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Sample records for source-sink population structure

  1. Population Structure of the Rockpool Blenny Entomacrodus vomerinus Shows Source-Sink Dynamics among Ecoregions in the Tropical Southwestern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sergio M. Q.; Mendes, Liana F.; Torres, Rodrigo A.; Pereira, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    The Tropical Southwestern Atlantic is characterized by prominent ecosystems with large-scale oceanographic complexity. Yet, the evolutionary processes underlying genetic differentiation and connectivity in this region remain largely unknown. Entomacrodus vomerinus (Valenciennes, 1836) is a demersal fish with planktonic larvae endemic to this marine province, inhabiting shallow tidal pools in continental and oceanic reef environments. We evaluated the population structure, genetic diversity and gene flow of E. vomerinus using mitochondrial data (CYTB and COI) and nuclear (rhodopsin, RHO) DNA sequences. We sampled a total of 85 individuals, comprising 46 from three oceanic archipelagos with varying distance from the coast (São Pedro and São Paulo—SS, Fernando de Noronha—FE and Rocas Atoll—RA) and 39 from two localities in northeastern Brazilian coast (Rio Grande do Norte—RN and Bahia—BA). Multilocus analysis revealed the presence of three Evolutionarily Significant Units—ESUs (SS, FE+RA, and RN+BA), which are in accordance with distinct marine ecoregions. Coalescent analyses showed that the central ESU has a larger effective population size than the other two, suggesting strong asymmetries in the genetic diversity across the species range. Moreover, they showed that gene flow is highly asymmetric, suggesting a source-sink dynamics from the central ESU into the remaining ones, in agreement with oceanic currents. Together, these results provide insights in the evolutionary mechanisms facilitating diversification in this marine province. PMID:27309356

  2. Population genetic analysis of microsatellite variation of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in Trinidad and Tobago: evidence for a dynamic source-sink metapopulation structure, founder events and population bottlenecks.

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    Barson, N J; Cable, J; Van Oosterhout, C

    2009-03-01

    Riverine fish populations are traditionally considered to be highly structured and subject to strong genetic drift. Here, we use microsatellites to analyse the population structure of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), focussing on the headwater floodplain area of the Caroni drainage in Trinidad. We also analyse the population genetics of guppies in the Northern Drainage in Trinidad, a habitat characterized by rivers flowing directly into the sea, and a small isolated population in Tobago. Upland Caroni populations are highly differentiated and display low levels of genetic diversity. However, we found no evidence to suggest that these upland populations experienced recent population crashes and the populations appear to approach mutation-drift equilibrium. Dominant downstream migration over both short- and long-time frames has a strong impact on the population genetics of lowland Caroni populations. This drainage system could be considered a source-sink metapopulation, with the tributary furthest downstream representing a 'super sink', receiving immigrants from rivers upstream in the drainage. Moreover, the effective population size in the lowlands is surprisingly low in comparison with the apparently large census population sizes.

  3. Reconstructing source-sink dynamics in a population with a pelagic dispersal phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Decker, Mary Beth; Ladd, Carol; Cheng, Wei; Zhou, Ziqian; Chan, Kung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    For many organisms, the reconstruction of source-sink dynamics is hampered by limited knowledge of the spatial assemblage of either the source or sink components or lack of information on the strength of the linkage for any source-sink pair. In the case of marine species with a pelagic dispersal phase, these problems may be mitigated through the use of particle drift simulations based on an ocean circulation model. However, when simulated particle trajectories do not intersect sampling sites, the corroboration of model drift simulations with field data is hampered. Here, we apply a new statistical approach for reconstructing source-sink dynamics that overcomes the aforementioned problems. Our research is motivated by the need for understanding observed changes in jellyfish distributions in the eastern Bering Sea since 1990. By contrasting the source-sink dynamics reconstructed with data from the pre-1990 period with that from the post-1990 period, it appears that changes in jellyfish distribution resulted from the combined effects of higher jellyfish productivity and longer dispersal of jellyfish resulting from a shift in the ocean circulation starting in 1991. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the source-sink reconstruction is robust to typical systematic and random errors in the ocean circulation model driving the particle drift simulations. The jellyfish analysis illustrates that new insights can be gained by studying structural changes in source-sink dynamics. The proposed approach is applicable for the spatial source-sink reconstruction of other species and even abiotic processes, such as sediment transport.

  4. Reconstructing source-sink dynamics in a population with a pelagic dispersal phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Chen

    Full Text Available For many organisms, the reconstruction of source-sink dynamics is hampered by limited knowledge of the spatial assemblage of either the source or sink components or lack of information on the strength of the linkage for any source-sink pair. In the case of marine species with a pelagic dispersal phase, these problems may be mitigated through the use of particle drift simulations based on an ocean circulation model. However, when simulated particle trajectories do not intersect sampling sites, the corroboration of model drift simulations with field data is hampered. Here, we apply a new statistical approach for reconstructing source-sink dynamics that overcomes the aforementioned problems. Our research is motivated by the need for understanding observed changes in jellyfish distributions in the eastern Bering Sea since 1990. By contrasting the source-sink dynamics reconstructed with data from the pre-1990 period with that from the post-1990 period, it appears that changes in jellyfish distribution resulted from the combined effects of higher jellyfish productivity and longer dispersal of jellyfish resulting from a shift in the ocean circulation starting in 1991. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the source-sink reconstruction is robust to typical systematic and random errors in the ocean circulation model driving the particle drift simulations. The jellyfish analysis illustrates that new insights can be gained by studying structural changes in source-sink dynamics. The proposed approach is applicable for the spatial source-sink reconstruction of other species and even abiotic processes, such as sediment transport.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity despite source-sink population dynamics in a long-lived perennial plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jill T; Sparks, Jed P; Geber, Monica A

    2010-11-01

    • Species that exhibit adaptive plasticity alter their phenotypes in response to environmental conditions, thereby maximizing fitness in heterogeneous landscapes. However, under demographic source-sink dynamics, selection should favor traits that enhance fitness in the source habitat at the expense of fitness in the marginal habitat. Consistent with source-sink dynamics, the perennial blueberry, Vaccinium elliottii (Ericaceae), shows substantially higher fitness and population sizes in dry upland forests than in flood-prone bottomland forests, and asymmetrical gene flow occurs from upland populations into bottomland populations. Here, we examined whether this species expresses plasticity to these distinct environments despite source-sink dynamics. • We assessed phenotypic responses to a complex environmental gradient in the field and to water stress in the glasshouse. • Contrary to expectations, V. elliottii exhibited a high degree of plasticity in foliar and root traits (specific leaf area, carbon isotope ratios, foliar nitrogen content, root : shoot ratio, root porosity and root architecture). • We propose that plasticity can be maintained in source-sink systems if it is favored within the source habitat and/or a phylogenetic artifact that is not costly. Additionally, plasticity could be advantageous if habitat-based differences in fitness result from incipient niche expansion. Our results illuminate the importance of evaluating phenotypic traits and fitness components across heterogeneous landscapes. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  6. Population-level consequences of herbivory, changing climate, and source-sink dynamics on a long-lived invasive shrub.

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    van Klinken, R D; Pichancourt, J B

    2015-12-01

    Long-lived plant species are highly valued environmentally, economically, and socially, but can also cause substantial harm as invaders. Realistic demographic predictions can guide management decisions, and are particularly valuable for long-lived species where population response times can be long. Long-lived species are also challenging, given population dynamics can be affected by factors as diverse as herbivory, climate, and dispersal. We developed a matrix model to evaluate the effects of herbivory by a leaf-feeding biological control agent released in Australia against a long-lived invasive shrub (mesquite, Leguminoseae: Prosopis spp.). The stage-structured, density-dependent model used an annual time step and 10 climatically diverse years of field data. Mesquite population demography is sensitive to source-sink dynamics as most seeds are consumed and redistributed spatially by livestock. In addition, individual mesquite plants, because they are long lived, experience natural climate variation that cycles over decadal scales, as well as anthropogenic climate change. The model therefore explicitly considered the effects of both net dispersal and climate variation. Herbivory strongly regulated mesquite populations through reduced growth and fertility, but additional mortality of older plants will be required to reach management goals within a reasonable time frame. Growth and survival of seeds and seedlings were correlated with daily soil moisture. As a result, population dynamics were sensitive to rainfall scenario, but population response times were typically slow (20-800 years to reach equilibrium or extinction) due to adult longevity. Equilibrium population densities were expected to remain 5% higher, and be more dynamic, if historical multi-decadal climate patterns persist, the effect being dampened by herbivory suppressing seed production irrespective of preceding rainfall. Dense infestations were unlikely to form under a drier climate, and required net

  7. Effect of source/sink ratios on yield components, growth dynamics and structural characteristics of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Benoît; Mialet-Serra, Isabelle; Rouan, Lauriane; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Caliman, Jean-Pierre; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Source/sink ratios are known to be one of the main determinants of oil palm growth and development. A long-term experiment (9 years) was conducted in Indonesia on mature oil palms subjected to continuous bunch ablation and partial defoliation treatments to artificially modify source/sink ratios. During the experiment, all harvested bunches were dissected and phenological measurements were carried out to analyse the effect of source/sink ratios on yield components explaining variations in bunch number, the number of fruits per bunch and oil dry weight per fruit. An integrative variable (supply/demand ratio) describing the ratio between the assimilate supply from sources and the growing organ demand for carbohydrate was computed for each plant on a daily basis from observations of the number of developing organs and their sink strength, and of climate variables. Defoliation and bunch ablation affected the bunch number and the fruit number per bunch. Variations in bunch number per month were mainly due to variations in the fraction of aborted inflorescence and in the ratio between female and male inflorescences. Under fluctuating trophic conditions, variations in fruit number per bunch resulted both from changes in fruit-set and in the number of branches (rachillae) per inflorescence. For defoliated plants, the decrease in the number of developing reproductive sinks appeared to be sufficient to maintain fruit weight and oil concentration at the control level, without any major decrease in the concentration of non-structural carbohydrate reserves. Computation of the supply/demand ratio revealed that each yield component had a specific phase of sensitivity to supply/demand ratios during inflorescence development. Establishing quantitative relationships between supply/demand ratios, competition and yield components is the first step towards a functional model for oil palm.

  8. Population genetics of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in Europe reveal source-sink dynamics and secondary dispersal to the Mediterranean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolte, Sören; Fuentes, Veronica; Haslob, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Repeated invasions of European waters by the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi offer a unique opportunity to study population dynamics and dispersal in gelatinous zooplankton. Here we followed population establishment in two recently invaded areas, the North and Baltic Sea, and analysed changes...... in population structure during a 3-yr interval using 7 highly polymorphic microsatellites (representing 191 alleles). A second goal was to reconstruct routes of recent invasive range expansion into the Mediterranean Sea. During the study period (2008-2010) populations in North Sea and Western Baltic Sea...... maintained their allelic composition with virtually unchanged levels of genetic diversity and between-population differentiation. This demonstrates that gene flow between the two regions was limited and indicates successful reproduction in both areas. In contrast, at the eastern distribution limit...

  9. Source-sink relationships in radish plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Starck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of source-sink relationships in di- and tetraploidal radish plants grown in. hydroponic cultures was investigated in two stages of their development: with intensively growing swollen hypocotyl and in the period of actively accumulating nutrients in the storage organ. It was found, that the proportion, between the mass of organs, their RGR and NAR was very similar in di- and tetraploidal populations, probably owing to a similar rate of photosynthesis and pattern of assimilates distribution. The high variability of swollen hypocotyls size is slightly correlated with the size of the whole aerial part and is not correlated with the rate of photosynthesis in leaves. Partial defoliation of radish plants did not affect the rate of photosynthesis of the remaining leaves. Only in the cotyledones the oldest donors of 14C-assimilates, a slight compensation of photosynthesis was reported. It may suggest, that the rate of photosynthesis in radish plants is not under the control of sink activity. The size of the storage organ have determined in some extent its attractive force and influenced the amount of 14C-assimilates exported from their donors. Translocation of photosynthates from the young, still growing leaves was conditioned mainly by their retention power. Therefore, in young radish plants cotyledons were the main donor of 14C-assimilates.

  10. Seasonal source-sink dynamics at the edge of a species' range

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    Kanda, L.L.; Fuller, T.K.; Sievert, P.R.; Kellogg, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    The roles of dispersal and population dynamics in determining species' range boundaries recently have received theoretical attention but little empirical work. Here we provide data on survival, reproduction, and movement for a Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) population at a local distributional edge in central Massachusetts (USA). Most juvenile females that apparently exploited anthropogenic resources survived their first winter, whereas those using adjacent natural resources died of starvation. In spring, adult females recolonized natural areas. A life-table model suggests that a population exploiting anthropogenic resources may grow, acting as source to a geographically interlaced sink of opossums using only natural resources, and also providing emigrants for further range expansion to new human-dominated landscapes. In a geographical model, this source-sink dynamic is consistent with the local distribution identified through road-kill surveys. The Virginia opossum's exploitation of human resources likely ameliorates energetically restrictive winters and may explain both their local distribution and their northward expansion in unsuitable natural climatic regimes. Landscape heterogeneity, such as created by urbanization, may result in source-sink dynamics at highly localized scales. Differential fitness and individual dispersal movements within local populations are key to generating regional distributions, and thus species ranges, that exceed expectations. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. New approaches to source-sink metapopulations decoupling demography and dispersal.

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    Bansaye, Vincent; Lambert, Amaury

    2013-09-01

    Source-sink systems are metapopulations of patches with different, and possibly temporally varying, habitat qualities, which are commonly used in ecology to study the fate of spatially extended populations. We propose new techniques that disentangle the respective contributions of demography and dispersal to the dynamics and fate of a single species in a source-sink system. Our approach is valid for a general class of stochastic, individual-based, stepping-stone models, with density-independent demography and dispersal, provided that the metapopulation is finite or else enjoys some transitivity property. We provide (1) a simple criterion of persistence, by studying the motion of a single random disperser until it returns to its initial position; (2) a joint characterization of the long-term growth rate and of the asymptotic occupancy frequencies of the ancestral lineage of a random survivor, by using large deviations theory. Both techniques yield formulas decoupling demography and dispersal, and can be adapted to the case of periodic or random environments, where habitat qualities are autocorrelated in space and possibly in time. In this last case, we display examples of coupled time-averaged sinks allowing survival, as was previously known in the absence of demographic stochasticity for fully mixing (Jansen and Yoshimura, 1998) or partially mixing (Evans et al., 2012; Schreiber, 2010) metapopulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Source-sink driven planetary flows in a polar basin

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    Gavilan Pascual-Ahuir, Estanislao; Willmott, Andrew; Luneva, Maria; Morales Maqueda, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Analytical process models are developed to study linear, steady-state, source-sink and wind stress curl driven barotropic planetary flows in a circular polar basin on the sphere with simple shelf topography. The leading order dynamical balance is geostrophic except near the boundary of the basin and the shelf edge, where dissipation in the form of either linear bottom friction or eddy diffusion becomes significant. Full spherical geometry is retained in the derivation of the barotropic vorticity equation. Subsequently, an overlooked approximation in the refereed literature of the sixties is adopted whereby the latitudinal dependence in the coefficients of the vorticity equation are suppressed, hence allowing analytical solutions to be obtained we refer to this as the "beta sphere approximation". The approximation is justified, a posteriori, and the study compares the analytical solutions with numerical solutions obtained from the NEMO ocean modelling system. Numerical experiments with NEMO are used to extend the process model solutions by obtaining the steady wind and boundary forced circulation in a polar basin with open boundaries representing the Bering Strait, Canadian Archipelago and Greenland Sea, and with a continental self and a representation of the Lomonosov ridge. NEMO based experiments are also conducted to investigate the sea surface anomaly field driven by the fluctuating flow through one, or more, of the straits connecting the Arctic basin to its marginal seas. Finally, we reflect on the likely impact of sea ice on the barotropic circulation in the Arctic Ocean.

  13. [Effects of low nitrogen stress on source-sink characters and grain-filling traits of different genotypes summer maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-dong; Xue, Ji-quan; Ma, Guo-sheng; Zhang, Ren-he; Zhang, Xing-hua

    2010-05-01

    This paper studied the source-sink characters and grain-filling traits of six genotype summer maize varieties under 2 years (from 2007 to 2008) application of low dosage (105 kg x hm(-2)) and normal dosage (337.5 kg x hm(-2)) fertilizer nitrogen. Under low nitrogen stress, the population yield, leaf area index (LAI), source-sink characters, and grain-filling traits of test varieties differed significantly. The varieties tolerant to low nitrogen, e.g., Xianyu 335 and Zhengdan 958, had longer active grain-filling stage, higher maximum filling rate, longer duration of maximum LAI, and more harmonious sink-source relation; while less tolerant species, e.g., Shaandan 902 and Yuyu 22, had shorter active grain-filling hours, lower maximum filling rate, lower mass increment and LAI under maximum grain-filling rate after silking, and significantly decreased source supply capacity. Low nitrogen stress increased the yield difference among the test varieties significantly.

  14. Correlation between dynamic tomato fruit-set and source-sink ratio: a common relationship for different plant densities and seasons?

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    Kang, MengZhen; Yang, LiLi; Zhang, BaoGui; de Reffye, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    It is widely accepted that fruit-set in plants is related to source-sink ratio. Despite its critical importance to yield, prediction of fruit-set remains an ongoing problem in crop models. Functional-structural plant models are potentially able to simulate organ-level plasticity of plants. To predict fruit-set, the quantitative link between source-sink ratio and fruit-set probability is analysed here via a functional-structural plant model, GreenLab. Two experiments, each with four plant densities, were carried out in a solar greenhouse during two growth seasons (started in spring and autumn). Dynamic fruit-set probability was estimated by frequent observation on inflorescences. Source and sink parameter values were obtained by fitting GreenLab outputs for the biomass of plant parts (lamina, petiole, internode, fruit), at both organ and plant level, to corresponding destructive measurements at six dates from real plants. The dynamic source-sink ratio was calculated as the ratio between biomass production and plant demand (sum of all organ sink strength) per growth cycle, both being outputs of the model. Most sink parameters were stable over multiple planting densities and seasons. From planting, source-sink ratio increased in the vegetative stage and reached a peak after fruit-set commenced, followed by a decrease of leaf appearance rate. Fruit-set probability was correlated with the source-sink ratio after the appearance of flower buds. The relationship between fruit-set probability and the most correlated source-sink ratio could be quantified by a single regression line for both experiments. The current work paves the way to predicting dynamic fruit-set using a functional structure model.

  15. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, S. I.

    2000-06-01

    This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.

  16. Source-sink interaction: a century old concept under the light of modern molecular systems biology.

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    Chang, Tian-Gen; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Raines, Christine

    2017-07-20

    Many approaches to engineer source strength have been proposed to enhance crop yield potential. However, a well-co-ordinated source-sink relationship is required finally to realize the promised increase in crop yield potential in the farmer's field. Source-sink interaction has been intensively studied for decades, and a vast amount of knowledge about the interaction in different crops and under different environments has been accumulated. In this review, we first introduce the basic concepts of source, sink and their interactions, then summarize current understanding of how source and sink can be manipulated through both environmental control and genetic manipulations. We show that the source-sink interaction underlies the diverse responses of crops to the same perturbations and argue that development of a molecular systems model of source-sink interaction is required towards a rational manipulation of the source-sink relationship for increased yield. We finally discuss both bottom-up and top-down routes to develop such a model and emphasize that a community effort is needed for development of this model. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Demographic source-sink dynamics restrict local adaptation in Elliott's blueberry (Vaccinium elliottii).

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    Anderson, Jill T; Geber, Monica A

    2010-02-01

    In heterogeneous landscapes, divergent selection can favor the evolution of locally adapted ecotypes, especially when interhabitat gene flow is minimal. However, if habitats differ in size or quality, source-sink dynamics can shape evolutionary trajectories. Upland and bottomland forests of the southeastern USA differ in water table depth, light availability, edaphic conditions, and plant community. We conducted a multiyear reciprocal transplant experiment to test whether Elliott's blueberry (Vaccinium elliottii) is locally adapted to these contrasting environments. Additionally, we exposed seedlings and cuttings to prolonged drought and flooding in the greenhouse to assess fitness responses to abiotic stress. Contrary to predictions of local adaptation, V. elliottii families exhibited significantly higher survivorship and growth in upland than in bottomland forests and under drought than flooded conditions, regardless of habitat of origin. Neutral population differentiation was minimal, suggesting widespread interhabitat migration. Population density, reproductive output, and genetic diversity were all significantly greater in uplands than in bottomlands. These disparities likely result in asymmetric gene flow from uplands to bottomlands. Thus, adaptation to a marginal habitat can be constrained by small populations, limited fitness, and immigration from a benign habitat. Our study highlights the importance of demography and genetic diversity in the evolution of local (mal)adaptation.

  18. Regulation Effects of Water and Nitrogen on the Source-Sink Relationship in Potato during the Tuber Bulking Stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    Full Text Available The source-sink relationship determines crop yield, and it is largely regulated by water and nutrients in agricultural production. This has been widely investigated in cereals, but fewer studies have been conducted in root and tuber crops such as potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. The objective of this study was to investigate the source-sink relationship in potato and the regulation of water and nitrogen on the source-sink relationship during the tuber bulking stage. A pot experiment using virus-free plantlets of the Atlantic potato cultivar was conducted, using three water levels (50%, 70% and 90% of field capacity and three nitrogen levels (0, 0.2, 0.4 g N∙kg-1 soil. The results showed that, under all water and nitrogen levels, plant source capacity were small at the end of the experiment, since photosynthetic activity in leaves were low and non-structural reserves in underground stems were completely remobilized. While at this time, there were very big differences in maximum and minimum tuber number and tuber weight, indicating that the sink tuber still had a large potential capacity to take in assimilates. These results suggest that the source-supplied assimilates were not sufficient enough to meet the demands of sink growth. Thus, we concluded that, unlike cereals, potato yield is more likely to be source-limited than sink-limited during the tuber bulking stage. Water and nitrogen are two key factors in potato production management. Our results showed that water level, nitrogen level and the interaction between water and nitrogen influence potato yield mainly through affecting source capacity via the net photosynthetic rate, total leaf area and leaf life span. Well-watered, sufficient nitrogen and well-watered combined with sufficient nitrogen increased yield mainly by enhancing the source capacity. Therefore, this suggests that increasing source capacity is more crucial to improve potato yield.

  19. Hormonal and metabolic regulation of source-sink relations under salinity and drought: from plant survival to crop yield stability.

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    Albacete, Alfonso A; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Securing food production for the growing population will require closing the gap between potential crop productivity under optimal conditions and the yield captured by farmers under a changing environment, which is termed agronomical stability. Drought and salinity are major environmental factors contributing to the yield gap ultimately by inducing premature senescence in the photosynthetic source tissues of the plant and by reducing the number and growth of the harvestable sink organs by affecting the transport and use of assimilates between and within them. However, the changes in source-sink relations induced by stress also include adaptive changes in the reallocation of photoassimilates that influence crop productivity, ranging from plant survival to yield stability. While the massive utilization of -omic technologies in model plants is discovering hundreds of genes with potential impacts in alleviating short-term applied drought and salinity stress (usually measured as plant survival), only in relatively few cases has an effect on crop yield stability been proven. However, achieving the former does not necessarily imply the latter. Plant survival only requires water status conservation and delayed leaf senescence (thus maintaining source activity) that is usually accompanied by growth inhibition. However, yield stability will additionally require the maintenance or increase in sink activity in the reproductive structures, thus contributing to the transport of assimilates from the source leaves and to delayed stress-induced leaf senescence. This review emphasizes the role of several metabolic and hormonal factors influencing not only the source strength, but especially the sink activity and their inter-relations, and their potential to improve yield stability under drought and salinity stresses. © 2013.

  20. Nitrogen and carbon source-sink relationships in trees at the Himalayan treelines compared with lower elevations.

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    Li, Mai-He; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Shi, Peili; Wang, San-Gen; Zhong, Yong-De; Liu, Xing-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Cai, Xiao-Hu; Shi, Zuo-Min

    2008-10-01

    No single hypothesis or theory has been widely accepted for explaining the functional mechanism of global alpine/arctic treeline formation. The present study tested whether the alpine treeline is determined by (1) the needle nitrogen content associated with photosynthesis (carbon gain); (2) a sufficient source-sink ratio of carbon; or (3) a sufficient C-N ratio. Nitrogen does not limit the growth and development of trees studied at the Himalayan treelines. Levels of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in trees were species-specific and site-dependent; therefore, the treeline cases studied did not show consistent evidence of source/carbon limitation or sink/growth limitation in treeline trees. However, results of the combined three treelines showed that the treeline trees may suffer from a winter carbon shortage. The source capacity and the sink capacity of a tree influence its tissue NSC concentrations and the carbon balance; therefore, we suggest that the persistence and development of treeline trees in a harsh alpine environment may require a minimum level of the total NSC concentration, a sufficiently high sugar:starch ratio, and a balanced carbon source-sink relationship.

  1. Role of transitory carbon reserves during adjustment to climate variability and source-sink imbalances in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

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    Legros, S; Mialet-Serra, I; Clement-Vidal, A; Caliman, J-P; Siregar, F A; Fabre, D; Dingkuhn, M

    2009-10-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a perennial, tropical, monocotyledonous plant characterized by simple architecture and low phenotypic plasticity, but marked by long development cycles of individual phytomers (a pair of one leaf and one inflorescence at its axil). Environmental effects on vegetative or reproductive sinks occur with various time lags depending on the process affected, causing source-sink imbalances. This study investigated how the two instantaneous sources of carbon assimilates, CO(2) assimilation and mobilization of transitory non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) reserves, may buffer such imbalances. An experiment was conducted in Indonesia during a 22-month period (from July 2006 to May 2008) at two contrasting locations (Kandista and Batu Mulia) using two treatments (control and complete fruit pruning treatment) in Kandista. Measurements included leaf gas exchange, dynamics of NSC reserves and dynamics of structural aboveground vegetative growth (SVG) and reproductive growth. Drought was estimated from a simulated fraction of transpirable soil water. The main sources of variation in source-sink relationships were (i) short-term reductions in light-saturated leaf CO(2) assimilation rate (A(max)) during seasonal drought periods, particularly in Batu Mulia; (ii) rapid responses of SVG rate to drought; and (iii) marked lag periods between 16 and 29 months of environmental effects on the development of reproductive sinks. The resulting source-sink imbalances were buffered by fluctuations in NSC reserves in the stem, which mainly consisted of glucose and starch. Starch was the main buffer for sink variations, whereas glucose dynamics remained unexplained. Even under strong sink limitation, no negative feedback on A(max) was observed. In conclusion, the different lag periods for environmental effects on assimilate sources and sinks in oil palm are mainly buffered by NSC accumulation in the stem, which can attain 50% (dw:dw) in stem tops. The resulting

  2. Viscoelastic Fluid over a Stretching Sheet with Electromagnetic Effects and Nonuniform Heat Source/Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Long Hsiao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD of an incompressible viscoelastic fluid over a stretching sheet with electric and magnetic dissipation and nonuniform heat source/sink has been studied. The buoyant effect and the electric number E1 couple with magnetic parameter M to represent the dominance of the electric and magnetic effects, and adding the specific item of nonuniform heat source/sink is presented in governing equations which are the main contribution of this study. The similarity transformation, the finite-difference method, Newton method, and Gauss elimination method have been used to analyze the present problem. The numerical solutions of the flow velocity distributions, temperature profiles, and the important wall unknown values of f''(0 and θ'(0 have been carried out. The parameter Pr, E1, or Ec can increase the heat transfer effects, but the parameter M or A* may decrease the heat transfer effects.

  3. Microbiology of atmospheric trace gases. Sources, sinks and global change processes. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murrell, J.C. [ed.] [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Kelly, D.P. [ed.] [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Inst. of Education

    1996-10-01

    It was a purpose in this ARW to bring together experts in the microbiology and biogeochemistry of the fundamentally important gases (methane, halomethanes, carbon monoxide, organosulfur compounds, nitrogen oxides) in order to quantify as far as possible the biological driving forces and regulatory processes (sources, sinks, and turnover dynamics) leading to the observed atmospheric composition, and to identify the biological and chemical networks linking the various trace gases in their production and turnover in the terrestrial and marine environments, which are the ultimate sources and sinks for the atmospheric phases of these compounds. (orig./SR)

  4. Parallel glide: flow of dislocations with internal stress source/sink distribution

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    Karlo T Raić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The unexpected glide of dislocations on a plane parallel to the film/substrate interface in ultrathin copper films, which has been called parallel glide (Balk et al 2003 Acta Metall. 51 447, is described using an analytical model. The phenomenon is observed as a problem involving inlet/outlet flow from different positions of a grain boundary into the grain channel. In this sense, parallel glide is presented as the flow of dislocations with an internal stress source/sink distribution.

  5. Source-Sink Communication: Regulated by Hormone, Nutrient, and Stress Cross-Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Su-May; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Ho, Tuan-Hua David

    2015-12-01

    Communication between source organs (exporters of photoassimilates) and sink organs (importers of fixed carbon) has a pivotal role in carbohydrate assimilation and partitioning during plant growth and development. Plant productivity is enhanced by sink strength and source activity, which are regulated by a complex signaling network encompassing sugars, hormones, and environmental factors. However, key components underlying the signaling pathways that regulate source-sink communication are only now beginning to be discovered. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating sugar mobilization during seed development and seedling establishment in cereals, which provide the majority of nutrition for humans. Insights into these mechanisms may provide strategies for improving crop productivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flow over Exponentially Stretching Sheet through Porous Medium with Heat Source/Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Swain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to study the heat and mass transfer effect in a boundary layer MHD flow of an electrically conducting viscous fluid subject to transverse magnetic field on an exponentially stretching sheet through porous medium. The effect of thermal radiation and heat source/sink has also been discussed in this paper. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with a shooting technique. Graphical results are displayed for nondimensional velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles while numerical values of the skin friction local Nusselt number and Sherwood number are presented in tabular form for various values of parameters controlling the flow system.

  7. Carbon source-sink relationship in Arabidopsis thaliana: the role of sucrose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mickaël; Mainson, Dany; Porcheron, Benoît; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2018-03-01

    The regulation of source-to-sink sucrose transport is associated with AtSUC and AtSWEET sucrose transporters' gene expression changes in plants grown hydroponically under different physiological conditions. Source-to-sink transport of sucrose is one of the major determinants of plant growth. Whole-plant carbohydrates' partitioning requires the specific activity of membrane sugar transporters. In Arabidopsis thaliana plants, two families of transporters are involved in sucrose transport: AtSUCs and AtSWEETs. This study is focused on the comparison of sucrose transporter gene expression, soluble sugar and starch levels and long distance sucrose transport, in leaves and sink organs (mainly roots) in different physiological conditions (along the plant life cycle, during a diel cycle, and during an osmotic stress) in plants grown hydroponically. In leaves, the AtSUC2, AtSWEET11, and 12 genes known to be involved in phloem loading were highly expressed when sucrose export was high and reduced during osmotic stress. In roots, AtSUC1 was highly expressed and its expression profile in the different conditions tested suggests that it may play a role in sucrose unloading in roots and in root growth. The SWEET transporter genes AtSWEET12, 13, and 15 were found expressed in all organs at all stages studied, while differential expression was noticed for AtSWEET14 in roots, stems, and siliques and AtSWEET9, 10 expressions were only detected in stems and siliques. A role for these transporters in carbohydrate partitioning in different source-sink status is proposed, with a specific attention on carbon demand in roots. During development, despite trophic competition with others sinks, roots remained a significant sink, but during osmotic stress, the amount of translocated [U- 14 C]-sucrose decreased for rosettes and roots. Altogether, these results suggest that source-sink relationship may be linked with the regulation of sucrose transporter gene expression.

  8. Population Structure and Eigenanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Patterson; Price, Alkes L.; David Reich

    2006-01-01

    Current methods for inferring population structure from genetic data do not provide formal significance tests for population differentiation. We discuss an approach to studying population structure (principal components analysis) that was first applied to genetic data by Cavalli-Sforza and colleagues. We place the method on a solid statistical footing, using results from modern statistics to develop formal significance tests. We also uncover a general “phase change” phenomenon about the abili...

  9. Estimating sources, sinks and fluxes of reactive atmospheric compounds within a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, K.; Duman, T.; Walker, J. T.; Bash, J. O.; Huang, C. W.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    While few dispute the significance of within-canopy sources or sinks of reactive gaseous and particulate compounds, their estimation continues to be the subject of active research and debate. Reactive species undergo turbulent dispersion within an inhomogeneous flow field, and may be subjected to chemical, biological and/or physical deposition, emissions or transformations on leaves, woody elements, and the forest floor. This system involves chemical reactions and biological processes with multiple time scales and represents the terrestrial ecosystem's exposure to nutrient and acid deposition and atmospheric oxidants. The quantification of these processes is a first step in better understanding the ecological impact of air pollution and feedback to atmospheric composition. Hence, it follows that direct measurements of sources or sinks is difficult to conduct in the presence of all these processes. However, mean scalar concentration profiles measured within the canopy can be used to infer the profile distribution of effective sinks and sources if the flow field is known. This is commonly referred to as the 'inverse problem'. In-canopy and above-canopy multi-level concentration measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitric acid, nitrous acid), as well as other compounds that are highly reactive to ammonia and its secondary products (hydrochloric acid and sulfur dioxide), are presented within a deciduous second-growth 180 year old oak-hickory forest situated within the Southeastern U.S. Two different approaches are used to solve for the source-sink distribution from the measured mean scalar concentration profiles: (1) an Eulerian high-order closure model that solves the scalar flux budget equation and (2) a new Lagrangian stochastic model that estimates the dispersion matrix. As each of these methods is subject to different assumptions, the combination of the two can be used to constrain the solution to the inverse problem and permit inference on the

  10. Atmospheric CO2 at Waliguan station in China: Transport climatology, temporal patterns and source-sink region representativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Siyang; An, Xingqin; Zhou, Lingxi; Tans, Pieter P.; Jacobson, Andy

    2017-06-01

    In order to explore where the source and sink have the greatest impact on CO2 background concentration at Waliguan (WLG) station, a statistical method is here proposed to calculate the representative source-sink region. The key to this method is to find the best footprint threshold, and the study is carried out in four parts. Firstly, transport climatology, expressed by total monthly footprint, was simulated by FLEXPART on a 7-day time scale. Surface CO2 emissions in Eurasia frequently transported to WLG station. WLG station was mainly influenced by the westerlies in winter and partly controlled by the Southeast Asian monsoon in summer. Secondly, CO2 concentrations, simulated by CT2015, were processed and analyzed through data quality control, screening, fitting and comparing. CO2 concentrations displayed obvious seasonal variation, with the maximum and minimum concentration appearing in April and August, respectively. The correlation of CO2 fitting background concentrations was R2 = 0.91 between simulation and observation. The temporal patterns were mainly correlated with CO2 exchange of biosphere-atmosphere, human activities and air transport. Thirdly, for the monthly CO2 fitting background concentrations from CT2015, a best footprint threshold was found based on correlation analysis and numerical iteration using the data of footprints and emissions. The grid cells where monthly footprints were greater than the best footprint threshold were the best threshold area corresponding to representative source-sink region. The representative source-sink region of maximum CO2 concentration in April was primarily located in Qinghai province, but the minimum CO2 concentration in August was mainly influenced by emissions in a wider region. Finally, we briefly presented the CO2 source-sink characteristics in the best threshold area. Generally, the best threshold area was a carbon sink. The major source and sink were relatively weak owing to less human activities and

  11. Application of Source-Sink Landscape Influence Values to Commuter Traffic: A Case Study of Xiamen Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Landscape patterns are closely related to ecological processes. Different spatial scales and research methods may lead to different results. Therefore, it is crucial to choose suitable research methods when studying different landscape patterns and ecological processes. In the present study, the methods of source-sink landscape theory were applied to the interactions between urban landscape characteristics and commuter traffic behavior around the arterial roads in Xiamen Island. After classification of land use types using remote sensing images from the IKONOS satellite and ArcGIS software (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA, the landscape patterns of areas surrounding arterial roads (within 1 km were evaluated using source-sink landscape influence (SLI. The results showed that Xiamen Island’s urban expressway had the highest SLI value (0.191, followed by the state highways (0.067, the provincial highways (0.030, and the county roads (0.025. When considering all road types, the correlation between a road’s SLI value and its commuter traffic flow was 0.684. This result was explained by three observations: (1 The contribution of the core area of each landscape pattern to traffic flow was positively correlated with the traffic flow. (2 Areas surrounding the urban expressway and the state highways had lower values for Shannon’s diversity index, indicating that these areas had a lower degree of landscape fragmentation. (3 The landscape patterns surrounding the urban expressway and the state highways were more concentrated and complex than those around other road types. The application of source-sink landscape pattern theory allows for researchers to integrate the relationships between landscape patterns surrounding roads and commuter traffic flow on those roads and to analyze the reasons for these relationships.

  12. Heat Source/Sink in a Magneto-Hydrodynamic Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow in a Porous Medium: Dual Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Awais, Muhammad; Imtiaz, Amna

    2016-01-01

    This communication deals with the properties of heat source/sink in a magneto-hydrodynamic flow of a non-Newtonian fluid immersed in a porous medium. Shrinking phenomenon along with the permeability of the wall is considered. Mathematical modelling is performed to convert the considered physical process into set of coupled nonlinear mathematical equations. Suitable transformations are invoked to convert the set of partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are tackled numerically for the solution computations. It is noted that dual solutions for various physical parameters exist which are analyzed in detail.

  13. Increasing the source/sink ratio in Vitis vinifera (cv Sangiovese) induces extensive transcriptome reprogramming and modifies berry ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice in which a proportion of berry clusters are removed from the vine to increase the source/sink ratio and improve the quality of the remaining berries. Until now no transcriptomic data have been reported describing the mechanisms that underlie the agronomic and biochemical effects of thinning. Results We profiled the transcriptome of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese berries before and after thinning at veraison using a genome-wide microarray representing all grapevine genes listed in the latest V1 gene prediction. Thinning increased the source/sink ratio from 0.6 to 1.2 m2 leaf area per kg of berries and boosted the sugar and anthocyanin content at harvest. Extensive transcriptome remodeling was observed in thinned vines 2 weeks after thinning and at ripening. This included the enhanced modulation of genes that are normally regulated during berry development and the induction of a large set of genes that are not usually expressed. Conclusion Cluster thinning has a profound effect on several important cellular processes and metabolic pathways including carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis and transport of secondary products. The integrated agronomic, biochemical and transcriptomic data revealed that the positive impact of cluster thinning on final berry composition reflects a much more complex outcome than simply enhancing the normal ripening process. PMID:22192855

  14. Increasing the source/sink ratio in Vitis vinifera (cv Sangiovese) induces extensive transcriptome reprogramming and modifies berry ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Chiara; Zenoni, Sara; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Allegro, Gianluca; Dal Santo, Silvia; Valentini, Gabriele; Intrieri, Cesare; Pezzotti, Mario; Filippetti, Ilaria

    2011-12-23

    Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice in which a proportion of berry clusters are removed from the vine to increase the source/sink ratio and improve the quality of the remaining berries. Until now no transcriptomic data have been reported describing the mechanisms that underlie the agronomic and biochemical effects of thinning. We profiled the transcriptome of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese berries before and after thinning at veraison using a genome-wide microarray representing all grapevine genes listed in the latest V1 gene prediction. Thinning increased the source/sink ratio from 0.6 to 1.2 m2 leaf area per kg of berries and boosted the sugar and anthocyanin content at harvest. Extensive transcriptome remodeling was observed in thinned vines 2 weeks after thinning and at ripening. This included the enhanced modulation of genes that are normally regulated during berry development and the induction of a large set of genes that are not usually expressed. Cluster thinning has a profound effect on several important cellular processes and metabolic pathways including carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis and transport of secondary products. The integrated agronomic, biochemical and transcriptomic data revealed that the positive impact of cluster thinning on final berry composition reflects a much more complex outcome than simply enhancing the normal ripening process.

  15. 3Increasing the source/sink ratio in Vitis vinifera (cv Sangiovese induces extensive transcriptome reprogramming and modifies berry ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastore Chiara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice in which a proportion of berry clusters are removed from the vine to increase the source/sink ratio and improve the quality of the remaining berries. Until now no transcriptomic data have been reported describing the mechanisms that underlie the agronomic and biochemical effects of thinning. Results We profiled the transcriptome of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese berries before and after thinning at veraison using a genome-wide microarray representing all grapevine genes listed in the latest V1 gene prediction. Thinning increased the source/sink ratio from 0.6 to 1.2 m2 leaf area per kg of berries and boosted the sugar and anthocyanin content at harvest. Extensive transcriptome remodeling was observed in thinned vines 2 weeks after thinning and at ripening. This included the enhanced modulation of genes that are normally regulated during berry development and the induction of a large set of genes that are not usually expressed. Conclusion Cluster thinning has a profound effect on several important cellular processes and metabolic pathways including carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis and transport of secondary products. The integrated agronomic, biochemical and transcriptomic data revealed that the positive impact of cluster thinning on final berry composition reflects a much more complex outcome than simply enhancing the normal ripening process.

  16. MHD Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid over an Exponentially Permeable Stretching Sheet with radiation and heat Source/Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of steady Magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting nanofluid due to an exponentially permeable stretching sheet with heat source/sink in presence of thermal radiation is numerically investigated. The effect of transverse Brownian motion and thermophoresis on heat transfer and nano particle volume fraction considered. The governing partial differential equations of mass, momentum, energy and nanoparticle volume fraction equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformation. These equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme, for some values of flow parameters such as Magnetic parameter (M, Wall mass transfer parameter(S, Prandtl number(Pr, Lewis number (Le, Thermophoresis parameter (Nt, Brownian motion parameter(Nb, Radiation parameter (R. The numerical values presented graphically and analized for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction.

  17. A source-sink model of the generation of plate tectonics from non-Newtonian mantle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David

    1995-01-01

    A model of mantle convection which generates plate tectonics requires strain rate- or stress-dependent rheology in order to produce strong platelike flows with weak margins as well as strike-slip deformation and plate spin (i.e., toroidal motion). Here, we employ a simple model of source-sink driven surface flow to determine the form of such a rheology that is appropriate for Earth's present-day plate motions. In this model, lithospheric motion is treated as shallow layer flow driven by sources and sinks which correspond to spreading centers and subduction zones, respectively. Two plate motion models are used to derive the source sink field. As originally implied in the simpler Cartesian version of this model, the classical power law rheologies do not generate platelike flows as well as the hypothetical Whitehead-Gans stick-slip rheology (which incorporates a simple self-lubrication mechanism). None of the fluid rheologies examined, however, produce more than approximately 60% of the original maximum shear. For either plate model, the viscosity fields produced by the power law rheologies are diffuse, and the viscosity lows over strike-slip shear zones or pseudo-margins are not as small as over the prescribed convergent-divergent margins. In contrast, the stick-slip rheology generates very platelike viscosity fields, with sharp gradients at the plate boundaries, and margins with almost uniformly low viscosity. Power law rheologies with high viscosity contrasts, however, lead to almost equally favorable comparisons, though these also yield the least platelike viscosity fields. This implies that the magnitude of toroidal flow and platelike strength distributions are not necessarily related and thus may present independent constraints on the determination of a self-consistent plate-mantle rheology.

  18. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, S.I.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which the complex interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are controlled in plants. As soluble sugar levels have been shown to play a vital role in a variety of source-sink interactions, a key aspect of the authors research is to determine the role of sugar-regulated gene expression in mediating source-sink interactions. In addition, as a critical aspect of source-sink interactions is the channeling of fixed carbon into different storage forms, they have pursued the findings that fumaric acid represents a significant form of storage carbon in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. In the future, a better understanding of the mechanisms by which interactions between sources and sinks of fixed carbon are coordinated will be a pre-requisite to developing more rationale approaches to improving harvest indices in crop species.

  19. Multi-Scale Approach to Understanding Source-Sink Dynamics of Amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Semlitsch brought a wealth of experience in herpetology and land use effects on amphibians and Dr. Eggert brought years of experience in population and...697–704. Denton, R. D. and S. C. Richter. 2012. A quantitative comparison of two common amphibian sampling techniques for wetlands. Herpetological ...Missouri Herpetological Association, Branson, MO, 2014. Anderson, T. L. and R. D. Semlitsch. Top predators and habitat complexity alter a larval

  20. The Rising Tide of Antimicrobial Resistance in Aquaculture: Sources, Sinks and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy E. M. Watts

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As the human population increases there is an increasing reliance on aquaculture to supply a safe, reliable, and economic supply of food. Although food production is essential for a healthy population, an increasing threat to global human health is antimicrobial resistance. Extensive antibiotic resistant strains are now being detected; the spread of these strains could greatly reduce medical treatment options available and increase deaths from previously curable infections. Antibiotic resistance is widespread due in part to clinical overuse and misuse; however, the natural processes of horizontal gene transfer and mutation events that allow genetic exchange within microbial populations have been ongoing since ancient times. By their nature, aquaculture systems contain high numbers of diverse bacteria, which exist in combination with the current and past use of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics, and other treatment regimens—singularly or in combination. These systems have been designated as “genetic hotspots” for gene transfer. As our reliance on aquaculture grows, it is essential that we identify the sources and sinks of antimicrobial resistance, and monitor and analyse the transfer of antimicrobial resistance between the microbial community, the environment, and the farmed product, in order to better understand the implications to human and environmental health.

  1. The Rising Tide of Antimicrobial Resistance in Aquaculture: Sources, Sinks and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joy E. M.; Schreier, Harold J.; Lanska, Lauma; Hale, Michelle S.

    2017-01-01

    As the human population increases there is an increasing reliance on aquaculture to supply a safe, reliable, and economic supply of food. Although food production is essential for a healthy population, an increasing threat to global human health is antimicrobial resistance. Extensive antibiotic resistant strains are now being detected; the spread of these strains could greatly reduce medical treatment options available and increase deaths from previously curable infections. Antibiotic resistance is widespread due in part to clinical overuse and misuse; however, the natural processes of horizontal gene transfer and mutation events that allow genetic exchange within microbial populations have been ongoing since ancient times. By their nature, aquaculture systems contain high numbers of diverse bacteria, which exist in combination with the current and past use of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics, and other treatment regimens—singularly or in combination. These systems have been designated as “genetic hotspots” for gene transfer. As our reliance on aquaculture grows, it is essential that we identify the sources and sinks of antimicrobial resistance, and monitor and analyse the transfer of antimicrobial resistance between the microbial community, the environment, and the farmed product, in order to better understand the implications to human and environmental health. PMID:28587172

  2. How reservoirs alter drinking water quality: Organic matter sources, sinks, and transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Kendall, Carol; Downing, Bryan D.; Losee, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Within reservoirs, production, transformation, and loss of dissolved organic matter (DOM) occur simultaneously. While the balance between production and loss determines whether a reservoir is a net sink or source of DOM, changes in chemical composition are also important because they affect DOM reactivity with respect to disinfection by-product (DBP) formation. The composition of the DOM pool also provides insight into DOM sources and processing, which can inform reservoir management. We examined the concentration and composition of DOM in San Luis Reservoir, a large off-stream impoundment of the California State Water Project. We used a wide array of DOM chemical tracers including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potentials (THMFP and HAAFP, respectively), absorbance properties, isotopic composition, lignin phenol content, and structural groupings determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There were periods when the reservoir was a net source of DOC due to the predominance of algal production (summer), a net sink due to the predominance of degradation (fall–winter), and balanced between production and consumption (spring). Despite only moderate variation in bulk DOC concentration (3.0–3.6 mg C/L), changes in DOM composition indicated that terrestrial-derived material entering the reservoir was being degraded and replaced by aquatic-derived DOM produced within the reservoir. Substantial changes in the propensity of the DOM pool to form THMs and HAAs illustrate that the DBP precursor pool was not directly coupled to bulk DOC concentration and indicate that algal production is an important source of DBP precursors. Results suggest reservoirs have the potential to attenuate DOM amount and reactivity with respect to DBP precursors via degradative processes; however, these benefits can be decreased or even negated by the production of algal-derived DOM.

  3. Cytokinin-mediated source/sink modifications improve drought tolerance and increase grain yield in rice under water-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Zvi; Reguera, Maria; Tumimbang, Ellen; Walia, Harkamal; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Drought is the major environmental factor limiting crop productivity worldwide. We hypothesized that it is possible to enhance drought tolerance by delaying stress-induced senescence through the stress-induced synthesis of cytokinins in crop-plants. We generated transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants expressing an isopentenyltransferase (IPT) gene driven by P(SARK) , a stress- and maturation-induced promoter. Plants were tested for drought tolerance at two yield-sensitive developmental stages: pre- and post-anthesis. Under both treatments, the transgenic rice plants exhibited delayed response to stress with significantly higher grain yield (GY) when compared to wild-type plants. Gene expression analysis revealed a significant shift in expression of hormone-associated genes in the transgenic plants. During water-stress (WS), P(SARK)::IPT plants displayed increased expression of brassinosteroid-related genes and repression of jasmonate-related genes. Changes in hormone homeostasis were associated with resource(s) mobilization during stress. The transgenic plants displayed differential expression of genes encoding enzymes associated with hormone synthesis and hormone-regulated pathways. These changes and associated hormonal crosstalk resulted in the modification of source/sink relationships and a stronger sink capacity of the P(SARK)::IPT plants during WS. As a result, the transgenic plants had higher GY with improved quality (nutrients and starch content). © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Genetic differences in fruit-set patterns are determined by differences in fruit sink strength and a source : sink threshold for fruit set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, A. M.; Ma, Y.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L. F. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Fruit set in indeterminate plant species largely depends on the balance between source and sink strength. Plants of these species show fluctuations in fruit set during the growing season. It was tested whether differences in fruit sink strength among the cultivars explained the differences in fruit-set patterns. Methods Capsicum was chosen as a model plant. Six cultivars with differences in fruit set, fruit size and plant growth were evaluated in a greenhouse experiment. Fruit-set patterns, generative and vegetative sink strength, source strength and the source : sink ratio at fruit set were determined. Sink strength was quantified as potential growth rate. Fruit set was related to total fruit sink strength and the source : sink ratio. The effect of differences observed in above-mentioned parameters on fruit-set patterns was examined using a simple simulation model. Key Results Sink strengths of individual fruits differed greatly among cultivars. Week-to-week fruit set in large-fruited cultivars fluctuated due to large fluctuations in total fruit sink strength, but in small-fruited cultivars, total fruit sink strength and fruit set were relatively constant. Large variations in week-to-week fruit set were correlated with a low fruit-set percentage. The source : sink threshold for fruit set was higher in large-fruited cultivars. Simulations showed that within the range of parameter values found in the experiment, fruit sink strength and source : sink threshold for fruit set had the largest impact on fruit set: an increase in these parameters decreased the average percentage fruit set and increased variation in weekly fruit set. Both were needed to explain the fruit-set patterns observed. The differences observed in the other parameters (e.g. source strength) had a lower effect on fruit set. Conclusions Both individual fruit sink strength and the source : sink threshold for fruit set were needed to explain the differences observed between fruit

  5. Genetic structure of chimpanzee populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Becquet

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the history and population structure of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, in part because of an extremely poor fossil record. To address this, we report the largest genetic study of the chimpanzees to date, examining 310 microsatellites in 84 common chimpanzees and bonobos. We infer three common chimpanzee populations, which correspond to the previously defined labels of "western," "central," and "eastern," and find little evidence of gene flow between them. There is tentative evidence for structure within western chimpanzees, but we do not detect distinct additional populations. The data also provide historical insights, demonstrating that the western chimpanzee population diverged first, and that the eastern and central populations are more closely related in time.

  6. Structure of African elephant populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    1996-01-01

    The structure of elephant populations from east and south Africa has been analyzed by Georgiadis et al. (1994) on the basis of restriction site variation of mitochondrial DNA. They used F statistics based on identity by descent in tests for subdivision and reached the conclusion that there was a ......The structure of elephant populations from east and south Africa has been analyzed by Georgiadis et al. (1994) on the basis of restriction site variation of mitochondrial DNA. They used F statistics based on identity by descent in tests for subdivision and reached the conclusion...

  7. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eBobeica

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3 % as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1 %. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9% than under carbon sufficiency (48%. Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary

  8. Differential responses of sugar, organic acids and anthocyanins to source-sink modulation in Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeica, Natalia; Poni, Stefano; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Dai, Zhanwu

    2015-01-01

    Grape berry composition mainly consists of primary and secondary metabolites. Both are sensitive to environment and viticultural management. As a consequence, climate change can affect berry composition and modify wine quality and typicity. Leaf removal techniques can impact berry composition by modulating the source-to-sink balance and, in turn, may mitigate some undesired effects due to climate change. The present study investigated the balance between technological maturity parameters such as sugars and organic acids, and phenolic maturity parameters such as anthocyanins in response to source-sink modulation. Sugar, organic acid, and anthocyanin profiles were compared under two contrasting carbon supply levels in berries of cv. Cabernet Sauvignon and Sangiovese collected at 9 and 14 developmental stages respectively. In addition, whole-canopy net carbon exchange rate was monitored for Sangiovese vines and a mathematic model was used to calculate the balance between carbon fixation and berry sugar accumulation. Carbon limitation affected neither berry size nor the concentration of organic acids at harvest. However, it significantly reduced the accumulation of sugars and total anthocyanins in both cultivars. Most interestingly, carbon limitation decreased total anthocyanin concentration by 84.3% as compared to the non source-limited control, whereas it decreased sugar concentration only by 27.1%. This suggests that carbon limitation led to a strong imbalance between sugars and anthocyanins. Moreover, carbon limitation affected anthocyanin profiles in a cultivar dependent manner. Mathematical analysis of carbon-balance indicated that berries used a higher proportion of fixed carbon for sugar accumulation under carbon limitation (76.9%) than under carbon sufficiency (48%). Thus, under carbon limitation, the grape berry can manage the metabolic fate of carbon in such a way that sugar accumulation is maintained at the expense of secondary metabolites.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.; Antal, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics shape the living world around us. At the centre of every evolutionary process is a population of reproducing individuals. The structure of that population affects evolutionary dynamics. The individuals can be molecules, cells, viruses, multicellular organisms or humans. Whenever the fitness of individuals depends on the relative abundance of phenotypes in the population, we are in the realm of evolutionary game theory. Evolutionary game theory is a general approach that can describe the competition of species in an ecosystem, the interaction between hosts and parasites, between viruses and cells, and also the spread of ideas and behaviours in the human population. In this perspective, we review the recent advances in evolutionary game dynamics with a particular emphasis on stochastic approaches in finite sized and structured populations. We give simple, fundamental laws that determine how natural selection chooses between competing strategies. We study the well-mixed population, evolutionary graph theory, games in phenotype space and evolutionary set theory. We apply these results to the evolution of cooperation. The mechanism that leads to the evolution of cooperation in these settings could be called ‘spatial selection’: cooperators prevail against defectors by clustering in physical or other spaces. PMID:20008382

  10. Genealogical histories in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Seiji; Uyenoyama, Marcy K

    2015-06-01

    In genealogies of genes sampled from structured populations, lineages coalesce at rates dependent on the states of the lineages. For migration and coalescence events occurring on comparable time scales, for example, only lineages residing in the same deme of a geographically subdivided population can have descended from a common ancestor in the immediately preceding generation. Here, we explore aspects of genealogical structure in a population comprising two demes, between which migration may occur. We use generating functions to obtain exact densities and moments of coalescence time, number of mutations, total tree length, and age of the most recent common ancestor of the sample. We describe qualitative features of the distribution of gene genealogies, including factors that influence the geographical location of the most recent common ancestor and departures of the distribution of internode lengths from exponential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heat Transfer in MHD Dusty Boundary Layer Flow over an Inclined Stretching Sheet with Non-Uniform Heat Source/Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of momentum and heat transfer characteristics in a hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid over an inclined stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink, where the flow is generated due to a linear stretching of the sheet. Using a similarity transformation, the governing equations of the problem are reduced to a coupled third-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations and are solved numerically by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth-order method using symbolic software Maple. Our numerical solutions are shown to agree with the available results in the literature and then employ the numerical results to bring out the effects of the fluid-particle interaction parameter, local Grashof number, angle of inclination, heat source/sink parameter, Chandrasekhar number, and the Prandtl number on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results have possible technological applications in liquid-based systems involving stretchable materials.

  12. Effect of heat radiation in a Walter’s liquid B fluid over a stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink and elastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Abdul Hakeem

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this present article heat transfer in a Walter’s liquid B fluid over an impermeable stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink, elastic deformation and radiation are reported. The basic boundary layer equations for momentum and heat transfer, which are non-linear partial differential equations, are converted into non-linear ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are solved analytically using hyper geometric functions. The results are carried out for prescribed surface temperature (PST and prescribed power law surface heat flux (PHF. The effects of viscous dissipation, Prandtl number, Eckert number, heat source/sink parameter with elastic deformation and radiation are shown in the several plots and addressed.

  13. Coupling Key Transport and Reaction Kinetics to Evaluate the Nitrate Source-Sink Function of Groundwater-Surface Water Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnetske, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater-surface water exchange environments, including groundwater discharge to coastal ecosystems, are characterized by strong hydrological and biogeochemical gradients. These gradients control the fate and transport of important ecosystem solutes, such as biologically-available nitrogen (N) and carbon. However, it is difficult to quantify the spatiotemporal coupling of these physical and biogeochemical gradients. Our recent investigations of N in groundwater-surface water environments (GSEs) help determine the relative role of these physical and biogeochemical controls across a range of temporal and spatial scales. For example, we used an advection, dispersion, and residence time model coupled with multiple Monod kinetic models to simulate the GSE concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This modeling showed how physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics couple in GSEs to control the fate of NO3. Further, we examined coupled nitrification-denitrification (N source-sink) dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions with global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses and a nondimensional form of the models. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in the GSE and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether the GSE was a source or a sink of NO3 to the surface waters. We further show that whether the GSE is a net NO3 source or net NO3 sink is determined by the ratio of the characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where GSEs with DaO2 > 1 will be net denitrification environments. Previous investigations of N dynamics variously identified stream GSEs as either a net source or sink of NO3. Our coupling of the hydrological and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within the GSE of streams allows us to explain

  14. The seabird paradox: dispersal, genetic structure and population dynamics in a highly mobile, but philopatric albatross species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Emmanuel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bernatchez, Louis

    2008-04-01

    The philopatric behaviour of albatrosses has intrigued biologists due to the high mobility of these seabirds. It is unknown how albatrosses maintain a system of fragmented populations without frequent dispersal movements, in spite of the long-term temporal heterogeneity in resource distribution at sea. We used both genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphism) and capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data to identify explicitly which among several models of population dynamics best applies to the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans) and to test for migration-drift equilibrium. We previously documented an extremely low genetic diversity in this species. Here, we show that populations exhibit little genetic differentiation across the species' range (Theta(B) albatross. Yet, our data suggest that several other factors including ongoing gene flow, recurrent long-distance dispersal and source-sink dynamics have contributed to different extent in shaping the genetic signature observed in this species. Our results show that an absence of genetic structuring may in itself reveal little about the true population dynamics in seabirds, but can provide insights into important processes when a comparison with other information, such as demographic data, is possible.

  15. Population Structure: Educational Facilities And Environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population Structure: Educational Facilities And Environmental Implications In The Cross River Region, Nigeria. ... Global Journal of Social Sciences ... The structure of cross river population used for this study indicated an expansive and dependent population of 48 percent, with the population of those of school age ...

  16. Relações fonte: dreno e crescimento vegetativo do meloeiro Effect of source: sink ratios and vegetative melon growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana da S Duarte

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito de diferentes relações fonte:dreno, determinadas a partir de variações da densidade de plantio e do número de frutos/planta, sobre o crescimento vegetativo de plantas de meloeiro. Foram realizados dois experimentos no período de primavera-verão de 2004/2005, em estufa plástica. Em um dos experimentos, 3 densidades de plantio (1,7; 2,4 e 3,0 plantas m-2 e dois números de frutos/planta (3 e 4 foram estudados. No outro experimento estabeleceu-se dois tratamentos: remoção de todos os frutos e três frutos/planta, a fim de avaliar o efeito da ausência de frutos na planta. A partir dos dados de matéria seca e fresca e da área foliar (AF, aos 68 dias após o transplante, foi determinada a produção e a distribuição de matéria seca para a fração vegetativa, bem como o índice de área foliar (IAF, a área foliar específica (AFE e os teores de matéria seca do caule e das folhas. O aumento da densidade de plantio não incrementou a força de fonte, não alterando o crescimento vegetativo em épocas de alta disponibilidade de radiação solar. A AF alcançada ao final do cultivo foi relativamente baixa, o que diminuiu o efeito de maior sombreamento mútuo e permitiu a penetração de radiação solar no interior do dossel, mesmo em densidades mais elevadas. O aparecimento de um novo fruto compete mais com os frutos remanescentes do que com os órgãos vegetativos. Os frutos competem com as partes vegetativas aéreas indistintamente, ou seja, o caule e as folhas atuam como um órgão único. As plantas de meloeiro se adaptam à baixa demanda de drenos através do acúmulo de fotoassimilados nos órgãos vegetativos.We evaluated the effect of different source:sink ratios determined through variations of planting density and number of fruits per plant during the vegetative growth of melon plants. Two experiments were carried out in a plastic greenhouse in the 2004/2005 spring-summer season. In one experiment, three

  17. MHD effects on heat transfer over stretching sheet embedded in porous medium with variable viscosity, viscous dissipation and heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunegnaw Dessie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this analysis, MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a fluid with variable viscosity through a porous medium towards a stretching sheet by taking in to the effects of viscous dissipation in presence of heat source/sink is considered. The symmetry groups admitted by the corresponding boundary value problem are obtained by using Lie’s scaling group of transformations. These transformations are used to convert the partial differential equations of the governing equations into self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by Runge-Kutta fourth order with shooting method. Numerical results obtained for different parameters such as viscosity variation parameter A, permeability parameter k1, heat source/sink parameter λ, magnetic field parameter M, Prandtl number Pr, and Eckert number Ec are drawn graphically and effects of different flow parameters on velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The skin-friction coefficient -f″(0 and heat transfer coefficient −θ′(0 are presented in tables.

  18. Genetic structure of Algerian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre-Witier, Philippe; Aireche, Hadi; Benabadji, Mohamed; Darlu, Pierre; Melvin, Kristin; Sevin, Andre; Crawford, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    Blood samples were collected in Algeria from 4,444 army recruits and tested for 10 genetic polymorphic systems. These samples were collected from territorial Wilayas (administrative units of Algeria) from which the young soldiers had originated. Based on similar geography and economic and political history, these Wilayas were clustered into 10 regions. These regions, not part of the governmental administrative units, were characterized by allelic frequencies, and analyzed using R-matrix principal components, Wright's F(ST), spatial autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Hierarchical relationships between the culturally defined regions were examined using two different analytical methods of phylogenetic tree constructions: neighbor-joining, and unweighted pair group average arithmetic (UPGMA). These results indicated the predominance of genetic homogeneity due to the gene flow between regions, but with some migration emanating from sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean Europe. Wright's F(ST) value of 0.0063, based on 16 alleles, suggested a relatively small genetic microdifferentiation of the regions. In Algeria, gene flow apparently swamped most of the effects of stochastic processes and disrupted the relationship between geography and genetics, as characterized by the isolation-by-distance model. Some genetic differences and similarities were observed between regions or clusters of regions. The resulting genetic structure of the Algerian populations is best explained by a combination of gene flow, ecology, and history.

  19. Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jorge; Wu, Bin; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Spatial structure greatly affects the evolution of cooperation. While in two-player games the condition for cooperation to evolve depends on a single structure coefficient, in multiplayer games the condition might depend on several structure coefficients, making it difficult to compare different population structures. We propose a solution to this issue by introducing two simple ways of ordering population structures: the containment order and the volume order. If population structure is greater than population structure in the containment or the volume order, then can be considered a stronger promoter of cooperation. We provide conditions for establishing the containment order, give general results on the volume order, and illustrate our theory by comparing different models of spatial games and associated update rules. Our results hold for a large class of population structures and can be easily applied to specific cases once the structure coefficients have been calculated or estimated. PMID:26819335

  20. Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jorge; Wu, Bin; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Spatial structure greatly affects the evolution of cooperation. While in two-player games the condition for cooperation to evolve depends on a single structure coefficient, in multiplayer games the condition might depend on several structure coefficients, making it difficult to compare different population structures. We propose a solution to this issue by introducing two simple ways of ordering population structures: the containment order and the volume order. If population structure S1 is greater than population structure S1 in the containment or the volume order, then S1 can be considered a stronger promoter of cooperation. We provide conditions for establishing the containment order, give general results on the volume order, and illustrate our theory by comparing different models of spatial games and associated update rules. Our results hold for a large class of population structures and can be easily applied to specific cases once the structure coefficients have been calculated or estimated. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. On population structure and marriage dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Giolito, Eugenio P.

    2010-01-01

    I develop an equilibrium, two-sided search model of marriage with endogenous population growth to study the interaction between fertility, the age structure of the population and the age at first marriage of men and women. Within a simple two-period overlapping generation model I show that, given an increase of the desired number of children, age at marriage is affected through two different channels. First, as population growth increases, the age structure of the population produces a thicke...

  2. Radiation effects on the flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an unsteady inclined stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    Full Text Available This study investigates the unsteady flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an inclined stretching sheet. Unsteadiness in the flow is due to the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and wall temperature. Mathematical analysis is performed in the presence of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink. The relevant boundary layer equations are reduced into self-similar forms by suitable transformations. The analytic solutions are constructed in a series form by homotopy analysis method (HAM. The convergence interval of the auxiliary parameter is obtained. Graphical results displaying the influence of interesting parameters are given. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  3. Radiation effects on the mixed convection flow induced by an inclined stretching cylinder with non-uniform heat source/sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sajid; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the mixed convection flow of Jeffrey liquid by an impermeable inclined stretching cylinder. Thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink are considered. The convective boundary conditions at surface are imposed. Nonlinear expressions of momentum, energy and concentration are transformed into dimensionless systems. Convergent homotopic solutions of the governing systems are worked out by employing homotopic procedure. Impact of physical variables on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Numerical computations for skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are carried out. It is concluded that velocity field enhances for Deborah number while reverse situation is observed regarding ratio of relaxation to retardation times. Temperature and heat transfer rate are enhanced via larger thermal Biot number. Effect of Schmidt number on the concentration and local Sherwood number is quite reverse.

  4. Radiation effects on the flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an unsteady inclined stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Asad, Sadia; Mustafa, Meraj; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the unsteady flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an inclined stretching sheet. Unsteadiness in the flow is due to the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and wall temperature. Mathematical analysis is performed in the presence of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink. The relevant boundary layer equations are reduced into self-similar forms by suitable transformations. The analytic solutions are constructed in a series form by homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence interval of the auxiliary parameter is obtained. Graphical results displaying the influence of interesting parameters are given. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Mixed Convection Stagnation-Point Flow of a Power-Law Non-Newtonian Nanofluid towards a Stretching Surface with Radiation and Heat Source/Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macha Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional MHD mixed convection boundary layer flow of heat and mass transfer stagnation-point flow of a non-Newtonian power-law nanofluid towards a stretching surface in the presence of thermal radiation and heat source/sink is investigated numerically. The non-Newtonian nanofluid model incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The basic transport equations are made dimensionless first and the complete nonlinear differential equations with associated boundary conditions are solved numerically by finite element method (FEM. The numerical calculations for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles for different values of the physical parameters to display the interesting aspects of the solutions are presented graphically and discussed. The skin friction coefficient, the local Nusslet number and the Sherwood number are exhibited and examined. Our results are compatible with the existing results for a special case.

  6. Effects of aligned magneticfield and radiation on the flow of ferrofluids over a flat plate with non-uniform heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep N

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the influence of radiation and aligned magneticfield on the flow of ferrofluids over a flat plate in presence of non-uniform heat source/sink and slip velocity.  We considered Fe3O4 magnetic nano particles embedded within the two types of base fluids namely water and kerosene. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and solved numerically using bvp5c Matlab package. The effects of dimensionless quantities on the flow and temperature profiles along with the friction factor and Nusselt number is discussed and presented through graphs and tables. It is found that present results have an excellent agreement with the existed studies under some special assumptions. Results indicate that a raise in the aligned angle enhances the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate.

  7. Dual solutions for unsteady mixed convection flow of MHD micropolar fluid over a stretching/shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandeep

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of non-uniform heat source/sink, mass transfer and chemical reaction on an unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow of a magneto-micropolar fluid past a stretching/shrinking sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation and suction/injection. The governing equations of the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and then solved numerically using Shooting technique with Matlab Package. The influence of non-dimensional governing parameters on velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration profiles are discussed and presented with the help of their graphical representations. Also, friction factor, heat and mass transfer rates have been computed and presented through tables. Under some special conditions, present results are compared with the existed results to check the accuracy and validity of the present study. An excellent agreement is observed with the existed results.

  8. Effects of heat source/sink on magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian power-law fluid on a stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naikoti Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Newtonian boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics over a stretching surface with thermal radiation and slip condition at the surface is analyzed. The flow is subject to a uniform transverse magnetic field. The suitable local similarity transformations are used to transform the non-linear partial differential equations into system of ordinary differential equations. The non-linear ordinary differential equations are linearized by using Quasi-linearization technique. The implicit finite difference scheme has been adopted to solve the obtained coupled ordinary differential equations. The important finding in this communication is the combined effects of Magnetic field parameter M, power law index n, slip parameter l, radiation parameter R, surface temperature parameter g , heat source/sink parameter S, local Eckert number Ec, temperature difference parameter r, generalized local Prandtl number Pr on velocity and temperature profiles and also the skin-friction coefficient -f''(0and heat transfer coefficient -θ'(0 results are discussed. The results pertaining to the present study indicate that as the increase of magnetic field parameter, slip parameter decreases the velocity profiles, where as the temperature profiles increases for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The power law index n and heat source/sink parameter decreases the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles. The effect of radiation parameter, Eckert number leads to increase the dimensionless temperature. It is found that increasing the slip parameter has the effect of decreasing the skin-friction coefficient-f''(0and heat transfer coefficient-θ'(0.With the increase of power law index n is to reduce the skin-friction coefficient and increase the heat transfer coefficient.

  9. Structural dynamics and ecology of flatfish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kevin M.

    1997-11-01

    The concept of structure in populations of marine fishes is fundamental to how we manage and conduct research on these resources. The degree of population structure ranges widely among flatfishes. Although we know that large populations tend to be subdivided into local populations, based on morphological, meristic and reproductive characteristics, these data often conflict with evidence on genetic stock structure, due to the scale and organization of movement within the metapopulation. Movement of individuals between local subpopulations and colonization events on a macroecological scale are probably important to some flatfish populations. Dispersal of larvae is known to be a major factor affecting population mixing. Some flatfishes have planktonic stages of long duration and for these species there is often, but not always, little population structure; gene flow sometimes may be limited by oceanographic features, such as eddies and fronts. At the juvenile stage dispersal can result in colonization of under-utilized habitats; however, for flatfishes with strong habitat requirements, this type of event may be less likely when suitable habitats are fragmented. Complex population structure has major implications for management, e.g. lumping harvested populations with little gene flow can have detrimental local effects. Moreover, the issue of population structure and movement influences the interpretation of research data, where populations are generally treated as closed systems. There is currently a strong need for a multidisciplinary approach to study fish population dynamics and the structure of their populations. This research should involve molecular geneticists, population geneticists, animal behaviourists and ecologists. Migration mechanisms, colonization and extinction events, gene flow and density-dependent movements are subject areas of great importance to managing large harvested populations, but our understanding of them at ecological scales, at least for

  10. Population structure of Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Gislason, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    model where the population structure of mackerel is described as a dynamic cline, rather than as connected contingents. Temporal changes in hydrography and mackerel behavior may affect the steepness of the cline at various locations. The new interpretation of the population structure of Atlantic...

  11. Evolutionary dynamics on any population structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Lippner, Gabor; Chen, Yu-Ting; Fotouhi, Babak; Momeni, Naghmeh; Yau, Shing-Tung; Nowak, Martin A.

    2017-03-01

    Evolution occurs in populations of reproducing individuals. The structure of a population can affect which traits evolve. Understanding evolutionary game dynamics in structured populations remains difficult. Mathematical results are known for special structures in which all individuals have the same number of neighbours. The general case, in which the number of neighbours can vary, has remained open. For arbitrary selection intensity, the problem is in a computational complexity class that suggests there is no efficient algorithm. Whether a simple solution for weak selection exists has remained unanswered. Here we provide a solution for weak selection that applies to any graph or network. Our method relies on calculating the coalescence times of random walks. We evaluate large numbers of diverse population structures for their propensity to favour cooperation. We study how small changes in population structure—graph surgery—affect evolutionary outcomes. We find that cooperation flourishes most in societies that are based on strong pairwise ties.

  12. (Genetic structure of natural populations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Our efforts in the first eight months were concentrated in obtaining a genomic clone of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Drosophila melanogaster and other Drosophila species. This we have now successfully accomplished. We seek to understand the role of SOD in radioresistance; how genetic variation in this enzyme is maintained in populations; and relevant aspects of its evolution that may contribute to these goals as well as to an understanding of molecular evolution in general. To accomplish these goals we are undertaking the following experiments: cloning and sequencing of (at least) one F allele, one S allele, and the null allele for SOD; cloning and sequencing SOD from species related to D. melanogaster; and cloning and sequencing the SOD gene from several independently sampled S and F alleles in D. melanogaster. We are also preparing to test the radioprotective effects of SOD. 67 refs.

  13. The atmosphere as a source/sink of polychlorinated biphenyls to/from the Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apell, Jennifer N; Gschwend, Philip M

    2017-08-01

    Waterbodies polluted with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may cause the air in the surrounding area to become PCB-contaminated. Conversely, when a waterbody is located in or near an urban area, the deposition of atmospheric PCBs may act as a low-level, ongoing source of PCB contamination to that water. Distinguishing these situations is necessary to be protective of human populations and to guide efforts seeking to cleanup such aquatic ecosystems. To assess the situation at the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW) Superfund site, low-density polyethylene passive samplers were deployed in the summer of 2015 to quantify freely dissolved water and gaseous air concentrations of PCBs thereby enabling estimates of the direction and magnitude of air-water exchange of PCB congeners. For the sum of the 27 PCB congeners, average concentrations were 220 pg/m3 (95% C.I.: 80-610) in the air and 320 pg/L (95% C.I.: 110-960) in the water. The sum of air-water exchange fluxes of these PCB congeners was estimated to be 68 ng/m2/day (95% C.I.: 30-148) into the lower atmosphere, contrasting with the reported wet and dry depositional flux of only 5.5 ng/m2/day (95% C.I.: 1-38) from the air into the water. Therefore, the atmosphere was ultimately a sink of PCBs from the LDW Superfund site, at least under 2015 summertime conditions. However, we conclude that air-water exchange of PCBs is likely only a minor sink of PCBs from the LDW and only a minor source of contamination to the region's local atmosphere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using plant growth modeling to analyse C source-sink relations under drought: inter and intra specific comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit ePallas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to assimilate C and allocate NSC (non structural carbohydrates to the most appropriate organs is crucial to maximize plant ecological or agronomic performance. Such C source and sink activities are differentially affected by environmental constraints. Under drought, plant growth is generally more sink than source limited as organ expansion or appearance rate is earlier and stronger affected than C assimilation. This favors plant survival and recovery but not always agronomic performance as NSC are stored rather than used for growth due to a modified metabolism in source and sink leaves. Such interactions between plant C and water balance are complex and plant modeling can help analyzing their impact on plant phenotype. This paper addresses the impact of trade-offs between C sink and source activities and plant production under drought, combining experimental and modeling approaches. Two contrasted monocotyledonous species (rice, oil palm were studied. Experimentally, the sink limitation of plant growth under moderate drought was confirmed as well as the modifications in NSC metabolism in source and sink organs. Under severe stress, when C source became limiting, plant NSC concentration decreased. Two plant models dedicated to oil palm and rice morphogenesis were used to perform a sensitivity analysis and further explore how to optimize C sink and source drought sensitivity to maximize plant growth. Modeling results highlighted that optimal drought sensitivity depends both on drought type and species and that modeling is a great opportunity to analyse such complex processes. Further modeling needs and more generally the challenge of using models to support complex trait breeding are discussed.

  15. A steady-state stomatal model of balanced leaf gas exchange, hydraulics and maximal source-sink flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölttä, Teemu; Lintunen, Anna; Chan, Tommy; Mäkelä, Annikki; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2017-07-01

    Trees must simultaneously balance their CO2 uptake rate via stomata, photosynthesis, the transport rate of sugars and rate of sugar utilization in sinks while maintaining a favourable water and carbon balance. We demonstrate using a numerical model that it is possible to understand stomatal functioning from the viewpoint of maximizing the simultaneous photosynthetic production, phloem transport and sink sugar utilization rate under the limitation that the transpiration-driven hydrostatic pressure gradient sets for those processes. A key feature in our model is that non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis increase with decreasing leaf water potential and/or increasing leaf sugar concentration and are thus coupled to stomatal conductance. Maximizing the photosynthetic production rate using a numerical steady-state model leads to stomatal behaviour that is able to reproduce the well-known trends of stomatal behaviour in response to, e.g., light, vapour concentration difference, ambient CO2 concentration, soil water status, sink strength and xylem and phloem hydraulic conductance. We show that our results for stomatal behaviour are very similar to the solutions given by the earlier models of stomatal conductance derived solely from gas exchange considerations. Our modelling results also demonstrate how the 'marginal cost of water' in the unified stomatal conductance model and the optimal stomatal model could be related to plant structural and physiological traits, most importantly, the soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance and soil moisture. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Population genetic structure of Aldabra giant tortoises

    OpenAIRE

    Balmer, Oliver; Ciofi, Claudio; Galbraith, David A.; Swingland, Ian R.; Zug, George R.,; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of population structure on islands is the result of physical processes linked to volcanism, orogenic events, changes in sea level, as well as habitat variation. We assessed patterns of genetic structure in the giant tortoise of the Aldabra atoll, where previous ecological studies suggested population subdivisions as a result of landscape discontinuity due to unsuitable habitat and island separation. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences and allelic variation...

  17. Carbon allocation, source-sink relations and plant growth: do we need to revise our carbon centric concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery that plants 'eat air' 215 years ago, carbon supply was considered the largely unquestioned top driver of plant growth. The ease at which CO2 uptake (C source activity) can be measured, and the elegant algorithms that describe the responses of photosynthesis to light, temperature and CO2 concentration, explain why carbon driven growth and productivity became the starting point of all process based vegetation models. Most of these models, nowadays adopt other environmental drivers, such as nutrient availability, as modulating co-controls, but the carbon priority is retained. Yet, if we believe in the basic rules of stoichometry of all life, there is an inevitable need of 25-30 elements other then carbon, oxygen and hydrogen to build a healthy plant body. Plants compete for most of these elements, and their availability (except for N) is finite per unit land area. Hence, by pure plausibility, it is a highly unlikely situation that carbon plays the rate limiting role of growth under natural conditions, except in deep shade or on exceptionally fertile soils. Furthermore, water shortage and low temperature, both act directly upon tissue formation (meristems) long before photosynthetic limitations come into play. Hence, plants will incorporate C only to the extent other environmental drivers permit. In the case of nutrients and mature ecosystems, this sink control of plant growth may be masked in the short term by a tight, almost closed nutrient cycle or by widening the C to other element ratio. Because source and sink activity must match in the long term, it is not possible to identify the hierarchy of growth controls without manipulating the environment. Dry matter allocation to C rich structures and reserves may provide some stoichimetric leeway or periodic escapes from the more fundamental, long-term environmental controls of growth and productivity. I will explain why carbon centric explanations of growth are limited or arrive at plausible answers

  18. Dissipation effect on MHD mixed convection flow over a stretching sheet through porous medium with non-uniform heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bhukta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissipative effect on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD mixed convective unsteady flow of an electrically conducting fluid over a stretching sheet embedded in a porous medium subject to transverse magnetic field in the presence of non-uniform heat source/sink has been investigated in this paper. The method of solution involves similarity transformation. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations governing flow, heat and mass transfer phenomena are reduced into set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are solved numerically by using Runge–Kutta fourth order method associated with shooting technique. The numerical computation of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number is presented in tables. The work of previous authors is compared with the present work as particular cases in the absence of unsteady parameter, solutal buoyancy, Darcy dissipation and chemical reaction. The results of steady and unsteady cases are also discussed. The important findings are as follows: effect of electric field enhances the skin friction contributing to flow instability. Higher Prandtl number is suitable for the reduction of coefficient of skin friction which is desirable.

  19. Effects on heat transfer of multiphase magnetic fluid due to circular magnetic field over a stretching surface with heat source/sink and thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zeeshan

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current article is to explore the boundary layer heat transport flow of multiphase magnetic fluid with solid impurities suspended homogeneously past a stretching sheet under the impact of circular magnetic field. Thermal radiation effects are also taken in account. The equations describing the flow of dust particles in fluid along with point dipole are modelled by employing conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy, which are then converted into non-linear coupled differential equations by mean of similarity approach. The transformed ODE’s are tackled numerically with the help of efficient Runga-Kutta method. The influence of ferromagnetic interaction parameter, viscous dissipation, fluid-particle interaction parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number, thermal radiation parameter and number of dust particles, heat production or absorption parameter with the two thermal process namely, prescribed heat flux (PHF or prescribed surface temperature (PST are observed on temperature and velocity profiles. The value of skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are calculated for numerous physical parameters. Present results are correlated with available for a limited case and an excellent agreement is found. Keywords: Ferromagnetic interaction parameter, Dusty magnetic fluid, stretching sheet, Magnetic dipole, Heat source/sink, Thermal radiation

  20. Structured population models in biology and epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Shigui

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of six chapters written by leading researchers in mathematical biology. These chapters present recent and important developments in the study of structured population models in biology and epidemiology. Topics include population models structured by age, size, and spatial position; size-structured models for metapopulations, macroparasitc diseases, and prion proliferation; models for transmission of microparasites between host populations living on non-coincident spatial domains; spatiotemporal patterns of disease spread; method of aggregation of variables in population dynamics; and biofilm models. It is suitable as a textbook for a mathematical biology course or a summer school at the advanced undergraduate and graduate level. It can also serve as a reference book for researchers looking for either interesting and specific problems to work on or useful techniques and discussions of some particular problems.

  1. Population Structure and Evolution of Rhinoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waman, Vaishali P.; Kolekar, Pandurang S.; Kale, Mohan M.; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2014-01-01

    Rhinoviruses, formerly known as Human rhinoviruses, are the most common cause of air-borne upper respiratory tract infections in humans. Rhinoviruses belong to the family Picornaviridae and are divided into three species namely, Rhinovirus A, -B and -C, which are antigenically diverse. Genetic recombination is found to be one of the important causes for diversification of Rhinovirus species. Although emerging lineages within Rhinoviruses have been reported, their population structure has not been studied yet. The availability of complete genome sequences facilitates study of population structure, genetic diversity and underlying evolutionary forces, such as mutation, recombination and selection pressure. Analysis of complete genomes of Rhinoviruses using a model-based population genetics approach provided a strong evidence for existence of seven genetically distinct subpopulations. As a result of diversification, Rhinovirus A and -C populations are divided into four and two subpopulations, respectively. Genetically, the Rhinovirus B population was found to be homogeneous. Intra-species recombination was observed to be prominent in Rhinovirus A and -C species. Significant evidence of episodic positive selection was obtained for several sites within coding sequences of structural and non-structural proteins. This corroborates well with known phenotypic properties such as antigenicity of structural proteins. Episodic positive selection appears to be responsible for emergence of new lineages especially in Rhinovirus A. In summary, the Rhinovirus population is an ensemble of seven distinct lineages. In case of Rhinovirus A, intra-species recombination and episodic positive selection contribute to its further diversification. In case of Rhinovirus C, intra- and inter-species recombinations are responsible for observed diversity. Population genetics approach was further useful to analyze phylogenetic tree topologies pertaining to recombinant strains, especially when trees

  2. Coexistence of competing stage-structured populations.

    KAUST Repository

    Fujiwara, Masami

    2011-10-05

    This paper analyzes the stability of a coexistence equilibrium point of a model for competition between two stage-structured populations. In this model, for each population, competition for resources may affect any one of the following population parameters: reproduction, juvenile survival, maturation rate, or adult survival. The results show that the competitive strength of a population is affected by (1) the ratio of the population parameter influenced by competition under no resource limitation (maximum compensatory capacity) over the same parameter under a resource limitation due to competition (equilibrium rate) and (2) the ratio of interspecific competition over intraspecific competition; this ratio was previously shown to depend on resource-use overlap. The former ratio, which we define as fitness, can be equalized by adjusting organisms\\' life history strategies, thereby promoting coexistence. We conclude that in addition to niche differentiation among populations, the life history strategies of organisms play an important role in coexistence.

  3. Population structure of ice-breeding seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Corey S; Stirling, Ian; Strobeck, Curtis; Coltman, David W

    2008-07-01

    The development of population genetic structure in ice-breeding seal species is likely to be shaped by a combination of breeding habitat and life-history characteristics. Species that return to breed on predictable fast-ice locations are more likely to exhibit natal fidelity than pack-ice-breeding species, which in turn facilitates the development of genetic differentiation between subpopulations. Other aspects of life history such as geographically distinct vocalizations, female gregariousness, and the potential for polygynous breeding may also facilitate population structure. Based on these factors, we predicted that fast-ice-breeding seal species (the Weddell and ringed seal) would show elevated genetic differentiation compared to pack-ice-breeding species (the leopard, Ross, crabeater and bearded seals). We tested this prediction using microsatellite analysis to examine population structure of these six ice-breeding species. Our results did not support this prediction. While none of the Antarctic pack-ice species showed statistically significant population structure, the bearded seal of the Arctic pack ice showed strong differentiation between subpopulations. Again in contrast, the fast-ice-breeding Weddell seal of the Antarctic showed clear evidence for genetic differentiation while the ringed seal, breeding in similar habitat in the Arctic, did not. These results suggest that the development of population structure in ice-breeding phocid seals is a more complex outcome of the interplay of phylogenetic and ecological factors than can be predicted on the basis of breeding substrate and life-history characteristics.

  4. Distribution, population structure and ecosystem effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena V. Telesh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial distribution, density, biomass, population structure,predation effects, and the influence of abiotic environmentalcharacteristics (salinity, water temperature, transparency, anddepth on a population of the Ponto-Caspian invasive cladoceranCercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov, 1891 were studied in the Gulf of Finlandand the open Baltic Sea (August 1999 and 2004. In our studyin 1999, this species was first recorded in plankton of opensouth-eastern Baltic waters. The age and sexual structure ofthe C. pengoi population were interrelated with population density.The strongest impact of C. pengoi predation on the pelagic communityin the Gulf of Finland was registered at the stations where thepercentage of C. pengoi in the total zooplankton biomass wasthe highest. The calculated impact values of C. pengoi exceededthose registered a decade ago, during the first years after Cercopagishad invaded the eastern Gulf of Finland.

  5. Structural stability of nonlinear population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Simone; Saavedra, Serguei

    2018-01-01

    In population dynamics, the concept of structural stability has been used to quantify the tolerance of a system to environmental perturbations. Yet, measuring the structural stability of nonlinear dynamical systems remains a challenging task. Focusing on the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, because of the linearity of the functional response, it has been possible to measure the conditions compatible with a structurally stable system. However, the functional response of biological communities is not always well approximated by deterministic linear functions. Thus, it is unclear the extent to which this linear approach can be generalized to other population dynamics models. Here, we show that the same approach used to investigate the classic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, which is called the structural approach, can be applied to a much larger class of nonlinear models. This class covers a large number of nonlinear functional responses that have been intensively investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We also investigate the applicability of the structural approach to stochastic dynamical systems and we provide a measure of structural stability for finite populations. Overall, we show that the structural approach can provide reliable and tractable information about the qualitative behavior of many nonlinear dynamical systems.

  6. Population Structure of West Greenland Narwhals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riget, F.; Dietz, R.; Møller, P.

    The hypothesis that different populations of narwhals in the West Greenland area exist has been tested by different biomarkers (metal and organochlorine concentrations, stable isotopes and DNA). Samples of muscle, liver, kidney, blubber and skin tissues of narwhals from West Greenland have been...... isotopes could not support the population structure with two West Greenland populations suggested by the genetic study....... analysed for heavy metals, organochlorines, stable isotopes and DNA. The obtained results of metal concentrations and DNA were included in the existing database, whereas no previous data on organochlorines and stable isotopes in West Greenland narwhals existed. The metal and POP concentrations and stable...

  7. Involvement of source-sink relationship and hormonal control in the response of Medicago ciliaris - Sinorhizobium medicae symbiosis to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, Imène; Jelali, Nahida; Slatni, T; Gruber, Margaret; Albacete, A; Martínez Andújar, Cristina; Martinez, V; Pérez-Alfocea, F; Abdelly, C

    2012-03-01

    In order to explore the relationship between leaf hormonal status and source-sink relations in the response of symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) to salt stress, three major phytohormones (cytokinins, abscisic acid and the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid), sucrose phosphate synthase activity in source leaves and sucrolytic activities in sink organs were analysed in two lines of Medicago ciliaris (salt-tolerant TNC 1.8 and salt-sensitive TNC 11.9). SNF (measured as nitrogenase activity and amount of N-fixed) was more affected by salt treatment in the TNC 11.9 than in TNC 1.8, and this could be explained by a decrease in nodule sucrolytic activities. SNF capacity was reflected in leaf biomass production and in the sink activity under salinity, as suggested by the higher salt-induced decrease in the young leaf sucrolytic activities in the sensitive line TNC 11.9, while they were not affected in the tolerant line TNC 1.8. As a consequence of maintaining sink activities in the actively growing organs, the key enzymatic activity for synthesis of sucrose (sucrose phosphate synthase) was also less affected in the mature leaves of the more tolerant genotype. Ours results showed also that the major hormone factor associated with the relative tolerance of TNC 1.8 was the stimulation of abscisic acid concentration in young leaves under salt treatment. This stimulation may control photosynthetic organ growth and also may contribute to a certain degree in the maintenance of coordinated sink-source relationships. Therefore, ABA may be an important component which conserves sucrose synthesis in source leaves.

  8. Influence of non-linear thermal radiation on 2D unsteady flow of a Williamson fluid with heat source/sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Masood; Hamid, Aamir

    The present article reports a new mathematical formulation for a time dependent flow of a non-Newtonian Williamson fluid model by taking into account the impacts of infinite shear rate viscosity. By incorporating the constitutive relation of Williamson fluid model the basic conservation equations are obtained for two dimensional boundary layer flow. In addition, the heat transfer characteristics for flow filed over a stretching surface has been explored within the sight of thermal radiation and heat sink or source. The Rosseland approximation is being employed for non-linear thermal radiation impacts in the presence of convective heat transfer mode. The current work aims at revealing the solution of equations describing the flow of Williamson fluid by mean of employing the dimensionless approach. Therefore, the leading nonlinear momentum and energy equations are rendered into a set of simultaneously ordinary differential equations via non-dimensional variables with associated physical boundary conditions. Numerical treatment of these reduced conservation equations has been conducted by utilizing the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. We have examined the influence of various physical variables, like, the unsteadiness parameter, Weissenberg number, viscosity ratio parameter, Biot number, radiation parameter, temperature ratio parameter, Prandtl number and heat source/sink parameter on momentum and thermal boundary layers, which is illustrated by means of graphs and tables. The results suggest that the impact of larger viscosity ratio parameter lead to higher fluid velocity while the converse is true for the temperature field. It is noted that the greater unsteadiness parameter results in a significant enhancement in the friction factor. In addition, an increase in thermal radiation as well as temperature ratio parameters improves the heat transfer performance in fluid flow. The work of previous researchers is correlated with the findings of this paper in some

  9. Effects of Deep Water Source-Sink Terms in 3rd generation Wave Model SWAN using different wind data in Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirezci, Cagil; Ozyurt Tarakcioglu, Gulizar

    2016-04-01

    Coastal development in Black Sea has increased in recent years. Therefore, careful monitoring of the storms and verification of numerical tools with reliable data has become important. Previous studies by Kirezci and Ozyurt (2015) investigated extreme events in Black Sea using different wind datasets (NCEP's CFSR and ECMWF's operational datasets) and different numerical tools (SWAN and Wavewatch III). These studies showed that significant effect to results is caused by the deep water source-sink terms (wave growth by wind, deep water dissipation of wave energy (whitecapping) and deep water non-linear wave-wave interactions). According to Timmermans(2015), uncertainty about wind forcing and the process of nonlinear wave-wave interactions are found to be dominant in numerical wave modelling. Therefore, in this study deep water source and sink term solution approaches of 3rd generation numerical tool (SWAN model) are tested, validated and compared using the selected extreme storms in Black Sea. 45 different storms and storm like events observed in Black Sea between years 1994-1999 are selected to use in the models. The storm selection depends on the instrumental wave data (significant wave heights, mean wave period and mean wave direction) obtained in NATO-TU Waves project by the deep water buoy measurements at Hopa, Sinop, Gelendzhik, and wind data (mean and peak wind speeds, storm durations) of the regarding events. 2 different wave growth by wind with the corresponding deep water dissipation terms and 3 different wave -wave interaction terms of SWAN model are used in this study. Wave growth by wind consist of two parts, linear growth which is explained by Cavaleri and Malanotte-Rizzoli(1981),and dominant exponential growth. There are two methods in SWAN model for exponential growth of wave, first one by Snyder et al. (1981), rescaled in terms of friction velocity by Komen et. al (1984) which is derived using driving wind speed at 10m elevation with related drag

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results exhibit a strong genetic differentiation which is obviously due to genetic drift in the isolated populations. The genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact (both grazing and collection for medicinal purposes). This research might ...

  11. Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Thomas G., Sreejayan, Joseph L. and Kuriachan P. 2001 Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza malampuzhaensis. Krish. et .... (Promega). Southern hybridization was carried out as reported earlier (Thomas et al. 2000). Results. DNA fingerprinting. A total of 33 decamer primers randomly selected from C,.

  12. Significant population genetic structuring of the holoplanktic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pelagia noctiluca is thought to have a global distribution, yet our understanding of genetic connectivity across the range of this problem animal is poor. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of populations off southern Africa using mitochondrial COI and nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 genes, and compare the results to recent ...

  13. Familial identification: population structure and relationship distinguishability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rori V Rohlfs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available With the expansion of offender/arrestee DNA profile databases, genetic forensic identification has become commonplace in the United States criminal justice system. Implementation of familial searching has been proposed to extend forensic identification to family members of individuals with profiles in offender/arrestee DNA databases. In familial searching, a partial genetic profile match between a database entrant and a crime scene sample is used to implicate genetic relatives of the database entrant as potential sources of the crime scene sample. In addition to concerns regarding civil liberties, familial searching poses unanswered statistical questions. In this study, we define confidence intervals on estimated likelihood ratios for familial identification. Using these confidence intervals, we consider familial searching in a structured population. We show that relatives and unrelated individuals from population samples with lower gene diversity over the loci considered are less distinguishable. We also consider cases where the most appropriate population sample for individuals considered is unknown. We find that as a less appropriate population sample, and thus allele frequency distribution, is assumed, relatives and unrelated individuals become more difficult to distinguish. In addition, we show that relationship distinguishability increases with the number of markers considered, but decreases for more distant genetic familial relationships. All of these results indicate that caution is warranted in the application of familial searching in structured populations, such as in the United States.

  14. Influence of non-linear thermal radiation on 2D unsteady flow of a Williamson fluid with heat source/sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khan

    Full Text Available The present article reports a new mathematical formulation for a time dependent flow of a non-Newtonian Williamson fluid model by taking into account the impacts of infinite shear rate viscosity. By incorporating the constitutive relation of Williamson fluid model the basic conservation equations are obtained for two dimensional boundary layer flow. In addition, the heat transfer characteristics for flow filed over a stretching surface has been explored within the sight of thermal radiation and heat sink or source. The Rosseland approximation is being employed for non-linear thermal radiation impacts in the presence of convective heat transfer mode. The current work aims at revealing the solution of equations describing the flow of Williamson fluid by mean of employing the dimensionless approach. Therefore, the leading nonlinear momentum and energy equations are rendered into a set of simultaneously ordinary differential equations via non-dimensional variables with associated physical boundary conditions. Numerical treatment of these reduced conservation equations has been conducted by utilizing the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. We have examined the influence of various physical variables, like, the unsteadiness parameter, Weissenberg number, viscosity ratio parameter, Biot number, radiation parameter, temperature ratio parameter, Prandtl number and heat source/sink parameter on momentum and thermal boundary layers, which is illustrated by means of graphs and tables. The results suggest that the impact of larger viscosity ratio parameter lead to higher fluid velocity while the converse is true for the temperature field. It is noted that the greater unsteadiness parameter results in a significant enhancement in the friction factor. In addition, an increase in thermal radiation as well as temperature ratio parameters improves the heat transfer performance in fluid flow. The work of previous researchers is correlated with the findings of

  15. Low source-sink ratio reduces reserve starch in grapevine woody canes and modulates sugar transport and metabolism at transcriptional and enzyme activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Angélica; Noronha, Henrique; Dai, Zhanwu; Delrot, Serge; Gerós, Hernâni

    2017-05-19

    Severe leaf removal decreases storage starch and sucrose in grapevine cv. Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings and modulates the activity of key enzymes and the expression of sugar transporter genes. Leaf removal is an agricultural practice that has been shown to modify vineyard efficiency and grape and wine composition. In this study, we took advantage of the ability to precisely control the number of leaves to fruits in Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings to study the effect of source-sink ratios (2 (2L), 6 (6L) and 12 (12) leaves per cluster) on starch metabolism and accumulation. Starch concentration was significantly higher in canes from 6L (42.13 ± 1.44 mg g DW-1) and 12L (43.50 ± 2.85 mg g DW-1) than in 2L (22.72 ± 3.10 mg g DW-1) plants. Moreover, carbon limitation promoted a transcriptional adjustment of genes involved in starch metabolism in grapevine woody tissues, including a decrease in the expression of the plastidic glucose-6-phosphate translocator, VvGPT1. Contrarily, the transcript levels of the gene coding the catalytic subunit VvAGPB1 of the VvAGPase complex were higher in canes from 2L plants than in 6L and 12L, which positively correlated with the biochemical activity of this enzyme. Sucrose concentration increased in canes from 2L to 6L and 12L plants, and the amount of total phenolics followed the same trend. Expression studies showed that VvSusy transcripts decreased in canes from 2L to 6L and 12L plants, which correlated with the biochemical activity of insoluble invertase, while the expression of the sugar transporters VvSUC11 and VvSUC12, together with VvSPS1, which codes an enzyme involved in sucrose synthesis, increased. Thus, sucrose seems to control starch accumulation through the adjustment of the cane sink strength.

  16. Origin and population structure of the Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J T

    1993-04-01

    The Norse and Celtic contributions to the founding population of Iceland have been estimated previously on a pan-Icelandic basis using gene frequency data for the entire island. Accounts of the settlement of Iceland, however, suggest that different regions received different proportions of Norse and Celtic settlers, indicating the need to incorporate geographic variation into Icelandic admixture studies. A formal likelihood ratio test rejects the null hypothesis of regional homogeneity in admixture proportions. Here, regional admixture estimates for Iceland are reported; they are in agreement with the settlement pattern inferred from historical accounts. The western, northern, and southern regions of Iceland exhibit a moderate Celtic component, consistent with historical indications that these regions were settled by Norse Vikings from the British Isles, accompanied by Celtic wives and slaves. Eastern Iceland, believed to have been settled chiefly by Vikings from Scandinavia, is characterized by a large Norse component of admixture. The northwestern peninsula is also found to be predominantly Norse. Regional genetic data are used to elucidate the contemporary population structure of Iceland. The observed structure correlates well with patterns of Icelandic geography, history, economy, marriage, urbanization, and internal migration. The northeastern region is strongly isolated, the urbanized areas of the north and southwest are representative of the overall population, and the remaining regions exhibit small-scale variation about the genetic central tendency. A high level of genetic homogeneity is indicated (RST = 0.0005), consistent with the high internal migration rate of the Icelanders. A regression of mean per-locus heterozygosity on distance from the gene frequency centroid reveals a greater than average external gene flow into the eastern region, whereas the northwestern peninsula has received less than average external gene flow. Iceland is compared with

  17. Dual solutions in hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer towards a stretching/shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink and variable surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El-Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The steady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a viscous, incompressible and heat generating/absorbing fluid over a shrinking sheet in the presence of a non-uniform heat source/sink is considered. The system of partial differential equations was transformed to a system of ordinary differential equations, which was solved numerically. Numerical results were obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the surface temperature as well as the velocity and temperature profiles for some values of the governing parameters. The study reveals that the range of velocity ratio parameter for which the solution exists increases as the magnetic field increase.

  18. Population structure of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teunis Jansen

    Full Text Available Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus occurs on both sides of the north Atlantic and has traditionally been grouped into 5 spawning components, some of which were thought to be isolated natal homing stocks. Previous studies have provided no evidence for cross Atlantic migration and no or weak support for isolated spawning components within either side of the North Atlantic. We question the de-facto accepted hypothesis of isolation between spawning components on the basis of spawning and age distribution data. The spawning intensities, proxied by larval abundances, are negatively correlated between the North Sea and Celtic Sea, which indicates that the two spawning components may be connected by straying individuals. This finding is based on unique larvae samples collected before the collapse of North Sea component, thus showing that the exchange is not a recent phenomenon due to the collapse. The analyses of old as well as more recent age distributions show that strong year classes spread into other areas where they spawn as adults ("twinning". Our findings are in accordance with the lack of solid evidence for stock separation from previous analyses of tagging data, genetics, ectoparasite infections, otolith shapes, and blood phenotypes. Because no method has been able to identify the origin of spawning mackerel unequivocally from any of the traditional spawning components, and in the light of our results, we conclude that straying outweighs spatial segregation. We propose a new model where the population structure of mackerel is described as a dynamic cline, rather than as connected contingents. Temporal changes in hydrography and mackerel behavior may affect the steepness of the cline at various locations. The new interpretation of the population structure of Atlantic mackerel has important implications for research, assessment and management.

  19. Robust permanence for interacting structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Josef; Schreiber, Sebastian J.

    The dynamics of interacting structured populations can be modeled by {dx}/{dt}=A(x)x where x∈R, x=(x,…,x), and A(x) are matrices with non-negative off-diagonal entries. These models are permanent if there exists a positive global attractor and are robustly permanent if they remain permanent following perturbations of A(x). Necessary and sufficient conditions for robust permanence are derived using dominant Lyapunov exponents λ(μ) of the A(x) with respect to invariant measures μ. The necessary condition requires maxλ(μ)>0 for all ergodic measures with support in the boundary of the non-negative cone. The sufficient condition requires that the boundary admits a Morse decomposition such that maxλ(μ)>0 for all invariant measures μ supported by a component of the Morse decomposition. When the Morse components are Axiom A, uniquely ergodic, or support all but one population, the necessary and sufficient conditions are equivalent. Applications to spatial ecology, epidemiology, and gene networks are given.

  20. SnRK1A-interacting negative regulators modulate the nutrient starvation signaling sensor SnRK1 in source-sink communication in cereal seedlings under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Ru; Lee, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Chih-Yu; Hong, Ya-Fang; Chen, Jyh-Long; Lu, Chung-An; Chen, Ku-Ting; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Yu, Su-May

    2014-02-01

    In plants, source-sink communication plays a pivotal role in crop productivity, yet the underlying regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. The SnRK1A protein kinase and transcription factor MYBS1 regulate the sugar starvation signaling pathway during seedling growth in cereals. Here, we identified plant-specific SnRK1A-interacting negative regulators (SKINs). SKINs antagonize the function of SnRK1A, and the highly conserved GKSKSF domain is essential for SKINs to function as repressors. Overexpression of SKINs inhibits the expression of MYBS1 and hydrolases essential for mobilization of nutrient reserves in the endosperm, leading to inhibition of seedling growth. The expression of SKINs is highly inducible by drought and moderately by various stresses, which is likely related to the abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated repression of SnRK1A under stress. Overexpression of SKINs enhances ABA sensitivity for inhibition of seedling growth. ABA promotes the interaction between SnRK1A and SKINs and shifts the localization of SKINs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it binds SnRK1A and prevents SnRK1A and MYBS1 from entering the nucleus. Our findings demonstrate that SnRK1A plays a key role regulating source-sink communication during seedling growth. Under abiotic stress, SKINs antagonize the function of SnRK1A, which is likely a key factor restricting seedling vigor.

  1. Spatial and population genetic structure of microsatellites in white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula E. Marquardt; Bryan K. Epperson

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the population genetic structure of seven microsatellite loci for old growth and second growth populations of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus). From each population, located within Hartwick Pines State Park, Grayling, Michigan, USA, 120-122 contiguous trees were sampled for genetic analysis. Within each population, genetic diversity...

  2. Visualising the demographic factors which shape population age structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Wilson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population pyramid is one of the most popular tools for visualising population age structure. However, it is difficult to discern from the diagram the relative effects of different demographic components on the size of age-specific populations, making it hard to understand exactly how a population's age structure is formed. Objective: The aim of this paper is to introduce a type of population pyramid which shows how births, deaths, and migration have shaped a population's age structure. Methods: Births, deaths, and population data were obtained from the Human Mortality Database and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. A variation on the conventional population pyramid, termed here a components-of-change pyramid, was created. Based on cohort population accounts, it illustrates how births, deaths, and net migration have created the population of each age group. A simple measure which summarises the impact of net migration on age structure is also suggested. Results: Example components-of-change pyramids for several countries and subnational regions are presented, which illustrate how births, deaths, and net migration have fashioned current population age structures. The influence of migration is shown to vary greatly between populations. Conclusions: The new type of pyramid aids interpretation of a population's age structure and helps to understand its demographic history over the last century.

  3. Possible ancestral structure in human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Plagnol

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Determining the evolutionary relationships between fossil hominid groups such as Neanderthals and modern humans has been a question of enduring interest in human evolutionary genetics. Here we present a new method for addressing whether archaic human groups contributed to the modern gene pool (called ancient admixture, using the patterns of variation in contemporary human populations. Our method improves on previous work by explicitly accounting for recent population history before performing the analyses. Using sequence data from the Environmental Genome Project, we find strong evidence for ancient admixture in both a European and a West African population (p approximately 10(-7, with contributions to the modern gene pool of at least 5%. While Neanderthals form an obvious archaic source population candidate in Europe, there is not yet a clear source population candidate in West Africa.

  4. Estimating population age structure using otolith morphometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doering-Arjes, P.; Cardinale, M.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    known-age fish individuals. Here we used known-age Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from the Faroe Bank and Faroe Plateau stocks. Cod populations usually show quite large variation in growth rates and otolith shape. We showed that including otolith morphometrics into ageing processes has the potential...... populations. The intercalibration method was successful but generalization from one stock to another remains problematic. The development of an otolith growth model is needed for generalization if an operational method for different populations is required in the future....... to make ageing objective, accurate, and fast. Calibration analysis indicated that a known-age sample from the same population and environment is needed to obtain robust calibration; using a sample from a different stock more than doubles the error rate, even in the case of genetically highly related...

  5. Genetic structure of Tribolium castaneum (Coleptera: Tenebrionidae) populations in mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is primarily found associated with human structures such as wheat and rice mills, which are spatially isolated resource patches with apparently limited immigration that could produce genetically structured populations. We investigated genetic diversity and...

  6. Population Genetic Structure and Gene Flow Among Nigerian Goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population Genetic structure in 200 indigenous goats sampled across four states from the South-Western and South Southern region of Nigeria was assessed using 7 microsatellite DNA markers. Observed Analysis of molecular genetic variation (AMOVA) was higher within populations (3.47) than among populations (1.84) ...

  7. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sudanese native chickens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of Sudanese native chicken breeds involved in a conservation program. Five Sudanese native chicken breeds were compared with populations studied previously, which included six purebred lines, six African populations and one ...

  8. Population genetic structure and phylogeography of the mud-flat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-27

    Jan 27, 2012 ... Genetic structure and evolutionary demography of the mud-flat crabs (Helice tientsinensis and H. latimera) were investigated ... revealed significant genetic structure in the 10 populations of H. tientsinensis and H. latimera. For all populations, the ..... Yellow Sea depression (Chen, 1991). A large land bridge,.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese honeybees (Apis cerana) under microsatellite markers. T Ji, L Yin, G Chen. Abstract. Using 21 microsatellite markers and PCR method, the polymorphisms of 20 Apis cerana honeybee populations across China was investigated and the genetic structure and diversity of ...

  10. POPULATION DENSITY, STRUCTURE AND GROUPING PATTERN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population density, sex and age ratio and grouping pattern of Menelik's bushbuck (Traglaphus scriptus meneliki) was studied in the Menagesha-Suba State Forest (msf) during August 2009 – April 2010. Data were collected during wet and dry seasons. Total-count method was used in four selected study sites within the ...

  11. On some quasilinear structured population models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Getto, P.

    2005-01-01

    The object of my research was the mathematical analysis of a class of population models in which the effect of differences of individuals (in e.g. age, size or position in space) on their physiological development, mortality and reproduction is assumed to play an important role. Such models, which

  12. Extensive population genetic structure in the giraffe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grether Gregory F

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central question in the evolutionary diversification of large, widespread, mobile mammals is how substantial differentiation can arise, particularly in the absence of topographic or habitat barriers to dispersal. All extant giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis are currently considered to represent a single species classified into multiple subspecies. However, geographic variation in traits such as pelage pattern is clearly evident across the range in sub-Saharan Africa and abrupt transition zones between different pelage types are typically not associated with extrinsic barriers to gene flow, suggesting reproductive isolation. Results By analyzing mitochondrial DNA sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci, we show that there are at least six genealogically distinct lineages of giraffe in Africa, with little evidence of interbreeding between them. Some of these lineages appear to be maintained in the absence of contemporary barriers to gene flow, possibly by differences in reproductive timing or pelage-based assortative mating, suggesting that populations usually recognized as subspecies have a long history of reproductive isolation. Further, five of the six putative lineages also contain genetically discrete populations, yielding at least 11 genetically distinct populations. Conclusion Such extreme genetic subdivision within a large vertebrate with high dispersal capabilities is unprecedented and exceeds that of any other large African mammal. Our results have significant implications for giraffe conservation, and imply separate in situ and ex situ management, not only of pelage morphs, but also of local populations.

  13. Extensive population genetic structure in the giraffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M; Brenneman, Rick A; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Pollinger, John P; Milá, Borja; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Louis, Edward E; Grether, Gregory F; Jacobs, David K; Wayne, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Background A central question in the evolutionary diversification of large, widespread, mobile mammals is how substantial differentiation can arise, particularly in the absence of topographic or habitat barriers to dispersal. All extant giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are currently considered to represent a single species classified into multiple subspecies. However, geographic variation in traits such as pelage pattern is clearly evident across the range in sub-Saharan Africa and abrupt transition zones between different pelage types are typically not associated with extrinsic barriers to gene flow, suggesting reproductive isolation. Results By analyzing mitochondrial DNA sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci, we show that there are at least six genealogically distinct lineages of giraffe in Africa, with little evidence of interbreeding between them. Some of these lineages appear to be maintained in the absence of contemporary barriers to gene flow, possibly by differences in reproductive timing or pelage-based assortative mating, suggesting that populations usually recognized as subspecies have a long history of reproductive isolation. Further, five of the six putative lineages also contain genetically discrete populations, yielding at least 11 genetically distinct populations. Conclusion Such extreme genetic subdivision within a large vertebrate with high dispersal capabilities is unprecedented and exceeds that of any other large African mammal. Our results have significant implications for giraffe conservation, and imply separate in situ and ex situ management, not only of pelage morphs, but also of local populations. PMID:18154651

  14. Population genetic structure analysis in endangered Hordeum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inbreeding index, gene flow values and cluster analysis revealed also significant differentiation between all populations. Gene flow decreased rapidly as the geographic distance increased. This may imply that seed exchange between farmers was limited to a regional scale. The lower correlation between the Euclidean ...

  15. Genetic variation and population structure in Oryza ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetically isolated smaller populations and a narrow genetic base in O. malampuzhaensis point to its vulnerability to genetic drift and genetic depauperation. Thus O. malampuzhaensis appears to be under the threat of extinction and needs to be conserved by use of suitable methods. The present study also identified ...

  16. Molecular variation in population structure of Xanthomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam) is the causal agent of cassava bacterial blight (CBB) in all cassava growing areas of the world. To develop an efficient disease management strategy, the genetic diversity of the pathogens population ought to be known. Information is scarce on the genetic diversity of Xam ...

  17. Modeling evolutionary games in populations with demographic structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Giaimo, Stefano; Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Classic life history models are often based on optimization algorithms, focusing on the adaptation of survival and reproduction to the environment, while neglecting frequency dependent interactions in the population. Evolutionary game theory, on the other hand, studies frequency dependent strategy...... interactions, but usually omits life history and the demographic structure of the population. Here we show how an integration of both aspects can substantially alter the underlying evolutionary dynamics. We study the replicator dynamics of strategy interactions in life stage structured populations. Individuals...

  18. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  19. Stability patterns for a size-structured population model and its stage-structured counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Pedersen, Michael; Lin, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare a general size-structured population model, where a size-structured consumer feeds upon an unstructured resource, to its simplified stage-structured counterpart in terms of equilibrium stability. Stability of the size-structured model is understood in terms of an equivale...... to the population level....

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure in Meconopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... genetic structure of M. quintuplinervia has probably been shaped by its breeding modes, biogeographic history and human impact ... Key words: Meconopsis quintuplinervia Regel, genetic diversity, random amplified polymorphic DNA markers, ..... inbreeding depression and facilitate quality control of drug.

  1. Population structure and genetic diversity of native and invasive populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Zhao

    Full Text Available AIMS: We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1 determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2 explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3 investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China. METHODS: We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China. IMPORTANT FINDINGS: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS or population differentiation (F ST. Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

  2. How population structure shapes neighborhood segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth E

    2014-03-01

    This study provides a framework for understanding how population composition conditions the relationship between individuals' choices about group affiliation and aggregate patterns of social separation or integration. The substantive focus is the role of income inequality in racial residential segregation. The author identifies three population parameters--between-group inequality, within-group inequality, and relative group size--that determine how income inequality between race groups affects racial segregation. She uses data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate models of individual-level residential mobility and incorporates these estimates into agent-based models. She then simulates segregation dynamics under alternative assumptions about (1) the relative size of minority groups and (2) the degree of correlation between race and income among individuals. The author finds that income inequality can have offsetting effects at the high and low ends of the income distribution. She demonstrates the empirical relevance of the simulation results using fixed-effects, metro-level regressions applied to 1980-2000 U.S. census data.

  3. Population structure analysis using rare and common functional variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Lili

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Next-generation sequencing technologies now make it possible to genotype and measure hundreds of thousands of rare genetic variations in individuals across the genome. Characterization of high-density genetic variation facilitates control of population genetic structure on a finer scale before large-scale genotyping in disease genetics studies. Population structure is a well-known, prevalent, and important factor in common variant genetic studies, but its relevance in rare variants is unclear. We perform an extensive population structure analysis using common and rare functional variants from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 mini-exome sequence. The analysis based on common functional variants required 388 principal components to account for 90% of the variation in population structure. However, an analysis based on rare variants required 532 significant principal components to account for similar levels of variation. Using rare variants, we detected fine-scale substructure beyond the population structure identified using common functional variants. Our results show that the level of population structure embedded in rare variant data is different from the level embedded in common variant data and that correcting for population structure is only as good as the level one wishes to correct.

  4. Earthworm ecology affects the population structure of their Verminephrobacter symbionts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macedo Viana, Flavia Daniela; Jensen, Christopher Erik; Macey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    from two contrasting ecological types of earthworm hosts: the high population density, fast reproducing compost worms, Eisenia andrei and E. fetida, and the low-density, slow reproducing Aporrectodea tuberculata, commonly found in garden soils; for both types, three distinct populations were...... across host individuals from the same population. Thus, host ecology shapes the population structure of the Verminephrobacter symbionts. The homogeneous symbiont populations in the compost worms indicate that Verminephrobacter can be transferred bi-parentally or via leaky horizontal transmission in high....... Although several studies have addressed the Verminephrobacter diversity between worm species, the intra-species diversity of the symbiont population has never been investigated. To address symbiont population structure, we used a multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) approach on Verminephrobacter isolated...

  5. Evolution of extortion in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-02-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionarily stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importance of coarsening, checkerboard ordering, and best response updating in evolutionary games.

  6. Evolution of extortion in structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionary stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals new counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importan...

  7. Population structure and adaptation in fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten

    Marine fishes represent a valuable resource for the global economy and food consumption. Accordingly, many species experience high levels of exploitation necessitating effective management plans. However, long term sustainability may be jeopardized from insufficient knowledge about intra-specific......Marine fishes represent a valuable resource for the global economy and food consumption. Accordingly, many species experience high levels of exploitation necessitating effective management plans. However, long term sustainability may be jeopardized from insufficient knowledge about intra...... genome-scan based investigation of local adaptation was conducted in the salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss. Despite profound socio-economic importance many populations have experienced strong declines and future conservation can be improved from identification of key environmental parameters and genes...

  8. HOW POPULATION STRUCTURE SHAPES NEIGHBORHOOD SEGREGATION*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how choices about social affiliation based on one attribute can exacerbate or attenuate segregation on another correlated attribute. The specific application is the role of racial and economic factors in generating patterns of racial residential segregation. I identify three population parameters—between-group inequality, within-group inequality, and relative group size—that determine how income inequality between race groups affects racial segregation. I use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to estimate models of individual-level residential mobility, and incorporate these estimates into agent-based models. I then simulate segregation dynamics under alternative assumptions about: (1) the relative size of minority groups; and (2) the degree of correlation between race and income among individuals. I find that income inequality can have offsetting effects at the high and low ends of the income distribution. I demonstrate the empirical relevance of the simulation results using fixed-effects, metro-level regressions applied to 1980-2000 U.S. Census data. PMID:25009360

  9. Human population structure detection via multilocus genotype clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starmer Joshua

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe a hierarchical clustering algorithm for using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genetic data to assign individuals to populations. The method does not assume Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage equilibrium among loci in sample population individuals. Results We show that the algorithm can assign sample individuals highly accurately to their corresponding ethnic groups in our tests using HapMap SNP data and it is also robust to admixed populations when tested with Perlegen SNP data. Moreover, it can detect fine-scale population structure as subtle as that between Chinese and Japanese by using genome-wide high-diversity SNP loci. Conclusion The algorithm provides an alternative approach to the popular STRUCTURE program, especially for fine-scale population structure detection in genome-wide association studies. This is the first successful separation of Chinese and Japanese samples using random SNP loci with high statistical support.

  10. In-Situ Measurements of HCN and CH3CN In the Pacific Troposphere: Sources, Sinks, and Comparisons with Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Viezee, W.; Jacob, D.; Blake, D.; Sachse, G.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new capillary gas chromatographic method using a Reduction Gas Detector was developed to measure HCN and CH3CN in the remote troposphere. This instrumental configuration was deployed for the very first time in the Trace-P field mission performed during the spring of 2001. The NASA DC-8 aircraft afforded an opportunity to measure HCN and CH3CN in polluted and pristine environments over the Pacific to a maximum altitude of 12 km. These are some of the first in situ measurements of the distribution of HCN and CH3CN over the Pacific. Large background concentrations of both nitriles were found to be present and significant variability was observed. The abundance of HCN and CH3CN was strongly impacted by outflow of pollution from Asia. In general there appeared to be a direct but nonlinear relationship between the mixing ratios of HCN and CH3CN. The vertical structure of these chemicals shows direct evidence of the presence of a significant oceanic sink. These observations will be compared with the column content HCN data from satellites and other available measurements. A large body of data have been collected and are being analyzed, both statistically and with the help of models, to better understand the sources and sinks of these nitriles. These results will be presented.

  11. A general modeling framework for describing spatially structured population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Christine; Fryxell, John; Bieri, Joanna; Federico, Paula; Earl, Julia; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady; Flockhart, Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Diffendorfer, James E.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Erickson, Richard A.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Variation in movement across time and space fundamentally shapes the abundance and distribution of populations. Although a variety of approaches model structured population dynamics, they are limited to specific types of spatially structured populations and lack a unifying framework. Here, we propose a unified network-based framework sufficiently novel in its flexibility to capture a wide variety of spatiotemporal processes including metapopulations and a range of migratory patterns. It can accommodate different kinds of age structures, forms of population growth, dispersal, nomadism and migration, and alternative life-history strategies. Our objective was to link three general elements common to all spatially structured populations (space, time and movement) under a single mathematical framework. To do this, we adopt a network modeling approach. The spatial structure of a population is represented by a weighted and directed network. Each node and each edge has a set of attributes which vary through time. The dynamics of our network-based population is modeled with discrete time steps. Using both theoretical and real-world examples, we show how common elements recur across species with disparate movement strategies and how they can be combined under a unified mathematical framework. We illustrate how metapopulations, various migratory patterns, and nomadism can be represented with this modeling approach. We also apply our network-based framework to four organisms spanning a wide range of life histories, movement patterns, and carrying capacities. General computer code to implement our framework is provided, which can be applied to almost any spatially structured population. This framework contributes to our theoretical understanding of population dynamics and has practical management applications, including understanding the impact of perturbations on population size, distribution, and movement patterns. By working within a common framework, there is less chance

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of leaf-nosed bat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation and population structure of the leaf-nosed bat Hipposideros speoris were estimated using 16S rRNA sequence and microsatellite analysis. Twenty seven distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were identified from 186 individuals, sampled from eleven populations. FST test revealed significant variations ...

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of Caragana microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caragana microphylla Lam. is a long-lived shrub species in the semi-arid, arid and desert regions. To determine the genetic diversity and population structure of C. microphylla Lam., 17 wild populations from the central and eastern part of Inner Mongolia were analyzed by inter-simple sequence repeat. 18 primers produced ...

  14. Population densities and community structure of birds in riverine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population density and community structure of birds were studied at three sites in riverine forest in the lowveld of Swaziland. Birds were surveyed monthly using a standard point count technique. A total of 101 species of birds was recorded. Species richness at the three sites ranged between 70–76 species. Population ...

  15. Ecological factors influence population genetic structure of European grey wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilot, Malgorzata; Jedrzejewski, Wlodzimierz; Branicki, Wojciech; Sidorovich, Vadim E; Jedrzejewska, Bogumila; Stachura, Krystyna; Funk, Stephan M

    2006-12-01

    Although the mechanisms controlling gene flow among populations are particularly important for evolutionary processes, they are still poorly understood, especially in the case of large carnivoran mammals with extensive continuous distributions. We studied the question of factors affecting population genetic structure in the grey wolf, Canis lupus, one of the most mobile terrestrial carnivores. We analysed variability in mitochondrial DNA and 14 microsatellite loci for a sample of 643 individuals from 59 localities representing most of the continuous wolf range in Eastern Europe. We tested an array of geographical, historical and ecological factors to check whether they may explain genetic differentiation among local wolf populations. We showed that wolf populations in Eastern Europe displayed nonrandom spatial genetic structure in the absence of obvious physical barriers to movement. Neither topographic barriers nor past fragmentation could explain spatial genetic structure. However, we found that the genetic differentiation among local populations was correlated with climate, habitat types, and wolf diet composition. This result shows that ecological processes may strongly influence the amount of gene flow among populations. We suggest natal-habitat-biased dispersal as an underlying mechanism linking population ecology with population genetic structure.

  16. Influence of mouth status on population structure of southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atherina breviceps, however, displayed multiple modal peaks in its combined population distribution, suggesting a greater influence of mouth condition on its population structure. Retrospective analyses of the various cohorts for A. breviceps identified peaks in recruitment/abundance during summer, coinciding with ...

  17. Genetic structure of West Greenland populations of lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Elsa Garcia; Olsen, M.; Hedeholm, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 11 microsatellite markers were used to determine the structure of West Greenlandic lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus populations across six spawning locations spanning >1500 km and compared with neighbouring populations in Canada and Iceland. To evaluate whether data allow for identifica...

  18. Population structure and expansion of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    Afr. J. Biotechnol. Palumbi SR, Baker Cs (1994). Contrasting population structure from nuclear intron sequences and mtDNA of humpback whales. Mol. Biol. Evol. 11:426-435. Rogers AR, Harpending H (1992). Population growth makes waves in the distribution of pairwise genetic differences. Mol. Biol. Evol. 9: 552-569.

  19. Genetic variation and population structure in native Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijia Wang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians--signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1 a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2 a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3 a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4 a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas.

  20. Variation in population structure and life-history parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size and age structures, sex ratio, size- and age-at-sex-change, growth and mortality rate of the protogynous hermaphrodite, steentjie Spondyliosoma emarginatum, were compared to determine the effects on population structure and life-history parameters of exploitation (comparing an unexploited reserve and an ...

  1. Population structure and expansion of kuruma shrimp ( Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neighbor-joining tree and network of all alleles showed no significant genealogical structure. Analyses of molecular variance and FST also revealed no significant genetic structure among five populations, but the FST value between ECS and ETS was significant. Fu's F statistics and analysis of mismatch distribution for ...

  2. Competition in size-structured populations: mechanisms inducing cohort formation and population cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roos, A.M.; Persson, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the consequences of size-dependent competition among the individuals of a consumer population by analyzing the dynamic properties of a physiologically structured population model. Only 2 size-classes of individuals are distinguished: juveniles and adults. Juveniles and

  3. A test of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2011-11-01

    Testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is used routinely as an important initial step for genotype data quality checking. Departure from HWE can be caused by many factors, such as genotyping errors, population stratification, and disease association, if we use affected individuals only. In a structured population, even if a marker is in HWE in each subpopulation, data may show departure from HWE if allele frequencies are different in different subpopulations and such a departure can be misinterpreted as a potential problem in genotyping quality, resulting in false exclusion from future analysis. In this article, we propose a new HWE test, a test for HWE in structured populations (HWES) that can assess departure from HWE and take into account of population stratification at the same time. Our proposed test can distinguish departure from HWE caused by population stratification and departure from HWE caused by other factors. We use simulation studies as well as applications to real data sets to evaluate the performance of the proposed test. Results show that, for a wide range of population structures, our proposed test has correct type I error rates while the traditional χ(2) test will lead to false-positive results. In homogenous populations, our proposed test has comparable power with the traditional χ(2) test. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparative population structure of cavity-nesting sea ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John M.; Eadie, John M.; Savard, Jean-Pierre L.; Christensen, Thomas K.; Berdeen, James; Taylor, Eric J.; Boyd, Sean; Einarsson, Árni

    2014-01-01

    A growing collection of mtDNA genetic information from waterfowl species across North America suggests that larger-bodied cavity-nesting species exhibit greater levels of population differentiation than smaller-bodied congeners. Although little is known about nest-cavity availability for these species, one hypothesis to explain differences in population structure is reduced dispersal tendency of larger-bodied cavity-nesting species due to limited abundance of large cavities. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined population structure of three cavity-nesting waterfowl species distributed across much of North America: Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica), Common Goldeneye (B. clangula), and Bufflehead (B. albeola). We compared patterns of population structure using both variation in mtDNA control-region sequences and band-recovery data for the same species and geographic regions. Results were highly congruent between data types, showing structured population patterns for Barrow's and Common Goldeneye but not for Bufflehead. Consistent with our prediction, the smallest cavity-nesting species, the Bufflehead, exhibited the lowest level of population differentiation due to increased dispersal and gene flow. Results provide evidence for discrete Old and New World populations of Common Goldeneye and for differentiation of regional groups of both goldeneye species in Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, and the eastern coast of North America. Results presented here will aid management objectives that require an understanding of population delineation and migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering areas. Comparative studies such as this one highlight factors that may drive patterns of genetic diversity and population trends.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure in contemporary house sparrow populations along an urbanization gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangestel, C; Mergeay, J; Dawson, D A; Callens, T; Vandomme, V; Lens, L

    2012-09-01

    House sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations have suffered major declines in urban as well as rural areas, while remaining relatively stable in suburban ones. Yet, to date no exhaustive attempt has been made to examine how, and to what extent, spatial variation in population demography is reflected in genetic population structuring along contemporary urbanization gradients. Here we use putatively neutral microsatellite loci to study if and how genetic variation can be partitioned in a hierarchical way among different urbanization classes. Principal coordinate analyses did not support the hypothesis that urban/suburban and rural populations comprise two distinct genetic clusters. Comparison of FST values at different hierarchical scales revealed drift as an important force of population differentiation. Redundancy analyses revealed that genetic structure was strongly affected by both spatial variation and level of urbanization. The results shown here can be used as baseline information for future genetic monitoring programmes and provide additional insights into contemporary house sparrow dynamics along urbanization gradients.

  6. Different perceptions of social dilemmas: Evolutionary multigames in structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Perc, Matjaz

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the fact that the same social dilemma can be perceived differently by different players, we here study evolutionary multigames in structured populations. While the core game is the weak prisoner's dilemma, a fraction of the population adopts either a positive or a negative value of the sucker's payoff, thus playing either the traditional prisoner's dilemma or the snowdrift game. We show that the higher the fraction of the population adopting a different payoff matrix, the more the evolution of cooperation is promoted. The microscopic mechanism responsible for this outcome is unique to structured populations, and it is due to the payoff heterogeneity, which spontaneously introduces strong cooperative leaders that give rise to an asymmetric strategy imitation flow in favor of cooperation. We demonstrate that the reported evolutionary outcomes are robust against variations of the interaction network, and they also remain valid if players are allowed to vary which game they play over time. These resu...

  7. Landscape, population structure and genetic diversity of Stomoxys calcitrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouli Aymes, N; Mavoungou, J F; De Stordeur, E; Duvallet, G

    2009-03-01

    To investigate whether different landscapes could affect genetic diversity and structure of the cosmopolitan diptera Stomoxys calcitrans, populations from Gabon and southern France were studied using dominant amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Gabon is characterized by a forested closed landscape, and southern France by an open Mediterranean landscape. The genetic diversity between Gabon and France populations did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Contrary to our expectation, this study shows a moderate level of genetic differentiation between these two distant countries (Fst = 0.0979) and a low genetic structure among Gabonese and French populations (Fst = 0.0291 and 0.0275 respectively). This result could indicate the capacities of S. calcitrans populations to sustain a high level of gene flow, despite geographic distance and isolation.

  8. Population genetic structure in natural and reintroduced beaver (Castor fiber populations in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautenburger, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758 is the only indigenous species of the genus Castor in Europe and Asia. Due to extensive hunting until the beginning of the 20th century, the distribution of the formerly widespread Eurasian beaver was dramatically reduced. Only a few populations remained and these were in isolated locations, such as the region of the German Elbe River. The loss of genetic diversity in small or captive populations throughgenetic drift and inbreeding is a severe conservation problem. However, the reintroduction of beaver populations from several regions in Europe has shown high viability and populations today are growing fast. In the present study we analysed the population genetic structure of a natural and two reintroduced beaver populations in Germany and Austria. Furthermore, we studied the genetic differentiation between two beaver species, C. fiber and the American beaver (C. canadensis, using RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA as a genetic marker. The reintroduced beaver populations of different origins and the autochthonous population of the Elbe River showed a similar low genetic heterogeneity. There was an overall high genetic similarity in the species C. fiber, and no evidence was found for a clear subspecific structure in the populations studied.

  9. Functional and component structure of the population trading service system

    OpenAIRE

    Кобилін, П. О.

    2017-01-01

    Formulation the problem. Over the past decade the system of population trading service has seen substantial qualitative changes, particularly the ownership form of retail, restaurant business institutions changed, the range of products expanded, new types of stores, forms of trade (supermarkets, hypermarkets, shopping malls, internet commerce, vending machines etc.) appeared. These changes affect the functional and component structure of population trading service system that has become more ...

  10. Special features of modern transformation of social structure Ukraines population

    OpenAIRE

    Mandubura, V.; Batagok, S.

    2010-01-01

    Issues of social structure of population of Ukraine are described. Reasons and problems concerning large-ranged marginalization of inhabitants of Ukraine are disclosed problems of improvement of methodological approach to structurising the spectrum of displays of marginal and polymarginal condition of population are revealed. A category underclass is defined and impact of marginalization on social and economical stability in context of subseguent development of society is disclosed.

  11. Stochastic simulation of structured skin cell population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-03-01

    The epidermis is the outmost skin tissue. It operates as a first defense system to process inflammatory signals and responds by producing inflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of immune cells. Various skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis occur as a result of the defect of proper skin barrier function and successive impaired inflammatory responses. The onset of such a skin disease links to the disturbed epidermal homeostasis regulated by appropriate self-renewal and differentiation of epidermal stem cells. The theory of physiologically structured population models provides a versatile framework to formulate mathematical models which describe the growth dynamics of a cell population such as the epidermis. In this paper, we develop an algorithm to implement stochastic simulation for a class of physiologically structured population models. We demonstrate that the developed algorithm is applicable to several cell population models and typical age-structured population models. On the basis of the developed algorithm, we investigate stochastic dynamics of skin cell populations and spread of inflammation. It is revealed that demographic stochasticity can bring considerable impact on the outcome of inflammation spread at the tissue level.

  12. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  13. Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Savage, Patrick E; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Stoneking, Mark; Ko, Ying-Chin; Loo, Jun-Hun; Trejaut, Jean A

    2014-01-07

    We present, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence that music and genes may have coevolved by demonstrating significant correlations between traditional group-level folk songs and mitochondrial DNA variation among nine indigenous populations of Taiwan. These correlations were of comparable magnitude to those between language and genes for the same populations, although music and language were not significantly correlated with one another. An examination of population structure for genetics showed stronger parallels to music than to language. Overall, the results suggest that music might have a sufficient time-depth to retrace ancient population movements and, additionally, that it might be capturing different aspects of population history than language. Music may therefore have the potential to serve as a novel marker of human migrations to complement genes, language and other markers.

  14. Population structure of larch forests in the Urals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putenikhin, V.P.; Farukshina, G.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa (Russian Federation). Botanical Garden Inst.

    1995-12-31

    The variability and population structure of larch (Larix sukaczewii Dyl.) naturally growing in the Urals was studied on the basis of biometric analysis of generative organs. The obtained results point to the existence of 11 phenotypically different local populations of Larix sukaczewii in the Urals. Four populations are identified in the South Urals: Marginal, central, high-mountainous, south-uralian and Bashkircis-uralian. Middle-uralian, Perm cis-uralian, central north-uralian and high-mountainous north-uralian populations are determined in the Middle and the North Urals. Three populations of Larix sukaczewii are identified in the Sub-Polar and the Polar Urals: Subpolar-uralian, Pechora-Thiman cisuralian and polar-uralian. 8 refs, 2 tabs

  15. Evolutionary genomics and population structure of Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis caused by the gastrointestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica has diverse disease outcomes. Study of genome and evolution of this fascinating parasite will help us to understand the basis of its virulence and explain why, when and how it causes diseases. In this review, we have summarized current knowledge regarding evolutionary genomics of E. histolytica and discussed their association with parasite phenotypes and its differential pathogenic behavior. How genetic diversity reveals parasite population structure has also been discussed. Queries concerning their evolution and population structure which were required to be addressed have also been highlighted. This significantly large amount of genomic data will improve our knowledge about this pathogenic species of Entamoeba. PMID:25505504

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Ethiopian Sheep Populations Revealed by High-Density SNP Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edea, Zewdu; Dessie, Tadelle; Dadi, Hailu; Do, Kyoung-Tag; Kim, Kwan-Suk

    2017-01-01

    Sheep in Ethiopia are adapted to a wide range of environments, including extreme habitats. Elucidating their genetic diversity is critical for improving breeding strategies and mapping quantitative trait loci associated with productivity. To this end, the present study investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of five Ethiopian sheep populations exhibiting distinct phenotypes and sampled from distinct production environments, including arid lowlands and highlands. To investigate the genetic relationships in greater detail and infer population structure of Ethiopian sheep breeds at the continental and global levels, we analyzed genotypic data of selected sheep breeds from the Ovine SNP50K HapMap dataset. All Ethiopian sheep samples were genotyped with Ovine Infinium HD SNP BeadChip (600K). Mean genetic diversity ranged from 0.29 in Arsi-Bale to 0.32 in Menz sheep, while estimates of genetic differentiation among populations ranged from 0.02 to 0.07, indicating low to moderate differentiation. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that 94.62 and 5.38% of the genetic variation was attributable to differences within and among populations, respectively. Our population structure analysis revealed clustering of five Ethiopian sheep populations according to tail phenotype and geographic origin-i.e., short fat-tailed (very cool high-altitude), long fat-tailed (mid to high-altitude), and fat-rumped (arid low-altitude), with clear evidence of admixture between long fat-tailed populations. North African sheep breeds showed higher levels of within-breed diversity, but were less differentiated than breeds from Eastern and Southern Africa. When African breeds were grouped according to geographic origin (North, South, and East), statistically significant differences were detected among groups (regions). A comparison of population structure between Ethiopian and global sheep breeds showed that fat-tailed breeds from Eastern and Southern Africa clustered

  17. Recombination hotspots and population structure in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jianbing; Awadalla, Philip; Duan, Junhui; McGee, Kate M; Joy, Deirdre A; McVean, Gilean A T; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2005-10-01

    Understanding the influences of population structure, selection, and recombination on polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD) is integral to mapping genes contributing to drug resistance or virulence in Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite's short generation time, coupled with a high cross-over rate, can cause rapid LD break-down. However, observations of low genetic variation have led to suggestions of effective clonality: selfing, population admixture, and selection may preserve LD in populations. Indeed, extensive LD surrounding drug-resistant genes has been observed, indicating that recombination and selection play important roles in shaping recent parasite genome evolution. These studies, however, provide only limited information about haplotype variation at local scales. Here we describe the first (to our knowledge) chromosome-wide SNP haplotype and population recombination maps for a global collection of malaria parasites, including the 3D7 isolate, whose genome has been sequenced previously. The parasites are clustered according to continental origin, but alternative groupings were obtained using SNPs at 37 putative transporter genes that are potentially under selection. Geographic isolation and highly variable multiple infection rates are the major factors affecting haplotype structure. Variation in effective recombination rates is high, both among populations and along the chromosome, with recombination hotspots conserved among populations at chromosome ends. This study supports the feasibility of genome-wide association studies in some parasite populations.

  18. Recombination hotspots and population structure in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbing Mu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the influences of population structure, selection, and recombination on polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD is integral to mapping genes contributing to drug resistance or virulence in Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite's short generation time, coupled with a high cross-over rate, can cause rapid LD break-down. However, observations of low genetic variation have led to suggestions of effective clonality: selfing, population admixture, and selection may preserve LD in populations. Indeed, extensive LD surrounding drug-resistant genes has been observed, indicating that recombination and selection play important roles in shaping recent parasite genome evolution. These studies, however, provide only limited information about haplotype variation at local scales. Here we describe the first (to our knowledge chromosome-wide SNP haplotype and population recombination maps for a global collection of malaria parasites, including the 3D7 isolate, whose genome has been sequenced previously. The parasites are clustered according to continental origin, but alternative groupings were obtained using SNPs at 37 putative transporter genes that are potentially under selection. Geographic isolation and highly variable multiple infection rates are the major factors affecting haplotype structure. Variation in effective recombination rates is high, both among populations and along the chromosome, with recombination hotspots conserved among populations at chromosome ends. This study supports the feasibility of genome-wide association studies in some parasite populations.

  19. Genetic population structure of Tectura paleacea: implications for the mechanisms regulating population structure in patchy coastal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovic, Emina; Lindberg, David R

    2011-04-07

    The seagrass limpet Tectura paleacea (Gastropoda; Patellogastropoda) belongs to a seagrass obligate lineage that has shifted from the Caribbean in the late Miocene, across the Isthmus of Panama prior to the closing of the Panamanian seaway, and then northward to its modern Baja California - Oregon distribution. To address whether larval entrainment by seagrass beds contributes to population structuring, populations were sampled at six California/Oregon localities approximately 2 degrees latitude apart during two post-settlement periods in July 2002 and June 2003. Partial cytochrome oxidase b (Cytb) sequences were obtained from 20 individuals (10 per year) from each population in order to determine the levels of population subdivision/connectivity. From the 120 individuals sequenced, there were eighty-one unique haplotypes, with the greatest haplotype diversity occurring in southern populations. The only significant genetic break detected was consistent with a peri-Point Conception (PPC) biogeographic boundary while populations north and south of Point Conception were each panmictic. The data further indicate that populations found south of the PPC biogeographic boundary originated from northern populations. This pattern of population structure suggests that seagrass patches are not entraining the larvae of T. paleacea by altering flow regimes within their environment; a process hypothesized to produce extensive genetic subdivision on fine geographic scales. In contrast to the haplotype data, morphological patterns vary significantly over very fine geographic scales that are inconsistent with the observed patterns of genetic population structure, indicating that morphological variation in T. paleacea might be attributed to differential ecophenotypic expression in response to local habitat variability throughout its distribution. These results suggest that highly localized conservation efforts may not be as effective as large-scale conservation efforts in near shore

  20. Genetic population structure of Tectura paleacea: implications for the mechanisms regulating population structure in patchy coastal habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emina Begovic

    Full Text Available The seagrass limpet Tectura paleacea (Gastropoda; Patellogastropoda belongs to a seagrass obligate lineage that has shifted from the Caribbean in the late Miocene, across the Isthmus of Panama prior to the closing of the Panamanian seaway, and then northward to its modern Baja California - Oregon distribution. To address whether larval entrainment by seagrass beds contributes to population structuring, populations were sampled at six California/Oregon localities approximately 2 degrees latitude apart during two post-settlement periods in July 2002 and June 2003. Partial cytochrome oxidase b (Cytb sequences were obtained from 20 individuals (10 per year from each population in order to determine the levels of population subdivision/connectivity. From the 120 individuals sequenced, there were eighty-one unique haplotypes, with the greatest haplotype diversity occurring in southern populations. The only significant genetic break detected was consistent with a peri-Point Conception (PPC biogeographic boundary while populations north and south of Point Conception were each panmictic. The data further indicate that populations found south of the PPC biogeographic boundary originated from northern populations. This pattern of population structure suggests that seagrass patches are not entraining the larvae of T. paleacea by altering flow regimes within their environment; a process hypothesized to produce extensive genetic subdivision on fine geographic scales. In contrast to the haplotype data, morphological patterns vary significantly over very fine geographic scales that are inconsistent with the observed patterns of genetic population structure, indicating that morphological variation in T. paleacea might be attributed to differential ecophenotypic expression in response to local habitat variability throughout its distribution. These results suggest that highly localized conservation efforts may not be as effective as large-scale conservation

  1. Detailed genetic structure of European bitterling populations in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Bartáková

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus is a small cyprinid fish whose populations declined markedly between 1950 and 1980. However, its range currently expands, partly due to human-assisted introductions. We determined the genetic variability and detailed spatial structure among bitterling populations in Central Europe and tested alternative hypotheses about colonization of this area. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci on a large sample of 688 individuals had been used to analyse genetic variability and population structure. Samples originated from 27 localities with emphasis on area of the Czech Republic where three major sea drainages (Black, Baltic, and Northern Sea meet. Highly variable level of intrapopulation genetic variability had generally been detected and a recent decrease in numbers (“bottleneck” had been indicated by genetic data among six populations. High level of interpopulation differentiation was identified even within the basins. There was a significant role of genetic drift and indications of low dispersal ability of R. amarus. Surprisingly, the Odra River was inhabited by two distinct populations without any genetic signatures of a secondary contact. Czech part of the Odra (Baltic basin was colonized from the Danubian refugium (similarly to adjacent Danubian basin rivers including the Morava, while Polish part of the Odra was genetically similar to the populations in the Vistula River (Baltic basin, that has been colonized by a different (Eastern phylogeographic lineage of R. amarus. Most Czech R. amarus populations were colonized from the Danubian refugium, suggesting potential for a human-mediated colonization of the Odra or Elbe Rivers by R. amarus. One Elbe basin population was genetically mixed from the two (Danubian and Eastern phylogeographic lineages. In general the Czech populations of R. amarus were genetically stable except for a single population which has probably been recently introduced. This research

  2. Genetic structure in four West African population groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guanjie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Africa contains the most genetically divergent group of continental populations and several studies have reported that African populations show a high degree of population stratification. In this regard, it is important to investigate the potential for population genetic structure or stratification in genetic epidemiology studies involving multiple African populations. The presences of genetic sub-structure, if not properly accounted for, have been reported to lead to spurious association between a putative risk allele and a disease. Within the context of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM Study (a genetic epidemiologic study of type 2 diabetes mellitus in West Africa, we have investigated population structure or stratification in four ethnic groups in two countries (Akan and Gaa-Adangbe from Ghana, Yoruba and Igbo from Nigeria using data from 372 autosomal microsatellite loci typed in 493 unrelated persons (986 chromosomes. Results There was no significant population genetic structure in the overall sample. The smallest probability is associated with an inferred cluster of 1 and little of the posterior probability is associated with a higher number of inferred clusters. The distribution of members of the sample to inferred clusters is consistent with this finding; roughly the same proportion of individuals from each group is assigned to each cluster with little variation between the ethnic groups. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed that the between-population component of genetic variance is less than 0.1% in contrast to 99.91% for the within population component. Pair-wise genetic distances between the four ethnic groups were also very similar. Nonetheless, the small between-population genetic variance was sufficient to distinguish the two Ghanaian groups from the two Nigerian groups. Conclusion There was little evidence for significant population substructure in the four major West African ethnic groups

  3. Ethnicity and population structure in personal naming networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Mateos

    Full Text Available Personal naming practices exist in all human groups and are far from random. Rather, they continue to reflect social norms and ethno-cultural customs that have developed over generations. As a consequence, contemporary name frequency distributions retain distinct geographic, social and ethno-cultural patterning that can be exploited to understand population structure in human biology, public health and social science. Previous attempts to detect and delineate such structure in large populations have entailed extensive empirical analysis of naming conventions in different parts of the world without seeking any general or automated methods of population classification by ethno-cultural origin. Here we show how 'naming networks', constructed from forename-surname pairs of a large sample of the contemporary human population in 17 countries, provide a valuable representation of cultural, ethnic and linguistic population structure around the world. This innovative approach enriches and adds value to automated population classification through conventional national data sources such as telephone directories and electoral registers. The method identifies clear social and ethno-cultural clusters in such naming networks that extend far beyond the geographic areas in which particular names originated, and that are preserved even after international migration. Moreover, one of the most striking findings of this approach is that these clusters simply 'emerge' from the aggregation of millions of individual decisions on parental naming practices for their children, without any prior knowledge introduced by the researcher. Our probabilistic approach to community assignment, both at city level as well as at a global scale, helps to reveal the degree of isolation, integration or overlap between human populations in our rapidly globalising world. As such, this work has important implications for research in population genetics, public health, and social science

  4. Ethnicity and population structure in personal naming networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Pablo; Longley, Paul A; O'Sullivan, David

    2011-01-01

    Personal naming practices exist in all human groups and are far from random. Rather, they continue to reflect social norms and ethno-cultural customs that have developed over generations. As a consequence, contemporary name frequency distributions retain distinct geographic, social and ethno-cultural patterning that can be exploited to understand population structure in human biology, public health and social science. Previous attempts to detect and delineate such structure in large populations have entailed extensive empirical analysis of naming conventions in different parts of the world without seeking any general or automated methods of population classification by ethno-cultural origin. Here we show how 'naming networks', constructed from forename-surname pairs of a large sample of the contemporary human population in 17 countries, provide a valuable representation of cultural, ethnic and linguistic population structure around the world. This innovative approach enriches and adds value to automated population classification through conventional national data sources such as telephone directories and electoral registers. The method identifies clear social and ethno-cultural clusters in such naming networks that extend far beyond the geographic areas in which particular names originated, and that are preserved even after international migration. Moreover, one of the most striking findings of this approach is that these clusters simply 'emerge' from the aggregation of millions of individual decisions on parental naming practices for their children, without any prior knowledge introduced by the researcher. Our probabilistic approach to community assignment, both at city level as well as at a global scale, helps to reveal the degree of isolation, integration or overlap between human populations in our rapidly globalising world. As such, this work has important implications for research in population genetics, public health, and social science adding new

  5. Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the management of marine ecosystems in the Mediterranean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent; Dubois, Mélodie; Ser-Giacomi, Enrico; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    A major challenge in marine ecology is to describe properly larval dispersal and marine connectivity since they structure marine populations and are thus crucial criteria to design Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Focusing on larval dispersal by ocean currents in the entire Mediterranean Sea, I present a new approach coupling Lagrangian modeling and Network Theory tools to characterize broad-scale connectivity of marine populations. The Mediterranean basin is subdivided into an ensemble of sub-regions that are interconnected through oceanic transport. Passive larvae of different pelagic durations and seasons are advected in a simulated surface flow from which a network of connected areas is constructed. First, the global analysis of the transport network using a community detection algorithm enables the extraction of hydrodynamical provinces which are delimited by frontiers matching multiscale oceanographic features. By examining the repeated occurrence of such boundaries, we identify the spatial scales and geographic structures that control larval dispersal across the entire seascape. We also analyze novel connectivity metrics for the existing marine reserves and we discussed our results in the context of ocean biogeography and MPAs design. Secondly, we studied the local properties of the network with the computation of proxies commonly used in population ecology to measure local retention, self-recruitment and larval sources/sinks. Our results confirmed that retention processes are favored along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic conditions while they are weak in the open ocean. Moreover, we found that divergent (convergent) oceanic zones resulting from Ekman theory are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks). Finally, although these proxies are often studied separately in the literature, we suggest they are inter-related under certain conditions. Their integrated interpretation leads to a better understanding of population dynamics and

  6. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  7. Culture, population structure, and low genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, L S; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-06

    Paleogenomic research has shown that modern humans, Neanderthals, and their most recent common ancestor have displayed less genetic diversity than living great apes. The traditional interpretation that low levels of genetic diversity in modern humans resulted from a relatively recent demographic bottleneck cannot account for similarly low levels of genetic diversity in Middle Pleistocene hominins. A more parsimonious hypothesis proposes that the effective population size of the human lineage has been low for more than 500,000 years, but the mechanism responsible for suppressing genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominin populations without similarly affecting that of their hominoid contemporaries remains unknown. Here we use agent-based simulation to study the effect of culturally mediated migration on neutral genetic diversity in structured populations. We show that, in populations structured by culturally mediated migration, selection can suppress neutral genetic diversity over thousands of generations, even in the absence of bottlenecks or expansions in census population size. In other words, selection could have suppressed the effective population size of Pleistocene hominins for as long as the degree of cultural similarity between regionally differentiated groups played an important role in mediating intraspecific gene flow.

  8. Population structure and inbreeding from pedigree analysis of purebred dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calboli, Federico C F; Sampson, Jeff; Fretwell, Neale; Balding, David J

    2008-05-01

    Dogs are of increasing interest as models for human diseases, and many canine population-association studies are beginning to emerge. The choice of breeds for such studies should be informed by a knowledge of factors such as inbreeding, genetic diversity, and population structure, which are likely to depend on breed-specific selective breeding patterns. To address the lack of such studies we have exploited one of the world's most extensive resources for canine population-genetics studies: the United Kingdom (UK) Kennel Club registration database. We chose 10 representative breeds and analyzed their pedigrees since electronic records were established around 1970, corresponding to about eight generations before present. We find extremely inbred dogs in each breed except the greyhound and estimate an inbreeding effective population size between 40 and 80 for all but 2 breeds. For all but 3 breeds, >90% of unique genetic variants are lost over six generations, indicating a dramatic effect of breeding patterns on genetic diversity. We introduce a novel index Psi for measuring population structure directly from the pedigree and use it to identify subpopulations in several breeds. As well as informing the design of canine population genetics studies, our results have implications for breeding practices to enhance canine welfare.

  9. Two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans show divergent population genetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Ingeborg Bjorvand; Carlsen, Tor; Saetre, Glenn-Peter; Högberg, Nils; Doi, Shuichi; Kauserud, Håvard

    2010-02-01

    The dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans is a devastating basidiomycete occurring in wooden constructions in temperate regions worldwide. In this study, we compare the genetic structures of two invasive populations from Europe and Japan. Microsatellite data from 14 loci and DNA sequences from four loci demonstrated that the two populations were highly differentiated. Significant isolation by distance effect was observed in Europe and Japan. Higher genetic variation was observed within the Japanese population than within the European population, corresponding with the observed higher richness of vegetative compatibility types in Japan, indicating that there has been a higher level of gene flow from the Asian source populations to Japan than to Europe. The European population is genetically more homogenous with only six detected vegetative compatibility types. Various tests indicate that both the European and the Japanese populations have gone through population bottlenecks prior to population expansion. No identical multi-locus genotypes were observed within Japan and very few within Europe, indicating limited clonal dispersal. Deviations from Hardy Weinberg expectations were observed both in Europe and Japan and heterozygote excess were observed at several loci, especially in Europe. Possible explanations for this pattern are discussed.

  10. Comparison of the population structure and life-history parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blacktail seabream Diplodus capensis were sampled from proximate (10 km apart) exploited and unexploited areas in southern Angola to compare their population structures and life-history parameters. Females dominated the larger size and older age classes in the unexploited area. In the exploited area the length and ...

  11. Population genetic structure and demographic history of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small yellow croaker, Larimichthys polyactis (Bleeker, 1877), a commercially important benthopelagic fish, is widely distributed in the Bohai, Yellow and East China Seas. To evaluate the population genetic structure and demographic history of L. polyactis, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid ...

  12. Population genetic structure of coral reef species Plectorhinchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population genetic structure and the dispersal ability of Plectorhinchus flavomaculatus from South China Sea were examined with a 464 bp segment of mtDNA control region. A total of 116 individuals were collected from 12 coral reefs in Xisha, Zhongsha and Nansha archipelagos and 22 haplotypes were obtained.

  13. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism. (AFLP). Ninety-one ... Key words: Small yellow croaker, Larimichthys polyactis, genetic population structure, genetic diversity, AFLP. ... gene mapping, linkage and genetic diversity of species.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of sweet cassava using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population structure was analyzed by means of genetic distances and probabilistic models; allelic frequencies were used in order to assess the genetic diversity indexes (Ht, Ho, PIC, % polymorphism and number of alleles) for each locus studied. All evaluated loci were polymorphic and the average was highly heterozygote ...

  15. Population Genetic Structure and Connectivity of the Abundant Sea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uncontrolled growth of sea urchin populations may have a negative effect on coral reefs, making them barren. To avoid this, different methods of sea urchin reduction have been developed but, without knowledge of their genetic structure and connectivity, these methods may be ineffective. The aim of this study was to ...

  16. Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Genetic diversity, population structure and marker trait associations for seed quality traits in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Ashok Badigannavar and Gerald O. Myers. J. Genet. 94, 87–94. Table 1. List of cotton germplasm lines used in this study. Germplasm no. Cultivar. Region. Germplasm no. Cultivar.

  17. Nonstationary and Chaotic Dynamics in Age-Structured Population Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arild Wikan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics from nonlinear discrete age-structured population models is under consideration. Focus is on bifurcations, as well as nonstationary and chaotic dynamics. We also explore different mechanisms which may lead to periodic phenomena. Some new results are also presented, in particular from models where both fecundity and survival terms contain nonlinear elements.

  18. AFLP analysis on genetic diversity and population structure of small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population genetic structure and diversity of small yellow croaker Larimichthys polyactis in the Bohai Bay, Yellow Sea and East China Sea were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Ninety-one individuals were collected from six locations representing three stocks of small yellow croaker.

  19. Marine reserve effects on population density and size structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine reserves are commonly used to conserve living resources, but their effectiveness where policing is difficult is unclear. We compared monthly population density and size structure data collected over 20 months for two rarely and two commonly exploited intertidal limpets inside and outside reserves in South Africa.

  20. The effect of anthropogenic disturbances on population structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of anthropogenic disturbances on population structure and regeneration of Scorodophloeus fischeri and Manilkara sulcata in coastal forests of Tanzania. ... best in Zaraninge forest with high density of trees with diameter at breast height (DBH) between 10–50cm and a higher seedling density than in other forests.

  1. Population structure of Gibberella xylarioides Heim and Saccas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, population structure of coffee wilt pathogen was studied by cross inoculating 12 accessions with four isolates collected in the four forest sites, namely, Bonga, Berhane-Kontir and Yayu (southwest) and Harenna (southeast) of Ethiopia. A pathogenic isolate 'Gx11' and a moderately resistant coffee cultivar cv. 7440, both ...

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard, Calotes ... These two lineages are separated by mountain ranges, which play an important role as natural barriers blocking gene flow. Our finding reveal at least two cryptic lineages represented in C.

  3. Molecular epidemiology and population structure of bovine Streptococcus uberis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rato, M G; Bexiga, R; Nunes, S F

    2008-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology and population structure of 30 bovine subclinical mastitis field isolates of Streptococcus uberis, collected from 6 Portuguese herds (among 12 farms screened) during 2002 and 2003, were examined by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for clustering of the isol...

  4. Mangrove expansion and population structure at a planted site, East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The expansion of mangroves was measured using past aerial photographs and Esri ArcGIS Desktop 10 software. In addition, field surveys were completed in 2011 to determine the population structure of the present mangrove forest and relate this to environmental conditions. The study showed that mangrove area cover ...

  5. Population structure and genetic trends for indigenous African beef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population structure and genetic trends for indigenous African beef cattle breeds in South Africa. ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... This study has confirmed the benefits of having sufficient pedigree and performance data available for genetic evaluations and application in selection for genetic improvement.

  6. Genetic variation and population structure of willowy flounder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first hypervariable region (HVR-1) of the mitochondrial DNA control region was utilized for determination of genetic variation and population structure in willowy flounder (Tanakius kitaharai) collected from Aomori, Ibaraki and Niigata. A total of 35 haplotypes were detected among 66 individuals with a total of 30 variable ...

  7. Population structure and recruitment of penaeid shrimps in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study characterizes the population structure and identifies nursery areas and recruitment seasons of penaeid shrimps in the Pungué river estuary of Mozambique. Shrimp samples were obtained from 12 trawl stations at monthly intervals during 2004. Six species were found, two of which (Fenneropenaeus indicus and ...

  8. Population genetic structure and cladistic analysis of Trypanosoma brucei isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, E.C.; Clausen, P.H.; Buscher, P.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Pas, te M.F.W.; Claassen, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using a novel multilocus DNA marker analysis method, we studied the population genetic structure of Trypansoma brucei stocks and derived clones isolated from animal and rhodesiense sleeping sickness patients during a national sleeping sickness control program in Mukono district, Uganda. We then

  9. Genetic Identification and Population Structure of Juvenile Mullet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—There is a growing demand for wild caught juvenile fish to supply the market for aquaculture. We investigated the local ... revealed a clear genetic population structure within the sampled fish community with a unique mainland cluster. ...... Genetic connectivity and historical demography of the blue barred parrotfish.

  10. Genetic structure of a population sample of apomictic dandelions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hulst, R.G.M.; Mes, T.H.M.; Falque, M.; Stam, P.; Den Nijs, J.C.M.; Bachmann, K.

    2003-01-01

    In Northern Europe, dandelion populations consist solely of triploid or higher polyploid apomicts. Without a regular sexual cycle or lateral gene transmission, a clonal structure is expected for Taraxacum apomicts, although this was not found by compatibility analysis. In this study, we investigate

  11. Summer distribution, abundance and population structure of illex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution, abundance and population structure of Illex argentinus in relation to oceanographic conditions during summer 1996 were analysed following a research cruise to the Argentine shelf (39°–51°30´S). Squid were distributed over the whole area, but the main concentrations were on the intermediate and outer ...

  12. Short communication Population structure and genetic trends for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-05-23

    May 23, 2016 ... Population structure and genetic trends for indigenous African beef cattle breeds in South Africa ... and performance records of five indigenous African beef cattle breeds (Afrikaner, Boran, Drakensberger,. Nguni and Tuli) in ..... circumference and semen characteristics of Line 1 Hereford bulls. J. Anim. Sci.

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A.

  14. Modeling evolutionary games in populations with demographic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Giaimo, Stefano; Baudisch, Annette; Traulsen, Arne

    2015-09-07

    Classic life history models are often based on optimization algorithms, focusing on the adaptation of survival and reproduction to the environment, while neglecting frequency dependent interactions in the population. Evolutionary game theory, on the other hand, studies frequency dependent strategy interactions, but usually omits life history and the demographic structure of the population. Here we show how an integration of both aspects can substantially alter the underlying evolutionary dynamics. We study the replicator dynamics of strategy interactions in life stage structured populations. Individuals have two basic strategic behaviours, interacting in pairwise games. A player may condition behaviour on the life stage of its own, or that of the opponent, or the matching of life stages between both players. A strategy is thus defined as the set of rules that determines a player׳s life stage dependent behaviours. We show that the diversity of life stage structures and life stage dependent strategies can promote each other, and the stable frequency of basic strategic behaviours can deviate from game equilibrium in populations with life stage structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Advancing environmentally explicit structured population models of plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlén, Johan; Morris, William; von Euler, Tove

    2016-01-01

    as species distributions and abundances. We searched the literature for studies that have linked abiotic and biotic environmental factors to vital rates and, using structured demographic models, population growth rates of plants. We found 136 studies that had examined the environmental drivers of plant...

  16. changes in population structures of the major fish species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the intricacies within these isolated water bodies. The available data so far indicate that the fisheries within satellite lakes are declining (Katunzi and Msuku 2001,. Katunzi and Kishe 2002, Katunzi 2003) while little is known on the ecosystems and population structures. Heavy fishing pressure, free access to the fisheries,.

  17. Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Genetic diversity and population structure of cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L. race latifolium H. ) using microsatellite markers. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Four groups were identified applying different methods (the probabilistic method, Principal Coordinates Analysis and Neighbor Joining tree). American ...

  18. Population structure of Salmonella investigated by amplified fragment length polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpdahl, M.; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) in determining the population structure of Salmonella. Methods and Results: A total of 89 strains were subjected to AFLP analysis using the enzymes BglII and BspDI, a combination...

  19. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  20. Population Genetic Structure of the People of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Zinck, Haley; Musharoff, Shaila; Salit, Jacqueline; Al-Ali, Khalid A.; Chouchane, Lotfi; Gohar, Abeer; Matthews, Rebecca; Butler, Marcus W.; Fuller, Jennifer; Hackett, Neil R.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    People of the Qatar peninsula represent a relatively recent founding by a small number of families from three tribes of the Arabian Peninsula, Persia, and Oman, with indications of African admixture. To assess the roles of both this founding effect and the customary first-cousin marriages among the ancestral Islamic populations in Qatar's population genetic structure, we obtained and genotyped with Affymetrix 500k SNP arrays DNA samples from 168 self-reported Qatari nationals sampled from Doha, Qatar. Principal components analysis was performed along with samples from the Human Genetic Diversity Project data set, revealing three clear clusters of genotypes whose proximity to other human population samples is consistent with Arabian origin, a more eastern or Persian origin, and individuals with African admixture. The extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is greater than that of African populations, and runs of homozygosity in some individuals reflect substantial consanguinity. However, the variance in runs of homozygosity is exceptionally high, and the degree of identity-by-descent sharing generally appears to be lower than expected for a population in which nearly half of marriages are between first cousins. Despite the fact that the SNPs of the Affymetrix 500k chip were ascertained with a bias toward SNPs common in Europeans, the data strongly support the notion that the Qatari population could provide a valuable resource for the mapping of genes associated with complex disorders and that tests of pairwise interactions are particularly empowered by populations with elevated LD like the Qatari. PMID:20579625

  1. Population genetic structure in the paddyfield warbler (Acrocephalus agricola Jerd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel ZEHTINDJIEV, Mihaela ILIEVA, Bengt HANSSON, Olga OPARINA,Mihail OPARIN, Staffan BENSCH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Population genetic structure was studied in paddyfield warblers Acrocephalus agricola breeding in NE Bulgaria, SE Russia and S Kazakhstan. We were particularly interested in the degree of genetic differentiation and gene flow of the Bulgarian population due to its geographical isolation, recent origin and unique migratory strategy. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA showed that there was no divergence between Bulgarian and Russian populations (FST = 0.007, whereas those in Kazakhstan differed significantly from the European breeding populations (Russia: FST = 0.058; Bulgaria: FST = 0.114. The degree of differentiation between populations at nuclear markers (five microsatellite loci; FST ≈ 0 was weaker than for mtDNA. We suggest that this relatively weak differentiation over the range of this species reflects a recent postglacial expansion, and results from mismatch distribution analyses and Fu’s FS tests are in agreement. Preservation of small and geographically isolated populations which may contain individuals with unique adaptive traits, such as the studied Bulgarian population of paddyfield warbler, is valuable for the long-term conservation of expanding migratory bird species [Current Zoology 57 (1: 63–71, 2011].

  2. Population structure and cultural geography of a folktale in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert M.; Greenhill, Simon J.; Atkinson, Quentin D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a burgeoning science of cultural evolution, relatively little work has focused on the population structure of human cultural variation. By contrast, studies in human population genetics use a suite of tools to quantify and analyse spatial and temporal patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Human genetic diversity can be explained largely as a result of migration and drift giving rise to gradual genetic clines, together with some discontinuities arising from geographical and cultural barriers to gene flow. Here, we adapt theory and methods from population genetics to quantify the influence of geography and ethnolinguistic boundaries on the distribution of 700 variants of a folktale in 31 European ethnolinguistic populations. We find that geographical distance and ethnolinguistic affiliation exert significant independent effects on folktale diversity and that variation between populations supports a clustering concordant with European geography. This pattern of geographical clines and clusters parallels the pattern of human genetic diversity in Europe, although the effects of geographical distance and ethnolinguistic boundaries are stronger for folktales than genes. Our findings highlight the importance of geography and population boundaries in models of human cultural variation and point to key similarities and differences between evolutionary processes operating on human genes and culture. PMID:23390109

  3. Turkish population structure and genetic ancestry reveal relatedness among Eurasian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodoğlugil, Uğur; Mahley, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Turkey has experienced major population movements. Population structure and genetic relatedness of samples from three regions of Turkey, using over 500,000 SNP genotypes, were compared together with Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP) data. To obtain a more representative sampling from Central Asia, Kyrgyz samples (Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan) were genotyped and analysed. Principal component (PC) analysis reveals a significant overlap between Turks and Middle Easterners and a relationship with Europeans and South and Central Asians; however, the Turkish genetic structure is unique. FRAPPE, STRUCTURE, and phylogenetic analyses support the PC analysis depending upon the number of parental ancestry components chosen. For example, supervised STRUCTURE (K=3) illustrates a genetic ancestry for the Turks of 45% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 42-49), 40% European (95% CI, 36-44) and 15% Central Asian (95% CI, 13-16), whereas at K=4 the genetic ancestry of the Turks was 38% European (95% CI, 35-42), 35% Middle Eastern (95% CI, 33-38), 18% South Asian (95% CI, 16-19) and 9% Central Asian (95% CI, 7-11). PC analysis and FRAPPE/STRUCTURE results from three regions in Turkey (Aydin, Istanbul and Kayseri) were superimposed, without clear subpopulation structure, suggesting sample homogeneity. Thus, this study demonstrates admixture of Turkish people reflecting the population migration patterns. © 2012 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  4. Evolutionary game dynamics in populations with heterogenous structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wes Maciejewski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary graph theory is a well established framework for modelling the evolution of social behaviours in structured populations. An emerging consensus in this field is that graphs that exhibit heterogeneity in the number of connections between individuals are more conducive to the spread of cooperative behaviours. In this article we show that such a conclusion largely depends on the individual-level interactions that take place. In particular, averaging payoffs garnered through game interactions rather than accumulating the payoffs can altogether remove the cooperative advantage of heterogeneous graphs while such a difference does not affect the outcome on homogeneous structures. In addition, the rate at which game interactions occur can alter the evolutionary outcome. Less interactions allow heterogeneous graphs to support more cooperation than homogeneous graphs, while higher rates of interactions make homogeneous and heterogeneous graphs virtually indistinguishable in their ability to support cooperation. Most importantly, we show that common measures of evolutionary advantage used in homogeneous populations, such as a comparison of the fixation probability of a rare mutant to that of the resident type, are no longer valid in heterogeneous populations. Heterogeneity causes a bias in where mutations occur in the population which affects the mutant's fixation probability. We derive the appropriate measures for heterogeneous populations that account for this bias.

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of Vietnamese indigenous cattle populations by microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Lan Doan; Do, Duy Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Trong

    2013-01-01

    Cattle play a very important role in agriculture and food security in Vietnam. A high level of cattle diversity exists and serves different needs of Vietnamese cattle keepers but has not yet been molecularly characterized. This study evaluates the genetic diversity and structure of Vietnamese......) to 17 (ETH185). The level of gene diversity was high indicated by a mean expected heterozygosity (He) across populations and loci of 0.73. Level of inbreeding (mean FIS=0.05) and genetic differentiation (mean FST=0.04) was moderate. The phylogenetic tree based on Reynolds genetic distance reflected...... of genetic diversity and distinct genetic structures. Based on these results, we recommend that for conservation homogenous populations (Nghe An, Thanh Hoa and Phu Yen) can be grouped to reduce costs and U Dau Riu, Lang Son and Ha Giang populations should be conserved separately to avoid loss of genetic...

  6. Sexual networks: measuring sexual selection in structured, polyandrous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Grant C; James, Richard; Krause, Jens; Pizzari, Tommaso

    2013-03-05

    Sexual selection is traditionally measured at the population level, assuming that populations lack structure. However, increasing evidence undermines this approach, indicating that intrasexual competition in natural populations often displays complex patterns of spatial and temporal structure. This complexity is due in part to the degree and mechanisms of polyandry within a population, which can influence the intensity and scale of both pre- and post-copulatory sexual competition. Attempts to measure selection at the local and global scale have been made through multi-level selection approaches. However, definitions of local scale are often based on physical proximity, providing a rather coarse measure of local competition, particularly in polyandrous populations where the local scale of pre- and post-copulatory competition may differ drastically from each other. These limitations can be solved by social network analysis, which allows us to define a unique sexual environment for each member of a population: 'local scale' competition, therefore, becomes an emergent property of a sexual network. Here, we first propose a novel quantitative approach to measure pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection, which integrates multi-level selection with information on local scale competition derived as an emergent property of networks of sexual interactions. We then use simple simulations to illustrate the ways in which polyandry can impact estimates of sexual selection. We show that for intermediate levels of polyandry, the proposed network-based approach provides substantially more accurate measures of sexual selection than the more traditional population-level approach. We argue that the increasing availability of fine-grained behavioural datasets provides exciting new opportunities to develop network approaches to study sexual selection in complex societies.

  7. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, William A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  8. Types of marriages, population structure and genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, T M B; Bomfim, T F; Souza, L V; Soares, N; Santos, F L; Acosta, A X; Abe-Sandes, K

    2013-07-01

    A high occurrence rate of consanguineous marriages may favour the onset and increased frequency of autosomal recessive diseases in a population. The population of Monte Santo, Bahia, Brazil, has a high frequency of rare genetic diseases such as mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, whose observed frequency in this population is 1:5000, while the incidence of this disease recorded in other regions of the world varies from 1:43,261 in Turkey to 1:1,505,160 in Switzerland. To verify the influence of consanguineous marriage on the increased frequency of observed genetic diseases in this population, the population structure and frequency of different types of marriage during different time periods were evaluated. A total of 9765 marriages were found in an analysis of parish marriage records from the city. Over three periods, 1860-1895, 1950-1961 and 1975-2010, the inbreeding rates were 37.1%, 13.2% and 4.2% respectively. Although there was a high rate of inbreeding, endogamic marriages were the dominant marriage type in all three periods. In the most recent period, there was an increase in the number of exogamous marriages and those among immigrants, but most of these occurred among individuals from cities that neighbour Monte Santo. The low rate of migration and high frequency of endogamic and consanguineous marriages show that growth of this population is predominantly internal and could explain the occurrence, and increase in frequency, of recessive genetic diseases in the city.

  9. Population structure of barley landrace populations and gene-flow with modern varieties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellucci

    Full Text Available Landraces are heterogeneous plant varieties that are reproduced by farmers as populations that are subject to both artificial and natural selection. Landraces are distinguished by farmers due to their specific traits, and different farmers often grow different populations of the same landrace. We used simple sequence repeats (SSRs to analyse 12 barley landrace populations from Sardinia from two collections spanning 10 years. We analysed the population structure, and compared the population diversity of the landraces that were collected at field level (population. We used a representative pool of barley varieties for diversity comparisons and to analyse the effects of gene flow from modern varieties. We found that the Sardinian landraces are a distinct gene pool from those of both two-row and six-row barley varieties. There is also a low, but significant, mean level and population-dependent level of introgression from the modern varieties into the Sardinian landraces. Moreover, we show that the Sardinian landraces have the same level of gene diversity as the representative sample of modern commercial varieties grown in Italy in the last decades, even within population level. Thus, these populations represent crucial sources of germplasm that will be useful for crop improvement and for population genomics studies and association mapping, to identify genes, loci and genome regions responsible for adaptive variations. Our data also suggest that landraces are a source of valuable germplasm for sustainable agriculture in the context of future climate change, and that in-situ conservation strategies based on farmer use can preserve the genetic identity of landraces while allowing adaptation to local environments.

  10. Evolutionary genomics and population structure of Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis caused by the gastrointestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica has diverse disease outcomes. Study of genome and evolution of this fascinating parasite will help us to understand the basis of its virulence and explain why, when and how it causes diseases. In this review, we have summarized current knowledge regarding evolutionary genomics of E. histolytica and discussed their association with parasite phenotypes and its differential pathogenic behavior. How genetic diversity reveals parasite population structure has also been discussed. Queries concerning their evolution and population structure which were required to be addressed have also been highlighted. This significantly large amount of genomic data will improve our knowledge about this pathogenic species of Entamoeba.

  11. Rivers influence the population genetic structure of bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J; Hohmann, G; Boesch, C; Vigilant, L

    2004-11-01

    Bonobos are large, highly mobile primates living in the relatively undisturbed, contiguous forest south of the Congo River. Accordingly, gene flow among populations is assumed to be extensive, but may be impeded by large, impassable rivers. We examined mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation in individuals from five distinct localities separated by rivers in order to estimate relative levels of genetic diversity and assess the extent and pattern of population genetic structure in the bonobo. Diversity estimates for the bonobo exceed those for humans, but are less than those found for the chimpanzee. All regions sampled are significantly differentiated from one another, according to genetic distances estimated as pairwise FSTs, with the greatest differentiation existing between region East and each of the two Northern populations (N and NE) and the least differentiation between regions Central and South. The distribution of nucleotide diversity shows a clear signal of population structure, with some 30% of the variance occurring among geographical regions. However, a geographical patterning of the population structure is not obvious. Namely, mitochondrial haplotypes were shared among all regions excepting the most eastern locality and the phylogenetic analysis revealed a tree in which haplotypes were intermixed with little regard to geographical origin, with the notable exception of the close relationships among the haplotypes found in the east. Nonetheless, genetic distances correlated with geographical distances when the intervening distances were measured around rivers presenting effective current-day barriers, but not when straight-line distances were used, suggesting that rivers are indeed a hindrance to gene flow in this species.

  12. Population structure in Tunisian indigenous rabbit ascertained using molecular information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Ben Larbi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic structure of domestic species provides a window into the process of domestication. This study attempts to offer an insight into the prevailing genetic status of Tunisian indigenous rabbit breeds using molecular markers. Thirty-six microsatellite loci were used to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic status and relationship among 12 Tunisian indigenous rabbit populations. A total of 264 rabbits from villages of the Tozeur and Kebili regions were studied. Standard statistics parameters of genetic variability within and between populations were calculated. The observed heterozygosity, unbiased expected heterozygosity and the effective number of alleles were used to assess the genetic variation of each indigenous breed. Results show a high genetic diversity and observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.3 and 0.5, which implies that there is an abundant genetic variation stored in Tunisian indigenous rabbit breeds. Significant population differentiation was observed (Fst=0.11, which means that most of the genetic variation resides within breeds. The percentage of individuals correctly classified to their population was 85%. Breeds with more than one breeder origin were divided into subgroups, due to differences in gene frequencies between breeders, which in some cases creates a genetic differentiation even higher than that observed between distinct breeds. The current study is the first detailed analysis of the genetic diversity of Tunisian indigenous rabbit populations. The data generated here provides valuable information about the genetic structure of the 12 rabbit populations and this can be used to designate priorities for their conservation.

  13. Development of paradigms for the dynamics of structured populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This is a technical progress report on the dynamics of predator-prey systems in a patchy environment. A new phenomenon that might contribute to outbreaks in systems of discrete patches has been determined using a discrete time model with both spatial and age structure. A model for a single species in a patchy environment with migration, local population growth and disasters with in patches has been formulated and a brief description is included.

  14. Population Structuring and Migration Pathway of Atlantic bonito Sarda sarda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Turan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Population structure of Atlantic Bonito Sarda sarda in the Mediterranean Sea and possible pathway of migration for spawning and feeding was discussed on the bases of genetic and morphological dataset. The effects of topographic and hydrographic factors on the connectivity and migration pattern of Atlantic Bonito in Turkish, Bulgarian and Croatian marine waters and fishery management implications of putative stocks were correspondingly referred

  15. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  16. Population structure of Nellore cattle in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Borges Barbosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the population genetic structure of Nellore cattle in northeastern Brazil. Pedigree information was collected from 175,231 animals born from 1967 to 2007. Probability of gene origin, inbreeding, average relatedness coefficient (AR, completeness pedigree, effective population size and generation interval were calculated. Generation interval was high due to the long period of time animals were used as reproducers. The bottleneck effect was evidenced as a result of intensive use of limited breeders over the last years. Low values were observed ​​in the effective number of founder animals (434 and ancestors (427 comparing with the number on the base (175,231 and reference populations (130,038. Generally, the variability explained by the founders and ancestors is considered low. The average coefficient of inbreeding (0.11% and AR (0.14% estimated for this population is considered low and can be partly explained by the increased population effective number in recent periods; however, it may be underestimated by shallow pedigree.

  17. Population structure of the wood decay fungus Fomitopsis pinicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, N; Holdenrieder, O; Stenlid, J

    1999-09-01

    Three populations of the wood decay fungus Fomitopsis pinicola, one from each of three countries (Sweden, Russia and Lithuania), were studied by means of arbitrary primed PCR. The genetic structure of the populations was assessed by inferring the genotype of the genets by studying the haplotypes of several single-spore isolates from one sporocarp for each individual. Heterozygotes could therefore be detected with a dominant genetic marker. The amplified band and the null allele of all loci segregated in a way that was in agreement with a 50:50 ratio. Genetic analysis showed that the total population as well as the subpopulations had heterozygote frequencies in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. No population differentiation was detected in spite of large geographical distances among the populations studied. We also compared the methods of somatic incompatibility and AP-PCR in terms of their value in detecting fungal genets. This was tested for a sample of dikaryotic mycelia from Switzerland. For the tested material the two methods gave congruent results.

  18. Population Structure of Pseudocercospora fijiensis in Costa Rica Reveals Shared Haplotype Diversity with Southeast Asian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Amanda; Charles, Melodi; Chavan, Suchitra; Muñoz, Miguel; Gómez-Alpizar, Luis; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2017-12-01

    Pseudocercospora fijiensis is the causal pathogen of black Sigatoka, a devastating disease of banana that can cause 20 to 80% yield loss in the absence of fungicides in banana crops. The genetic structure of populations of P. fijiensis in Costa Rica was examined and compared with Honduran and global populations to better understand migration patterns and inform management strategies. In total, 118 isolates of P. fijiensis collected from Costa Rica and Honduras from 2010 to 2014 were analyzed using multilocus genotyping of six loci and compared with a previously published global dataset of populations of P. fijiensis. The Costa Rican and Honduran populations shared haplotype diversity with haplotypes from Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Americas but not Africa for all but one of the six loci studied. Gene flow and shared haplotype diversity was found in Honduran and Costa Rican populations of the pathogen. The data indicate that the haplotypic diversity observed in Costa Rican populations of P. fijiensis is derived from dispersal from initial outbreak sources in Honduras and admixtures between genetically differentiated sources from Southeast Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.

  19. Identification of genetic and epigenetic marks involved in population structure.

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    Jingyu Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Population structure is well known as a prevalent and important factor in genetic studies, but its relevance in epigenetics is unclear. Very little is known about the affected epigenetic markers and their connections with genetics. In this study we assessed the impact of population diversity on genome wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and DNA methylation levels in 196 participants from five ethnic groups, using principle and independent component analyses. Three population stratification factors (PSFs were identified in the genomic SNP dataset, accounting for a relatively large portion of total variance (6%. In contrast, only one PSF was identified in genomic methylation dataset accounting for 0.2% of total variance. This methylation PSF, however, was significantly correlated with the largest SNP PSF (r = 0.72, p<1E-23. We then investigated the top contributing markers in these two linked PSFs. The SNP PSF predominantly consists of 8 SNPs from three genes, SLC45A2, HERC2 and CTNNA2, known to encode skin/hair/eye color. The methylation PSF includes 48 methylated sites in 44 genes coding for basic molecular functions, including transcription regulation, DNA binding, cytokine, and transferase activity. Among them, 8 sites are either hypo- or hyper-methylated correlating to minor alleles of SNPs in the SNP PSF. We found that the genes in SNP and methylation PSFs share common biological processes including sexual/multicellular organism reproduction, cell-cell signaling and cytoskeleton organization. We further investigated the transcription regulatory network operating at these genes and identified that most of genes closely interact with ID2, which encodes for a helix-loop-helix inhibitor of DNA binding. Overall, our results show a significant correlation between genetic and epigenetic population stratification, and suggest that the interrelationship between genetic and epigenetic population structure is mediated via complex multiple

  20. Demographic History, Population Structure, and Local Adaptation in Alpine Populations of Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia.

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    Lino Ometto

    Full Text Available Species evolution depends on numerous and distinct forces, including demography and natural selection. For example, local adaptation and population structure affect the evolutionary history of species living along environmental clines. This is particularly relevant in plants, which are often characterized by limited dispersal ability and the need to respond to abiotic and biotic stress factors specific to the local environment. Here we study the demographic history and the possible existence of local adaptation in two related species of Brassicaceae, Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia, which occupy separate habitats along the elevation gradient. Previous genome-wide analyses revealed the occurrence of distinct selective pressures in the two species, with genes involved in cold response evolving particularly fast in C. resedifolia. In this study we surveyed patterns of molecular evolution and genetic variability in a set of 19 genes, including neutral and candidate genes involved in cold response, across 10 populations each of C. resedifolia and C. impatiens from the Italian Alps (Trentino. We inferred the population structure and demographic history of the two species, and tested the occurrence of signatures of local adaptation in these genes. The results indicate that, despite a slightly higher population differentiation in C. resedifolia than in C. impatiens, both species are only weakly structured and that populations sampled at high altitude experience less gene flow than low-altitude ones. None of the genes showed signatures of positive selection, suggesting that they do not seem to play relevant roles in the current evolutionary processes of adaptation to alpine environments of these species.

  1. Demographic History, Population Structure, and Local Adaptation in Alpine Populations of Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, Lino; Li, Mingai; Bresadola, Luisa; Barbaro, Enrico; Neteler, Markus; Varotto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution depends on numerous and distinct forces, including demography and natural selection. For example, local adaptation and population structure affect the evolutionary history of species living along environmental clines. This is particularly relevant in plants, which are often characterized by limited dispersal ability and the need to respond to abiotic and biotic stress factors specific to the local environment. Here we study the demographic history and the possible existence of local adaptation in two related species of Brassicaceae, Cardamine impatiens and Cardamine resedifolia, which occupy separate habitats along the elevation gradient. Previous genome-wide analyses revealed the occurrence of distinct selective pressures in the two species, with genes involved in cold response evolving particularly fast in C. resedifolia. In this study we surveyed patterns of molecular evolution and genetic variability in a set of 19 genes, including neutral and candidate genes involved in cold response, across 10 populations each of C. resedifolia and C. impatiens from the Italian Alps (Trentino). We inferred the population structure and demographic history of the two species, and tested the occurrence of signatures of local adaptation in these genes. The results indicate that, despite a slightly higher population differentiation in C. resedifolia than in C. impatiens, both species are only weakly structured and that populations sampled at high altitude experience less gene flow than low-altitude ones. None of the genes showed signatures of positive selection, suggesting that they do not seem to play relevant roles in the current evolutionary processes of adaptation to alpine environments of these species. PMID:25933225

  2. Genetic Structure of Loach Population in Yatsu Paddy Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Noriyuki; Takemura, Takeshi; Mori, Atsushi; Okushima, Shuji

    Using repeated sequences of microsatellite DNA, we investigated genetic variation and spatial structure of the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus population in drainage canals including a main stream in the Shitada River basin composed of Yatsu paddy fields, Chiba Prefecture. Loach population samples of nine to 48 individuals were collected from 54 sampling sites in eight canals and the main stream, and genotype data in eight microsatellite loci were obtained for each sample in the genetic analysis. The average number of alleles per locus was 3.9 to 9.0, and the average observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.444-0.647 and 0.463-0.628, respectively, across samples. All samples seemed to be random mating, which conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Values of the fixation index FST, were estimated to range between 0-0.161 among all samples, and a part of these values were significant. The pattern of genetic differentiation between samples with principal component analysis indicated that samples in three distinct canals appeared to differentiate, suggesting that the genetic spatial structure of the loach population in Yatsu paddy fields must be complex.

  3. A Malthusian curb on spatial structure in microorganism populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A P

    2004-10-07

    That all organisms are born in the company of a parent but die alone is a fundamental biological asymmetry. It has been suggested that this provides a deep-rooted source of spatial pattern formation for microorganisms even at the scale of the population. Such a theory, however, neglects the strong influence in nature of the limited and spatially variable availability of food. The tendency, first recognized by Thomas Malthus in the 18th century, of a population to out-strip its food resources will eventually lead, through local starvation, to the suppression of a heterogeneity growing within a population. Using a generic model it is demonstrated that including local food limitation of breeding strongly dampens spatial structure otherwise resulting from birth and death. The extent of this damping is shown to be a function of the strength of the coupling between organisms and their food and of the total abundance of organic material. Moreover, this work provides an example of a density-dependent process acting to diminish spatial structure rather than to create it and highlights the rich variety of behaviour that is missed by continuum models which fail to represent such local dynamics.

  4. Population structure, genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in perennial ryegrass populations divergently selected for freezing tolerance

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    Mallikarjuna Rao eKovi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF] and 27 of Unselected [US] from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected control population were genotyped using 278 genome-wide SNPs derived from Lolium perenne L. transcriptome sequence. Our studies showed that the HF and LF populations are very divergent after selection for freezing tolerance, whereas the HF and US populations are more similar. Linkage disequilibrium (LD decay varied across the seven chromosomes and the conspicuous pattern of LD between the HF and LF population confirmed their divergence in freezing tolerance. Furthermore, two Fst outlier methods; finite island model (fdist by LOSITAN and hierarchical structure model using ARLEQUIN detected six loci under directional selection. These outlier loci are most probably linked to genes involved in freezing tolerance, cold adaptation and abiotic stress and might be the potential marker resources for breeding perennial ryegrass cultivars with improved freezing tolerance.

  5. A new eigenfunction spatial analysis describing population genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Diniz, João Vitor Barnez P L; Rangel, Thiago Fernando; Soares, Thannya Nascimento; Telles, Mariana Pires de Campos; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Bini, Luis Mauricio

    2013-12-01

    Several methods of spatial analyses have been proposed to infer the relative importance of evolutionary processes on genetic population structure. Here we show how a new eigenfunction spatial analysis can be used to model spatial patterns in genetic data. Considering a sample of n local populations, the method starts by modeling the response variable (allele frequencies or phenotypic variation) against the eigenvectors sequentially extracted from a geographic distance matrix (n × n). The relationship between the coefficient of determination (R(2)) of the models and the cumulative eigenvalues, which we named the spatial signal-representation (SSR) curve, can be more efficient than Moran's I correlograms in describing different patterns. The SSR curve was also applied to simulated data (under distinct scenarios of population differentiation) and to analyze spatial patterns in alleles from microsatellite data for 25 local populations of Dipteryx alata, a tree species endemic to the Brazilian Cerrado. The SSR curves are consistent with previous phylogeographical patterns of the species, revealing combined effects of isolation-by-distance and range expansion. Our analyses demonstrate that the SSR curve is a useful exploratory tool for describing spatial patterns of genetic variability and for selecting spatial eigenvectors for models aiming to explain spatial responses to environmental variables and landscape features.

  6. Genetic structure of Balearic honeybee populations based on microsatellite polymorphism

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    Moritz Robin FA

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic variation of honeybee colonies collected in 22 localities on the Balearic Islands (Spain was analysed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Previous studies have demonstrated that these colonies belong either to the African or west European evolutionary lineages. These populations display low variability estimated from both the number of alleles and heterozygosity values, as expected for the honeybee island populations. Although genetic differentiation within the islands is low, significant heterozygote deficiency is present, indicating a subpopulation genetic structure. According to the genetic differentiation test, the honeybee populations of the Balearic Islands cluster into two groups: Gimnesias (Mallorca and Menorca and Pitiusas (Ibiza and Formentera, which agrees with the biogeography postulated for this archipelago. The phylogenetic analysis suggests an Iberian origin of the Balearic honeybees, thus confirming the postulated evolutionary scenario for Apis mellifera in the Mediterranean basin. The microsatellite data from Formentera, Ibiza and Menorca show that ancestral populations are threatened by queen importations, indicating that adequate conservation measures should be developed for protecting Balearic bees.

  7. Complex transition to cooperative behavior in a structured population model.

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    Luciano Miranda

    Full Text Available Cooperation plays an important role in the evolution of species and human societies. The understanding of the emergence and persistence of cooperation in those systems is a fascinating and fundamental question. Many mechanisms were extensively studied and proposed as supporting cooperation. The current work addresses the role of migration for the maintenance of cooperation in structured populations. This problem is investigated in an evolutionary perspective through the prisoner's dilemma game paradigm. It is found that migration and structure play an essential role in the evolution of the cooperative behavior. The possible outcomes of the model are extinction of the entire population, dominance of the cooperative strategy and coexistence between cooperators and defectors. The coexistence phase is obtained in the range of large migration rates. It is also verified the existence of a critical level of structuring beyond that cooperation is always likely. In resume, we conclude that the increase in the number of demes as well as in the migration rate favor the fixation of the cooperative behavior.

  8. Geographical structure and differential natural selection among North European populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Brian P; Montgomery, Grant W; McRae, Allan F

    2009-01-01

    reflecting response to infectious disease epidemic. Such an event may explain a striking selective sweep centered on the rs2508049-G allele, close to the HLA-G gene on chromosome 6. Evidence of the sweep extends over a 8-Mb/3.5-cM region. Overall, the results illustrate the power of dense genotype and sample......Population structure can provide novel insight into the human past, and recognizing and correcting for such stratification is a practical concern in gene mapping by many association methodologies. We investigate these patterns, primarily through principal component (PC) analysis of whole genome SNP...... from F(ST)-based analysis of genic and nongenic SNPs that differential positive selection has operated across these populations despite their short divergence time and relatively similar geographic and environmental range. The pressure appears to have been focused on genes involved in immunity, perhaps...

  9. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

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    Matthew W Blair

    Full Text Available Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13 for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru. The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of

  10. Genetic population structure of Anopheles gambiae in Equatorial Guinea

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    Caccone Adalgisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of genetic structure among mosquito vector populations in islands have received particular attention as these are considered potentially suitable sites for experimental trials on transgenic-based malaria control strategies. In this study, levels of genetic differentiation have been estimated between populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. from the islands of Bioko and Annobón, and from continental Equatorial Guinea (EG and Gabon. Methods Genotyping of 11 microsatellite loci located in chromosome 3 was performed in three island samples (two in Bioko and one in Annobón and three mainland samples (two in EG and one in Gabon. Four samples belonged to the M molecular form and two to the S-form. Microsatellite data was used to estimate genetic diversity parameters, perform demographic equilibrium tests and analyse population differentiation. Results High levels of genetic differentiation were found between the more geographically remote island of Annobón and the continent, contrasting with the shallow differentiation between Bioko island, closest to mainland, and continental localities. In Bioko, differentiation between M and S forms was higher than that observed between island and mainland samples of the same molecular form. Conclusion The observed patterns of population structure seem to be governed by the presence of both physical (the ocean and biological (the M-S form discontinuity barriers to gene flow. The significant degree of genetic isolation between M and S forms detected by microsatellite loci located outside the "genomic islands" of speciation identified in A. gambiae s.s. further supports the hypothesis of on-going incipient speciation within this species. The implications of these findings regarding vector control strategies are discussed.

  11. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure and Ancestral Origin of Australian Wheat

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    Reem Joukhadar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of wheat into Australia by the First Fleet settlers, germplasm from different geographical origins has been used to adapt wheat to the Australian climate through selection and breeding. In this paper, we used 482 cultivars, representing the breeding history of bread wheat in Australia since 1840, to characterize their diversity and population structure and to define the geographical ancestral background of Australian wheat germplasm. This was achieved by comparing them to a global wheat collection using in-silico chromosome painting based on SNP genotyping. The global collection involved 2,335 wheat accessions which was divided into 23 different geographical subpopulations. However, the whole set was reduced to 1,544 accessions to increase the differentiation and decrease the admixture among different global subpopulations to increase the power of the painting analysis. Our analysis revealed that the structure of Australian wheat germplasm and its geographic ancestors have changed significantly through time, especially after the Green Revolution. Before 1920, breeders used cultivars from around the world, but mainly Europe and Africa, to select potential cultivars that could tolerate Australian growing conditions. Between 1921 and 1970, a dependence on African wheat germplasm became more prevalent. Since 1970, a heavy reliance on International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT germplasm has persisted. Combining the results from linkage disequilibrium, population structure and in-silico painting revealed that the dependence on CIMMYT materials has varied among different Australian States, has shrunken the germplasm effective population size and produced larger linkage disequilibrium blocks. This study documents the evolutionary history of wheat breeding in Australia and provides an understanding for how the wheat genome has been adapted to local growing conditions. This information provides a guide for industry to

  12. Temporal structure of neuronal population oscillations with empirical model decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaoli [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)]. E-mail: xiaoli.avh@gmail.com

    2006-08-07

    Frequency analysis of neuronal oscillation is very important for understanding the neural information processing and mechanism of disorder in the brain. This Letter addresses a new method to analyze the neuronal population oscillations with empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Following EMD of neuronal oscillation, a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are obtained, then Hilbert transform of IMFs can be used to extract the instantaneous time frequency structure of neuronal oscillation. The method is applied to analyze the neuronal oscillation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats in vivo, the results show the neuronal oscillations have different descriptions during the pre-ictal, seizure onset and ictal periods of the epileptic EEG at the different frequency band. This new method is very helpful to provide a view for the temporal structure of neural oscillation.

  13. Cryptic population structuring in Scandinavian lynx: reply to Pamilo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorde, P E; Rueness, E K; Stenseth, N C; Jakobsen, K S

    2006-04-01

    In a recent Commentary in this journal, Pamilo (2004) criticized our analysis of the spatial genetic structure of the Eurasian lynx in Scandinavia (Rueness et al. 2003). The analyses uncovered a marked geographical differentiation along the Scandinavian peninsula with an apparent linear gradient in the north-south direction. We used computer simulations to check on the proposition that the observed geographical structure could have arisen by genetic drift and isolation by distance in the approximate 25 generations that have passed since the last bottleneck. Pamilo disapproved of our choice of population model and also how we compared the outcome of the simulations with data. As these issues should be of interest to a wider audience we discuss them in some detail.

  14. Population structure of Serpula lacrymans in Europe with an outlook to the French population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Sundy; Skrede, Inger; LeFloch, Gaetan; Barbier, Georges; Kauserud, Håvard

    2014-01-01

    In this study the genetic variation and population structure in a French population of the dry rot fungus S. lacrymans was investigated using 14 microsatellites markers and compared to the rest of Europe. In that comparison the French population possessed the same allelic diversity as rest of Europe. A weak geographic structuring of the genetic variation was observed across Europe, where the French isolates to some extent separated from the rest of Europe, indicating that weak barriers to gene flow exists. Eighty percent of the isolates had unique multilocus microsatellite genotypes, which corresponds to high recombination and dispersal by sexual spores. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg expectations were observed in multiple loci. In most loci there was an excess of heterozygotes, which could be due to either non-random mating, presence of more than two nuclei in the secondary mycelia or another unrecognized process. A total of six vegetative compatibility (VC) groups were present in Europe, out of which four were sampled in France. One VC group was over-represented in France while two others were underrepresented, as compared to the rest of Europe. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of collective action in spatially structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jorge; Nöldeke, Georg; Lehmann, Laurent

    2015-10-07

    Many models proposed to study the evolution of collective action rely on a formalism that represents social interactions as n-player games between individuals adopting discrete actions such as cooperate and defect. Despite the importance of spatial structure in biological collective action, the analysis of n-player games games in spatially structured populations has so far proved elusive. We address this problem by considering mixed strategies and by integrating discrete-action n-player games into the direct fitness approach of social evolution theory. This allows to conveniently identify convergence stable strategies and to capture the effect of population structure by a single structure coefficient, namely, the pairwise (scaled) relatedness among interacting individuals. As an application, we use our mathematical framework to investigate collective action problems associated with the provision of three different kinds of collective goods, paradigmatic of a vast array of helping traits in nature: "public goods" (both providers and shirkers can use the good, e.g., alarm calls), "club goods" (only providers can use the good, e.g., participation in collective hunting), and "charity goods" (only shirkers can use the good, e.g., altruistic sacrifice). We show that relatedness promotes the evolution of collective action in different ways depending on the kind of collective good and its economies of scale. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for relatedness, the kind of collective good, and the economies of scale in theoretical and empirical studies of the evolution of collective action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H Tageldin, Mohammed; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075, θ = 0.07) were

  17. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salama Al-Hamidhi

    Full Text Available Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle.Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman.We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia. A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075,

  18. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus from Trinidad & Tobago.

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    Stefan Monecke

    Full Text Available It has been shown previously that high rates of methicillin- and mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus exist in the Caribbean islands of Trinidad and Tobago, as well as a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive S. aureus. Beyond these studies, limited typing data have been published. In order to obtain insight into the population structure not only of MRSA but also of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, 294 clinical isolates collected in 2012/2013 were typed by microarray hybridisation. A total of 15.31% of the tested isolates were MRSA and 50.00% were PVL-positive. The most common MSSA strains were PVL-positive CC8-MSSA (20.41% of all isolates tested, PVL-positive CC152-MSSA (9.52% and PVL-positive CC30-MSSA (8.84% while the most common MRSA were ST239-MRSA-III&SCCmer (9.18% and ST8-MRSA-IV, "USA300" (5.78%. 2.38% of characterised isolates belonged to distinct strains likely to be related to "Staphylococcus argenteus" lineages. The population structure of S. aureus isolates suggests an importation of strains from Africa, endemicity of PVL-positive MSSA (mainly CC8 and of ST239-MRSA-III, and a recent emergence of the PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300".

  19. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus from Trinidad & Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Stieber, Bettina; Roberts, Rashida; Akpaka, Patrick Eberechi; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown previously that high rates of methicillin- and mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus exist in the Caribbean islands of Trinidad and Tobago, as well as a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive S. aureus. Beyond these studies, limited typing data have been published. In order to obtain insight into the population structure not only of MRSA but also of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, 294 clinical isolates collected in 2012/2013 were typed by microarray hybridisation. A total of 15.31% of the tested isolates were MRSA and 50.00% were PVL-positive. The most common MSSA strains were PVL-positive CC8-MSSA (20.41% of all isolates tested), PVL-positive CC152-MSSA (9.52%) and PVL-positive CC30-MSSA (8.84%) while the most common MRSA were ST239-MRSA-III&SCCmer (9.18%) and ST8-MRSA-IV, "USA300" (5.78%). 2.38% of characterised isolates belonged to distinct strains likely to be related to "Staphylococcus argenteus" lineages. The population structure of S. aureus isolates suggests an importation of strains from Africa, endemicity of PVL-positive MSSA (mainly CC8) and of ST239-MRSA-III, and a recent emergence of the PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300".

  20. Networks and Models with Heterogeneous Population Structure in Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, R. R.

    Heterogeneous population structure can have a profound effect on infectious disease dynamics, and is particularly important when investigating “tactical” disease control questions. At times, the nature of the network involved in the transmission of the pathogen (bacteria, virus, macro-parasite, etc.) appears to be clear; however, the nature of the network involved is dependent on the scale (e.g. within-host, between-host, or between-population), the nature of the contact, which ranges from the highly specific (e.g. sexual acts or needle sharing at the person-to-person level) to almost completely non-specific (e.g. aerosol transmission, often over long distances as can occur with the highly infectious livestock pathogen foot-and-mouth disease virus—FMDv—at the farm-to-farm level, e.g. Schley et al. in J. R. Soc. Interface 6:455-462, 2008), and the timescale of interest (e.g. at the scale of the individual, the typical infectious period of the host). Theoretical approaches to examining the implications of particular network structures on disease transmission have provided critical insight; however, a greater challenge is the integration of network approaches with data on real population structures. In this chapter, some concepts in disease modelling will be introduced, the relevance of selected network phenomena discussed, and then results from real data and their relationship to network analyses summarised. These include examinations of the patterns of air traffic and its relation to the spread of SARS in 2003 (Colizza et al. in BMC Med., 2007; Hufnagel et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:15124-15129, 2004), the use of the extensively documented Great Britain livestock movements network (Green et al. in J. Theor. Biol. 239:289-297, 2008; Robinson et al. in J. R. Soc. Interface 4:669-674, 2007; Vernon and Keeling in Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B, Biol. Sci. 276:469-476, 2009) and the growing interest in combining contact structure data with phylogenetics to

  1. Population structure, migration, and diversifying selection in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Knijff, Peter de; Nivard, Michel G; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul; Brooks, Andrew; Ehli, Erik A; Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E; Hudziak, James J; Sullivan, Patrick F; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation in a population can be summarized through principal component analysis (PCA) on genome-wide data. PCs derived from such analyses are valuable for genetic association studies, where they can correct for population stratification. We investigated how to capture the genetic population structure in a well-characterized sample from the Netherlands and in a worldwide data set and examined whether (1) removing long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions and LD-based SNP pruning significantly improves correlations between PCs and geography and (2) whether genetic differentiation may have been influenced by migration and/or selection. In the Netherlands, three PCs showed significant correlations with geography, distinguishing between: (1) North and South; (2) East and West; and (3) the middle-band and the rest of the country. The third PC only emerged with minimized LD, which also significantly increased correlations with geography for the other two PCs. In addition to geography, the Dutch North–South PC showed correlations with genome-wide homozygosity (r=0.245), which may reflect a serial-founder effect due to northwards migration, and also with height (♂: r=0.142, ♀: r=0.153). The divergence between subpopulations identified by PCs is partly driven by selection pressures. The first three PCs showed significant signals for diversifying selection (545 SNPs - the majority within 184 genes). The strongest signal was observed between North and South for the functional SNP in HERC2 that determines human blue/brown eye color. Thus, this study demonstrates how to increase ancestry signals in a relatively homogeneous population and how those signals can reveal evolutionary history. PMID:23531865

  2. Population structure of humpback whales in the western and central South Pacific Ocean as determined by vocal exchange among populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ellen C; Goldizen, Anne W; Lilley, Matthew S; Rekdahl, Melinda L; Garrigue, Claire; Constantine, Rochelle; Hauser, Nan Daeschler; Poole, M Michael; Robbins, Jooke; Noad, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    For cetaceans, population structure is traditionally determined by molecular genetics or photographically identified individuals. Acoustic data, however, has provided information on movement and population structure with less effort and cost than traditional methods in an array of taxa. Male humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) produce a continually evolving vocal sexual display, or song, that is similar among all males in a population. The rapid cultural transmission (the transfer of information or behavior between conspecifics through social learning) of different versions of this display between distinct but interconnected populations in the western and central South Pacific region presents a unique way to investigate population structure based on the movement dynamics of a song (acoustic) display. Using 11 years of data, we investigated an acoustically based population structure for the region by comparing stereotyped song sequences among populations and years. We used the Levenshtein distance technique to group previously defined populations into (vocally based) clusters based on the overall similarity of their song display in space and time. We identified the following distinct vocal clusters: western cluster, 1 population off eastern Australia; central cluster, populations around New Caledonia, Tonga, and American Samoa; and eastern region, either a single cluster or 2 clusters, one around the Cook Islands and the other off French Polynesia. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that each breeding aggregation represents a distinct population (each occupied a single, terminal node) in a metapopulation, similar to the current understanding of population structure based on genetic and photo-identification studies. However, the central vocal cluster had higher levels of song-sharing among populations than the other clusters, indicating that levels of vocal connectivity varied within the region. Our results demonstrate the utility and value of

  3. Food web framework for size-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken H; Beyer, Jan E

    2011-03-07

    We synthesise traditional unstructured food webs, allometric body size scaling, trait-based modelling, and physiologically structured modelling to provide a novel and ecologically relevant tool for size-structured food webs. The framework allows food web models to include ontogenetic growth and life-history omnivory at the individual level by resolving the population structure of each species as a size-spectrum. Each species is characterised by the trait 'size at maturation', and all model parameters are made species independent through scaling with individual body size and size at maturation. Parameter values are determined from cross-species analysis of fish communities as life-history omnivory is widespread in aquatic systems, but may be reparameterised for other systems. An ensemble of food webs is generated and the resulting communities are analysed at four levels of organisation: community level, species level, trait level, and individual level. The model may be solved analytically by assuming that the community spectrum follows a power law. The analytical solution provides a baseline expectation of the results of complex food web simulations, and agrees well with the predictions of the full model on biomass distribution as a function of individual size, biomass distribution as a function of size at maturation, and relation between predator-prey mass ratio of preferred and eaten food. The full model additionally predicts the diversity distribution as a function of size at maturation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of native maize populations in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Claudia A.; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Hearne, Sarah; Franco, Jorge; Mir, Celine; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Taba, Suketoshi; Charcosset, Alain; Warburton, Marilyn L.

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 native maize populations from 23 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The germplasm, representing 131 distinct landraces, was genetically characterized as population bulks using 28 SSR markers. Three main groups of maize germplasm were identified. The first, the Mexico and Southern Andes group, highlights the Pre-Columbian and modern exchange of germplasm between North and South America. The second group, Mesoamerica lowland, supports the hypothesis that two separate human migration events could have contributed to Caribbean maize germplasm. The third, the Andean group, displayed early introduction of maize into the Andes, with little mixing since then, other than a regional interchange zone active in the past. Events and activities in the pre- and post-Columbian Americas including the development and expansion of pre-Columbian cultures and the arrival of Europeans to the Americas are discussed in relation to the history of maize migration from its point of domestication in Mesoamerica to South America and the Caribbean through sea and land routes. PMID:28403177

  5. Genetic structure of fragmented November moth (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) populations in farmland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wynne, Ian Robert; Loxdale, Hugh D.; Brookes, Cliff P.

    2003-01-01

    allozymes, conservation genetics, Epirrita dilutata, Epirrita christyi, molecular markers, habitat fragmentation, population genetic structure......allozymes, conservation genetics, Epirrita dilutata, Epirrita christyi, molecular markers, habitat fragmentation, population genetic structure...

  6. Population structure of a vector-borne plant parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Kelsey M; Koop, Jennifer A H; Alexandre, Nicolas M; Johnston, Lauren R; Whiteman, Noah K

    2016-07-01

    Parasites are among the most diverse groups of life on Earth, yet complex natural histories often preclude studies of their speciation processes. The biology of parasitic plants facilitates in situ collection of data on both genetic structure and the mechanisms responsible for that structure. Here, we studied the role of mating, dispersal and establishment in host race formation of a parasitic plant. We investigated the population genetics of a vector-borne desert mistletoe (Phoradendron californicum) across two legume host tree species (Senegalia greggii and Prosopis velutina) in the Sonoran desert using microsatellites. Consistent with host race formation, we found strong host-associated genetic structure in sympatry, little genetic variation due to geographic site and weak isolation by distance. We hypothesize that genetic differentiation results from differences in the timing of mistletoe flowering by host species, as we found initial flowering date of individual mistletoes correlated with genetic ancestry. Hybrids with intermediate ancestry were detected genetically. Individuals likely resulting from recent, successful establishment events following dispersal between the host species were detected at frequencies similar to hybrids between host races. Therefore, barriers to gene flow between the host races may have been stronger at mating than at dispersal. We also found higher inbreeding and within-host individual relatedness values for mistletoes on the more rare and isolated host species (S. greggii). Our study spanned spatial scales to address how interactions with both vectors and hosts influence parasitic plant structure with implications for parasite virulence evolution and speciation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Toxoplasma and Africa: One Parasite, Two Opposite Population Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Lokman; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Hamidović, Azra; Durieux, Marie-Fleur; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Mercier, Aurélien

    2018-02-01

    Exploring the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii is essential for an understanding of its worldwide distribution and the determinants of its evolution. Africa remains one of the least studied areas of the world regarding T. gondii genetic diversity. This review has compiled published data on T. gondii strains from Africa to generate a comprehensive map of their continent-wide geographical distribution. The emerging picture about T. gondii strain distribution in Africa suggests a geographical separation of the parasite populations across the continent. We discuss the potential role of a number of factors in shaping this structure. We finally suggest the next steps towards a better understanding of Toxoplasma epidemiology in Africa in light of the strains circulating on this continent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...... this the most comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of marine VHSV conducted to date. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences confirmed the existence of the 4 major genotypes previously identified based on N- and subsequent G-gene based analyses. The range of Genotype I included subgroups...... of isolates associated with rainbow trout aquaculture (Genotype la) and those from the Baltic marine environment (Genotype Ib) to emphasise the relatively close genetic relationship between these isolates. The existence of an additional genotype circulating within the Baltic Sea (Genotype II) was also...

  9. ASSESSMENT OF CHAROLAIS BULLS POPULATION STRUCTURE BASED ON SNPs ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Moravčíková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was identification of SNPs in leptin (LEP, leptin receptor (LEPR, growth hormone (GH and specific pituitary transcription factor (Pit-1 genes in order to analyze genetic structure of Charolais bulls’ population. The total numbers of genomic DNA samples were taken from 52 breeding bulls and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. After digestion with restriction enzymes were detected in bulls’ population alleles with frequency: LEP/Sau3AI A 0.83 and B 0.17 (±0.037; LEPR/BseGI C 0.95 and T 0.05 (±0.021, GH/AluI L 0.62 and V 0.38 (±0.048 and Pit1/HinfI A 0.40 and B 0.60 (±0.048. Based on the observed vs. expected genotypes frequencies population across loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05, only in case of Pit-1 locus was detected disequilibrium. Predominant were in analyzed breeding bulls LEP/Sau3AIAA (0.69, LEPR/T945MCC (0.90, GH/AluILL (0.43 and Pit-1/HinfIAB (0.65 genotypes. The observed heterozygosity of SNPs was also transferred to the low (LEP/Sau3AI/0.248 and LEPR/T945M/0.088 or median polymorphic information content (GH/AluI/0.366 and Pit-1/HinfI/0.370. Within genetic variability estimating negative (LEPR/T945M and Pit-1/HinfI and positive values (LEP/Sau3AI and GH/AluI of fixation indexes FIS indicating slight heterozygote excess or deficiency based on analyzed genetic marker were observed.

  10. Population genetic structure of a microalgal species under expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Lebret

    Full Text Available Biological invasions often cause major perturbations in the environment and are well studied among macroorganisms. Less is known about invasion by free-living microbes. Gonyostomum semen (Raphidophyceae is a freshwater phytoplankton species that has increased in abundance in Northern Europe since the 1980's and has expanded its habitat range. In this study, we aimed to determine the genetic population structure of G. semen in Northern Europe and to what extent it reflects the species' recent expansion. We sampled lakes from 12 locations (11 lakes in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Multiple strains from each location were genotyped using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP. We found low differentiation between locations, and low gene diversity within each location. Moreover, there was an absence of genetic isolation with distance (Mantel test, p = 0.50. According to a Bayesian clustering method all the isolates belonged to the same genetic population. Together our data suggest the presence of one metapopulation and an overall low diversity, which is coherent with a recent expansion of G. semen.

  11. Genetic population structure of muskellunge in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapuscinski, Kevin L.; Sloss, Brian L.; Farrell, John M.

    2013-01-01

    We quantified genetic relationships among Muskellunge Esox masquinongy from 15 locations in the Great Lakes to determine the extent and distribution of measurable population structure and to identify appropriate spatial scales for fishery management and genetic conservation. We hypothesized that Muskellunge from each area represented genetically distinct populations, which would be evident from analyses of genotype data. A total of 691 Muskellunge were sampled (n = 10–127/site) and genetic data were collected at 13 microsatellite loci. Results from a suite of analyses (including pairwise genetic differentiation, Bayesian admixture prediction, analysis of molecular variance, and tests of isolation by distance) indicated the presence of nine distinct genetic groups, including two that were approximately 50 km apart. Geographic proximity and low habitat complexity seemed to facilitate genetic similarity among areas, whereas Muskellunge from areas of greater habitat heterogeneity exhibited high differentiation. Muskellunge from most areas contained private alleles, and mean within-area genetic variation was similar to that reported for other freshwater fishes. Management programs aimed at conserving the broader diversity and long-term sustainability of Muskellunge could benefit by considering the genetically distinct groups as independent fisheries, and individual spawning and nursery habitats could subsequently be protected to conserve the evolutionary potential of Muskellunge.

  12. Effects of structural connectivity on fine scale population genetic structure of muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Sophie; Smith, Matthew J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2013-01-01

    In heterogeneous landscapes, physical barriers and loss of structural connectivity have been shown to reduce gene flow and therefore lead to population structuring. In this study, we assessed the influence of landscape features on population genetic structure and gene flow of a semiaquatic species, the muskrat. A total of 97 muskrats were sampled from three watersheds near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. We estimated population genetic structure using 11 microsatellite loci and identified a single genetic cluster and no genetic differences were found among the watersheds as a result of high levels of gene flow. At finer scales, we assessed the correlation between individual pairwise genetic distances and Euclidean distance as well as different models of least cost path (LCP). We used a range of cost values for the landscape types in order to build our LCP models. We found a positive relationship between genetic distance and least cost distance when we considered roads as corridors for movements. Open landscapes and urban areas seemed to restrict but not prevent gene flow within the study area. Our study underlines the high-dispersal ability of generalist species in their use of landscape and highlights how landscape features often considered barriers to animal movements are corridors for other species. PMID:24223287

  13. Using multiple metrics to assess the effects of forest succession on population status: a comparative study of two terrestrial salamanders in the US Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart Welsh; Karen L. Pope; Clara A. Wheeler

    2008-01-01

    Investigations to determine stable or source-sink animal population dynamics are challenging and often infeasible for most species due to the time and expense of mark-recapture studies and the challenge of life histories attributes that result in low detectability and low recapture probabilities. Often, managers rely solely on occupancy or relative abundance patterns...

  14. Narrow structure in the coherent population trapping resonance in sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzini, S.; Marmugi, L.; Lucchesini, A.; Gateva, S.; Cartaleva, S.; Nasyrov, K.

    2011-07-01

    We present a detailed study of coherent population trapping (CPT) in the Hanle configuration in sodium atoms confined inside a glass cell and irradiated with a broadband multimode dye laser light resonant with the D1 line. The presence of several modes spaced by tens of MHz is effective in inhibiting hyperfine optical pumping, thus reducing losses and allowing for efficient trapping. A narrow resonance, whose width is of the order of 1 mG, is observed superimposed on the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance. Such a structure is more than two orders of magnitude narrower than the broader one, with significantly reduced power broadening. In order to describe this phenomenon, we developed a theoretical model, based on numerical solutions of density matrix equations, which takes into account the peculiarity of CPT induced by broadband multimode laser light. Results are shown to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. In this framework, the small width and the small amount of power broadening exhibited by this narrow spectral structure are related to the time spent by the atoms to re-enter the laser beam volume after collisions that preserve the orientation. This study offers insight into the mechanisms of atoms depolarization caused by collisions with the cell walls and represents a starting point for the development of techniques for the diagnostics of cell-coating parameters and new applications in metrology and magnetometry.

  15. The Genetic Structure of Wild Orobanche cumana Wallr. (Orobanchaceae Populations in Eastern Bulgaria Reflects Introgressions from Weedy Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Pineda-Martos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orobanche cumana is a holoparasitic plant naturally distributed from central Asia to south-eastern Europe, where it parasitizes wild Asteraceae species. It is also an important parasitic weed of sunflower crops. The objective of this research was to investigate genetic diversity, population structure, and virulence on sunflower of O. cumana populations parasitizing wild plants in eastern Bulgaria. Fresh tissue of eight O. cumana populations and mature seeds of four of them were collected in situ on wild hosts. Genetic diversity and population structure were studied with SSR markers and compared to weedy populations. Two main gene pools were identified in Bulgarian populations, with most of the populations having intermediate characteristics. Cross-inoculation experiments revealed that O. cumana populations collected on wild species possessed similar ability to parasitize sunflower to those collected on sunflower. The results were explained on the basis of an effective genetic exchange between populations parasitizing sunflower crops and those parasitizing wild species. The occurrence of bidirectional gene flow may have an impact on wild populations, as new physiological races continuously emerge in weedy populations. Also, genetic variability of wild populations may favour the ability of weedy populations to overcome sunflower resistance mechanisms.

  16. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Coupat-Goutaland

    Full Text Available Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM. Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis. They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  17. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  18. Peach genetic resources: diversity, population structure and linkage disequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    was considerable LD extension while no variation of LD with physical distance was observed in the landraces. From the first STRUCTURE result, LG1 had the greatest proportion of alleles in LD within all three subpopulations. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a high level of genetic diversity and relatively fast decay of LD in the Oriental peach breeding program. Inclusion of Chinese landraces will have a greater effect on increasing genetic diversity in Occidental breeding programs. Fingerprinting with genotype data for all 658 cultivars will be used for accession management in different germplasms. A higher density of markers are needed for association mapping in Oriental germplasm due to the low extension of LD. Population structure and evaluation of LD provides valuable information for GWAS experiment design in peach. PMID:24041442

  19. [Genetic structure of populations of the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, A P; Berezovskaia, O P

    2002-11-01

    The genetic structure of a Colorado potato beetle population from Kiev oblast was examined by cluster analysis of individual RAPD patterns. The obtained clustering indicates that the population is structured. This may be explained by adaptation to pyrethroid insecticides used for controlling the population size of this pest. Micro-evolutionary factors affecting the genetic structure of local populations of Colorado potato beetle are discussed.

  20. Historical and anthropogenic factors affecting the population genetic structure of Ontario's inland lake populations of Walleye (Sander vitreus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Ryan P; Cena, Christopher J; Morgan, George E; Heath, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    Populations existing in formerly glaciated areas often display composite historical and contemporary patterns of genetic structure. For Canadian freshwater fishes, population genetic structure is largely reflective of dispersal from glacial refugia and isolation within drainage basins across a range of scales. Enhancement of sport fisheries via hatchery stocking programs and other means has the potential to alter signatures of natural evolutionary processes. Using 11 microsatellite loci genotyped from 2182 individuals, we analyzed the genetic structure of 46 inland lake walleye (Sander vitreus) populations spanning five major drainage basins within the province of Ontario, Canada. Population genetic analyses coupled with genotype assignment allowed us to: 1) characterize broad- and fine-scale genetic structure among Ontario walleye populations; and 2) determine if the observed population divergence is primarily due to natural or historical processes, or recent anthropogenic events. The partitioning of genetic variation revealed higher genetic divergence among lakes than among drainage basins or proposed ancestries-indicative of relatively high isolation among lakes, study-wide. Walleye genotypes were clustered into three major groups, likely reflective of Missourian, Mississippian, and Atlantic glacial refugial ancestry. Despite detectable genetic signatures indicative of anthropogenic influences, province-wide spatial genetic structure remains consistent with the hypothesis of dispersal from distinct glacial refugia and subsequent isolation of lakes within primary drainage basins. Our results provide a novel example of minimal impacts from fishery enhancement to the broad-scale genetic structure of inland fish populations.

  1. Addressing wild turkey population declines using structured decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelly F.; Fuller, Angela K.; Schiavone, Michael V.; Swift, Bryan L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Siemer, William F.; Decker, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case study from New York, USA, of the use of structured decision making (SDM) to identify fall turkey harvest regulations that best meet stakeholder objectives, in light of recent apparent declines in abundance of wild turkeys in the northeastern United States. We used the SDM framework to incorporate the multiple objectives associated with turkey hunting, stakeholder desires, and region-specific ecological and environmental factors that could influence fall harvest. We identified a set of 4 fall harvest regulations, composed of different season lengths and bag limits, and evaluated their relative achievement of the objectives. We used a stochastic turkey population model, statistical modeling, and expert elicitation to evaluate the consequences of each harvest regulation on each of the objectives. We conducted a statewide mail survey of fall turkey hunters in New York to gather the necessary information to evaluate tradeoffs among multiple objectives associated with hunter satisfaction. The optimal fall harvest regulation was a 2-week season and allowed for the harvest of 1 bird/hunter. This regulation was the most conservative of those evaluated, reflecting the concerns about recent declines in turkey abundance among agency wildlife biologists and the hunting public. Depending on the region of the state, the 2-week, 1-bird regulation was predicted to result in 7–32% more turkeys on the landscape after 5 years. The SDM process provided a transparent framework for setting fall turkey harvest regulations and reduced potential stakeholder conflict by explicitly taking the multiple objectives of different stakeholder groups into account.

  2. The structure of paranoia in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Paul E; McBride, Orla; Steel, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Radovanovic, Mirjana; Brugha, Traolach; Jenkins, Rachel; Meltzer, Howard I; Freeman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Psychotic phenomena appear to form a continuum with normal experience and beliefs, and may build on common emotional interpersonal concerns. We tested predictions that paranoid ideation is exponentially distributed and hierarchically arranged in the general population, and that persecutory ideas build on more common cognitions of mistrust, interpersonal sensitivity and ideas of reference. Items were chosen from the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders (SCID-II) questionnaire and the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire in the second British National Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity (n = 8580), to test a putative hierarchy of paranoid development using confirmatory factor analysis, latent class analysis and factor mixture modelling analysis. Different types of paranoid ideation ranged in frequency from less than 2% to nearly 30%. Total scores on these items followed an almost perfect exponential distribution (r = 0.99). Our four a priori first-order factors were corroborated (interpersonal sensitivity; mistrust; ideas of reference; ideas of persecution). These mapped onto four classes of individual respondents: a rare, severe, persecutory class with high endorsement of all item factors, including persecutory ideation; a quasi-normal class with infrequent endorsement of interpersonal sensitivity, mistrust and ideas of reference, and no ideas of persecution; and two intermediate classes, characterised respectively by relatively high endorsement of items relating to mistrust and to ideas of reference. The paranoia continuum has implications for the aetiology, mechanisms and treatment of psychotic disorders, while confirming the lack of a clear distinction from normal experiences and processes.

  3. Genetic structure of autochthonous populations of Meso-America: Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, R; Ramírez, E; Babinsky, V

    1996-06-01

    We analyze the possible effect of gene flow on the genetic structure of present-day Mexicans. For this purpose we reviewed previous admixture estimates for various Indian and Mestizo groups. Several facts seem clear: (1) There are no pure Indian groups in Mexico, because all Indian groups show variable degrees of admixture, mostly with whites (range, 0.088 in the Huichol to 0.373 in the Huasteco); (2) the main ancestral contribution to the noncoastal lower middle class Mestizo populations is Indian (above 50%) so that from a genetic standpoint Indians and lower middle class Mestizos are not much different; and (3) black ancestry is quite high on the coasts, ranging from 0.127 to 0.405 on the east coast, and is present in other Mestizos, ranging in large urban centers from 0.027 in Oaxaca to 0.107 in Puebla and in smaller cities from 0.08 in Tlaxcala to 0.181 in Cuanalán.

  4. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Suzana Cláudia Silveira; Santaella, Sandra Tédde; Martins, Claudia Miranda; Martins, Rogério Parentoni

    2016-01-01

    There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  5. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Cláudia Silveira Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  6. 15 CFR 50.10 - Fee structure for special population censuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fee structure for special population... § 50.10 Fee structure for special population censuses. The Bureau of the Census is authorized to conduct special population censuses at the request of and at the expense of the community concerned. To...

  7. Population structure of Vibrio fischeri within the light organs of Euprymna scolopes squid from Two Oahu (Hawaii) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, M S; Ruby, E G

    2009-01-01

    We resolved the intraspecific diversity of Vibrio fischeri, the bioluminescent symbiont of the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes, at two previously unexplored morphological and geographical scales. These scales ranged from submillimeter regions within the host light organ to the several kilometers encompassing two host populations around Oahu. To facilitate this effort, we employed both novel and standard genetic and phenotypic assays of light-organ symbiont populations. A V. fischeri-specific fingerprinting method and five phenotypic assays were used to gauge the genetic richness of V. fischeri populations; these methods confirmed that the symbiont population present in each adult host's light organ is polyclonal. Upon statistical analysis of these genetic and phenotypic population data, we concluded that the characteristics of symbiotic populations were more similar within individual host populations than between the two distinct Oahu populations of E. scolopes, providing evidence that local geographic symbiont population structure exists. Finally, to better understand the genesis of symbiont diversity within host light organs, the process of symbiosis initiation in newly hatched juvenile squid was examined both experimentally and by mathematical modeling. We concluded that, after the juvenile hatches, only one or two cells of V. fischeri enter each of six internal epithelium-lined crypts present in the developing light organ. We hypothesize that the expansion of different, crypt-segregated, clonal populations creates the polyclonal adult light-organ population structure observed in this study. The stability of the luminous-bacterium-sepiolid squid mutualism in the presence of a polyclonal symbiont population structure is discussed in the context of contemporary evolutionary theory.

  8. Comparison of genetic population structure of the large blue butterflies Maculinea nausithous and M. teleius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figurny-Puchalska, Edyta; Gadeberg, Rebekka M.E.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the genetic population structure of two rare myrmecophilous lycaenid butterflies, Maculinea nausithous and M. teleius, which often live sympatrically and have similar biology. In Europe, both species occur in highly fragmented populations and are vulnerable to local extinction...

  9. Population structure in an anadromous fish Tenualosa ilisha using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WATER INDIA

    2013-05-29

    May 29, 2013 ... tuna but in skipjack tuna no genetic differentiation was observed due to large population sizes (Ely et al., 2005). In Engraulis japonica from Yellow Sea and East China. Sea, cytochrome b gene fragment studies showed no significant genetic variation in its populations, the biological factors of anchovy such ...

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weerachai Saijuntha

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Abstract. The blue-crested lizard, Calotes mystaceus Duméril & Bibron, 1837, is listed as a protected wild animal in Thailand. Its population is likely to be dramatically reduced due to massive hunting in several areas in this country. Basic information on its population genetics is therefore needed to facilitate ...

  11. Quantifying Spatial Genetic Structuring in Mesophotic Populations of the Precious Coral Corallium rubrum

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Costantini; Lorenzo Carlesi; Marco Abbiati

    2013-01-01

    While shallow water red coral populations have been overharvested in the past, nowadays, commercial harvesting shifted its pressure on mesophotic organisms. An understanding of red coral population structure, particularly larval dispersal patterns and connectivity among harvested populations is paramount to the viability of the species. In order to determine patterns of genetic spatial structuring of deep water Corallium rubrum populations, for the first time, colonies found between 58-118 m ...

  12. Geographic structure of Plasmodium vivax: microsatellite analysis of parasite populations from Sri Lanka, Myanmar, and Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2010-01-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax parasites can predict the origin and spread of novel variants within a population enabling population specific malaria control measures. We analyzed the genetic diversity and population structure of 425 P. vivax isolates from Sri Lanka.......8610 in Sri Lanka. Significant linkage disequilibrium was maintained. Population structure showed two clusters (Asian and African) according to geography and ancestry. Strong clustering of outbreak isolates from Sri Lanka and Ethiopia was observed. Predictive power of ancestry using two-thirds of the isolates...

  13. Molecular Analyses Reveal Unexpected Genetic Structure in Iberian Ibex Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelone-Alasaad, Samer; Biebach, Iris; Pérez, Jesús M; Soriguer, Ramón C; Granados, José E

    2017-01-01

    Genetic differentiation in historically connected populations could be the result of genetic drift or adaptation, two processes that imply a need for differing strategies in population management. The aim of our study was to use neutral genetic markers to characterize C. pyrenaica populations genetically and examine results in terms of (i) demographic history, (ii) subspecific classification and (iii) the implications for the management of Iberian ibex. We used 30 neutral microsatellite markers from 333 Iberian ibex to explore genetic diversity in the three main Iberian ibex populations in Spain corresponding to the two persisting subspecies (victoria and hispanica). Our molecular analyses detected recent genetic bottlenecks in all the studied populations, a finding that coincides with the documented demographic decline in C. pyrenaica in recent decades. Genetic divergence between the two C. pyrenaica subspecies (hispanica and victoriae) was substantial (FST between 0.39 and 0.47). Unexpectedly, we found similarly high genetic differentiation between two populations (Sierra Nevada and Maestrazgo) belonging to the subspecies hispanica. The genetic pattern identified in our study could be the result of strong genetic drift due to the severe genetic bottlenecks in the studied populations, caused in turn by the progressive destruction of natural habitat, disease epidemics and/or uncontrolled hunting. Previous Capra pyrenaica conservation decision-making was based on the clear distinction between the two subspecies (victoriae and hispanica); yet our paper raises questions about the usefulness for conservation plans of the distinction between these subspecies.

  14. Evaluating Population Structure of Black Bears on the Kenai Peninsula using Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Analyses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stacie J. Robinson; Lisette P. Waits; Ian D. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Increasing human impacts on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, have raised questions about potential implications for genetic diversity and population structure of local taxa. Black bears (Ursus americanus...

  15. When domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus) population structures interact with their viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Dominique; Fouchet, David; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Poulet, Hervé; Guiserix, Micheline; Natoli, Eugenia; Sauvage, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Many theoretical studies have proposed different causal mechanisms by which the structure of a host population could have important implications for life history traits of pathogens. However, little information is available from real systems to test these hypotheses. The domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus, whose populations exhibit a great variability in social and spatial structure, represent an ideal case study to assess this question. In the present article, we show how cat population structure may have influenced the evolution of feline viruses and, in return, how these viruses may have modified the genetic structure of cat populations.

  16. The interplay between microevolution and community structure in microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Siobhán; Hodgson, David J; Buckling, Angus

    2013-08-01

    The structure of microbial communities is key to their functionality. However, this structure is likely to be influenced by adaptive genetic change in members of the community, which can occur over a matter of days. Changes in community structure can in turn influence the evolutionary trajectories of species within the community, further altering community structure. Microbial communities provide evidence for this interplay between rapid evolution and community structure. To date, studies are primarily limited to simple in vitro systems, but we suggest similar processes are inevitably operating in both natural and derived communities, which are important for biotechnology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic structure of populations of Mugil cephalus using RAPD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu in India was studied using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Five selective primers provided distinct and consistent RAPD profiles in all the four populations. The bands in the range 400 ...

  18. DEMOGRAPHY AND SPATIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE IN CALIFORNIA TIGER SALAMANDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the causes of many amphibian declines remain mysterious, there is general agreement that human habitat alteration represents the greatest threat to amphibian populations. In January 2000 the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing Santa Barbara County California Ti...

  19. Genetic diversity and structure in Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations analyzed by SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bang Zhong; Sasazaki, Shinji; Mannen, Hideyuki

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship and population structure among nine Eurasian cattle populations using 58 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. The calculated distribution of minor allele frequencies and heterozygosities suggested that the genetic diversity of Bos indicus populations was lower than that of Bos taurus populations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the main divergence between the Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations, and subsequently between Asian and European populations. By principal components analysis, the Bos taurus and Bos indicus populations were clearly distinguished with PC1 (61.1%); however, six Bos taurus populations clustered loosely and the partial separation between European and Asian groups was observed by PC2 (12.5%). The structure analysis was performed using the STRUCTURE program. Distinct separation between Bos taurus and Bos indicus was shown at K = 2, and that between European and Asian populations at K = 3. At K = 4, 5 and 6, Mongolian population showed an admixture pattern with different ancestry of Asian and European cattle. At K = 7, all Bos taurus populations showed each cluster with little proportion of admixture. In conclusion, 58 SNP markers in this study could sufficiently estimate the genetic diversity, relationship and structure for nine Eurasian cattle populations, especially by analyses of principal components and STRUCTURE.

  20. Sea otter population structure and ecology in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; Monson, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    Sea otters are the only fully marine otter. They share a common ancestry with the Old World land otters, but their route of dispersal to the New World is uncertain. The historic range of the species is along the northern Pacific Ocean rim, between central Baja California and the islands of northern Japan. Because they forage almost exclusively on bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates such as clams, snails, crabs, and sea urchins, they predominantly occur near shore. Their offshore distribution is limited by their diving ability; although they are capable of diving to more than 100 meters deep, most of their feeding takes place between the shoreline and depths of 40 meters. They are social animals, generally resting in protected bays or kelp forests in groups, commonly referred to as rafts. Because they are gregarious, possess a fine fur, and occur primarily near shore, they have been exploited by humans for as long as they have co-occupied coastal marine communities.During the late Pleistocene, glacial advances and retreats in the northern latitudes likely influenced genetic exchange within the sea otter’s northern range. When the glaciers were at their maximum, ice sheets extended over large coastal areas, isolating sea otter populations and causing local extinctions. During periods of glacial retreat, sea otters likely recolonized the newly available habitats, allowing exchange of individuals and gene flow between populations.Beginning in about 1750, sea otter populations underwent dramatic declines as a direct result of commercial harvest for their furs. Explorations by Vitus Bering led to the discovery of abundant sea otter populations in the Aleutian Islands. The early harvest, conducted by Russians with enslaved Aleut hunters, began in the eastern Aleutians. Eventually the harvest became multinational and contributed significantly to the exploration and settlement of the North Pacific coastline by Europeans. There were two distinct periods of harvest

  1. Evolutionary mechanisms shaping the genetic population structure of coastal fish: insight from populations of Coilia nasus in Northwestern Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tianxiang; Wan, Zhenzhen; Song, Na; Zhang, Xiumei; Han, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-01

    A number of evolutionary mechanisms have been suggested for generating significant genetic structuring among marine fish populations in Northwestern Pacific. We used mtDNA control region to assess the factors in shaping the genetic structure of Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus, an anadromous and estuarine coastal species, in Northwestern Pacific. Sixty seven individuals from four locations in Northwestern Pacific were sequenced for mitochondrial control region, detecting 61 haplotypes. The length of amplified control region varied from 677 to 754 bp. This length variability was due to the presence of varying numbers of a 38-bp tandemly repeated sequence. Two distinct lineages were detected, which might have diverged during Pleistocene low sea levels. There were strong differences in the geographical distribution of the two lineages. Analyses of molecular variance and the population statistic ΦST revealed significant genetic structure between China and Ariake Bay populations. Based on the frequency distribution of tandem repeat units, significant genetic differentiation was also detected between China and Ariake Bay populations. Isolation by distance seems to be the main factor driving present genetic structuring of C. nasus populations, indicating coastal dispersal pattern in this coastal species. Such an evolutionary process agrees well with some of the biological features characterizing this species.

  2. Understanding population structure and historical demography in a conservation context: population genetics of the endangered Kirengeshoma palmata (Hydrangeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Na; Sun, Yi; Comes, Hans-Peter; Fu, Cheng-Xin; Qiu, Ying-Xiong

    2014-03-01

    Both historical and contemporary microevolutionary processes greatly influence the genetic patterns of East Asian plant endemics, but the spatial and temporal contexts of these processes remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the relative influences of historical and contemporary gene flow and drift on the population genetic structure of Kirengeshoma palmata, a perennial herb from East China and South Japan. We used data from nine polymorphic microsatellite loci to assess the levels of genetic diversity, effective population size, and contemporary and historical gene flow for six of the seven known populations. We found high levels of inbreeding and allelic diversity within populations. Both contemporary and historical migration rates among populations were low, and a test of alternate models of population history strongly favored a model of long-term drift-migration equilibrium. We inferred declines in population size ca. 10,000-100,000 yr ago, but failed to detect recent declines. Bayesian clustering divided K. palmata populations into three genetic clusters, two of which were consistent with a glacial refugium hypothesis for two mountain ranges in East China. These results suggest that anthropogenic fragmentation has had little effect on the genetic characteristics of Chinese K. palmata. Rather, past decline in population size due to Late Pleistocene climate change as well as restricted pollen and seed dispersal may have contributed to low levels of both historical and contemporary gene flow, resulting in high genetic differentiation between adjacent mountain ranges due to genetic drift and inbreeding.

  3. Conservation biology of the last Italian population of Cistus laurifolius (Cistaceae: demographic structure, reproductive success and population genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Astuti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Isolated populations are usually subject to low fitness and reduced genetic diversity, both of which may negatively affect their survival and adaptive potential. Hence, these issues cannot be neglected when planning conservation actions for isolated populations. The Italian population of Cistus laurifolius subsp. laurifolius is extremely isolated. Furthermore, it is affected by fragmentation, being constituted by a single larger subpopulation, surrounded by three much smaller subpopulations, a few hundred metres to a few kilometres apart. In order to fill gaps in demographic and genetic knowledge concerning the Italian population, its area of occupancy, size, age-stage structure and phenology were investigated and its reproductive fitness, pollination strategies and genetic variability were assessed. The population was inferred as fully xenogamous and showed good reproductive performance. Despite this, its genetic variability was low and it showed relatively high levels of inbreeding depression (Fis, seemingly not affected by sub-population size. These results suggest that the Italian population recently suffered fragmentation and reduction in size. The low genetic diversity observed could be explained by the high percentage of mature individuals found in the population, possibly established before fragmentation. For these reasons, the Italian population of C. laurifolius subsp. laurifolius should be monitored and concrete actions aimed at its conservation planned.

  4. Population structure of Helicobacter pylori among ethnic groups in Malaysia: recent acquisition of the bacterium by the Malay population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawes Ian W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a major gastric bacterial pathogen. This pathogen has been shown to follow the routes of human migration by their geographical origin and currently the global H. pylori population has been divided into six ancestral populations, three from Africa, two from Asia and one from Europe. Malaysia is made up of three major ethnic populations, Malay, Chinese and Indian, providing a good population for studying recent H. pylori migration and admixture. Results Seventy eight H. pylori isolates, including 27 Chinese, 35 Indian and 16 Malay isolates from Malaysia were analysed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST of seven housekeeping genes and compared with the global MLST data. STRUCTURE analysis assigned the isolates to previously identified H. pylori ancestral populations, hpEastAsia, hpAsia2 and hpEurope, and revealed a new subpopulation, hspIndia, within hpAsia2. Statistical analysis allowed us to identify population segregation sites that divide the H. pylori populations and the subpopulations. The majority of Malay isolates were found to be grouped together with Indian isolates. Conclusion The majority of the Malay and Indian H. pylori isolates share the same origin while the Malaysian Chinese H. pylori is distinctive. The Malay population, known to have a low infection rate of H. pylori, was likely to be initially H. pylori free and gained the pathogen only recently from cross infection from other populations.

  5. Population genetic structure in the eastern population of Greater Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis Tabida)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sandhill Crane (SACR; Grus canadensis) is the most populous of the 15 extant crane species. Their breeding range covers the majority of the continental U.S. and...

  6. Density dependence in an age-structured population of great tits: identifying the critical age classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamelon, M.; Grotan, V.; Engen, S.; Bjørkvoll, E.; Visser, M.E.; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Classical approaches for the analyses of density dependence assume that all the individuals in a population equally respond and equally contribute to density dependence. However, in age-structured populations, individuals of different ages may differ in their responses to changes in population size

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris; Apiaceae) in the upper Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbottam Piya; Madhav P. Nepal; Jack L. Butler; Gary E. Larson; Achal Neupane

    2014-01-01

    Sickleweed (Falcaria vulgaris), an introduced species native to Europe and Asia, grows as an aggressive weed in some areas of the upper Midwest in the United States. We are reporting genetic diversity and population structure of sickleweed populations using microsatellite markers and nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Populations showed high genetic differentiation...

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... tant repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of ..... Peakall R. and Smouse P. E. 2012 GenAlEx 6.5: genetic analysis in. Excel. Population genetic software for teaching and research—an update. Bioinformatics 28, 2537–2539.

  9. Population genetic structure based on SSR markers in alfalfa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1988). Cultivated alfalfa is autotetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) (McCoy and Bingham 1988), cross-pollinated (allogamous) and seed propagated. Severe inbreeding depression and tetrasomic inheritance make it dif- ficult to carry out many types of population-genetic stud- ies in this species. Therefore, breeding approaches to de-.

  10. Effect of population structure and underlying magnitude of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Norris

    For each population, three combinations of additive and dominance genetic variances of different relative magnitudes ... detecting the magnitude of dominance genetic variance depends on the density and size of full-sib families in the data. ..... nonadditive genetic variance components and inbreeding depression. J. Dairy ...

  11. Population structure and growth of polydorid polychaetes that infest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polydorid polychaetes can infest cultured abalone thereby reducing productivity. In order to effectively control these pests, their reproductive biology must be understood. The population dynamics and reproduction of polydorids infesting abalone Haliotis midae from two farms in South Africa is described using a ...

  12. The population structure of Ukraine in relation to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is one of the classical genetic markers in human studies. PTC is of great interest from the medical point of view since a number of associations of the taster status with human diseases have been found. The aim of our study was to evaluate the population ...

  13. Genetic structure and diversity within and among six populations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-04-24

    Apr 24, 2010 ... Webb ex Christ and Helianthemum juliae Wildprett. Boletim do. Museo Municipal do Funchal. 2: 41-56. Barrett SCH, Kohn JR (1991). Genetic and evolutionary consequences of small population size in plants: implications for conservation. In: Falk DA, Holsinger KE (eds) Genetics and conservation of rare.

  14. Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugă, Bogdan; Turko, Patrick; Spaak, Piet; Pomati, Francesco

    2016-04-05

    Zooplankton communities can be strongly affected by cyanobacterial blooms, especially species of genus Daphnia, which are key-species in lake ecosystems. Here, we explored the effect of microcystin/nonmicrocystin (MC/non-MC) producing cyanobacteria in the diet of experimental Daphnia galeata populations composed of eight genotypes. We used D. galeata clones hatched from ephippia 10 to 60 years old, which were first tested in monocultures, and then exposed for 10 weeks as mixed populations to three food treatments consisting of green algae combined with cyanobacteria able/unable of producing MC. We measured the expression of nine genes potentially involved in Daphnia acclimation to cyanobacteria: six protease genes, one ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene, and two rRNA genes, and then we tracked the dynamics of the genotypes in mixed populations. The expression pattern of one protease and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes was positively correlated with the increased fitness of competing clones in the presence of cyanobacteria, suggesting physiological plasticity. The genotype dynamics in mixed populations was only partially related to the growth rates of clones in monocultures and varied strongly with the food. Our results revealed strong intraspecific differences in the tolerance of D. galeata clones to MC/non-MC-producing cyanobacteria in their diet, suggesting microevolutionary effects.

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure among exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was performed to study genetic relationships and population differentiation of 90 introduced sugarcane accessions in Ethiopia by means of 22 SSR molecular markers. The 22 SSR markers amplified a total of 260 alleles, of which 230 were polymorphic with a mean of 10.45 alleles per SSR locus.

  16. Similar levels of diversity and population Structure in superflock and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We use DNA microsatellite loci to estimate neutral genetic diversity and the level of gene flow among populations of two cichlid species from southern Lake Victoria, Africa: the endemic and stenotopic superflock species Pundamilia nyererei and the non-endemic, widespread species Astatoreochromis alluaudi. The two ...

  17. The population structure of Ukraine in relation to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.V. Filiptsova

    2015-01-06

    Jan 6, 2015 ... bitter taste;. Genetic marker;. Population of Ukraine. Abstract Background: The taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is one of the classical genetic markers in ... tors in the human body have been studied. Despite the fact ... cauliflower, and others [4] having in their composition com- pounds with ...

  18. Genetic variation and population structure of interleukin genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The extent of genetic variation and the degree of genetic differentiation among seven ethnic populations from Karnataka, India (Bunt, Havyak, Iyengar, Lingayath, Smartha, Vaishya, Vokkaliga), was investigated using four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: IL-1A 4845, IL-1B 3954, IL-1B 511 and IL-1RA 2018) of the ...

  19. Global population structure and demographic history of the grey seal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimova, A.; Phillips, C. D.; Fietz, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    a little over 10 000 years ago, consistent with the last proposed isolation of the Baltic Sea. Approximate Bayesian computation also identified genetic signals consistent with postglacial population expansion across much of the species range, suggesting that grey seals are highly responsive to changes...

  20. ObStruct: a method to objectively analyse factors driving population structure using Bayesian ancestry profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velimir Gayevskiy

    Full Text Available Bayesian inference methods are extensively used to detect the presence of population structure given genetic data. The primary output of software implementing these methods are ancestry profiles of sampled individuals. While these profiles robustly partition the data into subgroups, currently there is no objective method to determine whether the fixed factor of interest (e.g. geographic origin correlates with inferred subgroups or not, and if so, which populations are driving this correlation. We present ObStruct, a novel tool to objectively analyse the nature of structure revealed in Bayesian ancestry profiles using established statistical methods. ObStruct evaluates the extent of structural similarity between sampled and inferred populations, tests the significance of population differentiation, provides information on the contribution of sampled and inferred populations to the observed structure and crucially determines whether the predetermined factor of interest correlates with inferred population structure. Analyses of simulated and experimental data highlight ObStruct's ability to objectively assess the nature of structure in populations. We show the method is capable of capturing an increase in the level of structure with increasing time since divergence between simulated populations. Further, we applied the method to a highly structured dataset of 1,484 humans from seven continents and a less structured dataset of 179 Saccharomyces cerevisiae from three regions in New Zealand. Our results show that ObStruct provides an objective metric to classify the degree, drivers and significance of inferred structure, as well as providing novel insights into the relationships between sampled populations, and adds a final step to the pipeline for population structure analyses.

  1. Demography and genetic structure of a recovering grizzly bear population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, K.C.; Stetz, J.B.; Boulanger, J.; Macleod, A.C.; Paetkau, David; White, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    Grizzly bears (brown bears; Ursus arctos) are imperiled in the southern extent of their range worldwide. The threatened population in northwestern Montana, USA, has been managed for recovery since 1975; yet, no rigorous data were available to monitor program success. We used data from a large noninvasive genetic sampling effort conducted in 2004 and 33 years of physical captures to assess abundance, distribution, and genetic health of this population. We combined data from our 3 sampling methods (hair trap, bear rub, and physical capture) to construct individual bear encounter histories for use in Huggins-Pledger closed mark-recapture models. Our population estimate, N?? = 765 (95% CI = 715-831) was more than double the existing estimate derived from sightings of females with young. Based on our results, the estimated known, human-caused mortality rate in 2004 was 4.6% (95% CI = 4.2-4.9%), slightly above the 4% considered sustainable; however, the high proportion of female mortalities raises concern. We used location data from telemetry, confirmed sightings, and genetic sampling to estimate occupied habitat. We found that grizzly bears occupied 33,480 km2 in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) during 1994-2007, including 10,340 km beyond the Recovery Zone. We used factorial correspondence analysis to identify potential barriers to gene flow within this population. Our results suggested that genetic interchange recently increased in areas with low gene flow in the past; however, we also detected evidence of incipient fragmentation across the major transportation corridor in this ecosystem. Our results suggest that the NCDE population is faring better than previously thought, and they highlight the need for a more rigorous monitoring program.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ivoire. However, no study on the genetic diversity of the species has been performed to date. This study aims at analyzing the diversity and genetic structure of 35 maize accessions using 10 microsatellite markers. These accessions are from ...

  3. Sus scrofa: Population Structure, Reproduction and Condition in Tropical North Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NELSON, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Three feral pig populations inhabiting contrasting environments along the north easterncoast of Australia have been investigated with respect to population structure, individual condition andreproduction. The population on Prince of Wales Island contains a large proportion of juvenile andsub-adult pigs but lacks pigs in the higher age classes. Individuals also breed at an earlier age thananimals of the mainland populations. Pig populations on Cape York Peninsula show a largerproportion of older animals and feral pigs living in rainforest habitats show a low proportion ofanimals in very young and very old age classes. Pigs from the lowland rainforest population are inbetter condition than those of the other populations for most of the year, reflecting the availability offood all year round in this environment. Differences in the population structure of the threepopulations are discussed with respect to fecundity and several mortality factors such as predation anddiseases/parasites.

  4. Into the depth of population genetics: pattern of structuring in mesophotic red coral populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Federica; Abbiati, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Deep-sea reef-building corals are among the most conspicuous invertebrates inhabiting the hard-bottom habitats worldwide and are particularly susceptible to human threats. The precious red coral ( Corallium rubrum, L. 1758) has a wide bathymetric distribution, from shallow up to 800 m depth, and represents a key species in the Mediterranean mesophotic reefs. Several studies have investigated genetic variability in shallow-water red coral populations, while geographic patterns in mesophotic habitats are largely unknown. This study investigated genetic variability of C. rubrum populations dwelling between 55 and 120 m depth, from the Ligurian to the Ionian Sea along about 1500 km of coastline. A total of 18 deep rocky banks were sampled. Colonies were analyzed by means of a set of microsatellite loci and the putative control region of the mitochondrial DNA. Collected data were compared with previous studies. Both types of molecular markers showed high genetic similarity between populations within the northern (Ligurian Sea and Tuscan Archipelago) and the southern (Tyrrhenian and Ionian seas) study areas. Variability in habitat features between the sampling sites did not affect the genetic variability of the populations. Conversely, the patchy distribution of suitable habitats affected populations' connectivity within and among deep coral banks. Based on these results and due to the emphasis on red coral protection in the Mediterranean Sea by international institutions, red coral could be promoted as a `focal species' to develop management plans for the conservation of deep coralligenous reefs, a reservoir of marine biodiversity.

  5. Reproductive isolation with a learned trait in a structured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Douhan Justin; Servedio, Maria R

    2015-07-01

    Assortative mating displays and/or preferences can be affected by learning across a wide range of animal taxa, but the specifics of how this learning affects speciation with gene flow are not well understood. We use population genetic models with trait learning to investigate how the identity of the tutor affects the divergence of a self-referent phenotype-matching trait. We find that oblique learning (learning from unrelated individual of the previous generation) and maternal learning mask sexual selection and therefore do not allow the maintenance of divergence. In contrast, by enhancing positive frequency-dependent sexual selection, paternal learning can maintain more divergence than genetic inheritance, but leads to the loss of polymorphism more easily. Furthermore, paternal learning inhibits the invasion of a novel self-referent phenotype-matching trait, especially in a large population. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Transferrin variation and genetic structure of reindeer populations in Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut H. Røed

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyse transferrin variation in herds of semi-domestic reindeer from Scandinavia. The results are compared with previously reported values for other populations of both semi-domestic and wild reindeer using the same techniques as in the present study. In all populations the number of alleles was high, ranging from seven to eleven, and the heterozygosity was correspondingly high, with a mean of 0.749. This high genetic variation in all populations suggests that inbreeding is not widespread among Scandinavian reindeer. The pattern of allele frequency distribution indicates a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in the transferrin locus, both between the different semi-domestic herds and between the different wild populations. The mean value of genetic distance was 0.069 between semi-domestic herds and 0.091 between wild populations. Between semi-domestic and wild populations the genetic distance was particularly high, with a mean of 0.188. This high value was mainly due to a different pattern in the distribution of the two most common transferrin alleles: Tfu was most common among semi-domestic herds, while TfEI was most common among wild populations. These differences in transferrin allele distribution are discussed in relation to possible different origins of semi-domestic and wild reindeer in Scandinavia, or alternatively, to different selection forces acting on transferrin genotypes in semi-domestic and wild populations.Transferrin-variasjon og genetisk struktur hos rein i Skandinavia.Abstact in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Transferrin-variasjon i tamreinflokker ble analysert ved hjelp av polyacrylamid gel elektroforese. Resultatene er sammenlignet med verdier som tidligere er beskrevet for både tamrein og villrein hvor det ble benyttet samme metode som i denne undersøkelsen. I alle populasjonene ble det registrert et høyt antall alleler (7-11 og heterozygositeten var tilsvarende høy med en

  7. Genetic variability and structure of an isolated population of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rosa-Laura Heredia-Bobadilla

    2017-11-15

    Nov 15, 2017 ... lare, A. velasci; range Na = 4.0–6.0 per locus; Parra-Olea et al. 2012; Sunny et al. 2014a), but similar values to the. A. altamirani population of LZNP (Na = 3.5; Parra-Olea et al. ..... the aquaculture industry. Fungal Biol. Rev. 27, 33–42. Van Oosterhout C., Hutchinson W. F., Wills D. P. M. and Ship- ley P. 2004 ...

  8. Genetic structure of honeybee populations from southern Brazil and Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz Nilza Maria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Apis mellifera scutellata was introduced to Brazil in 1956 and Africanized honeybee populations have now spread from Argentina to the southwestern United States. Temperate climatic restrictions seem to be a natural limit to Africanized honeybee expansion around parallels 35° to 40° SL. We used allozyme loci (Mdh-1 and Hk-1 and mtDNA haplotypes to characterize honeybee populations in southern Brazil and Uruguay and define a possible transition area between Africanized and European bees. Samples of 194 bee colonies were collected from ten localities between 30°-35° SL and 52°-59° WL. The mtDNA restriction patterns of these colonies were obtained through digestion of the mitochondrial genome by Eco RI, or by digestion by Bgl II and Xba I of the cytochrome B locus and the COI-COII intergenic region, respectively. The distribution limit of African bee colonies, i.e., those populations with only the African mtDNA haplotype and with a high proportion of African genes as shown by allozyme analysis, is located in northern Uruguay, with a hybridization zone located farther south in Uruguay. A gradual cline from north to south was observed, confirmed by mtDNA, racial admixture, and genetic distance analyses. No evidence of either gametic disequilibrium between nuclear markers or cytonuclear disequilibrium among the nuclear and mtDNA genotypes was detected, suggesting that the hybridization process has been completed.

  9. Effect of ancient population structure on the degree of polymorphism shared between modern human populations and ancient hominins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Anders; Manica, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Recent comparisons between anatomically modern humans and ancient genomes of other hominins have raised the tantalizing, and hotly debated, possibility of hybridization. Although several tests of hybridization have been devised, they all rely on the degree to which different modern populations share genetic polymorphisms with the ancient genomes of other hominins. However, spatial population structure is expected to generate genetic patterns similar to those that might be attributed to hybridization. To investigate this problem, we take Neanderthals as a case study, and build a spatially explicit model of the shared history of anatomically modern humans and this hominin. We show that the excess polymorphism shared between Eurasians and Neanderthals is compatible with scenarios in which no hybridization occurred, and is strongly linked to the strength of population structure in ancient populations. Thus, we recommend caution in inferring admixture from geographic patterns of shared polymorphisms, and argue that future attempts to investigate ancient hybridization between humans and other hominins should explicitly account for population structure. PMID:22893688

  10. Genetic Drift Suppresses Bacterial Conjugation in Spatially Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Peter D.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Jiménez, José I.; Chen, Irene A.

    2014-02-01

    Conjugation is the primary mechanism of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Although conjugation normally occurs in surface-associated growth (e.g., biofilms), it has been traditionally studied in well-mixed liquid cultures lacking spatial structure, which is known to affect many evolutionary and ecological processes. Here we visualize spatial patterns of gene transfer mediated by F plasmid conjugation in a colony of Escherichia coli growing on solid agar, and we develop a quantitative understanding by spatial extension of traditional mass-action models. We found that spatial structure suppresses conjugation in surface-associated growth because strong genetic drift leads to spatial isolation of donor and recipient cells, restricting conjugation to rare boundaries between donor and recipient strains. These results suggest that ecological strategies, such as enforcement of spatial structure and enhancement of genetic drift, could complement molecular strategies in slowing the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  11. Influence of language and ancestry on genetic structure of contiguous populations: A microsatellite based study on populations of Orissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap VK

    2005-02-01

    genetic distances and coefficient of gene differentiation were fairly small, the studied populations are indeed genetically similar and that the genetic structure of populations in a geographical region is primarily influenced by their ancestry and not by socio-cultural hierarchy or language. The scenario of genetic structure, however, might be different for other regions of the subcontinent where populations have more similar ethnic and linguistic backgrounds and there might be variations in the patterns of genomic and socio-cultural affinities in different geographical regions.

  12. High genetic diversity and low population structure in Porter's sunflower (Helianthus porteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Scott D; Mandel, Jennifer R; Burke, John M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Granite outcrops in the southeastern United States are rare and isolated habitats that support edaphically controlled communities dominated by herbaceous plants. They harbor rare and endemic species that are expected to have low genetic variability and high population structure due to small population sizes and their disjunct habitat. We test this expectation for an annual outcrop endemic, Helianthus porteri (Porter's sunflower). Contrary to expectation, H. porteri has relatively high genetic diversity (H e = 0.681) and relatively low genetic structure among the native populations (F ST = 0.077) when compared to 5 other Helianthus species (N = 288; 18 expressed sequence tag-SSR markers). These findings suggest greater gene flow than expected. The potential for gene flow is supported by the analysis of transplant populations established with propagules from a common source in 1959. One population established close to a native population (1.5 km) at the edge of the natural range is genetically similar to and shares rare alleles with the adjacent native population and is distinct from the central source population. In contrast, a transplant population established north of the native range has remained similar to the source population. The relatively high genetic diversity and low population structure of this species, combined with the long-term success of transplanted populations, bode well for its persistence as long as the habitat persists.

  13. Whole-genome sequence variation, population structure and demographic history of the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The Genome of the Netherlands Consortium; T. Marschall (Tobias); A. Schönhuth (Alexander)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWhole-genome sequencing enables complete characterization of genetic variation, but geographic clustering of rare alleles demands many diverse populations be studied. Here we describe the Genome of the Netherlands (GoNL) Project, in which we sequenced the whole genomes of 250 Dutch

  14. Genetic variation and population structure of willowy flounder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-05

    Nov 5, 2008 ... Key words: Tanakius kitaharai, mitochondrial DNA control region, genetic variability, genetic structure. INTRODUCTION. Willowy ... to nuclear DNA (Brown et al., 1982; Wilson et al., 1985). The highest rates of base ... based on morphological features, and a piece of muscle tissue was obtained from each ...

  15. Genetic structure and variability within and among populations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lalouta

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... DTL distance estimates grouped the BAR ecotypes together showing the close relationship among them. APP appeared at the end of the longest branch confirming its use as an out-group. Clustering obtained by STRUCTURE revealed the high homogeneity of the. BAR breed since no clear subdivision in ...

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. ... genetic variability originated from differences among breeds, with all loci contributing significantly. An unrooted ..... be made for this breed to avoid inbreeding depression and genetic drift.

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of 10 Chinese indigenous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genetic structure and diversity of 10 Chinese indigenous egg-type duck breeds were investigated using 29 microsatellite markers. The total number of animals examined were 569, on average 57 animals per breed were selected. The microsatellite marker set analysed provided 177 alleles (mean 6.1 alleles per locus, ...

  18. 41 Population Structure and Exploitation of Three Commercial Tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    however, affects the forest biodiversity through reducing species diversity and altering the structure ... because other organisms depending on such a vanished tree face setbacks due to loss of their host (Johns ... (Cunningham, 2001). For example, studies that endeavor on measuring numbers of individuals from different ...

  19. Population structure in an anadromous fish Tenualosa ilisha using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WATER INDIA

    2013-05-29

    May 29, 2013 ... We investigated the mtDNA cytochrome b based genetic structure of anadromous clupeid hilsa,. Tenualosa ilisha, from the rivers Ganga and Hooghly. Six different haplotypes were observed, in sample size of 240, with a single dominant haplotype present in both rivers. Analysis of molecular variance.

  20. Population structure and association mapping studies for important ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-18

    Dec 18, 2014 ... design at the experimental field of IARI, New Delhi, India. (altitude 228.1m; 28.38. ◦. N; 77.12. ◦. E). The four check ... were carried out using SPSS software ver. 17. Genomewide screening. Genomewide .... which is implemented in the software Structure (Pritchard et al. 2000; http://pritch.bsd.uchicago.edu).

  1. Population genetic structure and phylogeography of the mud-flat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic structure and evolutionary demography of the mud-flat crabs (Helice tientsinensis and H. latimera) were investigated using sequence data of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. Samples of 213 individuals were collected from nine localities over most of the species' range along the coast of China seas ...

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure of maize landraces from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... (Chen et al., 2012) and quinoa (Bazile et al., 2014). This study aims at assessing the variability and genetic structure of local varieties of Ivorian maize using microsatellite markers. The results of the assessment can contribute to the ex situ conservation and the development of selection strategies in order to ...

  3. Genetic structure and variability within and among populations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the genetic diversity and the structure of the most dominant native fat-tailed Tunisian sheep breed (Barbarine, BAR) using microsatellite markers. Blood samples from 183 BAR animals, belonging to 4 subpopulations according to phenotypic traits, were collected across all regions in Tunisia.

  4. Genetic population structuring and demographic history of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climatic oscillations during the Pleistocene ice ages in the Northwestern Pacific produced great changes in species' geographical distribution and abundance, which could be expected to have genetic consequences in marine fishes. In order to estimate the demographic history and genetic structure of Epinephelus akaara ...

  5. Population fluctuations and community structure of small mammals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small mammals were live trapped monthly over a three year period in a subtropical grassland in Swaziland. Seven species of small mammals were recorded from the study grid. There were significant seasonal and inter annual differences in rodent numbers, breeding intensity and community structure. Mastomys natalensis ...

  6. Harvesting Renewable Resources of Population with Size Structure and Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang-Jun Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to explore the optimal exploitation way for a biological resources model incorporating individual’s size difference and spatial effects. The existence of a unique nonnegative solution to the state system is shown by means of Banach’s fixed point theorem, and the continuous dependence of the population density with the harvesting effort is given. The optimal harvesting strategy is established via normal cone and adjoint system technique. Some conditions are found to assure that there is only one optimal policy.

  7. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Major insights into the relationship between life-history features and fitness have come from Lotka's proof that population growth rate is determined by the level (expected amount) of reproduction and the average timing of reproduction of an individual. But this classical result is limited...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  8. Global population genetic structure and biogeography of the oceanic copepods Eucalanus hyalinus and E. spinifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Erica

    2005-01-01

    Although theory dictates that limited gene flow between populations is a necessary precursor to speciation under allopatric and parapatric models, it is currently unclear how genetic differentiation between conspecific populations can arise in open-ocean plankton species. I examined two recently ...... is an important factor determining the historical and contemporary patterns of dispersal of the two species. I suggest that species-specific ecological differences are likely to be a primary determinant of population genetic structure of open-ocean plankton......Although theory dictates that limited gene flow between populations is a necessary precursor to speciation under allopatric and parapatric models, it is currently unclear how genetic differentiation between conspecific populations can arise in open-ocean plankton species. I examined two recently...... distinguished sympatric, circumglobal sister species, Eucalanus hyalinus and Eucalanus spinifer, for population genetic structure throughout their global biogeographic ranges. Here I show that oceanic zooplankton species can be highly genetically structured on macro-geographic spatial scales, despite...

  9. Population structure and effective/census population size ratio in threatened three-spined stickleback populations from an isolated river basin in northwest Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Figueroa, A; Fernández, C; Amaro, R; Hermida, M; San Miguel, E

    2015-08-01

    Variability at 20 microsatellite loci was examined to assess the population genetic structure, gene flow, and effective population size (N(e)) in three populations of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from the upper basin of the Miño River in Galicia, NW Spain, where this species is threatened. The three populations showed similar levels of genetic diversity. There is a significant genetic differentiation between the three populations, but also significant gene flow. N(e) estimates based on linkage disequilibrium yielded values of 355 for the Miño River population and 241 and 311 for the Rato and Guisande Rivers, respectively, although we expect that these are overestimates. N(e) estimates based on temporal methods, considering gene flow or not, for the tributaries yielded values of 30-56 and 47-56 for the Rato and Guisande Rivers, respectively. Estimated census size (N(c)) for the Rato River was 880 individuals. This yielded a N(e)/N(c) estimate of 3-6 % for temporal estimation of N(e), which is within the empirical range observed in freshwater fishes. We suggest that the three populations analyzed have a sufficient level of genetic diversity with some genetic structure. Additionally, the absence of physical barriers suggests that conservation efforts and monitoring should focus in the whole basin as a unit.

  10. Population structure and genetic diversity in tristylous Narcissus triandrus: insights from microsatellite and chloroplast DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2007-06-01

    We investigated cpDNA sequence and nuclear microsatellite variation among populations of the wild daffodil Narcissus triandrus to examine the role of historical vs. contemporary forces in shaping population structure, morphological differentiation and sexual-system evolution. This wide-ranging heterostylous species of the Iberian Peninsula is largely composed of two allopatric varieties (vars. cernuus and triandrus), and populations with either stylar trimorphism or dimorphism. Dimorphic populations only occur in var. triandrus, are mainly restricted to the northwestern portion of the species range, and uniformly lack the mid-styled morph (M-morph). Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence variation revealed strong geographical structuring and evidence for a fragmentation event associated with differentiation of the two varieties. In var. triandrus, population fragmentation, restricted gene flow and isolation-by-distance were also inferred. Significant differences in genetic diversity and population structure between the two varieties likely reflect historical and contemporary differences in demography and gene flow among populations. Discordance between cpDNA markers and both microsatellite and morphological variation indicate that hybridization has occurred between the two varieties at contact zones. There were no differences in genetic diversity or population structure between dimorphic and trimorphic populations, and chloroplast haplotypes were not associated with either sexual system, indicating transitions in morph structure within each maternal lineage. M-morph frequencies were positively correlated with differentiation at microsatellite loci, indicating that the evolutionary processes influencing these neutral markers also influence alleles controlling the style morphs.

  11. Population structure age of Paraná state between 1970 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Pintor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of demographic transition began with an effort of Frank Notestein (1945 to understand the demographic changes that were occurring in Western Europe since the late nineteenth century. The demographic transition is the transition between two scenarios of population growth, which changes the age structure of the population. The aim of the article is to discuss the evolution of population structure age of Paraná state between 1970 and 2010. The changes in the age structure of the Paraná indicate a reduction in the share of young population and increasing aging population, an increase in the relative weight of the elderly population. Public policies on education, health, social security and labor market should consider the current change in the age structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze the change in the age structure of the population of the state of Paraná. For this we used data Censuses of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE on the age distribution of urban and rural Paraná and its Mesoregions. It was concluded that the change in structure occurs group widespread in all Mesoregions state. However, it occurs unevenly between urban and rural population.

  12. Quantifying Spatial Genetic Structuring in Mesophotic Populations of the Precious Coral Corallium rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Federica; Carlesi, Lorenzo; Abbiati, Marco

    2013-01-01

    While shallow water red coral populations have been overharvested in the past, nowadays, commercial harvesting shifted its pressure on mesophotic organisms. An understanding of red coral population structure, particularly larval dispersal patterns and connectivity among harvested populations is paramount to the viability of the species. In order to determine patterns of genetic spatial structuring of deep water Corallium rubrum populations, for the first time, colonies found between 58–118 m depth within the Tyrrhenian Sea were collected and analyzed. Ten microsatellite loci and two regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtMSH and mtC) were used to quantify patterns of genetic diversity within populations and to define population structuring at spatial scales from tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres. Microsatellites showed heterozygote deficiencies in all populations. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were observed at all investigated spatial scales, suggesting that populations are likely to be isolated. This differentiation may by the results of biological interactions, occurring within a small spatial scale and/or abiotic factors acting at a larger scale. Mitochondrial markers revealed significant genetic structuring at spatial scales greater then 100 km showing the occurrence of a barrier to gene flow between northern and southern Tyrrhenian populations. These findings provide support for the establishment of marine protected areas in the deep sea and off-shore reefs, in order to effectively maintain genetic diversity of mesophotic red coral populations. PMID:23646109

  13. Ancestral informative marker selection and population structure visualization using sparse Laplacian eigenfunctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of a small panel of population structure informative markers can reduce genotyping cost and is useful in various applications, such as ancestry inference in association mapping, forensics and evolutionary theory in population genetics. Traditional methods to ascertain ancestral informative markers usually require the prior knowledge of individual ancestry and have difficulty for admixed populations. Recently Principal Components Analysis (PCA has been employed with success to select SNPs which are highly correlated with top significant principal components (PCs without use of individual ancestral information. The approach is also applicable to admixed populations. Here we propose a novel approach based on our recent result on summarizing population structure by graph laplacian eigenfunctions, which differs from PCA in that it is geometric and robust to outliers. Our approach also takes advantage of the priori sparseness of informative markers in the genome. Through simulation of a ring population and the real global population sample HGDP of 650K SNPs genotyped in 940 unrelated individuals, we validate the proposed algorithm at selecting most informative markers, a small fraction of which can recover the similar underlying population structure efficiently. Employing a standard Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict individuals' continental memberships on HGDP dataset of seven continents, we demonstrate that the selected SNPs by our method are more informative but less redundant than those selected by PCA. Our algorithm is a promising tool in genome-wide association studies and population genetics, facilitating the selection of structure informative markers, efficient detection of population substructure and ancestral inference.

  14. Quantifying spatial genetic structuring in mesophotic populations of the precious coral Corallium rubrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Costantini

    Full Text Available While shallow water red coral populations have been overharvested in the past, nowadays, commercial harvesting shifted its pressure on mesophotic organisms. An understanding of red coral population structure, particularly larval dispersal patterns and connectivity among harvested populations is paramount to the viability of the species. In order to determine patterns of genetic spatial structuring of deep water Corallium rubrum populations, for the first time, colonies found between 58-118 m depth within the Tyrrhenian Sea were collected and analyzed. Ten microsatellite loci and two regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtMSH and mtC were used to quantify patterns of genetic diversity within populations and to define population structuring at spatial scales from tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres. Microsatellites showed heterozygote deficiencies in all populations. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were observed at all investigated spatial scales, suggesting that populations are likely to be isolated. This differentiation may by the results of biological interactions, occurring within a small spatial scale and/or abiotic factors acting at a larger scale. Mitochondrial markers revealed significant genetic structuring at spatial scales greater then 100 km showing the occurrence of a barrier to gene flow between northern and southern Tyrrhenian populations. These findings provide support for the establishment of marine protected areas in the deep sea and off-shore reefs, in order to effectively maintain genetic diversity of mesophotic red coral populations.

  15. Quantifying spatial genetic structuring in mesophotic populations of the precious coral Corallium rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Federica; Carlesi, Lorenzo; Abbiati, Marco

    2013-01-01

    While shallow water red coral populations have been overharvested in the past, nowadays, commercial harvesting shifted its pressure on mesophotic organisms. An understanding of red coral population structure, particularly larval dispersal patterns and connectivity among harvested populations is paramount to the viability of the species. In order to determine patterns of genetic spatial structuring of deep water Corallium rubrum populations, for the first time, colonies found between 58-118 m depth within the Tyrrhenian Sea were collected and analyzed. Ten microsatellite loci and two regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtMSH and mtC) were used to quantify patterns of genetic diversity within populations and to define population structuring at spatial scales from tens of metres to hundreds of kilometres. Microsatellites showed heterozygote deficiencies in all populations. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were observed at all investigated spatial scales, suggesting that populations are likely to be isolated. This differentiation may by the results of biological interactions, occurring within a small spatial scale and/or abiotic factors acting at a larger scale. Mitochondrial markers revealed significant genetic structuring at spatial scales greater then 100 km showing the occurrence of a barrier to gene flow between northern and southern Tyrrhenian populations. These findings provide support for the establishment of marine protected areas in the deep sea and off-shore reefs, in order to effectively maintain genetic diversity of mesophotic red coral populations.

  16. Food web framework for size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We synthesise traditional unstructured food webs, allometric body size scaling, trait-based modelling, and physiologically structured modelling to provide a novel and ecologically relevant tool for size-structured food webs. The framework allows food web models to include ontogenetic growth....... Parameter values are determined from cross-species analysis of fish communities as life-history omnivory is widespread in aquatic systems, but may be reparameterised for other systems. An ensemble of food webs is generated and the resulting communities are analysed at four levels of organisation: community...... level, species level, trait level, and individual level. The model may be solved analytically by assuming that the community spectrum follows a power law. The analytical solution provides a baseline expectation of the results of complex food web simulations, and agrees well with the predictions...

  17. Urban habitat fragmentation and genetic population structure of bobcats in coastal southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruell, E.W.; Riley, S.P.D.; Douglas, M.R.; Antolin, M.F.; Pollinger, J.R.; Tracey, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boydston, E.E.; Fisher, R.N.; Crooks, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    Although habitat fragmentation is recognized as a primary threat to biodiversity, the effects of urban development on genetic population structure vary among species and landscapes and are not yet well understood. Here we use non-invasive genetic sampling to compare the effects of fragmentation by major roads and urban development on levels of dispersal, genetic diversity, and relatedness between paired bobcat populations in replicate landscapes in coastal southern California. We hypothesized that bobcat populations in sites surrounded by urbanization would experience reduced functional connectivity relative to less isolated nearby populations. Our results show that bobcat genetic population structure is affected by roads and development but not always as predicted by the degree that these landscape features surround fragments. Instead, we suggest that urban development may affect functional connectivity between bobcat populations more by limiting the number and genetic diversity of source populations of migrants than by creating impermeable barriers to dispersal.

  18. Genetic drift suppresses bacterial conjugation in spatially structured populations

    OpenAIRE

    Freese, Peter D.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Jiménez, José I.; Chen, Irene A.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugation is the primary mechanism of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Although conjugation normally occurs in surface-associated growth (e.g., biofilms), it has been traditionally studied in well-mixed liquid cultures lacking spatial structure, which is known to affect many evolutionary and ecological processes. Here we visualize spatial patterns of gene transfer mediated by F plasmid conjugation in a colony of Escherichia coli growing on solid ag...

  19. Structure des populations et etat de conservation des principales ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... conservation durable des ressources phytogénétiques de la Réserve de Biosphère de la Pendjari. Mots clés: Conservation, aire protégée, plantes galactogènes et emménagogues, Pendjari, Bénin. English Title: Structure and conservation status of main lactogenic and emmenagogue plants of Pendjari biosphere reserve.

  20. Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Florez, J P; Hucke-Gaete, R; LeDuc, R; Lang, A; Taylor, B; Pimper, L E; Bedriñana-Romano, L; Rosenbaum, H C; Figueroa, C C

    2014-12-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas, 60 biopsy samples were collected from blue whales in SCh between 2003 and 2009. These samples were genotyped at seven microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region was sequenced, allowing us to identify 52 individuals. To investigate the genetic identity of this suspected remnant population, we compared these 52 individuals to blue whales from Antarctica (ANT, n = 96), Northern Chile (NCh, n = 19) and the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP, n = 31). No significant differentiation in haplotype frequencies (mtDNA) or among genotypes (nDNA) was found between SCh, NCh and ETP, while significant differences were found between those three areas and Antarctica for both the mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Our results suggest at least two breeding population units or subspecies exist, which is also supported by other lines of evidence such as morphometrics and acoustics. The lack of differences detected between SCh/NCh/ETP areas supports the hypothesis that eastern South Pacific blue whales are using the ETP area as a possible breeding area. Considering the small population sizes previously reported for the SCh area, additional conservation measures and monitoring of this population should be developed and prioritized. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic structure and molecular variability of potato virus M populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasinejad, Fatemeh; Jafarpour, Behrooz; Zakiaghl, Mohammad; Siampour, Majid; Rouhani, Hamid; Mehrvar, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of potato virus M (PVM; genus Carlavirus, family Betaflexiviridae), the complete nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of 30 PVM isolates from a major potato-growing region in Iran were determined. Phylogenetic analysis of these Iranian PVM isolates together with those available in the GenBank database suggested two divergent evolutionary lineages that did not reflect the origin of the isolates, and these were designated as PVM-o and PVM-d. Examination of the genetic variability of the coat protein of Iranian isolates and their counterparts whose sequences are available in the Genbank database revealed 16 genotype groups in the PVM population. Analysis of the synonymous-tononsynonymous ratio showed strong purifying selection in the CP gene in the genotype groups of divergent clades.

  2. Population structure, fluctuating asymmetry and genetic variability in an endemic and highly isolated Astyanax fish population (Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia Gross

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and chromosomal markers were used to infer the structure and genetic variability of a population of fish of the genus Astyanax, geographically isolated at sinkhole 2 of Vila Velha State Park, Paraná, Brazil. Two morphotypes types were observed, the standard phenotype I and phenotype II which showed an anatomical alteration probably due to an inbreeding process. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA analysis of different characters showed low levels of morphological variation among the population from sinkhole 2 and in another population from the Tibagi river (Paraná, Brazil. The Astyanax karyotype was characterized in terms of chromosomal morphology, constitutive heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer regions. Males and females presented similar karyotypes (2n=48, 6M+18SM+14ST+10A with no evidence of a sex chromosome system. One female from sinkhole 2 was a natural triploid with 2n=3x=72 chromosomes (9M+27SM+21ST+15A. The data are discussed regarding the maintenance of population structure and their evolutionary importance, our data suggesting that Astyanax from the Vila Velha State Park sinkhole 2 is a recently isolated population.

  3. Farming termites determine the genetic population structure of Termitomyces fungal symbionts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobre, Tânia; Fernandes, Cecília; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2011-01-01

    population structure of Termitomyces fungus gardens across 74 colonies of Macrotermes bellicosus in four west and central African countries. We confirm earlier, more limited, studies showing that the Termitomyces symbionts of M. bellicosus are normally transmitted vertically and clonally by dispersing males...... associated with the alternative termite hosts Macrotermes subhyalinus and Macrotermes natalensis. While Termitomyces associated with these alternative hosts are horizontally transmitted and recombine freely, the genetic population structure of the same Termitomyces associated with M. bellicosus is consistent...... with predominantly clonal reproduction and only occasional recombination. This implies that the genetic population structure of Termitomyces is controlled by the termite host and not by the Termitomyces symbiont....

  4. Phylogeography and population structure of the grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, from diverse Vitis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewer Marin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, was introduced into Europe more than 160 years ago and is now distributed everywhere that grapes are grown. To understand the invasion history of this pathogen we investigated the evolutionary relationships between introduced populations of Europe, Australia and the western United States (US and populations in the eastern US, where E. necator is thought to be native. Additionally, we tested the hypothesis that populations of E. necator in the eastern US are structured based on geography and Vitis host species. Results We sequenced three nuclear gene regions covering 1803 nucleotides from 146 isolates of E. necator collected from the eastern US, Europe, Australia, and the western US. Phylogeographic analyses show that the two genetic groups in Europe represent two separate introductions and that the genetic groups may be derived from eastern US ancestors. Populations from the western US and Europe share haplotypes, suggesting that the western US population was introduced from Europe. Populations in Australia are derived from European populations. Haplotype richness and nucleotide diversity were significantly greater in the eastern US populations than in the introduced populations. Populations within the eastern US are geographically differentiated; however, no structure was detected with respect to host habitat (i.e., wild or cultivated. Populations from muscadine grapes, V. rotundifolia, are genetically distinct from populations from other Vitis host species, yet no differentiation was detected among populations from other Vitis species. Conclusions Multilocus sequencing analysis of the grape powdery mildew fungus is consistent with the hypothesis that populations in Europe, Australia and the western US are derived from two separate introductions and their ancestors were likely from native populations in the eastern US. The invasion history of E. necator follows a pattern

  5. Temporal analysis of genetic structure to assess population dynamics of reintroduced swift foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Moehrenschlager, Axel

    2013-12-01

    Reintroductions are increasingly used to reestablish species, but a paucity of long-term postrelease monitoring has limited understanding of whether and when viable populations subsequently persist. We conducted temporal genetic analyses of reintroduced populations of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Canada (Alberta and Saskatchewan) and the United States (Montana). We used samples collected 4 years apart, 17 years from the initiation of the reintroduction, and 3 years after the conclusion of releases. To assess program success, we genotyped 304 hair samples, subsampled from the known range in 2000 and 2001, and 2005 and 2006, at 7 microsatellite loci. We compared diversity, effective population size, and genetic connectivity over time in each population. Diversity remained stable over time and there was evidence of increasing effective population size. We determined population structure in both periods after correcting for differences in sample sizes. The geographic distribution of these populations roughly corresponded with the original release locations, which suggests the release sites had residual effects on the population structure. However, given that both reintroduction sites had similar source populations, habitat fragmentation, due to cropland, may be associated with the population structure we found. Although our results indicate growing, stable populations, future connectivity analyses are warranted to ensure both populations are not subject to negative small-population effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of multiple sampling years to fully capture population dynamics of reintroduced populations. Análisis Temporal de la Estructura Genética para Evaluar la Dinámica Poblacional de Zorros (Vulpes velox) Reintroducidos. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. In situ population structure and ex situ representation of the endangered Amur tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P; Miquelle, D; Sugimoto, T; McCullough, D R; Caccone, A; Russello, M A

    2009-08-01

    The Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) is a critically endangered felid that suffered a severe demographic contraction in the 1940s. In this study, we sampled 95 individuals collected throughout their native range to investigate questions relative to population genetic structure and demographic history. Additionally, we sampled targeted individuals from the North American ex situ population to assess the genetic representation found in captivity. Population genetic and Bayesian structure analyses clearly identified two populations separated by a development corridor in Russia. Despite their well-documented 20th century decline, we failed to find evidence of a recent population bottleneck, although genetic signatures of a historical contraction were detected. This disparity in signal may be due to several reasons, including historical paucity in population genetic variation associated with postglacial colonization and potential gene flow from a now extirpated Chinese population. Despite conflicting signatures of a bottleneck, our estimates of effective population size (N(e) = 27-35) and N(e)/N ratio (0.07-0.054) were substantially lower than the only other values reported for a wild tiger population. Lastly, the extent and distribution of genetic variation in captive and wild populations were similar, yet gene variants persisted ex situ that were lost in situ. Overall, our results indicate the need to secure ecological connectivity between the two Russian populations to minimize loss of genetic diversity and overall susceptibility to stochastic events, and support a previous study suggesting that the captive population may be a reservoir of gene variants lost in situ.

  7. Structural perturbations to population skeletons: transient dynamics, coexistence of attractors and the rarity of chaos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra K Singh

    Full Text Available Simple models of insect populations with non-overlapping generations have been instrumental in understanding the mechanisms behind population cycles, including wild (chaotic fluctuations. The presence of deterministic chaos in natural populations, however, has never been unequivocally accepted. Recently, it has been proposed that the application of chaos control theory can be useful in unravelling the complexity observed in real population data. This approach is based on structural perturbations to simple population models (population skeletons. The mechanism behind such perturbations to control chaotic dynamics thus far is model dependent and constant (in size and direction through time. In addition, the outcome of such structurally perturbed models is [almost] always equilibrium type, which fails to commensurate with the patterns observed in population data.We present a proportional feedback mechanism that is independent of model formulation and capable of perturbing population skeletons in an evolutionary way, as opposed to requiring constant feedbacks. We observe the same repertoire of patterns, from equilibrium states to non-chaotic aperiodic oscillations to chaotic behaviour, across different population models, in agreement with observations in real population data. Model outputs also indicate the existence of multiple attractors in some parameter regimes and this coexistence is found to depend on initial population densities or the duration of transient dynamics. Our results suggest that such a feedback mechanism may enable a better understanding of the regulatory processes in natural populations.

  8. Source-sink manipulations in Coffea arabica L. and its effect on growth of shoots and root system Manipulação da relação fonte-dreno em Coffea arabica L. e seu efeito no crescimento da parte aérea e do sistema radicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Donizeti Alves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated changes in growth and carbohydrate content of shoots and root systems in response to source-sink manipulation in field-grown coffee trees. The source-sink manipulations were carried out using manual de-fruiting. Two plots of trees were established: in one group, the fruit was left on the tree, while in the second group all fruits were removed manually. Similar results were obtained for coffee trees with and without fruit in terms of height, stem and skirt diameter and branch lengths. A biochemical evaluation of the roots showed that no differences were found between the levels of carbohydrates. In the leaves, levels of soluble sugars and reducing sugars were higher in plants with fruit. The starch concentration in leaves and roots did not vary between the plots. Root length density did not vary between plants with and without fruit in the 0 - 0.4 m soil layer. However, plants without fruit had a higher root length density than plants with a full fruit load. These results contrast with results published by others on source-sink relationships of coffee plants. The joint data analysis shows that young trees, with a moderate fruit load, and with good nutritional and health status, produce carbohydrates in sufficient quantities to maintain vegetative and reproductive growth, without harming root system growth.Foram investigadas as alterações no crescimento e nos teores de carboidratos da parte aérea e sistema radicular em resposta à manipulação fonte-dreno em cafeeiros cultivados em condições de campo. Essas manipulações foram realizadas mediante desfrutificação manual. Dois grupos de plantas foram estabelecidos: em um grupo, a produção de frutos foi mantida, enquanto no segundo grupo, todos os frutos foram retirados manualmente. Cafeeiros, com e sem frutos apresentaram resultados semelhantes em termos de altura, diâmetro do caule e saia e comprimentos de ramos. Nas avaliações bioquímicas nas raízes n

  9. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species. PMID:25075291

  10. First regional evaluation of nuclear genetic diversity and population structure in northeastern coyotes ( Canis latrans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies of eastern coyotes ( Canis latrans) are based on one of two strategies: sampling many individuals using one or very few molecular markers, or sampling very few individuals using many genomic markers. Thus, a regional analysis of genetic diversity and population structure in eastern coyotes using many samples and several molecular markers is lacking. I evaluated genetic diversity and population structure in 385 northeastern coyotes using 16 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A region-wide analysis of population structure revealed three primary genetic populations, but these do not correspond to the same three subdivisions inferred in a previous analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences. More focused geographic analyses of population structure indicated that ample genetic structure occurs in coyotes from an intermediate contact zone where two range expansion fronts meet. These results demonstrate that genotyping several highly heterozygous SNPs in a large, geographically dense sample is an effective way to detect cryptic population genetic structure. The importance of SNPs in studies of population and wildlife genomics is rapidly increasing; this study adds to the growing body of recent literature that demonstrates the utility of SNPs ascertained from a model organism for evolutionary inference in closely related species.

  11. Derivation of stochastic partial differential equations for size- and age-structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edward J

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for size-structured and age- and size-structured populations are derived from basic principles, i.e. from the changes that occur in a small time interval. Discrete stochastic models of size-structured and age-structured populations are constructed, carefully taking into account the inherent randomness in births, deaths, and size changes. As the time interval decreases, the discrete stochastic models lead to systems of Itô stochastic differential equations. As the size and age intervals decrease, SPDEs are derived for size-structured and age- and size-structured populations. Comparisons between numerical solutions of the SPDEs and independently formulated Monte Carlo calculations support the accuracy of the derivations.

  12. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Native Chicken Populations from Myanmar, Thailand and Laos by Using 102 Indels Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Maw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of native chicken populations from Myanmar, Thailand, and Laos was examined by using 102 insertion and/or deletion (indels markers. Most of the indels loci were polymorphic (71% to 96%, and the genetic variability was similar in all populations. The average observed heterozygosities (HO and expected heterozygosities (HE ranged from 0.205 to 0.263 and 0.239 to 0.381, respectively. The coefficients of genetic differentiation (Gst for all cumulated populations was 0.125, and the Thai native chickens showed higher Gst (0.088 than Myanmar (0.041 and Laotian (0.024 populations. The pairwise Fst distances ranged from 0.144 to 0.308 among populations. A neighbor-joining (NJ tree, using Nei’s genetic distance, revealed that Thai and Laotian native chicken populations were genetically close, while Myanmar native chickens were distant from the others. The native chickens from these three countries were thought to be descended from three different origins (K = 3 from STRUCTURE analysis. Genetic admixture was observed in Thai and Laotian native chickens, while admixture was absent in Myanmar native chickens.

  13. The population genetic structure of vectors and our understanding of disease epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCoy K.D.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and predicting disease epidemiology relies on clear knowledge about the basic biology of the organisms involved. Despite the key role that arthropod vectors play in disease dynamics and detailed mechanistic work on the vectorpathogen interface, little information is often available about how these populations function under natural conditions. Population genetic studies can help fill this void by providing information about the taxonomic status of species, the spatial limits of populations, and the nature of gene flow among populations. Here, I briefly review different types of population genetic structure and some recent examples of where this information has provided key elements for understanding pathogen transmission in tick-borne systems.

  14. Evidence for population bottlenecks and subtle genetic structure in the yellow rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Kenneth J.; Miller, Leonard F.; Green, Michael; Haig, Susan M.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    The Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracencis) is among the most enigmatic and least studied North American birds. Nesting exclusively in marshes and wetlands, it breeds largely east of the Rocky Mountains in the northern United States and Canada, but there is an isolated population in southern Oregon once believed extirpated. The degree of connectivity of the Oregon population with the main population is unknown. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences (mtDNA) and six microsatellite loci to characterize the Yellow Rail's genetic structure and diversity patterns in six areas. Our mtDNA-based analyses of genetic structure identified significant population differentiation, but pairwise comparison of regions identified no clear geographic trends. In contrast, microsatellites suggested subtle genetic structure differentiating the Oregon population from those in the five regions sampled in the Yellow Rail's main breeding range. The genetic diversity of the Oregon population was also the lowest of the six regions sampled, and Oregon was one of three regions that demonstrated evidence of recent population bottlenecks. Factors that produced population reductions may include loss of wetlands to development and agricultural conversion, drought, and wildfire. At this time, we are unable to determine if the high percentage (50%) of populations having experienced bottlenecks is representative of the Yellow Rail's entire range. Further genetic data from additional breeding populations will be required for this issue to be addressed.

  15. Genetic structure of lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, populations in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Wendylee; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd; Schaeffer, Jeff; Roseman, Edward F.; Harford, William J.; Johnson, James E.; Fietsch, Cherie-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of spawning lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from six sites in the main basin of Lake Huron was conducted to determine population structure. Samples from fisheryindependent assessment surveys in the northwest main basin were analyzed to determine the relative contributions of lake whitefish genetic populations. Genetic population structure was identified using data from seven microsatellite DNA loci. One population was identified at Manitoulin Island, one to two were observed in the east-central main basin (Fishing Island and Douglas Point), and one to two populations were found in the northwest (Thunder Bay and Duncan Bay). The genetic identity of collections from Duncan Bay and Thunder Bay was not consistent among methods used to analyze population structure. Low genetic distances suggested that they comprised one population, but genic differences indicated that they may constitute separate populations. Simulated data indicated that the genetic origins of samples from a mixed-fishery could be accurately identified, but accuracy could be improved by incorporating additional microsatellite loci. Mixture analysis and individual assignment tests performed on mixed-stock samples collected from the western main basin suggested that genetic populations from the east-central main basin contributed less than those from the western main basin and that the proportional contribution of each baseline population was similar in each assessment sample. Analysis of additional microsatellite DNA loci may be useful to help improve the precision of the estimates, thus increasing our ability to manage and protect this valuable resource.

  16. Amphibian population genetics in agricultural landscapes: does viniculture drive the population structuring of the European common frog (Rana temporaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Lenhardt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Amphibian populations have been declining globally over the past decades. The intensification of agriculture, habitat loss, fragmentation of populations and toxic substances in the environment are considered as driving factors for this decline. Today, about 50% of the area of Germany is used for agriculture and is inhabited by a diverse variety of 20 amphibian species. Of these, 19 are exhibiting declining populations. Due to the protection status of native amphibian species, it is important to evaluate the effect of land use and associated stressors (such as road mortality and pesticide toxicity on the genetic population structure of amphibians in agricultural landscapes. We investigated the effects of viniculture on the genetic differentiation of European common frog (Rana temporaria populations in Southern Palatinate (Germany. We analyzed microsatellite data of ten loci from ten breeding pond populations located within viniculture landscape and in the adjacent forest block and compared these results with a previously developed landscape permeability model. We tested for significant correlation of genetic population differentiation and landscape elements, including land use as well as roads and their associated traffic intensity, to explain the genetic structure in the study area. Genetic differentiation among forest populations was significantly lower (median pairwise FST = 0.0041 at 5.39 km to 0.0159 at 9.40 km distance than between viniculture populations (median pairwise FST = 0.0215 at 2.34 km to 0.0987 at 2.39 km distance. Our analyses rejected isolation by distance based on roads and associated traffic intensity as the sole explanation of the genetic differentiation and suggest that the viniculture landscape has to be considered as a limiting barrier for R. temporaria migration, partially confirming the isolation of breeding ponds predicted by the landscape permeability model. Therefore, arable land may act as a sink habitat

  17. Amphibian population genetics in agricultural landscapes: does viniculture drive the population structuring of the European common frog (Rana temporaria)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Patrick P; Brühl, Carsten A; Leeb, Christoph; Theissinger, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Amphibian populations have been declining globally over the past decades. The intensification of agriculture, habitat loss, fragmentation of populations and toxic substances in the environment are considered as driving factors for this decline. Today, about 50% of the area of Germany is used for agriculture and is inhabited by a diverse variety of 20 amphibian species. Of these, 19 are exhibiting declining populations. Due to the protection status of native amphibian species, it is important to evaluate the effect of land use and associated stressors (such as road mortality and pesticide toxicity) on the genetic population structure of amphibians in agricultural landscapes. We investigated the effects of viniculture on the genetic differentiation of European common frog (Rana temporaria) populations in Southern Palatinate (Germany). We analyzed microsatellite data of ten loci from ten breeding pond populations located within viniculture landscape and in the adjacent forest block and compared these results with a previously developed landscape permeability model. We tested for significant correlation of genetic population differentiation and landscape elements, including land use as well as roads and their associated traffic intensity, to explain the genetic structure in the study area. Genetic differentiation among forest populations was significantly lower (median pairwise FST = 0.0041 at 5.39 km to 0.0159 at 9.40 km distance) than between viniculture populations (median pairwise FST = 0.0215 at 2.34 km to 0.0987 at 2.39 km distance). Our analyses rejected isolation by distance based on roads and associated traffic intensity as the sole explanation of the genetic differentiation and suggest that the viniculture landscape has to be considered as a limiting barrier for R. temporaria migration, partially confirming the isolation of breeding ponds predicted by the landscape permeability model. Therefore, arable land may act as a sink habitat, inhibiting genetic

  18. Factors influencing the optimum sex ratio in a structured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, L; Luck, R F

    1988-02-01

    W. D. Hamilton (1967, Science 156, 477-488) calculated the optimum sex-ratio strategy for a population subdivided into local mating groups. He made three important assumptions: that the females founding each group responded precisely to the number of them initiating the group; that ail broods within a group matured synchronously; and that males were incapable of dispersing between groups. We have examined the effects of relaxing each of these assumptions and obtained the following results: (1) When broods mature asynchronously the optimum sex ratio is considerably more female biased than the Hamiltonian prediction. (2) Increasing male dispersal always decreases the optimum female bias to the sex ratio, but it is of particular interest that when moderate levels of dispersal are coupled with asynchrony of brood maturation then the optimum strategy is relatively insensitive to changes in foundress number. (3) When females cannot precisely determine the number of other foundresses initiating the group then the optimum strategy is almost exactly the strategy appropriate to a group of average size. These effects can be most easily understood in terms of local parental control (LPC) of the sex ratio. Through LPC a founding female can alter the mating success of her sons by altering the sex ratio of her brood. Asynchrony in the maturation of broods within a group increases the control that a founding female has over the mating success of her sons, whereas male dispersal reduces it. We have shown that the role of LPC and the role of inbreeding, which favors a female-biased sex ratio in haploidiploid species, are independent and that their effects can be combined into a single general formula r = (1-(r2/z2) E(alpha z/alpha r]/(1 + I). The concept of LPC can also be used to interpret two factors which have been proposed to select for the Hamiltonian sex ratios: local mate competition is LPC acting through sons; and sib mating is LPC acting through daughters.

  19. Estimation of age structure of fish populations from length-frequency data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K.D.; Adams, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    A probability model is presented to determine the age structure of a fish population from length-frequency data. It is shown that when the age-length key is available, maximum-likelihood estimates of the age structure can be obtained. When the key is not available, approximate estimates of the age structure can be obtained. The model is used for determination of the age structure of populations of channel catfish and white crappie. Practical applications of the model to impact assessment are discussed.

  20. Understanding the genetic structure of Symplocos laurina Wall. populations using nuclear gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sofia; Bhagwat, R M; Kadoo, N Y; Lagu, M D; Gupta, V S

    2010-02-01

    To characterize the genetic diversity of present populations of Symplocos laurina, which grow in the montane forests in India, we analyzed the DNA sequences of a nuclear gene. Using the 881 bp sequence of cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, we detected 24 haplotypes among 195 individuals sampled from 14 populations. Two dominant haplotypes were distributed over the entire range of this species in India and several private haplotypes were found. Low genetic diversity within population, high differentiation, number of population specific haplotypes and deviation from neutral evolution characterized the present populations of S. laurina. An analysis of molecular variance indicated the presence of geographic structure within the haplotype distribution. The occurrence of S. laurina preglaciation in India is the most parsimonious explanation for the current geographic structure observed. The populations are presumably ancient and might have spread across its extant distribution range in India through a recent range expansion event.

  1. SWFSC/MMTD: Sperm Whale Abundance and Population Structure (SWAPS) 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1997 Sperm Whale Abundance and Population Structures (SWAPS) line-transect survey was designed to census sperm whales near the end of their breeding season in...

  2. SWFSC/MMTD/AK: Structure of Populations, Level of Abundance, and Status of Humpbacks (SPLASH) 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project was part of a larger international project (SPLASH) designed to estimate the abundance and determine the population structure for humpback whales...

  3. Genetic structure in insular and mainland populations of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and their hemosporidian parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Coraline; Moodley, Yoshan; Penn, Dustin J; Sorci, Gabriele; Garnier, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Small and isolated populations usually exhibit low levels of genetic variability, and thus, they are expected to have a lower capacity to adapt to changes in environmental conditions, such as exposure to pathogens and parasites. Comparing the genetic variability of selectively neutral versus functional loci allows one to assess the evolutionary history of populations and their future evolutionary potential. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) control immune recognition of parasites, and their unusually high diversity is genes which is likely driven by parasite-mediated balancing selection. Here, we examined diversity and differentiation of neutral microsatellite loci and functional MHC class I genes in house sparrows (Passer domesticus), living in six insular and six mainland populations, and we aimed to determine whether their diversity or differentiation correlates with the diversity and the prevalence of infection of hemosporidian parasites. We found that island bird populations tended to have lower neutral genetic variability, whereas MHC variability gene was similar between island and mainland populations. Similarly, island populations tended to show greater genetic differentiation than mainland populations, especially at microsatellite markers. The maintenance of MHC genetic diversity and its less marked structure in the island populations could be attributed to balancing-selection. The greater MHC differentiation among populations was negatively correlated with similarity in blood parasites (prevalence and diversity of parasite strains) between populations. Even at low prevalence and small geographical scale, haemosporidian parasites might contribute to structure the variability of immune genes among populations of hosts.

  4. Population genetic structure of the common warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) in Uganda: evidence for a strong philopatry among warthogs and social structure breakdown in a disturbed population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muwanka, V.B.; Nyakaana, S.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2007-01-01

    protected areas while no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectation was observed in the unprotected Luwero population. We explain these results in terms of: (i) a strong philopatry among warthogs, (ii) a Wahlund effect resulting from the sampling regime and (iii) break down of social structure......Fine-scale genetic structure of large mammals is rarely analysed. Yet it is potentially important in estimating gene flow between the now fragmented wildlife habitats and in predicting re-colonization following local extinction events. In this study, we examined the extent to which warthog...... populations from five localities in Uganda are genetically structured using both mitochondrial control region sequence and microsatellite allele length variation. Four of the localities (Queen Elizabeth, Murchison Falls, Lake Mburo and Kidepo Valley) are national parks with relatively good wildlife protection...

  5. Population dynamics of bowfin in a south Georgia reservoir: latitudinal comparisons of population structure, growth, and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Nicholas J.; Bonvechio, Timothy F.; McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the population dynamics of bowfin (Amia calva) in Lake Lindsay Grace, Georgia, and to compare those dynamics to other bowfin populations. Relative abundance of bowfin sampled in 2010 in Lake Lindsay Grace was low and variable (mean±SD; 2.7±4.7 fish per hour of electrofishing). Total length (TL) of bowfin collected in Lake Lindsay Grace varied from 233–683 mm. Age of bowfin in Lake Lindsay Grace varied from 0–5 yr. Total annual mortality (A) was estimated at 68%. Both sexes appeared to be fully mature by age 2 with gonadosomatic index values above 8 for females and close to 1 for males. The majority of females were older, longer, and heavier than males. Bowfin in Lake Lindsay Grace had fast growth up to age 4 and higher total annual mortality than the other populations examined in this study. A chi-square test indicated that size structure of bowfin from Lake Lindsay Grace was different than those of a Louisiana population and two bowfin populations from the upper Mississippi River. To further assess bowfin size structure, we proposed standard length (i.e., TL) categories: stock (200 mm, 8 inches), quality (350 mm, 14 inches), preferred (460 mm, 18 inches), memorable (560 mm, 22, inches), and trophy (710 mm, 28 inches). Because our knowledge of bowfin ecology is limited, additional understanding of bowfin population dynamics provides important insight that can be used in management of bowfin across their distribution.

  6. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae) in a Brazilian savanna

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,IA.; Valenti,MW.; Silva-Matos,DM.

    2009-01-01

    Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of th...

  8. Population structure of the wild soybean (Glycine soja) in China: implications from microsatellite analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Liu, Yifei; Wang, Yunsheng; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yinghui; Huang, Hongwen; Qiu, Lijuan; Wang, Ying

    2012-09-01

    Wild soybean (Glycine soja), a native species of East Asia, is the closest wild relative of the cultivated soybean (G. max) and supplies valuable genetic resources for cultivar breeding. Analyses of the genetic variation and population structure of wild soybean are fundamental for effective conservation studies and utilization of this valuable genetic resource. In this study, 40 wild soybean populations from China were genotyped with 20 microsatellites to investigate the natural population structure and genetic diversity. These results were integrated with previous microsatellite analyses for 231 representative individuals from East Asia to investigate the genetic relationships of wild soybeans from China. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 43·92 % of the molecular variance occurred within populations, although relatively low genetic diversity was detected for natural wild soybean populations. Most of the populations exhibited significant effects of a genetic bottleneck. Principal co-ordinate analysis, construction of a Neighbor-Joining tree and Bayesian clustering indicated two main genotypic clusters of wild soybean from China. The wild soybean populations, which are distributed in north-east and south China, separated by the Huang-Huai Valley, displayed similar genotypes, whereas those populations from the Huang-Huai Valley were different. The previously unknown population structure of the natural populations of wild soybean distributed throughout China was determined. Two evolutionarily significant units were defined and further analysed by combining genetic diversity and structure analyses from Chinese populations with representative samples from Eastern Asia. The study suggests that during the glacial period there may have been an expansion route between south-east and north-east China, via the temperate forests in the East China Sea Land Bridge, which resulted in similar genotypes of wild soybean populations from these regions. Genetic

  9. Population-based structural variation discovery with Hydra-Multi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Michael R; Hall, Ira M; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2015-04-15

    Current strategies for SNP and INDEL discovery incorporate sequence alignments from multiple individuals to maximize sensitivity and specificity. It is widely accepted that this approach also improves structural variant (SV) detection. However, multisample SV analysis has been stymied by the fundamental difficulties of SV calling, e.g. library insert size variability, SV alignment signal integration and detecting long-range genomic rearrangements involving disjoint loci. Extant tools suffer from poor scalability, which limits the number of genomes that can be co-analyzed and complicates analysis workflows. We have developed an approach that enables multisample SV analysis in hundreds to thousands of human genomes using commodity hardware. Here, we describe Hydra-Multi and measure its accuracy, speed and scalability using publicly available datasets provided by The 1000 Genomes Project and by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Hydra-Multi is written in C++ and is freely available at https://github.com/arq5x/Hydra. aaronquinlan@gmail.com or ihall@genome.wustl.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Population structure of Bartonella henselae in Algerian urban stray cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouelle Azzag

    Full Text Available Whole blood samples from 211 stray cats from Algiers, Algeria, were cultured to detect the presence of Bartonella species and to evaluate the genetic diversity of B. henselae strains by multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA. Bartonella henselae was the only species isolated from 36 (17% of 211 cats. B. henselae genotype I was the predominant genotype (64%. MLVA typing of 259 strains from 30 bacteremic cats revealed 52 different profiles as compared to only 3 profiles using MLST. Of these 52 profiles, 48 (92.3% were identified for the first time. One-third of the cats harbored one MLVA profile only. As there was a correlation between the age of cats and the number of MLVA profiles, we hypothesized that the single profile in these cats was the profile of the initial infecting strain. Two-third of the cats harbored 2 to 6 MLVA profiles simultaneously. The similarity of MLVA profiles obtained from the same cat, neighbor-joining clustering and structure-neighbor clustering indicate that such a diversity likely results from two different mechanisms occurring either independently or simultaneously: independent infections and genetic drift from a primary strain.

  12. Surnames and dialects in France: population structure and cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapoli, C; Goebl, H; Sobota, S; Mamolini, E; Rodriguez-Larralde, A; Barrai, I

    2005-11-07

    To study the isonymy structure of France as related to local language variations, the surname distributions of 6.03 million telephone users registered for the year 2002 were analysed in the 21 conterminous regions, their 94 departments and in 809 towns of the Country. For regions and departments the differences among local dialects were quantified according to the dialecto-metrization of the Atlas Linguistique Français. We found that Lasker's distance between regions was correlated with geographic distance with r=0.692+/-0.040, while Euclidean (r=0.546+/-0.058) and Nei's (r=0.610+/-0.048) distances were less correlated. Slightly lower correlations were observed for departments. Also, dialectometric distance was correlated with geography (r=0.582+/-0.069 for regions and r=0.617+/-0.015 for departments). The correlations between Lasker and dialectometric matrix distances for regions and departments are r=0.625+/-0.046 and 0.544+/-0.014, respectively, indicating that the common cause generating surname and language diversity accounts for about 35% of the differentiation. Both Lasker and dialectometric distances identify very similar boundaries between Poitou, Centre, Bourgogne and Franche Comptée at the North, and Aquitaine, Limousin, Auvergne, Rhône-Alpes in the South. Average Fisher's alpha for France was 7877 the highest value observed for the European countries studied to date. The size of alpha in most French towns indicates considerable recent immigration.

  13. A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows

    OpenAIRE

    Cousseau, L; Husemann, M; Foppen, R.; Vangestel, C.; Lens, L

    2016-01-01

    Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow pop...

  14. [The volume, age structure, and rate of growth of the population of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida Bush, V

    1990-01-01

    The author analyzes the effects of levels and trends in fertility, mortality, and migration in Mexico during the period 1950-1985 on the volume, growth rate, and age structure of the population. In addition, the future consequences of recent demographic trends are considered, with a focus on the demand for primary education, the size of the economically active population, household size and structure, and the need for medical services.

  15. Changing population structure and commuting situation in Tokyo Megalopolis: a municipality-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, R; Umezaki, M

    1993-06-01

    Census data was analyzed for 20 municipalities along the Tohoku Line in Tokyo Megalopolis to elucidate the changes in the population structure and the commuting situation in the last two decades. The major findings were: (1) the changing pattern of population structure markedly varied among the municipalities, and (2) the long-distance commuting workers have increased particularly among those 50 km or more from central Tokyo.

  16. The impact of natural transformation on adaptation in spatially structured bacterial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Engelstädter, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated that natural transformation and the formation of highly structured populations in bacteria are interconnected. In spite of growing evidence about this connection, little is known about the dynamics of natural transformation in spatially structured bacterial populations. Results In this work, we model the interdependency between the dynamics of the bacterial gene pool and those of environmental DNA in space to dissect the effect of transformation on ...

  17. Demographic connectivity for ursid populations at wildlife crossing structures in Banff National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Michael A; Clevenger, Anthony P; Kalinowski, Steven T

    2013-08-01

    Wildlife crossing structures are one solution to mitigating the fragmentation of wildlife populations caused by roads, but their effectiveness in providing connectivity has only been superficially evaluated. Hundreds of grizzly (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) passages through under and overpasses have been recorded in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada. However, the ability of crossing structures to allow individual and population-level movements across road networks remains unknown. In April 2006, we initiated a 3-year investigation into whether crossing structures provide demographic connectivity for grizzly and black bears in Banff National Park. We collected hair with multiple noninvasive methods to obtain genetic samples from grizzly and black bears around the Bow Valley. Our objectives were to determine the number of male and female grizzly and black bears that use crossing structures; examine spatial and temporal patterns of crossings; and estimate the proportions of grizzly and black bear populations in the Bow Valley that use crossing structures. Fifteen grizzly (7 female, 8 male) and 17 black bears (8 female, 9 male) used wildlife crossing structures. The number of individuals detected at wildlife crossing structures was highly correlated with the number of passages in space and time. Grizzly bears used open crossing structures (e.g., overpasses) more often than constricted crossings (e.g., culverts). Peak use of crossing structures for both bear species occurred in July, when high rates of foraging activity coincide with mating season. We compared the number of bears that used crossings with estimates of population abundance from a related study and determined that substantial percentages of grizzly (15.0% in 2006, 19.8% in 2008) and black bear (17.6% in 2006, 11.0% in 2008) populations used crossing structures. On the basis of our results, we concluded wildlife crossing structures provide demographic connectivity for bear populations

  18. Strong population genetic structure and larval dispersal capability of the burrowing ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The burrowing ghost shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis, is a vital member of the estuarine benthic community. Dense populations of shrimp are found in the major estuaries of Washington and Oregon. Our study determines the genetic structure of shrimp populations in order to gain ...

  19. Microsatellite variation and population structure of a recovering tree frog (Hyla arborea L.) metapopulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.F.P.; Bugter, R.J.F.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Zollinger, R.; Stronks, J.; Vos, C.C.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Numbers and sizes of populations of the European tree frog in The Netherlands have dramatically decreased in the second half of the last century due to extensive habitat destruction and fragmentation. We have studied the genetic structure of a slowly recovering meta-population. Strong genetic

  20. The population structure of Ukraine in relation to the phenylthiocarbamide sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Filiptsova

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Frequencies of alleles T and t obtained in the male and female population under research are very close to the frequencies of the same alleles in some populations of India. Data of this study supplement the currently available information in relation to the genetic structure of modern Ukrainian cities.

  1. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milano, I.; Babbucci, M.; Cariani, A.

    2014-01-01

    Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur...

  2. Genetic structure and demographic history of brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) populations from the southern Balkans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apostolidis, A.P.; Madeira, M.J.; Hansen, Michael Møller

    2008-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to characterize the genetic structure of brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations from the southern Balkans and to assess the spread of non-native strains and their introgression into native trout gene pools. We analysed polymorphism at nine microsatellite loci...... in seven supposedly non-admixed and three stocked brown trout populations. 2. The analyses confirmed the absence of immigration and extraordinarily strong genetic differentiation among the seven non-introgressed populations in parallel with low levels of intrapopulation genetic variability. In contrast......, analyses of the stocked populations revealed that the genetic integrity of the local populations had been substantially changed, and the populations must be characterized as hybrid swarms. The pattern of population differentiation observed at microsatellites contrasted to that depicted previously by mt...

  3. Discriminant analysis of principal components: a new method for the analysis of genetically structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The dramatic progress in sequencing technologies offers unprecedented prospects for deciphering the organization of natural populations in space and time. However, the size of the datasets generated also poses some daunting challenges. In particular, Bayesian clustering algorithms based on pre-defined population genetics models such as the STRUCTURE or BAPS software may not be able to cope with this unprecedented amount of data. Thus, there is a need for less computer-intensive approaches. Multivariate analyses seem particularly appealing as they are specifically devoted to extracting information from large datasets. Unfortunately, currently available multivariate methods still lack some essential features needed to study the genetic structure of natural populations. Results We introduce the Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components (DAPC), a multivariate method designed to identify and describe clusters of genetically related individuals. When group priors are lacking, DAPC uses sequential K-means and model selection to infer genetic clusters. Our approach allows extracting rich information from genetic data, providing assignment of individuals to groups, a visual assessment of between-population differentiation, and contribution of individual alleles to population structuring. We evaluate the performance of our method using simulated data, which were also analyzed using STRUCTURE as a benchmark. Additionally, we illustrate the method by analyzing microsatellite polymorphism in worldwide human populations and hemagglutinin gene sequence variation in seasonal influenza. Conclusions Analysis of simulated data revealed that our approach performs generally better than STRUCTURE at characterizing population subdivision. The tools implemented in DAPC for the identification of clusters and graphical representation of between-group structures allow to unravel complex population structures. Our approach is also faster than Bayesian clustering algorithms by

  4. Population genetic structure of economically important Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) in South Africa: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, A E; Geertsema, H; Warnich, L

    2010-08-01

    Comparative studies of the population genetic structures of agricultural pests can elucidate the factors by which their population levels are affected, which is useful for designing pest management programs. This approach was used to provide insight into the six Tortricidae of major economic importance in South Africa. The population genetic structure of the carnation worm E. acerbella and the false codling moth T. leucotreta, analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, is presented here for the first time. These results were compared with those obtained previously for the codling moth Cydia pomonella, the oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta, the litchi moth Cryptophlebia peltastica and the macadamia nut borer T. batrachopa. Locally adapted populations were detected over local geographic areas for all species. No significant differences were found among population genetic structures as result of population history (whether native or introduced) although host range (whether oligophagous or polyphagous) had a small but significant effect. It is concluded that factors such as dispersal ability and agricultural practices have the most important effects on genetically structuring populations of the economically important Tortricidae in South Africa.

  5. Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Waller, Tomás; Micucci, Patricio A.; Barros, Mariano; Draque, Juan; Amato, George; Mendez, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Yellow anacondas (Eunectes notaeus) are large, semiaquatic boid snakes found in wetland systems in South America. These snakes are commercially harvested under a sustainable management plan in Argentina, so information regarding population structuring can be helpful for determination of management units. We evaluated genetic structure and migration using partial sequences from the mitochondrial control region and mitochondrial genes cyt-b and ND4 for 183 samples collected within northern Argentina. A group of landscape features and environmental variables including several treatments of temperature and precipitation were explored as potential drivers of observed genetic patterns. We found significant population structure between most putative population comparisons and bidirectional but asymmetric migration in several cases. The configuration of rivers and wetlands was found to be significantly associated with yellow anaconda population structure (IBD), and important for gene flow, although genetic distances were not significantly correlated with the environmental variables used here. More in-depth analyses of environmental data may be needed to fully understand the importance of environmental conditions on population structure and migration. These analyses indicate that our putative populations are demographically distinct and should be treated as such in Argentina's management plan for the harvesting of yellow anacondas. PMID:22675425

  6. Polygyny and strong genetic structuring within an isolated population of the wood ant Formica rufa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Dekoninck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social structuring of populations within some Formica species exhibits considerable variation going from monodomous and monogynous populations to polydomous, polygynous populations. The wood ant species Formica rufa appears to be mainly monodomous and monogynous throughout most of its distribution area in central and northern Europe. Only occasionally it was mentioned that F. rufa can have both polygynous and monogynous colonies in the same geographical region. We studied an isolated polydomous F. rufa population in a deciduous mixed forest in the north-west of Belgium. The level of polydomy within the colonies varied from monodomous to 11 nests per colony. Our genetic analysis of eight variable microsatellites suggest an oligo- to polygynous structure for at least the major part of the sampled nests. Relatedness amongst nest mate workers varies considerable within the population and colonies but confirms in general a polygynous structure. Additionally high genetic diversity (e.g. up to 8 out of 11 alleles per nest for the most variable locus and high within nest genetic variance (93% indicate that multiple queens contribute to the gene pool of workers of the same nest. Moreover significant genetic structuring among colonies indicates that gene flow between colonies is restricted and that exchange of workers between colonies is very limited. Finally we explain how possible factors as budding and the absence of Serviformica can explain the differences in genetic structure within this polygynous F. rufa population.

  7. Population structure and genome-wide patterns of variation in Ireland and Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm T; Morris, Derek; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Wilson, James F; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L

    2010-11-01

    Located off the northwestern coast of the European mainland, Britain and Ireland were among the last regions of Europe to be colonized by modern humans after the last glacial maximum. Further, the geographical location of Britain, and in particular of Ireland, is such that the impact of historical migration has been minimal. Genetic diversity studies applying the Y chromosome and mitochondrial systems have indicated reduced diversity and an increased population structure across Britain and Ireland relative to the European mainland. Such characteristics would have implications for genetic mapping studies of complex disease. We set out to further our understanding of the genetic architecture of the region from the perspective of (i) population structure, (ii) linkage disequilibrium (LD), (iii) homozygosity and (iv) haplotype diversity (HD). Analysis was conducted on 3654 individuals from Ireland, Britain (with regional sampling in Scotland), Bulgaria, Portugal, Sweden and the Utah HapMap collection. Our results indicate a subtle but clear genetic structure across Britain and Ireland, although levels of structure were reduced in comparison with average cross-European structure. We observed slightly elevated levels of LD and homozygosity in the Irish population compared with neighbouring European populations. We also report on a cline of HD across Europe with greatest levels in southern populations and lowest levels in Ireland and Scotland. These results are consistent with our understanding of the population history of Europe and promote Ireland and Scotland as relatively homogenous resources for genetic mapping of rare variants.

  8. Population structure of humpback whales from their breeding grounds in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Howard C; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S; Best, Peter B; Findlay, Ken P; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H; Bonatto, Sandro L; Kotze, Deon P G H; Meÿer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy

    2009-10-08

    Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern Indian Ocean, and Northern Indian Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern Indian Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern Indian Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region.

  9. Population Structure of Humpback Whales from Their Breeding Grounds in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S.; Best, Peter B.; Findlay, Ken P.; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J.; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Kotze, Deon P. G. H.; Meÿer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern Indian Ocean, and Northern Indian Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern Indian Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern Indian Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern Indian Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region. PMID:19812698

  10. Population Structure Analysis of Bull Genomes of European and Western Ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Neo Christopher; Szyda, Joanna; Frąszczak, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Since domestication, population bottlenecks, breed formation, and selective breeding have radically shaped the genealogy and genetics of Bos taurus. In turn, characterization of population structure among diverse bull (males of Bos taurus) genomes enables detailed assessment of genetic resources...... and origins. By analyzing 432 unrelated bull genomes from 13 breeds and 16 countries, we demonstrate genetic diversity and structural complexity among the European/Western cattle population. Importantly, we relaxed a strong assumption of discrete or admixed population, by adapting latent variable models...... for individual-specific allele frequencies that directly capture a wide range of complex structure from genome-wide genotypes. As measured by magnitude of differentiation, selection pressure on SNPs within genes is substantially greater than that on intergenic regions. Additionally, broad regions of chromosome 6...

  11. The Impact of Divergence Time on the Nature of Population Structure: An Example from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alkes L.; Helgason, Agnar; Palsson, Snaebjorn; Stefansson, Hreinn; St. Clair, David; Andreassen, Ole A.; Reich, David; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The Icelandic population has been sampled in many disease association studies, providing a strong motivation to understand the structure of this population and its ramifications for disease gene mapping. Previous work using 40 microsatellites showed that the Icelandic population is relatively homogeneous, but exhibits subtle population structure that can bias disease association statistics. Here, we show that regional geographic ancestries of individuals from Iceland can be distinguished using 292,289 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We further show that subpopulation differences are due to genetic drift since the settlement of Iceland 1100 years ago, and not to varying contributions from different ancestral populations. A consequence of the recent origin of Icelandic population structure is that allele frequency differences follow a null distribution devoid of outliers, so that the risk of false positive associations due to stratification is minimal. Our results highlight an important distinction between population differences attributable to recent drift and those arising from more ancient divergence, which has implications both for association studies and for efforts to detect natural selection using population differentiation. PMID:19503599

  12. Molecular variability and genetic structure of Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an important soybean defoliator in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Janine; Maebe, Kevin; Guedes, Jerson Vanderlei Carús; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    This study provides the first genetic characterization of the soybean looper, Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, 1857), an important defoliating pest species of soybean crops in Brazil. Population genetic variability and the genetic structure of C. includens populations were evaluated by using ISSR markers with samples from the major soybean producing regions in Brazil in the growing seasons 2011/2012. Seven different primers were applied for population characterization of the molecular variability and genetic structure of 8 soybean looper populations from 8 states of Brazil. The seven ISSR loci generated 247 bands in 246 individuals of C. includens sampled. The expected heterozygosity (HE) in the populations varied between 0.093 and 0.106, while the overall HE was 0.099, indicating low genetic diversity. The analysis of molecular variance indicated that 98% of the variability was expressed among individuals within populations (FST = 0.021, p = 0.001). The low level of polymorphism over all populations, the high levels of gene flow, and the low genetic structure are indicatives of the exchange of genetic information between the different sampled regions. Population structuring suggests the presence of two major groups which do not correlate with their geographic sampling location in Brazil. These results may indicate recent recolonization of C. includens in Brazil or migration patterns following source-sink dynamics. Furthermore, the presence of two groups within C. includens suggests that a study on development of resistance or any other genetic-based trait needs to be evaluated on both groups, and pest management in soybean fields should be aware that differences may come to the control strategies they use.

  13. Molecular variability and genetic structure of Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, an important soybean defoliator in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Palma

    Full Text Available This study provides the first genetic characterization of the soybean looper, Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, 1857, an important defoliating pest species of soybean crops in Brazil. Population genetic variability and the genetic structure of C. includens populations were evaluated by using ISSR markers with samples from the major soybean producing regions in Brazil in the growing seasons 2011/2012. Seven different primers were applied for population characterization of the molecular variability and genetic structure of 8 soybean looper populations from 8 states of Brazil. The seven ISSR loci generated 247 bands in 246 individuals of C. includens sampled. The expected heterozygosity (HE in the populations varied between 0.093 and 0.106, while the overall HE was 0.099, indicating low genetic diversity. The analysis of molecular variance indicated that 98% of the variability was expressed among individuals within populations (FST = 0.021, p = 0.001. The low level of polymorphism over all populations, the high levels of gene flow, and the low genetic structure are indicatives of the exchange of genetic information between the different sampled regions. Population structuring suggests the presence of two major groups which do not correlate with their geographic sampling location in Brazil. These results may indicate recent recolonization of C. includens in Brazil or migration patterns following source-sink dynamics. Furthermore, the presence of two groups within C. includens suggests that a study on development of resistance or any other genetic-based trait needs to be evaluated on both groups, and pest management in soybean fields should be aware that differences may come to the control strategies they use.

  14. An agent-based computational model for tuberculosis spreading on age-structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciani Rodrigues, C. C.; Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based computational model to study the spreading of the tuberculosis (TB) disease on age-structured populations. The model proposed is a merge of two previous models: an agent-based computational model for the spreading of tuberculosis and a bit-string model for biological aging. The combination of TB with the population aging, reproduces the coexistence of health states, as seen in real populations. In addition, the universal exponential behavior of mortalities curves is still preserved. Finally, the population distribution as function of age shows the prevalence of TB mostly in elders, for high efficacy treatments.

  15. The structuring process of the macroparasite community of an experimental population of cichlasoma urophthalmus through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martinez; Kennedy; Aguirre-Macedo

    1998-09-01

    The structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged Cichlasoma urophthalmus was studied over time using sentinel fish. Three thousand uninfected cichlids were stocked in floating cages introduced into a quarry in which a wild population of the same species was present. Caged and wild cichlids were sampled monthly over 6 and 7 months, respectively. Seventeen macroparasite species were found in the wild C. urophthalmus population, ten of which were detected in the caged population after 6 months. Early infections were by those species that were more frequent and abundant in the wild population, while helminths with a low prevalence and abundance in the wild appeared later in the caged fish population. The results suggested that the structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged C. urophthalmus followed a predictable pattern, in which those species that were most frequent and abundant in the wild were the first to establish in sentinel fish.

  16. DISPERSAL IN THE WOOD FROG (RANA SYLVATICA): IMPLICATIONS FOR GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berven, Keith A; Grudzien, Thaddeus A

    1990-12-01

    Recapture of marked juvenile and adult wood frogs in five Appalachian Mountain ponds showed adults to be 100% faithful to the ponds in which they first bred, but approximately 18% of the juveniles dispersed to breed in ponds other than the one of origin. Effective population sizes were generally smaller than the population censuses and genetic neighborhoods had an average radius of 1,126 meters. Values of standardized genetic variance based on effective population size and mating success were relatively small. Genetic population structure estimated from the dispersal data suggested that ponds within about a 1,000 meter radius should show little genetic differentiation; ponds separated by a distance greater than 1,000 meters should experience little gene flow and show higher genetic differentiation. Wood frogs in these ponds do not show a meta-population structure as suggested for newts. © 1990 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    of alleles (MNA = 10.1), gene diversity (He = 0.82), allele richness (5.33) and number of private alleles (10). Thirteen percentage of the total genetic variation observed was due to differences among populations. The neighbour-joining dendrogram obtained from Nei's standard genetic distance differentiated......% (Ha Lang) to 98% (Mong Cai). individuals in indigenous pigs were assigned to their own populations. The results confirmed high level of genetic diversity and shed a new light on genetic structure of Vietnam indigenous pig populations.......The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers...

  18. The challenges of detecting subtle population structure and its importance for the conservation of emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Jane L; Clucas, Gemma V; Kao, Damian; Rogers, Alex D; Gharbi, Karim; Hart, Tom; Miller, Karen J

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the boundaries of breeding populations is of great importance for conservation efforts and estimates of extinction risk for threatened species. However, determining these boundaries can be difficult when population structure is subtle. Emperor penguins are highly reliant on sea ice, and some populations may be in jeopardy as climate change alters sea-ice extent and quality. An understanding of emperor penguin population structure is therefore urgently needed. Two previous studies have differed in their conclusions, particularly whether the Ross Sea, a major stronghold for the species, is isolated or not. We assessed emperor penguin population structure using 4,596 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), characterized in 110 individuals (10-16 per colony) from eight colonies around Antarctica. In contrast to a previous conclusion that emperor penguins are panmictic around the entire continent, we find that emperor penguins comprise at least four metapopulations, and that the Ross Sea is clearly a distinct metapopulation. Using larger sample sizes and a thorough assessment of the limitations of different analytical methods, we have shown that population structure within emperor penguins does exist and argue that its recognition is vital for the effective conservation of the species. We discuss the many difficulties that molecular ecologists and managers face in the detection and interpretation of subtle population structure using large SNP data sets, and argue that subtle structure should be taken into account when determining management strategies for threatened species, until accurate estimates of demographic connectivity among populations can be made. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Population structure and genetic diversity of worldwide Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever and Lancashire Heeler dog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, K

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to research the population structure and genetic diversity of the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NS) and the Lancashire Heeler (LH) dog breeds. Data consisted of nearly all the worldwide registration history for both breeds, including 28,668 NS and 4,782 LH individuals. A reference population, including the females born between 1999 and 2008, was defined for genetic analyses for each breed. Average depth of the pedigrees known for the reference population dogs was 12.9 complete generation equivalents in the NS and 6.0 in the LH. Only a small fraction of the born dogs were used later for breeding. Effective number of founders was 9.8 in the NS and 15.2 in the LH. More than 50% of the genetic diversity in the reference population was explained by two ancestors in the NS and five in the LH. Average inbreeding coefficients in the reference populations were 0.26 in the NS and 0.10 in the LH. Average kinships were 0.26 and 0.08 and realised effective population sizes 18 and 28, respectively. Failure to use available genetic resources for sustainable breeding has resulted in depletion of genetic variation in both breeds. To increase genetic variation, a larger proportion of the dogs should be used in reproduction and the contributions of reproducing animals should be equalized. In the LH, it is necessary to use the unregistered farm dogs in breeding. In the NS, crosses with another breed are needed.

  20. Gene flow and population structure in the Mexican blind cavefish complex (Astyanax mexicanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradic Martina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cave animals converge evolutionarily on a suite of troglomorphic traits, the best known of which are eyelessness and depigmentation. We studied 11 cave and 10 surface populations of Astyanax mexicanus in order to better understand the evolutionary origins of the cave forms, the basic genetic structuring of both cave and surface populations, and the degree to which present day migration among them affects their genetic divergence. Results To assess the genetic structure within populations and the relationships among them we genotyped individuals at 26 microsatellite loci. We found that surface populations are similar to one another, despite their relatively large geographic separation, whereas the cave populations are better differentiated. The cave populations we studied span the full range of the cave forms in three separate geographic regions and have at least five separate evolutionary origins. Cave populations had lower genetic diversity than surface populations, correlated with their smaller effective population sizes, probably the result of food and space limitations. Some of the cave populations receive migrants from the surface and exchange migrants with one another, especially when geographically close. This admixture results in significant heterozygote deficiencies at numerous loci due to Wahlund effects. Cave populations receiving migrants from the surface contain small numbers of individuals that are intermediate in both phenotype and genotype, affirming at least limited gene flow from the surface. Conclusions Cave populations of this species are derived from two different surface stocks denoted "old" and "new." The old stock colonized caves at least three times independently while the new stock colonized caves at least twice independently. Thus, the similar cave phenotypes found in these caves are the result of repeated convergences. These phenotypic convergences have occurred in spite of gene flow from surface

  1. Environmental and climatic determinants of molecular diversity and genetic population structure in a coenagrionid damselfly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Wellenreuther

    Full Text Available Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the target of many ecological and evolutionary studies. We addressed the following questions: (i Is the population structure affected by longitudinal or latitudinal gradients?; (ii Do geographic boundaries limit gene flow?; (iii Does geographic distance affect connectivity and is there a signature of past bottlenecks?; (iv Is there evidence of a recent range expansion and (vi what is the effect of geography and climatic factors on population structure? We found low to moderate genetic sub-structuring between populations (mean F(ST = 0.06, D(est = 0.12, and an effect of longitude, but not latitude, on genetic diversity. No significant effects of geographic boundaries (e.g. water bodies were found. F(ST-and D(est-values increased with geographic distance; however, there was no evidence for recent bottlenecks. Finally, we did not detect any molecular signatures of range expansions or an effect of geographic suitability, although local precipitation had a strong effect on genetic differentiation. The population structure of this small insect has probably been shaped by ecological factors that are correlated with longitudinal gradients, geographic distances, and local precipitation. The relatively weak global population structure and high degree of genetic variation within populations suggest that I. elegans has high dispersal ability, which is consistent with this species being an effective and early coloniser of new habitats.

  2. Genetic structure of the Newfoundland and Labrador population: founder effects modulate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Guangju; Zhou, Jiayi; Woods, Michael O; Green, Jane S; Parfrey, Patrick; Rahman, Proton; Green, Roger C

    2016-07-01

    The population of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has been a resource for genetic studies because of its historical isolation and increased prevalence of several monogenic disorders. Controversy remains regarding the genetic substructure and the extent of genetic homogeneity, which have implications for disease gene mapping. Population substructure has been reported from other isolated populations such as Iceland, Finland and Sardinia. We undertook this study to further our understanding of the genetic architecture of the NL population. We enrolled 494 individuals randomly selected from NL. Genome-wide SNP data were analyzed together with that from 14 other populations including HapMap3, Ireland, Britain and Native American samples from the Human Genome Diversity Project. Using multidimensional scaling and admixture analysis, we observed that the genetic structure of the NL population resembles that of the British population but can be divided into three clusters that correspond to religious/ethnic origins: Protestant English, Roman Catholic Irish and North American aboriginals. We observed reduced heterozygosity and an increased inbreeding coefficient (mean=0.005), which corresponds to that expected in the offspring of third-cousin marriages. We also found that the NL population has a significantly higher number of runs of homozygosity (ROH) and longer lengths of ROH segments. These results are consistent with our understanding of the population history and indicate that the NL population may be ideal for identifying recessive variants for complex diseases that affect populations of European origin.

  3. Genetic structure in large, continuous mammal populations: the example of brown bears in northwestern Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammeleht, E; Remm, J; Korsten, M; Davison, J; Tumanov, I; Saveljev, A; Männil, P; Kojola, I; Saarma, U

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of population structure and genetic diversity and the spatio-temporal demographic processes affecting populations is crucial for effective wildlife preservation, yet these factors are still poorly understood for organisms with large continuous ranges. Available population genetic data reveal that widespread mammals have for the most part only been carefully studied at the local population scale, which is insufficient for understanding population processes at larger scales. Here, we provide data on population structure, genetic diversity and gene flow in a brown bear population inhabiting the large territory of northwestern Eurasia. Analysis of 17 microsatellite loci indicated significant population substructure, consisting of four genetic groups. While three genetic clusters were confined to small geographical areas-located in Estonia, southern Finland and Leningrad oblast, Russia-the fourth cluster spanned a very large area broadly falling between northern Finland and the Arkhangelsk and Kirov oblasts of Russia. Thus, the data indicate a complex pattern where a fraction of the population exhibits large-scale gene flow that is unparalleled by other wild mammals studied to date, while the remainder of the population appears to have been structured by a combination of demographic history and landscape barriers. These results based on nuclear data are generally in good agreement with evidence previously derived using mitochondrial markers, and taken together, these markers provide complementary information about female-specific and population-level processes. Moreover, this study conveys information about spatial processes occurring over multiple generations that cannot be readily gained using other approaches, e.g. telemetry. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Understanding sources, sinks, and transport of marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kara Lavender; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2011-07-01

    Fifth International Marine Debris Conference: Hydrodynamics of Marine Debris; Honolulu, Hawaii, 20 March 2011; Ocean pollution in the form of marine debris, especially plastic debris, has received increasing public and media attention in recent years through striking but frequently inaccurate descriptions of “garbage patches.” Marine debris is composed of all manufactured materials, including glass, metal, paper, fibers, and plastic, that have been deliberately dumped or that accidentally entered the marine environment. Marine debris is most visible on beaches, but it has been observed in all oceans and in such remote locations as on the deep seabed and floating in the middle of subtropical ocean gyres. While many initiatives have been developed to solve this pollution problem through prevention and cleanup efforts, there is relatively little scientific information available to assess the current status of the problem or to provide metrics to gauge the success of remediation measures. With this in mind, a full-day workshop entitled “Hydrodynamics of Marine Debris” was convened at the Fifth International Marine Debris Conference in Hawaii, bringing together observational scientists and oceanographic modelers to outline the steps necessary to quantify the major sources and sinks of marine debris and the pathways between them. The ultimate goal in integrating the two approaches of study is to quantify the basinscale and global inventory of marine debris by closing the associated mass budgets.

  5. Suboptimal light conditions influence source-sink metabolism during flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies eChristiaens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids. Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural and optimal (supplemental light light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions.

  6. Kin groups and trait groups: population structure and epidemic disease selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, A G

    1984-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation based on the population structure of a small-scale human population, the Semai Senoi of Malaysia, has been developed to study the combined effects of group, kin, and individual selection. The population structure resembles D.S. Wilson's structured deme model in that local breeding populations (Semai settlements) are subdivided into trait groups (hamlets) that may be kin-structured and are not themselves demes. Additionally, settlement breeding populations are connected by two-dimensional stepping-stone migration approaching 30% per generation. Group and kin-structured group selection occur among hamlets the survivors of which then disperse to breed within the settlement population. Genetic drift is modeled by the process of hamlet formation; individual selection as a deterministic process, and stepping-stone migration as either random or kin-structured migrant groups. The mechanism for group selection is epidemics of infectious disease that can wipe out small hamlets particularly if most adults become sick and social life collapses. Genetic resistance to a disease is an individual attribute; however, hamlet groups with several resistant adults are less likely to disintegrate and experience high social mortality. A specific human gene, hemoglobin E, which confers resistance to malaria, is studied as an example of the process. The results of the simulations show that high genetic variance among hamlet groups may be generated by moderate degrees of kin-structuring. This strong microdifferentiation provides the potential for group selection. The effect of group selection in this case is rapid increase in gene frequencies among the total set of populations. In fact, group selection in concert with individual selection produced a faster rate of gene frequency increase among a set of 25 populations than the rate within a single unstructured population subject to deterministic individual selection. Such rapid evolution with plausible rates of

  7. Genetic population structure accounts for contemporary ecogeographic patterns in tropic and subtropic-dwelling humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Hruschka

    Full Text Available Contemporary human populations conform to ecogeographic predictions that animals will become more compact in cooler climates and less compact in warmer ones. However, it remains unclear to what extent this pattern reflects plastic responses to current environments or genetic differences among populations. Analyzing anthropometric surveys of 232,684 children and adults from across 80 ethnolinguistic groups in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Americas, we confirm that body surface-to-volume correlates with contemporary temperature at magnitudes found in more latitudinally diverse samples (Adj. R2 = 0.14-0.28. However, far more variation in body surface-to-volume is attributable to genetic population structure (Adj. R2 = 0.50-0.74. Moreover, genetic population structure accounts for nearly all of the observed relationship between contemporary temperature and body surface-to-volume among children and adults. Indeed, after controlling for population structure, contemporary temperature accounts for no more than 4% of the variance in body form in these groups. This effect of genetic affinity on body form is also independent of other ecological variables, such as dominant mode of subsistence and household wealth per capita. These findings suggest that the observed fit of human body surface-to-volume with current climate in this sample reflects relatively large effects of existing genetic population structure of contemporary humans compared to plastic response to current environments.

  8. Population genetic structure of the abyssal grenadier (Coryphaenoides armatus) around the mid-Atlantic ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, H.; Cousins, N. J.; Cregeen, S. J.; Piertney, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the factors that affect the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in oceanic and deep sea environments is a central focus in marine population genetics. Whilst it has been considered that the oceans represent a homogenous environment that would facilitate dispersal and minimise population structure, it is now clear that topographical features and current patterns can influence the extent of spatial gene flow and promote significant population genetic divergence even at local scales. Here we examine patterns of population genetic structure among N. Atlantic populations of the cosmopolitan abyssal grenadier Coryphaenoides armatus in relation to two hypothesised barriers to gene flow-the mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone/Sub-Polar Front. A suite of microsatellite markers were developed to examine the spatial pattern of allelic variation among 210 individuals from ten sampling locations encompassing sites east and west of the MAR and north and south of the CGFZ, plus a geographically distinct sample of individuals from the Crozet Islands in the Indian Ocean. Considerable genetic diversity was detected among individuals (na=5-13 and HO=0.46-0.69 across populations) but with an overall lack of genetic divergence between populations. Pairwise estimates of divergence among NE Atlantic samples were small and non-significant (max FST=0.04) and Structure-based Bayesian analysis of genetic clusters returned no distinct population structure. The only indication of genetic structure was between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, with FST estimates of ca. 0.05. Patterns of genetic diversity and divergence are discussed in relation to what has been resolved in Coryphaenoides congeners, and what is known about the life history and ecology of C. armatus.

  9. Constructing stage-structured matrix population models from life tables: comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masami; Diaz-Lopez, Jasmin

    2017-01-01

    A matrix population model is a convenient tool for summarizing per capita survival and reproduction rates (collectively vital rates) of a population and can be used for calculating an asymptotic finite population growth rate ( λ ) and generation time. These two pieces of information can be used for determining the status of a threatened species. The use of stage-structured population models has increased in recent years, and the vital rates in such models are often estimated using a life table analysis. However, potential bias introduced when converting age-structured vital rates estimated from a life table into parameters for a stage-structured population model has not been assessed comprehensively. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of methods for such conversions using simulated life histories of organisms. The underlying models incorporate various types of life history and true population growth rates of varying levels. The performance was measured by comparing differences in λ and the generation time calculated using the Euler-Lotka equation, age-structured population matrices, and several stage-structured population matrices that were obtained by applying different conversion methods. The results show that the discretization of age introduces only small bias in λ or generation time. Similarly, assuming a fixed age of maturation at the mean age of maturation does not introduce much bias. However, aggregating age-specific survival rates into a stage-specific survival rate and estimating a stage-transition rate can introduce substantial bias depending on the organism's life history type and the true values of λ . In order to aggregate survival rates, the use of the weighted arithmetic mean was the most robust method for estimating λ . Here, the weights are given by survivorship curve after discounting with λ . To estimate a stage-transition rate, matching the proportion of individuals transitioning, with λ used for discounting

  10. Constructing stage-structured matrix population models from life tables: comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Fujiwara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A matrix population model is a convenient tool for summarizing per capita survival and reproduction rates (collectively vital rates of a population and can be used for calculating an asymptotic finite population growth rate (λ and generation time. These two pieces of information can be used for determining the status of a threatened species. The use of stage-structured population models has increased in recent years, and the vital rates in such models are often estimated using a life table analysis. However, potential bias introduced when converting age-structured vital rates estimated from a life table into parameters for a stage-structured population model has not been assessed comprehensively. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of methods for such conversions using simulated life histories of organisms. The underlying models incorporate various types of life history and true population growth rates of varying levels. The performance was measured by comparing differences in λ and the generation time calculated using the Euler-Lotka equation, age-structured population matrices, and several stage-structured population matrices that were obtained by applying different conversion methods. The results show that the discretization of age introduces only small bias in λ or generation time. Similarly, assuming a fixed age of maturation at the mean age of maturation does not introduce much bias. However, aggregating age-specific survival rates into a stage-specific survival rate and estimating a stage-transition rate can introduce substantial bias depending on the organism’s life history type and the true values of λ. In order to aggregate survival rates, the use of the weighted arithmetic mean was the most robust method for estimating λ. Here, the weights are given by survivorship curve after discounting with λ. To estimate a stage-transition rate, matching the proportion of individuals transitioning, with λ used

  11. Models of kleptoparasitism on networks: the effect of population structure on food stealing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichrysanthou, Christoforos; Broom, Mark; Rychtář, Jan

    2017-09-18

    The behaviour of populations consisting of animals that interact with each other for their survival and reproduction is usually investigated assuming homogeneity amongst the animals. However, real populations are non-homogeneous. We focus on an established model of kleptoparasitism and investigate whether and how much population heterogeneities can affect the behaviour of kleptoparasitic populations. We consider a situation where animals can either discover food items by themselves or attempt to steal the food already discovered by other animals through aggressive interactions. Representing the likely interactions between animals by a network, we develop pairwise and individual-based models to describe heterogeneities in both the population structure and other individual characteristics, including searching and fighting abilities. For each of the models developed we derive analytic solutions at the steady state. The high accuracy of the solutions is shown in various examples of populations with different degrees of heterogeneity. We observe that highly heterogeneous structures can significantly affect the food intake rate and therefore the fitness of animals. In particular, the more highly connected animals engage in more conflicts, and have a reduced food consumption rate compared to poorly connected animals. Further, for equivalent average level of connectedness, the average consumption rate of a population with heterogeneous structure can be higher.

  12. Structure and genetic diversity of natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Duarte, J F; Santos, T C; Santos, R M; Silva-Mann, R; Carvalho, D

    2016-06-17

    In the face of a possible loss of genetic diversity in plants due the environmental changes, actions to ensure the genetic variability are an urgent necessity. The extraction of Brazilian pepper fruits is a cause of concern because it results in the lack of seeds in soil, hindering its distribution in space and time. It is important to address this concern and explore the species, used by riparian communities and agro-factories without considering the need for keeping the seeds for natural seed banks and for species sustainability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structure and the genetic diversity in natural Brazilian pepper populations (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Twenty-two alleles in 223 individuals were identified from eight forest remnants located in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and Sergipe. All populations presented loci in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviation. Four populations presented six combinations of loci in linkage disequilibrium. Six exclusive alleles were detected in four populations. Analysis of molecular variance showed the absence of diversity between regions and that between the populations (GST) was 41%. Genetic diversity was structured in seven clusters (ΔK7). Brazilian pepper populations were not structured in a pattern of isolation by distance and present genetic bottleneck. The populations São Mateus, Canastra, Barbacena, and Ilha das Flores were identified as management units and may support conservation projects, ecological restoration and in implementation of management plans for Brazilian pepper in the State of Sergipe.

  13. Population structure and genetic diversity of the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis in Bristol, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawksworth, Joseph; Levy, Max; Smale, Chloe; Cheung, Dean; Whittle, Alice; Longhurst, Denise; Muir, Peter; Gibson, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, an extremely common, but non-life-threatening, sexually-transmitted disease throughout the world. Recent population genetics studies of T. vaginalis have detected high genetic diversity and revealed a two-type population structure, associated with phenotypic differences in sensitivity to metronidazole, the drug commonly used for treatment, and presence of T. vaginalis virus. There is currently a lack of data on UK isolates; most isolates examined to date are from the US. Here we used a recently described system for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of T. vaginalis to study diversity of clinical isolates from Bristol, UK. We used MLST to characterise 23 clinical isolates of T. vaginalis collected from female patients during 2013. Seven housekeeping genes were PCR-amplified for each isolate and sequenced. The concatenated sequences were then compared with data from other MLST-characterised isolates available from http://tvaginalis.mlst.net/ to analyse the population structure and construct phylogenetic trees. Among the 23 isolates from the Bristol population of T. vaginalis, we found 23 polymorphic nucleotide sites, 25 different alleles and 19 sequence types (genotypes). Most isolates had a unique genotype, in agreement with the high levels of heterogeneity observed elsewhere in the world. A two-type population structure was evident from population genetic analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction split the isolates into two major clades. Tests for recombination in the Bristol population of T. vaginalis gave conflicting results, suggesting overall a clonal pattern of reproduction. We conclude that the Bristol population of T. vaginalis parasites conforms to the two-type population structure found in most other regions of the world. We found the MLST scheme to be an efficient genotyping method. The online MLST database provides a useful repository and resource that will prove

  14. Distance, dams and drift: What structures populations of an endangered, benthic stream fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James H.; Angermeier, Paul; Hallerman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial population structure plays an important role in species persistence, evolution and conservation. Benthic stream fishes are diverse and frequently imperilled, yet the determinants and spatial scaling of their population structure are understudied. We investigated the range-wide population genetic structure of Roanoke logperch (Percina rex), an endangered, benthic stream fish of the eastern United States. Fish were sampled from 35 sites and analysed at 11 microsatellite DNA loci. Clustering models were used to sort individuals into genetically cohesive groups and thereby estimate the spatial scaling of population structure. We then used Bayesian generalized linear mixed models (BGLMMs) to test alternative hypotheses about the environmental factors most responsible for generating structure, as measured by the differentiation statistic FST. Clustering models delineated seven discrete populations, whose boundaries coincided with agents of fragmentation, including hydroelectric dams and tailwaters. In the absence of hydrological barriers, gene flow was extensive throughout catchments, whereas there was no evidence for contemporary dispersal between catchments across barriers. In the best-supported BGLMM, FST was positively related to the spatial distance and degree of hydrological alteration between sites and negatively related to genetic diversity within sites. Whereas the effect of tailwaters was equivocal, dams strongly influenced differentiation: the effect of a dam on FST was comparable to that of a between-site distance of over 1200 km of unimpounded river. Overall, the effect of distance-mediated dispersal was negligible compared to the combined effects of fragmentation and genetic drift. The contemporary population structure of P. rex comprises a few geographically extensive ‘islands’ that are fragmented by hydroelectric projects. This information clarifies the importance of a catchment-scale perspective on conserving the species and

  15. Little effect of seasonal constraints on population genetic structure in eusocial paper wasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengronne, Thibault; Leadbeater, Ellouise; Patalano, Solenn; Dreier, Stephanie; Field, Jeremy; Sumner, Seirian; Keller, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Climate has long been suggested to affect population genetic structures of eusocial insect societies. For instance, Hamilton [Journal of Theoretical Biology7 (1964) 17] discusses whether temperate and tropical eusocial insects may show differences in population-level genetic structure and viscosity, and how this might relate to differences in the degree of synchrony in their life cycles or modes of nest founding. Despite the importance of Hamilton's 1964 papers, this specific idea has not been tested in actual populations of wasps, probably due to the paucity of studies on tropical species. Here, we compare colony and population genetic structures in two species of primitively eusocial paper wasps with contrasting ecologies: the tropical species Polistes canadensis and the temperate species P. dominulus. Our results provide important clarifications of Hamilton's discussion. Specifically, we show that the genetic structures of the temperate and tropical species were very similar, indicating that seasonality does not greatly affect population viscosity or inbreeding. For both species, the high genetic differentiation between nests suggests strong selection at the nest level to live with relatives, whereas low population viscosity and low genetic differentiation between nest aggregations might reflect balancing selection to disperse, avoiding competition with relatives. Overall, our study suggests no prevalence of seasonal constraints of the life cycle in affecting the population genetic structure of eusocial paper wasps. These conclusions are likely to apply also to other primitively eusocial insects, such as halictine bees. They also highlight how selection for a kin structure that promotes altruism can override potential effects of ecology in eusocial insects.

  16. Population size-structure-dependent fitness and ecosystem consequences in Trinidadian guppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D; Heatherly, Thomas; Marshall, Michael C; Thomas, Steven A; Flecker, Alexander S; Reznick, David N

    2015-07-01

    Decades of theory and recent empirical results have shown that evolutionary, population, community and ecosystem properties are the result of feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. The vast majority of theory and empirical research on these eco-evolutionary feedbacks has focused on interactions among population size and mean traits of populations. However, numbers and mean traits represent only a fraction of the possible feedback dimensions. Populations of many organisms consist of different size classes that differ in their impact on the environment and each other. Moreover, rarely do we know the map of ecological pathways through which changes in numbers or size structure cause evolutionary change. The goal of this study was to test the role of size structure in eco-evolutionary feedbacks of Trinidadian guppies and to begin to build an eco-evolutionary map along this unexplored dimension. We used a factorial experiment in mesocosms wherein we crossed high- and low-predation guppy phenotypes with population size structure. We tested the ability of changes in size structure to generate selection on the demographic rates of guppies using an integral projection model (IPM). To understand how fitness differences among high- and low-predation phenotypes may be generated, we measured the response of the biomass of lower trophic levels and nutrient cycling to the different phenotype and size structure treatments. We found a significant interaction between guppy phenotype and the size structure treatments for absolute fitness. Size structure had a very large effect on invertebrate biomass in the mesocosms, but there was little or no effect of the phenotype. The effect of size structure on algal biomass depended on guppy phenotype, with no difference in algal biomass in populations with more, smaller guppies, but a large decrease in algal biomass in mesocosms with phenotypes adapted to low-predation risk. These results indicate an important role for size

  17. Genetic population structure of the recently introduced Asian clam, Potamocorbula amurensis, in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, T. F.

    1994-01-01

    The genetic population structure of the recently introduced Asian clam, Potamocorbula amurensis, in San Francisco Bay was described using starch gel electrophoresis at eight presumptive loci. Specimens were taken from five environmentally distinct sites located throughout the bay. The population maintains a high degree of genetic variation, with a mean heterozygosity of 0.295, a mean polymorphism of 0.75, and an average of 3.70 alleles per locus. The population is genetically homogeneous, as evidenced from genetic distance values and F-statistics. However, heterogeneity of populations was indicated from a contingency chi-square test. Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and heterozygote deficiencies were found at the Lap-1 locus for all populations and at the Lap-2 locus for a single population. High levels of variability could represent a universal characteristic of invading species, the levels of variability in the source population(s), and/or the dynamics of the introduction. Lack of differentiation between subpopulations may be due to the immaturity of the San Francisco Bay population, the “general purpose” phenotype genetic strategy of the species, high rates of gene flow in the population, and/or the selective neutrality of the loci investigated.

  18. Genetic structure in two northern muriqui populations (Brachyteles hypoxanthus, Primates, Atelidae as inferred from fecal DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Fagundes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the genetic diversity of two northern muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus Primata, Atelidae populations, the Feliciano Miguel Abdala population (FMA, n = 108 in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais (19°44' S, 41°49' W and the Santa Maria de Jetibá population (SMJ, n = 18 in the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo (20°01' S, 40°44' W. Fecal DNA was isolated and PCR-RFLP analysis used to analyze 2160 bp of mitochondrial DNA, made up of an 820 bp segment of the gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2, EC 1.9.3.1, an 880 bp segment of the gene cytochrome b (cytb, EC 1.10.2.2 and 460 bp of the hypervariable segment of the mtDNA control region (HVRI. The cox2 and cytb sequences were monomorphic within and between populations whereas the HVRI revealed three different population exclusive haplotypes, one unique to the SMJ population and two, present at similar frequencies, in the FMA population. Overall haplotype diversity (h = 0.609 and nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.181 were high but reduced within populations. The populations were genetically structured with a high fixation index (F ST = 0.725, possibly due to historical subdivision. These findings have conservation implications because they seem to indicate that the populations are distinct management units.

  19. Population fragmentation leads to spatial and temporal genetic structure in the endangered Spanish imperial eagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, B; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J

    2007-02-01

    The fragmentation of a population may have important consequences for population genetic diversity and structure due to the effects of genetic drift and reduced gene flow. We studied the genetic consequences of the fragmentation of the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) population into small patches through a temporal analysis. Thirty-four museum individuals representing the population predating the fragmentation were analysed for a 345-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region and a set of 10 nuclear microsatellite loci. Data from a previous study on the current population (N = 79) were re-analysed for this subset of 10 microsatellite markers and results compared to those obtained from the historical sample. Three shared mitochondrial haplotypes were found in both populations, although fluctuations in haplotype frequencies and the occurrence of a fourth haplotype in the historical population resulted in lower current levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity. However, microsatellite markers revealed undiminished levels of nuclear diversity. No evidence for genetic structure was observed for the historical Spanish imperial eagle population, suggesting that the current pattern of structure is the direct consequence of population fragmentation. Temporal fluctuations in mitochondrial and microsatellite allelic frequencies were found between the historical and the current population as well as for each pairwise comparison between historical and current Centro and historical and current Parque Nacional de Doñana nuclei. Our results indicate an ancestral panmictic situation for the species that management policies should aim to restore. A historical analysis like the one taken here provides the baseline upon which the relative role of recent drift in shaping current genetic patterns in endangered species can be evaluated and this knowledge is used to guide conservation actions.

  20. Populism

    OpenAIRE

    Abts, Koenraad; Van Kessel, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Populism is a concept applied to a wide range of political movements and actors across the globe. There is, at the same time, considerable confusion about the attributes and manifestation of populism, as well as its impact on democracy. This contribution identifies the defining elements of the populist ideology and discusses the varieties in which populism manifests itself, for instance as a component of certain party families. We finally discuss various normative interpretations of populism,...

  1. GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF OUTCROSSING IN THE CLEISTOGAMOUS ANNUAL, IMPATIENS CAPENSIS. I. POPULATION-GENETIC STRUCTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Susan E; Waller, Donald M

    1987-09-01

    We examined the genetic structure of 11 populations of Impatiens capensis, a cleistogamous annual herb, using starch gel electrophoresis. We sampled both cleistogamous (CL) and chasmogamous (CH) progeny (if present) from maternal parents in each population to infer maternal genotypes and to estimate the extent and pattern of inbreeding within and among populations. Only eight of 31 loci were polymorphic, with one to six (mean = 3.1) loci varying within each population. Mean heterozygosity per individual is quite low (mean = 3.9%) and comparable to highly self-fertilized species. Gene flow is low, and genetic distances do not parallel geographical distances, suggesting a population structure similar to Wright's Island model with drift among the populations. Fixation indexes within populations (f̂ or FIS ) span the largest range yet reported for a plant species (0.26 to 0.94, mean = 0.57). Further inbreeding results from population substructuring (θ^ or FST=0.46), resulting in a total average inbreeding coefficient (F̂ or FIT ) of 0.77. Despite these high overall levels of inbreeding, chasmogamy significantly reduces fixation, which may account for the observed greater fitness of CH progeny. © 1987 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousseau, L; Husemann, M; Foppen, R; Vangestel, C; Lens, L

    2016-10-01

    Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow populations. To allow the most powerful statistical inference, historical populations were resampled at identical locations and each individual bird was genotyped using nine polymorphic microsatellites. Although the demographic history was not reflected by a reduction in genetic diversity, levels of genetic differentiation increased over time, and the original, panmictic population (inferred from the museum samples) diverged into two distinct genetic clusters. Reductions in census size were supported by a substantial reduction in effective population size, although to a smaller extent. As most studies of contemporary house sparrow populations have been unable to identify genetic signatures of recent population declines, results of this study underpin the importance of longitudinal genetic surveys to unravel cryptic genetic patterns.

  3. Dynamics of a physiologically structured population in a time-varying environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Irene Louise Torpe; Starke, Jens; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically structured population models have become a valuable tool to model the dynamics of populations. In a stationary environment such models can exhibit equilibrium solutions as well as periodic solutions. However, for many organisms the environment is not stationary, but varies more...... or less regularly. In order to understand the interaction between an external environmental forcing and the internal dynamics in a population, we examine the response of a physiologically structured population model to a periodic variation in the food resource. We explore the addition of forcing in two...... with the oscillations of the unforced system, and both periodic and irregular (quasi-periodic or chaotic) solutions occur. In both cases the periodic solutions include one and multiple period cycles, and each cycle can have several reproduction pulses....

  4. The age-sex structure of the slave population in Harris County, Texas: 1850 and 1860.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, J

    1987-10-01

    The effect of the slave system on demography can be revealed by examining the age-sex structure of slave populations. The age-sex structure of slaves in Harris County, Texas is investigated using the 1850 and 1860 slave schedules. Median ages for black and mulatto slaves suggest that the population was young. Population pyramids exhibit a narrow base and top with a broad middle. The high proportion of slaves between 10 and 30 years of age and the increase in population size between 1850 and 1860 were mainly related to the importation of slaves and only partly due to natural increase. The data also show that black slaves were older on small plantations while mulattoes were older on larger farms. It is suggested that differential treatment in terms of purchase practices, assignment of tasks, food allocation, and/or differential susceptibility to infectious diseases may account for this pattern.

  5. Landlocked Arctic charr ( Salvelinus alpinus ) population structure and lake morphometry in Greenland - is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riget, F.; Jeppesen, E.; Landkildehus, F.

    2000-01-01

    correlated with lake volume. Our study indicates that the charr population structure became more complex with increasing lake size. Moreover, the population structure seemed to be influenced by lake-water transparency and the presence or absence of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)......Landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alphinus) populations in sub-Arctic and Arctic Greenland lakes were sampled with multi- mesh-sized survey gillnets. The study covered a range of small shallow lakes (0.01 km(2) maximum depth 200 In). Arctic charr were found in one to three different forms...... in lakes with maximum depths >3 m. A dwarf form occurred in all lakes inhabited by Arctic charr and was the only form in lakes with maximum depths 20 m, large-sized charr were more abundant, and the length- frequency distribution of the population was bimodal, with a first mode around 10-12 cm and a second...

  6. Genetic structure of the veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) populations along the coast of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianmin; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wang, Rucai

    2008-10-01

    The veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) is a valuable and important fishery resource in China. In order to provide guidelines for fisheries management, the genetics population structure was assessed using 10 polymorphic allozyme loci from seven populations of R. venosa across the species' range on the Chinese coast. The mean allele richness ranged from 1.65 to 2.13, and the mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.086 to 0.149. Significant genetic differentiation was present, and the theta value was 0.016 across all populations. The nMDS plot of pairwise theta values, UPGMA dendrogram, and AMOVA analysis were in good agreement and identified three geographic subdivision groups. We propose that the genetic structure may be due to larval dispersal barriers and localized adaptation or a combination thereof. The implications of these results for the management of R. venosa populations are discussed.

  7. Gender inequality on the example of socio-demographic structures of Belgrade population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuburović Ankica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of demographic characteristics from the gender perspective represents a contribution to enlightening the social relations between female and male population in Belgrade. Gender specificity and explicitness of socio-demographic structures indicate to different positions and statuses of the female and male populations. There are more females than men in the total population of the capital city of Serbia. The sex imbalance of age groups is determined by gender differences in the number of born boys and girls, in migration characteristics and in the level of mortality. The male population is greater in the age group up to 20 years old, while the female population is more numerous among the middle-aged and older generations. Gender differences in marital structure, level of education and economic activities cannot be reduced only to demographic limits. A larger rate of married persons among the males in relation to female population is determined by the different behavior in view of remarriage in case of divorce or death of partner. Women are widowed or divorced more often than men, which can be interpreted as a less favorable position in everyday functioning, especially when the women have small or school-age children, as well as in the case of older women. Gender differences in the level of education of Belgrade population are not exceptionally pronounced and are a consequence of unfavorable positions of older women to a certain degree. Differences in economic activity, among other things, are determined by uneven utilization of female and male work force. The rate of economic activity is greater in the male population, and the coefficient of economic dependency in the female population. The gender difference in the rate of supported persons among the work capable population increases the unfavorable social position of women. The characteristics of socio-demographic structures of female and male population of the city of Belgrade vary

  8. Genetic population structure in an equatorial sparrow: roles for culture and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, J E; Fleischer, R C; Danner, R M; Moore, I T

    2017-06-01

    Female preference for local cultural traits has been proposed as a barrier to breeding among animal populations. As such, several studies have found correlations between male bird song dialects and population genetics over relatively large distances. To investigate whether female choice for local dialects could act as a barrier to breeding between nearby and contiguous populations, we tested whether variation in male song dialects explains genetic structure among eight populations of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Ecuador. Our study sites lay along a transect, and adjacent study sites were separated by approximately 25 km, an order of magnitude less than previously examined for this and most other species. This transect crossed an Andean ridge and through the Quijos River Valley, both of which may be barriers to gene flow. Using a variance partitioning approach, we show that song dialect is important in explaining population genetics, independent of the geographic variables: distance, the river valley and the Andean Ridge. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that song acts as a barrier to breeding among populations in close proximity. In addition, songs of contiguous populations differed by the same degree or more than between two populations previously shown to exhibit female preference for local dialect, suggesting that birds from these populations would also breed preferentially with locals. As expected, all geographic variables (distance, the river valley and the Andean Ridge) also predicted population genetic structure. Our results have important implications for the understanding whether, and at what spatial scale, culture can affect population divergence. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  9. Characterisation of genetic structure of the Mayan population in Guatemala by autosomal STR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, L J; Alvarez-Cubero, M J; Saiz, M; Alvarez, J C; Martinez-Labarga, C; Lorente, J A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the Guatemalan population comprises genetically isolated groups due to geographic, linguistic and cultural factors. For example, Mayan groups within the Guatemala population have preserved their own language, culture and religion. These practices have limited genetic admixture and have maintained the genetic identity of Mayan populations. This study is designed to define the genetic structure of the Mayan-Guatemalan groups Kaqchiquel, K'iche', Mam and Q'eqchi' through autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and to analyse the genetic relationships between them and with other Mayan groups. Fifteen STR polymorphisms were analysed in 200 unrelated donors belonging to the Kaqchiquel (n = 50), K'iche' (n = 50), Mam (n = 50) and Q'eqchi' (n = 50) groups living in Guatemala. Genetic distance, non-metric MDS and AMOVA were used to analyse the genetic relationships between population groups. Within the Mayan population, the STRs D18S51 and FGA were the most informative markers and TH01 was the least informative. AMOVA and genetic distance analyses showed that the Guatemalan-Native American populations are highly similar to Mayan populations living in Mexico. The Mayan populations from Guatemala and other Native American groups display high genetic homogeneity. Genetic relationships between these groups are more affected by cultural and linguistic factors than geographical and local flow. This study represents one of the first steps in understanding Mayan-Guatemalan populations, the associations between their sub-populations and differences in gene diversity with other populations. This article also demonstrates that the Mestizo population shares most of its ancestral genetic components with the Guatemala Mayan populations.

  10. The basic approach to age-structured population dynamics models, methods and numerics

    CERN Document Server

    Iannelli, Mimmo

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to age-structured population modeling which emphasises the connection between mathematical theory and underlying biological assumptions. Through the rigorous development of the linear theory and the nonlinear theory alongside numerics, the authors explore classical equations that describe the dynamics of certain ecological systems. Modeling aspects are discussed to show how relevant problems in the fields of demography, ecology, and epidemiology can be formulated and treated within the theory. In particular, the book presents extensions of age-structured modelling to the spread of diseases and epidemics while also addressing the issue of regularity of solutions, the asymptotic behaviour of solutions, and numerical approximation. With sections on transmission models, non-autonomous models and global dynamics, this book fills a gap in the literature on theoretical population dynamics. The Basic Approach to Age-Structured Population Dynamics will appeal to graduate students an...

  11. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly...... in the layer deposited at age 3, considered to be the one best representing the baseline of the breeding ground, in delta N-15, delta C-13 and delta O-18 values in the period up to age 20, and in the ontogenetic variation of delta N-15 and delta O-18 values. These differences evidence that diet composition......, use of habitat and/or migratory destinations are dissimilar between whales from the two regions and suggest that the North Atlantic population of sperm whales is more structured than traditionally accepted....

  12. Earliest evidence for the structure of Homo sapiens populations in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Eleanor M. L.; Drake, Nick A.; Jennings, Richard; Groucutt, Huw S.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the structure and variation of Homo sapiens populations in Africa is critical for interpreting multiproxy evidence of their subsequent dispersals into Eurasia. However, there is no consensus on early H. sapiens demographic structure, or its effects on intra-African dispersals. Here, we show how a patchwork of ecological corridors and bottlenecks triggered a successive budding of populations across the Sahara. Using a temporally and spatially explicit palaeoenvironmental model, we found that the Sahara was not uniformly ameliorated between ∼130 and 75 thousand years ago (ka), as has been stated. Model integration with multivariate analyses of corresponding stone tools then revealed several spatially defined technological clusters which correlated with distinct palaeobiomes. Similarities between technological clusters were such that they decreased with distance except where connected by palaeohydrological networks. These results indicate that populations at the Eurasian gateway were strongly structured, which has implications for refining the demographic parameters of dispersals out of Africa.

  13. Study of the matrimonial structure of the population of central Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, G; Francalacci, P; Paoli, G; Latini, V; Salis, M

    1996-12-01

    Temporal changes in the matrimonial structure of four Sardinian populations (Bitti, Lula, Lodè and Gavoi) have been studied. The endogamy rates and the average marriage distances indicate that the four villages experienced a long period of isolation. Only in recent decades endogamous marriages have fallen shortly. The trends of marital isonymy and inbreeding, evaluated both from isonymy and dispensation for consanguineous marriages, are similar to those of endogamy. The kinship values between pairs of populations show some preferential relationship (Bitti-Lodè, Lodè-Lula) and an evident differentiation between Gavoi and Bitti. The results also indicate that the values of kinship are not associated with the geographic distances. The possible impact of the matrimonial structure on the genetic structure and the relationships among the studied populations will be examined in further investigations, in which the genetic markers will be considered.

  14. Oceanography and life history predict contrasting genetic population structure in two Antarctic fish species

    OpenAIRE

    Young, E. F.; Belchier, M.; Hauser, L; Horsburgh, G.J.; Meredith, M. P.; Murphy, E.J.; Pascoal, S.; Rock, J; Tysklind, N.; Carvalho, G R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the key drivers of population connectivity in the marine environment is essential for the effective management of natural resources. Although several different approaches to evaluating connectivity have been used, they are rarely integrated quantitatively. Here, we use a ?seascape genetics? approach, by combining oceanographic modelling and microsatellite analyses, to understand the dominant influences on the population genetic structure of two Antarctic fishes with contrasting ...

  15. High Genetic Diversity and Structured Populations of the Oriental Fruit Moth in Its Range of Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yan; Peng, Xiong; Liu, Gaoming; Pan, Hongyan; Dorn, Silvia; Chen, Maohua

    2013-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita ( = Cydia) molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected through...

  16. Dynamics of the population phenological structure of Polistes dominulus in the black sea biosphere reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Rusina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The change in the phenotypic population structure of Polistes dominulus (Christ (Hymenoptera, Vespidae paper-wasp nested in the Black Sea Reserve was analysed. It was shown that colour patterns of clypeus, mesoscutum and first tergite vary considerably in different phases of the population number. The impact of factors of different nature on the relationship between the colour patterns and mode of colony foundation is discussed.

  17. Drivers of population structure of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Genov, Tilen; Holcer, Draško; Fortuna, Caterina Maria; Gaspari, Stefania; Scheinin, A. P.; Natali, Chiara; Frantzis, Alexandros; Chelazzi, Guido; Moura, André E.

    2015-01-01

    The drivers of population differentiation in oceanic high dispersal organisms, have been crucial for research in evolutionary biology. Adaptation to different environments is commonly invoked as a driver of differentiation in the oceans, in alternative to geographic isolation. In this study, we investigate the population structure and phylogeography of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in the Mediterranean Sea, using microsatellite loci and the entire mtDNA control region. By furthe...

  18. Spatial Genetic Structure and Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of Argentinean Populations of the Grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus

    OpenAIRE

    Rosetti, Natalia; Remis, Maria Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Many grasshopper species are considered of agronomical importance because they cause damage to pastures and crops. Comprehension of pest population dynamics requires a clear understanding of the genetic diversity and spatial structure of populations. In this study we report on patterns of genetic variation in the South American grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus which is an agricultural pest of crops and forage grasses of great economic significance in Argentina. We use Direct Amplification of ...

  19. Population Genetic Structure of the Tropical Two-Wing Flyingfish (Exocoetus volitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Lewallen

    Full Text Available Delineating populations of pantropical marine fish is a difficult process, due to widespread geographic ranges and complex life history traits in most species. Exocoetus volitans, a species of two-winged flyingfish, is a good model for understanding large-scale patterns of epipelagic fish population structure because it has a circumtropical geographic range and completes its entire life cycle in the epipelagic zone. Buoyant pelagic eggs should dictate high local dispersal capacity in this species, although a brief larval phase, small body size, and short lifespan may limit the dispersal of individuals over large spatial scales. Based on these biological features, we hypothesized that E. volitans would exhibit statistically and biologically significant population structure defined by recognized oceanographic barriers. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing cytochrome b mtDNA sequence data (1106 bps from specimens collected in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans (n = 266. AMOVA, Bayesian, and coalescent analytical approaches were used to assess and interpret population-level genetic variability. A parsimony-based haplotype network did not reveal population subdivision among ocean basins, but AMOVA revealed limited, statistically significant population structure between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (ΦST = 0.035, p<0.001. A spatially-unbiased Bayesian approach identified two circumtropical population clusters north and south of the Equator (ΦST = 0.026, p<0.001, a previously unknown dispersal barrier for an epipelagic fish. Bayesian demographic modeling suggested the effective population size of this species increased by at least an order of magnitude ~150,000 years ago, to more than 1 billion individuals currently. Thus, high levels of genetic similarity observed in E. volitans can be explained by high rates of gene flow, a dramatic and recent population expansion, as well as extensive and consistent dispersal throughout the geographic

  20. Structured populations of the oriental fruit moth in an agricultural ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriani, Marco V G; Mazzi, Dominique; Hein, Silke; Dorn, Silvia

    2010-07-01

    Intercontinental trade has led to multiple introductions of invasive pest species at a global scale. Molecular analyses of the structure of populations support the understanding of ecological strategies and evolutionary patterns that promote successful biological invasions. The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita (= Cydia) molesta, is a cosmopolitan and economically destructive pest of stone and pome fruits, expanding its distribution range concomitantly with global climate warming. We used ten newly developed polymorphic microsatellite markers to examine the genetic structure of G. molesta populations in an agricultural ecosystem in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. Larvae collected in eight sampling sites were assigned to a mosaic of five populations with significant intra-regional structure. Inferred measures of gene flow within populations implicated both active dispersal, and passive dispersal associated with accidental anthropogenic displacements. Small effective population sizes, coupled with high inbreeding levels, highlighted the effect of orchard management practices on the observed patterns of genetic variation within the sampling sites. Isolation by distance did not appear to play a major role at the spatial scale considered. Our results provide new insights into the population genetics and dynamics of an invasive pest species at a regional scale.

  1. The impact of natural transformation on adaptation in spatially structured bacterial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Engelstädter, Jan

    2014-06-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that natural transformation and the formation of highly structured populations in bacteria are interconnected. In spite of growing evidence about this connection, little is known about the dynamics of natural transformation in spatially structured bacterial populations. In this work, we model the interdependency between the dynamics of the bacterial gene pool and those of environmental DNA in space to dissect the effect of transformation on adaptation. Our model reveals that even with only a single locus under consideration, transformation with a free DNA fragment pool results in complex adaptation dynamics that do not emerge in previous models focusing only on the gene shuffling effect of transformation at multiple loci. We demonstrate how spatial restriction on population growth and DNA diffusion in the environment affect the impact of transformation on adaptation. We found that in structured bacterial populations intermediate DNA diffusion rates predominantly cause transformation to impede adaptation by spreading deleterious alleles in the population. Overall, our model highlights distinctive evolutionary consequences of bacterial transformation in spatially restricted compared to planktonic bacterial populations.

  2. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Costa-Urrutia

    Full Text Available Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009 of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05 were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1 a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2 a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population.

  3. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Sanvito, Simona; Victoria-Cota, Nelva; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis; Gendron, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009) of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05) were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1) a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2) a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area) were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population.

  4. netview p: a network visualization tool to unravel complex population structure using genome-wide SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinig, Eike J; Neuditschko, Markus; Khatkar, Mehar S; Raadsma, Herman W; Zenger, Kyall R

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches are emerging as valuable tools for the analysis of complex genetic structure in wild and captive populations. netview p combines data quality control with the construction of population networks through mutual k-nearest neighbours thresholds applied to genome-wide SNPs. The program is cross-platform compatible, open-source and efficiently operates on data ranging from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of SNPs. The pipeline was used for the analysis of pedigree data from simulated (n = 750, SNPs = 1279) and captive silver-lipped pearl oysters (n = 415, SNPs = 1107), wild populations of the European hake from the Atlantic and Mediterranean (n = 834, SNPs = 380) and grey wolves from North America (n = 239, SNPs = 78 255). The population networks effectively visualize large- and fine-scale genetic structure within and between populations, including family-level structure and relationships. netview p comprises a network-based addition to other population analysis tools and provides user-friendly access to a complex network analysis pipeline through implementation in python. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Phylogeny, genetic relationships and population structure of five Italian local chicken breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ceccobelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Number and population size of local chicken breeds in Italy is considered to be critical. Molecular data can be used to provide reliable insight into the diversity of chicken breeds. The first aim of this study was to investigate the maternal genetic origin of five Italian local chicken breeds (Ancona, Livorno, Modenese, Romagnola and Valdarnese bianca based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA information. Secondly, the extent of the genetic diversity, population structure and the genetic relationships among these chicken populations, by using 27 microsatellite markers, were assessed. To achieve these targets, a 506 bp fragment of the D-loop region was sequenced in 50 chickens of the five breeds. Eighteen variable sites were observed which defined 12 haplotypes. They were assigned to three clades and two maternal lineages. Results indicated that 90% of the haplotypes are related to clade E, which has been described to originate from the Indian subcontinent. For the microsatellite analysis, 137 individual blood samples from the five Italian breeds were included. A total of 147 alleles were detected at 27 microsatellite loci. The five Italian breeds showed a slightly higher degree of inbreeding (FIS=0.08 than the commercial populations that served as reference. Structure analysis showed a separation of the Italian breeds from the reference populations. A further sub-clustering allowed discriminating among the five different Italian breeds. This research provides insight into population structure, relatedness and variability of the five studied breeds.

  6. Molecular markers for genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic population structure of freshwater mussel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choupina, A B; Martins, I M

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater mussel species are in global decline. Anthropogenic changes of river channels and the decrease of autochthonous fish population, the natural hosts of mussels larval stages (glochidia), are the main causes. Therefore, the conservation of mussel species depends not only on habitat conservation, but also on the availability of the fish host. In Portugal, information concerning most of the mussel species is remarkably scarce. One of the most known species, Unio pictorum is also in decline however, in the basins of the rivers Tua and Sabor (Northeast of Portugal), there is some indication of relatively large populations. The aforementioned rivers can be extremely important for this species conservation not only in Portugal, but also in the remaining Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is important to obtain data concerning Unio pictorum bioecology (distribution, habitat requirements, population structure, genetic variability, reproductive cycle and recruitment rates), as well as the genetic variability and structure of the population. Concomitantly, information concerning fish population structure, the importance of the different fish species as "glochidia" hosts and their appropriate density to allow effective mussel recruitment, will also be assessed. The achieved data is crucial to obtain information to develop effective management measures in order to promote the conservation of this bivalve species, the conservation of autochthonous fish populations, and consequently the integrity of the river habitats.

  7. Estimation of genetic structure of a Mycosphaerella musicola population using inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixouto, Y S; Dórea Bragança, C A; Andrade, W B; Ferreira, C F; Haddad, F; Oliveira, S A S; Darosci Brito, F S; Miller, R N G; Amorim, E P

    2015-07-17

    Among the diseases affecting banana (Musa sp), yellow Sigatoka, caused by the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella musicola Leach, is considered one of the most important in Brazil, causing losses throughout the year. Understanding the genetic structure of pathogen populations will provide insight into the life history of pathogens, including the evolutionary processes occurring in agrosystems. Tools for estimating the possible emergence of pathogen variants with altered pathogenicity, virulence, or aggressiveness, as well as resistance to systemic fungicides, can also be developed from such data. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity and population genetics of M. musicola in the main banana-producing regions in Brazil. A total of 83 isolates collected from different banana cultivars in the Brazilian states of Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, and Minas Gerais were evaluated using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. High variability was detected between the isolates, and 85.5% of the haplotypes were singletons in the populations. The highest source of genetic diversity (97.22%) was attributed to variations within populations. Bayesian cluster analysis revealed the presence of 2 probable ancestral groups, however, showed no relationship to population structure in terms of collection site, state of origin, or cultivar. Similarly, we detected noevidence of genetic recombination between individuals within different states, indicating that asexual cycles play a major role in M. musicola reproduction and that long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is the main factor contributing to the lack of population structure in the fungus.

  8. Genetic structure of Fennoscandian populations of the threatened wood-decay fungus Fomitopsis rosea (Basidiomycota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauserud, Håvard; Schumacher, Trond

    2003-02-01

    The genetic structure of five Fennoscandian populations of the threatened wood-decay fungus Fomitopsis rosea (Basidiomycota) was investigated using codominant PCR-RFLP, allele specific amplification (ASA) markers, inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers and mating studies. Sequence analyses of a subset of single spore isolates revealed sequence variation in four target sequences; internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and intergenic spacer (IGS1) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (efa) gene and the super oxide dismutase (sod) gene. No sequence variation was found in amplified portions of the mitochondrial large and small rRNA genes. Genotype distributions were mostly (90%) in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, and the nrDNA markers (ITS/IGS1), efa and sod were in most cases (87%) in linkage equilibrium, indicating an outcrossing reproductive mode, panmictic conditions and large population sizes of the fungus. Mating tests confirmed that F. rosea exhibits an outcrossing bipolar heterothallic mating system. Mating allele richness was high in two investigated populations. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and IGS1 sequences from the five geographic populations revealed some geographic sub-structuring of the ITS sequences, but no sub-structuring of IGS1. The nrDNA (ITS/IGS1), efa and sod markers gave a low overall FST (0.013). The ISSR markers gave no clustering of the populations in UPGMA, and the between-population variance component was very low in AMOVA (0.4%), indicating a high level of gene flow.

  9. Genetic diversity, population structure, and resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a worldwide collection of eggplant germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, Rachel P; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Hausbeck, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784) was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The polymorphism information content (PIC) for the population was moderate (0.49) in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance.

  10. Genomic patterns in Acropora cervicornis show extensive population structure and variable genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Schopmeyer, Stephanie; Goergen, Elizabeth; Bartels, Erich; Nedimyer, Ken; Johnson, Meaghan; Maxwell, Kerry; Galvan, Victor; Manfrino, Carrie; Lirman, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Threatened Caribbean coral communities can benefit from high-resolution genetic data used to inform management and conservation action. We use Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS) to investigate genetic patterns in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis, across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT) and the western Caribbean. Results show extensive population structure at regional scales and resolve previously unknown structure within the FRT. Different regions also exhibit up to threefold differences in genetic diversity (He), suggesting targeted management based on the goals and resources of each population is needed. Patterns of genetic diversity have a strong spatial component, and our results show Broward and the Lower Keys are among the most diverse populations in Florida. The genetic diversity of Caribbean staghorn coral is concentrated within populations and within individual reefs (AMOVA), highlighting the complex mosaic of population structure. This variance structure is similar over regional and local scales, which suggests that in situ nurseries are adequately capturing natural patterns of diversity, representing a resource that can replicate the average diversity of wild assemblages, serving to increase intraspecific diversity and potentially leading to improved biodiversity and ecosystem function. Results presented here can be translated into specific goals for the recovery of A. cervicornis, including active focus on low diversity areas, protection of high diversity and connectivity, and practical thresholds for responsible restoration.

  11. POPULATION STRUCTURE AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF Ceratozamia mexicana BRONGN. (ZAMIACEAE IN PRESERVED AND DISTURBED ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Rivera-Fernández

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vegetal populations are affected by biotic and abiotic factors that influence the regeneration processes. The aims of this study were to know the population structure of Ceratozamia mexicana under two contrasting conditions (conserved site and disturbed site, and to determine if the sexual structure, the population density and the spatial distribution of C. mexicana are modified by effect of disturbance. Eight plots of 25 m2 within each site (conserved and disturbed were used. The structure and spatial distribution of the sites were determined. Methods included analysis of variance, spatial distribution indexes, and climatic and edaphic factors determined by conventional methods for their comparison. The conserved site showed a demographic structure of an inverted "J", while the disturbed site varied slightly with more discontinuous distribution. Population density was 0.78 individuals/m2 in the conserved site and 0.26 individuals/m2 in the disturbed site. Spatial distribution for all development stages of the plant was random, with the exception of the seedling stage, which was aggregated. Results showed that perturbation decreases the density of plants and removes reproductive individuals, which threatens the persistence of the population.

  12. Genetic diversity, population structure, and resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a worldwide collection of eggplant germplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P Naegele

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo, landraces and heirloom cultivars from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluated for resistance to two Phytophthora capsici isolates seven days post inoculation. Only one accession (PI 413784 was completely resistant to both isolates evaluated. Partial resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot was found in accessions from all four eggplant species evaluated in this study. Genetic diversity and population structure were assessed using 22 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs. The polymorphism information content (PIC for the population was moderate (0.49 in the population. Genetic analyses using the program STRUCTURE indicated the existence of four genetic clusters within the eggplant collection. Population structure was detected when eggplant lines were grouped by species, continent of origin, country of origin, fruit shape and disease resistance.

  13. Population structure of Aphis spiraecola (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on pear trees in China identified using microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinjun; Li, Jie; Niu, Jianqun; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qingwen

    2012-04-01

    The spiraea aphid (Aphis spiraecola Patch) is a primary pest of fruit trees, particularly pear trees in China. Despite the economic importance of this pest, little is known about its genetic structure or its patterns of dispersal at local and regional scales; however, knowledge of these characteristics is important for establishing effective control strategies for this pest. The genetic variability of 431 individuals from 21 populations on pear trees in China was investigated using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. The high polymorphism of these markers was evident from the expected heterozygosity value (He = 0.824) and the Polymorphism Information Content (PIC = 0.805), indicating that the spiraea aphid maintains a high level of genetic diversity. The analysis of molecular variance revealed a middle level of population differentiation (F(ST) = 0.1478) among A. spiraecola populations. This result is consistent with the results of the STRUCTURE analysis (K = 3), the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average tree and the Mantel test (r = 0.6392; P importance of considering regional differences in studies of population structure, even when strong isolation-by-distance influences the genetic population structure of species.

  14. History and structure of the closed pedigreed population of Icelandic Sheepdogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliehoek, Pieter A; Bijma, Piter; van der Meijden, Arie

    2009-08-06

    Dog breeds lose genetic diversity because of high selection pressure. Breeding policies aim to minimize kinship and therefore maintain genetic diversity. However, policies like mean kinship and optimal contributions might be impractical. Cluster analysis of kinship can elucidate the population structure, since this method divides the population in clusters of related individuals. Kinship-based analyses have been carried out on the entire Icelandic Sheepdog population, a sheep-herding breed. Analyses showed that despite increasing population size and deliberately transferring dogs, considerable genetic diversity has been lost. When cluster analysis was based on kinships calculated seven generation backwards, as performed in previous studies, results differ markedly from those based on calculations going back to the founder-population, and thus invalidate recommendations based on previous research. When calculated back to the founder-population, kinship-based clustering reveals the distribution of genetic diversity, similarly to strategies using mean kinship. Although the base population consisted of 36 Icelandic Sheepdog founders, the current diversity is equivalent to that of only 2.2 equally contributing founders with no loss of founder alleles in descendants. The maximum attainable diversity is 4.7, unlikely achievable in a non-supervised breeding population like the Icelandic Sheepdog. Cluster analysis of kinship coefficients can provide a supporting tool to assess the distribution of available genetic diversity for captive population management.

  15. History and structure of the closed pedigreed population of Icelandic Sheepdogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijma Piter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dog breeds lose genetic diversity because of high selection pressure. Breeding policies aim to minimize kinship and therefore maintain genetic diversity. However, policies like mean kinship and optimal contributions, might be impractical. Cluster analysis of kinship can elucidate the population structure, since this method divides the population in clusters of related individuals. Kinship-based analyses have been carried out on the entire Icelandic Sheepdog population, a sheep-herding breed. Results Analyses showed that despite increasing population size and deliberately transferring dogs, considerable genetic diversity has been lost. When cluster analysis was based on kinships calculated seven generation backwards, as performed in previous studies, results differ markedly from those based on calculations going back to the founder-population, and thus invalidate recommendations based on previous research. When calculated back to the founder-population, kinship-based clustering reveals the distribution of genetic diversity, similarly to strategies using mean kinship. Conclusion Although the base population consisted of 36 Icelandic Sheepdog founders, the current diversity is equivalent to that of only 2.2 equally contributing founders with no loss of founder alleles in descendants. The maximum attainable diversity is 4.7, unlikely achievable in a non-supervised breeding population like the Icelandic Sheepdog. Cluster analysis of kinship coefficients can provide a supporting tool to assess the distribution of available genetic diversity for captive population management.

  16. Genetic structure, spatial organization, and dispersal in two populations of bat-eared foxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamler, Jan F; Gray, Melissa M; Oh, Annie; Macdonald, David W

    2013-09-01

    We incorporated radio-telemetry data with genetic analysis of bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) from individuals in 32 different groups to examine relatedness and spatial organization in two populations in South Africa that differed in density, home-range sizes, and group sizes. Kin clustering occurred only for female dyads in the high-density population. Relatedness was negatively correlated with distance only for female dyads in the high-density population, and for male and mixed-sex dyads in the low-density population. Home-range overlap of neighboring female dyads was significantly greater in the high compared to low-density population, whereas overlap within other dyads was similar between populations. Amount of home-range overlap between neighbors was positively correlated with genetic relatedness for all dyad-site combinations, except for female and male dyads in the low-density population. Foxes from all age and sex classes dispersed, although females (mostly adults) dispersed farther than males. Yearlings dispersed later in the high-density population, and overall exhibited a male-biased dispersal pattern. Our results indicated that genetic structure within populations of bat-eared foxes was sex-biased, and was interrelated to density and group sizes, as well as sex-biases in philopatry and dispersal distances. We conclude that a combination of male-biased dispersal rates, adult dispersals, and sex-biased dispersal distances likely helped to facilitate inbreeding avoidance in this evolutionarily unique species of Canidae.

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of leafy kale and Brassica rupestris Raf. in south Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Lorenzo; von Bothmer, Roland; Poulsen, Gert; Branca, Ferdinando; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2014-12-01

    Local varieties of leafy kales (Brassica oleracea L.) are grown in home gardens in Calabria and Sicily for self-consumption, in the same area where the wild relative Brassica rupestris Raf. also grows. With the use of AFLP markers, comparisons were made of the genetic diversity and population structure of ten wild and 22 cultivated populations, as well as of a hybrid population and of four commercial cultivars of different B. oleracea crops. The level of genetic diversity was higher in leafy kales than in wild populations and this diversity was mainly distributed within populations. Wild populations remained distinct from cultivated material. Additionally, most wild populations were distinctively isolated from each other. On the other hand, it was not possible to molecularly distinguish even geographically distant leafy kale populations from each other or from different B. oleracea crops. It was possible to detect inter-crossing between leafy kales and B. rupestris. Findings from this study illustrate the existing level of genetic diversity in the B. oleracea gene pool. Individual populations (either wild or leafy kales) with higher levels of genetic diversity have been identified and suggestions are given for an informed conservation strategy. Domestication hypotheses are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. Gene flow and genetic structure in the Galician population (NW Spain) according to Alu insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Tito A; Fariña, José; Diéguez, Lois Pérez; Lodeiro, Rosa

    2008-12-02

    The most recent Alu insertions reveal different degrees of polymorphism in human populations, and a series of characteristics that make them particularly suitable genetic markers for Human Biology studies. This has led these polymorphisms to be used to analyse the origin and phylogenetic relationships between contemporary human groups. This study analyses twelve Alu sequences in a sample of 216 individuals from the autochthonous population of Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of studying their genetic structure and phylogenetic position with respect to the populations of Western and Central Europe and North Africa, research that is of special interest in revealing European population dynamics, given the peculiarities of the Galician population due to its geographical situation in western Europe, and its historical vicissitudes. The insertion frequencies of eleven of the Alu elements analysed were within the variability range of European populations, while Yb8NBC125 proved to be the lowest so far recorded to date in Europe. Taking the twelve polymorphisms into account, the GD value for the Galician population was 0.268. The comparative analyses carried out using the MDS, NJ and AMOVA methods reveal the existence of spatial heterogeneity, and identify three population groups that correspond to the geographic areas of Western-Central Europe, Eastern Mediterranean Europe and North Africa. Galicia is shown to be included in the Western-Central European cluster, together with other Spanish populations. When only considering populations from Mediterranean Europe, the Galician population revealed a degree of genetic flow similar to that of the majority of the populations from this geographic area. The results of this study reveal that the Galician population, despite its geographic situation in the western edge of the European continent, occupies an intermediate position in relation to other European populations in general, and Iberian populations in particular. This

  19. Population structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae based on whole genome data and its relationship with antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Ezewudo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection (STI of major importance. As a result of antibiotic resistance, there are now limited options for treating patients. We collected draft genome sequence data and associated metadata data on 76 N. gonorrhoeae strains from around the globe and searched for known determinants of antibiotics resistance within the strains. The population structure and evolutionary forces within the pathogen population were analyzed. Our results indicated a cosmopolitan gonoccocal population mainly made up of five subgroups. The estimated ratio of recombination to mutation (r/m = 2.2 from our data set indicates an appreciable level of recombination occurring in the population. Strains with resistance phenotypes to more recent antibiotics (azithromycin and cefixime were mostly found in two of the five population subgroups.

  20. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda

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    Jose L. Horreo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region, one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival.

  1. Analysis of correlation structure in Lymantria dispar L. larvae from locally adapted populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrdaković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of allelochemical stress and population origin on the patterns of phenotypic and genetic correlations among life history traits and digestive enzyme activities were investigated in larvae of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.; Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae. Thirty-two full-sib families from oak (suitable host plant, Quercus population, and twenty-six full-sib families from locust-tree (unsuitable host plant, Robinia population forests were reared on an artificial diet, with or without a 5% tannic acid supplement. Comparison of correlation matrices revealed significant similarity between the two populations in the structure of phenotypic and genetic correlations of life history traits and of digestive enzyme activities. The patterns of correlations of the examined traits, within each of the two locally adapted populations and in the presence of allelochemical stress, remained stabile despite the different selection pressures that mold these traits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173027

  2. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horreo, Jose L; Raab, Rainer; Spakovszky, Péter; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda) living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region), one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden) was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival.

  3. Genetic structure of natural populations of the grass endophyte Epichloë festucae in semiarid grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo García, R; Martínez Zapater, J M; García Criado, B; Zabalgogeazcoa, I

    2002-03-01

    Plants of red fescue (Festuca rubra), a commercially important turf grass, are infected by the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae in semiarid natural grasslands, known as dehesas, in western Spain. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to analyse the genetic polymorphism existing in two natural populations of Epichloë festucae. Linkage disequilibrium and the presence of clonal lineages indicated that nonrecombinant asexual reproduction predominates in both populations. However, most genetic variation detected was found to occur within populations, with only a moderate amount of genetic differentiation between populations (F(ST): 0.197). Overall, the study suggests that dehesa grasslands are useful reservoirs of Epichloë festucae endophytes, and provides information on population structure which is relevant to design sampling strategies.

  4. Within-population genetic structure in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stands characterized by different disturbance histories: does forest management simplify population substructure?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Piotti; Stefano Leonardi; Myriam Heuertz; Joukje Buiteveld; Thomas Geburek; Sophie Gerber; Koen Kramer; Cristina Vettori; Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin

    2013-01-01

    The fine-scale assessment of both spatially and non-spatially distributed genetic variation is crucial to preserve forest genetic resources through appropriate forest management. Cryptic within-population genetic structure may be more common than previously thought in forest tree populations, which has strong implications for the potential of forests to adapt to environmental change. The present study was aimed at comparing within-population genetic structure in European beech (Fagus sylvatic...

  5. Population genetic structure of savannah elephants in Kenya: conservation and management implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okello, John B A; Masembe, Charles; Rasmussen, Henrik B

    2008-01-01

    We investigated population genetic structure and regional differentiation among African savannah elephants in Kenya using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. We observed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide diversity of 1.68% and microsatellite variation in terms of average number of alleles...... genome to the matrilineal social structure of elephant populations, female natal philopatry, and probably ancient vicariance. Lack of significant regional differentiation at the nuclear loci vis-a-vis strong differences at mtDNA loci between regions is likely the effect of subsequent homogenization...

  6. CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURE OF POPULATION AND HOUSING FUND BETWEEN TWO CENSUSES

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    Nicu MARCU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, a series of structural changes took place in our country with regard to the whole society, mainly in the economic and the social area.Changes occurred in the number and the structure of the population living at a specific time. Whether we refer to the residence environment, gender or employment status as recorded in the Population and Housing Census of 18 March 2002 in the villages, towns, municipalities and counties - as administrative and territorial units, and also in the developing regions, the changes result from official statistical data and information published in the last ten years.

  7. Population genetic structure and historical demography of Oratosquilla oratoria revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Ding, Ge; Ge, B; Zhang, H; Tang, B

    2012-12-01

    Genetic diversity, population genetic structure and molecular phylogeographic pattern of mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria in Bohai Sea and South China Sea were analyzed by mitochondrial DNA sequences. Nucleotide and haplotype diversities were 0.00409-0.00669 and 0.894-0.953 respectively. Neighbor-Joining phylogenetic tree clustered two distinct lineages. Both phylogenetic tree and median-joining network showed the consistent genetic structure corresponding to geographical distribution. Mismatch distributions, negative neutral test and "star-like" network supported a sudden population expansion event. And the time was estimated about 44000 and 50000 years ago.

  8. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae in a Brazilian savanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IA. Silva

    Full Text Available Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of the dry season in 2006. We sampled and measured all individuals of Z. rhoifolium found in 80 plots of 25 m². We found 149 individuals before the fire and 112 after the fire, of which 77 were resprouts from burned seedlings and saplings. We did not find significant differences between the population structure before and after the fire. The spatial distribution of the population remained clumped after the fire. Thus, the Z. rhoifolium population was very resilient to a severe fire. We did not find any new seedlings. As a consequence, resprouting seems to be more important than sexual reproduction in promptly regenerating the Z. rhoifolium populations.

  9. Fire effects on the population structure of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam (Rutaceae) in a Brazilian savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I A; Valenti, M W; Silva-Matos, D M

    2009-08-01

    Since cerrado fires may impede the growth of seedlings into trees, they may shape the population of woody species. In this study, we assessed the effects of a severe fire on the population structure and spatial distribution of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a widespread cerrado tree. We were interested to know the importance of the resprouting and sexual reproduction in regenerating the population. The study area had been for about six years protected from fire, before a severe fire at the end of the dry season in 2006. We sampled and measured all individuals of Z. rhoifolium found in 80 plots of 25 m(2). We found 149 individuals before the fire and 112 after the fire, of which 77 were resprouts from burned seedlings and saplings. We did not find significant differences between the population structure before and after the fire. The spatial distribution of the population remained clumped after the fire. Thus, the Z. rhoifolium population was very resilient to a severe fire. We did not find any new seedlings. As a consequence, resprouting seems to be more important than sexual reproduction in promptly regenerating the Z. rhoifolium populations.

  10. THE STRUCTURE AND SEASONALITY OF BAYLISASCARIS PROCYONIS POPULATIONS IN RACCOONS (PROCYON LOTOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, L Kristen; Delzell, Darcie A P; Gehrt, Stanley D; Harrell, Elise D; Hiben, Mark; Walter, Elizabeth; Anchor, Chris; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2016-04-28

    Baylisascaris procyonis , the raccoon ( Procyon lotor ) ascarid, is a common roundworm parasite of raccoons that is also a well-recognized zoonotic pathogen, and a cause for conservation concern. The transmission dynamics of B. procyonis differ with host population attributes, season, and landscape. We examined how the parasite's population attributes change with season, parasite population structure, and host demographics. We examined 1,050 raccoon gastrointestinal tracts collected from 1996 to 2012. Of the 1,050 raccoons necropsied, 382 (36%) were infected with at least one B. procyonis (x¯=15.8 [95% confidence interval=13.39-18.26]; median=7; range 1-199 worms/host), and populations were overdispersed. There was a seasonal change in prevalence with a peak in October/November. Worm burdens decreased approximately 28% per month from January to June and increased approximately 31% per month from June to December. The sex structure of B. procyonis populations was female-biased (56% female). Host demographics did not impact parasite population attributes. This study provides evidence that B. procyonis populations exhibit a yearly cycle of loss and recruitment that may impact the transmission dynamics of the parasite.

  11. HISTORICAL FACTORS AND ANISOPLETHIC POPULATION STRUCTURE IN TRISTYLOUS PONTEDERIA CORDATA: A REASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Martin T; Barrett, Spencer C H

    1988-05-01

    Theoretical models of floral-morph frequencies in tristylous species predict a single equilibrium with all three morphs represented in equal proportions (isoplethy). North American populations of Pontederia cordata exhibit considerable heterogeneity of morph frequencies between populations, with the short-styled morph often in excess of isoplethic expectations and the long-styled morph commonly underrepresented. In a previous study, it was proposed that anisoplethic population structure in P. cordata is the result of differential male fertility, owing to genetic differences in pollen production among the morphs. In this study, the influence of historical factors on morph frequencies prior to equilibrium was investigated using a deterministic computer model. Nonequilibrium frequencies are strongly influenced by the genotypes of founding individuals, and, because tristyly is under the control of two diallelic loci, phenotypic equilibrium is approached asymptotically. The model indicates that in nonequilibrium populations the short-styled morph will be in excess and the long-styled morph will be underrepresented. This suggests that historical factors play an important role in determining population structure in P. cordata. Several features of the population ecology of the species lend support to this interpretation. Historical factors should be taken into account when interpreting data from population surveys of morph frequencies in tristylous species and of other genetic polymorphisms not under single-locus control. © 1988 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Population genetic structure of Sisyrinchium micranthum Cav. (Iridaceae in Itapuã State Park, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Olinda Tacuatiá

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sisyrinchium micranthum Cav. is a member of the family Iridaceae, which is distributed over the American continent. In Brazil, this species is found, not only in disturbed areas and coastal regions, but is also very common in urban centers, such as public parks, during the spring. Chromosome counts for North American specimens are 2n = 32 and 2n = 48, whereas in southern Brazil, there is a polyploidy series with three chromosome numbers, 2n = 16, 2n = 32, and 2n = 48. Population analyses using DNA molecular markers are inexistent for this species, in spite of its wide distribution and morphological variation. To study the genetic population structure of S. micranthum, five natural populations were accessed in a conservation park within the Atlantic Rain Forest Biome in southern Brazil. Here, the chromosome numbers 2n = 16 and 2n = 48 had already been described. Molecular analysis showed that the populations are highly structured with low gene flow among them. The population with 2n = 48 was genetically less variable than and distinct from the other populations. Population genetics in relation to cytogenetic data provided new insights regarding the genetic diversification and mating system of S. micranthum.

  13. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  14. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lima

    Full Text Available Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors. Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  15. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  16. The influence of climatic niche preferences on the population genetic structure of a mistletoe species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; González, Clementina; González-Rodríguez, Antonio; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2017-06-01

    The prevalent view on genetic structuring in parasitic plants is that host-race formation is caused by varying degrees of host specificity. However, the relative importance of ecological niche divergence and host specificity to population differentiation remains poorly understood. We evaluated the factors associated with population differentiation in mistletoes of the Psittacanthus schiedeanus complex (Loranthaceae) in Mexico. We used genetic data from chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites to study population genetic structure and tested its association with host preferences and climatic niche variables. Pairwise genetic differentiation was associated with environmental and host preferences, independent of geography. However, environmental predictors appeared to be more important than host preferences to explain genetic structure, supporting the hypothesis that the occurrence of the parasite is largely determined by its own climatic niche and, to a lesser degree, by host specificity. Genetic structure is significant within this mistletoe species complex, but the processes associated with this structure appear to be more complex than previously thought. Although host specificity was not supported as the major determinant of population differentiation, we consider this to be part of a more comprehensive ecological model of mistletoe host-race formation that incorporates the effects of climatic niche evolution. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Temporal genetic population structure and interannual variation in migration behavior of Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Benjamin J.; Wyss, Lance A.; McCoun, Rebecca; Courter, Ian; Schwabe, Lawrence; Peery, Christopher; Schreck, Carl B.; Spice, Erin K.; Docker, Margaret F.

    2017-01-01

    Studies using neutral loci suggest that Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, lack strong spatial genetic population structure. However, it is unknown whether temporal genetic population structure exists. We tested whether adult Pacific lamprey: (1) show temporal genetic population structure; and (2) migrate different distances between years. We non-lethally sampled lamprey for DNA in 2009 and 2010 and used eight microsatellite loci to test for genetic population structure. We used telemetry to record the migration behaviors of these fish. Lamprey were assignable to three moderately differentiated genetic clusters (FST = 0.16–0.24 for all pairwise comparisons): one cluster was composed of individuals from 2009, and the other two contained individuals from 2010. The FST value between years was 0.13 and between genetic clusters within 2010 was 0.20. A total of 372 (72.5%) fish were detected multiple times during their migrations. Most fish (69.9%) remained in the mainstem Willamette River; the remaining 30.1% migrated into tributaries. Eighty-two lamprey exhibited multiple back-and-forth movements among tributaries and the mainstem, which may indicate searching behaviors. All migration distances were significantly greater in 2010, when the amplitude of river discharge was greater. Our data suggest genetic structuring between and within years that may reflect different cohorts.

  18. The doubly conditioned frequency spectrum does not distinguish between ancient population structure and hybridization

    KAUST Repository

    Eriksson, Anders

    2014-03-13

    Distinguishing between hybridization and population structure in the ancestral species is a key challenge in our understanding of how permeable species boundaries are to gene flow. The doubly conditioned frequency spectrum (dcfs) has been argued to be a powerful metric to discriminate between these two explanations, and it was used to argue for hybridization between Neandertal and anatomically modern humans. The shape of the observed dcfs for these two species cannot be reproduced by a model that represents ancient population structure in Africa with two populations, while adding hybridization produces realistic shapes. In this letter, we show that this result is a consequence of the spatial coarseness of the demographic model and that a spatially structured stepping stone model can generate realistic dcfs without hybridization. This result highlights how inferences on hybridization between recently diverged species can be strongly affected by the choice of how population structure is represented in the underlying demographic model. We also conclude that the dcfs has limited power in distinguishing between the signals left by hybridization and ancient structure. 2014 The Author.

  19. A population on the edge: genetic diversity and population structure of the world's northernmost harbour seals (Phoca vitulina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Liselotte Wesley; Lydersen, Christian; Frie, Anne Kirstine

    2011-01-01

      It is crucial to examine the genetic diversity and structure of small, isolated populations, especially those at the edge of their distribution range, because they are vulnerable to stochastic processes if genetic diversity is low and isolation level high, and because such populations provide...... harbour seal populations, but if it the Svalbard population is experiencing inbreeding, this could reduce its resilience to climate change, disease outbreaks or other perturbations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010...

  20. Large-scale structure of brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) populations in England: effects on rodenticide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniza, Mohd Z.H.; Adams, Sally; Jones, Eleanor P.; MacNicoll, Alan; Mallon, Eamonn B.; Smith, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a relatively recent (<300 years) addition to the British fauna, but by association with negative impacts on public health, animal health and agriculture, it is regarded as one of the most important vertebrate pest species. Anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced for brown rat control in the 1950s and are widely used for rat control in the UK, but long-standing resistance has been linked to control failures in some regions. One thus far ignored aspect of resistance biology is the population structure of the brown rat. This paper investigates the role population structure has on the development of anticoagulant resistance. Using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA, we examined 186 individuals (from 15 counties in England and one location in Wales near the Wales–England border) to investigate the population structure of rural brown rat populations. We also examined individual rats for variations of the VKORC1 gene previously associated with resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides. We show that the populations were structured to some degree, but that this was only apparent in the microsatellite data and not the mtDNA data. We discuss various reasons why this is the case. We show that the population as a whole appears not to be at equilibrium. The relative lack of diversity in the mtDNA sequences examined can be explained by founder effects and a subsequent spatial expansion of a species introduced to the UK relatively recently. We found there was a geographical distribution of resistance mutations, and relatively low rate of gene flow between populations, which has implications for the development and management of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:26664802

  1. Large-scale structure of brown rat (Rattus norvegicus populations in England: effects on rodenticide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Z.H. Haniza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The brown rat (Rattus norvegicus is a relatively recent (<300 years addition to the British fauna, but by association with negative impacts on public health, animal health and agriculture, it is regarded as one of the most important vertebrate pest species. Anticoagulant rodenticides were introduced for brown rat control in the 1950s and are widely used for rat control in the UK, but long-standing resistance has been linked to control failures in some regions. One thus far ignored aspect of resistance biology is the population structure of the brown rat. This paper investigates the role population structure has on the development of anticoagulant resistance. Using mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA, we examined 186 individuals (from 15 counties in England and one location in Wales near the Wales–England border to investigate the population structure of rural brown rat populations. We also examined individual rats for variations of the VKORC1 gene previously associated with resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides. We show that the populations were structured to some degree, but that this was only apparent in the microsatellite data and not the mtDNA data. We discuss various reasons why this is the case. We show that the population as a whole appears not to be at equilibrium. The relative lack of diversity in the mtDNA sequences examined can be explained by founder effects and a subsequent spatial expansion of a species introduced to the UK relatively recently. We found there was a geographical distribution of resistance mutations, and relatively low rate of gene flow between populations, which has implications for the development and management of anticoagulant resistance.

  2. Environmental and Climatic Determinants of Molecular Diversity and Genetic Population Structure in a Coenagrionid Damselfly

    OpenAIRE

    Maren Wellenreuther; Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A.; Adolfo Cordero-Rivera; Svensson, Erik I.; Bengt Hansson

    2011-01-01

    Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the...

  3. Egg distribution, bottom topography and small-scale cod population structure in a coastal marine system

    OpenAIRE

    Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Espen Moland; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Knutsen, Jan Atle; Simonsen, Jan Henrik; Skreslet, Stig; Stenseth, Nils Christian

    2007-01-01

    Coastal marine species with pelagic egg and larval stages, such as the Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, can be structured into genetically distinct local populations on a surprisingly small geographic scale considering their dispersal potential. Mechanisms responsible for such small-scale genetic structure may involve homing of adults to their natal spawning grounds, but also local retention of pelagic eggs and larvae. For example, spawning within sheltered fjord habitats is expected to favour loca...

  4. Clonality as a driver of spatial genetic structure in populations of clonal tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dering, Monika; Chybicki, Igor Jerzy; Rączka, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Random genetic drift, natural selection and restricted gene dispersal are basic factors of the spatial genetic structure (SGS) in plant populations. Clonal reproduction has a profound effect on population dynamics and genetic structure and thus emerges as a potential factor in contributing to and modelling SGS. In order to assess the impact of clonality on SGS we studied clonal structure and SGS in the population of Populus alba. Six hundred and seventy-two individuals were mapped and genotyped with 16 nuclear microsatellite markers. To answer the more general question regarding the relationship between SGS and clonality we used Sp statistics, which allows for comparisons of the extent of SGS among different studies, and the comparison of published data on SGS in clonal and non-clonal tree species. Sp statistic was extracted for 14 clonal and 27 non-clonal species belonging to 7 and 18 botanical families, respectively. Results of genetic investigations conducted in the population of P. alba showed over-domination of clonal reproduction, which resulted in very low clonal diversity (R = 0.12). Significant SGS was found at both ramet (Sp = 0.095) and genet level (Sp = 0.05) and clonal reproduction was indicated as an important but not sole driving factor of SGS. Within-population structure, probably due to family structure also contributed to high SGS. High mean dominance index (D = 0.82) indicated low intermingling among genets. Literature survey revealed that clonal tree species significantly differ from non-clonal species with respect to SGS, having 2.8-fold higher SGS. This led us to conclude that clonality is a life-history trait that can have deep impact on processes acting in populations of clonal tree species leading to significant SGS.

  5. Assessment of Genetic Heterogeneity in Structured Plant Populations Using Multivariate Whole-Genome Regression Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehermeier, Christina; Schön, Chris-Carolin; de Los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Plant breeding populations exhibit varying levels of structure and admixture; these features are likely to induce heterogeneity of marker effects across subpopulations. Traditionally, structure has been dealt with as a potential confounder, and various methods exist to "correct" for population stratification. However, these methods induce a mean correction that does not account for heterogeneity of marker effects. The animal breeding literature offers a few recent studies that consider modeling genetic heterogeneity in multibreed data, using multivariate models. However, these methods have received little attention in plant breeding where population structure can have different forms. In this article we address the problem of analyzing data from heterogeneous plant breeding populations, using three approaches: (a) a model that ignores population structure [A-genome-based best linear unbiased prediction (A-GBLUP)], (b) a stratified (i.e., within-group) analysis (W-GBLUP), and (c) a multivariate approach that uses multigroup data and accounts for heterogeneity (MG-GBLUP). The performance of the three models was assessed on three different data sets: a diversity panel of rice (Oryza sativa), a maize (Zea mays L.) half-sib panel, and a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) data set that originated from plant breeding programs. The estimated genomic correlations between subpopulations varied from null to moderate, depending on the genetic distance between subpopulations and traits. Our assessment of prediction accuracy features cases where ignoring population structure leads to a parsimonious more powerful model as well as others where the multivariate and stratified approaches have higher predictive power. In general, the multivariate approach appeared slightly more robust than either the A- or the W-GBLUP. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF A PRIMITIVELY SOCIAL BEE: DOES GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE FACILITATE ALTRUISM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blows, M W; Schwarz, M P

    1991-05-01

    Exoneura bicolor is a univoltine, facultatively social bee exhibiting a solitary/quasisocial/semisocial colony polymorphism (Schwarz, 1986, 1987). Intracolony relatedness in semisocial colonies has been previously estimated at 0.49 ± 0.06 (Schwarz, 1987), although the crucial relatedness between altruists and the brood that they rear will be about half this value. This value is unlikely to be increased by the preferential rearing of only close relatives (Schwarz, 1988a) and no known morphological specializations preclude workers from reproducing in this species. Hamilton (1972, 1975) suggested that relatedness may be increased through population subdivision, if this leads to significant inbreeding and increased between-colony genetic variance. The same process may also operate at higher levels of population structure (e.g., Wade, 1978). Population structure and intracolony relatedness in E. bicolor were investigated in seven localities in southern Victoria, Australia, to determine if inbreeding at any level of population structure was contributing to relatedness between altruists and beneficiaries within these colonies. Population structure was described using hierarchical F-statistics and an identity by descent measure, developed by Queller and Goodnight (1989), was used to estimate intracolony relatedness. It was found that inbreeding was not contributing to between-group genetic variance, at any level, in a consistent manner across localities. Therefore relatedness, considered in isolation, does not seem sufficient to account for the presence of worker behavior. It is suggested that large benefits for group living may be responsible for maintaining altruistic behavior, in part, in this species. Significant heterogeneity among localities for all F-statistics estimated in our analysis was found and this may be attributable to stochastic elements such as cofounding behavior and the low percentage of males in the brood. The possible consequences of such

  7. Hierarchical spatial genetic structure in a distinct population segment of greater sage-grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Coates, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) within the Bi-State Management Zone (area along the border between Nevada and California) are geographically isolated on the southwestern edge of the species’ range. Previous research demonstrated that this population is genetically unique, with a high proportion of unique mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and with significant differences in microsatellite allele frequencies compared to populations across the species’ range. As a result, this population was considered a distinct population segment (DPS) and was recently proposed for listing as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. A more comprehensive understanding of the boundaries of this genetically unique population (where the Bi-State population begins) and an examination of genetic structure within the Bi-State is needed to help guide effective management decisions. We collected DNA from eight sampling locales within the Bi-State (N = 181) and compared those samples to previously collected DNA from the two most proximal populations outside of the Bi-State DPS, generating mtDNA sequence data and amplifying 15 nuclear microsatellites. Both mtDNA and microsatellite analyses support the idea that the Bi-State DPS represents a genetically unique population, which has likely been separated for thousands of years. Seven mtDNA haplotypes were found exclusively in the Bi-State population and represented 73 % of individuals, while three haplotypes were shared with neighboring populations. In the microsatellite analyses both STRUCTURE and FCA separate the Bi-State from the neighboring populations. We also found genetic structure within the Bi-State as both types of data revealed differences between the northern and southern part of the Bi-State and there was evidence of isolation-by-distance. STRUCTURE revealed three subpopulations within the Bi-State consisting of the northern Pine Nut Mountains (PNa), mid Bi-State, and White Mountains (WM) following a

  8. Inference of population structure of Leishmania donovani strains isolated from different Ethiopian visceral leishmaniasis endemic areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Gelanew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parasites' evolution in response to parasite-targeted control strategies, such as vaccines and drugs, is known to be influenced by their population genetic structure. The aim of this study was to describe the population structure of Ethiopian strains of Leishmania donovani derived from different areas endemic for visceral leishmaniasis (VL as a prerequisite for the design of effective control strategies against the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-three strains of L. donovani newly isolated from VL cases in the two main Ethiopian foci, in the north Ethiopia (NE and south Ethiopia (SE of the country were investigated by using 14 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. The microsatellite profiles of 60 previously analysed L. donovani strains from Sudan, Kenya and India were included for comparison. Multilocus microsatellite typing placed strains from SE and Kenya (n = 30 in one population and strains from NE and Sudan (n = 65 in another. These two East African populations corresponded to the areas of distribution of two different sand fly vectors. In NE and Sudan Phlebotomus orientalis has been implicated to transmit the parasites and in SE and Kenya P. martini. The genetic differences between parasites from NE and SE are also congruent with some phenotypic differences. Each of these populations was further divided into two subpopulations. Interestingly, in one of the subpopulations of the population NE we observed predominance of strains isolated from HIV-VL co-infected patients and of strains with putative hybrid genotypes. Furthermore, high inbreeding irreconcilable from strict clonal reproduction was found for strains from SE and Kenya indicating a mixed-mating system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identified a hierarchical population structure of L. donovani in East Africa. The existence of two main, genetically and geographically separated, populations could reflect different parasite-vector associations

  9. Spatial genetic structure and mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Argentinean populations of the grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rosetti

    Full Text Available Many grasshopper species are considered of agronomical importance because they cause damage to pastures and crops. Comprehension of pest population dynamics requires a clear understanding of the genetic diversity and spatial structure of populations. In this study we report on patterns of genetic variation in the South American grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus which is an agricultural pest of crops and forage grasses of great economic significance in Argentina. We use Direct Amplification of Minisatellite Regions (DAMD and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxydase 1 (COI mitochondrial gene to investigate intraspecific structure, demographic history and gene flow patterns in twenty Argentinean populations of this species belonging to different geographic and biogeographic regions. DAMD data suggest that, although genetic drift and migration occur within and between populations, measurable relatedness among neighbouring populations declines with distance and dispersal over distances greater than 200 km is not typical, whereas effective gene flow may occur for populations separated by less than 100 km. Landscape analysis was useful to detect genetic discontinuities associated with environmental heterogeneity reflecting the changing agroecosystem. The COI results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between two groups of populations located at both margins of the Paraná River which became separated during climate oscillations of the Middle Pleistocene, suggesting a significant restriction in effective dispersion mediated by females and large scale geographic differentiation. The number of migrants between populations estimated through mitochondrial and DAMD markers suggest that gene flow is low prompting a non-homogeneous spatial structure and justifying the variation through space. Moreover, the genetic analysis of both markers allows us to conclude that males appear to disperse more than females, reducing the chance of the

  10. Spatial genetic structure and mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Argentinean populations of the grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Natalia; Remis, Maria Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Many grasshopper species are considered of agronomical importance because they cause damage to pastures and crops. Comprehension of pest population dynamics requires a clear understanding of the genetic diversity and spatial structure of populations. In this study we report on patterns of genetic variation in the South American grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus which is an agricultural pest of crops and forage grasses of great economic significance in Argentina. We use Direct Amplification of Minisatellite Regions (DAMD) and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxydase 1 (COI) mitochondrial gene to investigate intraspecific structure, demographic history and gene flow patterns in twenty Argentinean populations of this species belonging to different geographic and biogeographic regions. DAMD data suggest that, although genetic drift and migration occur within and between populations, measurable relatedness among neighbouring populations declines with distance and dispersal over distances greater than 200 km is not typical, whereas effective gene flow may occur for populations separated by less than 100 km. Landscape analysis was useful to detect genetic discontinuities associated with environmental heterogeneity reflecting the changing agroecosystem. The COI results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between two groups of populations located at both margins of the Paraná River which became separated during climate oscillations of the Middle Pleistocene, suggesting a significant restriction in effective dispersion mediated by females and large scale geographic differentiation. The number of migrants between populations estimated through mitochondrial and DAMD markers suggest that gene flow is low prompting a non-homogeneous spatial structure and justifying the variation through space. Moreover, the genetic analysis of both markers allows us to conclude that males appear to disperse more than females, reducing the chance of the genetic loss

  11. Cannibals in space: the coevolution of cannibalism and dispersal in spatially structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Kamo, Masashi; Boots, Mike

    2010-05-01

    The propensity for cannibalism varies considerably both within and between species. Currently we have little understanding of both the causes of this variation and its evolutionary consequences for other life-history traits. We examine how different levels of spatial structure affect the evolution of cannibalism and how cannibalism in turn drives the evolution of dispersal. Using pair approximations and simulations, we show that cannibalism can easily evolve in spatially structured populations as long as some dispersal exists. Furthermore, for a wide range of intermediate levels of spatial structure, we find the possibility of evolutionary branching leading to polymorphism in cannibalism. We also show that cannibalism itself can have important evolutionary consequences and select for increased dispersal rates, thus helping to determine the spatial structure of populations. The coevolution of cannibalism and dispersal results in the evolution of various alternative life-history strategies with different dispersal and cannibalism regimes. Which strategy evolves depends on the environmental conditions that determine initial cannibalism rates. Our results therefore suggest that differences in spatial structure could explain variation in the propensity for cannibalism and cannibalistic polyphenism. Furthermore, results emphasize that cannibalism can drive the evolution of other life-history traits and determine the spatial structure of natural populations.

  12. Population structures of Brazilian tall coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) by microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Coconut palms of the Tall group were introduced to Brazil from the Cape Verde Islands in 1553. The present study sought to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within Brazilian Tall coconut populations. Samples were collected of 195 trees from 10 populations. Genetic diversity was accessed by investigating 13 simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci. This provided a total of 68 alleles, ranging from 2 to 13 alleles per locus, with an average of 5.23. The mean values of gene diversity (He ) and observed heterozygosity (Ho ) were 0.459 and 0.443, respectively. The genetic differentiation among populations was estimated at θ^P=0.1600and the estimated apparent outcrossing rate was ta = 0.92. Estimates of genetic distances between the populations varied from 0.034 to 0.390. Genetic distance and the corresponding clustering analysis indicate the formation of two groups. The first consists of the Baía Formosa, Georgino Avelino, and São José do Mipibu populations and the second consists of the Japoatã, Pacatuba, and Praia do Forte populations. The correlation matrix between genetic and geographic distances was positive and significant at a 1% probability. Taken together, our results suggest a spatial structuring of the genetic variability among the populations. Geographically closer populations exhibited greater similarities. PMID:21637579

  13. Microsatellite loci to determine population structure of Garra rufa (Heckel, 1843 in the Khuzestan Province (Iran

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    Ali Shabani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity of Garra rufa was studied using 6 polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci. The specimens of G. rufa were collected from the Kheirabad and Maroon rivers. Despite high importance of this species, there is no genetic information about its population structure. A total of 133 alleles were detected at the 6 loci across the two populations. The Kheirabad population exhibited a lower genetic variation (Ho=0.429 and He=0.850 than the Maroon one. The average numbers of observed alleles in the Kheirabad and Maroon populations were 11.8 and 10.3, respectively. The genetic similarity and distance between the two populations were 0.721 and 0.326, respectively. It seems that Maroon population live under better conditions in contrast to the Kheirabad one. Diminution of genetic variation within examined populations decreases its adaptation to environmental alterations. Based on the results of this study, we can identify two different Garra rufa populations in the Khuzestan province.

  14. Genetic structure and diversity in Juniperus communis populations in Saxony, Germany

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    Reim Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, land use changes led to a rapid decline and fragmentation of J. communis populations in Germany. Population isolation may lead to a restricted gene flow and, further, to negative effects on genetic variation. In this study, genetic diversity and population structure in seven fragmented J. communis populations in Saxony, Germany, were investigated using nuclear microsatellites (nSSR and chloroplast single nucleotide polymorphism (cpSNP. In all Saxony J. communis populations, a high genetic diversity was determined but no population differentiation could be detected whatever method was applied (Bayesian cluster analysis, F-statistics, AMOVA. The same was true for three J. communis out-group samples originating from Italy, Slovakia and Norway, which also showed high genetic diversity and low genetic differences regarding other J. communis populations. Low genetic differentiation among the J. communis populations ascertained with nuclear and chloroplast markers indicated high levels of gene flow by pollen and also by seeds between the sampled locations. Low genetic differentiation may also provide an indicator of Juniper survival during the last glacial maximum (LGM in Europe. The results of this study serve as a basis for the implementation of appropriate conservation measures in Saxony.

  15. Population structure of a widespread species under balancing selection: the case of Arbutus unedo L.

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    Xabier eSantiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbutus unedo L. is an evergreen shrub with a circum-Mediterranean distribution that also reaches the Eurosiberian region in northern Iberia, Atlantic France, and a disjunct population in southern Ireland. Due to the variety of climatic conditions across its distribution range, the populations of A. unedo were expected to display local adaptation. Conversely, common garden experiments revealed that diverse genotypes from a range of provenances produce similar phenotypes through adaptive plasticity, suggesting the action of stabilizing selection across its climatically heterogeneous range. Nonetheless, since an uniform response might also result from extensive gene flow, we have inferred the population structure of A. unedo and assessed whether its extended and largely one-dimensional range influences gene flow with the help of AFLP genotypes for 491 individuals from 19 populations covering the whole range of the species. As we had anticipated, gene flow is restricted in A. unedo, providing further support to the hypothesis that stabilizing selection is the most likely explanation for the homogeneous phenotypes along the range. The Euro-Siberian populations were not particularly isolated from the Mediterranean. Instead, there was a distinct genetic divide between the populations around the Mediterranean Sea and those sampled along Atlantic coasts from northern Africa up to Ireland. This genetic structure suggests the action of historic rather than biogeographic factors as it seems consistent with a scenario of independent glacial refugia in the Atlantic and Mediterranean portions of the range of A. unedo. Genetic exchange was likewise restricted within each set of populations. Nevertheless, IBD was stronger, and FST increased faster with distance, along the Atlantic, suggesting that gene flow might be larger among Mediterranean populations. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in NW Iberia and Ireland than in other populations whereas

  16. Microsatellite based genetic diversity and population structure of the endangered Spanish Guadarrama goat breed

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    Jurado Juan J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessing genetic biodiversity and population structure of minor breeds through the information provided by neutral molecular markers, allows determination of their extinction risk and to design strategies for their management and conservation. Analysis of microsatellite loci is known to be highly informative in the reconstruction of the historical processes underlying the evolution and differentiation of animal populations. Guadarrama goat is a threatened Spanish breed which actual census (2008 consists of 3057 females and 203 males distributed in 22 populations more or less isolated. The aim of this work is to study the genetic status of this breed through the analysis of molecular data from 10 microsatellites typed in historic and actual live animals. Results The mean expected heterozygosity across loci within populations ranged from 0.62 to 0.77. Genetic differentiation measures were moderate, with a mean FST of 0.074, GST of 0.081 and RST of 0.085. Percentages of variation among and within populations were 7.5 and 92.5, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses pointed out a population subdivision in 16 clusters, however, no correlation between geographical distances and genetic differences was found. Management factors such as the limited exchange of animals between farmers (estimated gene flow Nm = 3.08 mostly due to sanitary and social constraints could be the major causes affecting Guadarrama goat population subdivision. Conclusion Genetic diversity measures revealed a good status of biodiversity in the Guadarrama goat breed. Since diseases are the first cause affecting the census in this breed, population subdivision would be an advantage for its conservation. However, to maintain private alleles present at low frequencies in such small populations minimizing the inbreeding rate, it would necessitate some mating designs of animals carrying such alleles among populations. The systematic use of molecular markers will

  17. Microsatellite based genetic diversity and population structure of the endangered Spanish Guadarrama goat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Magdalena; Calvo, Jorge H; Martínez, Marta; Marcos-Carcavilla, Ane; Cuevas, Javier; González, Carmen; Jurado, Juan J; de Tejada, Paloma Díez

    2009-09-29

    Assessing genetic biodiversity and population structure of minor breeds through the information provided by neutral molecular markers, allows determination of their extinction risk and to design strategies for their management and conservation. Analysis of microsatellite loci is known to be highly informative in the reconstruction of the historical processes underlying the evolution and differentiation of animal populations. Guadarrama goat is a threatened Spanish breed which actual census (2008) consists of 3057 females and 203 males distributed in 22 populations more or less isolated. The aim of this work is to study the genetic status of this breed through the analysis of molecular data from 10 microsatellites typed in historic and actual live animals. The mean expected heterozygosity across loci within populations ranged from 0.62 to 0.77. Genetic differentiation measures were moderate, with a mean FST of 0.074, GST of 0.081 and RST of 0.085. Percentages of variation among and within populations were 7.5 and 92.5, respectively. Bayesian clustering analyses pointed out a population subdivision in 16 clusters, however, no correlation between geographical distances and genetic differences was found. Management factors such as the limited exchange of animals between farmers (estimated gene flow Nm = 3.08) mostly due to sanitary and social constraints could be the major causes affecting Guadarrama goat population subdivision. Genetic diversity measures revealed a good status of biodiversity in the Guadarrama goat breed. Since diseases are the first cause affecting the census in this breed, population subdivision would be an advantage for its conservation. However, to maintain private alleles present at low frequencies in such small populations minimizing the inbreeding rate, it would necessitate some mating designs of animals carrying such alleles among populations. The systematic use of molecular markers will facilitate the comprehensive management of these

  18. Population genetic structure in six sympatric and widespread aquatic plants inhabiting diverse lake environments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian-Jin; Mei, Fang-Fang; Wang, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Many aquatic plant species are distributed over large areas and diverse environments with populations interconnected by abiotic and biotic mediators. Here, we examined differences and similarities in the population genetic structure of six sympatric and widespread aquatic plant species. We sampled the aquatic species from six Chinese lakes found on plateaus, plains, and different river systems and analyzed them using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Samples originating from each lake tended to cluster together. Of the six species, only Nymphoides peltata and Myriophyllum spicatum could be divided into plateau and plain groups, once Taihu Lake individuals were excluded. Genetic similarities between populations connected by the Yangtze River were not consistently higher than unconnected populations. Populations from Taihu Lake and/or Weishanhu Lake were distant from other lake populations for all species except Potamogeton lucens . The Taihu and Weishanhu populations clustered for Ceratophyllum demersum and Typha latifolia . Hydrophilous C. demersum had the lowest gene flow ( Nm  = 0.913), whereas the entomophilous Hydrocharis dubia ( Nm  = 2.084) and N. peltata ( Nm  = 2.204) had the highest gene flow. The genetic relationships among distant populations of aquatic plants reflect the comprehensive effects of environmental selection pressure and biotic and abiotic connectivity. Differences in environmental factors between plateau and plain lakes and long distance hydrochory have limited importance on aquatic plant genetic structures. Among multiple evolutionary forces, gene flow mediated by birds may play the most important role in the formation of genetic patterns in the six species examined. For example, the close genetic relationship between Taihu Lake and Weishanhu Lake populations, each in different river systems and with different climates, may be related to the migration routes of birds. Differences in gene flow among the six aquatic plants

  19. Impacts of breeder loss on social structure, reproduction and population growth in a social canid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Bridget L; Brainerd, Scott M; Meier, Thomas J; Prugh, Laura R

    2015-01-01

    The importance of individuals to the dynamics of populations may depend on reproductive status, especially for species with complex social structure. Loss of reproductive individuals in socially complex species could disproportionately affect population dynamics by destabilizing social structure and reducing population growth. Alternatively, compensatory mechanisms such as rapid replacement of breeders may result in little disruption. The impact of breeder loss on the population dynamics of social species remains poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of breeder loss on social stability, recruitment and population growth of grey wolves (Canis lupus) in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska using a 26-year dataset of 387 radiocollared wolves. Harvest of breeding wolves is a highly contentious conservation and management issue worldwide, with unknown population-level consequences. Breeder loss preceded 77% of cases (n = 53) of pack dissolution from 1986 to 2012. Packs were more likely to dissolve if a female or both breeders were lost and pack size was small. Harvest of breeders increased the probability of pack dissolution, likely because the timing of harvest coincided with the breeding season of wolves. Rates of denning and successful recruitment were uniformly high for packs that did not experience breeder loss; however, packs that lost breeders exhibited lower denning and recruitment rates. Breeder mortality and pack dissolution had no significant effects on immediate or longer term population dynamics. Our results indicate the importance of breeding individuals is context dependent. The impact of breeder loss on social group persistence, reproduction and population growth may be greatest when average group sizes are small and mortality occurs during the breeding season. This study highlights the importance of reproductive individuals in maintaining group cohesion in social species, but at the population level socially complex species may be resilient

  20. Multi-locus estimates of population structure and migration in a fence lizard hybrid zone.

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    Adam D Leaché

    Full Text Available A hybrid zone between two species of lizards in the genus Sceloporus (S. cowlesi and S. tristichus on the Mogollon Rim in Arizona provides a unique opportunity to study the processes of lineage divergence and merging. This hybrid zone involves complex interactions between 2 morphologically and ecologically divergent subspecies, 3 chromosomal groups, and 4 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA clades. The spatial patterns of divergence between morphology, chromosomes and mtDNA are discordant, and determining which of these character types (if any reflects the underlying population-level lineages that are of interest has remained impeded by character conflict. The focus of this study is to estimate the number of populations interacting in the hybrid zone using multi-locus nuclear data, and to then estimate the migration rates and divergence time between the inferred populations. Multi-locus estimates of population structure and gene flow were obtained from 12 anonymous nuclear loci sequenced for 93 specimens of Sceloporus. Population structure estimates support two populations, and this result is robust to changes to the prior probability distribution used in the Bayesian analysis and the use of spatially-explicit or non-spatial models. A coalescent analysis of population divergence suggests that gene flow is high between the two populations, and that the timing of divergence is restricted to the Pleistocene. The hybrid zone is more accurately described as involving two populations belonging to S. tristichus, and the presence of S. cowlesi mtDNA haplotypes in the hybrid zone is an anomaly resulting from mitochondrial introgression.