0 times higher for the latter light source than the former source. Moreover, as the residence time increased from 0.2 to 1.2 min, the average conversion efficiencies for BTEX of the 3-h photocatalytic process increased from nearly zero to 81%, 7 to nearly 100%, 20 to nearly 100%, and 29–30 to nearly 100%, respectively. The cylindrical photocatalytic reactor inserted with UV-LEDs could be energy-efficiently applied for the decomposition of low-level toxic compounds after optimization of the operating conditions.

  16. Photocatalytic performance of cylindrical reactor inserted with UV light-emitting-diodes for purification of low-level toxic volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Wan K., E-mail: wkjo@knu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun J., E-mail: khj435@naver.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalyst baked at 350 Degree-Sign C exhibited the highest BTEX degradation efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional lamp evidenced a higher degradation efficiency compared to LEDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LEDs was more energy-efficient than conventional lamp for BTEX degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As the residence time increased, the average degradation efficiency increased. - Abstract: The present study investigated the photocatalytic performance of a cylindrical reactor inserted with UV light-emitting-diodes for the decomposition of low-level (0.1 ppm) gas-phase organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX)). The morphological and optical properties of photocatalysts (Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2}) baked at different temperatures were determined using a range of spectral instruments. The photocatalyst baked at 350 Degree-Sign C exhibited the highest conversion efficiencies for both benzene and toluene (81 and {approx}100%, respectively). The conventional lamp showed a higher conversion efficiency for benzene compared to the 380-nm UV-LED and a higher conversion efficiency for benzene and toluene than the 365-nm UV-LED. However, the ratios of conversion efficiency to electric power consumption were 2.5-3.0 times higher for the latter light source than the former source. Moreover, as the residence time increased from 0.2 to 1.2 min, the average conversion efficiencies for BTEX of the 3-h photocatalytic process increased from nearly zero to 81%, 7 to nearly 100%, 20 to nearly 100%, and 29-30 to nearly 100%, respectively. The cylindrical photocatalytic reactor inserted with UV-LEDs could be energy-efficiently applied for the decomposition of low-level toxic compounds after optimization of the operating conditions.

  17. Source Signature of Sr Isotopes in Fluids Emitting From Mud volcanoes in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C.; You, C.; Chao, H.

    2003-12-01

    Located at the boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Asia Continental Plate, abundance of mud volcanoes were erupted on land in Taiwan. According to their occurrences and associated tectonic settings, these mud volcanoes were classified into four groupies. The group (I) mud volcanoes are located in the western coastal plane, whereas group (II) and (III) are situated near the Kutinkung anticline axis and the Chishan fault respectively. The group (IV) mud volcanoes are discovered at the Coastal Range. Although there are numerous studies focused on morphology, possible fluid migration paths and sources are poorly understood. We have collected and analyzed major ions and Sr isotopic ratios in fluids separated from various mud volcanoes in Taiwan. Chemical contents of these fluids were measured by IC and the emitted gasses were analyzed by GC. The Sr concentrations in these fluids were determined using AA and the isotopic compositions were analyzed by TIMS. The dominated ions in fluids are Na and Cl which account for 98% of dissolved materials. All fluids show similar Na/Cl ratios(0.7-0.8), slightly higher than seawater but each group has unique Sr isotopic signature. Waters expelled from group I mud volcanoes featured with low salinity and high Sr isotopic ratios ranged from 0.71150 to 0.71175. Groups II and III were outcroped in the Kutinkung formation but show distinctive chemical compositions. Group II fluids have four times Cl concentrations(358-522mM) compared with those of group III(85-162mM). The latter fluids appear to be more radiogenic(0.71012- 0.71075) indicating possible influence due to water-rock interactions. Low 87Sr/86Sr(0.70692-0.70939) is typical characteristic of mud volcano fluids in group IV where large Mg and K depletion were discovered, suggesting effects due to sediment diagenetic processes. The chemical compositions of mud volcano associated gasses show similar distribution pattern. The major gas constituents in mud volcano zones

  18. Feasibility of ultraviolet-light-emitting diodes as an alternative light source for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H; Richards, Jeffrey T; Coutts, Janelle L; Soler, Robert; Maxik, Fred; Wheeler, Raymond M

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether ultraviolet-light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could serve as an efficient photon source for heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO). An LED module consisting of 12 high-power UV-A (lambda max = 365 nm) LEDs was designed to be interchangeable with a UV-A fluorescent black light blue (BLB) lamp for a bench scale annular reactor packed with silica-titania composite (STC) pellets. Lighting and thermal properties of the module were characterized to assess its uniformity and total irradiance. A forward current (I(F)) of 100 mA delivered an average irradiance of 4.0 mW cm(-2) at a distance of 8 mm, which is equivalent to the maximum output of the BLB, but the irradiance of the LED module was less uniform than that of the BLB. The LED and BLB reactors were tested for the oxidization of ethanol (50 ppm(v)) in a continuous-flow-through mode with 0.94 sec residence time. At the same average irradiance, the UV-A LED reactor resulted in a lower CO2 production rate (19.8 vs. 28.6 nmol L(-1) s(-1)), lower ethanol removal (80% vs. 91%), and lower mineralization efficiency (28% vs. 44%) than the UV-A BLB reactor. Ethanol mineralization was enhanced with the increase of the irradiance at the catalyst surface. This result suggests that reduced ethanol mineralization in the LED reactor relative to the BLB reactor at the same average irradiance could be attributed to the nonuniform irradiance over the photocatalyst, that is, a portion of the catalyst was exposed to less than the average irradiance. The potential of UV-A LEDs may be fully realized by optimizing the light distribution over the catalyst and utilizing their instantaneous "on" and "off" feature for periodic irradiation. Nevertheless, our results also showed that the current UV-A LED module had the same wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 13% as that of the UV-A BLB, demonstrating that UV-A LEDs are a viable photon source both in terms of WPE and PCO efficiency.

  19. Feasibility of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes as an Alternative Light Source for Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Langanf H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Soler, Robert; Maxik, Fred; Coutts, Janelle; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could serve as an alternative photon source efficiently for heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO). An LED module consisting of 12 high-power UV-A LEDs was designed to be interchangeable with a UV-A fluorescent black light blue (BLB) lamp in a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) packed bed annular reactor. Lighting and thermal properties were characterized to assess the uniformity and total irradiant output. A forward current of (I(sub F)) 100 mA delivered an average irradiance of 4.0 m W cm(exp -2), which is equivalent to the maximum output of the BLB, but the irradiance of the LED module was less uniform than that of the BLB. The LED- and BLB-reactors were tested for the oxidization of 50 ppmv ethanol in a continuous flow-through mode with 0.94 sec space time. At the same irradiance, the UV-A LED reactor resulted in a lower PCO rate constant than the UV-A BLB reactor (19.8 vs. 28.6 nM CO2 sec-I), and consequently lower ethanol removal (80% vs. 91%) and mineralization efficiency (28% vs. 44%). Ethanol mineralization increased in direct proportion to the irradiance at the catalyst surface. This result suggests that reduced ethanol mineralization in the LED- reactor could be traced to uneven irradiance over the photocatalyst, leaving a portion of the catalyst was under-irradiated. The potential of UV-A LEDs may be fully realized by optimizing the light distribution over the catalyst and utilizing their instantaneous "on" and "off' feature for periodic irradiation. Nevertheless, the current UV-A LED module had the same wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 13% as that of the UV-A BLB. These results demonstrated that UV-A LEDs are a viable photon source both in terms of WPE and PCO efficiency.

  20. Distribution, exposure pathways, sources and toxicity of nonylphenol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water SA. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ... of their toxicity, oestrogenic properties and widespread contamination. ... to provide better understanding of these emerging environmental contaminants.

  1. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (Λ) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (<50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of Λ taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of Λ. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in Λ determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it ideal to determine

  2. Light emitting diodes as an alternative ambient illumination source in photolithography environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Dennis Dan; Ou, Haiyan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    We explored an alternative light emitting diode (LED) - based solution to replace the existing yellow fluorescent light tubes (YFT) used in photolithography rooms. A no-blue LED lamp was designed and a prototype was fabricated. For both solutions, the spectral power distribution (SPD) was measured......, the colorimetric values were calculated, and a visual comparison using Gretagmacbeth colorcharts was performed. The visual comparison showed that the LED bulb was better to render colors despite a low color rendering index (CRI). Furthermore, the LED bulb was tested in a photolithography room...... and there was no exposure to the photoresist even after 168 hours illumination....

  3. Size of the virtual source behind a convex spherical surface emitting a space charge limited ion current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavet, I.

    1987-01-01

    A plasma source fitted with a circular orifice and emitting a space charge limited ion current can be made to operate with a convex spherical plasma boundary (meniscus) by appropriately adjusting its extraction parameters. In this case, the diameter of the virtual source behind the meniscus is much smaller than the orifice diameter. The effective value of this virtual source diameter depends significantly on various practical factors that are more or less controllable. Its lower ideal limit, however, depends only on the radio δ of the interelectrode distance to the meniscus curvature radius and on the ratio ω of the initial to final ion energy. This ideal limit is given for the ranges 0.1 ≤ δ ≤ 10 and 10 -7 ≤ ω ≤ 10 -3 . Preliminary experimental results are reported. (orig.)

  4. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effects on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  5. Biodiesel and Cold Temperature Effect on Speciated Mobile Source Air Toxics from Modern Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a particular focus on mobile source air toxics (MSATs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a temperature controlled chass...

  6. Bat calls while preying: A method for reconstructing the signal emitted by a directional sound source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guarato, Francesco; Hallam, John

    2010-01-01

    Understanding and modeling bat biosonar behavior should take into account what the bat actually emitted while exploring the surrounding environment. Recording of the bat calls could be performed by means of a telemetry system small enough to sit on the bat head, though filtering due to bat...... directivity affects recordings and not all bat species are able to carry such a device. Instead, remote microphone recordings of the bat calls could be processed by means of a mathematical method that estimates bat head orientation as a first step before calculating the amplitudes of each call for each...... and discussed. A further improvement of the method is necessary as its performance for call reconstruction strongly depends on correct choice of the sample at which the recorded call is thought to start in each microphone data set....

  7. Monte Carlo dose calculations of beta-emitting sources for intravascular brachytherapy: a comparison between EGS4, EGSnrc, and MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Li, X A

    2001-02-01

    The dose parameters for the beta-particle emitting 90Sr/90Y source for intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) have been calculated by different investigators. At a distant distance from the source, noticeable differences are seen in these parameters calculated using different Monte Carlo codes. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of calculations using an EGS4, an EGSnrc, and the MCNP Monte Carlo codes. Data calculated and compared include the depth dose curve for a broad parallel beam of electrons, and radial dose distributions for point electron sources (monoenergetic or polyenergetic) and for a real 90Sr/90Y source. For the 90Sr/90Y source, the doses at the reference position (2 mm radial distance) calculated by the three code agree within 2%. However, the differences between the dose calculated by the three codes can be over 20% in the radial distance range interested in IVBT. The difference increases with radial distance from source, and reaches 30% at the tail of dose curve. These differences may be partially attributed to the different multiple scattering theories and Monte Carlo models for electron transport adopted in these three codes. Doses calculated by the EGSnrc code are more accurate than those by the EGS4. The two calculations agree within 5% for radial distance <6 mm.

  8. Search for gamma-ray emitting AGN among unidentified Fermi-LAT sources using machine learning algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doert, Marlene [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Einecke, Sabrina [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Errando, Manel [Barnard College, Columbia University, New York City (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) is the deepest all-sky survey of the gamma-ray sky currently available to the community. Out of the 1873 catalog sources, 576 remain unassociated. We present a search for active galactic nuclei (AGN) among these unassociated objects, which aims at a reduction of the number of unassociated gamma-ray sources and a more complete characterization of the population of gamma-ray emitting AGN. Our study uses two complimentary machine learning algorithms which are individually trained on the gamma-ray properties of associated 2FGL sources and thereafter applied to the unassociated sample. The intersection of the two methods yields a high-confidence sample of 231 AGN candidate sources. We estimate the performance of the classification by taking inherent differences between the samples of associated and unassociated 2FGL sources into account. A search for infra-red counterparts and first results from follow-up studies in the X-ray band using Swift satellite data for a subset of our AGN candidates are also presented.

  9. The sound power emitted by a source of low acoustic impedance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Verholt, Lars M.

    1998-01-01

    Several authors have maintained that a source of low acoustic impedance (which includes standardised reference sources of the aerodynamic type) would radiate less than the free field power in a reverberation room. However, neither computer simulations nor experiments have confirmed this assertion....

  10. Identification of specific sources of airborne particles emitted from within a complex industrial (steelworks) site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2018-06-01

    A case study is provided of the development and application of methods to identify and quantify specific sources of emissions from within a large complex industrial site. Methods include directional analysis of concentrations, chemical source tracers and correlations with gaseous emissions. Extensive measurements of PM10, PM2.5, trace gases, particulate elements and single particle mass spectra were made at sites around the Port Talbot steelworks in 2012. By using wind direction data in conjunction with real-time or hourly-average pollutant concentration measurements, it has been possible to locate areas within the steelworks associated with enhanced pollutant emissions. Directional analysis highlights the Slag Handling area of the works as the most substantial source of elevated PM10 concentrations during the measurement period. Chemical analyses of air sampled from relevant wind directions is consistent with the anticipated composition of slags, as are single particle mass spectra. Elevated concentrations of PM10 are related to inverse distance from the Slag Handling area, and concentrations increase with increased wind speed, consistent with a wind-driven resuspension source. There also appears to be a lesser source associated with Sinter Plant emissions affecting PM10 concentrations at the Fire Station monitoring site. The results are compared with a ME2 study using some of the same data, and shown to give a clearer view of the location and characteristics of emission sources, including fugitive dusts.

  11. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C

  12. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  13. Long-Wavelength InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Light Emitting Sources Monolithically Grown on Si Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct integration of III–V light emitting sources on Si substrates has attracted significant interest for addressing the growing limitations for Si-based electronics and allowing the realization of complex optoelectronics circuits. However, the high density of threading dislocations introduced by large lattice mismatch and incompatible thermal expansion coefficient between III–V materials and Si substrates have fundamentally limited monolithic epitaxy of III–V devices on Si substrates. Here, by using the InAlAs/GaAs strained layer superlattices (SLSs as dislocation filter layers (DFLs to reduce the density of threading dislocations. We firstly demonstrate a Si-based 1.3 µm InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD laser that lases up to 111 °C, with a low threshold current density of 200 A/cm2 and high output power over 100 mW at room temperature. We then demonstrate the operation of InAs/GaAs QD superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs monolithically grown on Si substrates. The fabricated two-section SLD exhibits a 3 dB linewidth of 114 nm, centered at ~1255 nm with a corresponding output power of 2.6 mW at room temperature. Our work complements hybrid integration using wafer bonding and represents a significant milestone for direct monolithic integration of III–V light emitters on Si substrates.

  14. Photoluminescence studies of organic phosphor coated diffusing surface using blue inorganic light-emitting diode as excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2013-01-01

    We report the studies on photoluminescence (PL) of organic phosphor coated on a diffusing surface using a blue inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) array as an excitation source. The organic phosphor composite coated diffuser was used to scatter the directional blue light from the LED array. Some of the blue light is absorbed by the organic phosphor composite and the phosphor molecules are excited and re-emit light at longer wavelengths due to the PL process. The output light consists of scattered blue light plus phosphor generated broadband yellow light, thus making white light. The diffuser was made up of a plastic substrate coated with an organic composite of small molecule fluorescent material zinc(II)bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Znq 2 ) doped with different percentages of electro-phosphorescent metal complex iridium(III)bis(2-methyldibenzo-[f, h] quinoxaline) (acetylacetonate) ([Ir(MDQ) 2 (acac)]). By means of changing the concentration and the thickness of the phosphor composite material the colour coordinates of white light were achieved. The CIE coordinates and correlated colour temperature were calculated for various thicknesses and phosphor composite concentrations and the results are reported. (paper)

  15. THE ENVIRONMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF EMITTING ELECTRONS AS A FUNCTION OF SOURCE ACTIVITY IN MARKARIAN 421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Ansoldi, Stefano; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    For the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421, we study the variation of the spectral energy distribution (SED) as a function of source activity, from quiescent to active. We use a fully automatized χ 2 -minimization procedure, instead of the 'eyeball' procedure more commonly used in the literature, to model nine SED data sets with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model and examine how the model parameters vary with source activity. The latter issue can finally be addressed now, because simultaneous broadband SEDs (spanning from optical to very high energy photon) have finally become available. Our results suggest that in Mrk 421 the magnetic field (B) decreases with source activity, whereas the electron spectrum's break energy (γ br ) and the Doppler factor (δ) increase-the other SSC parameters turn out to be uncorrelated with source activity. In the SSC framework, these results are interpreted in a picture where the synchrotron power and peak frequency remain constant with varying source activity, through a combination of decreasing magnetic field and increasing number density of γ ≤ γ br electrons: since this leads to an increased electron-photon scattering efficiency, the resulting Compton power increases, and so does the total (= synchrotron plus Compton) emission.

  16. New approach for location of continuously emitting acoustic emission sources by phase-controlled probe arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeller, P.; Klein, M.; Waschkies, E.; Deuster, G.

    1991-01-01

    Usually burst-like acoustic emission (AE) is localized by triangulation. For continuous AE, e.g. from leakages, this method is not feasible. Therefore a new method for localization of continuous AE has been developed. It is based on a phase-controlled probe array which consists of many single sensor elements. The AE signals received by the different sensor elements are delayed according to their time-of-flight differences from the source to the single elements of the receiver array. By choosing special combinations of time differences between the array elements the directivity pattern of the sensitivity of the array can be changed, e.g. rotated in the plane of a large plate. Thus, the source direction can be determined by one array. Some preliminary experiments with an artificial noise source, positioned on a large steel plate, have been performed and have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. (orig.)

  17. Monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED source in layers hens during the second production cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Borille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLight is an important environmental factor for birds, allowing not only their vision, but also influencing their physiological responses, such as behavioral and reproductive activity. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the impact of different colors of monochromatic light (LED sources in laying hens production during the second laying cycle. The study was conducted in an experimental laying house during 70 days. A total of 300 laying hens Isa Brown® genetic strain, aged 95 weeks, in the second laying cycle were used in the study. The artificial light sources used were blue, yellow, green, red and white. The light regimen was continuous illumination of 17 h per day (12 h natural and 5 h artificial in a daily light regimen of 17L:5D (light: dark. The Latin Square design was adopted with five treatments (five colors divided into five periods, and five boxes, with six replicates of ten birds in each box. The production and egg quality were evaluated. The different colors of light source did not affect production parameters or egg quality (p > 0.05. The monochromatic light source may be considered as an alternative to artificial lighting in laying hens during the second production cycle.

  18. Physical Properties and Lung Deposition of Particles Emitted from Five Major Indoor Sources.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tuan, V.Vu.; Ondráček, Jakub; Ždímal, Vladimír; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Delgado-Saborit, J.M.; Harrison, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-14 ISSN 1873-9318 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 315760 - HEXACOMM Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : indoor sources * particle size * hygroscopic growth Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.184, year: 2016

  19. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality.

  20. Free and Open Source Chemistry Software in Research of Quantitative Structure-Toxicity Relationship of Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastija Vesna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are toxic chemicals aimed for the destroying pest on crops. Numerous data evidence about toxicity of pesticides on aquatic organisms. Since pesticides with similar properties tend to have similar biological activities, toxicity may be predicted from structure. Their structure feature and properties are encoded my means of molecular descriptors. Molecular descriptors can capture quite simple two-dimensional (2D chemical structures to highly complex three-dimensional (3D chemical structures. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR method uses linear regression analyses for correlation toxicity of chemical with their structural feature using molecular descriptors. Molecular descriptors were calculated using open source software PaDEL and in-house built PyMOL plugin (PyDescriptor. PyDescriptor is a new script implemented with the commonly used visualization software PyMOL for calculation of a large and diverse set of easily interpretable molecular descriptors encoding pharmacophoric patterns and atomic fragments. PyDescriptor has several advantages like free and open source, can work on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOS. QSTR method allows prediction of toxicity of pesticides without experimental assay. In the present work, QSTR analysis for toxicity of a dataset of mixtures of 5 classes of pesticides comprising has been performed.

  1. THE EXTENDED He IIλ4686-EMITTING REGION IN IZw 18 UNVEILED: CLUES FOR PECULIAR IONIZING SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Bayo, F. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Brinchmann, J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kunth, D.; Durret, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC, 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2015-03-10

    New integral field spectroscopy has been obtained for IZw 18, the nearby lowest-metallicity galaxy considered to be our best local analog of systems forming at high redshift (z). Here we report the spatially resolved spectral map of the nebular He ii λ4686 emission in IZw 18, from which we derived for the first time its total He ii-ionizing flux. Nebular He ii emission implies the existence of a hard radiation field. He ii-emitters are observed to be more frequent among high-z galaxies than for local objects. Therefore, investigating the He ii-ionizing source(s) in IZw 18 may reveal the ionization processes at high z. He ii emission in star-forming galaxies has been suggested to be mainly associated with Wolf–Rayet stars (WRs), but WRs cannot satisfactorily explain the He ii-ionization at all times, particularly at the lowest metallicities. Shocks from supernova remnants, or X-ray binaries, have been proposed as additional potential sources of He ii-ionizing photons. Our data indicate that conventional He ii-ionizing sources (WRs, shocks, X-ray binaries) are not sufficient to explain the observed nebular He iiλ4686 emission in IZw 18. We find that the He ii-ionizing radiation expected from models for either low-metallicity super-massive O stars or rotating metal-free stars could account for the He ii-ionization budget measured, while only the latter models could explain the highest values of He iiλ4686/Hβ observed. The presence of such peculiar stars in IZw 18 is suggestive and further investigation in this regard is needed. This letter highlights that some of the clues of the early universe can be found here in our cosmic backyard.

  2. Sensitivity of various thermoluminescent, radiophotoluminescent and photographic detectors to neutrons emitted by a 252Cf source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Frantisek; Medioni, Roger; Chapuis, A.; Portal, Guy.

    1975-07-01

    The specific sensitivity of various thermoluminescent, radiophotoluminescent and photographic detectors to the neutron spectrum of a 252 Cf source was measured and the effect of the size and composition of the containers in which they might be put was investigated. PB33 radiophotoluminescent glasses, radiothermoluminescent alumina and calcium sulfate were less sensitive to fission neutrons whereas photographic emulsions were more sensitive. The former should be used for γ detection in mixed fields of photons and fission neutrons [fr

  3. Volatile organic compounds released from Microcystis flos-aquae under nitrogen sources and their toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghuan; Yang, Lin; Yang, Wangting; Bai, Yan; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Jingxian; Zhou, Lv; Zuo, Zhaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication promotes massive growth of cyanobacteria and algal blooms, which can poison other algae and reduce biodiversity. To investigate the differences in multiple nitrogen (N) sources in eutrophicated water on the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from cyanobacteria, and their toxic effects on other algal growth, we analyzed VOCs emitted from Microcystis flos-aquae with different types and concentrations of nitrogen, and determined the effects under Normal-N and Non-N conditions on Chlorella vulgaris. M. flos-aquae released 27, 22, 20, 27, 19, 25 and 17 compounds, respectively, with NaNO 3 , NaNO 2 , NH 4 Cl, urea, Ser, Lys and Arg as the sole N source. With the reduction in N amount, the emission of VOCs was increased markedly, and the most VOCs were found under Non-N condition. C. vulgaris cell propagation, photosynthetic pigment and Fv/Fm declined significantly following exposure to M. flos-aquae VOCs under Non-N condition, but not under Normal-N condition. When C. vulgaris cells were treated with two terpenoids, eucalyptol and limonene, the inhibitory effects were enhanced with increasing concentrations. Therefore, multiple N sources in eutrophicated water induce different VOC emissions from cyanobacteria, and reduction in N can cause nutrient competition, which can result in emissions of more VOCs. Those VOCs released from M. flos-aquae cells under Non-N for nutrient competition can inhibit other algal growth. Among those VOCs, eucalyptol and limonene are the major toxic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Positron Source from Betatron X-rays Emitted in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.K.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O' Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-04-21

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), an ultra-short, 28.5 GeV electron beam field ionizes a neutral column of Lithium vapor. In the underdense regime, all plasma electrons are expelled creating an ion column. The beam electrons undergo multiple betatron oscillations leading to a large flux of broadband synchrotron radiation. With a plasma density of 3 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup -3}, the effective focusing gradient is near 9 MT/m with critical photon energies exceeding 50 MeV for on-axis radiation. A positron source is the initial application being explored for these X-rays, as photo-production of positrons eliminates many of the thermal stress and shock wave issues associated with traditional Bremsstrahlung sources. Photo-production of positrons has been well-studied; however, the brightness of plasma X-ray sources provides certain advantages. In this paper, we present results of the simulated radiation spectra for the E-167 experiments, and compute the expected positron yield.

  5. Boron-Containing Red Light-Emitting Phosphors And Light Sources Incorporating The Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-03-28

    A boron-containing phosphor comprises a material having a formula of AD1-xEuxB9O16, wherein A is an element selected from the group consisting of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, and combinations thereof; D is at least an element selected from the group consisting of rare-earth metals other than europium; and x is in the range from about 0.005 to about 0.5. The phosphor is used in a blend with other phosphors in a light source for generating visible light with a high color rendering index.

  6. Bright broadband coherent fiber sources emitting strongly blue-shifted resonant dispersive wave pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Haohua; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We predict and realize the targeted wavelength conversion from the 1550-nm band of a fs Er:fiber laser to an isolated band inside 370-850 nm, corresponding to a blue-shift of 700-1180 nm. The conversion utilizes resonant dispersive wave generation in widely available optical fibers with good...... efficiency (~7%). The converted band has a large pulse energy (~1 nJ), high spectral brightness (~1 mW/nm), and broad Gaussian-like spectrum compressible to clean transform-limited ~17 fs pulses. The corresponding coherent fiber sources open up portable applications of optical parametric oscillators and dual......-output synchronized ultrafast lasers....

  7. Transformation of toxic potential of Jatropha curcas (Ratanjyot into protein source: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Shukla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of animal largely depends on supplying of quality feed and proteinaceous supplement to the animals. Jatropha plant can grow in the barren lands, and are used as a source of biodiesel. Besides, the plant may act as a rich proteinaceous source. However, the antinutritional factors present in the seed and seed oil of the plant may hamper the availability and beneficial use of the plant. Curcin and phorbol esters are the major toxic compounds present in the plant; these toxic compounds cause to produce liver and kidney diseases. Detoxification of these toxic compounds by physical and chemical means converting to less toxic seed cake may serve the purpose of using this plant in future as a replacement of costly protein supplement for animals. Therefore, in modern world, it is recommended to utilize the protein source by neutralizing the antinutritional factors. This mini-review describes the updates on how J. curcas can be utilized as a supplementary source of protein for animals by decreasing its toxicity.

  8. CENTRAL WAVELENGTH ADJUSTMENT OF LIGHT EMITTING SOURCE IN INTERFEROMETRIC SENSORS BASED ON FIBER-OPTIC BRAGG GRATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Aleynik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the investigation of fiber-optic interferometric sensor based on the array of fiber Bragg gratings. Reflection spectra displacement mechanism of the fiber Bragg gratings under the external temperature effects and the static pressure is described. The experiment has shown that reflection spectra displacement of Bragg gratings reduces the visibility of the interference pattern. A method of center wavelength adjustment is proposed for the optical radiation source in accord ance with the current Bragg gratings reflection spectra based on the impulse relative modulation of control signal for the Peltier element controller. The semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser controlled by a pump driver is used as a light source. The method is implemented by the Peltier element controller regulating and stabilizing the light source temperature, and a programmable logic-integrated circuit monitoring the Peltier element controller. The experiment has proved that the proposed method rendered possible to regulate the light source temperature at a pitch of 0.05 K and adjust the optical radiation source center wavelength at a pitch of 0.05 nm. Experimental results have revealed that the central wavelength of the radiation adjustment at a pitch of 0.005 nm gives the possibility for the capacity of the array consisting of four opticalfiber sensors based on the fiber Bragg gratings. They are formed in one optical fiber under the Bragg grating temperature change from 0° C to 300° C and by the optical fiber mechanical stretching by the force up to 2 N.

  9. Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the urban environment: Occurrence, toxicity and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nitika; Ayoko, Godwin A; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a major class of toxic pollutants because of their carcinogenic and mutagenic characteristics. People living in urban areas are regularly exposed to PAHs because of abundance of their emission sources. Within this context, this study aimed to: (i) identify and quantify the levels of ambient PAHs in an urban environment; (ii) evaluate their toxicity; and (iii) identify their sources as well as the contribution of specific sources to measured concentrations. Sixteen PAHs were identified and quantified in air samples collected from Brisbane. Principal Component Analysis - Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA-APCS) was used in order to conduct source apportionment of the measured PAHs. Vehicular emissions, natural gas combustion, petrol emissions and evaporative/unburned fuel were the sources identified; contributing 56%, 21%, 15% and 8% of the total PAHs emissions, respectively, all of which need to be considered for any pollution control measures implemented in urban areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete β/γ -emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete Β- and γ-emitting (ΒγE) sources (e.g., ΒγE hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot ΒγE particles are 60 Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 μm and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 μCi) of radioactivity. For such ΒγE sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized Β irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete ΒγE sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to Β radiation from ΒγE sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects

  11. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  12. Atmospheric toxic metals emission inventory and spatial characteristics from anthropogenic sources of Guangdong province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, S.; Menghua, L.; Xiao, X.; Yuqi, W.; Zhuangmin, Z.; Zhijiong, H.; Cheng, L.; Guanglin, J.; Zibing, Y.; Junyu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric toxic metals (TMs) are part of particulate matters, and may create adverse effects on the environment and human health depending upon their bioavailability and toxicity. Localized emission inventory is fundamental for parsing of toxic metals to identify key sources in order to formulate efficient toxic metals control strategies. With the use of the latest municipal level environment statistical data, this study developed a bottom-up emission inventory of five toxic metals (Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr) from anthropogenic activities in Guangdong province for the year of 2014. Major atmospheric toxic metals sources including combustion sources (coal, oil, biomass, municipal solid waste) and industrial process sources (cement production, nonferrous metal smelting, iron and steel industry, battery and fluorescent lamp production) were investigated. Results showed that: (1) The total emissions of Hg, As, Pb, Cd, Cr in Guangdong province were 18.14, 32.59, 411.34, 13.13, 84.16 t, respectively. (2) Different pollutants have obvious characteristics of emission sources. For total Hg emission, 46% comes from combustion sources, of which 32% from coal combustion and 8% from MSW combustion. Other 54% comes from industrial processes, which dominated by the cement (19%), fluorescent lamp (18%) and battery production (13%). Of the total Hg emission, 69% is released as Hg0 , 29% as Hg2+ , and only 2% as Hgp due to strict particulate matters controls policies. For As emissions, coal combustion, nonferrous metal smelting and iron and steel industry contributed approximate 48%, 25% and 24%, respectively. Pb emissions primarily come from battery production (42%), iron and steel industry (21%) and on-road mobile gasoline combustion (17%). Cd and Cr emissions were dominated by nonferrous metal smelting (71%) and iron and steel industry (82%), respectively. (3) In term of the spatial distribution, emissions of atmospheric toxic metals are mainly concentrated in the central region of

  13. Chemical characterization and toxicity assessment of fine particulate matters emitted from the combustion of petrol and diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Fei; Lou, Wenhao; Li, Dan; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-12-15

    Fuel consumption is one of the major contributors to air pollution worldwide. Plenty of studies have demonstrated that the diesel and petrol exhaust fine particulate matters (FPMs) are associated with increases of various diseases. However, the influences of different fuel types and their chemical components on toxicity have been less investigated. In this study, four kinds of fuels that widely used in China were burned in a laboratory simulation, and the FPMs were collected and analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that black carbon was mainly soot with a dendritic morphology. For light diesel oil, marine heavy diesel oil, 93 octane petrol and 97 octane petrol diesel oil, the emission factors of FPMs were 3.05±0.29, 3.21±0.54, 2.36±0.33, and 2.28±0.25g/kg fuel, respectively. And the emission factors for the "16 US EPA" PAHs of FPM were 0.45±0.20, 0.80±0.22, 1.00±0.20, and 1.05±0.19mg/g FPMs, respectively. Fe is the most abundant metal in these FPMs, and the emission factors of FPMs were 2.58±1.70, 4.45±0.11, 8.18±0.58, and 9.24±0.17mg/g FPMs, respectively. We ranked the cytotoxicity of the FPMs emission from fuels combustion: marine heavy diesel oil>97 octane petrol>93 octane petrol>light diesel oil, and the genotoxicity of FPMs emission from fuels combustion: marine heavy diesel oil>light diesel oil>93 octane petrol>97 octane petrol. Significant correlations were found between PAH concentrations and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results demonstrated that fuels exhaust FPMs have strong association with ROS activity, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. These results indicated that fuels exhaust FPMs pose a potentially serious health, and emphasized the importance of assessing the health risks posed by the particulate pollutants in vehicle exhausts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Alex; Delistraty, Damon

    2010-01-01

    Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was

  15. The effect of toxic carbon source on the reaction of activated sludge in the batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Zhang, Siyu; Xu, Min; Song, Jiamei

    2018-03-01

    The toxic carbon source can cause higher residual effluent dissolved organic carbon than easily biodegraded carbon source in activated sludge process. In this study, an integrated activated sludge model is developed as the tool to understand the mechanism of toxic carbon source (phenol) on the reaction, regarding the carbon flows during the aeration period in the batch reactor. To estimate the toxic function of phenol, the microbial cells death rate (k death ) is introduced into the model. The integrated model was calibrated and validated by the experimental data and it was found the model simulations matched the all experimental measurements. In the steady state, the toxicity of phenol can result in higher microbial cells death rate (0.1637 h -1 vs 0.0028 h -1 ) and decay rate coefficient of biomass (0.0115 h -1 vs 0.0107 h -1 ) than acetate. In addition, the utilization-associated products (UAP) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formation coefficients of phenol are higher than that of acetate, indicating that more carbon flows into the extracellular components, such as soluble microbial products (SMP), when degrading toxic organics. In the non-steady state of feeding phenol, the yield coefficient for growth and maximum specific growth rate are very low in the first few days (1-10 d), while the decay rate coefficient of biomass and microbial cells death rate are relatively high. The model provides insights into the difference of the dynamic reaction with different carbon sources in the batch reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the urban environment: Occurrence, toxicity and source apportionment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Nitika; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a major class of toxic pollutants because of their carcinogenic and mutagenic characteristics. People living in urban areas are regularly exposed to PAHs because of abundance of their emission sources. Within this context, this study aimed to: (i) identify and quantify the levels of ambient PAHs in an urban environment; (ii) evaluate their toxicity; and (iii) identify their sources as well as the contribution of specific sources to measured concentrations. Sixteen PAHs were identified and quantified in air samples collected from Brisbane. Principal Component Analysis – Absolute Principal Component Scores (PCA-APCS) was used in order to conduct source apportionment of the measured PAHs. Vehicular emissions, natural gas combustion, petrol emissions and evaporative/unburned fuel were the sources identified; contributing 56%, 21%, 15% and 8% of the total PAHs emissions, respectively, all of which need to be considered for any pollution control measures implemented in urban areas. - Highlights: • PAHs represent a major group of outdoor air pollutants. • Concentration levels of PAHS in urban schools ranged from 1.2 to 38 ng/m"3. • PCA–APCS technique used to identify sources of PAHs and their contributions. • Vehicular emissions (56%) were found to be the prominent sources of PAHs.

  17. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Unspecified Toxic Chemicals - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intro to the unspecified toxic chemicals module, when to list toxic chemicals as a candidate cause, ways to measure toxic chemicals, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for toxic chemicals, toxic chemicals module references and literature reviews.

  18. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Unspecified Toxic Chemicals - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intro to the unspecified toxic chemicals module, when to list toxic chemicals as a candidate cause, ways to measure toxic chemicals, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for toxic chemicals, toxic chemicals module references and literature reviews.

  19. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: report of the AAPM and ESTRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K; Dewerd, Larry A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Meigooni, Ali S; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J; Sloboda, Ron S; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2012-05-01

    Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific (192)Ir, (137)Cs, and (60)Co source models. This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  20. EMISSIONS OF ORGANIC AIR TOXICS FROM OPEN ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed literature search was performed to collect and collate available data reporting emissions of toxic organic substances into the air from open burning sources. Availability of data varied according to the source and the class of air toxics of interest. Volatile organic compound (VOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) data were available for many of the sources. Data on semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) that are not PAHs were available for several sources. Carbonyl and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) data were available for only a few sources. There were several sources for which no emissions data were available at all. Several observations were made including: 1) Biomass open burning sources typically emitted less VOCs than open burning sources with anthropogenic fuels on a mass emitted per mass burned basis, particularly those where polymers were concerned; 2) Biomass open burning sources typically emitted less SVOCs and PAHs than anthropogenic sources on a mass emitted per mass burned basis. Burning pools of crude oil and diesel fuel produced significant amounts of PAHs relative to other types of open burning. PAH emissions were highest when combustion of polymers was taking place; and 3) Based on very limited data, biomass open burning sources typically produced higher levels of carbonyls than anthropogenic sources on a mass emitted per mass burned basis, probably due to oxygenated structures r

  1. Particulate matter emissions, and metals and toxic elements in airborne particulates emitted from biomass combustion: The importance of biomass type and combustion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosima, Angela T; Tsakanika, Lamprini-Areti V; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria Th

    2017-05-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of biomass combustion with respect to burning conditions and fuel types on particulate matter emissions (PM 10 ) and their metals as well as toxic elements content. For this purpose, different lab scale burning conditions were tested (20 and 13% O 2 in the exhaust gas which simulate an incomplete and complete combustion respectively). Furthermore, two pellet stoves (8.5 and 10 kW) and one open fireplace were also tested. In all cases, 8 fuel types of biomass produced in Greece were used. Average PM 10 emissions ranged at laboratory-scale combustions from about 65 to 170 mg/m 3 with flow oxygen at 13% in the exhaust gas and from 85 to 220 mg/m 3 at 20% O 2 . At pellet stoves the emissions were found lower (35 -85 mg/m 3 ) than the open fireplace (105-195 mg/m 3 ). The maximum permitted particle emission limit is 150 mg/m 3 . Metals on the PM 10 filters were determined by several spectrometric techniques after appropriate digestion or acid leaching of the filters, and the results obtained by these two methods were compared. The concentration of PM 10 as well as the total concentration of the metals on the filters after the digestion procedure appeared higher at laboratory-scale combustions with flow oxygen at 20% in the exhaust gas and even higher at fireplace in comparison to laboratory-scale combustions with 13% O 2 and pellet stoves. Modern combustion appliances and appropriate types of biomass emit lower PM 10 emissions and lower concentration of metals than the traditional devices where incomplete combustion conditions are observed. Finally, a comparison with other studies was conducted resulting in similar results.

  2. Concentrations, sources and human health risk of inhalation exposure to air toxics in Edmonton, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Md Aynul; Kindzierski, Warren B

    2017-04-01

    With concern about levels of air pollutants in recent years in the Capital Region of Alberta, an investigation of ambient concentrations, sources and potential human health risk of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) or air toxics was undertaken in the City of Edmonton over a 5-year period (2009-2013). Mean concentrations of individual HAPs in ambient air including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace metals ranged from 0.04 to 1.73 μg/m 3 , 0.01-0.54 ng/m 3 , and 0.05-3.58 ng/m 3 , respectively. Concentrations of benzene, naphthalene, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), arsenic, manganese and nickel were far below respective annual Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives. Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk of air toxics were also compared with risk levels recommended by regulatory agencies. Positive matrix factorization identified six air toxics sources with traffic as the dominant contributor to total HAPs (4.33 μg/m 3 , 42%), followed by background/secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (1.92 μg/m 3 , 25%), fossil fuel combustion (0.92 μg/m 3 , 11%). On high particulate air pollution event days, local traffic was identified as the major contributor to total HAPs compared to background/SOA and fossil fuel combustion. Carcinogenic risk values of traffic, background/SOA and metals industry emissions were above the USEPA acceptable level (1 × 10 -6 ), but below a tolerable risk (1 × 10 -4 ) and Alberta benchmark (1 × 10 -5 ). These findings offer useful preliminary information about current ambient air toxics levels, dominant sources and their potential risk to public health; and this information can support policy makers in the development of appropriate control strategies if required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bioaccessibility and Speciation of Potential Toxicants in Some Geogenic Sources of Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, S. A.; Wolf, R. E.; Plumlee, G.; Reynolds, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    The correlation of exposure to particulate matter (PM) and increased morbidity and mortality was established in the 1970's. Research focused on elucidating mechanisms of action (i.e. particle size, composition, and biodurability), has generally examined anthropogenic sources such as solid or liquid combustion byproducts of fossil fuels, byproducts from the smelting of metal ores, and commercial/industrial mineral dusts (asbestos, crystalline silica. metal dusts). While many studies exist on agricultural exposures to inorganic dust, far fewer have examined health issues related to particulate matter contributions from rural, non-agricultural dusts or other geogenic sources. Geogenic PM (produced by natural processes such as volcanic ash, volcanic fog (vog), dusts from dry lakes or glacial deposits, smoke and windborne ash from wildfires, and dusts containing various soil pathogens) and geoanthropogenic PM (produced from natural sources by processes that are modified or enhanced by human activities such as dusts from lakebeds dried by human removal of water, dusts produced from areas that have undergone desertification as a result of human practices etc.) are increasingly recognized as potential agents of toxicity and disease, via both environmental and occupational exposures. Surface sediment on some dry lake beds may contribute significant amounts of mineral dusts to the atmospheric load. For example, Owens Lake (a dry lake in southern California) has been a major source of PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 micrometers) dust in the United States. Dusts from dry and drying saline lakes may contain high concentrations of metals, such as arsenic, with known human health toxicity. Wildfires, consuming over nine million acres in 2007, also contribute significant amounts of particulate matter in addition to their other hazards. Designed to estimate the bioaccessibility of metals in soils, dusts and other environmental materials by measuring the reactivity of the

  4. Corrosion protection products as a source of bisphenol A and toxicity to the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Dietschweiler, Conrad; Werner, Inge; Burkhardt, Michael

    2017-10-15

    Steel components are typically treated with anti-corrosion coatings like epoxy or polyurethane resins to protect the integrity and functioning of steel. Such resins may contain substances, such as bisphenol A (BPA), that have caused concern in a human and environmental toxicological context. We investigated the release of toxicity from four anti-corrosion coatings used in hydraulic and civil engineering. Resins were applied onto glass plates and leachate samples produced by horizontally shaking the plates in water for 7 days. Two experiments were conducted, one with a 1 day and one with a 7 day curing period. Using a suite of bioassays, we tested samples for: agonistic and antagonistic effects on various mammalian nuclear receptors; inhibition of photosynthesis and growth in algae; inhibition of bacterial bioluminescence; and inhibition of water flea reproduction. Concentrations of BPA, bisphenol F and various BPA transformation products were determined by chemical analysis (LC-MS/MS). Bioassay results were evaluated using a scheme developed by DIBt (Centre of Competence for Construction, Berlin, Germany). Three products induced responses in one or more of the measured endpoints and toxicity profiles varied markedly in intensity across products. One product released high amounts of BPA which was associated with effects on nuclear receptor transactivation, requiring a more than 700-fold dilution for effect induction to fall below 20%. The same product was also the most toxic to water flea reproduction, requiring ca. 70-fold dilution for effects to fall below 20%. Another product was highly toxic in terms of bacterial bioluminescence, particularly after a shorter curing time, requiring a ca. 1'300-fold dilution for effects to fall below 20%. The third product required a 22-fold dilution for inhibition of water flea reproduction to drop below 20%. Results show that anti-corrosion coatings based on epoxy resins can be a source of toxicity to the aquatic environment

  5. Surma eye cosmetic in Afghanistan: a potential source of lead toxicity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, J R; Stoff, B K

    2018-02-01

    Surma is a traditional eye cosmetic used as an eyeliner for infants in Afghanistan, as well as in many other countries in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Surma has been reported to contain lead and to be a potential source of lead toxicity in children, which can lead to permanent damage to multiple organ systems. To our knowledge, assessment for lead in surma found in Afghanistan has not been performed. We determined the quantitative lead content of a convenience sample of 10 surma products acquired in Afghanistan. Analysis revealed that 70% of surma samples contained high levels of lead (range 35-83%). The remaining samples contained low levels of lead (range 0.04-0.17%). The majority of surma samples contained very high levels of lead, a troubling finding that could potentially correlate with lead toxicity in Afghan children. Making available lead-free surma alternatives and providing health education, for both healthcare professionals and the general population, in locations where surma use is prevalent and for those involved in care of refugees and immigrants from Afghanistan, may be strategies to prevent lead poisoning in children. What is Known: • Surma is a traditional cosmetic used as an eyeliner for infants in Afghanistan as well as in many countries in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. • Surma has been reported to contain lead and to be a source of lead toxicity in children. What is New: • Assessment for lead content in surma found in Afghanistan has not been performed. • In this convenience sample of 10 surma products acquired in Afghanistan, 70% contained very high levels of lead.

  6. Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: Analyzing Effect of Source Configurations on Dose Metrics Relevant to Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the use of partial breast irradiation (PBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer with low-risk factors has increased. The volume of the high-dose regions has been correlated with toxicity in interstitial treatment. Although no such associations have been made in applicator-based experience, new applicators are being developed that use complex noncentered source configurations. This work studied the effect of noncentered source placements on the volume of the high-dose regions around a spherical applicator. Methods and Materials: Many applicator configurations were numerically simulated for a range of inflation radii. For each configuration, a dose homogeneity index was used as a dose metric to measure the volume of the high-dose region. Results: All multisource configurations examined resulted in an increase of the high-dose region compared with a single-center source. The resulting decrease in the prescription dose homogeneity index was more pronounced for sources further from the center of the applicator, and the effect was reduced as the number of dwell locations was increased. Conclusion: The geometries of particular applicators were not considered to achieve a more general result. On the basis of the calculations of this work, it would appear that treatment using noncentered dwell locations will lead to an increase in the volume of the high-dose regions

  7. Source water assessment and nonpoint sources of acutely toxic contaminants: A review of research related to survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark J.; Montemagno, Carlo D.; Jenkins, Michael B.

    1998-12-01

    Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (PL-930123) in 1996 required that public water supply managers identify potential sources of contamination within contributing areas. Nonpoint sources of acutely toxic microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium parvum, challenge current approaches to source identification and management as a first step toward developing management plans for public water supply protection. Little may be known about survival and transport in the field environment, prescribed practices may not be designed to manage such substances, and infective stages may be present in vast numbers and may resist water treatment and disinfection processes. This review summarizes research related to survival and transport of C. parvum oocysts, as an example of an acutely toxic contaminant with nonpoint sources in animal agriculture. It discusses ∥1) significance of infected domesticated animals as potential sources of C. parvum, (2) laboratory and field studies of survival and transport, and (3) approaches to source control in the context of public health protection.

  8. Atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities: Levels, emission sources and toxicity equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Eckhardt, Sabine; Li, Jun; Breivik, Knut; Lam, Paul K.S.; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Jones, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric concentration of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured on diurnal basis by active air sampling during Dec 2006 to Feb 2007 in seven major cities from the northern (New Delhi and Agra), eastern (Kolkata), western (Mumbai and Goa) and southern (Chennai and Bangalore) parts of India. Average concentration of Σ 25 PCBs in the Indian atmosphere was 4460 (±2200) pg/m −3 with a dominance of congeners with 4–7 chlorine atoms. Model results (HYSPLIT, FLEXPART) indicate that the source areas are likely confined to local or regional proximity. Results from the FLEXPART model show that existing emission inventories cannot explain the high concentrations observed for PCB-28. Electronic waste, ship breaking activities and dumped solid waste are attributed as the possible sources of PCBs in India. Σ 25 PCB concentrations for each city showed significant linear correlation with Toxicity equivalence (TEQ) and Neurotoxic equivalence (NEQ) values. Highlights: •Unlike decreasing trend of PCBs in United States and European countries, high levels of PCBs remain in the Indian atmosphere. •Existing emission inventories cannot explain the high PCB concentrations in Indian atmosphere. •Electronic waste recycling, ship dismantling and open burning of municipal solid waste are implicated as potential sources. -- Measurement of atmospheric Polychlorinated biphenyls in seven major Indian cities

  9. In 0.35Ga 0.65P light-emitting diodes grown by gas-source MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselink, W. Ted; Zachau, Martin

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes the growth and optical characteristics of In yGa 1- yP with 0.3Raman spectra of these undoped films and observe strong excitonic luminescence over the entire composition range investigated. The band gap derived from the luminescence excitation spectra corresponds to that of a fully relaxed InGaP film with no residual strain, which is confirmed by the Raman measurements. Light-emitting diodes with peak (300 K) emission centered at less than 590 nm have been fabricated from p-i-n junctions in In 0.35Ga 0.65P. This alloy is close to that with the largest direct band gap in the In yGa 1- y P system and has lattice mismatch from the GaAs substrate of 1%.

  10. An Experimental Comparison of Two Different Technetium Source Activities Which Can Imitate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Case of Thyroid Toxic Nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftari, Ramë; Fejza, Ferki; Bicaj, Xhavit; Nura, Adem; Topciu, Valdete; Bajrami, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In cases of thyroid toxic autonomous nodule, anterior projection of Tc-99m pertechnetate image shows a hot nodule that occupies most, or the entire thyroid lobe with near-total or total suppression of the contra lateral lobe. In this case is very difficult to distinguish toxic nodule from lobe agenesis. Our interest was to estimate and determinate the rate of radioactivity when the source with high activity can make total suppression of the second source with low activity in same conditions with thyroid scintigraphy procedures. Material and methodology: Thyroid scintigraphy was performed with Technetium 99 meta stable pertechnetate. A parallel high resolution low energy collimator was used as an energy setting of 140 KeV photo peak for T-99m. Images are acquired at 200 Kilo Counts in the anterior projection with the collimator positioned as close as the patient’s extended neck (approximately in distance of 18 cm). The scintigraphy of thyroid gland was performed 15 minutes after intravenous administration of 1.5 mCi Tc-99m pertechnetate. Technetium 99 meta stable radioactive sources with different activity were used for two scintigraphies studies, performed in same thyroid scintigraphy acquisition procedures. In the first study, were compared the standard source with high activity A=11.2 mCi with sources with variable activities B=1.33 mCi; 1.03 mCi; 0.7 mCi; 0.36 mCi; and 0.16mCi) in distance of 1.5cm from each other sources, which is approximately same with distance between two thyroid lobes. In the second study were compared the sources with low activity in proportion 70:1(source A = 1.5 mCi and source B=0.021mCi). As clinical studies we preferred two different patents with different thyroid disorders. There were one patient with thyroid toxic nodule in the right lobe, therefore the second patient was with left thyroid nodule agenesis. Results: During our examination, we accurately determined that two radioactive sources in proportion 70:1 will be

  11. Cobalt toxicity in humans-A review of the potential sources and systemic health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyssens, Laura; Vinck, Bart; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Wuyts, Floris; Maes, Leen

    2017-07-15

    Cobalt (Co) and its compounds are widely distributed in nature and are part of numerous anthropogenic activities. Although cobalt has a biologically necessary role as metal constituent of vitamin B 12 , excessive exposure has been shown to induce various adverse health effects. This review provides an extended overview of the possible Co sources and related intake routes, the detection and quantification methods for Co intake and the interpretation thereof, and the reported health effects. The Co sources were allocated to four exposure settings: occupational, environmental, dietary and medical exposure. Oral intake of Co supplements and internal exposure through metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants deliver the highest systemic Co concentrations. The systemic health effects are characterized by a complex clinical syndrome, mainly including neurological (e.g. hearing and visual impairment), cardiovascular and endocrine deficits. Recently, a biokinetic model has been proposed to characterize the dose-response relationship and effects of chronic exposure. According to the model, health effects are unlikely to occur at blood Co concentrations under 300μg/l (100μg/l respecting a safety factor of 3) in healthy individuals, hematological and endocrine dysfunctions are the primary health endpoints, and chronic exposure to acceptable doses is not expected to pose considerable health hazards. However, toxic reactions at lower doses have been described in several cases of malfunctioning MoM hip implants, which may be explained by certain underlying pathologies that increase the individual susceptibility for Co-induced systemic toxicity. This may be associated with a decrease in Co bound to serum proteins and an increase in free ionic Co 2+ . As the latter is believed to be the primary toxic form, monitoring of the free fraction of Co 2+ might be advisable for future risk assessment. Furthermore, future research should focus on longitudinal studies in the clinical setting of Mo

  12. A systematic evaluation of the dose-rate constant determined by photon spectrometry for 21 different models of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-10-21

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic comparison of the dose-rate constant (Λ) determined by the photon spectrometry technique (PST) with the consensus value ((CON)Λ) recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for 21 low-energy photon-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. A total of 63 interstitial brachytherapy sources (21 different models with 3 sources per model) containing either (125)I (14 models), (103)Pd (6 models) or (131)Cs (1 model) were included in this study. A PST described by Chen and Nath (2007 Med. Phys. 34 1412-30) was used to determine the dose-rate constant ((PST)Λ) for each source model. Source-dependent variations in (PST)Λ were analyzed systematically against the spectral characteristics of the emitted photons and the consensus values recommended by the AAPM brachytherapy subcommittee. The values of (PST)Λ for the encapsulated sources of (103)Pd, (125)I and (131)Cs varied from 0.661 to 0.678 cGyh(-1) U(-1), 0.959 to 1.024 cGyh(-1)U(-1) and 1.066 to 1.073 cGyh(-1)U(-1), respectively. The relative variation in (PST)Λ among the six (103)Pd source models, caused by variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distributions of radioactivity among the source models, was less than 3%. Greater variations in (PST)Λ were observed among the 14 (125)I source models; the maximum relative difference was over 6%. These variations were caused primarily by the presence of silver in some (125)I source models and, to a lesser degree, by the variations in photon attenuation and in spatial distribution of radioactivity among the source models. The presence of silver generates additional fluorescent x-rays with lower photon energies which caused the (PST)Λ value to vary from 0.959 to 1.019 cGyh(-1)U(-1) depending on the amount of silver used by a given source model. For those (125)I sources that contain no silver, their (PST)Λ was less variable and had values within 1% of 1.024 cGyh(-1)U(-1). For the 16

  13. An Experimental Comparison of Two Different Technetium Source Activities Which Can Imitate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Case of Thyroid Toxic Nodule

    OpenAIRE

    Miftari, Ramë; Fejza, Ferki; Bicaj, Xhavit; Nura, Adem; Topciu, Valdete; Bajrami, Ismet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In cases of thyroid toxic autonomous nodule, anterior projection of Tc-99m pertechnetate image shows a hot nodule that occupies most, or the entire thyroid lobe with near-total or total suppression of the contra lateral lobe. In this case is very difficult to distinguish toxic nodule from lobe agenesis. Our interest was to estimate and determinate the rate of radioactivity when the source with high activity can make total suppression of the second source with low activity in same con...

  14. Field Measurements of Trace Gases and Aerosols Emitted by Undersampled Combustion Sources Including Wood and Dung Cooking Fires, Garbage and Crop Residue Burning, and Indonesian Peat Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C.; Jayarathne, T. S.; Goetz, D.; Simpson, I. J.; Selimovic, V.; Bhave, P.; Blake, D. R.; Cochrane, M. A.; Ryan, K. C.; Putra, E. I.; Saharjo, B.; Stone, E. A.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Field measurements were conducted in Nepal and in the Indonesian province of Central Kalimantan to improve characterization of trace gases and aerosols emitted by undersampled combustion sources. The sources targeted included cooking with a variety of stoves, garbage burning, crop residue burning, and authentic peat fires. Trace gas and aerosol emissions were studied using a land-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, whole air sampling, photoacoustic extinctiometers (405 and 870nm), and filter samples that were analyzed off-line. These measurements were used to calculate fuel-based emission factors (EFs) for up to 90 gases, PM2.5, and PM2.5 constituents. The aerosol optical data measured included EFs for the scattering and absorption coefficients, the single scattering albedo (at 870 and 405 nm), as well as the absorption Ångström exponent. The emissions varied significantly by source, although light absorption by both brown and black carbon (BrC and BC, respectively) was important for all non-peat sources. For authentic peat combustion, the emissions of BC were negligible and absorption was dominated by organic aerosol. The field results from peat burning were in reasonable agreement with recent lab measurements of smoldering Kalimantan peat and compare well to the limited data available from other field studies. The EFs can be used with estimates of fuel consumption to improve regional emissions inventories and assessments of the climate and health impacts of these undersampled sources.

  15. Theoretical response of a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector to alpha-emitting sources and suggested applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrable, K.W.; Phoenix, K.A.; Chabot, G.E.; French, C.S.; Jo, M.; Falo, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The classic problem of alpha absorption is discussed in terms of the quantitative determination of the activity of weightless alpha sources and the specific alpha activity of extended sources accounting for absorption in the source medium and the window of a large area ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector. The relationship for the expected counting rate gamma of a monoenergetic source of active area A, specific alpha activity C, and thickness H that exceeds the effective mass density range Rs of the alpha particle in the source medium can be expressed by a quadratic equation in the window thickness x when this source is placed in direct contact with the window of the ZnS(Ag) detector. This expression also gives the expected counting rate of a finite detector of sensitive area A exposed to an infinite homogeneous source medium. Counting rates y obtained for a source separated from a ZnS(Ag) detector by different thicknesses x of window material can be used to estimate parameter values in the quadratic equation, y = a + bx + cx2. The experimental value determined for the coefficient b provides a direct estimation of the specific activity C. This coefficient, which depends on the ratio of the ranges in the source medium and detector window and not the ranges themselves, is essentially independent of the energy of the alpha particle. Although certain experimental precautions must be taken, this method for estimating the specific activity C is essentially an absolute method that does not require the use of standards, special calibrations, or complicated radiochemical procedures. Applications include the quantitative determination of Rn and progeny in air, water, and charcoal, and the measurement of the alpha activity in soil and on air filter samples

  16. Different sources of reduced carbon contribute to form three classes of terpenoid emitted by Quercus ilex L. leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Cecinato, A.; Frattoni, M.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Quercus ilex L. leaves emit terpenes but do not have specialized structures for terpene storage. We exploited this unique feature to investigate terpene biosynthesis in intact leaves of Q. ilex. Light induction allowed us to distinguish three classes of terpenes: (i) a rapidly induced class including alpha-pinene; (ii) a more slowly induced class, including cis-beta-ocimene; and (iii) the most slowly induced class, including 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol. Using 13C, we found that alpha-pinene and cis-beta-ocimene were labeled quickly and almost completely while there was a delay before label appeared in linalool and 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol. The acetyl group of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-yl acetate was labeled quickly but label was limited to 20% of the moiety. It is suggested that the ocimene class of monoterpenes is made from one or more terpenes of the alpha-pinene class and that both classes are made entirely from reduced carbon pools inside the chloroplasts. Linalool and 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol are made from a different pool of reduced carbon, possibly in nonphotosynthetic plastids. The acetyl group of the 3-methyl-3-buten-1-yl acetate is derived mostly from carbon that does not participate in photosynthetic reactions. Low humidity and prolonged exposure to light favored ocimenes emission and induced linalool emission. This may indicate conversion between terpene classes

  17. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescence-Based Lactate Sensor Using Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs) as the Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chengliang Qian

    2006-01-01

    Multianalyte bio(chemical) sensors are extensively researched for monitoring analytes in complex systems, such as blood serum. As a step towards developing such multianalyte sensors, we studied a novel, structurally integrated, organic light emitting device (OLED)-based sensing platform for detection of lactate. Lactate biosensors have attracted numerous research efforts, due to their wide applications in clinical diagnosis, athletic training and food industry. The OLED-based sensor is based on monitoring the oxidation reaction of lactate, which is catalyzed by the lactate oxidase (LOX) enzyme. The sensing component is based on an oxygen-sensitive dye, Platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), whose photoluminescence (PL) lifetime τ decreases as the oxygen level increases. The PtOEP dye was embedded in a thin film polystyrene (PS) matrix; the LOX was dissolved in solution or immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. τ was measured as a function of the lactate concentration; as the lactate concentration increases, τ increases due to increased oxygen consumption. The sensors performance is discussed in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, and response time. A response time of ∼32 sec was achieved when the LOX was dissolved in solution and kept in a closed cell. Steps towards development of a multianalyte sensor array using an array of individually addressable OLED pixels were also presented

  18. Structurally Integrated Photoluminescence-Based Lactate Sensor Using Organic Light Emitting Devices (OLEDs) as the Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Chengliang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Multianalyte bio(chemical) sensors are extensively researched for monitoring analytes in complex systems, such as blood serum. As a step towards developing such multianalyte sensors, we studied a novel, structurally integrated, organic light emitting device (OLED)-based sensing platform for detection of lactate. Lactate biosensors have attracted numerous research efforts, due to their wide applications in clinical diagnosis, athletic training and food industry. The OLED-based sensor is based on monitoring the oxidation reaction of lactate, which is catalyzed by the lactate oxidase (LOX) enzyme. The sensing component is based on an oxygen-sensitive dye, Platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP), whose photoluminescence (PL) lifetime τ decreases as the oxygen level increases. The PtOEP dye was embedded in a thin film polystyrene (PS) matrix; the LOX was dissolved in solution or immobilized in a sol-gel matrix. τ was measured as a function of the lactate concentration; as the lactate concentration increases, τ increases due to increased oxygen consumption. The sensors performance is discussed in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, and response time. A response time of ~32 sec was achieved when the LOX was dissolved in solution and kept in a closed cell. Steps towards development of a multianalyte sensor array using an array of individually addressable OLED pixels were also presented.

  19. Clinical application of photodynamic medicine technology using light-emitting fluorescence imaging based on a specialized luminous source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Fujisawa, Kazune; Munekage, Eri; Iwabu, Jun; Uemura, Sunao; Tsujii, Shigehiro; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Sato, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2018-04-04

    The natural amino acid 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) precursor and a new-generation photosensitive substance that accumulates specifically in cancer cells. When indocyanine green (ICG) is irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, it shifts to a higher energy state and emits infrared light with a longer wavelength than the irradiated NIR light. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) using ALA and ICG-based NIR fluorescence imaging has emerged as a new diagnostic technique. Specifically, in laparoscopic examinations for serosa-invading advanced gastric cancer, peritoneal metastases could be detected by ALA-PDD, but not by conventional visible-light imaging. The HyperEye Medical System (HEMS) can visualize ICG fluorescence as color images simultaneously projected with visible light in real time. This ICG fluorescence method is widely applicable, including for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes, visualization of blood vessels in organ resection, and blood flow evaluation during surgery. Fluorescence navigation by ALA-PDD and NIR using ICG imaging provides good visualization and detection of the target lesions that is not possible with the naked eye. We propose that this technique should be used in fundamental research on the relationship among cellular dynamics, metabolic enzymes, and tumor tissues, and to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety in multicenter cooperative clinical trials.

  20. Determination of Pesticides by Gas Chromatography Combined with Mass Spectrometry Using Femtosecond Lasers Emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the Ionization Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xixiang; Imasaka, Tomoko; Imasaka, Totaro

    2018-04-03

    A standard sample mixture containing 51 pesticides was separated by gas chromatography (GC), and the constituents were identified by mass spectrometry (MS) using femtosecond lasers emitting at 267, 400, and 800 nm as the ionization source. A two-dimensional display of the GC/MS was successfully used for the determination of these compounds. A molecular ion was observed for 38 of the compounds at 267 nm and for 30 of the compounds at 800 nm, in contrast to 27 among 50 compounds when electron ionization was used. These results suggest that the ultraviolet laser is superior to the near-infrared laser for molecular weight determinations and for a more reliable analysis of these compounds. In order to study the conditions for optimal ionization, the experimental data were examined using the spectral properties (i.e., the excitation and ionization energies and absorption spectra for the neutral and ionized species) obtained by quantum chemical calculations. A few molecules remained unexplained by the currently reported rules, requiring additional rules for developing a full understanding of the femtosecond ionization process. The pesticides in the homogenized matrix obtained from kabosu ( citrus sphaerocarpa) were measured using lasers emitting at 267 and 800 nm. The pesticides were clearly separated and measured on the two-dimensional display, especially for the data measured at 267 nm, suggesting that this technique would have potential for use in the practical trace analysis of the pesticides in the environment.

  1. WE-A-17A-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Development of a Calorimeter for the Measurement of the Power Emitted From LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L [University of WI-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Model-based dose calculation algorithms for brachytherapy sources are designed to compute dose per particle or dose per unit energy leaving the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. As such, the power leaving the encapsulation of a source, called emitted power (EP), would be a natural source strength metric for these new algorithms. However, no instrument is currently capable of an absolute measurement of EP. A calorimeter operating with a liquid helium thermal sink was designed and constructed to measure the EP of low-dose rate (LDR) I-125 and Pd-103 brachytherapy sources. Methods: Calorimeter design was optimized through thermal and Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Thermal modeling showed that specific thermal conditions would be necessary for accurate calorimeter measurements. These conditions were experimentally verified. The EP of two LDR I-125 source models was measured. An air-kermastrength (AKS)-to-EP conversion coefficient was determined through MC simulations and applied to well-type ionization chamber measurements of AKS to enable comparison with EP measurements. Results: MCdetermined EP per unit AKS conversion coefficients were source model dependent and are on the order of 0.1 μW/U. The signal-to-noise ratio was a function of source strength, and was 294 for a 0.5 μW source. Measurements were repeatable to within 3.6% for a 0.5 μW source. Initial EP measurements were made with two I-125 source models, a 5.7 U Oncura 6711 and a 2.9 U Best Medical 2301. Model 2301 results agreed with the MC-converted AKS value to within the measurement uncertainty of 4.3% at k=1. The Model 6711 results were systematically high and are under investigation. Conclusion: A calorimeter was designed to provide an absolute measurement of the EP for LDR brachytherapy sources and preliminary EP measurements have been made. This new calorimeter design shows promise of providing a more fundamentally useful source strength standard.

  2. Elaboration of supports for beta emitting sources (with vyns); Elaboracion de soportes para fuentes emisoras beta (con vyns)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes P, A.; Torre O, J. De la; Tejera R, A.; Becerril V, A.; Bribiesca S, L

    1990-04-15

    The Laboratory of Radioactive patterns account with a 4 {pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence system of recent acquisition with which absolute measures of radioactive activity with uncertainties of the order of 0.1% can be made. Since the coincidence method for the activity measure consists on detecting to the particle and the photon corresponding to oneself nuclear disintegration, it is necessary to elaborate special radioactive sources on thin supports, in order to allowing the maximum possible fluence of {beta} particles ({approx} 100%). This work a technique for the elaboration of these sources and for the measure of the thickness of the walls of the support is presented. (Author)

  3. Dispersion of traffic exhausts emitted from a stationary line source versus individual moving cars – a numerical comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Gross

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional microscale model was used to study the effects of moving vehicles on air pollution in the close vicinity of a road. The numerical results are compared to general findings from wind tunnel experiments and field observations. It was found that the model is suitable to capture the main flow characteristics within an urban street canyon, in particular the modifications relating to running traffic. A comparison of the results for a stationary line source approach and for multiple single moving sources demonstrates significant differences. For a street in a flat terrain, the near-road concentrations are underestimated by up to a factor of two if the emissions are approximated by a stationary line source. This underestimation decreases with increasing distance, and becomes negligible 30–50 m away from the road. For an urban canyon situation, the line source assumption is a conservative approximation for the concentrations at the leeside of the street, while on the opposite pavement and wall, a systematic underestimation was found. Also, the effects of different traffic situations have been studied and discussed.

  4. Inhibitory and Toxic Effects of Volatiles Emitted by Strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on Growth and Survival of Selected Microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans. VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds—ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone and dimethyl disulfide—were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  5. Mercury from combustion sources: a review of the chemical species emitted and their transport in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Different species of mercury have different physical/chemical properties and thus behave quite differentially in air pollution control equipment and in the atmosphere. In general, emission of mercury from coal combustion sources are approximately 20-50% elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) and 50-80% divalent mercury (Hg(II)), which may be predominantly HgCl 2 . Emissions of mercury from waste incinerators are approximately 10-20% Hg 0 and 75-85% Hg(II). The partitioning of mercury in flue gas between the elemental and divalent forms may be dependent on the concentration of particulate carbon, HCl and other pollutants in the stack emissions. The emission of mercury from combustion facilities depends on the species in the exhaust stream and the type of air pollution control equipment used at the source. Air pollution control equipment for mercury removal at combustion facilities includes activated carbon injection, sodium sulfide injection and wet lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization. White Hg(II) is water-soluble and may be removed form the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition close to the combustion sources, the combination of a high vapor pressure and low water-solubility facilitate the long-range transport of Hg 0 in the atmosphere. Background mercury in the atmosphere is predominantly Hg 0 . Elemental mercury is eventually removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition onto surfaces and by wet deposition after oxidation to water-soluble, divalent mercury. 62 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted from highly ionized atoms in the vacuum spark and laser-produced high power plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelbaum, P.

    1987-05-01

    The interest in atomic spectroscopy has greatly been reinforced in the last ten years. This gain of interest is directly related to the developments in different fields of research where hot plasmas are created. These fields include in particular controlled thermonuclear fusion research by means of inertial or magnetic confinement approaches and also the most recent efforts to achieve lasers in the XUV region. The present work is based on the specific contribution of the atomic spectroscopy group at the Hebrew University. The recent development of both theoretical and experimental tools allowed us to progress in the understanding of the highly ionized states of heavy elements. In this work the low-inductance vacuum-spark developed at the Hebrew University was used as the hot plasma source. The spectra were recorded in the 7-300 A range by means of a high-resolution extreme-grazing-incidence spectrometer developed at the Racah Institute by Profs. J.L. Schwob and B.S. Fraenkel. To the extend the spectroscopic studies to higher-Z atoms, the laser-produced plasma facility at Soreq Nuclear Center was used. In this work the spectra of the sixth row elements were recorded in the x-rays by means of a crystal spectrometer. All these experimental systems are briefly described in chapter one. Chapter two deals with the theoretical methods used in the present work for the atomic calculations. Chapter three deals with the spectra of elements of the fifth row emitted from the vacuum-spark in the 30-150 A range. These spectra as experimental data were used in order to test ab-initio computations along the NiI sequence 3d-nl transitions. The results of this work are presented in chapter four. Chapter five is devoted to the measurement and analysis of spectra emitted from the vacuum-spark by rare-earth elements. (author)

  7. A Planar, Chip-Based, Dual-Beam Refractometer Using an Integrated Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) Light Source and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Erin L.; Veneman, P. Alex; Simmonds, Adam; Zacher, Brian; Huebner, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple chip-based refractometer with a central organic light emitting diode (OLED) light source and two opposed organic photovoltaic (OPV) detectors on an internal reflection element (IRE) substrate, creating a true dual-beam sensor platform. For first-generation platforms, we demonstrate the use of a single heterojunction OLED based on electroluminescence emission from an Alq3/TPD heterojunction (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum/N,N′-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine) and light detection with planar heterojunction pentacene/C60 OPVs. The sensor utilizes the considerable fraction of emitted light from conventional thin film OLEDs that is coupled into guided modes in the IRE instead of into the forward (display) direction. A ray-optics description is used to describe light throughput and efficiency-limiting factors for light coupling from the OLED into the substrate modes, light traversing through the IRE substrate, and light coupling into the OPV detectors. The arrangement of the OLED at the center of the chip provides for two sensing regions, a “sample” and “reference” channel, with detection of light by independent OPV detectors. This configuration allows for normalization of the sensor response against fluctuations in OLED light output, stability, and local fluctuations (temperature) which might influence sensor response. The dual beam configuration permits significantly enhanced sensitivity to refractive index changes relative to single-beam protocols, and is easily integrated into a field-portable instrumentation package. Changes in refractive index (ΔR.I.) between 10−2 and 10−3 R.I. units could be detected for single channel operation, with sensitivity increased to ΔR.I. ≈ 10−4 units when the dual beam configuration is employed. PMID:20218580

  8. Toxic emissions from mobile sources: a total fuel-cycle analysis for conventional and alternative fuel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebrake, J J; Wang, M Q; He, D

    2001-07-01

    Mobile sources are among the largest contributors of four hazardous air pollutants--benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde--in urban areas. At the same time, federal and state governments are promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles as a means to curb local air pollution. As yet, the impact of this movement toward alternative fuels with respect to toxic emissions has not been well studied. The purpose of this paper is to compare toxic emissions from vehicles operating on a variety of fuels, including reformulated gasoline (RFG), natural gas, ethanol, methanol, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and electricity. This study uses a version of Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model, appropriately modified to estimate toxic emissions. The GREET model conducts a total fuel-cycle analysis that calculates emissions from both downstream (e.g., operation of the vehicle) and upstream (e.g., fuel production and distribution) stages of the fuel cycle. We find that almost all of the fuels studied reduce 1,3-butadiene emissions compared with conventional gasoline (CG). However, the use of ethanol in E85 (fuel made with 85% ethanol) or RFG leads to increased acetaldehyde emissions, and the use of methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas (CNG) may result in increased formaldehyde emissions. When the modeling results for the four air toxics are considered together with their cancer risk factors, all the fuels and vehicle technologies show air toxic emission reduction benefits.

  9. Solid-state, ambient-operation thermally activated delayed fluorescence from flexible, non-toxic gold-nanocluster thin films: towards the development of biocompatible light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talite, M. J. A.; Lin, H. T.; Jiang, Z. C.; Lin, T. N.; Huang, H. Y.; Heredia, E.; Flores, A.; Chao, Y. C.; Shen, J. L.; Lin, C. A. J.; Yuan, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    Luminescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with good biocompatibility have gained much attention in bio-photonics. In addition, they also exhibit a unique photo-physical property, namely thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF), by which both singlet and triplet excitons can be harvested. The combination of their non-toxic material property and unique TADF behavior makes AuNCs biocompatible nano-emitters for bio-related light-emitting devices. Unfortunately, the TADF emission is quenched when colloidal AuNCs are transferred to solid states under ambient environment. Here, a facile, low-cost and effective method was used to generate efficient and stable TADF emissions from solid AuNCs under ambient environment using polyvinyl alcohol as a solid matrix. To unravel the underlying mechanism, temperature-dependent static and transient photoluminescence measurements were performed and we found that two factors are crucial for solid TADF emission: small energy splitting between singlet and triplet states and the stabilization of the triplet states. Solid TADF films were also deposited on the flexible plastic substrate with patterned structures, thus mitigating the waveguide-mode losses. In addition, we also demonstrated that warm white light can be generated based on a co-doped single emissive layer, consisting of non-toxic, solution-processed TADF AuNCs and fluorescent carbon dots under UV excitation.

  10. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Ariel; Tessler, Nir; Einziger, Pinchas D.; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  11. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Ariel, E-mail: ariel.epstein@utoronto.ca; Tessler, Nir, E-mail: nir@ee.technion.ac.il; Einziger, Pinchas D. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Roberts, Matthew, E-mail: mroberts@cdtltd.co.uk [Cambridge Display Technology Ltd, Building 2020, Cambourne Business Park, Cambourne, Cambridgeshire CB23 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-14

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  12. Evaluation of e-liquid toxicity using an open-source high-throughput screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, James E.; Zorn, Bryan T.; Kochar, Tavleen K.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Glish, Gary L.; Tarran, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The e-liquids used in electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) consist of propylene glycol (PG), vegetable glycerin (VG), nicotine, and chemical additives for flavoring. There are currently over 7,700 e-liquid flavors available, and while some have been tested for toxicity in the laboratory, most have not. Here, we developed a 3-phase, 384-well, plate-based, high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to rapidly triage and validate the toxicity of multiple e-liquids. Our data demonstrated that the PG/VG vehicle adversely affected cell viability and that a large number of e-liquids were more toxic than PG/VG. We also performed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis on all tested e-liquids. Subsequent nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis revealed that e-liquids are an extremely heterogeneous group. Furthermore, these data indicated that (i) the more chemicals contained in an e-liquid, the more toxic it was likely to be and (ii) the presence of vanillin was associated with higher toxicity values. Further analysis of common constituents by electron ionization revealed that the concentration of cinnamaldehyde and vanillin, but not triacetin, correlated with toxicity. We have also developed a publicly available searchable website (www.eliquidinfo.org). Given the large numbers of available e-liquids, this website will serve as a resource to facilitate dissemination of this information. Our data suggest that an HTS approach to evaluate the toxicity of multiple e-liquids is feasible. Such an approach may serve as a roadmap to enable bodies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to better regulate e-liquid composition. PMID:29584716

  13. Enhanced Light Output of Dipole Source in GaN-Based Nanorod Light-Emitting Diodes by Silver Localized Surface Plasmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamao Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The light output of dipole source in three types of light-emitting diodes (LEDs, including the conventional planar LED, the nanorod LED, and the localized surface plasmon (LSP assisted LED by inserting silver nanoparticles in the gaps between nanorods, was studied by use of two-dimensional finite difference time domain method. The height of nanorod and the size of silver nanoparticles were variables for discussion. Simulation results show that a large height of nanorod induces strong wavelength selectivity, which can be significantly enhanced by LSP. On condition that the height of nanorod is 400 nm, the diameter of silver nanoparticle is 100 nm, and the wavelength is 402.7 nm, the light-output efficiency for LSP assisted LED is enhanced by 190% or 541% as compared to the nanorod counterpart or the planar counterpart, respectively. The space distribution of Poynting vector was present to demonstrate the significant enhancement of light output at the resonant wavelength of LSP.

  14. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors to h...

  15. Protection against salt toxicity in Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae symbiotic association by using combined-N sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A K; Singh, Satya S

    2006-09-01

    Protection from salt stress was observed in the terms of yield (fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein) and nitrogenase activity. Azollapinnata appeared highly sensitive to 40 mM external NaCl stress. Fronds of Azolla unable to grow beyond a concentration of 30 mM NaCl and accordingly death was recorded at 40 mM NaCl on the 6th day of incubation. Yield was inhibited by various levels of NaCl (0, 10, 20 and 30 mM). Addition of combined-N to the growth medium protected the association partially from salt toxicity. Among the N-sources (NO3-, NH4+ and urea) tried, urea mitigated the salt-induced toxicity most efficiently. Reduction in nitrogenase activity was observed when intact Azolla was grown in nutrient medium either supplemented with different levels of NaCl or combined nitrogen. Only NO3- (5 mM) protected the enzymatic activity from salt toxicity while other concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and urea slowed down the salt-induced inhibition of enzyme activity in Azolla-Anabaena association. These results suggested that an optimum protection from salt stress could be obtained by using a combination of combined nitrogen sources. The reason for this protection might be due to the availability of combined nitrogen to the association, nitrogen is only available through the biological nitrogen fixation which is the most sensitive to salt stress.

  16. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-01-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an

  17. Air toxics concentrations, source identification, and health risks: An air pollution hot spot in southwest Memphis, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chunrong; Foran, Jeffery

    2013-12-01

    Southwest Memphis is a residential region surrounded by fossil fuel burning, steel, refining, and food processing industries, and considerable mobile sources whose emissions may pose adverse health risks to local residents. This study characterizes cancer and non-cancer risks resulting from exposure to ambient air toxics in southwest Memphis. Air toxics samples were collected at a central location every 6 days from June 5, 2008 to January 8, 2010. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected in evacuated stainless-steel canisters and aldehydes by DNPH cartridges, and samples were analyzed for 73 target compounds. A total of 60 compounds were detected and 39 were found in over 86% of the samples. Mean concentrations of many compounds were higher than those measured in many industrial communities throughout the U.S. The cumulative cancer risk associated with exposure to 13 carcinogens found in southwest Memphis air was 2.3 × 10-4, four times higher than the national average of 5.0 × 10-5. Three risk drivers were identified: benzene, formaldehyde, and acrylonitrile, which contributed 43%, 19%, and 14% to the cumulative risk, respectively. This is the first field study to confirm acrylonitrile as a potential risk driver. Mobile, secondary, industrial, and background sources contributed 57%, 24%, 14%, and 5% of the risk, respectively. The results of this study indicate that southwest Memphis, a region of significant income, racial, and social disparities, is also a region under significant environmental stress compared with surrounding areas and communities.

  18. E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Catherine Ann; Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Goessler, Walter; Cohen, Joanna E.; Rule, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: The popularity of electronic cigarette devices is growing worldwide. The health impact of e-cigarette use, however, remains unclear. E-cigarettes are marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes. The aim of this research was the characterization and quantification of toxic metal concentrations in five, nationally popular brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes. Methods: We analyzed the cartomizer liquid in 10 cartomizer refills for each of five brands by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results: All of the tested metals (cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese and nickel) were found in the e-liquids analyzed. Across all analyzed brands, mean (SD) concentrations ranged from 4.89 (0.893) to 1970 (1540) μg/L for lead, 53.9 (6.95) to 2110 (5220) μg/L for chromium and 58.7 (22.4) to 22,600 (24,400) μg/L for nickel. Manganese concentrations ranged from 28.7 (9.79) to 6910.2 (12,200) μg/L. We found marked variability in nickel and chromium concentration within and between brands, which may come from heating elements. Conclusion: Additional research is needed to evaluate whether e-cigarettes represent a relevant exposure pathway for toxic metals in users. - Highlights: • Certain brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes contain high levels of nickel and chromium. • Cig-a-likes contain low levels of cadmium, compared to tobacco cigarettes. • Nickel and chromium in the e-liquid of cig-a-likes may come from nichrome heating coils.

  19. E-cigarettes as a source of toxic and potentially carcinogenic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Catherine Ann, E-mail: chess@prev.org [University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health, Prevention Research Center, 180 Grand Ave., Ste. 1200, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Olmedo, Pablo [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Navas-Acien, Ana [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Institute for Global Tobacco Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Goessler, Walter [Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, Graz, Institute of Chemistry, Unversitätsplatz 1, 8010 Graz (Austria); Cohen, Joanna E. [Institute for Global Tobacco Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Rule, Ana Maria [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Background and aims: The popularity of electronic cigarette devices is growing worldwide. The health impact of e-cigarette use, however, remains unclear. E-cigarettes are marketed as a safer alternative to cigarettes. The aim of this research was the characterization and quantification of toxic metal concentrations in five, nationally popular brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes. Methods: We analyzed the cartomizer liquid in 10 cartomizer refills for each of five brands by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results: All of the tested metals (cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese and nickel) were found in the e-liquids analyzed. Across all analyzed brands, mean (SD) concentrations ranged from 4.89 (0.893) to 1970 (1540) μg/L for lead, 53.9 (6.95) to 2110 (5220) μg/L for chromium and 58.7 (22.4) to 22,600 (24,400) μg/L for nickel. Manganese concentrations ranged from 28.7 (9.79) to 6910.2 (12,200) μg/L. We found marked variability in nickel and chromium concentration within and between brands, which may come from heating elements. Conclusion: Additional research is needed to evaluate whether e-cigarettes represent a relevant exposure pathway for toxic metals in users. - Highlights: • Certain brands of cig-a-like e-cigarettes contain high levels of nickel and chromium. • Cig-a-likes contain low levels of cadmium, compared to tobacco cigarettes. • Nickel and chromium in the e-liquid of cig-a-likes may come from nichrome heating coils.

  20. Drawing up of a selection table of the most appropriate gas treatment coming from anthropogenical fixed sources emitted to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monge Calvo, Karla Maria

    2000-01-01

    This inform has like an general objective the creation of a reference table which allows to simplify the selection of the most appropriate treatment method for the gas decontamination emitted to the atmosphere. To go ahead with this job, it performed a bibliographic research of the different method's kinds: dry, humid, complementary and of gas's cleaning for gas and steams. Later, for to draw up the table, it was decided to treat different methodologies and equipment by aside, as well as to include variables of design like: kind of industry and emission, characteristics or properties of the particles, as well as answer variables among that includes: treatment's methods, advantages and disadvantages when it utilizes such equipment. This research is limited to theoretical studies and data. This study intent to be the first guide for to select the treatment's method for the decontamination most appropriate to the particular problem of every industry, since it was necessary a guide that allows to the user to identify the emissions treatment's methods and to apply them to the different contaminating industries, which at the same time it allows to take a quick and good decision, of the appropriate method, by means of a brief table that be easy to use. Seeing as the project is just theoretical, it wasn't possible to include a class of detail of the already installed equipment, since it didn't have measurements of the same. It doesn't cover the totality of cares, either that must be taken for the design of the different equipment suggested here, that's why for the final process's design it must be consulted other references. The advantage of the selection's table is that every equipment is treated by aside, which simplifies the appropriate method. Besides that allows to have a good idea of the suggested equipment's form thanks to the description and to the diagram that it contains. In order to use the table, is advised besides to consult different bibliographical sources

  1. Automatic device for measuring {beta}-emitting sources: P.A.P.A. {beta}-meters; Dispositif automatique pour la mesure de sources emettrices de rayonnement {beta}: P.A.P.A. {beta} metres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colomer, J; Valentin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1969-07-01

    The apparatus described is designed for measuring {beta}-emitting elements by the absorption method; it is suitable for carrying out a large number of routine analyses. A mechanical device pushes an aluminium absorption set automatically between the source and the detector; the movement is programmed for cutting on and off by a transistorized electronic unit, with printing out and punching of the results on tape; then this can be mathematically processed by a computer (tracing of absorption spectra, extrapolation and calculation of the activity). The detector is either a {beta}-probe or a proportional counter with a specially designed loop. For routine measurements, the accuracy obtained, with all corrections made, is from 5 to 8 per cent; the reproducibility is about 2 per cent. (authors) [French] L'appareillage decrit est destine aux mesures des elements emetteurs {beta} par la methode d'absorption et il permet d'effectuer, en routine, un nombre important de mesures. Un ensemble mecanique effectue le passage automatique, sous vide primaire, d'un jeu d'absorption en aluminium entre la source et le detecteur, ce passage est programme en pre-temps ou pre-coup par un ensemble electronique a transistors, avec impression et perforation sur bandes des resultats des mesures pour traitement mathematique par un ordinateur (trace du spectre d'absorption, extrapolation et calcul d'activite). Le detecteur est soit une sonde {beta}, soit un compteur proportionnel a boucle specialement realise. Sur des mesures de routine, la precision obtenue, toutes corrections effectuees, est de 5 a 8 pour cent et la reproductibilite de l'ordre de 2 pour cent. (auteur)

  2. Biomonitoring of PAHs by using Quercus ilex leaves: Source diagnostic and toxicity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Flavia; Claudia, Lancellotti; MariaVittoria, Prati; Giulia, Maisto; Anna, Alfani

    2011-03-01

    Quercus ilex L. leaves were sampled at nineteen urban sites and two remote sites in order to evaluate PAH contamination degree. One-, two- and three-year-old leaves were collected and leaf lipid content was measured to investigate the influence of leaf age and lipids in PAH accumulation. Some PAH diagnostic ratios, such as Ant/Ant + Phen, Flt/Flt + Pyr, B[a]A/B[a]A + Crys and IP/IP + B[g,h,i]P, were calculated. The results suggest that Q. ilex leaves are effective biomonitors of PAH air contamination: in fact, a great PAH accumulation in leaves from the urban areas, until 30-time higher compared to those from the remote sites, has been observed. At each site, the similar total PAH concentrations in leaves of different age, probably due to a canopy effect, indicate an ability of all leaf age classes to monitor local PAH concentrations in air, remarking practical implications for air biomonitoring. The findings suggest that PAH adsorption in Q. ilex leaves does not result limited by leaf lipid content. Moreover, this study demonstrates the source-diagnostic potential of Q. ilex leaves, because, in particular, the Flt/Flt + Pyr and IP/IP + B[g,h,i]P ratios indicate vehicular traffic as the main source of PAHs in the urban areas and wood combustion in the remote areas. Moreover, to distinguish biomass combustion source, a promising tracer PAH as DB[a,h]A could be used. The high contribution of DB[a,h]A to total PAH concentrations at the remote sites determines a high carcinogenic potential in this area, similar to that calculated for the urban area where the carcinogenic PAH concentrations in absolute values are often higher.

  3. Assessment of toxic metals in wheat crops grown on selected soils, irrigated by different water sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid A. Al-Othman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a comparative study of the concentration of different metals (e.g., Cd, Pb, As, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mn, and Cr in various parts of wheat plants (e.g., roots, stem, leaves and seeds collected at several locations in Khyber Pukhtoon Khaw, Pakistan. The wheat crop in these areas was irrigated using different irrigation sources, including rain, tube well, river, and canal. In wheat samples, the concentration of metals was analyzed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Among the various parts of the plant, the roots had the highest levels of heavy metals, followed by the vegetative parts. By comparison, the seeds and grains had the lowest levels of heavy metals. The levels of heavy metals in all of the studied areas were not significantly localized to any particular area. The general order for the accumulation of studied metals in wheat was found to be Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Cr > As > Pb > Cd.

  4. Tracing toxic elements sources using lead isotopes: An example from the San Antonio–El Triunfo mining district, Baja California Sur, México

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez-Caminero, Leopoldo; Weber, Bodo; Wurl, Jobst; Carrera-Muñoz, Mariela

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Provenance of toxic elements is investigated in a basin close to the mining district. • Stable lead isotope analyses assist to distinguish between sources of toxic elements. • Two major sources are identified: mine tailings and fault bounded mineralization. • There is evidence in the detritus of a different natural lead component. • An additional anthropogenic lead input is detectable from the soluble phases. - Abstract: Pollution of sediments and water bodies with toxic elements around the San Antonio–El Triunfo mining district, Baja California Sur, México is probably sourced from the tailings of abandoned mines that are hosted in mineralized Cretaceous granitoids. However, there is evidence to suggest local hot springs related to recent faults may be an additional source for contamination in the area. In this study, lead isotope signatures are applied to draw conclusions with regard to potential sources of toxic elements. Lead isotope ratios were analyzed from sulfides and scoria from the abandoned mines, fluvial sediments, and igneous rocks with secondary disseminated mineralization. To differentiate between superposed secondary and residual primary lead, leaching experiments were performed, and both leachate and residues were analyzed separately. Most of the residues from sediment samples have lead isotope ratios similar to those from the sulfides and scoria of the mining district, indicating that most of the lead in the detritus is related to the mineralized plutons. However, there is evidence of an additional detrital component. Lead isotope ratios from the leachates indicate a different source for the superimposed lead that is best explained by the contamination with the average Mexican industrial lead. Secondary disseminated mineralization that is related to younger, deep structures (hot springs) has different lead isotope ratios compared to massive vein sulfides and accounts for a significant amount in areas with high

  5. Physicochemical and spectroscopic properties of natural organic matter (NOM) from various sources and implications for ameliorative effects on metal toxicity to aquatic biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Reasi, Hassan A.; Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Smith, D. Scott, E-mail: ssmith@wlu.camailto [Department of Chemistry, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Natural organic matter (NOM), expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC in mg C L{sup -1}), is an ubiquitous complexing agent in natural waters, and is now recognized as an important factor mitigating waterborne metal toxicity. However, the magnitude of the protective effect, judged by toxicity measures (e.g. LC50), varies substantially among different NOM sources even for similar DOC concentrations, implying a potential role of NOM physicochemical properties or quality of NOM. This review summarizes some key quality parameters for NOM samples, obtained by reverse osmosis, and by using correlation analyses, investigates their contribution to ameliorating metal toxicity towards aquatic biota. At comparable and environmentally realistic DOC levels, molecular spectroscopic characteristics (specific absorbance coefficient, SAC, and fluorescence index, FI) as well as concentrations of fluorescent fractions obtained from mathematical mixture resolution techniques (PARAFAC), explain considerable variability in the protective effects. NOM quality clearly influences the toxicity of copper (Cu) and lead (Pb). NOM quality may also influence the toxicity of silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg), but as yet insufficient data are available to unequivocally support the latter correlations between toxicity reduction and NOM quality predictors. Cu binding capacities, protein-to-carbohydrate ratio, and lipophilicity, show insignificant correlation to the amelioration offered by NOMs, but these conclusions are based on data for Norwegian NOMs with very narrow ranges for the latter two parameters. Certainly, various NOMs alleviate metal toxicity differentially and therefore their quality measures should be considered in addition to their quantity.

  6. Rice is a potential dietary source of not only arsenic but also other toxic elements like lead and chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad M. Shraim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a staple food and a good source of nutrition for half of the earth’s population including Middle Eastern countries. However, rice may accumulate hazardous levels of toxic elements. In KSA, rice is imported from many countries; some of which suffer from arsenic contamination in their groundwater and soil. Despite the large daily consumption of rice in KSA, no investigations on the contamination of rice sold there are published so far. Additionally, reports on the contamination of rice with other toxic elements are rare in the literature. To investigate this issue, a total of 84 rice samples were collected from local markets in Almadinah Almunawarah, KSA (n = 70 and Brisbane, Australia (n = 12 and analyzed for arsenic and other elements by ICP-MS. The mean concentrations (mg kg−1 for the KSA samples with concentrations >LOQ were 0.136 for As (range 0.026–0.464, n = 70; Cd: 0.017 (0.003–0.046, n = 64; Pb: 0.029 (0.003–0.218, n = 40; Ni: 0.064 (0.042–0.086, n = 5; Mg: 157 (51.8–777, n = 70; Mn: 4.28 (0.960–10.9, n = 70; Fe: 7.07 (1.9–55.1, n = 70; Zn: 6.19 (1.15–13.5, n = 70; Cu 1.28 (0.508–2.41, n = 70; Se 0.202 (0.007–0.574, n = 70; Cr: 0.057 (0.010–0.184, n = 19; and Co: 0.012 (0.001–0.116, n = 56. Several samples were found to contain at least one element in excess of the Chinese MCL (0.2 mg kg−1for Cd, Cr, Pb, and iAs each. A large variation in element concentration was observed for samples of different origins. In comparison, the American rice accumulated the highest arsenic concentration (mean 0.257 mg kg−1 followed by the Thai rice (mean 0.200 mg kg−1, the Pakistani rice (mean 0.147 mg kg−1, the Indian rice (mean 0.103 mg kg−1, and finally the Egyptian rice (mean 0.097 mg kg−1. Additionally, 3 individual samples from Surinam, Australia, and France contained arsenic concentrations (mg kg−1 of 0.290, 0.188, and 0.183. The findings of this investigation

  7. The exemption from the requirement of registration and/or licensing of some sources. machines and devices emitting ionizing and /or on ionizing radiation: a proposed draft for Israeli regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, T; Margaliot, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1997-11-16

    The licensing and authorization of the import, purchase, distribution, transportation and application of radioactive materials and devices emitting ionizing and/or non-ionizing radiation are carried out in Israel by the Ministries of the Environment and of Health. The legal basis for file authority of these Ministries in radiation protection matters is file {sup P}harmacists Regulation- Radioactive Elements and Products Thereof, 1981 (revision 1994) (PRREPT). Licenses are issued by the Chief Radiation Executive (CUE) appointed by the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health. The Regulations include a clause which enables the CUE to exempt certain amounts of radioactive materials from file requirements laid down in the PRREPT. The exemption clause is general and does not indicate the types and amounts of radioactive material may be exempted. The proposed draft Israeli regulations are related to exemption of some sources, machines and devices emitting ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, wife a suggestion to extend file above mentioned exemption clause to include some machines and devices and to provide an explicit and detailed list of materials, sources and devices to be exempted. Among these are the following: (authors)

  8. The exemption from the requirement of registration and/or licensing of some sources. machines and devices emitting ionizing and /or on ionizing radiation: a proposed draft for Israeli regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, T.; Margaliot, M.

    1997-01-01

    The licensing and authorization of the import, purchase, distribution, transportation and application of radioactive materials and devices emitting ionizing and/or non-ionizing radiation are carried out in Israel by the Ministries of the Environment and of Health. The legal basis for file authority of these Ministries in radiation protection matters is file P harmacists Regulation- Radioactive Elements and Products Thereof, 1981 (revision 1994) (PRREPT). Licenses are issued by the Chief Radiation Executive (CUE) appointed by the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health. The Regulations include a clause which enables the CUE to exempt certain amounts of radioactive materials from file requirements laid down in the PRREPT. The exemption clause is general and does not indicate the types and amounts of radioactive material may be exempted. The proposed draft Israeli regulations are related to exemption of some sources, machines and devices emitting ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, wife a suggestion to extend file above mentioned exemption clause to include some machines and devices and to provide an explicit and detailed list of materials, sources and devices to be exempted. Among these are the following: (authors)

  9. Evaluation of the Possible Sources and Controlling Factors of Toxic Metals/Metalloids in the Florida Everglades and Their Potential Risk of Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbin; Duan, Zhiwei; Liu, Guangliang; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Daniel; Cai, Yong

    2015-08-18

    The Florida Everglades is an environmentally sensitive wetland ecosystem with a number of threatened and endangered fauna species susceptible to the deterioration of water quality. Several potential toxic metal sources exist in the Everglades, including farming, atmospheric deposition, and human activities in urban areas, causing concerns of potential metal exposure risks. However, little is known about the pollution status of toxic metals/metalloids of potential concern, except for Hg. In this study, eight toxic metals/metalloids (Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, and Hg) in Everglades soils were investigated in both dry and wet seasons. Pb, Cr, As, Cu, Cd, and Ni were identified to be above Florida SQGs (sediment quality guidelines) at a number of sampling sites, particularly Pb, which had a level of potential risk to organisms similar to that of Hg. In addition, a method was developed for quantitative source identification and controlling factor elucidation of toxic metals/metalloids by introducing an index, enrichment factor (EF), in the conventional multiple regression analysis. EFs represent the effects of anthropogenic sources on metals/metalloids in soils. Multiple regression analysis showed that Cr and Ni were mainly controlled by anthropogenic loading, whereas soil characteristics, in particular natural organic matter (NOM), played a more important role for Hg, As, Cd, and Zn. NOM may control the distribution of these toxic metals/metalloids by affecting their mobility in soils. For Cu and Pb, the effects of EFs and environmental factors are comparable, suggesting combined effects of loading and soil characteristics. This study is the first comprehensive research with a vast amount of sampling sites on the distribution and potential risks of toxic metals/metalloids in the Everglades. The finding suggests that in addition to Hg other metals/metalloids could also potentially be an environmental problem in this wetland ecosystem.

  10. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incand...

  11. Data used in Xu et al., 2016 paper entitled "Characteristics and distributions of atmospheric mercury emitted from anthropogenic sources in Guiyang, southwestern China

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Mercury emissions data from anthropogenic sources as described in Xu et al., 2016. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Xu, X., N. Liu, M....

  12. Primary emissions and chemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds emitted from laboratory biomass burning sources during the 2016 FIREX FireLab campaign: measurements from a H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, M. M.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Sekimoto, K.; Yuan, B.; Lim, C. Y.; Hagan, D. H.; Kroll, J. H.; Cappa, C. D.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Yokelson, R. J.; Roberts, J. M.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Non-methane organic gases (NMOG) emitted by biomass burning constitute a large source of reactive carbon in the atmosphere. Once emitted, these compounds may undergo series of reactions with the OH radical and nitrogen oxides to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA), ozone, or other health-impacting products. The complex emission profile and strong variability of biomass burning NMOG play an important, yet understudied, role in the variability of air quality outcomes such as SOA and ozone. In this study, we summarize measurements of biomass burning volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted using a H3O+ chemical ionization mass spectrometer (H3O+-CIMS) during the 2016 FIREX laboratory campaign in Missoula, MT. Specifically, we will present data demonstrating the chemical evolution of biomass burning VOCs artificially aged in a field-deployable photooxidation chamber and an oxidation flow reactor. More than 50 OH-oxidation experiments were conducted with biomass types representing a range of North American fuels. Across many fuel types, VOCs with high SOA and ozone formation potential, such as aromatics and furans, were observed to quickly react with the OH radical while oxidized species were generated. We compare the calculated OH reactivity of the primary emissions to the calculated OH reactivity used in many photochemical models and highlight areas requiring additional research in order to improve model/measurement comparisons.

  13. Photosynthates as dominant source of CH4 and CO2 in soil water and CH4 emitted to the atmosphere from paddy fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoda, Tomomi; Kimura, Mamoto; Wada, Eitaro

    1996-09-01

    Emission rates of CH4 from paddy soil with and without rice straw applications were measured with pot experiments to estimate the contribution of rice straw to the total CH4 emission during the growth period of rice plants. The CH4 derived from rice straw was calculated to be 44% of the total emission. 13CO2 uptake experiments were also carried out four times from June 30 to September 13, 1994, to estimate the contribution of photosynthesized carbon to CH4 emission. The contribution percentages of photosynthesized carbon to the total CH4 emitted to the atmosphere were 3.8% around June 30, 31% around July 25, 30% around August 19, and 14% around September 13 in the treatment with rice straw applications, and 52% around July 25, 28% around August 19, and 15% around September 13 in the treatment without rice straw applications. They were calculated to be 22% and 29% for the entire growth period in the treatments with and without rice straw applications, respectively. The contribution percentages of photosynthesized carbon to the total CH4 and inorganic carbon (Σ CO2) dissolved in soil water were 1.3%, 30%, 29%, and 34% for dissolved CH4 and 3.0%, 36%, 30% and 28% for dissolved inorganic carbon around June 30, July 25, August l9, and September 13, respectively, in the treatment with rice straw applications. They were 70%, 23%, and 32% for dissolved CH4 and 31%, 16%, and 19% for dissolved inorganic carbon around July 25, August 19, and September 13, respectively, in the treatment without rice straw applications.

  14. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  15. Toxicity of particles emitted by the traffic: follow-up and bibliographic synthesis final report; Toxicite des particules emises par la circulation automobile: suivi et synthese bibliographique rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, S.

    1999-12-01

    This study compiles the data published recently concerning the diesel and petrol motor emissions toxicity and in particular the effects of the particles phase. The aim of the work is to give a synthetical overview of the state of knowledge in this domain to allow a scientific argumentation concerning the toxicity risks assessment from these pollutants. The data concern epidemiological studies and also experimental studies in vivo and in vitro. (A.L.B.)

  16. Swept-source optical coherence tomography powered by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser enables 2.3-mm-deep brain imaging in mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    We report noninvasive, in vivo optical imaging deep within a mouse brain by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), enabled by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). VCSEL SS-OCT offers a constant signal sensitivity of 105 dB throughout an entire depth of 4.25 mm in air, ensuring an extended usable imaging depth range of more than 2 mm in turbid biological tissue. Using this approach, we show deep brain imaging in mice with an open-skull cranial window preparation, revealing intact mouse brain anatomy from the superficial cerebral cortex to the deep hippocampus. VCSEL SS-OCT would be applicable to small animal studies for the investigation of deep tissue compartments in living brains where diseases such as dementia and tumor can take their toll.

  17. Elucidating source processes of N2O fluxes following grassland-to-field-conversion using isotopologue signatures of soil-emitted N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, G.; Giesemann, A.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.

    2012-04-01

    Conversion of grassland to arable land often causes enhanced nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to the atmosphere. This is due to the tillage of the sward and subsequent decomposition of organic matter. Prediction of such effects is uncertain so far because emissions may differ depending on site and soil conditions. The processes of N2O turnover (nitrification, production by bacterial or fungal denitrifiers, bacterial reduction to N2) are difficult to identify, however. Isotopologue signatures of N2O such as δ18O, average δ15N (δ15Nbulk) and 15N site preference (SP = difference in δ15N between the central and peripheral N positions of the asymmetric N2O molecule) can be used to characterize N2O turnover processes using the known ranges of isotope effects of the various N2O pathways. We aim to evaluate the impact of grassland-to-field-conversion on N2O fluxes and the governing processes using isotopic signatures of emitted N2O. At two sites, in Kleve (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, conventional farming) and Trenthorst (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, organic farming), a four times replicated plot experiment with (i) mechanical conversion (ploughing, maize), (ii) chemical conversion (broadband herbicide, maize per direct seed) and (iii) continuous grassland as reference was started in April 2010. In Trenthorst we additionally established a (iv) field with continuous maize cultivation as further reference. Over a period of two years, mineral nitrogen (Nmin) content was measured weekly on soil samples taken from 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. Soil water content and N2O emissions were measured weekly as well. Gas samples were collected using a closed chamber system. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry was carried out on gas samples from selected high flux events to determine δ18O, δ15Nbulk and SP of N2O. δ18O and SP of N2O exhibited a relatively large range (32 to 72 ‰ and 6 to 34 ‰, respectively) indicating highly variable process dynamics. The data-set is grouped

  18. Analyses of multi-pion Hanbury Brown–Twiss correlations for the pion-emitting sources with Bose–Einstein condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bary, Ghulam; Ru, Peng; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2018-06-01

    We calculate the three- and four-particle correlations of identical pions in an evolving pion gas (EPG) model with Bose–Einstein condensation. The multi-pion correlation functions in the EPG model are analyzed in different momentum intervals and compared with the experimental data for Pb–Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=2.76 {TeV}. It is found that the multi-pion correlation functions and cumulant correlation functions are sensitive to the condensation fraction of the EPG sources in the low average transverse-momentum intervals of the three and four pions. The model results of the multi-pion correlations are consistent with the experimental data in a considerable degree, which gives a source condensation fraction between 16% and 47%.

  19. Recent developments in white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohe, P. P.; Nandanwar, D. V.; Belsare, P. D.; Moharil, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    In the recent years solid state lighting based on LEDs has revolutionized lighting technology. LEDs have many advantages over the conventional lighting based on fluorescent and incandescent lamps such as mercury free, high conversion efficiency of electrical energy into light, long lifetime reliability and ability to use with many types of devices. LEDs have emerged as a new potentially revolutionary technology that could save up to half of energy used for lighting applications. White LEDs would be the most important light source in the future, so much so that this aspect had been highlighted by the Nobel committee during the award of 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics. Recent advancement in the fabrication of GaN chip capable of emitting in blue and near UV region paved way for fabrication of white LED lamps. Mainly there are two approaches used for preparing white emitting solid state lamp. In the first approach blue light (λ=450 nm) emitted from the InGaN LED chip is partially absorbed by the YAG:Ce3+ phosphor coated on it and re-emitted as yellow fluorescence. A white light can be generated by the combination of blue + yellow emission bands. These lamps are already available. But they are suffering from major drawback that their Colour Rendering Index (CRI) is low. In the second approach, white LEDs are made by coating near ultraviolet emitting (360 to 410nm) LED with a mixture of high efficiency red, green and blue emitting phosphors, analogous to the fluorescent lamp. This method yields lamps with better color rendition. Addition of a yellow emitting phosphor improves CRI further. However conversion efficiency is compromised to some extent. Further the cost of near UV emitting chip is very high compared to blue emitting chips. Thus cost and light output wise, near UV chips are much inferior to blue chips. Recently some rare earth activated oxynitrides, silicates, fluorides have emerged as an important family of luminescent materials for white LED application

  20. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed.

  1. A large air shower array to search for astrophysical sources emitting γ-rays with energies ≥1014 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borione, A.; Covault, C.E.; Cronin, J.W.; Fick, B.E.; Gibbs, K.G.; Krimm, H.A.; Mascarenhas, N.C.; McKay, T.A.; Mueller, D.; Newport, B.J.; Ong, R.A.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Sanders, H.; Catanese, M.; Ciampa, D.; Green, K.D.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Matthews, J.; Nitz, D.; Sinclair, D.; Van der Velde, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the technical details and the performance of a large array which detects both the electron and muon components in extensive air showers with energies ≥10 14 eV. The array was designed to search for γ-rays from astrophysical sources. The background of cosmic rays is reduced by the selection of muon poor events. The array consists of 1089 scintillation detectors on the surface covering an area of 0.23 km 2 and 1024 scintillation counters of 2.5 m 2 each, buried 3 m below the surface for muon detection. Each of the surface detectors has its own local electronics and local data storage controlled by a microprocessor. The array is located at Dugway, Utah USA (40.2 N, 112.8 W) where the average atmospheric depth is 870 g/cm 2 . ((orig.))

  2. Top emitting white OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Patricia; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, George-Baehr-Strasse 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Top emitting organic light emitting diodes (TOLEDs) provide a number of interesting opportunities for new applications, such as the opportunity to fabricate ITO-free devices by using opaque substrates. This makes it possible to manufacture low cost OLEDs for signage and lighting applications. A general top emitting device consists of highly reflecting metal contacts as anode and semitransparent cathode, the latter one for better outcouling reasons. In between several organic materials are deposited as charge transporting, blocking, and emission layers. Here, we show a top emitting white organic light emitting diode with silver electrodes arranged in a p-i-n structure with p- and n-doped charge transport layers. The centrical emission layer consists of two phosphorescent (red and green) and one fluorescent (blue) emitter systems separated by an ambipolar interlayer to avoid mutual exciton quenching. By adding an additional dielectric capping layer on top of the device stack, we achieve a reduction of the strong microcavity effects which appear due to the high reflection of both metal electrodes. Therefore, the outcoupled light shows broad and nearly angle-independent emission spectra, which is essential for white light emitting diodes.

  3. E-SovTox: An online database of the main publicly-available sources of toxicity data concerning REACH-relevant chemicals published in the Russian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Legrand, Nicolas; Kahru, Anne

    2010-08-01

    A new open-access online database, E-SovTox, is presented. E-SovTox provides toxicological data for substances relevant to the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) system, from publicly-available Russian language data sources. The database contains information selected mainly from scientific journals published during the Soviet Union era. The main information source for this database - the journal, Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevania [Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases], published between 1957 and 1992 - features acute, but also chronic, toxicity data for numerous industrial chemicals, e.g. for rats, mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits. The main goal of the abovementioned toxicity studies was to derive the maximum allowable concentration limits for industrial chemicals in the occupational health settings of the former Soviet Union. Thus, articles featured in the database include mostly data on LD50 values, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation and cumulative properties. Currently, the E-SovTox database contains toxicity data selected from more than 500 papers covering more than 600 chemicals. The user is provided with the main toxicity information, as well as abstracts of these papers in Russian and in English (given as provided in the original publication). The search engine allows cross-searching of the database by the name or CAS number of the compound, and the author of the paper. The E-SovTox database can be used as a decision-support tool by researchers and regulators for the hazard assessment of chemical substances. 2010 FRAME.

  4. Migratory birds are the source of highly toxic organic pollutants for indigenous people in the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesiakova, A. A.; Gusakova, E. V.; Trofimova, A. N.; Sorokina, T. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are highly toxic organic contaminants. Due to their chemical properties they had wide application in industry and agriculture in the 20th century. In 2001 the production of PCBs has been prohibited almost worldwide. Environmental contamination has been found in soils, water, and air where there were PCB production sites. They have been detected in fish, birds and animals of migratory species, retaining transboarding transfer. Several migratory species of birds (Taiga bean goose, greater white-fronted goose, lesser white fronted goose and barnacle goose) are a diet for indigenous people. PCBs accumulating in the human body affect all systems and organs. This article reviews the contribution of migratory bird species in transboarding transfer of highly toxic contaminants in the Nenets Autonomous Area, Kolguev island (Russian Arctic).

  5. Carbonaceous species emitted from handheld two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, John; Olson, David A.; Hays, Michael D.

    Small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work (e.g., string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc.) can emit a variety of potentially toxic carbonaceous air pollutants. Yet, the emissions effluents from these machines go largely uncharacterized, constraining the proper development of human exposure estimates, emissions inventories, and climate and air quality models. This study samples and evaluates chemical pollutant emissions from the dynamometer testing of six small, handheld spark-ignition engines—model years 1998-2002. Four oil-gas blends were tested in each engine in duplicate. Emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and gas-phase hydrocarbons were predominant, and the PM emitted was organic matter primarily. An ANOVA model determined that engine type and control tier contributed significantly to emissions variations across all identified compound classes; whereas fuel blend was an insignificant variable accounting for engines were generally intermediate in magnitude compared with other gasoline-powered engines, numerous compounds traditionally viewed as motor vehicle markers are also present in small engine emissions in similar relative proportions. Given that small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work account for 5-10% of total US emissions of CO, CO 2, NO x, HC, and PM 2.5, source apportionment models and human exposure studies need to consider the effect of these small engines on ambient concentrations in air polluted environments.

  6. Characterisation of dust material emitted during harbour operations (HADA Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, N.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Artinano, B.; Guerra, A.; Luaces, J.A.; Lorente, A.; Basora, J. [CSIC, Institute of Earth Science ' Jaume Almera' , Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this work is to compile an inventory of the main characteristics (chemical, morphological, mineralogical and grain size parameters) of the bulk cargo materials and of the material emitted during different port operations for possible use as tracers of the fugitive PM emission sources. For all cases, the tracer characteristics determined for each bulk material were also identified in the corresponding PM material emitted. This inventory could assist the harbour authorities to identify the origin of high PM events recorded by air quality monitoring networks in harbour areas, and could also help modellers to predict the impact of harbour activities on ambient PM levels. The harbour of Tarragona (north-east Spain) was selected for this study given the high volume of solids in bulk handled. To this end, 12 handling operations of selected materials (clinker, phosphate, pyrite ash, Mn mineral, fine Si-Mn, coke (coal), bituminous coal, tapioca, soybean, alfalfa, corn, andalusite) were selected for the characterisation of suspended and deposited PM. In spite of the coarse grain size distribution of these bulk cargo materials, with a very low % in the fraction {lt}10 {mu}m, manipulation of these materials during harbour operations may result in high emissions of PM 10 with relatively high levels of potential toxic elements. Furthermore, ambient PM 10 in the area with the highest traffic density of the harbour was also sampled and characterised.

  7. A single-source solid-precursor method for making eco-friendly doped semiconductor nanoparticles emitting multi-color luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, K; Aditya, V; Vadera, S R; Kumar, N; Kutty, T R N

    2007-02-01

    A novel synthesis method is presented for the preparation of eco-friendly, doped semiconductor nanocrystals encapsulated within oxide-shells, both formed sequentially from a single-source solid-precursor. Highly luminescent ZnS nanoparticles, in situ doped with Cu(+)-Al3+ pairs and encapsulated with ZnO shells are prepared by the thermal decomposition of a solid-precursor compound, zinc sulfato-thiourea-oxyhydroxide, showing layered crystal structure. The precursor compound is prepared by an aqueous wet-chemical reaction involving necessary chemical reagents required for the precipitation, doping and inorganic surface capping of the nanoparticles. The elemental analysis (C, H, N, S, O, Zn), quantitative estimation of different chemical groups (SO4(2-) and NH4(-)) and infrared studies suggested that the precursor compound is formed by the intercalation of thiourea, and/or its derivatives thiocarbamate (CSNH2(-)), dithiocarbamate (CS2NH2(-)), etc., and ammonia into the gallery space of zinc-sulfato-oxyhydroxide corbel where the Zn(II) ions are both in the octahedral as well as tetrahedral coordination in the ratio 3 : 2 and the dopant ions are incorporated within octahedral voids. The powder X-ray diffraction of precursor compound shows high intensity basal reflection corresponding to the large lattice-plane spacing of d = 11.23 angstroms and the Rietveld analysis suggested orthorhombic structure with a = 9.71 angstroms, b = 12.48 angstroms, c = 26.43 angstroms, and beta = 90 degrees. Transmission electron microscopy studies show the presence of micrometer sized acicular monocrystallites with prismatic platy morphology. Controlled thermolysis of the solid-precursor at 70-110 degrees C leads to the collapse of layered structure due to the hydrolysis of interlayer thiourea molecules or its derivatives and the S2- ions liberated thereby reacts with the tetrahedral Zn(II) atoms leading to the precipitation of ZnS nanoparticles at the gallery space. During this process

  8. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  9. Overview of major hazards. Part 2: Source term; dispersion; combustion; blast, missiles, venting; fire; radiation; runaway reactions; toxic substances; dust explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilain, J.

    Approaches to major hazard assessment and prediction are reviewed. Source term: (phenomenology/modeling of release, influence on early stages of dispersion); dispersion (atmospheric advection, diffusion and deposition, emphasis on dense/cold gases); combustion (flammable clouds and mists covering flash fires, deflagration, transition to detonation; mostly unconfined/partly confined situations); blast formation, propagation, interaction with structures; catastrophic fires (pool fires, torches and fireballs; highly reactive substances) runaway reactions; features of more general interest; toxic substances, excluding toxicology; and dust explosions (phenomenology and protective measures) are discussed.

  10. Vertical profile, source apportionment, and toxicity of PAHs in sediment cores of a wharf near the coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Ju, Yun-Ru; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-03-01

    Three sediment cores were collected from a wharf near a coal-based steel refining industrial zone in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Analyses for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the US Environmental Protection Agency priority list in the core sediment samples were conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The vertical profiles of PAHs in the core sediments were assessed, possible sources and apportionment were identified, and the toxicity risk of the core sediments was determined. The results from the sediment analyses showed that total concentrations of the 16 PAHs varied from 11774 ± 4244 to 16755 ± 4593 ng/g dry weight (dw). Generally, the vertical profiles of the PAHs in the sediment cores exhibited a decreasing trend from the top to the lower levels of the S1 core and an increasing trend of PAHs from the top to the lower levels of the S2 and S3 cores. Among the core sediment samples, the five- and six-ring PAHs were predominantly in the S1 core, ranging from 42 to 54 %, whereas the composition of the PAHs in the S2 and S3 cores were distributed equally across three groups: two- and three-ring, four-ring, and five- and six-ring PAHs. The results indicated that PAH contamination at the site of the S1 core had a different source. The molecular indices and principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression were used to determine the source contributions, with the results showing that the contributions of coal, oil-related, and vehicle sources were 38.6, 35.9, and 25.5 %, respectively. A PAH toxicity assessment using the mean effect range-median quotient (m-ERM-q, 0.59-0.79), benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalent (TEQ(carc), 1466-1954 ng TEQ/g dw), and dioxin toxicity equivalent (TEQ(fish), 3036-4174 pg TEQ/g dw) identified the wharf as the most affected area. The results can be used for regular monitoring, and future pollution prevention and management should target the coal-based industries in this region for pollution reduction.

  11. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  12. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, D.; Retallack, J.

    1993-01-01

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  13. Plant regeneration of non-toxic Jatropha curcas—impacts of plant growth regulators, source and type of explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2011-01-28

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel plant, however, oil and deoiled cake are toxic. A non-toxic variety of J. curcas is reported from Mexico. The present investigation explores the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) viz. 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ) individually and in combination with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), on regeneration from in vitro and field-grown mature leaf explants, in vitro and glasshouse-grown seedlings cotyledonary leaf explants of non-toxic J. curcas. In all the tested parameters maximum regeneration efficiency (81.07%) and the number of shoot buds per explants (20.17) was observed on 9.08 μM TDZ containing Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) medium from in vitro cotyledonary leaf explants. The regenerated shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 μM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 μM BAP and 5.5 μM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 μM BAP and 8.5 μM IAA. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing different concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA and NAA for four days followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg/l activated charcoal. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate.

  14. Plant regeneration of non-toxic Jatropha curcas—impacts of plant growth regulators, source and type of explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish; Vijay Anand, K. G.; Reddy, Muppala P.

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel plant, however, oil and deoiled cake are toxic. A non-toxic variety of J. curcas is reported from Mexico. The present investigation explores the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) viz. 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ) individually and in combination with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), on regeneration from in vitro and field-grown mature leaf explants, in vitro and glasshouse-grown seedlings cotyledonary leaf explants of non-toxic J. curcas. In all the tested parameters maximum regeneration efficiency (81.07%) and the number of shoot buds per explants (20.17) was observed on 9.08 μM TDZ containing Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) medium from in vitro cotyledonary leaf explants. The regenerated shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 μM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 μM BAP and 5.5 μM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 μM BAP and 8.5 μM IAA. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing different concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA and NAA for four days followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg/l activated charcoal. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate.

  15. Influence of ammonia on forming the toxicity of waters from the surface sources of water supply determined on Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch, 1782

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. Arystarkhova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Determination of the influence of ammonia in waters from surface sources of water supply of Zhytomyr city on forming the toxicity of these waters determined by test-reactions of atypical motor activity of Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch, 1782 with the use of the «time sampling» method during 2012–2014. Methodology. Biotesting was performed at the Municipal Enterprise "Zhytomyrvodokanal". Water samples were taken once a month time from the Teteriv river reservoirs and tap water network and then placed into aquaria (8 dm3 on a group. Control and experimental groups of fish were formed according to the following scheme: control group — samples of settled (24 hours tap water; experimental group D-1 — water samples from the Denyshivske reservoir; experimental group D-2 — water samples from the Vidsichne water intake. Test specimens were females of C. auratus gibelio. Biotesting was conducted using the «time sampling» method by keeping fish (n=30 in water for 12 hours. The toxicity indexes of waters were calculated on the basis of the following test-reactions: spiral-like and vector movements, jumping out from water, immobilization and death of fish. Statistical processing of study results were performed using cross-correlation and regression analysis in MS Excel 2007 and Statistica-6. Findings. The study showed an effect of ammonia on the toxicity of waters from reservoirs of the Teteriv river that was determined by atypical motor activity with the use of the «time sampling» method, which consisted in the instantaneous fixation of the number of individuals that favored one or another act of behavior. It was shown that females not adapted to the action of ammonia reacted to its concentration in water of more than 0.55 mg/dm3 by disorders in movements. Unlike fish of experience groups, only single pathological acts were observed in the control group. A positive moderate relationship, which had a tendency to an increase, was

  16. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  17. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  19. Final Air Toxics Standards for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a December 2007 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Clay Ceramics Manufacturing, Glass Manufacturing, and Secondary Nonferrous Metals Processing Area Sources

  20. Fragranced consumer products: Chemicals emitted, ingredients unlisted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinemann, Anne C.; MacGregor, Ian C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Davis, Amy L.; Ribeiro, Daniel S.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2011-01-01

    Fragranced consumer products are pervasive in society. Relatively little is known about the composition of these products, due to lack of prior study, complexity of formulations, and limitations and protections on ingredient disclosure in the U.S. We investigated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from 25 common fragranced consumer products-laundry products, personal care products, cleaning supplies, and air fresheners-using headspace analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Our analysis found 133 different VOCs emitted from the 25 products, with an average of 17 VOCs per product. Of these 133 VOCs, 24 are classified as toxic or hazardous under U.S. federal laws, and each product emitted at least one of these compounds. For 'green' products, emissions of these compounds were not significantly different from the other products. Of all VOCs identified across the products, only 1 was listed on any product label, and only 2 were listed on any material safety data sheet (MSDS). While virtually none of the chemicals identified were listed, this nonetheless accords with U.S. regulations, which do not require disclosure of all ingredients in a consumer product, or of any ingredients in a mixture called 'fragrance.' Because the analysis focused on compounds emitted and listed, rather than exposures and effects, it makes no claims regarding possible risks from product use. Results of this study contribute to understanding emissions from common products, and their links with labeling and legislation.

  1. An aluminium nitride light-emitting diode with a wavelength of 210 nanometres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Kasu, Makoto; Makimoto, Toshiki

    2006-05-18

    Compact high-efficiency ultraviolet solid-state light sources--such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes--are of considerable technological interest as alternatives to large, toxic, low-efficiency gas lasers and mercury lamps. Microelectronic fabrication technologies and the environmental sciences both require light sources with shorter emission wavelengths: the former for improved resolution in photolithography and the latter for sensors that can detect minute hazardous particles. In addition, ultraviolet solid-state light sources are also attracting attention for potential applications in high-density optical data storage, biomedical research, water and air purification, and sterilization. Wide-bandgap materials, such as diamond and III-V nitride semiconductors (GaN, AlGaN and AlN; refs 3-10), are potential materials for ultraviolet LEDs and laser diodes, but suffer from difficulties in controlling electrical conduction. Here we report the successful control of both n-type and p-type doping in aluminium nitride (AlN), which has a very wide direct bandgap of 6 eV. This doping strategy allows us to develop an AlN PIN (p-type/intrinsic/n-type) homojunction LED with an emission wavelength of 210 nm, which is the shortest reported to date for any kind of LED. The emission is attributed to an exciton transition, and represents an important step towards achieving exciton-related light-emitting devices as well as replacing gas light sources with solid-state light sources.

  2. Distribution, Sources and Toxicity Potentials of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Around the Vicinity of Balogun-Birro Dumpsite of Oshogbo, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adedosu, T.A.; Adeniyi, O.K.; Adedosu, H.O.

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of soil within the vicinity of dumpsites by toxic and persistent organic pollutants is of environmental concern because of their carcinogenic, genotoxic and environmental persistence. Waste disposal sites have been identified as potential source of PAHs accumulating in soil. Assessment of level, distribution and sources of PAHs in environmental media is important for evaluation of ecotoxicological and health effect. This study investigated the distribution, sources and level of PAHs in soil within the vicinity of Balogun-Birro Dumpsite in Osogbo, Nigeria and their potential impacts on human health. Soil samples were collected at ten points within the vicinity of the dumpsite. The level of the 16 USEPA PAHs in the soil samples were determined by gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The total concentration of the 16PAHs ranged between 0.1137 mg/ kg to 5.6491 mg/ kg. Samples from the main dumpsite and the mechanic workshops had highest PAHs concentrations of 5.6491 mg/ kg and 3.6529 mg/ kg respectively. The distribution of PAHs ring size is in the order of 3>4>5>6>2. Carcinogenic fractions represent 34.74 % of the total PAHs. The total concentration of carcinogenic PAHs ranged from 0.06425 mg/ kg to 1.6775 mg/ kg. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicate that pyrogenic activities are major sources of PAHs. The study had revealed increasing accumulation of carcinogenic PAHs in soil within the vicinity of the dumpsite. (author)

  3. Byproduct metals and rare-earth elements used in the production of light-emitting diodes—Overview of principal sources of supply and material requirements for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is expanding because of environmental issues and the efficiency and cost savings achieved compared with use of traditional incandescent lighting. The longer life and reduced power consumption of some LEDs have led to annual energy savings, reduced maintenance costs, and lower emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides from powerplants because of the resulting decrease in energy consumption required for lighting applications when LEDs are used to replace less-energy-efficient sources. Metals such as arsenic, gallium, indium, and the rare-earth elements (REEs) cerium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, terbium, and yttrium are important mineral materials used in LED semiconductor technology. Most of the world's supply of these materials is produced as byproducts from the production of aluminum, copper, lead, and zinc. Most of the rare earths required for LED production in 2011 came from China, and most LED production facilities were located in Asia. The LED manufacturing process is complex and is undergoing much change with the growth of the industry and the changes in demand patterns of associated commodities. In many respects, the continued growth of the LED industry, particularly in the general lighting sector, is tied to its ability to increase LED efficiency and color uniformity while decreasing the costs of producing, purchasing, and operating LEDs. Research is supported by governments of China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. Because of the volume of ongoing research in this sector, it is likely that the material requirements of future LEDs may be quite different than LEDs currently (2011) in use as industry attempts to cut costs by reducing material requirements of expensive heavy rare-earth phosphors and increasing the sizes of wafers for economies of scale. Improved LED performance will allow customers to reduce the number of LEDs in automotive, electronic

  4. Top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Simone; Thomschke, Michael; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2011-11-07

    We review top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which are beneficial for lighting and display applications, where non-transparent substrates are used. The optical effects of the microcavity structure as well as the loss mechanisms are discussed. Outcoupling techniques and the work on white top-emitting OLEDs are summarized. We discuss the power dissipation spectra for a monochrome and a white top-emitting OLED and give quantitative reports on the loss channels. Furthermore, the development of inverted top-emitting OLEDs is described.

  5. Comparison of corneal power, astigmatism, and wavefront aberration measurements obtained by a point-source color light-emitting diode-based topographer, a Placido-disk topographer, and a combined Placido and dual Scheimpflug device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Bruna V; Wang, Li; Ali, Shazia F; Koch, Douglas D; Weikert, Mitchell P

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the performance of a point-source color light-emitting diode (LED)-based topographer (color-LED) in measuring anterior corneal power and aberrations with that of a Placido-disk topographer and a combined Placido and dual Scheimpflug device. Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas USA. Retrospective observational case series. Normal eyes and post-refractive-surgery eyes were consecutively measured using color-LED, Placido, and dual-Scheimpflug devices. The main outcome measures were anterior corneal power, astigmatism, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs) (6.0 mm pupil), which were compared using the t test. There were no statistically significant differences in corneal power measurements in normal and post-refractive surgery eyes and in astigmatism magnitude in post-refractive surgery eyes between the color-LED device and Placido or dual Scheimpflug devices (all P > .05). In normal eyes, there were no statistically significant differences in 3rd-order coma and 4th-order spherical aberration between the color-LED and Placido devices and in HOA root mean square, 3rd-order coma, 3rd-order trefoil, 4th-order spherical aberration, and 4th-order secondary astigmatism between the color-LED and dual Scheimpflug devices (all P > .05). In post-refractive surgery eyes, the color-LED device agreed with the Placido and dual-Scheimpflug devices regarding 3rd-order coma and 4th-order spherical aberration (all P > .05). In normal and post-refractive surgery eyes, all 3 devices were comparable with respect to corneal power. The agreement in corneal aberrations varied. Drs. Wang, Koch, and Weikert are consultants to Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems AG. Dr. Koch is a consultant to Abbott Medical Optics, Inc., Alcon Surgical, Inc., and i-Optics Corp. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Using open source computational tools for predicting human metabolic stability and additional absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rishi R; Gifford, Eric M; Liston, Ted; Waller, Chris L; Hohman, Moses; Bunin, Barry A; Ekins, Sean

    2010-11-01

    Ligand-based computational models could be more readily shared between researchers and organizations if they were generated with open source molecular descriptors [e.g., chemistry development kit (CDK)] and modeling algorithms, because this would negate the requirement for proprietary commercial software. We initially evaluated open source descriptors and model building algorithms using a training set of approximately 50,000 molecules and a test set of approximately 25,000 molecules with human liver microsomal metabolic stability data. A C5.0 decision tree model demonstrated that CDK descriptors together with a set of Smiles Arbitrary Target Specification (SMARTS) keys had good statistics [κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.57, specificity = 0.91, and positive predicted value (PPV) = 0.64], equivalent to those of models built with commercial Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) and the same set of SMARTS keys (κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.58, specificity = 0.91, and PPV = 0.63). Extending the dataset to ∼193,000 molecules and generating a continuous model using Cubist with a combination of CDK and SMARTS keys or MOE2D and SMARTS keys confirmed this observation. When the continuous predictions and actual values were binned to get a categorical score we observed a similar κ statistic (0.42). The same combination of descriptor set and modeling method was applied to passive permeability and P-glycoprotein efflux data with similar model testing statistics. In summary, open source tools demonstrated predictive results comparable to those of commercial software with attendant cost savings. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of open source descriptors and the opportunity for their use as a tool for organizations to share data precompetitively, avoiding repetition and assisting drug discovery.

  7. Light emitting fabric technologies for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge; Cochrane, Cédric; Tylcz, Jean Baptiste; Betrouni, Nacim; Mortier, Laurent; Koncar, Vladan

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered to be a promising method for treating various types of cancer. A homogeneous and reproducible illumination during clinical PDT plays a determinant role in preventing under- or over-treatment. The development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of optical fiber into flexible structures could offer an interesting alternative. This paper aims to describe different methods proposed to develop Side Emitting Optical Fibers (SEOF), and how these SEOF can be integrated in a flexible structure to improve light illumination of the skin during PDT. Four main techniques can be described: (i) light blanket integrating side-glowing optical fibers, (ii) light emitting panel composed of SEOF obtained by micro-perforations of the cladding, (iii) embroidery-based light emitting fabric, and (iv) woven-based light emitting fabric. Woven-based light emitting fabrics give the best performances: higher fluence rate, best homogeneity of light delivery, good flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxic fluoride and arsenic contaminated groundwater in the Lahore and Kasur districts, Punjab, Pakistan and possible contaminant sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Abida; Masuda, Harue; Firdous, Nousheen

    2007-01-01

    The present study is the first attempt to put forward possible sources of As, F - and SO 4 2- contaminated groundwater in the Kalalanwala area, Punjab, Pakistan. Five rainwater and 24 groundwater samples from three different depths were analyzed. Shallow groundwater from 24 to 27 m depth contained high F - (2.47-21.1 mg/L), while the groundwater samples from the deeper depth were free from fluoride contamination. All groundwater samples contained high As (32-1900 μg/L), in excess of WHO drinking water standards. The SO 4 2- ranges from 110 to 1550 mg/L. δ 34 S data indicate three sources for SO 4 2- air pollutants (5.5-5.7 per mille ), fertilizers (4.8 per mille ), and household waste (7.0 per mille ). Our important finding is the presence of SO 4 2- , As and F - in rainwater, indicating the contribution of these elements from air pollution. We propose that pollutants originate, in part, from coal combusted at brick factories and were mobilized promotionally by the alkaline nature of the local groundwater. - Simultaneous As and F - contamination of groundwater and possible pollutant sources are discussed

  9. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  10. Contamination levels, toxicity profiles, and emission sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of an emerging industrial town and its environs in the Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofomatah, Anthony C; Okoye, Chukwuma O B

    2017-11-09

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in Nnewi and its environs were determined. Soil samples were extracted by sonication using hexane:dichloromethane (3:1) mixture and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. The total PAHs concentrations (μg/kg) were 16.681 to 46.815, being three orders of magnitude lower than the maximum permissible level recommended by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). These concentrations followed this order: industrial ˃ farmlands ˃ commercial ˃ residential. Industrialized areas showed higher concentrations (p ˂ 0.05) than the other areas. Diagnostic ratios show that the major source of PAHs was the open burning of industrial and agricultural wastes, as shown by the occurrence of highest concentrations in the industrial areas, followed by agricultural areas. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent values showed non-pollution and very low toxicity. Nevertheless, it was clear that industrialization has had some impact on the PAHs levels in soils and the total environment in this area and could be problematic with time, except with proper environmental management.

  11. Safety assessment of freeze-dried powdered Tenebrio molitor larvae (yellow mealworm) as novel food source: Evaluation of 90-day toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, So-Ri; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Jung, Kyung-Jin; Yu, Hee-Jin; Yun, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide demand for novel food source has grown and edible insects are a promising food sources for humans. Tenebrio molitor, as known as yellow mealworm, has advantages of being rich in protein, and easy to raise as a novel food source. The objective of this study was to evaluate subchronic toxicity, including potential hypersensitivity, of freeze-dried powdered T. molitor larvae (fdTML) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. The fdTML was administered orally once daily at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 90 days. A toxicological assessment was performed, which included mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings, histopathologic examination and allergic reaction. There were no fdTML- related findings in clinical signs, urinalysis, hematology and serum chemistry, gross examination, histopathologic examination or allergic reaction. In conclusion, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) for fdTML was determined to be in excess of 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of rats under the experimental conditions of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of light-emitting diode beacon light fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Rotating beacons containing filament light sources have long been used on highway maintenance trucks : to indicate the presence of the truck to other drivers. Because of advances in light-emitting diode (LED) : technologies, flashing lights containin...

  13. National Air Toxic Assessments (NATA) Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Air Toxics Assessment was conducted by EPA in 2002 to assess air toxics emissions in order to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types...

  14. Evaluation of Levels, Sources and Health Hazards of Road-Dust Associated Toxic Metals in Jalalabad and Kabul Cities, Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadoon, Waqar Azeem; Khpalwak, Wahdatullah; Chidya, Russel Chrispine Garven; Abdel-Dayem, Sherif Mohamed Mohamed Ali; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Makhdoom, Masood Arshad; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate selected road-dust associated heavy metals, their relations with natural and anthropogenic sources, and potential human and environmental health risks. For this purpose, 42 and 36 road-dusts samples were collected from Jalalabad and Kabul cities (Afghanistan), respectively. The following elements were found in descending concentrations: Mn, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu, Cr, Co, and Cd in Jalalabad; and Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr, Pb, Co, and Cd in Kabul. Except for Ni, all the elemental contents were less than the Canadian permissible limits in residential/parkland soils. Principle Component Analysis and enrichment of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn pointed to anthropogenic sources, whereas Co, Cr, and Mn indicated crustal inputs. Broadly, Cd monomial risk index ([Formula: see text]) was considerable; however, one site each in both cities showed high risk ([Formula: see text] ≥ 350). The potential ecological risk (RI) is mostly low; however, at some sites, the risk was considerable. Ingestion appeared to be the main exposure route (99%) for heavy metals and contributed > 90% to noncancerous (all residents), as well as 92% (children) and 75-89% (adults) cancerous risks. The noncancerous risks of all metals and their integrated risks for all residents were within acceptable levels. Moreover, potential cancer risks in children from Ni and Cr were slightly higher than the US-EPA safe levels but were within acceptable levels for adults. This study found higher risks to children and therefore recommends proper management and ways to control metals pollution load in these areas to decrease human health and RIs.

  15. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  16. Source apportionment and health risk assessment of potentially toxic elements in road dust from urban industrial areas of Ahvaz megacity, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmeddin, Ali; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Moore, Farid; Lahijanzadeh, Ahmadreza

    2017-10-28

    This study investigates the occurrence and spatial distribution of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) (Hg, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, Al, Fe, Mn, V and Sb) in 67 road dust samples collected from urban industrial areas in Ahvaz megacity, southwest of Iran. Geochemical methods, multivariate statistics, geostatistics and health risk assessment model were adopted to study the spatial pollution pattern and to identify the priority pollutants, regions of concern and sources of the studied PTEs. Also, receptor positive matrix factorization model was employed to assess pollution sources. Compared to the local background, the median enrichment factor values revealed the following order: Sb > Pb > Hg > Zn > Cu > V > Fe > Mo > Cd > Mn > Cr ≈ Co ≈ Al ≈ Ni. Statistical results show that a significant difference exists between concentrations of Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Sb, V and Hg in different regions (univariate analysis, Kruskal-Wallis test p matrix factorization model revealed that traffic-related emissions (43.5%) and steel industries (26.4%) were first two sources of PTEs in road dust, followed by natural sources (22.6%) and pipe and oil processing companies (7.5%). The arithmetic mean of pollution load index (PLI) values for high traffic sector (1.92) is greater than industrial (1.80) and residential areas (1.25). Also, the results show that ecological risk values for Hg and Pb in 41.8 and 9% of total dust samples are higher than 80, indicating their considerable or higher potential ecological risk. The health risk assessment model showed that ingestion of dust particles contributed more than 83% of the overall non-carcinogenic risk. For both residential and industrial scenarios, Hg and Pb had the highest risk values, whereas Mo has the lowest value.

  17. Evaluation of the health impact of aerosols emitted from different combustion sources: Comprehensive characterization of the aerosol physicochemical properties as well as the molecular biological and toxicological effects of the aerosols on human lung cells and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Mülhopt, S.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Weggler, B.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Passig, J.; Gröger, T.; Jalava, P. I.; Happo, M.; Uski, O.

    2017-12-01

    . Detailed analyses suggest a large difference in relative toxicity for different combustion sources. Recently the cell experiments were successively evaluated and verified by animal exposure tests. This is important to develop a reliable animal-test free-monitoring method for aerosol-induced health effects.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration levels, pattern, source identification and soil toxicity assessment in urban traffic soil of Dhanbad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Swapnil; Sinha, Alok; Tarafdar, Abhrajyoti

    2016-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess and understand potential health risk and to examine the impact of vehicular traffic on the contamination status of urban traffic soils in Dhanbad City with respect to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eight urban traffic sites and two control/rural site surface soils were analyzed and the contents of 13 priority PAHs was determined. Total PAH concentration at traffic sites ranged from 1.019 μg g(-1) to 10.856 μg g(-1) with an average value of 3.488 μg g(-1). At control/rural site, average concentration of total PAHs was found to be 0.640 μg g(-1). PAH pattern was dominated by four- and five-ring PAHs (contributing >50% to the total PAHs) at all the eight traffic sites. On the other hand, rural soil showed a predominance of low molecular weight three-ring PAHs (contributing >30% to the total PAHs). Indeno[123-cd]pyrene/benz[ghi]perylene (IP/BgP) ratio indicated that PAH load at the traffic sites is predominated by the gasoline-driven vehicles. The ratio of Ant/(Ant+Phe) varied from 0.03 to 0.44, averaging 0.10; Fla/(Fla+Pyr) from 0.39 to 0.954, averaging 0.52; BaA/(BaA+Chry) from 0.156 to 0.60, averaging 0.44; and IP/(IP+BgP) from 0.176 to 0.811, averaging 0.286. The results indicated that vehicular emission was the major source for PAHs contamination with moderate effect of coal combustion and biomass combustion. Carcinogenic potency of PAH load in traffic soil was nearly 6.15 times higher as compared to the control/rural soil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Digital photography as source documentation of skin toxicity: an analysis from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01 Post-Mastectomy Radiation Skin Care trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Peter H.; Plant, Natalie A.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated digital photographs as a method of providing auditable source documentation for radiotherapy-induced skin toxicity and the possibility therefore of centralised, blinded scoring for a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Digital photograph sets from the first five patients from each of 12 participating centres were audited. Minimum camera specifications and photograph requirements were protocol specified. Three readers rated photographs for four key quality items. They also scored skin reactions according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) v3.0 acute skin score and also for the presence of any moist desquamation. Five hundred fifty-two images were available. Field of view was scored as inadequate in 1–10%, focus inadequate in 0.4–4%, lighting inadequate in 0.2–3% and dividing line marking inadequate for scoring of skin reactions within sectors in 18–23% of photographs by three readers. Reader pairwise inter-observer agreement was 83–88% for CTC acute skin scores, but the kappa value ranged from 0.58 to 0.73. The percentage of image sectors not scored by readers due to difficulty in assessing was 1–10%. Moist desquamation was scored by clinicians in 8 (medial)–13% (lateral) of patients compared with 3–5% and 5–11% by readers. Photo reader inter-observer agreement is only moderate. Photo readers tended to underscore the frequency of moist desquamation, but the trend by sector parallels the clinical scorers. Photographs are useful source documents for auditing and monitoring, but not a replacement for clinical scoring.

  20. Digital photography as source documentation of skin toxicity: an analysis from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01 post-mastectomy radiation skin care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter H; Plant, Natalie A; Graham, Jennifer Louise; Browne, Lois H; Borg, Martin; Capp, Anne; Delaney, Geoff P; Harvey, Jennifer; Kenny, Lizbeth; Francis, Michael; Zissiadis, Yvonne

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated digital photographs as a method of providing auditable source documentation for radiotherapy-induced skin toxicity and the possibility therefore of centralised, blinded scoring for a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Digital photograph sets from the first five patients from each of 12 participating centres were audited. Minimum camera specifications and photograph requirements were protocol specified. Three readers rated photographs for four key quality items. They also scored skin reactions according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) v3.0 acute skin score and also for the presence of any moist desquamation. Five hundred fifty-two images were available. Field of view was scored as inadequate in 1-10%, focus inadequate in 0.4-4%, lighting inadequate in 0.2-3% and dividing line marking inadequate for scoring of skin reactions within sectors in 18-23% of photographs by three readers. Reader pairwise inter-observer agreement was 83-88% for CTC acute skin scores, but the kappa value ranged from 0.58 to 0.73. The percentage of image sectors not scored by readers due to difficulty in assessing was 1-10%. Moist desquamation was scored by clinicians in 8 (medial)-13% (lateral) of patients compared with 3-5% and 5-11% by readers. Photo reader inter-observer agreement is only moderate. Photo readers tended to underscore the frequency of moist desquamation, but the trend by sector parallels the clinical scorers. Photographs are useful source documents for auditing and monitoring, but not a replacement for clinical scoring. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Surface Sediments from the Southern Shores of the Caspian Sea, Anzali City: Toxicity Assessment and Source Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhsareh Azimi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Caspian Sea has recently experienced great damages due to intense pressure from human activities, petroleum contaminant discharges from oil extraction and refining activities, and domestic and industrial wastewaters discharged into the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the sources and levels of one of the most dangerous oil pollutants ‒ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ‒ in the southern shores of the Caspian Sea (Anzali City. The data would be compared with standard PAHs concentrations in order to derive the information required for designing appropriate management measures. For the purposes of this study, nine surface sediment samples were collected from the experimental field and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS was used to analyze the samples for their contaminants. The total PAHs concentrations ranged from 736 to 9009 ng g-1d.w with an increasing trend along the east-west direction. Also, multiple indexes were used to detect the petrogenic origin of these compounds. Compared with sediment quality guidelines (SQGs of Florida (TELs/PELs, the levels for half the PAH compounds exceeded TELs. Moreover, naphthalene, fluorine, and phenanthrene concentrations exceeded the PELs in some stations, indicating likely acute toxic effects. However, comparison with sediment quality guidelines (SQGs of the United States (TELs/PELs revealed that most of the compounds at the stations investigated were lower than ERLs. It was concluded that the quality guidelines of the Florida State are more conservative for protecting the biotic organisms in the region.

  2. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Thianche, Emmmanuelle

    1998-01-01

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author) [fr

  3. POTENTIALLY TOXIC ELEMENT CYCLES AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MULTIPLE SOURCES IN THE IRRIGATION DITCHES FROM THE RAVENNA COASTAL PLAIN THROUGH TRACE ELEMENTS AND ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Vittori Antisari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While monitoring the physico-chemical characteristics, trace elements and O-H-Sr-B isotopic data were obtained in superficial waters from a number of irrigations canals and ditches in the Ravenna coastal plain, in order to highlight the cycling of potentially toxic elements and the different sources of the solutes. Surveys were conducted during March and July 2008, and considered as representative of the waters in winter and summer, respectively. In summer, the water mass balance in the network is mostly controlled by the ingression of freshwaters from the Canale Emiliano Romagnolo (CER. The O-H isotopic data indicated that, in winter, waters are primarily recharged from Apennine catchments and undergo evaporation to different extents.The boron isotopic signature indicates the important role played by the marine component. A major seawater contribution was evidenced in canals close to the coastline; however, the process controlling the origin of dissolved boron is not solely related to direct mixing with sea water but comprises an additional source probably related to water-soil exchanges and boron of marine origin leaching, owing to the prolonged exposure of alluvial sediments to sea water. An additional boron contribution from the agricultural practice was is also evidenced. Calculation based on the conservative behaviour of chloride ions indicated that in canals and ditches not directly connected with the sea up to the 80% of the Sr budget did not originate from seawater, indicating a source from Al-silicate minerals and supporting the hypothesis of significant soil-water interactions and chemical exchanges.The positive correlation between pH and dissolved oxygen in winter waters is likely to reflect CO2 consumption during algal photosynthesis, favouring the in-situ generation of colloidal particles due to the oxidative precipitation of ferric iron oxy-hydroxides and probably small carbonate particles able to adsorb trace metals on their

  4. Positron emitting pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of physiology at the molecular level bridges the gap between laboratory science and clinical medicine by providing the most specific and sensitive means for imaging molecular pathways and interactions in tissues of man. PET-imaging requires the use Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals (PRPs), which are radioactively labeled 'true metabolites' i.e., sugars, amino acids, fatty acids etc., essentially made of H, C, N and O which the cells in the body can metabolize. The PET-isotopes: 11 C, 15 O, 13 N and 18 F (instead of H) are cyclotron produced and are short-lived, which places several constraints on the synthesis time for the PRPs, quality control and their clinical use as compared to the conventional 99m Tc- and other SPECT-RPs widely used in nuclear medicine. There are large number of published reports showing the utility of several PRPs labeled with 18 F (T 1/2 = 110 min) and 11 C (T 1/2 = 20 min). A few PRPs have been labeled with 13 N (T 1/2 = 10 min). 15 O (T 1/2 = 2min) is used mostly as H 2 15 O, C 15 or C 15 O 2 . 18 F-radiopharmaceuticals can be made at a medical cyclotron facility and sent to PET -imaging centres, which can be reached in a couple of hours. The sensitivity of PET -imaging has encouraged R and D in several other PRPs, labeled with viz., 68 Ga (generator produced, T 1/2 68 min), 124 I (cyclotron, T 1/2 4.2 d), 82 Rb (generator, T 1/2 75s), 64 Cu (cyclotron, T 1/2 12h), and 94m Tc (cyclotron, T 1/2 52 min). Due to its relevance in several diseases, particularly cancer, PET-imaging has made major scientific contribution to drug development, particularly for neurological diseases and cancer treatment. (author)

  5. Introducing Toxics

    OpenAIRE

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-01-01

    With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present ...

  6. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for medical diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor

    This thesis deals with the design and fabrication of tunable Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The focus has been the application of tunable VCSELs in medical diagnostics, specifically OCT. VCSELs are candidates as light sources for swept-source OCT where their high sweep rate, wide...

  7. Toxic effects of two sources of dietborne cadmium on the juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. and tissue-specific accumulation of related minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kang; Chi, Shuyan; Liu, Hongyu; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui; Zhang, Shuang; Tan, Beiping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CdCl 2 –Cd showed a higher toxicity than SVM-Cd for cobia. • Cd accumulation in cobia fed diets contaminated SVM-Cd was higher than in cobia fed diets contaminated CdCl 2 –Cd. • Cd accumulation in tissues of cobia fed both types of Cd was kidney > liver > intestine > gill muscle. • Dietborne Cd decreased the Fe concentration in kidney and liver, Ca concentrations in vertebra and scale. - Abstract: In the present study, juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. were fed diets contaminated by two different sources of cadmium: squid viscera meal (SVM-Cd, organic form) and cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 –Cd, inorganic form). The Cd concentrations in fish diet were approximate 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg Cd kg −1 for both inorganic and organic forms. In the control diet (0.312 mg Cd kg −1 diet, Cd mainly come from fish meal), no cadmium was added. The experiment lasted for 16 weeks and a statistically significant inverse relationship was observed between specific growth rate (SGR) and the concentration of dietary Cd. The SGR of cobia fed a diet with SVM-Cd increased at the lowest doses and decreased with the increasing level of dietary SVM. Fish fed diet contaminated SVM-Cd had significantly higher SGR than those fed diets contaminated CdCl 2 –Cd among the high Cd level diets treatments. The dietary Cd levels also significantly affected the survival rate of the fish. Among the hematological characteristics and plasma constituents, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activities and alkaline phosphatase activities in serum and liver increased and hepatic superoxide dismutase activity decreased with the increasing dietary Cd levels. The cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of CdCl 2 –Cd had significantly higher ALP activity than cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of SVM-Cd. The results from these studies indicate no differences in toxicity response to dietborne SVM-Cd and CdCl 2 –Cd at a low level of Cd. However, at a higher level, cobia was

  8. Toxic effects of two sources of dietborne cadmium on the juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. and tissue-specific accumulation of related minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kang [Laboratory of Aquatic Animal Nutrition and Feed, College of Fisheries, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China); Guangdong Yuehai Feed Group Co., Ltd., Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China); Chi, Shuyan; Liu, Hongyu; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui; Zhang, Shuang [Laboratory of Aquatic Animal Nutrition and Feed, College of Fisheries, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China); Tan, Beiping, E-mail: bptan@126.com [Laboratory of Aquatic Animal Nutrition and Feed, College of Fisheries, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • CdCl{sub 2}–Cd showed a higher toxicity than SVM-Cd for cobia. • Cd accumulation in cobia fed diets contaminated SVM-Cd was higher than in cobia fed diets contaminated CdCl{sub 2}–Cd. • Cd accumulation in tissues of cobia fed both types of Cd was kidney > liver > intestine > gill muscle. • Dietborne Cd decreased the Fe concentration in kidney and liver, Ca concentrations in vertebra and scale. - Abstract: In the present study, juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. were fed diets contaminated by two different sources of cadmium: squid viscera meal (SVM-Cd, organic form) and cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}–Cd, inorganic form). The Cd concentrations in fish diet were approximate 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg Cd kg{sup −1} for both inorganic and organic forms. In the control diet (0.312 mg Cd kg{sup −1} diet, Cd mainly come from fish meal), no cadmium was added. The experiment lasted for 16 weeks and a statistically significant inverse relationship was observed between specific growth rate (SGR) and the concentration of dietary Cd. The SGR of cobia fed a diet with SVM-Cd increased at the lowest doses and decreased with the increasing level of dietary SVM. Fish fed diet contaminated SVM-Cd had significantly higher SGR than those fed diets contaminated CdCl{sub 2}–Cd among the high Cd level diets treatments. The dietary Cd levels also significantly affected the survival rate of the fish. Among the hematological characteristics and plasma constituents, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activities and alkaline phosphatase activities in serum and liver increased and hepatic superoxide dismutase activity decreased with the increasing dietary Cd levels. The cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of CdCl{sub 2}–Cd had significantly higher ALP activity than cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of SVM-Cd. The results from these studies indicate no differences in toxicity response to dietborne SVM-Cd and CdCl{sub 2}–Cd at a low level of Cd

  9. Toxic effects of two sources of dietborne cadmium on the juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. and tissue-specific accumulation of related minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Chi, Shuyan; Liu, Hongyu; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui; Zhang, Shuang; Tan, Beiping

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, juvenile cobia, Rachycentron canadum L. were fed diets contaminated by two different sources of cadmium: squid viscera meal (SVM-Cd, organic form) and cadmium chloride (CdCl2-Cd, inorganic form). The Cd concentrations in fish diet were approximate 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0mg Cd kg(-1) for both inorganic and organic forms. In the control diet (0.312mg Cd kg(-1) diet, Cd mainly come from fish meal), no cadmium was added. The experiment lasted for 16 weeks and a statistically significant inverse relationship was observed between specific growth rate (SGR) and the concentration of dietary Cd. The SGR of cobia fed a diet with SVM-Cd increased at the lowest doses and decreased with the increasing level of dietary SVM. Fish fed diet contaminated SVM-Cd had significantly higher SGR than those fed diets contaminated CdCl2-Cd among the high Cd level diets treatments. The dietary Cd levels also significantly affected the survival rate of the fish. Among the hematological characteristics and plasma constituents, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activities and alkaline phosphatase activities in serum and liver increased and hepatic superoxide dismutase activity decreased with the increasing dietary Cd levels. The cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of CdCl2-Cd had significantly higher ALP activity than cobia fed diet contaminated by high level of SVM-Cd. The results from these studies indicate no differences in toxicity response to dietborne SVM-Cd and CdCl2-Cd at a low level of Cd. However, at a higher level, cobia was more sensitive to dietborne CdCl2-Cd than SVM-Cd. Based on quadratic regression of SGR, The Cd concentrations was 3.617mg kg(-1) in the optimal diet, Cd source was SVM (126mg Cd kg(-1) in SVM) which stimulate the growth of cobia and the added level was determined to be 26.7g kg(-1) diet in the present study. Cd accumulations in the kidney of cobia fed both types of Cd were higher than other tissues, and the order of Cd accumulation in tissues

  10. Tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device includes at least one elongated structure at least partially fabricated from one or more semiconductor materials exhibiting a bandgap characteristic including one or more energy transitions whose energies correspond to photon energies of light

  11. Emissions of organic air toxics from open burning: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, P M [United States Environmental Protection Agency, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory; Lutes, C C; Santoianni, D A [ARCADIS G and M, Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Emissions from open burning, on a mass pollutant per mass fuel (emission factor) basis, are greater than those from well-controlled combustion sources. Some types of open burning (e.g. biomass) are large sources on a global scale in comparison to other broad classes of sources (e.g. mobile and industrial sources). A detailed literature search was performed to collect and collate available data reporting emissions of organic air toxics from open burning sources. The sources that were included in this paper are: Accidental Fires, Agricultural Burning of Crop Residue, Agricultural Plastic Film, Animal Carcasses, Automobile Shredder Fluff Fires, Camp Fires, Car-Boat-Train (the vehicle not cargo) Fires, Construction Debris Fires, Copper Wire Reclamation, Crude Oil and Oil Spill Fires, Electronics Waste, Fiberglass, Fireworks, Grain Silo Fires, Household Waste, Land Clearing Debris (biomass), Landfills/Dumps, Prescribed Burning and Savanna/Forest Fires, Structural Fires, Tire Fires, and Yard Waste Fires. Availability of data varied according to the source and the class of air toxics of interest. Volatile organic compound (VOC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) data were available for many of the sources. Non-PAH semi-volatile organic compound (SVOC) data were available for several sources. Carbonyl and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) data were available for only a few sources. There were several known sources for which no emissions data were available at all. It is desirable that emissions from those sources be tested so that the relative degree of hazard they pose can be assessed. Several observations were made including: Biomass open burning sources typically emitted less VOCs than open burning sources with anthropogenic fuels on a mass emitted per mass burned basis, particularly those where polymers were concerned. Biomass open burning sources typically emitted less SVOCs and PAHs than anthropogenic sources on a mass

  12. Metabolism and biological effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, W. J.

    1979-05-01

    The emphasis of much of the current and planned research on the toxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides is directed toward the complexities of actual and potential conditions of occupational environmental exposures of human beings. These, as well as the more limited studies on mechanisms of biological transport and effects, should increase our ability to predict health risks more accurately and to deal more confidently with human exposures, if and when they occur.

  13. Nanosecond field emitted and photo-field emitted current pulses from ZrC tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganter, R.; Bakker, R.J.; Gough, C.; Paraliev, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Le Pimpec, F.; Rivkin, L.; Wrulich, A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to find electron sources with low thermal emittance, cathodes based on single tip field emitter are investigated. Maximum peak current, measured from single tip in ZrC with a typical apex radius around 1 μm, are presented. Voltage pulses of 2 ns duration and up to 50 kV amplitude lead to field emission current up to 470 mA from one ZrC tip. Combination of high applied electric field with laser illumination gives the possibility to modulate the emission with laser pulses. Nanoseconds current pulses have been emitted with laser pulses at 1064 nm illuminating a ZrC tip under high-DC electric field. The dependence of photo-field emitted current with the applied voltage can be explained by the Schottky effect

  14. Nanosecond field emitted and photo-field emitted current pulses from ZrC tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: romain.ganter@psi.ch; Bakker, R.J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Gough, C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Paraliev, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Pedrozzi, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Le Pimpec, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Rivkin, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Wrulich, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    In order to find electron sources with low thermal emittance, cathodes based on single tip field emitter are investigated. Maximum peak current, measured from single tip in ZrC with a typical apex radius around 1 {mu}m, are presented. Voltage pulses of 2 ns duration and up to 50 kV amplitude lead to field emission current up to 470 mA from one ZrC tip. Combination of high applied electric field with laser illumination gives the possibility to modulate the emission with laser pulses. Nanoseconds current pulses have been emitted with laser pulses at 1064 nm illuminating a ZrC tip under high-DC electric field. The dependence of photo-field emitted current with the applied voltage can be explained by the Schottky effect.

  15. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  16. Human exposure to dioxin from combustion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Because of their extreme toxicity, much concern and debate has arisen about the nature and extent of human exposure to dioxin. Since municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators are known to emit polychorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polycholorinated dibenzofurnas (PCDFs) many people who live near MSW incinerators fear that they will be exposed to high levels of dioxin and subsequently develop cancer. What is often overlooked in this debate, however, is the fact that the general population is continuously being exposed to trace amounts of dioxin as exemplified by the fact that virtually all human adipose tissue samples contain dioxin at levels of 3 parts per trillion (ppt) or greater. This paper provides a perspective on MSW incineration as a source of human exposure to dioxin by comparing this exposure source with exposure to background environmental contamination and evaluates some of the potential key sources of PCDD/PCDF input into the enviroment. 32 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Hospital and urban effluent waters as a source of accumulation of toxic metals in the sediment receiving system of the Cauvery River, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Ngelikoto, Patience; Elongo, Vicky; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Piana, Pius T M; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-09-01

    Hospital and urban effluents contain a variety of toxic and/or persistent substances in a wide range of concentrations, and most of these compounds belong to the group of emerging contaminants. The release of these substances into the aquatic ecosystem can lead to the pollution of water resources and may place aquatic organisms and human health at risk. Sediments receiving untreated and urban effluent waters from the city of Tiruchirappalli in the state of Tamil Nadu, India, are analyzed for potential environmental and human health risks. The sediment samples were collected from five hospital outlet pipes (HOP) and from the Cauvery River Basin (CRB) both of which receive untreated municipal effluent waters (Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India). The samples were characterized for grain size, organic matter, toxic metals, and ecotoxicity. The results highlight the high concentration of toxic metals in HOP, reaching values (mg kg(-1)) of 1851 (Cr), 210 (Cu), 986 (Zn), 82 (Pb), and 17 (Hg). In contrast, the metal concentrations in sediments from CRB were lower than the values found in the HOP (except for Cu, Pb), with maximum values (mg kg(-1)) of 75 (Cr), 906 (Cu), 649 (Zn), 111 (Pb), and 0.99 (Hg). The metal concentrations in all sampling sites largely exceed the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) and the Probable Effect Concentration (PEC) for the Protection of Aquatic Life recommendation. The ecotoxicity test with ostracods exposed to the sediment samples presents a mortality rate ranging from 22 to 100 % (in sediments from HOP) and 18-87 % (in sediments from CRB). The results of this study show the variation of toxic metal levels as well as toxicity in sediment composition related to both the type of hospital and the sampling period. The method of elimination of hospital and urban effluents leads to the pollution of water resources and may place aquatic organisms and human health at risk.

  18. Introducing Toxics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Bellinger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With this inaugural issue, Toxics begins its life as a peer-reviewed, open access journal focusing on all aspects of toxic chemicals. We are interested in publishing papers that present a wide range of perspectives on toxicants and naturally occurring toxins, including exposure, biomarkers, kinetics, biological effects, fate and transport, treatment, and remediation. Toxics differs from many other journals in the absence of a page or word limit on contributions, permitting authors to present their work in as much detail as they wish. Toxics will publish original research papers, conventional reviews, meta-analyses, short communications, theoretical papers, case reports, commentaries and policy perspectives, and book reviews (Book reviews will be solicited and should not be submitted without invitation. Toxins and toxicants concern individuals from a wide range of disciplines, and Toxics is interested in receiving papers that represent the full range of approaches applied to their study, including in vitro studies, studies that use experimental animal or non-animal models, studies of humans or other biological populations, and mathematical modeling. We are excited to get underway and look forward to working with authors in the scientific and medical communities and providing them with a novel venue for sharing their work. [...

  19. Improvement in light-extraction efficiency of light emitting diode ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... emitting diode (OLED) can be enhanced by using light- extraction ... to grow, ω should posses a positive value, which is possible only when ∂φ/∂h < 0, .... To detect small changes, first, the source LED was sta- bilized by ...

  20. An assessment of ultraviolet radiation components of light emitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of ultraviolet radiation components of light emitted from electric arc and their possible exposure risks. ... The study of Ultraviolet Radiation has of recent become interesting because of the health hazards it poses to human. Apart from its intensity reaching the earth from the sun, other man-made sources have ...

  1. The Light-Emitting Diode as a Light Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Hack, W. Nathan; Tran, Kiet; Vira, Zeeshan; Pickett, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A light-emitting diode (LED) and operational amplifier can be used as an affordable method to provide a digital output indicating detection of an intense light source such as a laser beam or high-output LED. When coupled with a microcontroller, the combination can be used as a multiple photogate and timer for under $50. A similar circuit is used…

  2. Tuning the colour of white polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.M. de; Sarfert, W.; Paetzold, R.

    2010-01-01

    Colour tuning of white polymer light emitting diode (LED) light sources can be attained by various methods at various stages in the production process of the lamps and/or by the design of the active material incorporated in the LEDs. In this contribution we will describe the methods and discuss the

  3. Assessing comparative terrestrial ecotoxicity of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn: The influence of aging and emission source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Holm, Peter E.; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    H or soil organic carbon, emission source occasionally has an effect on reactivity of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn emitted from various anthropogenic sources followed by aging in the soil from a few years to two centuries. The uncertainties in estimating the age prevent definitive conclusions about...... the influence of aging time on the reactivity of metals from anthropogenic sources in soils. Thus, for calculating comparative toxicity potentials of man-made metal contaminations in soils, we recommend using time-horizon independent accessibility factors derived from source-specific reactive fractions....

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland soils under different land uses in a coastal estuary: toxic levels, sources and relationships with soil organic matter and water-stable aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Bai, Junhong; Wang, Junjing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2014-09-01

    The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the soils from industrial, wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites to characterize their distributions, toxic levels and possible sources in the Pearl River Estuary and identify their relationships with soil organic matter (SOM) and water-stable aggregates (WSAs). Our results indicate that the average concentration of total PAHs in this region reached a moderate pollution level, which was higher than that in other larger estuaries in Asia. The average level of total PAHs in industrial soils was 1.2, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.3 times higher than those in soils from wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites, respectively. Greater accumulation of PAHs occurred in the middle and/or bottom soil layers where 3-ring PAHs were dominant. Industrial soils also exhibited the highest toxic levels with the highest toxic equivalent concentrations of PAHs, followed by wharf and milldam soils, and the cropland and wetland soils had the lowest toxicity. The diagnostic ratios suggested that PAHs primarily originated from biomass and coal combustion at industrial and milldam sites, and petroleum combustion was determined to be the primary source of PAHs at the wharf, cropland and wetland sites. Both 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs in the milldam and wharf soils were significantly positively correlated with the SOM, whereas the 4,5,6-ring PAHs and total PAHs in industrial soils and the 2-ring PAHs in cropland soils were significantly negatively correlated with the SOM. In addition, large WSAs also exhibited a significant positive correlation with PAHs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimony Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically.

  6. Antimony Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The...

  7. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  8. Ring cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujagic, E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are electrically driven semiconductor lasers, which have undergone a steady improvement since the first demonstration in 1994. These are now well established as reliable sources of coherent light in the mid-infrared (MIR) and terahertz (THz)range of the electromagnetic spectrum (3-300 μm). The rapid progress of this type of lasers is based on a high degree of freedom in tailoring the emission wavelength within a large variety of semiconductor heterostructure designs and materials. These properties have attracted the attention of various applications such as gas analysis, chemical sensing, spectral imaging and free-space telecommunication. In order to improve the selectivity, sensitivity and efficiency of today's sensor systems, high optical power, continuous wave and room temperature performance, single-mode operation and low divergence optical beams, are highly desirable qualities of a compact laser source in this field of research. Since all of these features cannot be provided by a conventional edge-emitting device at the same time, research has put focus on the development of surface emitting devices. Nowadays, the vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) are the most prominent representative for this type of light emitters. With its capability of producing narrow circular beams, the feasibility of two-dimensional arrays and on-wafer testing, such a coherent light source results in a reduction of the fabrication effort and production costs. Since the radiation in QCLs is strictly polarized normal to the epitaxial layer plane, fabrication of VCSELs based on QC structures is not viable. The subject of this work is the design and realization of 'ring cavity surface emitting lasers' (ring-CSELs). This type of lasers employs a circular ring cavity and a resonant distributed feedback (DFB) surface grating. Ring-CSELs were fabricated on the basis of MIR and THz QC structures, which cover a wavelength range from 4 μm to 93

  9. Source contribution and risk assessment of airborne toxic metals by neutron activation analysis in Taejeon industrial complex area - Concentration analysis and health risk assessment of airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Jang, M. S.; Nam, B. H.; Yun, M. J. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The study centers on one-year continual concentration analysis using ICP-MS and on health risk assessment of 15 airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. About 1-year arithmetic mean of human carcinogen, arsenic, hexavalent chromium and nickel subsulfide is 6.05, 2.40 and 2.81 ng/m{sup 3} while the mean of probable human carcinogen, beryllium, cadmium and lead is 0.06, 3.92, 145.99 ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. And the long-term arithmetic mean concentration of non-carcinogenic metal, manganese is 44.60 ng/m{sup 3}. The point risk estimate for the inhalation of carcinogenic metals is 7.0 X10{sup -5}, which is higher than a risk standard of 10{sup -5}. The risk from human carcinogens is 6.2X10{sup -5}, while that from probable human carcinogens is 8.0X10{sup -6}, respectively. About 86 % of the cancer risk is due to the inhalation of human carcinogens, arsenic and hexavalent chromium. Thus, it is necessary to properly manage both arsenic and hexavalent chromium risk in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. 37 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  10. Recycling technology of emitted carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hironori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research (NIMC), Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Ways to halt global warming are being discussed worldwide. Global warming is an energy problem which is mainly attributed to the large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) released into the atmosphere from the rapid increase in energy consumption since the Industrial Revolution. The basic solution to the problem, therefore, is to cut consumption of fossil fuels. To this end, it is important to promote energy conservation by improving the fuel efficiency of machines, as well as shift to energy sources that do not emit carbon dioxide and develop related technologies. If current trends in economic growth continue in the devloping world as well as the developed countries, there can be no doubt that energy consumption will increase. Therefore, alongside energy conservation and the development of alternative energies, the importance of technologies to recover and fix CO{sub 2} will increase in the fight against global warming.

  11. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  12. High Intensity Organic Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiangfei

    This thesis is dedicated to the fabrication, modeling, and characterization to achieve high efficiency organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for illumination applications. Compared to conventional lighting sources, OLEDs enabled the direct conversion of electrical energy into light emission and have intrigued the world's lighting designers with the long-lasting, highly efficient illumination. We begin with a brief overview of organic technology, from basic organic semiconductor physics, to its application in optoelectronics, i.e. light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, photodetectors and thin-film transistors. Due to the importance of phosphorescent materials, we will focus on the photophysics of metal complexes that is central to high efficiency OLED technology, followed by a transient study to examine the radiative decay dynamics in a series of phosphorescent platinum binuclear complexes. The major theme of this thesis is the design and optimization of a novel architecture where individual red, green and blue phosphorescent OLEDs are vertically stacked and electrically interconnected by the compound charge generation layers. We modeled carrier generation from the metal-oxide/doped organic interface based on a thermally assisted tunneling mechanism. The model provides insights to the optimization of a stacked OLED from both electrical and optical point of view. To realize the high intensity white lighting source, the efficient removal of heat is of a particular concern, especially in large-area devices. A fundamental transfer matrix analysis is introduced to predict the thermal properties in the devices. The analysis employs Laplace transforms to determine the response of the system to the combined effects of conduction, convection, and radiation. This perspective of constructing transmission matrices greatly facilitates the calculation of transient coupled heat transfer in a general multi-layer composite. It converts differential equations to algebraic forms, and

  13. Investigation of organic light emitting diodes for interferometric purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Anna; Zimak, Marzena; Sałbut, Leszek

    2011-05-01

    Recently the new type of light source has been introduced to the market. Organic light emitting diode (OLED) is not only interesting because of the low applying voltage, wide light emitting areas and emission efficiency. It gives the possibility to create a light source of a various shape, various color and in the near future very likely even the one that will change shape and spectrum in time in controlled way. Those opportunities have not been in our reach until now. In the paper authors try to give an answer to the question if the new light source -OLED - is suitable for interferometric purposes. Tests cover the short and long term spectrum stability, spectrum changes due to the emission area selection. In the paper the results of two OLEDs (red and white) are shown together with the result of an attempt to use them in an interferometric setup.

  14. Vertical distribution, composition profiles, sources and toxicity assessment of PAH residues in the reclaimed mudflat sediments from the adjacent Thane Creek of Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaiah, N; Mohite, R D; Singare, P U; Reddy, A V R; Singhal, R K; Blaha, U

    2017-05-15

    A study on vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility, carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting PAHs was performed in the reclaimed mudflat sediments adjacent to the Thane Creek of Mumbai. The 5-rings PAHs and ΣC-PAHs were more dominant at 120cm depth contributing 52.23% and 60.19% respectively to ∑PAHs. The average ratio values of LMW/HMW PAHs (0.58); Fla/(Fla+Pyr) (0.50); Ant/(Ant+Phe) (0.50); BaA/(Chry+BaA) (0.48); BaP/BghiP (2.06), Phe/Ant (1.03) and BaA/Chr (0.93) indicate that the PAH contamination might have raised due to inefficient combustion and pyrogenic emissions during the open burning of solid waste in the vicinity. This was further supported by the anthropogenic ferri(o)magnetic loading over the last 100years influencing the Creek sediments. The PAHs toxicity estimation was performed by calculating the toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) value of 8.62ng TEQ/g which was below the safe level (600ng TEQ/g) suggested by the Canadian risk-based soil criterion for protection of human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of light-emitting diode beacon light fixtures : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Rotating beacons containing filament light sources have long been used on highway maintenance trucks : to indicate the presence of the truck to other drivers. Because of advances in light-emitting diode (LED) : technologies, flashing lights containin...

  16. Activity measurement of phosphorus-32 in the presence of pure beta-emitting impurities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, B

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available Activity measurements undertaken at the CSIR's National Metrology Laboratory (NML) on a solution of the pure beta-emitting radionuclide phosphorus-32, which formed part of an international key comparison, are described. Since exploratory source...

  17. Power saving regulated light emitting diode circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haville, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    A power saving regulated light source circuit, comprising a light emitting diode (LED), a direct current source and a switching transistor connected in series with the LED, a control voltage producing resistor connected in series with the LED to produce a control voltage corresponding to the current through the LED, a storage capacitor connected in parallel with the series combination of the LED and the resistor, a comparator having its output connected to the input of the transistor, the comparator having a reference input and a control input, a stabilized biasing source for supplying a stabilized reference voltage to the reference input, the control input of the comparator being connected to the control voltage producing resistor, the comparator having a high output state when the reference voltage exceeds the control voltage while having a low output state when the control voltage exceeds the reference voltage, the transistor being conductive in response to the high state while being nonconductive in response to the low state, the transistor when conductive being effective to charge the capacitor and to increase the control voltage, whereby the comparator is cycled between the high and low output states while the transistor is cycled between conductive and nonconductive states

  18. Source and Enrichment of Toxic Elements in Coal Seams around Mafic Intrusions: Constraints from Pyrites in the Yuandian Coal Mine in Anhui, Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei An

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrite, a mineral that can cause potential environmental issues in coal mining, is commonly found in coal seams around intrusions. In this paper, pyrites from the Yuandian Coal Mine (Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, Eastern China were studied using SEM, Raman and LA-ICP-MS. The pyrite morphologic and geochemical data suggest that (1 four pyrite generations are present (framboidal sedimentary pyrites (Py I in the original coal, coarse-grained magmatic pyrites (Py II in the intruding diabase, fine-grained metamorphic pyrites (Py III in the intrusive contact aureole, and spheroid/vein hydrothermal pyrites (Py IV in the cokeite; and (2 concentrations of cobalt, nickel, arsenic, selenium, lead and copper in the metamorphic pyrites are much higher than the other pyrite generations. We propose that mafic magmatism is the main contributor of the toxic elements to the intrusion-related cokeite at Yuandian.

  19. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bandlapalli Pavani; Mandava Ragini; David Banji; Otilia J F Banji; N Gouri Pratusha

    2011-01-01

    There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflec...

  20. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in dust emitted from circulating fluidized bed boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielska, B; Konieczyńiski, J

    2008-11-01

    Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in granulometric fractions of dust emitted from a hard coal fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was investigated. The dust was sampled with the use of a Mark III impactor. In each fraction of dust, by using gas chromatography (GC), 16 selected PAHs and total PAHs were determined and the toxic equivalent B(a)P (TE B(a)P) was computed. The results, recalculated for the standard granulometric fractions, are presented as concentrations and content of the determined PAHs in dust. Distributions of PAHs and their profiles in the granulometric dust fractions were studied also. The PAHs in dust emitted from the CFB boiler were compared with those emitted from mechanical grate boilers; a distinctly lower content of PAHs was found in dust emitted from the former.

  1. Study of compounds emitted during thermo-oxidative decomposition of polyester fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzięcioł Małgorzata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Compounds emitted during thermo-oxidative decomposition of three commercial polyester fabrics for indoor outfit and decorations (upholstery, curtains were studied. The experiments were carried out in a flow tubular furnace at 600°C in an air atmosphere. During decomposition process the complex mixtures of volatile and solid compounds were emitted. The main volatile products were carbon oxides, benzene, acetaldehyde, vinyl benzoate and acetophe-none. The emitted solid compounds consisted mainly of aromatic carboxylic acids and its derivatives, among which the greatest part took terephthalic acid, monovinyl terephthalate and benzoic acid. The small amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were also emitted. The emission profiles of the tested polyester fabrics were similar. The presence of toxic compounds indicates the possibility of serious hazard for people during fire.

  2. Light extraction efficiency enhancement for fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    Fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes(LEDs) light source, as an innovative energy-efficient light source, would even have longer lifetime, better light quality and eliminated blue-tone effect, compared to the current phosphor based white LED light source. In this paper, the yellow...

  3. Seleção de atrativos alimentares e toxicidade de inseticidas para o manejo da broca-pequena-do-tomateiro Selection of attractive food sources and toxicity of insecticides in tomato fruit borer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Maria de França

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a preferência alimentar, o limiar de ingestão e efeito tóxico inseticidas associados atrativos, em adultos Neoleucinodes elegantalis. Foram testados os atrativos: melado e mel a 10%, extrato hexânico de frutos verdes de tomate a 0,4%, sacarose a 5%, suco de laranja e suco de uva a 30%, vinagre de vinho tinto a 10% e proteína hidrolisada a 5%. Com base no teste de preferência alimentar, foram selecionados os atrativos sacarose, melado, mel e suco de laranja, para determinar o limiar de concentração capaz de estimular a alimentação de adultos de N. elegantalis. Foi testado o efeito tóxico de inseticidas associados ao mel a 10%. A sacarose e o mel apresentaram o melhor resultado em relação ao número de pousos e ao tempo de pouso e de alimentação de adultos de N. elegantalis. Os inseticidas não afetaram negativamente a atração pelo alimento dos adultos de N. elegantalis. Carbaril, cartape, deltametrina, fenpropatrina, indoxacarbe, lambda-cialotrina e lufenurom provocaram 100% de mortalidade em adultos (machos + fêmeas, após 24 horas de exposição, e mostraram-se promissores para o uso em iscas tóxicas.This work aimed at evaluating the food preference, threshold of intake and toxic effect insecticides associated with attractive sources on adults Neoleucinodes elegantalis. The following attractive food sources were tested: molasses and honey at 10%, hexanic extract of green tomato fruits at 0.4%, sucrose at 5%, orange and grape juice at 30%, red wine vinegar at 10%, and hydrolyzed protein at 5% concentration. Based on the food preference test, sucrose, molasses, honey, and orange juice were selected to determine the threshold concentration capable of stimulating feeding in N. elegantalis adults. The toxic effect of insecticides added to honey at 10% was also tested. Sucrose and honey had the best results in terms of number of landings, landing time, and feeding time of adults of N

  4. 2011 NATA - Emissions Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all emissions sources that were modeled in the 2011 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), inlcluding point, nonpoint, and mobile sources, and...

  5. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Wen Yeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV LEDs and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED, have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450-480 nm and nUV (380-400 nm LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  6. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Lin, Chun-Che; Yeh, Chiao-Wen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2010-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV) LEDs) and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED) or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED), have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450−480 nm) and nUV (380−400 nm) LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+) is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  7. Nanocrystalline silicon as the light emitting material of a field emission display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, A; Sola, F; Resto, O; Fonseca, L F; Gonzalez-BerrIos, A; Jesus, J De; Morell, G

    2008-01-01

    A nanocrystalline Si-based paste was successfully tested as the light emitting material in a field emission display test device that employed a film of carbon nanofibers as the electron source. Stable emission in the 550-850 nm range was obtained at 16 V μm -1 . This relatively low field required for intense cathodoluminescence (CL) from the PSi paste may lead to longer term reliability of both the electron emitting and the light emitting materials, and to lower power consumption. Here we describe the synthesis, characterization, and analyses of the light emitting nanostructured Si paste and the electron emitting C nanofibers used for building the device, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The corresponding spectra and field emission curves are also shown and discussed

  8. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  9. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes in water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhunen, Sari; Särkkä, Heikki; Sillanpää, Mika

    2009-06-01

    The novel system of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) was studied in water disinfection. Conventional UV lamps, like mercury vapor lamp, consume much energy and are considered to be problem waste after use. UV LEDs are energy efficient and free of toxicants. This study showed the suitability of LEDs in disinfection and provided information of the effect of two emitted wavelengths and different test mediums to Escherichia coli destruction. Common laboratory strain of E. coli (K12) was used and the effects of two emitted wavelengths (269 and 276 nm) were investigated with two photolytic batch reactors both including ten LEDs. The effects of test medium were examined with ultrapure water, nutrient and water, and nutrient and water with humic acids. Efficiency of reactors was almost the same even though the one emitting higher wavelength had doubled optical power compared to the other. Therefore, the effect of wavelength was evident and the radiation emitted at 269 nm was more powerful. Also, the impact of background was studied and noticed to have only slight deteriorating effect. In the 5-min experiment, the bacterial reduction of three to four log colony-forming units (CFU) per cubic centimeter was achieved, in all cases. When turbidity of the test medium was greater, part of the UV radiation was spent on the absorption and reactions with extra substances on liquid. Humic acids can also coat the bacteria reducing the sensitivity of the cells to UV light. The lower wavelength was distinctly more efficient when the optical power is considered, even though the difference of wavelengths was small. The reason presumably is the greater absorption of DNA causing more efficient bacterial breakage. UV LEDs were efficient in E. coli destruction, even if LEDs were considered to have rather low optical power. The effect of wavelengths was noticeable but the test medium did not have much impact. This study found UV LEDs to be an optimal method for bacterial

  10. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    all chemicals and impact pathways characterizes the contribution of each factor to the total variation of 10–12 orders of magnitude in impacts per kg across all chemicals. This large variation between characterisation factors for different chemicals as well as the 3 orders of magnitude uncertainty....... As a whole, the assessment of toxicity in LCA has progressed on a very sharp learning curve during the past 20 years. This rapid progression is expected to continue in the coming years, focusing more on direct exposure of workers to chemicals during manufacturing and of consumers during product use...

  11. Nuclear radiation and agricultural production - the food chain as a pathway for radionuclide (toxic trace elements) migration from the source to the ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacintov, P [Statni Veterinarni Ustav, Brno (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-01-01

    The transport of /sup 131/I from the source into the atmosphere, its concentration in the atmosphere above agricultural land, its deposition in the vegetative cover and factors which affect the deposition rate, its retention and the effects of weather conditions are described as an example of the transport of radionuclides from the source to the ecosystem and into the human body. The relation is given for the calculation of the effective half-life of /sup 131/I retention in plants. In steady state during permanent /sup 131/I release the effective life-time is 7.2 days on the average. The transport is described of /sup 131/I from the vegetation into the organism of the cow, into milk and from there into the human body. The intake of /sup 131/I depends on the amount of milk consumed which again depends on age, sex and dietary habits. For children the maximum permissible concentration of /sup 131/I in milk is 15 to 40 pCi/l, based on a dose limit of 90 mrem/y to the thyroid. The knowledge of all factors related to /sup 131/I transport through the food chain to the human body allows determining the permissible level of /sup 131/I release from a nuclear power plant.

  12. Efficient white organic light emitting devices with dual emitting layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yaoshan; Hwang Shiaowen; Chen Hsianhung; Lee Mengting; Shen Wenjian; Chen, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new white organic light-emitting device (OLED) with the structure of indium tin oxide / CF x / 1,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-phenylamino]-biphenyl (NPB) (30 nm)/NPB: 2,8-di(t-butyl)-5,11-di[4-(t-butyl)phenyl]-6,12-diphenylnaphthacene (20 nm; 1.6 %) / 2-methyl-9,10-di(2-naphthyl) anthracene: p-bis(p-N,N-di-phenyl-aminostyryl)benzene (40 nm, 3%) / aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (20 nm) / LiF (1 nm) / Al (200 nm) has been investigated. The device showed white emission with a high-luminous yield of 9.75 cd/A at 20 mA/cm 2 , but its Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates appeared to change from (0.34, 0.42) at 6 mA/cm2 to (0.27, 0.37) at 200 mA/cm 2 due to the shift of recombination zone. The change of color with drive current was suppressed by introduction of an electron-blocking layer of NPB along with a hole-blocking layer of aluminum (III) bis(2-methyl-8-quinolinato)4-phenylphenolato to the white OLED which successfully confined the recombination site and achieved a luminous yield of 9.9 cd/A at 20 mA/cm 2

  13. Efficient white organic light emitting devices with dual emitting layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yaoshan [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China); Hwang Shiaowen [Display Institute, Microelectronics and Information Systems Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China)]. E-mail: jesse@faculty.nctu.edu.tw; Chen Hsianhung [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China); Lee Mengting [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China); Shen Wenjian [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China); Chen, C.H. [Display Institute, Microelectronics and Information Systems Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30050 (China)

    2005-09-22

    In this paper, a new white organic light-emitting device (OLED) with the structure of indium tin oxide / CF {sub x} / 1,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-phenylamino]-biphenyl (NPB) (30 nm)/NPB: 2,8-di(t-butyl)-5,11-di[4-(t-butyl)phenyl]-6,12-diphenylnaphthacene (20 nm; 1.6 %) / 2-methyl-9,10-di(2-naphthyl) anthracene: p-bis(p-N,N-di-phenyl-aminostyryl)benzene (40 nm, 3%) / aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (20 nm) / LiF (1 nm) / Al (200 nm) has been investigated. The device showed white emission with a high-luminous yield of 9.75 cd/A at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, but its Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates appeared to change from (0.34, 0.42) at 6 mA/cm2 to (0.27, 0.37) at 200 mA/cm{sup 2} due to the shift of recombination zone. The change of color with drive current was suppressed by introduction of an electron-blocking layer of NPB along with a hole-blocking layer of aluminum (III) bis(2-methyl-8-quinolinato)4-phenylphenolato to the white OLED which successfully confined the recombination site and achieved a luminous yield of 9.9 cd/A at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  14. Gaseous emissions and toxic hazards associated with plastics in fire situations: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    The hazards of plastics in fire situations, the gases emitted, the factors influencing the nature of these emissions, the characteristics of toxic gases, and the results of laboratory studies, are discussed. The literature pertaining to the pyrolysis and oxidation of plastics was reviewed. An effort was made to define the state of the art for determining the toxic gases emitted by plastics under fire conditions. Recommendations are made and research needs defined as a result of this review.

  15. Highly efficient silicon light emitting diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a

  16. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  17. CASPER: Concordia Atmospheric SPectroscopy of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Petris, M.; Catalano, A.; de Gregori, S.; Lamagna, L.; Lattanzi, V.; Luzzi, G.; Maoli, R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melchiorri, F.; Savini, G.; Vetrani, G. G.; Battistelli, E. S.; Valenziano, L.; Mandolesi, N.; Villa, F.; Cuttaia, F.; Ade, P. A. R.; Mauskopf, P.; Orlando, A.; Encrenaz, P.; Pardo, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.

    CASPER (Concordia Atmospheric SPectroscopy of Emitted Radiation) is a spectrometer proposed for installation at Dome C, devoted to measurements of atmospheric emission in the spectral region between 180 μm and 3 mm (3 55 cm-1). This instrument will be able to perform continuous spectral sampling at different altitudes at angular scales of 1°. From the recorded data it is possible to extract atmospheric transmittance within 1% in the whole wide operating band, together with water vapour content and O{2} and O{3} concentrations. CASPER will allow us to characterize the site for future FIR/mm telescopes. Atmospheric data recorded by CASPER will allow for correction of astrophysical and cosmological observations without the need for telescope-specific procedures and further loss of observation time with more precision in the observations themselves. Calibration of ground-based telescopes on known sky sources is strongly affected by atmospheric absorption. CASPER has this as its primary goal. The spectrometer is based on a Martin-Puplett interferometer. Two data sampling solutions will be performed: phase modulation & fast scan strategy. Sky radiation is collected towards the interferometer by an optical setup that allows the field of view, to explore the full 0° div 90° range of elevation angles. With a low spurious polarization instrument, monitoring of polarized atmospheric contribution will be possible.

  18. Aggregation in organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Abigail

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology has great potential for becoming a solid state lighting source. However, there are inefficiencies in OLED devices that need to be understood. Since these inefficiencies occur on a nanometer scale there is a need for structural data on this length scale in three dimensions which has been unattainable until now. Local Electron Atom Probe (LEAP), a specific implementation of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), is used in this work to acquire morphology data in three dimensions on a nanometer scale with much better chemical resolution than is previously seen. Before analyzing LEAP data, simulations were used to investigate how detector efficiency, sample size and cluster size affect data analysis which is done using radial distribution functions (RDFs). Data is reconstructed using the LEAP software which provides mass and position data. Two samples were then analyzed, 3% DCM2 in C60 and 2% DCM2 in Alq3. Analysis of both samples indicated little to no clustering was present in this system.

  19. Light sources and light pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, G.

    2005-01-01

    From the dawn of mankind fire and light sources in general played an essential role in everyday life and protection over night. The development of new light sources went through many stages and is now an immense technological achievement, but also a threat for the wildlife at night, mainly because of the so-called light pollution. This paper discusses several very successful light sources connected with low pressure mercury and sodium vapour electric discharges. The luminous efficacy, colour rendering index and other lighting features cannot be always satisfactory, but at least some of the features can be much better than those met by the standard tungsten filament bulbs. High-pressure metal-vapour discharge lamps definitely have a good colour rendering index and a relatively high luminosity. Different light sources with burners at high pressure are discussed, paying special attention to their spectrum. The paper investigates new trends in development through a number of examples with non-toxic elements and pulsed electric discharge, which may be good news in terms of clean environment and energy savings. Light emitting diodes have recently appeared as worthy competitors to conventional light sources. White LEDs have approached 100 lumen/Watt efficacy in laboratories. This suggests that in some not very distant future they could completely replace high-pressure lamps, at least in indoor lighting. The article speculates on new developments which combine trends in nano technology and material science. The paper concludes with light pollution in view of several recent observations of plant and animal life at night in the vicinity of strong light sources. Photo-induced changes at the cell level may completely alter the normal life of plants and animals.(author)

  20. Study of photophysical processes in organic light-emitting diodes based on light-emission profile reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvelli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are emerging as a promising option for energy-efficient, flexible light sources. A key factor that needs to be measured and controlled is the shape of the emission profile, i.e. the spatial distribution of the emitting excitons across the active layer thickness.

  1. Assessing the use of Low Voltage UV-light Emitting Miniature LEDs for Marine Biofouling Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    of that required to drive traditional UV mercury lamps . Secondly, given their small size and relatively low cost, UV LEDs provide ease of maintenance...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Assessing the use of Low Voltage UV -light Emitting Miniature LEDs for Marine Biofouling Control Richard...settling organisms. The introduction of miniature UV light emitting diodes ( LEDs ) as a light source enables them to be embedded into thin, flexible

  2. Toxicity identification evaluation methods for identification of toxicants in refinery effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barten, K.A.; Mount, D.R.; Hackett, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    During the last five years, the authors have used Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) methods to characterize and identify the source(s) of toxicity in effluents from dozens of municipal and industrial facilities. In most cases, specific chemicals responsible for toxicity have been identified. Although generally successful, the initial experience was that for several refinery effluents, they were able only to qualitatively characterize the presence of organic toxicants; standard toxicant identification procedures were not able to isolate specific organic chemicals. They believe that organic toxicity in these refinery effluents is caused by multiple organic compounds rather than by just a few; evidence for this includes an inability to isolate toxicity in a small number of fractions using liquid chromatography and the presence of very large numbers of compounds in isolated fractions. There is also evidence that the toxicant(s) may be ionic, in that the toxicity of whole effluent and isolated fractions often show increasing toxicity with decreasing pH. Finally, positive-pressure filtration has also reduced toxicity in some samples. In this presentation the authors summarize their experiences with refinery effluents, focusing on typical patterns they have observed and alternative procedures they have used to better understand the nature of these toxicants

  3. Longitudinally mounted light emitting plasma in a dielectric resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliard, Richard; DeVincentis, Marc; Hafidi, Abdeslam; O' Hare, Daniel; Hollingsworth, Gregg [LUXIM Corporation, 1171 Borregas Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States)

    2011-06-08

    Methods for coupling power from a dielectric resonator to a light-emitting plasma have been previously described (Gilliard et al IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. at press). Inevitably, regardless of the efficiency of power transfer, much of the emitted light is absorbed in the resonator itself which physically surrounds much if not all of the radiating material. An investigation into a method is presented here for efficiently coupling power to a longitudinally mounted plasma vessel which is mounted on the surface of the dielectric material of the resonator, thereby eliminating significant absorption of light within the resonator structure. The topology of the resonator and its physical properties as well as those of the metal halide plasma are presented. Results of basic models of the field configuration and plasma are shown as well as a configuration suitable as a practical light source.

  4. The Impact of a Nickel-Copper Smelter on Concentrations of Toxic Elements in Local Wild Food from the Norwegian, Finnish, and Russian Border Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martine D; Nøst, Therese H; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Evenset, Anita; Dudarev, Alexey A; Rautio, Arja; Myllynen, Päivi; Dushkina, Eugenia V; Jagodic, Marta; Christensen, Guttorm N; Anda, Erik E; Brustad, Magritt; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2017-06-28

    Toxic elements emitted from the Pechenganickel complex on the Kola Peninsula have caused concern about potential effects on local wild food in the border regions between Norway, Finland and Russia. The aim of this study was to assess Ni, Cu, Co, As, Pb, Cd, and Hg concentrations in local wild foods from these border regions. During 2013-2014, we collected samples of different berry, mushroom, fish, and game species from sites at varying distances from the Ni-Cu smelter in all three border regions. Our results indicate that the Ni-Cu smelter is the main source of Ni, Co, and As in local wild foods, whereas the sources of Pb and Cd are more complex. We observed no consistent trends for Cu, one of the main toxic elements emitted by the Ni-Cu smelter; nor did we find any trend for Hg in wild food. Concentrations of all investigated toxic elements were highest in mushrooms, except for Hg, which was highest in fish. EU maximum levels of Pb, Cd, and Hg were exceeded in some samples, but most had levels considered safe for human consumption. No international thresholds exist for the other elements under study.

  5. Versatile Tri(pyrazolyl)phosphanes as Phosphorus Precursors for the Synthesis of Highly Emitting InP/ZnS Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, René; Guhrenz, Chris; Haubold, Danny; Hübner, René; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Weigand, Jan J

    2017-11-13

    Tri(pyrazolyl)phosphanes (5 R1,R2 ) are utilized as an alternative, cheap and low-toxic phosphorus source for the convenient synthesis of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). From these precursors, remarkably long-term stable stock solutions (>6 months) of P(OLA) 3 (OLAH=oleylamine) are generated from which the respective pyrazoles are conveniently recovered. P(OLA) 3 acts simultaneously as phosphorus source and reducing agent in the synthesis of highly emitting InP/ZnS core/shell QDs. These QDs are characterized by a spectral range between 530-620 nm and photoluminescence quantum yields (PL QYs) between 51-62 %. A proof-of-concept white light-emitting diode (LED) applying the InP/ZnS QDs as a color-conversion layer was built to demonstrate their applicability and processibility. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. White organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenow, Thomas Conrad

    2011-03-22

    Three approaches were taken in order to achieve reproducible and highly efficient white OLEDs with excellent colour quality. The first approach is based on the triplet harvesting concept. Otherwise unused triplet excitons are transferred from a fluorescent to a phosphorescent emitter with a smaller triplet energy. Because a blue emitter allowing for triplet transfer to a phosphorescent green emitter was not available, a model system for a three-colour white OLED was developed and investigated. This model device consists of the fluorescent blue emitter 4P-NPD and the phosphorescent emitters Ir(dhfpy){sub 2}acac and Ir(MDQ){sub 2}acac emitting in the yellow and red region, respectively. Here, it was shown that both phosphorescent emitters are excited by triplet diffusion and not by direct charge carrier recombination. The second approach is based on a hybrid white OLED with a single emission layer. This layer is a combination of a fluorescent blue and two phosphorescent emitters in a common matrix material. Because of the above mentioned lack of a blue emitter, which allows for triplet transfer to a green phosphorescent emitter, the concentrations of all emitters were chosen in a way that exciton transfer between the emitters was suppressed. The result is a non-radiative recombination of triplet excitons on the fluorescent blue emitter and an accordingly low quantum efficiency. However, a remarkable colour stability against varying brightness was achieved with this OLED. The most successful approach is based on a stacked OLED. Here, the concept of triplet harvesting is limited to triplet transfer between a fluorescent blue and a phosphorescent red emitter. The resulting spectral gap is filled by a full phosphorescent unit comprising the emission of a green and a yellow emitter, which is stacked on top of the triplet harvesting OLED. By individually optimising both units, it was possible to reach lighting relevant luminous efficacies up to {eta}{sub {nu}}=33 lm/W at

  7. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Integrated Use of n-Alkanes and PAH to Evaluate the Anthropogenic Hydrocarbon Sources and the Toxicity Assessment of Surface Sediments from the Southwestern Coasts of the Caspian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golshan Shirneshan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH compounds and normal alkanes form a large group of undegradable environmental contaminats. This study aims to determine the sources and distribution of oil pollution (PAH compounds and normal alkanes in the sediments of the southwestern coastal areas of the Caspian Sea and to compare their levels with the relevant standards. For this purpose, 18 surface sediment samples were collected from depths of 10, 20, and 50 meters along two transects in the vertical direction located in the coastal areas of Sangachin and Hashtpar (Gilan Province. The samples were then examined using mass-spectrometric gas chromatography. The origins of n-alkanes were identified using CPI index (0.76-0.95, U/R (3.30‒6.57, and Pristane/Phytane (0.21‒0.42. The sources of PAHs were determined using the index ratios of LMW/HMW (1.93‒13.37, Phenanthrene/Anthracene (11.44‒ 16.7, Chrysene/Benzo (a anthracene (4.69‒10/33, Fluoranthene/Pyrene (0.53‒0.69, and MP/P (0.05‒0.08. Results confirmed the dominant petrogenic source of the hydrocarbons found in the region. The total concentrations of 30 aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs in the sediments ranged from 823.8 to 3899.5 µg/g and from 626.95 to 3842.5362 ng/g, respectively. Comparison of the measured PAH concentrations with US sediment quality guidelines revealed that the levels of naphthalene, fluorine, Acenaphthylene, and Acenaphthene exceeded the ERLs at stations with depths of 50m in Sangachin and Hashtpar while comparisons with Canadian standards indicated that they were higher than PELs at all the stations sampled. A major point of great concern is the high concentration of naphthalene as the most toxic PAH compound, which naturally warrants due attention to adopt appropriate management programs.

  9. Highly efficient sources of single indistinguishable photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    be electrically driven. Several design strategies addressing these requirements have been proposed. In the cavity-based source, light emission is controlled using resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics effects, whereas in the waveguide-based source, broadband electric field screening effects are employed......Solid-state sources capable of emitting single photons on demand are of great interest in quantum information applications. Ideally, such a source should emit exactly one photon into the collection optics per trigger, the emitted photons should be indistinguishable and the source should...

  10. Molecular toxicity mechanism of nanosilver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle McShan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver is an ancient antibiotic that has found many new uses due to its unique properties on the nanoscale. Due to its presence in many consumer products, the toxicity of nanosilver has become a hot topic. This review summarizes recent advances, particularly the molecular mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. The surface of nanosilver can easily be oxidized by O2 and other molecules in the environmental and biological systems leading to the release of Ag+, a known toxic ion. Therefore, nanosilver toxicity is closely related to the release of Ag+. In fact, it is difficult to determine what portion of the toxicity is from the nano-form and what is from the ionic form. The surface oxidation rate is closely related to the nanosilver surface coating, coexisting molecules, especially thiol-containing compounds, lighting conditions, and the interaction of nanosilver with nucleic acids, lipid molecules, and proteins in a biological system. Nanosilver has been shown to penetrate the cell and become internalized. Thus, nanosilver often acts as a source of Ag+ inside the cell. One of the main mechanisms of toxicity is that it causes oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species and causes damage to cellular components including DNA damage, activation of antioxidant enzymes, depletion of antioxidant molecules (e.g., glutathione, binding and disabling of proteins, and damage to the cell membrane. Several major questions remain to be answered: (1 the toxic contribution from the ionic form versus the nano-form; (2 key enzymes and signaling pathways responsible for the toxicity; and (3 effect of coexisting molecules on the toxicity and its relationship to surface coating.

  11. Source and replica calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem

  12. Comparative Chemistry and Toxicity of Diesel and Biomass Combustion Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution includes a complex mixture of carbonaceous gases and particles emitted from multiple anthropogenic, biogenic, and biomass burning sources, and also includes secondary organic components that form during atmospheric aging of these emissions. Exposure to these mixture...

  13. Radiation Emitting Product Corrective Actions and Recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database provides descriptions of radiation-emitting products that have been recalled under an approved corrective action plan to remove defective and...

  14. Radiation-emitting Electronic Product Codes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains product names and associated information developed by the Center for all products, both medical and non-medical, which emit radiation. It...

  15. Emissive Ion Thruster -EMIT, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A propulsion system is proposed that is based on acceleration of ions emitted from a thin, solid-state electrochemical ceramic membrane. This technology would...

  16. Pyridine Based Polymer Light-Emitting Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Y

    1997-01-01

    ...) as a hole transporting/electron blocking layer. This improves the device efficiency and brightness significantly due to the charge confinement and exciplex emission at the PVK/emitting polymer interface...

  17. Determination of some toxic gaseous emissions at Ama Industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of some toxic gaseous emissions at Ama Industrial Complex, Enugu, south eastern Nigeria. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... A study of some gases emitted from three industries at Ama industrial complex, Nigeria, was carried out ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  18. Printing method for organic light emitting device lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Hyun Chul; Kim, Seon Hoon; Kim, Doo-Gun; Kim, Tae-Un; Kim, Snag-Gi; Hong, Kyung-Jin; So, Soon-Yeol

    2013-03-01

    Organic Light Emitting Device (OLED) has a characteristic to change the electric energy into the light when the electric field is applied to the organic material. OLED is currently employed as a light source for the lighting tools because research has extensively progressed in the improvement of luminance, efficiency, and life time. OLED is widely used in the plate display device because of a simple manufacture process and high emitting efficiency. But most of OLED lighting projects were used the vacuum evaporator (thermal evaporator) with low molecular. Although printing method has lower efficiency and life time of OLED than vacuum evaporator method, projects of printing OLED actively are progressed because was possible to combine with flexible substrate and printing technology. Printing technology is ink-jet, screen printing and slot coating. This printing method allows for low cost and mass production techniques and large substrates. In this research, we have proposed inkjet printing for organic light-emitting devices has the dominant method of thick film deposition because of its low cost and simple processing. In this research, the fabrication of the passive matrix OLED is achieved by inkjet printing, using a polymer phosphorescent ink. We are measured optical and electrical characteristics of OLED.

  19. Si light-emitting device in integrated photonic CMOS ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaikai; Snyman, Lukas W.; Aharoni, Herzl

    2017-07-01

    The motivation for integrated Si optoelectronics is the creation of low-cost photonics for mass-market applications. Especially, the growing demand for sensitive biochemical sensors in the environmental control or medicine leads to the development of integrated high resolution sensors. Here CMOS-compatible Si light-emitting device structures are presented for investigating the effect of various depletion layer profiles and defect engineering on the photonic transition in the 1.4-2.8 eV. A novel Si device is proposed to realize both a two-terminal Si-diode light-emitting device and a three-terminal Si gate-controlled diode light-emitting device in the same device structure. In addition to the spectral analysis, differences between two-terminal and three-terminal devices are discussed, showing the light emission efficiency change. The proposed Si optical source may find potential applications in micro-photonic systems and micro-optoelectro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) in CMOS integrated circuitry.

  20. In-source formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), the putatively toxic acetaminophen (paracetamol) metabolite, after derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and GC-ECNICI-MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Trettin, Arne; Zörner, Alexander A; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias

    2011-05-15

    Pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) bromide (PFB-Br) is a versatile derivatization reagent for numerous classes of compounds. Under electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization (ECNICI) conditions PFB derivatives of acidic compounds readily and abundantly ionize to produce intense anions due to [M-PFB](-). In the present article we investigated the PFB-Br derivatization of unlabelled acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, NAPAP-d(0); paracetamol; MW 151) and tetradeuterated acetaminophen (NAPAP-d(4); MW 155) in anhydrous acetonitrile and their GC-ECNICI-MS behavior using methane as the buffer gas. In addition to the expected anions [M-PFB](-) at m/z 150 from NAPAP-d(0) and m/z 154 from NAPAP-d(4), we observed highly reproducibly almost equally intense anions at m/z 149 and m/z 153, respectively. Selected ion monitoring of these ions is suitable for specific and sensitive quantification of acetaminophen in human plasma and urine. Detailed investigations suggest in-source formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI; MW 149), the putatively toxic acetaminophen metabolite, from the PFB ether derivative of NAPAP. GC-ECNICI-MS of non-derivatized NAPAP did not produce NAPQI. The peak area ratio of m/z 149 to m/z 150 and of m/z 153 to m/z 154 decreased with increasing ion-source temperature in the range 100-250°C. Most likely, NAPQI formed in the ion-source captures secondary electrons to become negatively charged (i.e., [NAPQI](-)) and thus detectable. Formation of NAPQI was not observed under electron ionization (EI) conditions, i.e., by GC-EI-MS, from derivatized and non-derivatized NAPAP. NAPQI was not detectable in flow injection analysis LC-MS of native NAPAP in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode, whereas in negative ESI mode low extent NAPQI formation was observed (<5%). Our results suggest that oxidation of drug derivatives in the ion-sources of mass spectrometers may form intermediates that are produced from activated drugs in enzyme-catalyzed reactions

  1. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  2. Projections of air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility combustion: Input for hazardous air pollutant regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by the 1990 CAAA to promulgate rules for all ''major'' sources of any of these HAPs. According to the HAPs section of the new Title III, any stationary source emitting 10 tons per year (TPY) of one HAP or 25 TPY of a combination of HAPs will be considered and designated a major source. In contrast to the original National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which were designed to protect public health to ''an ample margin of safety,'' the new Title III, in its first phase, will regulate by industrial category those sources emitting HAPs in excess of the 10/25-TPY threshold levels, regardless of health risks. The trace elements normally associated with coal mineral matter and the various compounds formed during coal combustion have the potential to produce hazardous air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. Under Title III, the EPA is required to perform certain studies, prior to any regulation of electric utilities; these studies are currently underway. Also, the US Department of Energy (DOE) maintains a vested interest in addressing those energy policy questions affecting electric utility generation, coal mining, and steel producing critical to this country's economic well-being, where balancing the costs to the producers and users of energy with the benefits of environmental protection to the workers and the general populace remains of significant concern

  3. Polarization of photons emitted by decaying dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bonivento

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiatively decaying dark matter may be searched through investigating the photon spectrum of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We explore whether the properties of dark matter can be constrained through the study of a polarization state of emitted photons. Starting from the basic principles of quantum mechanics we show that the models of symmetric dark matter are indiscernible by the photon polarization. However, we find that the asymmetric dark matter consisted of Dirac fermions is a source of circularly polarized photons, calling for the experimental determination of the photon state.

  4. Light-emitting diodes - Their potential in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Naichia Gary; Wu, Chia-Hao [College of Applied Sciences, MingDao University, 369 Wen-Hua Road, Peetou, Changhua 52345 (China); Cheng, Ta Chih [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, 1 Hseuh-Fu Rd., Nei-Pu Hsiang, Pingtung 91201 (China)

    2010-10-15

    The rapid development of high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) makes feasible the use of LEDs, among other light sources (such as laser, intense pulse light and other incoherent light systems), for medical treatment and light therapy. This paper provides a general review on red, green, blue, ultraviolet LED applications in photo rejuvenation and medical treatments of a variety of physical abnormalities, as well as the relief of stress, circadian rhythm disorders, and seasonal affective disorder. The review, concentrated in the papers published after 1990, intends to show that LEDs are well qualified to succeed its more energy demanding counterparts in the named areas and beyond. (author)

  5. Petroleum hydrocarbon toxicity to corals: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicholas R; Renegar, D Abigail

    2017-06-30

    The proximity of coral reefs to coastal urban areas and shipping lanes predisposes corals to petroleum pollution from multiple sources. Previous research has evaluated petroleum toxicity to coral using a variety of methodology, including monitoring effects of acute and chronic spills, in situ exposures, and ex situ exposures with both adult and larval stage corals. Variability in toxicant, bioassay conditions, species and other methodological disparities between studies prevents comprehensive conclusions regarding the toxicity of hydrocarbons to corals. Following standardized protocols and quantifying the concentration and composition of toxicant will aid in comparison of results between studies and extrapolation to actual spills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Baltimore Air Toxics Study (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.A. [Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Baltimore Air Toxics Study is one of the three urban air toxics initiatives funded by EPA to support the development of the national air toxics strategy. As part of this project, the Air Quality Integrated Management System (AIMS) is under development. AIMS is designed to bring together the key components of urban air quality management into an integrated system, including emissions assessment, air quality modeling, and air quality monitoring. Urban area source emissions are computed for a wide range of pollutants and source categories, and are joined with existing point source emissions data. Measured air quality data are used to evaluate the adequacy of the emissions data and model treatments as a function of season, meteorological parameters, and daytime/nighttime conditions. Based on tested model performance, AIMS provides the potential to improve the ability to predict air quality benefits of alternative control options for criteria and toxic air pollutants. This paper describes the methods used to develop AIMS, and provides examples from its application in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The use of AIMS in the future to enhance environmental management of major industrial facilities also will be addressed in the paper.

  7. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  8. Evaluation of the health impact of nanoparticles emitted from combustion sources: Comprehensive characterization of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticle emissions from wood combustion compliances, car- and ship diesel-engines as well as investigation of their toxicological effects on human lung cells and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Mülhopt, S.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Karg, E.; Weggler, B.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Lintelmann, J.; Sklorz, M.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Passig, J.; Gröger, T.; BéruBé, K.; Krebs, T.

    2016-12-01

    with murine RAW macrophages. Detailed analyses of the activated cellular response pathways, such as pro-inflammatory responses, xenobiotic metabolism, phagocytosis and oxidative stress were performed. The data is suggesting a large difference in relative toxicity for different combustion sources.

  9. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Are Metals Emitted from Electronic Cigarettes a Reason for Health Concern? A Risk-Assessment Analysis of Currently Available Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have found that metals are emitted to the electronic cigarette (EC aerosol. However, the potential health impact of exposure to such metals has not been adequately defined. The purpose of this study was to perform a risk assessment analysis, evaluating the exposure of electronic cigarette (EC users to metal emissions based on findings from the published literature. Methods: Two studies were found in the literature, measuring metals emitted to the aerosol from 13 EC products. We estimated that users take on average 600 EC puffs per day, but we evaluated the daily exposure from 1200 puffs. Estimates of exposure were compared with the chronic Permissible Daily Exposure (PDE from inhalational medications defined by the U.S. Pharmacopeia (cadmium, chromium, copper, lead and nickel, the Minimal Risk Level (MRL defined by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (manganese and the Recommended Exposure Limit (REL defined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (aluminum, barium, iron, tin, titanium, zinc and zirconium. Results: The average daily exposure from 13 EC products was 2.6 to 387 times lower than the safety cut-off point of PDEs, 325 times lower than the safety limit of MRL and 665 to 77,514 times lower than the safety cut-off point of RELs. Only one of the 13 products was found to result in exposure 10% higher than PDE for one metal (cadmium at the extreme daily use of 1200 puffs. Significant differences in emissions between products were observed. Conclusions: Based on currently available data, overall exposure to metals from EC use is not expected to be of significant health concern for smokers switching to EC use, but is an unnecessary source of exposure for never-smokers. Metal analysis should be expanded to more products and exposure can be further reduced through improvements in product quality and appropriate choice of materials.

  11. Morphology of micro- and nanoparticles emitted by copper plants in Western Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Cwil, M.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.; Diduszko, R.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol particles were collected in the vicinity of copper plants in Western Poland and analysed by mass spectrometry methods like secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and X-ray diffraction to characterise the possible dangers for the environment and health. The motivation of the work was to approach the toxicological mechanisms that are triggered when aerosol nanoparticles enter the human body. Different analytical techniques were used in order to compare bulk and surface properties of particles. The particle collection was performed with nine-stage cascade impactor with rotating plates and also with micro-fibre quartz filter collector. SSMS bulk analysis of copper plant emitted particles shows the presence of over 30 elements, the concentration in wt.% of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cl is 30, 5, 2 and 1, respectively. XRD analysis of these particles shows crystalline phases of quartz and probable phases containing copper CuS 2 , lead Pb 2 SiO 4 , PbO - massicot, Pb 5 [OH][PO 4 ] 3 , Pb 3 SiO 5 , iron and calcium Ca[Mg 0.67 Fe 0.33 ][CO 3 ] - dolomite, ferroan, Ca[FeMg][CO 3 ] 2 - ankerite, Ca[MgFe]Si 2 O 6 - augite. Surface sensitive SIMS depth profile analysis revealed the core-shell structure of copper plant emitted particles. The obtained structure of these particles shows that surfaces of the particles are enriched in elements like chlorine, fluorine, lead and chromium with respect to the core concentrations of these elements. The cores are composed mainly of copper, oxygen and carbon containing compounds. Lead concentration is nearly two times greater at the surface layers of particles than in the cores. SIMS analysis of urban aerosol particles collected in Legnica shows compositional dependence with size. Surface shell layer concentration of lead is three times greater for coarse 6-15 μm particles than for tiny 300 nm-1 μm particles. Such non-uniform particle morphology may enhance the toxic properties of particles suspended in

  12. Morphology of micro- and nanoparticles emitted by copper plants in Western Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konarski, P.; Cwil, M.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.; Diduszko, R

    2004-07-01

    Aerosol particles were collected in the vicinity of copper plants in Western Poland and analysed by mass spectrometry methods like secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and X-ray diffraction to characterise the possible dangers for the environment and health. The motivation of the work was to approach the toxicological mechanisms that are triggered when aerosol nanoparticles enter the human body. Different analytical techniques were used in order to compare bulk and surface properties of particles. The particle collection was performed with nine-stage cascade impactor with rotating plates and also with micro-fibre quartz filter collector. SSMS bulk analysis of copper plant emitted particles shows the presence of over 30 elements, the concentration in wt.% of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cl is 30, 5, 2 and 1, respectively. XRD analysis of these particles shows crystalline phases of quartz and probable phases containing copper CuS{sub 2}, lead Pb{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, PbO - massicot, Pb{sub 5}[OH][PO{sub 4}]{sub 3}, Pb{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}, iron and calcium Ca[Mg{sub 0.67}Fe{sub 0.33}][CO{sub 3}] - dolomite, ferroan, Ca[FeMg][CO{sub 3}]{sub 2} - ankerite, Ca[MgFe]Si{sub 2}O{sub 6} - augite. Surface sensitive SIMS depth profile analysis revealed the core-shell structure of copper plant emitted particles. The obtained structure of these particles shows that surfaces of the particles are enriched in elements like chlorine, fluorine, lead and chromium with respect to the core concentrations of these elements. The cores are composed mainly of copper, oxygen and carbon containing compounds. Lead concentration is nearly two times greater at the surface layers of particles than in the cores. SIMS analysis of urban aerosol particles collected in Legnica shows compositional dependence with size. Surface shell layer concentration of lead is three times greater for coarse 6-15 {mu}m particles than for tiny 300 nm-1 {mu}m particles. Such non-uniform particle

  13. Light emitting fabric for photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thecua, E.; Vicentini, C.; Vignion, A.-S.; Lecomte, F.; Deleporte, P.; Mortier, L.; Szeimies, R.-M.; Mordon, S.

    2017-02-01

    The integration of optical fibers into flexible textile structures, by using knitting or weaving processes can allow the development of flexible light sources. The paper aims to present a new technology: Light Emitting Fabrics (LEF), which can be used for example for PDT of Actinic Keratosis in Dermatology. The predetermined macro-bending of optical fibers, led to a homogeneous side emission of light over the entire surface of the fabric. Tests showed that additional curvatures when applying the LEF on non-planar surfaces had no impact on light delivery and proved that LEF can adapt to the human morphology. The ability of the LEF, coupled with a 635nm LASER source, to deliver a homogeneous light to lesions is currently assessed in a clinical trial for the treatment of AK of the scalp by PDT. The low irradiance and progressive activation of the photosensitizer ensure a pain reduction, compared to discomfort levels experienced by patients during a conventional PDT session.

  14. Internal sources dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, Eduardo

    1994-01-01

    The absorbed dose, need of estimation in risk evaluation in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine practice,internal dosimetry,internal and external sources. Calculation methodology,Marinelli model,MIRD system for absorbed dose calculation based on biological parameters of radiopharmaceutical in human body or individual,energy of emitted radiations by administered radionuclide, fraction of emitted energy that is absorbed by target body.Limitation of the MIRD calculation model. A explanation of Marinelli method of dosimetry calculation,β dosimetry. Y dosimetry, effective dose, calculation in organs and tissues, examples. Bibliography .

  15. Toxicity identification evaluation of cosmetics industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Elisa Dias; Mounteer, Ann H; Leão, Lucas Henrique de Souza; Bahia, Renata Cibele Barros; Campos, Izabella Maria Ferreira

    2013-01-15

    The cosmetics industry has shown steady growth in many developing countries over the past several years, yet little research exists on toxicity of wastewaters it generates. This study describes a toxicity identification evaluation conducted on wastewater from a small Brazilian hair care products manufacturing plant. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological analyses of three wastewater treatment plant inlet and outlet samples collected over a six month period revealed inefficient operation of the treatment system and thus treated wastewater organic matter, suspended solids and surfactants contents consistently exceeded discharge limits. Treated wastewater also presented high acute toxicity to Daphnia similis and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. This toxicity was associated with suspended solids, volatile or sublatable and non-polar to moderately polar organic compounds that could be recovered in filtration and aeration residues. Seven surfactants used in the largest quantities in the production process were highly toxic to P. subcapitata and D. similis. These results indicated that surfactants, important production raw materials, are a probable source of toxicity, although other possible sources, such as fragrances, should not be discarded. Improved treatment plant operational control may reduce toxicity and lower impact of wastewater discharge to receiving waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulsed neutron source well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillingham, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed neutron source arrangement is provided in which a sealed cylindrical chamber encloses a rotatable rotor member carrying a plurality of elongated target strips of material which emits neutrons when bombarded with alpha particles emitted by the plurality of source material strips. The rotor may be locked in a so-called ON position by an electromagnetic clutch drive mechanism controllable from the earth's surface so as to permit the making of various types of logs utilizing a continuously emitting neutron source. (Patent Office Record)

  17. Environmental impact by toxic compounds from waste treatment; Miljoepaaverkan fraan toxiska aemnen vid hantering av avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefblad, Gun; Bisaillon, Mattias; Sundberg, Johan (Profu AB (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    The study deals with emissions of toxic compounds from waste treatment to the environment with the aim of improving the state of knowledge and to find a way of describing the environmental impact from these substances. Toxicity is one of a number of environmental aspects necessary to address in the planning of waste treatment and in the daily waste treatment routines in order to fulfill the environmental objective A Non-Toxic Environment and other environmental requirements. The study includes waste to incineration, composting and anaerobic digestion. A comparison between methods were made for biological household waste. According to our study, the compounds of importance for waste treatment are metals and persistent organic compounds. These tend to bioaccumulate and enrich in food chains. The substances are important for the environmental objective A Non-Toxic Environment. In a first step the compounds chosen in this study may be suggested for describing toxicity from waste treatment: As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, dioxin, PCB, the phthalate DEHP and the brominated flame retardant HBCDD. Other substances may be added to the list in a next step from up-dated and quality-assured characterisation factors or from other requirements or preferences. There is a limited knowledge on toxic compounds in waste flows and in different environmental compartments. More data are available for metals than for organic substances. There is also a limited knowledge on the fate of the compounds during the waste treatment processes. Most information is found for incineration. During composting and anaerobic digestion the metals will mainly be emitted to the environment by use of the compost and the anaerobic digestion residue. Organic substances will to some extent be degraded during the processes. However, there are gaps of knowledge to fill for the further work on estimating toxic emissions. There is mainly a need for more extensive data on toxic compounds in waste and their variations. A test

  18. Single side Emitting Transparent OLED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Verschuren, C.A.; Bruls, D.M.; Tanase, C.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent OLEDs offer great potential for novel applications. Preferably, the light should be emitted from one side only. This can bedone to some extent by modifying electrode thicknesses, but at the cost of reduced transparency. Here, we demonstrate a new approach tomake single side emissive

  19. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  20. Coumafuryl (Fumarin) toxicity in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, L L; Su, J J; Barnes, H J

    1993-01-01

    Coumafuryl (Fumarin) toxicity was diagnosed in chickens less than 1 week of age. Mortality rate was 100%. Necropsy showed crops and gizzards to be full of feed. There was diffuse hemorrhage and unclotted blood in the abdomen and thorax. Histological examination showed congestion and hemorrhage. Chemical analysis of crop and gizzard contents contained approximately 340 ppm coumafuryl. The source of the coumafuryl was found to be the wood-straw mats in the chick boxes.

  1. A toxicity reduction evaluation for an oily waste treatment plant exhibiting episodic effluent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten-Unal, M; Gelderloos, A B; Hughes, J S

    1998-07-30

    A Toxicity Reduction Evaluation (TRE) was conducted on the oily wastewater treatment plant (Plant) at a Naval Fuel Depot. The Plant treats ship and ballast wastes, berm water from fuel storage areas and wastes generated in the fuel reclamation plant utilizing physical/chemical treatment processes. In the first period of the project (Period I), the TRE included chemical characterization of the plant wastewaters, monitoring the final effluent for acute toxicity and a thorough evaluation of each treatment process and Plant operating procedures. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures were performed as part of the overall TRE to characterize and identify possible sources of toxicity. Several difficulties were encountered because the effluent was saline, test organisms were marine species and toxicity was sporadic and unpredictable. The treatability approach utilizing enhancements, improved housekeeping, and operational changes produced substantial reductions in the acute toxicity of the final effluent. In the second period (Period II), additional acute toxicity testing and chemical characterization were performed through the Plant to assess the long-term effects of major unit process improvements for the removal of toxicity. The TIE procedures were also modified for saline wastewaters to focus on suspected class of toxicants such as surfactants. The TRE was successful in reducing acute toxicity of the final effluent through process improvements and operational modifications. The results indicated that the cause of toxicity was most likely due to combination of pollutants (matrix effect) rather than a single pollutant.

  2. Efficient light harvesting from flexible perovskite solar cells under indoor white light-emitting diode illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucarelli, G.; Di Giacomo, F.; Zardetto, V.; Creatore, M.; Brown, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    This is the first report of an investigation on flexible perovskite solar cells for artificial light harvesting by using a white light-emitting diode (LED) lamp as a light source at 200 and 400 lx, values typically found in indoor environments. Flexible cells were developed using either

  3. High tunability and superluminescence in InAs mid-infrared light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherstnev, V.V.; Krier, A.; Hill, G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the observation of super luminescence and high spectral current tunability (181 nm) of InAs light emitting diodes operating at 3.0 μm. The source is based on an optical whispering gallery mode which is generated near the edges of the mesa and which is responsible for the superluminescence. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional modeling of charge transport, injection and recombination in organic light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der J.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are ideally suited for lighting and display applications. Commercial OLED displays as well as OLED white-light sources are presently being introduced to the market. Essential electronic processes in OLEDs are the injection of electrons and holes into an organic

  5. The distribution and abundance of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    The distribution of gamma emitting radionuclides in Lake Ontario sediments was investigated. Samples were collected using a systematic design in the vicinity of Pickering and Darlington, and supplemented by lakewide offshore samples. Naturally occurring 40 K was the predominant source of gamma activity. 60 Co was the only potentially CANDU released radionuclide which showed a distributional association with the Pickering 'A' NGS discharge

  6. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M.; Engin, Ayse Basak; Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M.; Rezaee, Ramin; Karimi, Gholamreza; Drozd, Vladimir A.; Nikitina, Anna V.; Solomennik, Sergey F.; Kudryavkina, Olga R.; Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.; Golokhvast, Kirill S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500 mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500 mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. - Highlights: • Basophil sensitization is more important than cell count in VEP exposure. • CD16+ cells are more effective than basophils on CD4+ T cell proliferation. • CD16+ and CD16- monocytes respond to VEP exposure in opposite directions. • CD8+ T cell proliferation is inhibited by all doses of VEPs. • Globally, more stringent standards are needed for vehicle particle emissions.

  7. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M; Engin, Ayse Basak; Chernyshev, Valery V; Chaika, Vladimir V; Ugay, Sergey M; Rezaee, Ramin; Karimi, Gholamreza; Drozd, Vladimir A; Nikitina, Anna V; Solomennik, Sergey F; Kudryavkina, Olga R; Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Golokhvast, Kirill S

    2017-01-01

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Engin, Ayse Basak [Gazi University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, 06330, Hipodrom, Ankara (Turkey); Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Rezaee, Ramin [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnurd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, Gholamreza [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Drozd, Vladimir A.; Nikitina, Anna V.; Solomennik, Sergey F.; Kudryavkina, Olga R. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan [Biology Institute Shandong Academy of Science, Jinan 250014 (China); Tzatzarakis, Manolis [Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Tsatsakis, Aristidis M., E-mail: aris@med.uoc.gr [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Golokhvast, Kirill S., E-mail: droopy@mail.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500 mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500 mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. - Highlights: • Basophil sensitization is more important than cell count in VEP exposure. • CD16+ cells are more effective than basophils on CD4+ T cell proliferation. • CD16+ and CD16- monocytes respond to VEP exposure in opposite directions. • CD8+ T cell proliferation is inhibited by all doses of VEPs. • Globally, more stringent standards are needed for vehicle particle emissions.

  9. Hybrid light emitting transistors (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhieddine, Khalid; Ullah, Mujeeb; Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Burn, Paul L.

    2015-10-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well studied and established in current display applications. Light-emitting transistors (LETs) have been developed to further simplify the necessary circuitry for these applications, combining the switching capabilities of a transistor with the light emitting capabilities of an OLED. Such devices have been studied using mono- and bilayer geometries and a variety of polymers [1], small organic molecules [2] and single crystals [3] within the active layers. Current devices can often suffer from low carrier mobilities and most operate in p-type mode due to a lack of suitable n-type organic charge carrier materials. Hybrid light-emitting transistors (HLETs) are a logical step to improve device performance by harnessing the charge carrier capabilities of inorganic semiconductors [4]. We present state of the art, all solution processed hybrid light-emitting transistors using a non-planar contact geometry [1, 5]. We will discuss HLETs comprised of an inorganic electron transport layer prepared from a sol-gel of zinc tin oxide and several organic emissive materials. The mobility of the devices is found between 1-5 cm2/Vs and they had on/off ratios of ~105. Combined with optical brightness and efficiencies of the order of 103 cd/m2 and 10-3-10-1 %, respectively, these devices are moving towards the performance required for application in displays. [1] M. Ullah, K. Tandy, S. D. Yambem, M. Aljada, P. L. Burn, P. Meredith, E. B. Namdas., Adv. Mater. 2013, 25, 53, 6213 [2] R. Capelli, S. Toffanin, G. Generali, H. Usta, A. Facchetti, M. Muccini, Nature Materials 2010, 9, 496 [3] T. Takenobu, S. Z. Bisri, T. Takahashi, M. Yahiro, C. Adachi, Y. Iwasa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 066601 [4] H. Nakanotani, M. Yahiro, C. Adachi, K. Yano, Appl. Phys. Lett. 2007, 90, 262104 [5] K. Muhieddine, M. Ullah, B. N. Pal, P. Burn E. B. Namdas, Adv. Mater. 2014, 26,37, 6410

  10. Near-field photometry for organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Harikumar, Krishnan; Isphording, Alexandar; Venkataramanan, Venkat

    2013-03-01

    Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology is rapidly maturing to be ready for next generation of light source for general lighting. The current standard test methods for solid state lighting have evolved for semiconductor sources, with point-like emission characteristics. However, OLED devices are extended surface emitters, where spatial uniformity and angular variation of brightness and colour are important. This necessitates advanced test methods to obtain meaningful data for fundamental understanding, lighting product development and deployment. In this work, a near field imaging goniophotometer was used to characterize lighting-class white OLED devices, where luminance and colour information of the pixels on the light sources were measured at a near field distance for various angles. Analysis was performed to obtain angle dependent luminous intensity, CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature (CCT) in the far field. Furthermore, a complete ray set with chromaticity information was generated, so that illuminance at any distance and angle from the light source can be determined. The generated ray set is needed for optical modeling and design of OLED luminaires. Our results show that luminance non-uniformity could potentially affect the luminaire aesthetics and CCT can vary with angle by more than 2000K. This leads to the same source being perceived as warm or cool depending on the viewing angle. As OLEDs are becoming commercially available, this could be a major challenge for lighting designers. Near field measurement can provide detailed specifications and quantitative comparison between OLED products for performance improvement.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates emitted by motorcycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Chau Thuy; Kameda, Takayuki; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2013-01-01

    We determined eleven PAHs and four NPAHs in particulates and regulated pollutants (CO, CO 2 , HC, NO x , PM) exhausted from motorcycles to figure out the characteristics of motorcycle exhausts. Fluoranthene and pyrene accounted for more than 50% of the total detected PAHs. Among four detected NPAHs, 6-nitrochrysene and 7-nitrobenz[a]anthracene were the predominant NPAHs and were highly correlated relationship with their parent PAHs (R = 0.93 and 0.97, respectively). The PM and HC emissions tended to be close to the PAH emissions. NO x and NPAHs were negatively correlated. Despite their small engine size, motorcycles emitted much more PM and PAHs, showed stronger PAH-related carcinogenicity and indirect-acting mutagenicity, but weaker NPAH-related direct-acting mutagenic potency than automobiles. This is the first study to analyze both PAHs and NPAHs emitted by motorcycles, which could provide useful information to design the emission regulations and standards for motorcycles such as PM. -- Highlights: ► We characterized PAHs and NPAHs distribution in motorcycle exhausts. ► NPAHs concentrations were about three orders of magnitude lower than those of PAHs. ► We found larger amounts of PM and PAHs in exhaust of motorcycles than of automobiles. ► Motorcycles showed stronger PAH-related toxicity than automobiles. ► Motorcycles showed weaker NPAH-related direct-acting mutagenicity than automobiles. -- Control polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in particulates emitted by motorcycles due to their toxic potency

  12. Toxic substances handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Handbook, published in conjunction with Toxic Substances Alert Program at NASA Lewis Research Center, profiles 187 toxic chemicals in their relatively pure states and include 27 known or suspected carcinogens.

  13. Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zysk, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Modelling of atmospheric transport of heavy metals emitted from Polish power sector. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the atmospheric heavy metals contamination and its deposition to ecosystems. The increasing attention to mercury pollution has been mainly driven by the growing evidence of its negative impacts on wildlife, ecosystems and particularly human health. Lead and cadmium are also toxics which are being emitted into the atmosphere by anthropogenic as well as natural sources. The harmful influence of these three heavy metals was underlined in the Aarhus Protocol on Heavy Metals of 1998. The Parties of this protocol (including Poland) are obligated to reduce emissions, observe the transport and the amounts of lead, mercury and cadmium in the environment. Poland is one of the biggest emitter of mercury, lead and cadmium in Europe mainly due to emission from coal combustion processes. Therefore in Poland, research efforts to study the heavy metals emission, atmospheric transport, concentration and deposition are extremely important. The objectives of this work were twofold: - The practical objective was to develop and run a model to represent the atmospheric dispersion of mercury and to implement it in the air quality modelling platform Polyphemus.- The scientific objective was to perform heavy metals dispersion studies over Europe and detailed studies of the impact of the polish power sector on the air quality regarding mercury, cadmium and lead. To meet the declared aim, a new mercury chemical model was implemented into the Polyphemus air quality system. The scientific literature was reviewed regarding mercury chemistry and mercury chemical models. It can be concluded that the chemistry of mercury is still not well known. The models also differ in the way of calculating the dry and wet deposition of mercury. The elemental gaseous mercury ambient concentrations are evenly distributed, on the contrary, high variations in the spatial gradients of

  14. Few-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser: Optional emission of transverse modes with different polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuyu; Zhang, Xing; Hofmann, Werner; Yu, Lijuan; Liu, Jianguo; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2018-05-01

    Few-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers that can be controlled to emit certain modes and polarization states simply by changing the biased contacts are proposed and fabricated. By directly etching trenches in the p-doped distributed Bragg reflector, the upper mesa is separated into several submesas above the oxide layer. Individual contacts are then deposited. Each contact is used to control certain transverse modes with different polarization directions emitted from the corresponding submesa. These new devices can be seen as a prototype of compact laser sources in mode division multiplexing communications systems.

  15. GREEN LIGHT EMITTING TRICOMPONENT LUMINOPHORS OF 2-NAPHTHOL FOR CONSTRUCTION OF ORGANIC LIGHT EMITTING DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    K. G. MANE , P. B. NAGORE , DR. S. R. PUJARI

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a previous study and incredible progress in basic theoretical modeling, and working for organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) including preparation and characteristic studies of Organo- Luminescent Materials by conventional solid state reaction technique.

  16. 40 CFR 125.66 - Toxics control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) An applicant that has known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants shall have an... any applicant which has no known or suspected industrial sources of toxic pollutants or pesticides and.... (a) Chemical analysis. (1) The applicant shall submit at the time of application a chemical analysis...

  17. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab; Oh, Seung Kyu; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keon Hwa; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jeomoh; Pouladi, Sara; Lee, Sung-Nam; Li, Xiaohang; Kwak, Joon-Seop; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  18. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab

    2018-01-26

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  19. Moderation of Neutrons Emitted by a Pulsed Source and Neutron Spectrometry Based on Slowing-Down Time; Ralentissement des Neutrons Emis par une Source Pulsee et Leur Spectrometrie en Fonction du Temps de Ralentissement; Zamedlenie nejtronov, ispuskaemykh impul'snym istochnikom, i spektrometriya nejtronov po vremeni zamedleniya; Moderacion de Neutrones Emitidos por una Pitente Pulsada y Espectrometria Neutronica Basada en el Tiempo de Frenado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, A. A.; Isakov, A. I.; Kazarnovskij, M. V.; Popov, Ju. P.; Shapiro, F. L. [Fizicheskij Institut Im. P.N. Lebedeva AN SSSR, Moskva, SSSR (Russian Federation)

    1965-08-15

    Over the past ten years research has been going on at the P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute on the non-stationary moderation of neutrons in heavy media, the development of a method of neutron spectrometry based on the slowing-down time and the use of this method in studying the energy dependence of the cross-sections of nuclear reactions produced by neutrons with energy up to 30 keV. The authors review this work and discuss the results achieved. After a brief discussion of the theory of the non-stationary moderation and thermalization of neutrons the authors set forth the results of experimental studies of neutron moderation in graphite, iron and lead, and of neutron thermalization in lead. Using a pulsed neutron source and resonance detectors the distribution of slowing-down times was measured up to a series of fixed values for final neutron energy. The results are compared with theory, which takes into account the thermal motion of the moderator atoms; in the case of lead this thermal motion leads to a measurable spread in the slowing-down times at energies below 10 eV. The relationship between the mean velocity of neutrons in lead and the slowing-down time is measured in the subcadmium energy range and a comparison made with multigroup theory. The procedure for determining the energy dependence of neutron reaction cross-sections by slowing-down time is described and the potentialities of this method of spectrometry discussed. There follows a brief discussion of the results obtained in two fields of spectrometric measurement. Firstly, precise measurement of the relative excitation functions of the following reactions: He{sup 3}(n, p), Li{sup 6}(n, {alpha}), B{sup 10}(n, {alpha}) and N{sup 14}(n, p) - the most interesting results being the discovery of a constant negative component of the reaction cross-section and indications of the existence of an excited He{sup 4} level. Secondly, measurement of the energy dependence of averaged radiative capture cross

  20. Toxicities of selected substances to freshwater biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohreiter, D.W.

    1980-05-01

    The amount of data available concerning the toxicity of various substances to freshwater biota is so large that it is difficult to use in a practical situation, such as environmental impact assessment. In this document, summary tables are presented showing acute and/or chronic toxicity of selected substances for various groups of aquatic biota. Each entry is referenced to its original source so that details concerning experimental conditions may be consulted. In addition, general information concerning factors modifying toxicity, synergisms, evidence of bioaccumulation, and water quality standards and criteria for the selected substances is given. The final table is a general toxicity table designed to provide an easily accessible and general indication of toxicity of selected substances in aquatic systems.

  1. The role of phonon scattering in the indistinguishability of photons emitted from semiconductor cavity QED systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Gregersen, Niels; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    A solid-state single-photon source emitting indistinguishable photons on-demand is an essential component of linear optics quantum computing schemes. However, the emitter will inevitably interact with the solid-state environment causing decoherence and loss of indistinguishability. In this paper......, we present a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the influence of phonon scattering on the coherence properties of single photons emitted from semiconductor quantum dots. We model decoherence using a full microscopic theory and compare with standard Markovian approximations employing Lindblad...

  2. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-01-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, Arpad A [Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), 1133 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036-4329 (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Characterization of aerosol emitted by the combustion of nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motzkus, C; Chivas-Joly, C; Guillaume, E; Ducourtieux, S; Saragoza, L; Lesenechal, D; Mace, T, E-mail: charles.motzkus@lne.fr [LNE, 29 Avenue Roger Hennequin, 78197 Trappes Cedex (France)

    2011-07-06

    Day after day, new applications using nanoparticles appear in industry, increasing the probability to find these particles in the workplace as well as in ambient air. As epidemiological studies have shown an association between increased particulate air pollution and adverse health effects in susceptible members of the population, it is particularly important to characterize aerosols emitted by different sources of emission, during the combustion of composites charged with nanoparticles for example. The present study is led in the framework of the NANOFEU project, supported by the French Research Agency (ANR), in order to characterize the fire behaviour of polymers charged with suitable nanoparticles and make an alternative to retardant systems usually employed. To determine the impact of these composites on the emission of airborne particles produced during their combustions, an experimental setup has been developed to measure the mass distribution in the range of 30 nm - 10 {mu}m and the number concentration of submicrometric particles of the produced aerosol. A comparison is performed on the aerosol emitted during the combustion of several polymers alone (PMMA, PA-6), polymers containing nanofillers (silica, alumina, and carbon nanotubes) and polymers containing both nanofillers and a conventional flame retardant system (ammonium polyphosphate). The results on the morphology of particles were also investigated using AFM.

  5. Organic Light-Emitting Transistors: Materials, Device Configurations, and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congcong; Chen, Penglei; Hu, Wenping

    2016-03-09

    Organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) represent an emerging class of organic optoelectronic devices, wherein the electrical switching capability of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and the light-generation capability of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are inherently incorporated in a single device. In contrast to conventional OFETs and OLEDs, the planar device geometry and the versatile multifunctional nature of OLETs not only endow them with numerous technological opportunities in the frontier fields of highly integrated organic electronics, but also render them ideal scientific scaffolds to address the fundamental physical events of organic semiconductors and devices. This review article summarizes the recent advancements on OLETs in light of materials, device configurations, operation conditions, etc. Diverse state-of-the-art protocols, including bulk heterojunction, layered heterojunction and laterally arranged heterojunction structures, as well as asymmetric source-drain electrodes, and innovative dielectric layers, which have been developed for the construction of qualified OLETs and for shedding new and deep light on the working principles of OLETs, are highlighted by addressing representative paradigms. This review intends to provide readers with a deeper understanding of the design of future OLETs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  7. Light-emitting device test systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Mark; Brodie, Alan; George, James; Guan, Yu; Nyffenegger, Ralph

    2018-01-23

    Light-emitting devices, such as LEDs, are tested using a photometric unit. The photometric unit, which may be an integrating sphere, can measure flux, color, or other properties of the devices. The photometric unit may have a single port or both an inlet and outlet. Light loss through the port, inlet, or outlet can be reduced or calibrated for. These testing systems can provide increased reliability, improved throughput, and/or improved measurement accuracy.

  8. Safety of light emitting diodes in toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higlett, M P; O'Hagan, J B; Khazova, M

    2012-03-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are increasingly being used in toys. An assessment methodology is described for determining the accessible emission limits for the optical radiation from the toys, which takes account of expected use and reasonably foreseeable misuse of toys. Where data are available, it may be possible to assess the toy from the data sheet alone. If this information is not available, a simple measurement protocol is proposed.

  9. Safety of light emitting diodes in toys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higlett, M P; O'Hagan, J B; Khazova, M

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are increasingly being used in toys. An assessment methodology is described for determining the accessible emission limits for the optical radiation from the toys, which takes account of expected use and reasonably foreseeable misuse of toys. Where data are available, it may be possible to assess the toy from the data sheet alone. If this information is not available, a simple measurement protocol is proposed.

  10. White-light-emitting supramolecular gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Vakayil K; Ranjith, Choorikkat; Armaroli, Nicola

    2014-01-07

    Let there be light, let it be white: Recent developments in the use of chromophore-based gels as scaffolds for the assembly of white-light-emitting soft materials have been significant. The main advantage of this approach lies in the facile accommodation of selected luminescent components within the gel. Excitation-energy-transfer processes between these components ultimately generate the desired light output. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  12. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria

    1997-01-01

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particles and antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus bypassing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of 'the new physics of antimatter' are pointed out

  13. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santilli, Ruggero Maria [Instituto per la Ricerca di Base (Italy)

    1997-08-15

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particles and antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus bypassing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of 'the new physics of antimatter' are pointed out.

  14. Colour tuneable light-emitting transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, Eva J.; Melzer, Christian; Seggern, Heinz von [Electronic Materials Department, Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In recent years the interest in ambipolar organic light-emitting field-effect transistors has increased steadily as the devices combine switching behaviour of transistors with light emission. Usually, small molecules and polymers with a band gap in the visible spectral range serve as semiconducting materials. Mandatory remain balanced injection and transport properties for both charge carrier types to provide full control of the spatial position of the recombination zone of electrons and holes in the transistor channel via the applied voltages. As will be presented here, the spatial control of the recombination zone opens new possibilities towards light-emitting devices with colour tuneable emission. In our contribution an organic light-emitting field-effect transistors is presented whose emission colour can be changed by the applied voltages. The organic top-contact field-effect transistor is based on a parallel layer stack of acenes serving as organic transport and emission layers. The transistor displays ambipolar characteristics with a narrow recombination zone within the transistor channel. During operation the recombination zone can be moved by a proper change in the drain and gate bias from one organic semiconductor layer to another one inducing a change in the emission colour. In the presented example the emission maxima can be switched from 530 nm to 580 nm.

  15. Mixed gamma emitting gas standard and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, R.C.; McFarland, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The invention in one aspect pertains to a method of calibrating gamma spectroscopy systems for gas counting in a variety of counting containers comprising withdrawing a precision volume of a mixed gamma-emitting gas standard from a precision volume vial and delivering the withdrawn precision volume of the gas standard to the interior of a gas counting container. Another aspect of the invention pertains to a mixed gamma-emitting gas standard, comprising a precision spherical vial of predetermined volume, multiple mixed emitting gas components enclosed within the vial, and means for withdrawing from the vial a predetermined amount of the components wherein the gas standard is used to calibrate a gamma spectrometer system for gas counting over a wide energy range without the use of additional standards. A third aspect comprehends a gamma spectrometer calibration system for gas counting, comprising a precision volume spherical glass vial for receiving mixed multiisotope gas components, and two tubular arms extending from the vial. A ground glass stopcock is positioned on each arm, and the outer end of one arm is provided with a rubber septum port

  16. Does antimatter emit a new light?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Contemporary theories of antimatter have a number of insufficiencies which stimulated the recent construction of the new isodual theory based on a certain anti-isomorphic map of all (classical and quantum) formulations of matter called isoduality. In this note we show that the isodual theory predicts that antimatter emits a new light, called isodual light, which can be distinguished from the ordinary light emitted by matter via gravitational interactions (only). In particular, the isodual theory predicts that all stable antiparticles such as the isodual photon, the positron and the antiproton experience antigravity in the field of matter (defined as the reversal of the sign of the curvature tensor). The antihydrogen atom is therefore predicted to: experience antigravity in the field of Earth; emit the isodual photon; and have the same spectroscopy of the hydrogen atom, although subjected to an anti-isomorphic isodual map. In this note we also show that the isodual theory predicts that bound states of elementary particle sand antiparticles (such as the positronium) experience ordinary gravitation in both fields of matter and antimatter, thus by passing known objections against antigravity. A number of intriguing and fundamental, open theoretical and experimental problems of 'the new physics of antimatter' are pointed out. 16 refs

  17. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  18. Increasing the Brightness of Light Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Ling

    2006-01-01

    In modern illumination systems, compact size and high brightness are important features. Light recycling allows an increase of the spectral radiance (brightness) emitted by a light source for the price of reducing the total radiant power. Light recycling means returning part of the emitted light to the source where part of it will escape absorption. As a result, the output brightness can be increased in a restricted phase space, ...

  19. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  20. Quantum dot superluminescent light emitting diodes: Ideal blackbody radiators?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, Martin; Elsaesser, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology (Germany); Hopkinson, Mark [Dept. E and E.E, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Krakowski, Michel [Alcatel Thales, III-V Lab. (France)

    2008-07-01

    Quantum dot (QD) superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) provide large optical bandwidths at desired wavelengths and are therefore promising devices for incoherent light application. The intensity noise behavior of QD SLEDs is of fundamental physical interest as it provides insight into the photon emission process. We performed high precision intensity noise measurements over several decades of optical output power. For low driving currents spontaneous emission leads to Shot Noise. For high currents we find excess noise behavior with Amplified Spontaneous Emission acting as the dominant source of noise. The QD SLEDs' noise can be described as blackbody radiation noise with a limited number of optical modes. It is therefore possible to identify the SLEDs' relevant intensity noise parameters.

  1. Surface displacement imaging by interferometry with a light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilhaire, Stefan; Grauby, Stephane; Jorez, Sebastien; Lopez, Luis David Patino; Rampnoux, Jean-Michel; Claeys, Wilfrid

    2002-01-01

    We present an imaging technique to measure static surface displacements of electronic components. A device is supplied by a transient current that creates a variation of temperature, thus a surface displacement. To measure the latter, a setup that is based on a Michelson interferometer is used. To avoid the phenomenon of speckle and the drawbacks inherent to it, we use a light emitting diode as the light source for the interferometer. The detector is a visible CCD camera that analyzes the optical signal containing the information of surface displacement of the device. Combining images, we extract the amplitude of the surface displacement. Out-of-plane surface-displacement images of a thermoelectric device are presented

  2. Application of Surface Plasmonics for Semiconductor Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed

    This thesis addresses the lack of an efficient semiconductor light source at green emission colours. Considering InGaN based quantum-well (QW) light-emitters and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), various ways of applying surface plasmonics and nano-patterning to improve the efficiency, are investigated....... By placing metallic thin films or nanoparticles (NPs) in the near-field of QW light-emitters, it is possible to improve their internal quantum efficiency (IQE) through the Purcell enhancement effect. It has been a general understanding that in order to achieve surface plasmon (SP) coupling with QWs......-QW coupling does not necessarily lead to emission enhancement. The findings of this work show that the scattering and absorption properties of NPs play a crucial role in determining whether the implementation will improve or degrade the optical performance. By applying these principles, a novel design...

  3. High mobility solution-processed hybrid light emitting transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young; Ullah, Mujeeb; Burn, Paul L.; Namdas, Ebinazar B.; Chae, Gil Jo; Cho, Shinuk; Seo, Jung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, solution-processed hybrid (inorganic-organic) light emitting transistors (HLETs). The devices employ a high-mobility, solution-processed cadmium sulfide layer as the switching and transport layer, with a conjugated polymer Super Yellow as an emissive material in non-planar source/drain transistor geometry. We demonstrate HLETs with electron mobilities of up to 19.5 cm 2 /V s, current on/off ratios of >10 7 , and external quantum efficiency of 10 −2 % at 2100 cd/m 2 . These combined optical and electrical performance exceed those reported to date for HLETs. Furthermore, we provide full analysis of charge injection, charge transport, and recombination mechanism of the HLETs. The high brightness coupled with a high on/off ratio and low-cost solution processing makes this type of hybrid device attractive from a manufacturing perspective

  4. Trouble in paradise. Did Chinese solar producer Jinko Solar pollute water with toxic effluents?; Aerger im Paradies. Hat der chinesische Solarkonzern Jinko Solar Giftstoffe ins Abwasser geleitet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemer, Jochen

    2011-10-15

    When neighbours protested against toxic effluents emitted by a Chinese industrial plant, this received international attention, especially as the plant in question is producing solar cells for Jinko Solar at Haining. However, the real facts are impossible to obtain.

  5. Directionality of nose-emitted echolocation calls from bats without a nose leaf (Plecotus auritus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Hallam, John; Moss, Cynthia F; Hedenström, Anders

    2018-02-13

    All echolocating bats and whales measured to date emit a directional bio-sonar beam that affords them a number of advantages over an omni-directional beam, i.e. reduced clutter, increased source level and inherent directional information. In this study, we investigated the importance of directional sound emission for navigation through echolocation by measuring the sonar beam of brown long-eared bats, Plecotus auritus Plecotus auritus emits sound through the nostrils but has no external appendages to readily facilitate a directional sound emission as found in most nose emitters. The study shows that P. auritus , despite lacking an external focusing apparatus, emits a directional echolocation beam (directivity index=13 dB) and that the beam is more directional vertically (-6 dB angle at 22 deg) than horizontally (-6 dB angle at 35 deg). Using a simple numerical model, we found that the recorded emission pattern is achievable if P. auritus emits sound through the nostrils as well as the mouth. The study thus supports the hypothesis that a directional echolocation beam is important for perception through echolocation and we propose that animals with similarly non-directional emitter characteristics may facilitate a directional sound emission by emitting sound through both the nostrils and the mouth. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Isotope and machine sources for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar G, M.

    1992-05-01

    Artificial radioactive sources as Co-60 and Cs- 137 are produced by bombarding Co-59 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor and by chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel respectively. Both radioactive sources emit very high frequency electromagnetic radiation called y-rays. This highly penetrating radiation is employed for preservation of food. Each y-ray emitted from a radioactive source transports energy from the source to the irradiated food. Penetration of y-rays and their intensity depend on y-energy. Inside this study the advantages and disadvantages of both sources are compared. (Author)

  7. Isotope and machine sources for food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M

    1992-05-15

    Artificial radioactive sources as Co-60 and Cs- 137 are produced by bombarding Co-59 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor and by chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel respectively. Both radioactive sources emit very high frequency electromagnetic radiation called y-rays. This highly penetrating radiation is employed for preservation of food. Each y-ray emitted from a radioactive source transports energy from the source to the irradiated food. Penetration of y-rays and their intensity depend on y-energy. Inside this study the advantages and disadvantages of both sources are compared. (Author)

  8. Optical design of adjustable light emitting diode for different lighting requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jia-Ning; Yu Jie; Tong Yu-Zhen; Zhang Guo-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) sources have been widely used for illumination. Optical design, especially freedom compact lens design is necessary to make LED sources applied in lighting industry, such as large-range interior lighting and small-range condensed lighting. For different lighting requirements, the size of target planes should be variable. In our paper we provide a method to design freedom lens according to the energy conservation law and Snell law through establishing energy mapping between the luminous flux emitted by a Lambertian LED source and a certain area of the target plane. The algorithm of our design can easily change the radius of each circular target plane, which makes the size of the target plane adjustable. Ray-tracing software Tracepro is used to validate the illuminance maps and polar-distribution maps. We design lenses for different sizes of target planes to meet specific lighting requirements. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Recombination zone in white organic light emitting diodes with blue and orange emitting layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Taiju; Kishimoto, Tadashi; Wako, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kuniharu; Iguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-10-01

    White fluorescent OLED devices with a 10 nm thick blue-emitting layer and a 31 nm thick orange-emitting layer have been fabricated, where the blue-emitting layer is stacked on a hole transport layer. An interlayer was inserted between the two emitting layers. The thickness of the interlayer was changed among 0.3, 0.4, and 1.0 nm. White emission with CIE coordinates close to (0.33, 0.33) was observed from all the OLEDs. OLED with 0.3 nm thick interlayer gives the highest maximum luminous efficiency (11 cd/A), power efficiency (9 lm/W), and external quantum efficiency (5.02%). The external quantum efficiency becomes low with increasing the interlayer thickness from 0 nm to 1.0 nm. When the location of the blue- and orange-emitting layers is reversed, white emission was not obtained because of too weak blue emission. It is suggested that the electron-hole recombination zone decreases nearly exponentially with a distance from the hole transport layer.

  10. Toxic substances alert program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    A toxicity profile is provided, of 187 toxic substances procured by NASA Lewis Research Center during a 3 1/2 year period, including 27 known or suspected carcinogens. The goal of the program is to assure that the center's health and safety personnel are aware of the procurement and use of toxic substances and to alert and inform the users of these materials as to the toxic characteristics and the control measures needed to ensure their safe use. The program also provides a continuing record of the toxic substances procured, who procured them, what other toxic substances the user has obtained in the past, and where similar materials have been used elsewhere at the center.

  11. White organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent tube efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Lindner, Frank; Schwartz, Gregor; Seidler, Nico; Walzer, Karsten; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2009-05-14

    The development of white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) holds great promise for the production of highly efficient large-area light sources. High internal quantum efficiencies for the conversion of electrical energy to light have been realized. Nevertheless, the overall device power efficiencies are still considerably below the 60-70 lumens per watt of fluorescent tubes, which is the current benchmark for novel light sources. Although some reports about highly power-efficient white OLEDs exist, details about structure and the measurement conditions of these structures have not been fully disclosed: the highest power efficiency reported in the scientific literature is 44 lm W(-1) (ref. 7). Here we report an improved OLED structure which reaches fluorescent tube efficiency. By combining a carefully chosen emitter layer with high-refractive-index substrates, and using a periodic outcoupling structure, we achieve a device power efficiency of 90 lm W(-1) at 1,000 candelas per square metre. This efficiency has the potential to be raised to 124 lm W(-1) if the light outcoupling can be further improved. Besides approaching internal quantum efficiency values of one, we have also focused on reducing energetic and ohmic losses that occur during electron-photon conversion. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for further research, leading to white OLEDs having efficiencies beyond 100 lm W(-1). This could make white-light OLEDs, with their soft area light and high colour-rendering qualities, the light sources of choice for the future.

  12. Novel Biomedical Device Utilizing Light-Emitting Nanostructures Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Goldman, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Sketches and chemical diagrams of state-of-the-art device and novel proposed device are presented. Current device uses a diode laser that emits into a fluorescent fluid only one wavelength and a photodetector diode that detects only one wavelength. Only one type of bacteria can be detected. The proposed device uses a quantum dot array that emits into a fluorescent fluid multiple wavelengths and an NIR 512 spectrometer that scans 0.8- to 1.7-mm wavelengths. Hundreds of different bacteria and viruses can be detected. A novel biomedical device is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with the University of Michigan. This device uses nano-structured quantum dots that emit light in the near-infrared (IR) region. The nanostructured quantum dots are used as a source and excite fluorochrome polymers coupled with antibodies that seek out and attach to specific bacteria and viruses. The fluorochrome polymers/antibodies fluoresce at specific wavelengths in the near-IR spectrum, but these wavelengths are offset from the excitation wavelength and can be detected with a tunable spectrometer. The device will be used to detect the presence of viruses and bacteria in simple fluids and eventually in more complex fluids, such as blood. Current state-of-the-art devices are limited to single bacteria or virus detection and a considerable amount of time and effort is required to prepare samples for analysis. Most importantly, the devices are quite large and cumbersome, which prohibits them from being used on the International Space Station and the space shuttles. This novel device uses nanostructured quantum dots which, through molecular beam epitaxy and highly selective annealing processes, can be developed into an illumination source that could potentially generate hundreds of specific wavelengths. As a result, this device will be able to excite hundreds of antibody/fluorochrome polymer combinations, which in turn could be used to detect hundreds of bacteria

  13. Enhanced quantum efficiency in blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hyeok; Lim, Yong Taik; Park, O Ok; Yu, Jae-Woong; Kim, Jai Kyeong; Kim, Young Chul

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting devices based on environmentally stable, blue-emitting polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposites were fabricated by blending poly(di-octylfluorene) (PDOF) with organo-clay. By reducing the excimer formation that leads to long wavelength tails, the photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) color purity of the device was enhanced. When a conjugated polymer/dielectric nanolayer nanocomposite is applied to an EL device, we expect an electronic structure similar to the well-known quantum well in small nanodomains. The ratio of PDOF/organo-clay was regulated from 2:1 to 0.5:1 (w/w). The light-emitting device of 0.5:1 (w/w) blend demonstrated the highest quantum efficiency (QE), 0.72% (ph/el), which is ∼500 times higher value compared with that of the pure PDOF layer device. However, the driving voltage of the nanocomposite devices tended to increase with increasing organo-clay content

  14. Nitric oxide in denitrification - an elusive signal molecule emitted from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, L. R.; Frostegard, A.

    2010-12-01

    Soils emit variable amounts of NO and N2O, with environmental consequences (atmosphere chemistry and global warming). Nitrification was for some time considered the main source of NO emission, but several investigations have indicated that denitrification may be a potent source as well. However, strong emission of NO from denitrifying organisms is in some conflict with common understanding of the role of NO in the regulation of denitrification, as based on paradigm model strains. NO appears to be an important signal molecule for denitrifying organisms by exerting a positive feedback on the expression of the genes coding for denitrification. On the other hand, a careful control of the NO concentrations at nanomolar concentrations has long been considered an essential fitness character for denitrifying organisms, since micromolar concentrations of NO is toxic to many organisms. For the same reason, organisms lacking genes encoding NO reductase (NOR) have been considered unfit for denitrification. This view is challenged by isolation of organisms whose primary product of denitrification is NO, either because they lack the genes for NO reductase, or because their synthesis of the denitrification proteome is extremely unbalanced, resulting in transient NO accumulation to micromolar concentrations when grown in pure culture. Such paralyzing NO concentrations are probably never reached in natural environments, however, due to diffusion and NO-absorption by adjacent organisms, be it by NOR or other NO scavenging enzymes. Hypothetically, the production of NO by denitrifying organisms may be an advantage by fending off nearby competitors. We have embarked on a comparative study of denitrification phenotypes regarding their denitrification gene expression and control of NO and N2O concentrations in response to anoxic spells. This includes model strains (Paracoccus denitrificans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and recently isolated strains within several genera. Some are found

  15. Background sources at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, γ-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Nanoengineering of organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, J.M.

    2000-11-01

    This thesis reports nanoengineerging of the emission and transport properties of organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This is achieved by a control of the electronic material properties and the photonic device properties. A novel class of conjugated materials for electroluminescence (EL) applications is presented, based on successively branching, or dendritic, materials comprising an emissive core and a shielding dendritic architecture. Exciton localisation at the centre of these dendrimers is observed in both luminescence and absorption. A detailed quantum chemical investigation using an exciton model supports these findings and accurately describes the energies and oscillator strengths of transitions in the core and branches. The dendrimer generation describes the degree of branching and gives a direct measure of the separation and interaction between chromophores. Increasing generation is found to lead to a reduction in red tail emission. This correlates with an increase in operating field and LED efficiency. Dendrimer blends with triplet harvesting dendritic phosphors are also investigated and found to exhibit unique emission properties. A numerical device model is presented, which is used to describe the temperature dependence of single layer polymer LEDs by fitting the field-dependent mobility and the barrier to hole injection. The device model is also used to obtain mobility values for the dendrimer materials, which are in excellent agreement with results obtained from time-of-flight measurements. The dendrimer generation is shown to provide a direct control of hopping mobility, which decreases by two orders of magnitude as the dendrimer generation increases from 0 to 3. The photonic properties and spontaneous emission of an LED are modified by incorporating a periodic wavelength scale microstructure into the emitting film. This is found to double the amount of light emitted with no effect on the device current. An investigation of the angular dependence

  17. Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Today, cancer treatments mainly rely on surgery or external beam radiation to remove or destroy bulky tumors. Chemotherapy is given when tumours cannot be removed or when dissemination is suspected. However, these approaches cannot permanently treat all cancers and relapse occurs in up to 50% of the patients’ population. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) are effective against some disseminated and metastatic diseases, although they are rarely curative. Most preclinical and clinical developments in this field have involved electron-emitting radionuclides, particularly iodine-131, yttrium-90 and lutetium-177. The large range of the electrons emitted by these radionuclides reduces their efficacy against very small tumour cell clusters or isolated tumour cells present in residual disease and in many haematological tumours (leukaemia, myeloma). The range of alpha particles in biological tissues is very short, less than 0.1 mm, which makes alpha emitters theoretically ideal for treatment of such isolated tumour cells or micro-clusters of malignant cells. Thus, over the last decade, a growing interest for the use of alpha-emitting radionuclides has emerged. Research on targeted alpha therapy (TAT) began years ago in Nantes through cooperation between Subatech, a nuclear physics laboratory, CRCNA, a cancer research centre with a nuclear oncology team and ITU (Karlsruhe, Germany). CD138 was demonstrated as a potential target antigen for Multiple Myeloma, which is a target of huge clinical interest particularly suited for TAT because of the disseminated nature of the disease consisting primarily of isolated cells and small clusters of tumour cells mainly localized in the bone marrow. Thus anti-CD138 antibodies were labelled with bismuth-213 from actinium-225/bismuth-213 generators provided by ITU and used to target multiple myeloma cells. In vitro studies showed cell cycle arrest, synergism with chemotherapy and very little induction

  18. Hybrid fluorescent layer emitting polarized light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadimasoudi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanorods have anisotropic absorption and emission properties. In this work a hybrid luminescent layer is produced based on a mixture of CdSe/CdS nanorods dispersed in a liquid crystal that is aligned by an electric field and polymerized by UV illumination. The film emits light with polarization ratio 0.6 (polarization contrast 4:1. Clusters of nanorods in liquid crystal can be avoided by applying an AC electric field with sufficient amplitude. This method can be made compatible with large-scale processing on flexible transparent substrates. Thin polarized light emitters can be used in LCD backlights or solar concentrators to increase the efficiency.

  19. Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an electron emitting device for use in an electron discharge system. It comprises: a filament having a pair of terminal ends, electrical supply means for supplying electrical power to the terminal ends of the filament for directly heating the filament by the passage of an electrical current along the filament between the terminal ends, the filament being substantially tapered in cross section continuously in one direction from one of its pair of terminal ends to another of its pair of terminal ends to achieve uniform heating of the filament along the length thereof by compensating for the nonuniform current along the filament due to the emission of electrons therefrom

  20. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  1. Fine structure in deformed proton emitting nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed 131 Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2 + state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2 + energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed

  2. Problems of Modelling Toxic Compounds Emitted by a Marine Internal Combustion Engine in Unsteady States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnicki Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary engine tests are performed based on the theory of experiment. The available versions of programmes used for analysing experimental data make frequent use of the multiple regression model, which enables examining effects and interactions between input model parameters and a single output variable. The use of multi-equation models provides more freedom in analysing the measured results, as those models enable simultaneous analysis of effects and interactions between many output variables. They can also be used as a tool in preparing experimental material for other advanced diagnostic tools, such as the models making use of neural networks which, when properly prepared, enable also analysing measurement results recorded during dynamic processes.

  3. Housing for a radioactive source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domnanovich, J. R.; Erwin, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive structure comprises a radioactive source surrounded by a housing. The housing contains a first and second shielding body and a connecting device. The first shielding body has a protrusion which contains a first recess for receiving the radioactive source. The second shielding body has a second recess in one face end which accommodates the protrusion and a conical aperture communicating with the second recess in another face end. The connecting device connects the first shielding body to the second shielding body. When the radioactive source is inserted into the first recess and when the protrusion is located in the second recess, the radioactive source emits radiation primarily through the conical aperture into the environment. The source preferably contains americium which emits gamma radiation. The structure may be used as a motion correction sensor or as a marker in a nuclear diagnostic imaging

  4. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Vineet; Bhatnagar Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralizat...

  5. Air toxics research in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahkala, M.

    1994-01-01

    Air toxics research in Finland has developed rapidly in recent years. Though they have no enormous environmental problems in Finland, the author feels that they have to increase their knowledge of more efficient energy production and control technology. Enormous emission sources are around them, but there are also huge markets for know-how and technology in the energy sector. Two Finnish national research programs will ensure the continuity of the development efforts concerning combustion technology and environmental aspects at both theoretical and practical levels

  6. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...... and intermolecular self-organization that typically determine transport and optical emission in π-conjugated oligomers and polymers. In this context, hydrostatic pressure through diamond anvil cells has proven to be an elegant tool to control structure and interactions without chemical intervention. This has been...... and intermolecular interactions on optical excitations, electron–phonon interaction, and changes in backbone conformations. This picture is connected to the optical high pressure studies of other π-conjugated systems and emerging x-ray scattering experiments from polyfluorenes which provides a structure-property map...

  7. Organic bistable light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liping; Liu, Jie; Pyo, Seungmoon; Yang, Yang

    2002-01-01

    An organic bistable device, with a unique trilayer structure consisting of organic/metal/organic sandwiched between two outmost metal electrodes, has been invented. [Y. Yang, L. P. Ma, and J. Liu, U.S. Patent Pending, U.S. 01/17206 (2001)]. When the device is biased with voltages beyond a critical value (for example 3 V), the device suddenly switches from a high-impedance state to a low-impedance state, with a difference in injection current of more than 6 orders of magnitude. When the device is switched to the low-impedance state, it remains in that state even when the power is off. (This is called "nonvolatile" phenomenon in memory devices.) The high-impedance state can be recovered by applying a reverse bias; therefore, this bistable device is ideal for memory applications. In order to increase the data read-out rate of this type of memory device, a regular polymer light-emitting diode has been integrated with the organic bistable device, such that it can be read out optically. These features make the organic bistable light-emitting device a promising candidate for several applications, such as digital memories, opto-electronic books, and recordable papers.

  8. Females and Toxic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    labeled as toxic, can he or she be rehabilitated?; Are there leadership styles that can be promoted to combat toxic leadership?; and Are the senior...examines leadership styles that are favorable for female leaders, and offers Transformational/Adaptive leadership as a style promising rehabilitative tools

  9. Rigorous simulations of emitting and non-emitting nano-optical structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, O.T.A.

    2010-01-01

    In the next decade, several applications of nanotechnology will change our lives. LED lighting is about to replace the common light bulb. The main advantages are its energy efficiency and long lifetime. LEDs can be much more efficient, when part of the emitted light that is currently trapped in the

  10. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  11. Synchroton Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light

  12. A numerical simulation of 129I in the atmosphere emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Togawa, Orihiko

    2010-01-01

    A global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, is applied to investigate the behavior of 129 I emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe (Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France). The result of numerical simulation for more than fifty-year period from the 1950s is validated by comparison with measurements of 129 I around the world and analyzed to clarify the characteristic of the distributions of concentration and deposition of 129 I. The modeled concentrations of 129 I in precipitation in Europe and the United States and inventories in the seawater around Japan and the Gulf of Mexico are in the same order as measurements. the emitted 129 I to the atmosphere is distributed all over the Northern Hemisphere due mainly to the prevailing westerlies and can be an important source of supply of artificial 129 I for the seawater remote from the point source such as a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  13. Positron emitting radionuclides for South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchbank, S.; Van der Walt, T.N.; Sharpey-Shafer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In South Africa there are currently two projects underway to supply and utilise positron emitting radionuclides for imaging in clinical nuclear medicine facilities. The advantages and applications of such radio nuclides are numerous and well known. However the premier initial application will be to employ 1BF, at first in the compound fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F)-FDG, for patients with cancers and neoplasms. The two projects are sited at iThemba LABS, where production of a generator supplying 66 Ga and the provision of ( 18 F]-FDG, are in an advanced state of planning; the former already fully financed by the Innovation Fund of the National Research Foundation. The two positron emitting radionuclides, 18 F and 68 Ge, will be produced using a cyclotron induced reaction on 1802 and Ga, respectively, at iThemba LABS. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator consists of an anion exchanger loaded with 68 Ge, which decays to 68 Ga. The resulting radiopharmaceuticals, ( 18 F]-FDG and 68 Ga citrate, will be produced by the Radionuclide Production Group of iThemba LABS, using well described methods. However the structures and processes to be used in the generator to provide 68 Ga are novel and will be explained. Initially provision of the CBF]-FDG will be to selected clinical medicine facilities in the Western Cape and Gauteng. It should be noted that the logistical problems of providing this radiopharmaceutical (which are much complicated by its short half life of 109.7 min) to Gauteng, were shown to be surmountable in the 1970s, by a regular delivery of 18 F between Gauteng and Cape Town, after the advent of a commercial service using jet aircraft. The obvious requirement that there should be appropriate nuclear medicine facilities to image patients, at the sites to which the positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals will be supplied, has been addressed. Proposed solutions will be outlined, in terms of a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) camera and a gamma

  14. The global variability of diatomaceous earth toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nattrass, C; Horwell, C J; Damby, D E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diatomaceous earth (DE) is mined globally and is potentially of occupational respiratory health concern due to the high crystalline silica content in processed material. DE toxicity, in terms of variability related to global source and processing technique, is poorly understood...

  15. Developing Procedures for Screening High Emitting Vehicles and Quantifying the Environmental Impacts of Grades

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sangjun

    2005-01-01

    Since the transportation sector is highly responsible for U.S. fuel consumption and emissions, assessing the environmental impacts of transportation activities is essential for air-quality improvement programs. Also, high emitting vehicles need to be considered in the modeling of mobile-source emissions, because they contribute to a large portion of the total emissions, although they comprise a small portion of the vehicle fleet. In the context of this research, the thesis quantifies the envi...

  16. Quantum-cascade laser photoacoustic detection of methane emitted from natural gas powered engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M. V.; Sthel, M. S.; Silva, M. G.; Paiva, L. B.; Pinheiro, F. W.; Miklòs, A.; Vargas, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we present a laser photoacoustic arrangement for the detection of the important greenhouse gas methane. A quantum-cascade laser and a differential photoacoustic cell were employed. A detection limit of 45 ppbv in nitrogen was achieved as well as a great selectivity. The same methodology was also tested in the detection of methane issued from natural gas powered vehicles (VNG) in Brazil, which demonstrates the excellent potential of this arrangement for greenhouse gas detection emitted from real sources.

  17. Exploring the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment on the veterinary healthcare team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eMoore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians’ and Registered Veterinary Technicians’ (RVT’s perceptions of the veterinary health care team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with 4 veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians and 4 Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs. Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These attitudes included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the go to person, avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when broken communication and tension between staff members occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands.The presence of people with a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment.

  18. Exploring the Impact of Toxic Attitudes and a Toxic Environment on the Veterinary Healthcare Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Irene C; Coe, Jason B; Adams, Cindy L; Conlon, Peter D; Sargeant, Jan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to compare veterinarians' and Registered Veterinary Technicians' (RVT's) perceptions of the veterinary healthcare team with respect to the impact of toxic attitudes and a toxic environment. Focus group interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and follow up probes were held with four veterinarian groups (23 companion animal veterinarians) and four Registered Veterinary Technician groups (26 RVTs). Thematic analysis of the discussions indicated both veterinarian and RVT participants felt team members with manifestations of toxic attitudes negatively impacted veterinary team function. These manifestations included people being disrespectful, being resistant to change, always wanting to be the "go to person," avoiding conflict, and lacking motivation. When conflict was ignored, or when people with toxic attitudes were not addressed, a toxic environment often resulted. A toxic environment sometimes manifested when "broken communication and tension between staff members" occurred as a result of employees lacking confidence, skills, or knowledge not being managed properly. It also occurred when employees did not feel appreciated, when there was difficulty coping with turnover, and when there were conflicting demands. The presence of people manifesting a toxic attitude was a source of frustration for both veterinarian and RVT participants. Prompt and consistent attention to negative behaviors is recommended to reduce the development of a toxic environment.

  19. DSSTOX STRUCTURE-SEARCHABLE PUBLIC TOXICITY DATABASE NETWORK: CURRENT PROGRESS AND NEW INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE CHEMO-BIOINFORMATICS CAPABILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA DSSTox website (http://www/epa.gov/nheerl/dsstox) publishes standardized, structure-annotated toxicity databases, covering a broad range of toxicity disciplines. Each DSSTox database features documentation written in collaboration with the source authors and toxicity expe...

  20. High efficient white organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Stefan; Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Schmid, Guenter; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Due to the rapid progress in the last years the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) has reached a level where general lighting presents a most interesting application target. We demonstrate, how the color coordinates of the emission spectrum can be adjusted using a combinatorial evaporation tool to lie on the desired black body curve representing cold and warm white, respectively. The evaluation includes phosphorescent and fluorescent dye approaches to optimize lifetime and efficiency, simultaneously. Detailed results are presented with respect to variation of layer thicknesses and dopant concentrations of each layer within the OLED stack. The most promising approach contains phosphorescent red and green dyes combined with a fluorescent blue one as blue phosphorescent dopants are not yet stable enough to achieve long lifetimes.

  1. Electronic Cigarette Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J Drew; Michaels, David; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often advertised as a healthier product when compared with traditional cigarettes. Currently, there are limited data to support this and only a threat of federal regulation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette toxicity, especially in children, and case reports of toxic exposures have increased over the past 3 years. This research letter reports the frequency of hazardous exposures to e-cigarettes and characterizes the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarette toxicity.

  2. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  3. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    stream_size 3 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name 2_Int_Conf_Waste_Mgmt_Chem_Petrochem_Ind_Toxic_Mgmt_1991_258.pdf.txt stream_source_info 2_Int_Conf_Waste_Mgmt_Chem_Petrochem_Ind_Toxic_Mgmt_1991_258.pdf.txt Content...

  4. CAMEX-3 ATMOSPHERIC EMITTED RADIANCE INTERFEROMETER (AERI) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) was used to make atmospheric temperature and moisture retrievals. AERI provides absolutely calibrated...

  5. Extended emission sources observed via two-proton correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Obenshain, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two-proton correlations were measured as a function of the total energy and relative momentum of the proton. The correlation is analyzed for different orientations of the relative momentum, which allows information on the size and lifetime of the emission source to be extracted. The most energetic particles are emitted from a short- lived source of compound nucleus dimensions while the lower energy protons appear to be emitted from a source considerably larger than the compound nucleus. 9 refs., 3 figs

  6. Plume residence and toxic material accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spigarelli, S.A.; Holpuch, R.

    1975-01-01

    Increased growth rates and 137 Cs concentrations in plume resident trout are thought to be the result of increased metabolism, food consumption, and activity caused by exposure to increased water temperature and flow in thermal discharges. These exposure conditions could contribute to increased accumulation of biologically active, toxic substances by primary forage and predator fish species in the Great Lakes. Uptake and retention of various toxic substances by predators depend on concentrations in forage species (trophic transfer), ambient water, and point source effluents (direct uptake). Contaminants of immediate concern in Great Lakes systems (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons) accumulate in adipose tissue, and body concentrations have been correlated with total lipid content in fish. In addition to direct toxic effects on fish, many lipophilic contaminants are known to cause severe human health problems when ingested at concentrations commonly found in Lake Michigan salmonids. Although power plants may or may not be the direct source of a toxic substance, the thermal discharge environment may contribute to the accumulation of toxic substances in fish and the transfer of these materials to man

  7. Toxic phytoplankton in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kristine M.; Garrison, David L.; Cloern, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) was conceived and designed to document the changing distribution and effects of trace substances in San Francisco Bay, with focus on toxic contaminants that have become enriched by human inputs. However, coastal ecosystems like San Francisco Bay also have potential sources of naturally-produced toxic substances that can disrupt food webs and, under extreme circumstances, become threats to public health. The most prevalent source of natural toxins is from blooms of algal species that can synthesize metabolites that are toxic to invertebrates or vertebrates. Although San Francisco Bay is nutrient-rich, it has so far apparently been immune from the epidemic of harmful algal blooms in the world’s nutrient-enriched coastal waters. This absence of acute harmful blooms does not imply that San Francisco Bay has unique features that preclude toxic blooms. No sampling program has been implemented to document the occurrence of toxin-producing algae in San Francisco Bay, so it is difficult to judge the likelihood of such events in the future. This issue is directly relevant to the goals of RMP because harmful species of phytoplankton have the potential to disrupt ecosystem processes that support animal populations, cause severe illness or death in humans, and confound the outcomes of toxicity bioassays such as those included in the RMP. Our purpose here is to utilize existing data on the phytoplankton community of San Francisco Bay to provide a provisional statement about the occurrence, distribution, and potential threats of harmful algae in this Estuary.

  8. Estimation of soft X-ray and EUV transition radiation power emitted from the MIRRORCLE-type tabletop synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyosugi, N; Yamada, H; Minkov, D; Morita, M; Yamaguchi, T; Imai, S

    2007-03-01

    The tabletop synchrotron light sources MIRRORCLE-6X and MIRRORCLE-20SX, operating at electron energies E(el) = 6 MeV and E(el) = 20 MeV, respectively, can emit powerful transition radiation (TR) in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and the soft X-ray regions. To clarify the applicability of these soft X-ray and EUV sources, the total TR power has been determined. A TR experiment was performed using a 385 nm-thick Al foil target in MIRRORCLE-6X. The angular distribution of the emitted power was measured using a detector assembly based on an NE102 scintillator, an optical bundle and a photomultiplier. The maximal measured total TR power for MIRRORCLE-6X is P(max) approximately equal 2.95 mW at full power operation. Introduction of an analytical expression for the lifetime of the electron beam allows calculation of the emitted TR power by a tabletop synchrotron light source. Using the above measurement result, and the theoretically determined ratio between the TR power for MIRRORCLE-6X and MIRRORCLE-20SX, the total TR power for MIRRORCLE-20SX can be obtained. The one-foil TR target thickness is optimized for the 20 MeV electron energy. P(max) approximately equal 810 mW for MIRRORCLE-20SX is obtained with a single foil of 240 nm-thick Be target. The emitted bremsstrahlung is negligible with respect to the emitted TR for optimized TR targets. From a theoretically known TR spectrum it is concluded that MIRRORCLE-20SX can emit 150 mW of photons with E > 500 eV, which makes it applicable as a source for performing X-ray lithography. The average wavelength, \\overline\\lambda = 13.6 nm, of the TR emission of MIRRORCLE-20SX, with a 200 nm Al target, could provide of the order of 1 W EUV.

  9. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  10. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  11. Showcasing Sustainability in Your Toxics Release Inventory Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    From a June 2012 webinar, these slides contain guidance for reporting Pollution Prevention and Source Reduction data on the Toxics Release Inventory Form R and a synopsis of EPA's use of this information.

  12. Solution processed, white emitting tandem organic light-emitting diodes with inverted device architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfle, Stefan; Schienle, Alexander; Bernhard, Christoph; Bruns, Michael; Lemmer, Uli; Colsmann, Alexander

    2014-08-13

    Fully solution processed monochromatic and white-light emitting tandem or multi-photon polymer OLEDs with an inverted device architecture have been realized by employing WO3 /PEDOT:PSS/ZnO/PEI charge carrier generation layers. The luminance of the sub-OLEDs adds up in the stacked device indicating multi-photon emission. The white OLEDs exhibit a CRI of 75. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Toxic potency and effects of diffuse air pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, T.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse air pollution consists of an omnipresent complex mixture of pollutants that is emitted from many widely dispersed sources as traffic, industries, households, energy plants, waste incinerators, and agriculture. It can be deposited in relatively remote areas as a result of

  14. Highly efficient white top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes with forward directed light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Patricia; Reineke, Sebastian; Furno, Mauro; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The demand for highly efficient and energy saving illumination has increased considerably during the last decades. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for future lighting technologies. They offer high efficiency along with excellent color quality, allowing substantially lower power consumption than traditional illuminants. Recently, especially top-emitting devices have attracted high interest due to their compatibility with opaque substrates like metal sheets. In this contribution, we demonstrate top-emitting OLEDs with white emission spectra employing a multilayer hybrid cavity structure with two highly efficient phosphorescent emitter materials for orange-red (Ir(MDQ)2(acac)) and green (Ir(ppy)3) emission as well as the stable fluorescent blue emitter TBPe. To improve the OLED performance and modify the color quality, two different electron blocking layers and anode material combinations are tested. Compared to Lambertian emission, our devices show considerably enhanced forward emission, which is preferred for most lighting applications. Besides broadband emission and angle independent emission maxima, power efficiencies of 13.3 lm/W at 3 V and external quantum efficiencies of 5.3% are achieved. The emission shows excellent CIE coordinates of (0.420,0.407) at approx. 1000 cd/m{sup 2} and color rendering indices up to 77.

  15. Spectrum study of top-emitting organic light-emitting devices with micro-cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Wei Fuxiang; Liu Hui

    2009-01-01

    Blue and white top-emitting organic light-emitting devices OLEDs with cavity effect have been fabricated. TBADN:3%DSAPh and Alq 3 :DCJTB/TBADN:TBPe/Alq 3 :C545 were used as emitting materials of microcavity OLEDs. On a patterned glass substrate, silver was deposited as reflective anode, and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) layer as HIL and 4'-bis[N-(1-Naphthyl)- N-phenyl-amino]biphenyl (NPB) layer as HTL were made. Al/Ag thin films were made as semi-transparent cathode with a transmittance of about 30%. By changing the thickness of indium tin oxide ITO, deep blue with Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates (CIEx, y) of (0.141, 0.049) was obtained on TBADN:3%DSAPh devices, and different color (red, blue and green) was obtained on Alq 3 :DCJTB/TBADN:TBPe/Alq 3 :C545 devices, full width at half maxima (FWHM) was only 17 nm. The spectral intensity and FWHM of emission in cavity devices have also been studied.

  16. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  17. A Simple, Small-Scale Lego Colorimeter with a Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Used as Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asheim, Jonas; Kvittingen, Eivind V.; Kvittingen, Lise; Verley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a simple, inexpensive, and robust colorimeter from a few Lego bricks, in which one light-emitting diode (LED) is used as a light source and a second LED as a light detector. The colorimeter is suited to various grades and curricula.

  18. Degradation in organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vincent Vinh

    This thesis is about the fundamental causes of degradation in tris(8-Hydroxyquinoline) Aluminum (Alq3)-based organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Degradation typically occurs when a current is forced through an insulating material. Since the insulator does not support conduction waves (in its ground state), chemical restructuring must occur to accommodate the current. OLEDs have many technical advantages over the well known semiconductor-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). OLEDs have quantum efficiencies ˜1% (˜10 times higher than the LEDs), and operational power thresholds ˜.05mW (˜100 lower than the LEDs). OLEDs are preferred in power limited and portable devices; devices such as laptops and displays consume ˜1/4 of the supplied power---any power saving is significant. Other advantages, like better compliance to curved surfaces and ease of fabrication, give the OLEDs an even greater edge over the LEDs. OLEDs must have at least comparable or better lifetimes to remain attractive. Typical OLEDs last several 100hrs compared to the several 1000hrs for the LEDs. For reliable OLED application, it is necessary to understand the above breakdown mechanism. In this thesis, we attempt to understand the breakdown by looking at how OLEDs are made, how they work, and when they don't. In the opening sections, we give an overview of OLEDs and LEDs, especially how sustained luminescence is achieved through current circulation. Then in Chapter 2, we look at the basic components in the OLEDs. In Chapter 3 we look at how a hole material (like poly-vinyl carbazole or PVK) establishes an excitonic environment for the sustained luminescence in Alq3. We then approximate how potential is distributed when a simple luminescence system is in operation. In Chapter 4, we look at ways of measuring this distribution via the OLED impedance. Finally in Chapter 5, we look at the OLED stability under light emission conditions via PVK and Alq3 photoemission and photoabsorption spectra

  19. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T e /e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux

  20. Pulsed neutron source well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillingham, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed neutron source with a chamber containing a plurality of alpha emitting strips and beryllium targets coaxially mounted is described. A pulsed source is provided by rotation of the target to on-off positions along with electromagnetic and magnetic devices for positive locking and rotation. (U.S.)

  1. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  2. Coherence characteristics of light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Dalip Singh; Saxena, Kanchan; Dubey, Satish Kumar; Shakher, Chandra

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of coherence characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Experiments were performed using red and green color LEDs directly illuminating the Young's double slit kept in the far-zone. Fourier transform fringe analysis technique was used for the measurement of the visibility of interference fringes from which the modulus of degree of spectral coherence was determined. Low degree of spectral coherence, typically 0.4 for red and 0.2 for green LED with double-slit separation of 400 μm was observed. A variable slit was then kept in front of the LEDs and the double slit was illuminated with the light coming out of the slit. Experiments were performed with various slit sizes and the visibility of the interference fringes was observed. It was found that visibility of the interference fringes changes drastically in presence of variable slit kept in front of LEDs and a high degree of spectral coherence, typically 0.85 for red and 0.8 for green LED with double-slit separation of 400 μm and rectangular slit opening of 500 μm was observed. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical counterparts. Coherence lengths of both the LEDs were also determined and it was obtained 5.8±2 and 24±4 μm for green and red LEDs, respectively.

  3. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, John C; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Ahmed, Ahmed E

    2009-01-01

    The haloacetonitriles (HANs) exist in drinking water exclusively as byproducts of disinfection. HANs are found in drinking water more often, and in higher concentrations, when surface water is treated by chloramination. Human exposure occurs through consumption of finished drinking water; oral and dermal contact also occurs, and results from showering, swimming and other activities. HANs are reactive and are toxic to gastrointestinal tissues following oral administration. Such toxicity is characterized by GSH depletion, increased lipid peroxidation, and covalent binding of HAN-associated radioactivity to gut tissues. The presence of GSH in cells is an important protective mechanism against HAN toxicity; depletion of cellular GSH results in increased toxicity. Some studies have demonstrated an apparently synergistic effect between ROS and HAN administration, that may help explain effects observed in GI tissues. ROS are produced in gut tissues, and in vitro evidence indicates that ROS may contribute to the degradation and formation of reactive intermediates from HANs. The rationale for ROS involvement may involve HAN-induced depletion of GSH and the role of GSH in scavenging ROS. In addition to effects on GI tissues, studies show that HAN-derived radiolabel is found covalently bound to proteins and DNA in several organs and tissues. The addition of antioxidants to biologic systems protects against HAN-induced DNA damage. The protection offered by antioxidants supports the role of oxidative stress and the potential for a threshold in han-induced toxicity. However, additional data are needed to substantiate evidence for such a threshold. HANs are readily absorbed from the GI tract and are extensively metabolized. Elimination occurs primarily in urine, as unconjugated one-carbon metabolites. Evidence supports the involvement of mixed function oxidases, the cytochrome P450 enzyme family and GST, in HAN metabolism. Metabolism represents either a detoxification or

  4. Applications of Light Emitting Diodes in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianfei; Xiong, Daxi

    2017-11-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have become the main light sources for general lighting, due to their high lumen efficiency and long life time. Moreover, their high bandwidth and the availability of diverse wavelength contents ranging from ultraviolet to infrared empower them with great controllability in tuning brightness, pulse durations and spectra. These parameters are the essential ingredients of the applications in medical imaging and therapies. Despite the fast advances in both LED technologies and their applications, few reviews have been seen to link the controllable emission properties of LEDs to these applications. The objective of this paper is to bridge this gap by reviewing the main control techniques of LEDs that enable creating enhanced lighting patterns for imaging and generating effective photon doses for photobiomodulation. This paper also provides the basic mechanisms behind the effective LED therapies in treating cutaneous and neurological diseases. The emerging field of optogenetics is also discussed with a focus on the application of LEDs. The multidisciplinary topics reviewed in this paper can help the researchers in LEDs, imaging, light therapy and optogenetics better understand the basic principles in each other's field; and hence to stimulate the application of LEDs in health care.

  5. Deep UV emitting scintillators for alpha and beta particle detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606 (United States); Jia, D.D.; Lewis, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Feofilov, S.P. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Meltzer, R.S., E-mail: rmeltzer@physast.uga.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30606 (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Several deep UV emitting scintillators, whose emission falls in the solar blind region of the spectrum (200-280 nm), are described and their scintillator properties are characterized. They include LaPO{sub 4}:Pr, YPO{sub 4}:Pr, YAlO{sub 3}:Pr, Pr(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}, YPO{sub 4}:Bi and ScPO{sub 4}. These materials would facilitate the detection of ionizing radiation in open areas, even during the daylight hours, and could be used to support large area surveys that monitor for the presence of ionization radiation due, for example, to system leaks or transfer contamination. These materials can be used in the form of powders, thin films or paints for radiation detection. They are characterized for both beta radiation using electron beams (2-35 keV) and {sup 137}Cs and alpha radiations using {sup 241}Am sources. Their absolute light yields are estimated and are compared to that of Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce. Their light yields decrease as a function of electron energy but at 10 keV they approach 8000 ph/MeV.

  6. Printable candlelight-style organic light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, J. H.; Singh, M.; Song, W. C.; Liu, S. H.

    2017-06-01

    Candles or oil lamps are currently the most friendly lighting source to human eyes, physiology, ecosystems, artifacts, environment, and night skies due to their blue light-less emission. Candle light also exhibits high light-quality that provides visual comfort. However, they are relatively low in power efficacy (0.3 lm/W), making them energy-wasting, besides having problems like scorching hot, burning, catching fire, flickering, carbon blacking, oxygen consuming, and release of green house gas etc. In contrast, candlelight organic light-emitting diode (OLED) can be made blue-hazard free and energy-efficient. The remaining challenges are to maximize its light-quality and enable printing feasibility, the latter of which would pave a way to cost-effective manufacturing. We hence demonstrate herein the design and fabrication of a candlelight OLED via wet-process. From retina protection perspective, its emission is 13, 12 and 8 times better than those of the blue-enriched white CFL, LED and OLED. If used at night, it is 9, 6 and 4 times better from melatonin generation perspective.

  7. An improved in situ method for determining depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, R.R.; Kearfott, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry determines the quantities of radionuclides in some medium with a portable detector. The main limitation of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry lies in determining the depth distribution of radionuclides. This limitation is addressed by developing an improved in situ method for determining the depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in large area sources. This paper implements a unique collimator design with conventional radiation detection equipment. Cylindrically symmetric collimators were fabricated to allow only those gamma-rays emitted from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis) to be detected. Positioned with its axis normal to surface of the media, each collimator enables the detection of gamma-rays emitted from a different range of polar angles and preferential depths. Previous in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. However, the absolute method presented in this paper determines the depth distribution as a histogram and does not rely on such assumptions. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method only requires a single gamma-ray emission, provides more detailed depth information, and offers a superior ability for characterizing complex depth distributions. Collimated spectrometer measurements of buried area sources demonstrated the ability of the method to yield accurate depth information. Based on the results of actual measurements, this method increases the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry as an independent characterization tool in situations with unknown radionuclide depth distributions

  8. Red light emitting solid state hybrid quantum dot-near-UV GaN LED devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hongjoo; Lee, Seonghoon

    2007-01-01

    We produced core-shell (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots by direct colloidal chemical synthesis and the surface-passivation method-an overcoating of the core CdSe with a larger-bandgap material ZnSe. The (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots(QDs) play the role of a colour conversion centre. We call these quantum dots nanophosphors. We fabricated red light emitting hybrid devices of (CdSe)ZnSe QDs and a near-UV GaN LED by combining red light emitting (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots (as a colour conversion centre) with a near-UV(NUV) GaN LED chip (as an excitation source). A few good red phosphors have been known for UV excitation wavelengths, and red phosphors for UV excitation have been sought for a long time. Here we tested the possibility of using (CdSe)ZnSe QDs as red nanophosphors for UV excitation. The fabricated red light emitting hybrid device of (CdSe)ZnSe and a NUV GaN LED chip showed a good luminance. We demonstrated that the (CdSe)ZnSe quantum dots were promising red nanophosphors for NUV excitation and that a red LED made of QDs and a NUV excitation source was a highly efficient hybrid device

  9. Hybrid p-n junction light-emitting diodes based on sputtered ZnO and organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Jong H.; Kitamura, M.; Arita, M.; Arakawa, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated light-emitting hybrid p-n junction devices using low temperature deposited ZnO and organic films, in which the ZnO and the organic films served as the n- and p-type component, respectively. The devices have a rectification factor as high as ∼10 3 and a current density greater than 2 A/cm 2 . Electroluminescence of the hybrid device shows the mixture of the emission bands arising from radiative charge recombination in organic and ZnO. The substantial device properties could provide various opportunities for low cost and large area multicolor light-emitting sources.

  10. Hazardous and toxic waste management in Botswana: practices and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Meng, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Hazardous and toxic waste is a complex waste category because of its inherent chemical and physical characteristics. It demands for environmentally sound technologies and know-how as well as clean technologies that simultaneously manage and dispose it in an environmentally friendly way. Nevertheless, Botswana lacks a system covering all the critical steps from importation to final disposal or processing of hazardous and toxic waste owing to limited follow-up of the sources and types of hazardous and toxic waste, lack of modern and specialised treatment/disposal facilities, technical know-how, technically skilled manpower, funds and capabilities of local institutions to take lead in waste management. Therefore, because of a lack of an integrated system, there are challenges such as lack of cooperation among all the stakeholders about the safe management of hazardous and toxic waste. Furthermore, Botswana does not have a systematic regulatory framework regarding monitoring and hazardous and toxic waste management. In addition to the absence of a systematic regulatory framework, inadequate public awareness and dissemination of information about hazardous and toxic waste management, slower progress to phase-out persistent and bio-accumulative waste, and lack of reliable and accurate information on hazardous and toxic waste generation, sources and composition have caused critical challenges to effective hazardous and toxic waste management. It is, therefore, important to examine the status of hazardous and toxic waste as a waste stream in Botswana. By default; this mini-review article presents an overview of the current status of hazardous and toxic waste management and introduces the main challenges in hazardous and toxic waste management. Moreover, the article proposes the best applicable strategies to achieve effective hazardous and toxic waste management in the future. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Laser generation of proton beams for the production of short-lived positron emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, I.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Singhal, R.P.; McCanny, T.; McKenna, P.; Clark, E.L.; Krushelnick, K.; Zepf, M.; Beg, F.N.; Tatarakis, M.; Dangor, A.E.; Norreys, P.A.; Clarke, R.J.; Allott, R.M.; Ross, I.N.

    2001-01-01

    Protons of energies up to 37 MeV have been generated when ultra-intense lasers (up to 10 20 W cm -2 ) interact with hydrogen containing solid targets. These protons can be used to induce nuclear reactions in secondary targets to produce β + -emitting nuclei of relevance to the nuclear medicine community, namely 11 C and 13 N via (p, n) and (p,α) reactions. Activities of the order of 200 kBq have been measured from a single laser pulse interacting with a thin solid target. The possibility of using ultra-intense lasers to produce commercial amounts of short-lived positron emitting sources for positron emission tomography (PET) is discussed

  12. InP/ZnS nanocrystals for colour conversion in white light emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirazi, Roza

    In this work a comprehensive study of a colloidal InP/ZnS nanocrystals (NC) as the colour conversion material for white light emitting diodes (WLED) is shown. Studied nanocrystals were synthesised by wet chemistry using one pot, hot injection method. A quantum efficiency (QE) of photoluminescence......, radiative and non-radiative recombination rates were determined and QE of 63% for the population of NCs that emit light was derived. A search for source of exciton losses in bright nanocrystals temperature resolved TRPL was studied and it revealed carrier trapping most likely at core-shell interface as well...... as at the surface and which competes with bright and dark exciton states. A presence of long-lived dark excitons and trapped charges lead to strong Auger recombination at high (relative to the trapping times) excitation. A colour conversion efficiency of the nanocrystals upon light absorption and in a process...

  13. Sheath formation of a plasma containing multiply charged ions, cold and hot electrons, and emitted electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    It is quite well known that ion confinement is an important factor in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) as it is closely related to the plasma potential. A model of sheath formation was extended to a plasma containing multiply charged ions (MCIs), cold and hot electrons, and secondary electrons emitted either by MCIs or hot electrons. In the model, a modification of the 'Bohm criterion' was given, the sheath potential drop and the critical emission condition were also analyzed. It appears that the presence of hot electrons and emitted electrons strongly affects the sheath formation so that smaller hot electrons and larger emission current result in reduced sheath potential (or floating potential). However the sheath potential was found to become independent of the emission current J when J > J c , (where J c is the critical emission current. The paper is followed by the associated poster

  14. AlGaInN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipshidze, G.; Kuryatkov, V.; Borisov, B.; Holtz, M.; Nikishin, S.; Temkin, H.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown on Si(111) by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia are described. The layers are composed of superlattices of AlGaN/GaN and AlN/AlGaInN. The layers are doped n and p type with Si and Mg, respectively. Hole concentration of 4x10 17 cm -3 , with a mobility of 8 cm2/Vs, is measured in Al 0.4 Ga 0.6 N/GaN. We demonstrate effective n- and p-type doping of structures based on AlN/AlGaInN. Light-emitting diodes based on these structures show light emission between 290 and 334 nm

  15. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  16. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  17. Commercial mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, C. Robin; Paboeuf, David; Ortega, Tiago; Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Lin, Jipeng; Hempler, Nils; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents the latest efforts in the development of commercial optically-pumped semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs) at M Squared Lasers. Two types of SDLs are currently being developed: an ultrafast system and a continuous wave single frequency system under the names of Dragonfly and Infinite, respectively. Both offer a compact, low-cost, easy-to-use and maintenance-free tool for a range of growing markets including nonlinear microscopy and quantum technology. To facilitate consumer uptake of the SDL technology, the performance specifications aim to closely match the currently employed systems. An extended Dragonfly system is being developed targeting the nonlinear microscopy market, which typically requires 1-W average power pulse trains with pulse durations below 200 fs. The pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the commonly used laser systems, typically Titanium-sapphire lasers, is 80 MHz. This property is particularly challenging for mode-locked SDLs which tend to operate at GHz repetition rates, due to their short upper state carrier lifetime. Dragonfly has found a compromise at 200 MHz to balance mode-locking instabilities with a low PRF. In the ongoing development of Dragonfly, additional pulse compression and nonlinear spectral broadening stages are used to obtain pulse durations as short as 130 fs with an average power of 0.85 W, approaching the required performance. A variant of the Infinite system was adapted to provide a laser source suitable for the first stage of Sr atom cooling at 461 nm. Such a source requires average powers of approximately 1 W with a sub-MHz linewidth. As direct emission in the blue is not a viable approach at this stage, an SDL emitting at 922 nm followed by an M Squared Lasers SolTiS ECD-X doubler is currently under development. The SDL oscillator delivered >1 W of single frequency (RMS frequency noise <150kHz) light at 922 nm.

  18. Evaluation of some emitted elements from selected small industries in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elboraie, Mahir Zein Elabdeen

    1999-08-01

    control site. Correlation coefficient data indicated that the elements were possibly contributed to the same sources. Enrichment factor revealed that the elements were contributed by sources other than soil dust. Emission from these industries were found to be limited in the indoor environment. This work revealed that calcium is the major emitted element from paint industry. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, copper and lead being emitted from this industry in minor amounts. Lead is the major emitted element from battery and printing industries. In workshop industry, iron being the major pollutant emitted,together with minor amounts of nickel, copper, zinc, and lead. Copper and zinc are the major emitted elements from mint industry. Iron, cobalt, and nickel emitted from this industry in minor amounts

  19. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs. Ultraviolet C (UVC light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001 were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  20. Time Effectiveness of Ultraviolet C Light (UVC) Emitted by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in Reducing Stethoscope Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Gabriele; Fattorini, Mattia; Nante, Nicola; Rosadini, Daniele; Serafini, Andrea; Tani, Marco; Cevenini, Gabriele

    2016-09-23

    Today it is well demonstrated that stethoscopes can be as contaminated as hands, which are a recognized source of Health-Care Associated Infections (HCAIs). Ultraviolet C (UVC) light has proven disinfection capacity and the innovative UVC technology of Light Emitting Diode (LED) shows several potential benefits. To verify whether the use of UVC LEDs is effective and reliable in stethoscope membrane disinfection after prolonged use, a pre-post intervention study was conducted. A total of 1668 five-minute cycles were performed on two UVC LEDs to simulate their use; thereafter, their disinfection capacity was tested on stethoscope membranes used on a previously auscultated volunteer. Then, a further 1249 cycles were run and finally the LEDs were tested to assess performance in reducing experimental contamination by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli on the stethoscope membrane. Baseline volunteer contamination identified 104 Colony Forming Units (CFUs) while treated Petri dishes had 12 and 15 CFUs (p < 0.001). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) were also found relating to the reduction of specific bacteria: in particular, after treatment no CFU were observed for S. aureus and E. coli. UVC LEDs demonstrated the capacity to maintain high levels of disinfection after more than 240 h of use and they were effective against common microorganisms that are causative agents of HCAIs.

  1. Metabolic response to low-level toxicant exposure in a novel renal tubule epithelial cell system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, James Keith; Athersuch, Toby James; Cavill, Rachel; Radford, Robert; Slattery, Craig; Jennings, Paul; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P; Ebbels, Timothy Mark David; Keun, Hector Charles

    Toxicity testing is vital to protect human health from exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, combining novel cellular models with molecular profiling technologies, such as metabolomics can add new insight into the molecular basis of toxicity and provide a rich source of

  2. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  3. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Vineet; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  4. Lighting emitting microstructures in porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, E.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques are used to examine microstructuring effects on the optical properties of single layer, multilayer, single and multiple microcavity structures fabricated from porous silicon. Two important issues regarding the effects of the periodic structuring of this material are discussed. Firstly, the precise role played by this microstructuring, given that the luminescence is distributed throughout the entire structure and the low porosity layers are highly absorbing at short wavelengths. The second issue examined concerns the observed effects on the optical spectra of the samples owing to the emission bandwidth of the material being greater than the optical stopband of the structure. Measurements of the reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of different porous silicon microstructures are presented and discussed. The results are modelled using a transfer matrix technique. The matrix method has been modified to calculate the optical spectra of porous silicon specifically by accounting for the effects of dispersion, absorption and emission within the material. Layer thickness and porosity gradients have also been included in the model. The dielectric function of the two component layers (i.e. silicon and air) is calculated using the Looyenga formula. This approach can be adapted to suit other porous semiconductors if required. Examination of the experimental results have shown that the emitted light is strongly controlled by the optical modes of the structures. Furthermore, the data display an interplay of a wide variety of effects dependent upon the structural composition. Comparisons made between the experimental and calculated reflectivity and photoluminescence spectra of many different porous silicon microstructures show very good agreement. (author)

  5. Optical coherence tomography findings in methanol toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kendra A; Warren, Alexis K; Baumal, Caroline R; Hedges, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    Methanol toxicity poses a significant public health problem in developing countries, and in Southeast Asia, where the most common source of poisoning is via adulterated liquor in local drinks. Methanol toxicity can have devastating visual consequences and retinal specialists should be aware of the features of this toxic optic neuropathy. The authors report a case of severe systemic methanol toxicity and relatively mild optic neuropathy demonstrating unique retinal changes on optical coherence tomography (OCT). A previously healthy student developed ataxia, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness hours after drinking homemade alcohol while traveling in Indonesia. She was found to have a serum pH of 6.79 and elevated methanol levels. She was treated with intravenous ethanol, methylprednisolone and sodium bicarbonate. When she awoke she had bilateral central scotomas. At presentation, she had central depression on visual field testing. OCT of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) was normal but ganglion cell layer analysis (GCL) showed highly selective loss of the nasal fibers in both eyes. Further, OCT of the macula demonstrated inner nuclear layer (INL) microcysts in the corresponding area of selective GCL loss in both eyes. The selective involvement of the papillomacular bundle fibers is common in toxic optic neuropathies and represents damage to the small caliber axons rich in mitochondria. Despite severe systemic toxicity, the relative sparing of the optic nerve in this case enabled characterization of the evolution of methanol toxicity with segmental GCL involvement and preservation of the RNFL, corresponding to the papillomacular bundle. This is the first reported case of INL microcysts in methanol optic neuropathy and supports that they are a non-specific finding, and may represent preferential damage to the papillomacular bundle.

  6. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Toxicity and antinociceptive effects of Hamelia patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro

    Full Text Available Abstract Many medicinal herbs are used in folk medicine without taking into account their toxicity. Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae, a Mexican endemic species, is used for the empirical treatment of pain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the toxicity and antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extracts of H. patens leaves. The toxicity of H. patens leaves (500–5000 mg/kg was evaluated in acute (14 days and subacute (28 days assays. In the subacute assay, a blood analysis (both hematology and chemistry was carried out. The antinociceptive effects of H. patens leaves (50–200 mg/kg were evaluated using thermal-induced nociception (hot plate and the chemical-induced nociceptive tests (acid acetic and formalin. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 estimated for H. patens leaves was 2964 mg/kg i.p. and >5000 mg/kg p.o., whereas in the subacute test HPE did not affect hematological or biochemical parameters. In chemical-induced nociception models, H. patens (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. showed antinociceptive effects with similar activity than 100 mg/kg naproxen. In the hot plate test, HPE at 100 mg/kg (17% and 200 mg/kg (25% showed moderate antinociceptive effects. HPE could be a good source of antinociceptive agents because of its good activity and low toxicity.

  8. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  9. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Selvaraj, Uthra [Department of Biotechnology, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Kumar, Vadivel Vinod [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip, E-mail: philip@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael [Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich [Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Raman, Thiagarajan, E-mail: raman@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases (CRID), School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH){sub 2} without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd{sup 2+} ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd{sup 2+} ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd{sup 2+} from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights:

  10. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao; Selvaraj, Uthra; Kumar, Vadivel Vinod; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip; Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael; Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich; Raman, Thiagarajan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH) 2 without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd 2+ ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd 2+ ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd 2+ from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights: • Toxicity of Cd

  11. Directionality of nose-emitted echolocation calls from bats without a nose-leaf (Plecotus auritus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Hallam, John; Moss, Cynthia F

    2018-01-01

    All echolocating bats and whales measured to date emit a directional bio-sonar beam that affords them a number of advantages over an omni-directional beam, i.e. reduced clutter, increased source level and inherent directional information. In this study we investigated the importance...... of a directional sound emission for navigation through echolocation by measuring the sonar beam of brown long-eared bats, Plecotus auritusP. auritus emits sound through the nostrils but has no external appendages to readily facility a directional sound emission as found in most nose emitters. The study shows...... that P. auritus, despite the lack of an external focusing apparatus, emits a directional echolocation beam (Directivity index=13 dB) and that the beam is more directional vertically (-6 dB angle at 22°) than horizontally (-6dB angle at 35°). Using a simple numerical model we find that the recorded...

  12. Toxic alcohol ingestion: prompt recognition and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gillian A; Valento, Matthew; Kim, Jeremy

    2016-09-22

    Identifying patients with potential toxic alcohol exposure and initiating appropriate management is critical to avoid significant patient morbidity. Sources of toxic alcohol exposure include ethylene glycol, methanol, diethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and isopropanol. Treatment considerations include the antidotes fomepizole and ethanol, and hemodialysis for removal of the parent compound and its toxic metabolites. Additional interventions include adjunctive therapies that may improve acidosis and enhance clearance of the toxic alcohol or metabolites. This issue reviews common sources of alcohol exposure, basic mechanisms of toxicity, physical examination and laboratory findings that may guide rapid assessment and management, and indications for treatment. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  13. Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Vi-En

    2010-02-23

    At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

  14. External radiation toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The section contains summaries of research on neutron and gamma-ray toxicity in rodents, late effects of low-dose rate, whole-body, protracted exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on young adult beagles, and the effects of protracted, low-dose rate exposure to 60 Co gamma rays on preclinical leukemic phase-related changes in the granulopoietic system of beagles

  15. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local anaesthetic toxicity has been known since the introduction of local anaesthetic drugs into anaesthetic practice more than a hundred ... was the first to think of cocaine as a narcotic. ..... anaesthetics act as Na+ channel-blocking agents, they slow down .... all neurons, leading to global CNS depression, slowing and.

  16. Toxicity of lunar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linnarsson, D.; Carpenter, J.; Fubini, B.; Gerde, P.; Loftus, D.; Prisk, K.; Staufer, U.; Tranfield, E.; van Westrenen, W.

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of

  17. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  18. How toxic is ibogaine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, Ruud P. W.; Brunt, Tibor M.

    2016-01-01

    Ibogaine is a psychoactive indole alkaloid found in the African rainforest shrub Tabernanthe Iboga. It is unlicensed but used in the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction. However, reports of ibogaine's toxicity are cause for concern. To review ibogaine's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics,

  19. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic .... wherein the right hemisphere, was preserved for histology and fixed in 10% ... Biochemical Assays: The left hemisphere of the brain samples was ...... development in male and female rats. Exp Physiol.

  20. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  1. Toxic Hazards in Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Pasteur, Lillm,FRANCE. (2) CONISH H.H., EARTH M.L.& IANNi F.L, "Comparative Toxicology of Platics during Thar-modecoqiorition Intsw-re8posium on...Pyrolysnis and Combustion of Materials" Firm and Materials (1976).1, 29-35 (8) ALAAIE Y."Toxicity of Platic dacomposition ProductsŖd Annu~al Progress

  2. Hearing sensation levels of emitted biosonar clicks in an echolocating Atlantic bottlenose dolphin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhai Li

    Full Text Available Emitted biosonar clicks and auditory evoked potential (AEP responses triggered by the clicks were synchronously recorded during echolocation in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus trained to wear suction-cup EEG electrodes and to detect targets by echolocation. Three targets with target strengths of -34, -28, and -22 dB were used at distances of 2 to 6.5 m for each target. The AEP responses were sorted according to the corresponding emitted click source levels in 5-dB bins and averaged within each bin to extract biosonar click-related AEPs from noise. The AEP amplitudes were measured peak-to-peak and plotted as a function of click source levels for each target type, distance, and target-present or target-absent condition. Hearing sensation levels of the biosonar clicks were evaluated by comparing the functions of the biosonar click-related AEP amplitude-versus-click source level to a function of external (in free field click-related AEP amplitude-versus-click sound pressure level. The results indicated that the dolphin's hearing sensation levels to her own biosonar clicks were equal to that of external clicks with sound pressure levels 16 to 36 dB lower than the biosonar click source levels, varying with target type, distance, and condition. These data may be assumed to indicate that the bottlenose dolphin possesses effective protection mechanisms to isolate the self-produced intense biosonar beam from the animal's ears during echolocation.

  3. Optimization of white organic light emitting diodes based on emitting layer charge carrier conduction properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, H I; Lee, C H

    2008-01-01

    We have fabricated white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with multi-emitting layer (EML) structures in which 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) layers doped with the phosphorescent dopants fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy) 3 ) and bis(2-(2'-benzo[4,5-a]thienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium(acetylacetonate) (btp 2 Ir(acac)) and the fluorescent dopant 4,4'-bis[2-{4-(N,N-diphenylamino) phenyl}vinyl]biphenyl (DPAVBi) were used as green (G), red (R) and blue (B) EMLs, respectively. A higher efficiency was expected with the R/G/B EML sequence from the hole transport layer interface than with the G/R/B sequence because of the differences in the charge carrier conduction properties of the EMLs doped with phosphorescent dopants and the luminance balance between the phosphorescent and fluorescent emissions. A high efficiency of 18.3 cd A -1 (an external quantum efficiency of 8.5%) at 100 cd m -2 and good colour stability were achieved with the R/G/B EML sequence as expected, with an additional non-doped CBP interlayer used between the G and B EMLs. In addition, the OLED with this sequence was found to have the longest lifetime of the white devices we tested

  4. Optimization of white organic light emitting diodes based on emitting layer charge carrier conduction properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, H I; Lee, C H [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hibaek75@snu.ac.kr

    2008-05-21

    We have fabricated white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with multi-emitting layer (EML) structures in which 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) layers doped with the phosphorescent dopants fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and bis(2-(2'-benzo[4,5-a]thienyl)pyridinato-N,C3')iridium(acetylacetonate) (btp{sub 2}Ir(acac)) and the fluorescent dopant 4,4'-bis[2-{l_brace}4-(N,N-diphenylamino) phenyl{r_brace}vinyl]biphenyl (DPAVBi) were used as green (G), red (R) and blue (B) EMLs, respectively. A higher efficiency was expected with the R/G/B EML sequence from the hole transport layer interface than with the G/R/B sequence because of the differences in the charge carrier conduction properties of the EMLs doped with phosphorescent dopants and the luminance balance between the phosphorescent and fluorescent emissions. A high efficiency of 18.3 cd A{sup -1} (an external quantum efficiency of 8.5%) at 100 cd m{sup -2} and good colour stability were achieved with the R/G/B EML sequence as expected, with an additional non-doped CBP interlayer used between the G and B EMLs. In addition, the OLED with this sequence was found to have the longest lifetime of the white devices we tested.

  5. Simple single-emitting layer hybrid white organic light emitting with high color stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Lu, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneously achieving a high efficiency and color quality at luminance levels required for solid-state lighting has been difficult for white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Single-emitting layer (SEL) white OLEDs, in particular, exhibit a significant tradeoff between efficiency and color stability. Furthermore, despite the simplicity of SEL white OLEDs being its main advantage, the reported device structures are often complicated by the use of multiple blocking layers. In this paper, we report a highly simplified three-layered white OLED that achieves a low turn-on voltage of 2.7 V, an external quantum efficiency of 18.9% and power efficiency of 30 lm/W at 1000 cd/cm2. This simple white OLED also shows good color quality with a color rendering index of 75, CIE coordinates (0.42, 0.46), and little color shifting at high luminance. The device consists of a SEL sandwiched between a hole transport layer and an electron transport layer. The SEL comprises a thermally activated delayer fluorescent molecule having dual functions as a blue emitter and as a host for other lower energy emitters. The improved color stability and efficiency in such a simple device structure is explained as due to the elimination of significant energy barriers at various organic-organic interfaces in the traditional devices having multiple blocking layers.

  6. Air toxics emissions from an IGCC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Norrbacka, P. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland); Hinderson, A. [Vattenfall (Sweden); Rosenberg, R.; Zilliacus, R.; Kurkela, E.; Nieminen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Hoffren, H. [IVO International Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The so-called simplified coal gasification combined cycle process, incorporating air gasification and hot gas cleanup, promises high power generation efficiency in an environmentally acceptable manner. Increasingly more stringent environmental regulations have focused attention on the emissions of not only SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} but also on the so-called air toxics which include a number of toxic trace elements. As result of recent amendments to the United States Clean Air Act, IGCC emissions of eleven trace elements: antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium - as well as the radionuclides uranium and thorium may be regulated. Similarly, air missions standards in Europe include a limit of 0.05 mg Nm{sup 3} for mercury and cadmium and 1.0 3/Nm{sup 3} for other class I trace elements. A suitable sampling/measuring system has been developed in this project (in cooperation with Imatran Voima Oy, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Radian Cooperation) which will be used in the pressurized gasification tests. This will enable an accurate measurement of the volatilized trace element species, at high temperature and pressure, which may be found in the vapour phase. Models are being developed that can be used to determine not only the chemical equilibrium composition of gaseous, liquid and solid phases, but also possible interactions of the gaseous species with aerosol particles and surfaces, These should be used to more accurately assess the impact of the toxic trace metals emitted from the simplified IGCC system

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    that carbon blacks contain free radical and other surface functionality as manufactured, and that exposure to ozone further functionalizes the surface. Samples of carbon black that have been exposed to ozone react with their ambient environment so that acid anhydride and cyclic ether functionality hydrolyze to form carboxylic acid functionality, observable by transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Persistent free radical content, but not free radical content from ozone exposure, may mediate the toxic response of cells to carbon blacks in vitro. Results showed that macrophages exposed to carbon blacks that had been exposed to ozone were not less viable in vitro than macrophages exposed to carbon blacks as manufactured because the free radical content that resulted from ozone exposure was not persistent in an aqueous medium. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to ozonated carbon blacks and ozone was less lethal to macrophages than carbon black exposure alone, possibly because the ozone oxidatively preconditioned the macrophages to resist oxidative stress. The nature of redox-active iron species on the surface of iron-loaded synthetic carbon particles was explored. The particles had been shown in previous studies to provoke an inflammatory response involving the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, which was correlated with their production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that the source of bioavailable Fenton-active iron on the surfaces of the particles was fluoride species that were byproducts of a step in the synthetic process. Fluoride ligated the iron already on the surface, forming a complex that resisted precipitation in the biological medium and thus made the iron more bioavailable. The results of this thesis aim to clarify whether the size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles should be considered more closely as criteria with which to develop better environmental controls

  8. Modeling and Design of High-Efficiency Single-Photon Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    be electrically driven. Several design strategies addressing these requirements have been proposed. In the cavity-based source, light emission is controlled using resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics effects, whereas in the waveguide-based source, broadband electric field screening effects are employed......Solid-state sources capable of emitting single photons on demand are of great interest in quantum information applications. Ideally, such a source should emit exactly one photon into the collection optics per trigger, the emitted photons should be indistinguishable, and the source should...

  9. Assessing comparative terrestrial ecotoxicity of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn: The influence of aging and emission source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owsianiak, Mikołaj; Holm, Peter E.; Fantke, Peter; Christiansen, Karen S.; Borggaard, Ole K.; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Metal exposure to terrestrial organisms is influenced by the reactivity of the solid-phase metal pool. This reactivity is thought to depend on the type of emission source, on aging mechanisms that are active in the soil, and on ambient conditions. Our work shows, that when controlling for soil pH or soil organic carbon, emission source occasionally has an effect on reactivity of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn emitted from various anthropogenic sources followed by aging in the soil from a few years to two centuries. The uncertainties in estimating the age prevent definitive conclusions about the influence of aging time on the reactivity of metals from anthropogenic sources in soils. Thus, for calculating comparative toxicity potentials of man-made metal contaminations in soils, we recommend using time-horizon independent accessibility factors derived from source-specific reactive fractions. - Highlights: • We found an effect of source on reactivity of anthropogenic metals in soils. • The influence of aging on reactivity of anthropogenic metals was not consistent. • We recommend including source and disregarding aging in calculation of CTPs values. - Improving current life cycle inventory (LCI) and life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) practice in terrestrial ecotoxicity assessment of metals.

  10. Astrometric and Timing Effects of Gravitational Waves from Localized Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Schafer, Gerhard; Gwinn, Carl R.; Eubanks, T. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    A consistent approach for an exhaustive solution of the problem of propagation of light rays in the field of gravitational waves emitted by a localized source of gravitational radiation is developed in the first post-Minkowskian and quadrupole approximation of General Relativity. We demonstrate that the equations of light propagation in the retarded gravitational field of an arbitrary localized source emitting quadrupolar gravitational waves can be integrated exactly. The influence of the gra...

  11. Characterization of metals emitted from motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James J; Lough, Glynis C; Shafer, Martin M; Christensen, William F; Arndt, Michael F; DeMinter, Jeffrey T; Park, June-Soo

    2006-03-01

    A systematic approach was used to quantify the metals present in particulate matter emissions associated with on-road motor vehicles. Consistent sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to determine the chemical composition of particulate matter less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10*) and particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), including analysis of trace metals by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Four sources of metals were analyzed in emissions associated with motor vehicles: tailpipe emissions from gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles, brake wear, tire wear, and resuspended road dust. Profiles for these sources were used in a chemical mass balance (CMB) model to quantify their relative contributions to the metal emissions measured in roadway tunnel tests in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Roadway tunnel measurements were supplemented by parallel measurements of atmospheric particulate matter and associated metals at three urban locations: Milwaukee and Waukesha, Wisconsin, and Denver, Colorado. Ambient aerosol samples were collected every sixth day for one year and analyzed by the same chemical analysis techniques used for the source samples. The two Wisconsin sites were studied to assess the spatial differences, within one urban airshed, of trace metals present in atmospheric particulate matter. The measurements were evaluated to help understand source and seasonal trends in atmospheric concentrations of trace metals. ICP-MS methods have not been widely used in analyses of ambient aerosols for metals despite demonstrated advantages over traditional techniques. In a preliminary study, ICP-MS techniques were used to assess the leachability of trace metals present in atmospheric particulate matter samples and motor vehicle source samples in a synthetic lung fluid.

  12. Fluorescent deep-blue and hybrid white emitting devices based on a naphthalene-benzofuran compound

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui; Zheng, Shijun; Chae, HyunSik; Li, Sheng; Mochizuki, Amane; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis, photophysics and electrochemical properties of naphthalene-benzofuran compound 1 and its application in organic light emitting devices. Fluorescent deep-blue emitting devices employing 1 as the emitting dopant embedded in 4

  13. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  14. Tunable and white light emitting AlPO4 mesoporous glass by design of inorganic/organic luminescent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin He

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization of tunable and white light emitting sources employed by UV-LED with single-host phosphors has been an exciting development in the search for high luminous efficiency and excellent color rendering index white-light source. A tunable and white light emitting mesoporous glass was prepared by utilizing both inorganic/organic (Europium/coumarin luminescent species in the meso-structure. The tunable and white light emission was deliberately designed by CIE calculation based on the individual emission spectra, which was realized by tailoring the emission of Eu2+/Eu3+ ions and coumarin 535 in sol-gel AlPO4 mesoporous glass. This simple and versatile procedure is not limited in the combination of rare earth and organic dye and is therefore extendable to other luminescent species in meso-structure for color-tunable efficient solid-state lighting sources.

  15. Benzoporphyrin derivative and light-emitting diode for use in photodynamic therapy: Applications of space light-emitting diode technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Harry T.; Houle, John M.; Bajic, Dawn M.; Schmidt, Meic H.; Reichert, Kenneth W. II; Meyer, Glenn A.

    1998-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality that recently has been applied as adjuvant therapy for brain tumors. PDT consists of intravenously injecting a photosensitizer, which preferentially accumulates in tumor cells, into a patient and then activating the photosensitizer with a light source. This results in free radical generation followed by cell death. The development of more effective light sources for PDT of brain tumors has been facilitated by applications of space light-emitting diode array technology; thus permitting deeper tumor penetration of light and use of better photosensitizers. Currently, the most commonly used photosensitizer for brain tumor PDT is Photofrin registered . Photofrin registered is a heterogeneous mixture of compounds derived from hematoporphyrin. Photofrin registered is activated with a 630 nm laser light and does destroy tumor cells in animal models and humans. However, treatment failure does occur using this method. Most investigators attribute this failure to the limited penetration of brain tissue by a 630 nm laser light and to the fact that Photofrin registered has only a minor absorption peak at 630 nm, meaning that only a small fraction of the chemical is activated. Benzoporphyrin Derivative Monoacid Ring A (BPD) is a new, second generation photosensitizer that can potentially improve PDT for brain tumors. BPD has a major absorption peak at 690 nm, which gives it two distinct advantages over Photofrin registered . First, longer wavelengths of light penetrate brain tissue more easily so that larger tumors could be treated, and second, the major absorption peak means that a larger fraction of the drug is activated upon exposure to light. In the first part of this project we have studied the tumoricidal effects of BPD in vitro using 2A9 canine glioma and U373 human glioblastoma cell cultures. Using light emitting diodes (LED) with a peak emission of 688 nm as a light source, cell kill of up to 86 percent was

  16. All-inorganic white light emitting devices based on ZnO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannen, Ekaterina

    2012-09-21

    Semiconductor nanaocrystals (NCs) are very promising candidates for lightweight large-area rollable displays and light emitting devices (LEDs). They are expected to combine the efficiency, robustness and color tunability of conventional semiconductor LEDs with the flexible fabrication techniques known from OLED technology, since the NCs are compatible with solution processing and therefore can be deposited on virtually any substrates including glass and plastic. Today, NC-LEDs consist of chemically synthesized QDs embedded in organic charge injection and transport layers. The organic layers limit the robustness of the NC-LEDs and result in significant constrictions within the device fabrication procedure, such as organic evaporation steps, inert (i.e. humidity and oxygen free) atmosphere and obligatory encapsulation. These limitations during the production process as well as complex chemical synthesis route of the implemented NCs and organic components lead to high fabrication costs and low turnover. So far, only prototype devices have been introduced by several research groups and industrial companies. Still, the main concern retarding NC-LEDs from market launch is the high content of toxic heavy metals like Cd in the active nanocrystalline light emitting material. Within this work, possible environmentally safe and ambient-air-compatible alternatives to conventional QDs and organics were explored, with the main focus on design and fabrication of completely inorganic white NC-LEDs with commercial ZnO nanoparticles as an active light emitting material. While the electrical transport properties through the NC-network of the commercially available VP AdNano {sup registered} ZnO2O particles were already to some extent explored, their optical properties and therefore suitability as an active light emitter in NC-LEDs were not studied so far. (orig.)

  17. Disponibilidade dos metais pesados tóxicos cádmio, chumbo e cromo no solo e tecido foliar da soja adubada com diferentes fontes de NPK+Zn Availability of cadmium, lead and chromium toxic heavy metals in soil and soybean leaf tissue fertilized with different sources of NPK+Zn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivair André Nava

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Os fertilizantes utilizados para suprir micronutrientes podem apresentar metais pesados tóxicos em sua composição que podem proporcionar severas consequências ao meio ambiente. Plantas cultivadas na presença de determinadas concentrações de elementos tóxicos podem oferecer risco de contaminação, pois os acumulam em seus tecidos. Desse forma, neste trabalho objetivou-se avaliar a disponibilização dos metais pesados tóxicos Cd, Pb, e Cr para o solo e tecido foliar da cultura da soja, cultivada a campo e fertilizada com um formulado N:P2O5:K2O e diferentes fontes de Zn. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso, em esquema fatorial [(5+1x2], com três repetições. Os tratamentos foram constituídos de cinco diferentes fertilizantes NPK+Zn (quatro fontes com Zn e uma sem Zn, um tratamento sem adubação e duas doses de adubação (uma vez e o seu dobro. Com base nos resultados obtidos foi concluído que a aplicação dos tratamentos disponibilizou Cd, Pb e Cr para as plantas de soja e para o solo do experimento nas duas doses de adubação utilizadas.Fertilizers used to supply micronutrients may have toxic heavy metals in their composition, which can have severe consequences for the environment. Plants grown in the presence of certain concentrations of toxic elements may present a risk of contamination because the toxins accumulate in their tissues. This study aimed to measure the presence of the toxic heavy metals Cd, Pb and Cr in the soil and leaf tissue of field-grown soybean plants, fertilized with a formulated N:P2O5:K2O and different sources of Zn. The experimental design utilized randomized blocks in a factorial scheme [(5+1x2], with three replications. The treatments consisted of five different fertilizers NPK + Zn (four sources with Zn and one without Zn, a treatment without fertilizer and two fertilizer levels (a single and double application. Based on obtained results it was concluded that the double

  18. All-Quantum-Dot Infrared Light-Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhenyu; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Liu, Mengxia; Yuan, Mingjian; Ip, Alexander H.; Ahmed, Osman S.; Levina, Larissa; Kinge, Sachin; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising candidates for infrared electroluminescent devices. To date, CQD-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have employed a CQD emission layer sandwiched between carrier transport

  19. Can a tachyon emit light radiation in all directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanujam, G A [NGM Coll., Tamil Nadu (India). Dept. of Physics

    1976-03-01

    It is shown here that a critical analysis of the approaches employed by various authors to accommodate tachyons into special relativity leads one to the conclusion that a tachyon can emit light radiation only along its line of motion.

  20. Fabrication of organic light emitting diode using Molybdenum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    65

    out by measuring sheet resistance, optical transmittance and surface ... role in the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) performance because it determines the .... coated glass by thermal vacuum deposition method and optimize it by using ...

  1. Blue-light emitting triazolopyridinium and triazoloquinolinium salts

    KAUST Repository

    Carboni, Valentina; Su, Xin; Qian, Hai; Aprahamian, Ivan; Credi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Compounds that emit blue light are of interest for applications that include optoelectronic devices and chemo/biosensing and imaging. The design and synthesis of small organic molecules that can act as high-efficiency deep-blue-light emitters

  2. Vacuum Deposited Organic Light Emitting Devices on Flexible Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forrest, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this eight year program was to demonstrate both passive and active matrix, flexible, small scale displays based on small molecular weight organic light emitting device (OLED) technology...

  3. Organic synthesis with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.

    1988-01-01

    Chemistry with short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes of the non-metals, principally 11 C, 13 N and 18 F, has burgeoned over the last decade. This has been almost entirely because of the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a powerful non-invasive technique for investigating pathophysiology in living man. PET is essentially an external technique for the rapid serial reconstruction of the spatial distribution of any positron-emitting radioisotope that has been administered in vivo. Such a distribution is primarily governed by the chemical form in which the positron-emitting radioisotope is incorporated, and importantly for clinical research, is often perturbed by physical, biological or clinical factors. Judicious choice of the chemical form enables specific biological information to be obtained. For example, the labelling of glucose with a positron-emitting radioisotope could be expected to provide a radiopharmaceutical for the study of glucose utilisation in both health and disease. (author)

  4. White top emitting OLED with angle independent emission characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomschke, Michael; Freitag, Patricia; Schwartz, Gregor; Nitsche, Robert; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Georg-Baehr-Strasse 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The general device structure of a top emitting organic light emitting diode (OLED) consists of several organic layers sandwiched in between two metal contacts, with the top one being semitransparent for light outcoupling reasons. Due to the high reflectivity of the electrodes, strong microcavity effects occur which lead to a preferred emission of light of a certain wavelength with main outcoupling in forward direction. This creates rather narrow emission bands, accompanied by strong spectral shifts upon viewing angle variation. By using an organic capping layer on top of the semitransparent metal contact, this unwanted effect can be reduced. This is important especially for white light emission for the use of OLEDs in future lighting applications. Our optical simulations show that the strong angular dependence of the emission color almost vanishes. To verify the simulations we study white top emitting OLEDs based on an approach which are adapted to the top emitting case.

  5. Compositions of volatile organic compounds emitted from melted virgin and waste plastic pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Ni, Yueyong; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    To characterize potential air pollution issues related to recycling facilities of waste plastics, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from melted virgin and waste plastics pellets were analyzed. In this study, laboratory experiments were performed to melt virgin and waste plastic pellets under various temperatures (150, 200, and 250 degrees C) and atmospheres (air and nitrogen [N2]). In the study presented here, low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and the recycled waste plastic pellets were used. The VOCs generated from each plastic pellets were collected by Tenax/Carboxen adsorbent tubes and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The result showed the higher temperatures generated larger amounts of total VOCs (TVOCs). The VOCs emitted from the virgin plastic pellets likely originated from polymer degradation. Smaller TVOC emissions were observed in N2 atmosphere than in air atmosphere. In particular, larger amounts of the oxygenated compounds, which are generally hazardous and malodorous, were detected in air than in N2. In addition to the compounds originating from polymer degradation, the compounds originating from the plastic additives were also detected from LDPE and PS. Furthermore, various species of VOCs likely originating from contaminant inseparate polyvinyl chloride (PVC), food residues, cleaning agents, degreasers, and so on were detected from the waste plastic. Thus, melting waste plastics, as is conducted in recycling facilities, might generate larger amounts of potentially toxic compounds than producing virgin plastics.

  6. Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential toxicity and influence of salinity on acute toxicity of copper sulphate and lead nitrate against Oreochromis niloticus. KA Bawa-Allah, F Osuala, J Effiong. Abstract. This study investigated the salinity-tolerance of Oreochromis niloticus and the influence of salinity changes on the acute toxicities of copper sulphate ...

  7. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  8. Organic light emitting diode with light extracting electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry

    2017-04-18

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (20), a first electrode (12), an emissive active stack (14), and a second electrode (18). At least one of the first and second electrodes (12, 18) is a light extracting electrode (26) having a metallic layer (28). The metallic layer (28) includes light scattering features (29) on and/or in the metallic layer (28). The light extracting features (29) increase light extraction from the organic light emitting diode (10).

  9. SOR/72-43 Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    These Regulations of 10 February 1972, supplemented by SOR/77-895, lay down the classes of radiation emitting devices for the purposes of the Radiation Emitting Devices Act. They lay down their standards of design and construction and warning sign specifications and provide for the procedure to be followed by inspectors of such devices. The devices include inter alia extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, baggage inspection x-ray devices, laser scanners, television receivers. (NEA)

  10. Power output and efficiency of beta-emitting microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheneler, David; Ward, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Current standard methods to calculate the dose of radiation emitted during medical applications by beta-minus emitting microspheres rely on an over-simplistic formalism. This formalism is a function of the average activity of the radioisotope used and the physiological dimensions of the patient only. It neglects the variation in energy of the emitted beta particle due to self-attenuation, or self-absorption, effects related to the finite size of the sphere. Here it is assumed the sphere is comprised of a pure radioisotope with beta particles being emitted isotropically throughout the material. The full initial possible kinetic energy distribution of a beta particle is taken into account as well as the energy losses due to scattering by other atoms in the microsphere and bremsstrahlung radiation. By combining Longmire’s theory of the mean forward range of charged particles and the Rayleigh distribution to take into account the statistical nature of scattering and energy straggling, the linear attenuation, or self-absorption, coefficient for beta-emitting radioisotopes has been deduced. By analogy with gamma radiation transport in spheres, this result was used to calculate the rate of energy emitted by a beta-emitting microsphere and its efficiency. Comparisons to standard point dose kernel formulations generated using Monte Carlo data show the efficacy of the proposed method. Yttrium-90 is used as a specific example throughout, as a medically significant radioisotope, frequently used in radiation therapy for treating cancer. - Highlights: • Range-energy relationship for the beta particles in yttrium-90 is calculated. • Formalism for the semi-analytical calculation of self-absorption coefficients. • Energy-dependent self-absorption coefficient calculated for yttrium-90. • Flux rate of beta particles from a self-attenuating radioactive sphere is shown. • The efficiency of beta particle emitting radioactive microspheres is calculated

  11. Risk Assessment for Toxic Air Pollutants: A Citizen's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisonous substances in the air that come from natural sources (for example, radon gas coming up from the ground) or from manmade sources (for example, chemical compounds given off by factory smokestacks) and can harm the environment or your health. Inhaling (or breathing) toxic air ...

  12. A white organic light emitting diode based on anthracene-triphenylamine derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Qu, Jianjun; Yu, Junsheng; Tao, Silu; Gan, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    White organic lighting-diode (WOLED) can be used as flat light sources, backlights for liquid crystal displays and full color displays. Recently, a research mainstream of white OLED is to develop the novel materials and optimize the structure of devices. In this work a WOLED with a structure of ITO/NPB/PAA/Alq3: x% rubrene/Alq3/Mg: Ag, was fabricated. The device has two light-emitting layers. NPB is used as a hole transport layer, PAA as a blue emitting layer, Alq3: rubrene host-guest system as a yellow emitting layer, and Alq3 close to the cathode as an electron transport layer. In the experiment, the doping concentration of rubrene was optimized. WOLED 1 with 4% rubrene achieved a maximum luminous efficiency of 1.80 lm/W, a maximum luminance of 3926 cd/m2 and CIE coordinates of (0.374, 0.341) .WOLED 2 with 2% rubrene achieved a maximum luminous efficiency of 0.65 lm/W, a maximum luminance of 7495cd/m2 and CIE coordinates of (0.365,0.365).

  13. Seasonal variability in irradiance affects herbicide toxicity to the marine flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eSjollema

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR and Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR of the solar spectrum affect microalgae directly and modify the toxicity of phytotoxic compounds present in water. As a consequence seasonal variable PAR and UVR levels are likely to modulate the toxic pressure of contaminants in the field. Therefore the present study aimed to determine the toxicity of two model contaminants, the herbicides diuron and Irgarol®1051, under simulated irradiance conditions mimicking different seasons. Irradiance conditions of spring and autumn were simulated with a set of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs. Toxicity of both herbicides was measured individually and in a mixture by determining the inhibition of photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII of the marine flagellate Dunaliella teriolecta using Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM fluorometry. Toxicity of the single herbicides was higher under simulated spring irradiance than under autumn irradiance and this effect was also observed for mixtures of the herbicides. This irradiance dependent toxicity indicates that herbicide toxicity in the field is seasonally variable. Consequently toxicity tests under standard light conditions may overestimate or underestimate the toxic effect of phytotoxic compounds.

  14. Biological control of toxic cyanobacteri

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndlela, Luyanda L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available . Ecotoxicity studies: is toxicity reduced? (Testing on daphnids, fish and human cell lines) Resulting impacts on cyanotoxins (Toxin conformation changes, ELISA detection) Competition assays against toxic cyanobacteria (Can Bacillus etc. outcompete...

  15. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  16. Air Toxics Emissions from Open Burning of Crop Residues in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM Oanh, N. T.; Permadi, D. A.; Hopke, P. K.; Smith, K. R.; Nguyet, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural crops production in Southeast Asia (SEA) increases annually to meet domestic consumption of growing population and also for export. Crop residue open burning (CROB) is commonly practiced by farmers to quickly dispose of huge amounts of the agricultural waste, such as rice straw, generated after each crop cycle. This CROB activity emits various toxic air pollutants as well as short-lived climate pollutants such as black carbon particles. Our study focused on quantifying the 2015 annual emissions of semi-volatile organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), dioxins/furans (PCDD/PCDF), organochlorine pesticides (OCP), along with other conventional trace gases, particulate matter, and greenhouse gases from CROB in 10 major agricultural crop producing SEA countries. Crop production statistics and current field OB practices were gathered from our primary surveys and relevant secondary data sources. Emission factors for rice straw and maize residue burning were taken mainly from our measurements in Thailand while for other crops relevant published data were used. The best emission estimates of air toxics from CROB in SEA were 112 g-TEQ/yr of PCDD/PCDF, 33 t/yr of OCP, and 25 Gg/yr of total PAH of which the well-known carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene was 0.3 Gg/yr. The CROB of rice production had the highest shares of emissions (33-95%) among considered 8 crop types. Indonesia was the top contributor to the total SEA emissions (30-45%) followed by Vietnam (16-26%), Thailand (6-22%) and Myanmar (5-18%). The spatial distributions of emissions, 0.1º x 0.1º, for each specie were prepared using MODIS land cover data. Temporally, higher emissions were observed in the harvesting months of the main rice crops. This emissions database can be used in regional air quality modeling studies to assess the impacts of CROB activity and to promote non-open burning alternatives.

  17. Toxic waste liquor disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Toxic waste liquors, especially radio active liquors, are disposed in a sub-zone by feeding down a bore hole a first liquid, then a buffer liquid (e.g. water), then the toxic liquors. Pressure variations are applied to the sub-zone to mix the first liquid and liquors to form gels or solids which inhibit further mixing and form a barrier between the sub-zone and the natural waters in the environment of the sub-zone. In another example the location of the sub-zone is selected so that the environement reacts with the liquors to produce a barrier around the zone. Blind bore holes are used to monitor the sub-zone profile. Materials may be added to the liquor to enhance barrier formation. (author)

  18. A novel red-emitting phosphor for white light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Fuqiang; Chen, Donghua

    2010-01-01

    A novel red-emitting phosphor of Eu 3+ -activated molybdate was prepared at 850 o C by a modified solid-state reaction. Photoluminescence (PL) results showed that the phosphor can be efficiently excited by UV-visible light from 350 to 550 nm, and exhibited bright red emission at 614 nm. XPS are taken to investigate the structure and compositions of this material. The crystallization and particle sizes of the phosphor have been investigated by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM images show that the grain size of the phosphor is about 30 nm which is in full agreement with the theoretical calculation data from the XRD patterns.

  19. [Performance dependence of organic light-emitting devices on the thickness of Alq3 emitting layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jia-rong; Liao, Qiao-sheng; Yang, Rui-bo; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Peng-ju

    2010-10-01

    The dependence of opto-electronical characteristics in organic light-emitting devices on the thickness of Alq3 emitter layer was studied, where MoO3, NPB, and Alq3 were used as hole injector, hole transporter, and emitter/electron transporter, respectively. By increasing the thickness of Alq3 layer from 20 to 100 nm, the device current decreased gradually, and the EL spectra of devices performed a little red shift with an obvious broadening in long wavelength range but a little decrease in intensity of short wavelength range. The authors simulated the EL spectra using the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Alq3 as Alq3 intrinsic emission, which coincided with the experimental EL spectra well. The simulated results suggested that the effect of interference takes the major role in broadening the long wavelength range of EL spectra, and the distribution of emission zone largely affects the profile of EL spectra in short wavelength range.

  20. Lambertian white top-emitting organic light emitting device with carbon nanotube cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, P.; Zakhidov, Al. A.; Luessem, B.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Leo, K.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that white organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with top carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes show almost no microcavity effect and exhibit essentially Lambertian emission. CNT top electrodes were applied by direct lamination of multiwall CNT sheets onto white small molecule OLED stack. The devices show an external quantum efficiency of 1.5% and high color rendering index of 70. Due to elimination of the cavity effect, the devices show good color stability for different viewing angles. Thus, CNT electrodes are a viable alternative to thin semitransparent metallic films, where the strong cavity effect causes spectral shift and non-Lambertian angular dependence. Our method of the device fabrication is simple yet effective and compatible with virtually any small molecule organic semiconductor stack. It is also compatible with flexible substrates and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  1. Optic neuritis with residual tunnel vision in perchloroethylene toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrj, M; Thomas, A; Paci, C; Rotilio, D

    1998-01-01

    In a 57-year-old female owner of a dry-cleaning shop, we describe the association of severe bilateral optic neuritis with unexpectedly high concentrations of perchloroethylene/metabolites in the blood and of chloroform in urine. Visual disturbances consisted of complete blindness for 9 days in the left eye, for 11 days in the right eye, with bright phosphenes and pain on eye rotation. Only central (2-3 degrees radius) vision recovered in the following months. Although environmental concentrations of perchloroethylene were within normal limits, we measured five-fold increases in vapors emitted when ironing freshly dry-cleaned fabrics, and suggest that inhalation of perchloroethylene vapors was the cause of this case of ocular nerve toxicity, recapitulating a previous report of major perchloroethylene toxicity.

  2. Portable, accurate toxicity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.; Hinds, A.A.; Vieaux, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever tightening environmental regulations, severe penalties for non-compliance, and expensive remediation costs have stimulated development of methods to detect and measure toxins. Most of these methods are bioassays that must be performed in the laboratory; none previously devised has been truly portable. The US Army, through the Small Business Innovative Research program, has developed a hand-held, field deployable unit for testing toxicity of battlefield water supplies. This patented system employs the measurable quenching, in the presence of toxins, of the natural bioluminescence produced by the marine dinoflagellate alga Pyrocystis lunula. The procedure's inventor used it for years to measure toxicity concentrations of chemical warfare agents actually, their simulants, primarily in the form of pesticides and herbicides plus assorted toxic reagents, waterbottom samples, drilling fluids, even blood. While the procedure is more precise, cheaper, and faster than most bioassays, until recently it was immobile. Now it is deployable in the field. The laboratory apparatus has been proven to be sensitive to toxins in concentrations as low as a few parts per billion, repeatable within a variation of 10% or less, and unlike some other bioassays effective in turbid or colored media. The laboratory apparatus and the hand-held tester have been calibrated with the EPA protocol that uses the shrimplike Mysidopsis bahia. The test organism tolerates transportation well, but must be rested a few hours at the test site for regeneration of its light-producing powers. Toxicity now can be measured confidently in soils, water columns, discharge points, and many other media in situ. Most significant to the oil industry is that drilling fluids can be monitored continuously on the rig

  3. Lead toxicity: current concerns.

    OpenAIRE

    Goyer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has be...

  4. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  5. Kombucha--toxicity alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Kombucha mushroom, also known as Manchurian mushroom, is a mail-order product touted to lower blood pressure and raise T-cell counts. No controlled trials have been conducted to test these claims. Aspergillus, a mold that may grow on the Kombucha mushroom, attacks the brain and may be fatal to persons with weakened immune systems. Reported toxicity reactions have included stomach problems and yeast infections. Taking Kombucha in combination with other drugs may affect the drugs potency.

  6. Toxicity of nitrogen pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diggle, W M; Gage, J C

    1954-01-01

    Two ppM N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ for 4 h or 1 ppM, 4 h/day for 12 days produced acute pulmonary edema in rats. Ten daily 4-h exposures to 0.5 ppM produced no edema but respiratory distress. NO/sub 2/ produced no edema (some hemorrhage) at 80 mg/m/sup 3/. Nitric acid vapor (63 mg/m/sup 3/) had no obvious toxic effect.

  7. The use of ionic salt dyes as amorphous, thermally stable emitting layers in organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondroudis, Konstantinos; Mitzi, David B.

    2000-01-01

    The conversion of two neutral dye molecules (D) to ionic salts (H2N-D-NH2ṡ2HX) and their utilization as emitting layers in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is described. The dye salts, AEQTṡ2HCl and APTṡ2HCl, can be deposited as amorphous films using conventional evaporation techniques. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis, coupled with thermal annealing studies, demonstrate the resistance of the films to crystallization. This stability is attributed to strong ionic forces between the relatively rigid molecules. OLEDs incorporating such salts for emitting layers exhibit better thermal stability compared with devices made from the corresponding neutral dyes (H2N-D-NH2). These results suggest that ionic salts may more generally enable the formation of thermally stable, amorphous emitting, and charge transporting layers.

  8. Separations chemistry of toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.; Barr, M.; Barrans, R.

    1996-01-01

    Sequestering and removing toxic metal ions from their surroundings is an increasingly active area of research and is gaining importance in light of current environmental contamination problems both within the DOE complex and externally. One method of separating metal ions is to complex them to a molecule (a ligand or chelator) which exhibits specific binding affinity for a toxic metal, even in the presence of other more benign metals. This approach makes use of the sometimes subtle differences between toxic and non-toxic metals resulting from variations in size, charge and shape. For example, toxic metals such as chromium, arsenic, and technetium exist in the environment as oxyanions, negatively charged species with a characteristic tetrahedral shape. Other toxic metals such as actinides and heavy metals are positively charged spheres with specific affinities for particular donor atoms such as oxygen (for actinides) and nitrogen (for heavy metals). In most cases the toxic metals are found in the presence of much larger quantities of less toxic metals such as sodium, calcium and iron. The selectivity of the chelators is critical to the goal of removing the toxic metals from their less toxic counterparts. The approach was to build a ligand framework that complements the unique characteristics of the toxic metal (size, charge and shape) while minimizing interactions with non-toxic metals. The authors have designed ligands exhibiting specificity for the target metals; they have synthesized, characterized and tested these ligands; and they have shown that they exhibit the proposed selectivity and cooperative binding effects

  9. Plasmon enhanced green GaN light-emitting diodes - Invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Fadil, Ahmed; Iida, Daisuke

    in spectral design, more compact etc. TheIII-nitride (GaN, InNetc.) semiconductors are attracting a lot of research effort because the combination of both could emit light with wavelength range from UV to infrared. Basically one material platform could provide all the solutions to light sources.However huge...... nanosphere lithography. For both cases, emission enhancement is demonstrated. For periodic Ag nanoparicles, aphotoluminescence enhancement of 2.7 is observed with a nanodisk diameter of 330 nm.It is found that an optimalpitch exists for a given particle size.For the random Ag nanoparticles,low temperature...

  10. Noniterative algorithm for improving the accuracy of a multicolor-light-emitting-diode-based colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2012-05-01

    We present a noniterative algorithm to reliably reconstruct the spectral reflectance from discrete reflectance values measured by using multicolor light emitting diodes (LEDs) as probing light sources. The proposed algorithm estimates the spectral reflectance by a linear combination of product functions of the detector's responsivity function and the LEDs' line-shape functions. After introducing suitable correction, the resulting spectral reflectance was found to be free from the spectral-broadening effect due to the finite bandwidth of LED. We analyzed the data for a real sample and found that spectral reflectance with enhanced resolution gives a more accurate prediction in the color measurement.

  11. Accuracy Improvement for Light-Emitting-Diode-Based Colorimeter by Iterative Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2011-09-01

    We present a simple algorithm, combining an interpolating method with an iterative calculation, to enhance the resolution of spectral reflectance by removing the spectral broadening effect due to the finite bandwidth of the light-emitting diode (LED) from it. The proposed algorithm can be used to improve the accuracy of a reflective colorimeter using multicolor LEDs as probing light sources and is also applicable to the case when the probing LEDs have different bandwidths in different spectral ranges, to which the powerful deconvolution method cannot be applied.

  12. Timing Calibration for Time-of-Flight PET Using Positron-Emitting Isotopes and Annihilation Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Burr, Kent C.; Wang, Gin-Chung; Du, Huini; Gagnon, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Adding time-of-flight (TOF) technology has been proven to improve image quality in positron emission tomography (PET). In order for TOF information to significantly reduce the statistical noise in reconstructed PET images, good timing resolution is needed across the scanner field of view (FOV). This work proposes an accurate, robust, and practical crystal-based timing calibration method using 18F - FDG positron-emitting sources together with a spatially separated annihilation target. We calibrated a prototype Toshiba TOF PET scanner using this method and then assessed its timing resolution at different locations in the scanner FOV.

  13. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-01-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  14. Measurement of angular distribution of neutrons emitted from plasma focus using NTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Maric, Z.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Stanojevic, J.; Dordevic, D.; Joksimovic, D.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J.

    1999-01-01

    Mica detectors together with thick uranium foils were used for detection and angular distribution measurement of the neutrons emitted from the d-plasma focus (DPF). The distance between detectors and plasma pinch was 4 cm. For reason of detector protection from the thermal shock, they were covered with the mica layer of 1 mm thickness. Annealing of the detectors were measured after the irradiation with neutrons from an Am-Be source and treated with thermal shock H-plasma focus (HPF). Geometry of detectors in both experiments was the same

  15. Measurement of angular distribution of neutrons emitted from plasma focus using NTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antanasijevic, R.; Maric, Z.; Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Stanojevic, J.; Dordevic, D.; Joksimovic, D.; Udovicic, V.; Vukovic, J

    1999-06-01

    Mica detectors together with thick uranium foils were used for detection and angular distribution measurement of the neutrons emitted from the d-plasma focus (DPF). The distance between detectors and plasma pinch was 4 cm. For reason of detector protection from the thermal shock, they were covered with the mica layer of 1 mm thickness. Annealing of the detectors were measured after the irradiation with neutrons from an Am-Be source and treated with thermal shock H-plasma focus (HPF). Geometry of detectors in both experiments was the same.

  16. Measurement of angular distribution of neutrons emitted from plasma focus using NTD

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Stanojevic, J; Dordevic, D; Joksimovic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Mica detectors together with thick uranium foils were used for detection and angular distribution measurement of the neutrons emitted from the d-plasma focus (DPF). The distance between detectors and plasma pinch was 4 cm. For reason of detector protection from the thermal shock, they were covered with the mica layer of 1 mm thickness. Annealing of the detectors were measured after the irradiation with neutrons from an Am-Be source and treated with thermal shock H-plasma focus (HPF). Geometry of detectors in both experiments was the same.

  17. Compact light-emitting diode lighting ring for video-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Kuan; Chang, Feng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a foldable ring-shaped light-emitting diode (LED) lighting assembly, designed to attach to a rubber wound retractor, is realized and tested through porcine animal experiments. Enabled by the small size and the high efficiency of LED chips, the lighting assembly is compact, flexible, and disposable while providing direct and high brightness lighting for more uniform background illumination in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). When compared with a conventional fiber bundle coupled light source that is usually used in laparoscopy and endoscopy, the much broader solid angle of illumination enabled by the LED assembly allows greatly improved background lighting and imaging quality in VATS.

  18. Light-Emitting Diode-Based Illumination System for In Vitro Photodynamic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Defu Chen; Huifen Zheng; Zhiyong Huang; Huiyun Lin; Zhidong Ke; Shusen Xie; Buhong Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a light-emitting diode- (LED-) based illumination system that can be used as an alternative light source for in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT). This illumination system includes a red LED array composed of 70 LEDs centered at 643 nm, an air-cooling unit, and a specific-designed case. The irradiance as a function of the irradiation distance between the LED array and the sample, the homogeneity and stability of irradiation, and the effect of long-time irrad...

  19. Compact light-emitting diode lighting ring for video-assisted thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Kuan; Chang, Feng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a foldable ring-shaped light-emitting diode (LED) lighting assembly, designed to attach to a rubber wound retractor, is realized and tested through porcine animal experiments. Enabled by the small size and the high efficiency of LED chips, the lighting assembly is compact, flexible, and disposable while providing direct and high brightness lighting for more uniform background illumination in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). When compared with a conventional fiber bundle coupled light source that is usually used in laparoscopy and endoscopy, the much broader solid angle of illumination enabled by the LED assembly allows greatly improved background lighting and imaging quality in VATS.

  20. Modern toxic antipersonnel projectiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Yvan; Regenstreif, Philippe; Fanton, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 1944, Kurt von Gottberg, the SS police chief in Minsk, was shot and injured by 2 Soviet agents. Although he was only slightly injured, he died 6 hours later. The bullets were hollow and contained a crystalline white powder. They were 4-g bullets, semi-jacketed in cupronickel, containing 28 mg of aconitine. They were later known as akonitinnitratgeschosse. The Sipo (the Nazi security police) then ordered a trial with a 9-mm Parabellum cartridge containing Ditran, an anticholinergic drug with hallucinogenic properties causing intense mental confusion. In later years, QNB was used and given the NATO code BZ (3-quinuclidinyl-benzylate). It was proven that Saddam Hussein had this weapon (agent 15) manufactured and used it against the Kurds. Serbian forces used the same type of weapon in the Bosnian conflict, particularly in Srebrenica.The authors go on to list the Cold War toxic weapons developed by the KGB and the Warsaw pact countries for the discreet elimination of dissidents and proindependence leaders who had taken refuge in the West. These weapons include PSZh-13 launchers, the Troika electronic sequential pistol, and the ingenious 4-S110T captive piston system designed by the engineer Stechkin. Disguised as a cigarette case, it could fire a silent charge of potassium cyanide. This rogues gallery also includes the umbrella rigged to inject a pellet of ricin (or another phytalbumin of similar toxicity, such as abrin or crotin) that was used to assassinate the Bulgarian writer and journalist Georgi Markov on September 7, 1978, in London.During the autopsy, the discovery of a bullet burst into 4 or 5 parts has to make at once suspecting the use of a toxic substance. Toxicological analysis has to look for first and foremost aconitine, cyanide, suxamethonium, Ditran, BZ, or one of the toxic phytalbumins. The use of such complex weapons has to make suspect a powerful organization: army, secret service, terrorism. The existence of the Russian UDAR spray